Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN)

 - Class of 1986

Page 1 of 184

 

Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collection, 1986 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1986 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1986 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 184 of the 1986 volume:

Wi? WWWMWWW ew MMM- 4 TABLE OF CGNTENTS Opemng Sports ACtiV1t1ES Student L1fe TECh1tGS Ads Index Closmg ARSENAL CANNON Volume 72 - 1986 Arsenal Technical High School Indianapolis, IN 46201 4-ff?z"N 'N .N Q u 493 The new attitude on campus is reflected in friendship, formality of dress, increased attention to "the books," and a renewed sense of unity which brings the Tech family closer together. Bradley Thomp- son, Stacy McCall, Amy Small, William Palmer, and Donald Kauf- man represent many of the components of the new attitude, as they go about their daily routine. ll 'a l ,gl f '- lil all ll 4 ,l 51 il ,. .il l '-l l ,l rl? iii gi it lil We've Got A NEW ATTITUDE T "Feeling good from my head to my shoes. Know where I 'm going and know what to do. I 've tidied up my point of view. I 've got a new attitude. " Changes in the social and administrative structure of Tech High School, brought with them changes in attitudes. Although not every change was as positive and upbeat as those in the lyrics from the hit song, I'ue Got a New Attitude, there was a cautiously optimistic shift in the Tech family's point of view. Influenced by the positive, yet realistic attitude of first- year principal, Dr. Joseph McGeehan, the school began to pursue solutions to those pro- blems which it shares with most large, urban schools as well as those problems which seem unique to Tech. Midway through his "rookie" year, Dr. McGeehan reflected upon the cooperation demonstrated by the various segments of the Tech community and stated, "I think that everyone has been both responsive and responsible." A renewed competitive at- titude spread through the athletic department and resulted in improved perfor- mances such as the varsity girls basketball team winning its Sectional in double overtime. A more serious attitude con- cerning attendance manifested itself in the form of a new com- puterized attendance system, WMM-M 2 Opening the near elimination of study halls, and an increase in paren- tal contacts for cutting. Class attitudes were revealed as seniors selected a new com- pany for their commencement supplies and collected funds to have their section of the year- book in color. The juniors con- tinued their winning ways by sweeping the powderpuff foot- ball game and the homecoming float competitions. And, the sophomore and freshman classes achieved formal organization signaling a new at- titude toward building class and school spirit. With a decreased enrollment of 2,107 students and a smaller faculty, the Tech family welcomed positive changes and sought to foster more close-knit relationships. Pride dominated our list of characteristics as we attemp- ted to prove to all outside the Tech community that we've got a new attitude. Twins, Sherri and Terri Dowdell, display the medals they won at a na- tional track meet in Seattle, Washington. Josten's representative, Brad Long, helps seniors Deborah Childress, Christina King, Patrick Council, and Charles Gregory place their announce- ment orders. xml,- ff I il H r During half-time at homecoming, principal Dr. Joseph McGeehan ac- cepts the trophy awarded to the band for participation in the Labor Day parade from Mr. Delano Bryant. 4 ffl , W 1410 E. C f fu. -. . ,A - . ,, r - sy "'k- ., Q, 1 egg 1 4. L .. 1. .--" ix 'S 2 N :il 5 .V I Er." X' id ,V -, I , LQ, xc e l Winning the Sectional was a result 4-df of the girls' new attitude towards goal 1" i setting. X s L 'B rf 1, a ob',4,.' ,,f "Ci U 5 ,ll I Fun ' Sun EN ORK S DO "l've taken my fun where l've found it," said Rudyard Kipling and most Techites adopted this attitude to ensure summer fun. Instead of bumm- ing around the house, many Titans decided to make the most of their vacation. Some worked to make money and, without school, they were able to pick up more hours. Others worked - but were not paid for their efforts. Four seniors went to a leadership camp in Shelby, Michigan, where they were counselors for underprivileged sixth graders. Participant Shuron Belk commented, "It was a really big responsibility, but I enjoyed the challenge of changing my kids' attitudes toward themselves into more positive ones." While at Wabash College for nine days, two Tech seniors participated in the Opportunity to Learn About Business pro- gram which taught them how corporations work. About the experience, Robin Sanders 4 Summer Feature said, "I was surprised at how difficult it is to run a business. We had to solve problems that I never imagined companies faced." Hoosier Girls and Boys State, held at Indiana State University, provided participants the op- portunity to better understand the functions of government, and the Journalism Institute at Indiana University gave the Cannon yearbook editor a head start in designing the 1986 Cannon. Not everyone spent his time learning during the summer, some were just out to have fun in the sun. The fun was spread over the entire United States and Canada as Titans enjoyed water skiing, horseback riding, camping, fishing, mountain climbing, and especially tann- ing. After visiting Canada, Scott Payton said, "I enjoyed getting back to nature. Only having the bare necessities made me feel like I was playing the role of a pioneer in a history book." While visiting Lake Monroe, senior Jeffrey Valentine gets his "tips up" and the tow rope taut, as he waits for the ski boat to take off. Senior Scott Payton proudly displays the 7 112 pound Pike he landed while vacationing in Canada. -f -x ---- ev:-ew..-Tia., -W A , , H:-1, N Q pf.. .. sws. . I . Y iiiflirffflwlgss i' me . . .. sf 5 A sfisgtwfs ' :i e ' , ,.i.ijNat',,....,...,f', 'jf A- . mA.,'w ':3:ls"l5iK :a"E5X'4iWesM'l"' V' Siwwss-4: X if . , . . C Xe, ,N A NN . - A ' 5 I . C X N ,. e , j - .: ' T-9 ,, -:V ': W , , ns - an Qwsvit . M X, Ass who-N. . - .. X' 'N if ,Q 1 1: . i If CY sexo. it Q 231, sl: Kwik -ff, , ... . " K ' , ,Wa .ws V., Wm,-ff... X '.:.sbq,l Q. 'Q . 5: Vs .5 . . .M f y.:s.,a,Q V, , . -x A -gf fe. i n " wwFSQflS3TA3"P Qf2T3SggtgS'5N'tw'3tf'fh rf-e lk - iaiiwww -' 'lax --Xxx A s'vt.l5l'f5fr' rr ,-5 . tx . mx X fists X 1 is X st N We f sg , "N L . - Q- ,. ..,.... . . , X' . f " " 4 45 -Q ,V Q 2 , vi :Vu as lr Yu 9 G. mfg? ,ia tl g 7 A. ' . v LZ .W A 423 ' 1 I ,sf " , - no ' mor A .rr in A Smiling with anticipation, Kelly Love prepares for a "ride in the saddle" during a week at Young Life Camp in Colorado. Sophomore Amy Small Qleftj works Not wanting to leave Camp Mmrwan on her tan whale vnsltlng relatives rn ca Michigan a srxth grade camper cl Michigan lngs to senior counselor Deana Harger Summer Feature 5 - 1 4 'J , 'NW N hm ,x ,. . . . u 1 ' . , . .il1 .11. rv J l Junior quarterback Donna Branch sees a break in the defensive line and scrambles to gain yardage. Donna was a key player in the 12-6 victory over the seniors, ZX After the emotional powderpuff foot- ball game, the crowd gathers around the bonfire and enjoys the needed calm. 6 Powderpuff Football Senior cheerleaders, tFront Row, Dallas Dishman, Raymond Love, James Allen, fRow 21 Patrick Council, Steve O'NeaI, Dennis Arnott, Brian Mitchell, and fBack Rowj Mark Goshen, show a form all their own while forming a pyramid. The male cheerleaders kept the crowd under control and fired up. Junior cheerleaders, Qstandingj Harvey Lee, Darren Neely, fBottom Rowj Kristopher Musgrove, Kevin Sims, William Van Cleave, fRow 21 James Glover, Aaron Jurgesmeyer, and fTop Rowj Brent Purvis manage to smile even though they are having a lit- tle difficulty staying in formation. :Z ' in .--v. Q, -IAZMW' U . Sugar ' Spic OT ALW YS NICE ...u6T' wg, .. H-tr,-'fi -- 5-H -,,-'it-e.. - ,l" 'V in , hug w-li Q, Nj, - 'JW'--of-:Q 'Lakin-X +R! '--.1 . 411' . ' ' lg' 'U"'-FQ "Anything boys can do, girls can do betterg" or so the junior and senior girls tried to prove in the first homecoming powder- puff football game sponsored by the Student Affairs Organization. Once their teams were formed, the male cheerleading squads chosen, and the coaches selected, free time during the evenings and weekends was devoted to preparation for the big game. On the eve of homecoming, the female football players replaced "pumps" with tennis shoes, slacks with sweatpants, and blouses with football jerseys. While the players were warming up, the all-male of- ficiating staff, made up of varsi- ty football players and others involved in male sports, finaliz- ed the game rules. Meanwhile, the male cheerleaders began performing both original and traditional cheers. No admis- sion was charged, thus enabling those truly interested to attend and giving the cheerleaders a larger and more spirited crowd. As the opening whistle blew, friendships with those on the opposing team were forgot- ten and it was every "man" for himself. The girls on the sparse senior team were forced to play both offense and defense. They Listening to last minute instruc- tions, junior Kim Lewis adjusts her watch strap. Even though the players donned old sweats, they did not forget the needed accessories. managed to score early with what turned out to be their first and last touchdown. The junior girls, taking advantage of their larger roster, rotated an offen- sive and defensive squad. The depth of the junior team allow- ed them to score twice, resulting in a final score of 12- 6, in favor of the underclassmen. However, those who participated and those who watched agreed that there were no losers. A parent noted, "I thought both teams played extremely well, but the juniors maintained a more con- stant energy." When asked about his team's loss, Senior coach, Steve Pittman, com- mented,"l think that a big fac- tor in the senior loss was the size of the team. Both teams had the same percentage of participation from their class: however, the senior class is almost half the size of the junior class." As the participants limped off the field to enjoy the bon- fire, their efforts were not forgotten. With every step, a new ache was felt and a new bruise appeared. One player painfully observed, "l don't think I am going to be able to walk without pain until the Prom." W Mmm, Powderpuff Football YT ,ww Freshman Melissa Wilson tries to control the nervous jitters as she sits in the freshman float before the parade of floats. 7 U U rg eff' While working on the senior float, Dallas Dishman, Deana Harger, Brian Mitchell, and Misty Blaine try to see if the excess paper mache paste on their clothes and bodies is strong enough to hold them together. me' 8 Homecoming Senior Sherri Moore and junior Dawn Junior Douglas Warren slides into Llpshaw use teamwork while preparing position to operate the hornet and the the concession stand for the huge "pow" sign on the junior float. homecoming crowd. We All eed EBCDDY TI-I RE N wut, MW s ,fe 'A f ' ,JW . Junior sponsor. Mr.WilIlam Mc- Creafy. and Douglas Warren appear unaware of the pending navel attack by a giant hornet. 15. J.. E "That's what friends are for " Dionne Warwick may never have worked on a homecoming float, but her lyrics certainly applied to this creative endeavor. Members of the loosely-formed float com- mittees quickly learned that life is much more bearable when one has friends whom one can depend on. Experienced float builders, whose friendships dated to their freshman float- building days, rekindled those friendships and developed new ones with the rookies as they prepared for homecoming '85. Arriving before the game to set up ticket sales, faculty members Mr. Ray- mond Browne, Mr. Garlan Howard, and Mr. Duane Blankenhorn converse before the crowd arrives. it i 1 Building floats in confined areas made it nearly impossible not to get "close" to classmates and co-workers. The resulting sense of unity helped to overcome the headaches, sacrifices, and fatigue. And, when the prepara- tions seemed too much to cope with, there was always a friend there to lean on. "Right when l was ready to hang it up, a friend came by and smeared paper mache glop all over me. l realized then that it didn't mat- ter how the float turned out, on- ly that I was with friends," commented senior Misty Blaine. Non float-builders were not exempt from preparations either. The football team prac- ticed long and hard, the color guard drilled, and the band worked on its pre-game and halftime routines. King and queen candidates spent time grooming and dressing in an- ticipation of being crowned. Faculty members arrived early to help organize the last-minute details. The entire Tech com- munity became preoccupied with putting on a good show for what they hoped would be a large crowd of alumni - those students of years gone by who paid their dues stuffing chicken wire, rehearsing halftime routines, and com- peting for Tech High School. T Homecoming 9 FQ? 11" " ' 'SW -' Xl 1 I . i 1 1 , , The huge homecoming crowd enjoys the game and all the extras. 'Xi N ' - L , x ,, X, 1 IL I i i - l L- f 5 XX gf Zia! xvf , gcc, f The class of 1987's winning float sits ready to slug the bugs and also its competition. ,J ' f XX I 'XXI' . J A f l ' , i ' If . f i .W .rl'1',"w'mw K ' , -1 . , ' -, , we ..,... N 10 Homecoming Drum majors, Anthony MacLennan and Darlene Powell, lead the marching Newly crowned homecoming king, band onto the field for their half-time performance. Brian Mitchell, raises his hands to signify "V" for victory. Traditions Updated fo HCDMECO Homecoming '85 was a month late and a down short. Originally scheduled for the Broad Ripple game on September 27, the annual alumni reunion was moved to the Howe game on Gctober 18, to allow additional time for planning new activities and in- volving more people. Added to the array of tradi- tional homecoming festivities were a powderpuff football game, a bonfire, and greater competition in the homecom- ing float and banner contests. All four classes, several organizations, and at least one independent group of students swelled the list of entries for the homecoming parade. The Class of '87 won the float competition for the third consecutive year and placed itself in a position to become the first class ever to sweep the competion throughout its four years at Tech. Crowning the homecoming royalty, Queen Robin Sanders and King Brian Mitchell, was Tech alumnus, Bruce Pillow, a successful actor on the daytime drama, "All My Children," who came home to Indiana for the filming of the movie "Hoosiers," Completing the homecoming court were queen candidates D'Ondra Coleman, Leona Flanigan, Sharon Fowlkes, and Remitha Stewart and king candidates Phillip Alexander, Steve O'Neal, Steve Pittman, and Aaron Zinnerman. ln the rivalry on the field, Tech played a lackluster first half, handing Howe a 20-O ad- vantage. Taking charge in the third quarter, however, the Titan defense shutdown the Hornets and inspired the of- fense. Two fourth quarter touchdowns moved the Titans to within six points with a score of 20-14. Driving for a score during the final seconds of the game, the offense stalled on the one-yard line. Tech ran out of downs as the clock expired. Although the team provided plenty of excitement and suspense, it was unable to secure a come-from-behind victory. Before being crowned homecoming Football player Tim Lutes watches queen, varsity cheerleader Robin the game while Michael Sabian gets last Sanders peps up the crowd. minute instructions. is Homecoming 1 1 II Before Christmas break, seniors Shuron Belk and Patti Means share a laugh and promise "to do lunch" during vacation. While keeping up their summer tans, junior Kathleen Johnson and sophomore Angela Curtis enjoy the sunshine and catch up on the latest campus gossip. ln.. !..l.. um... ti1llLf.T2ffl1ffIlL'iLE?lI I2lf..7l'EDITil.SlET7FL l.r12li1r,.l'iIIIQ.2LfI.I,".J... u.....u.T1a ,..L.nu..JL....i. "7.. ML.. .uh...i.A.x..i ik.A..a.u4 515551 NKPJFII-CI frh-H" 1 Yr -YP- l f,7,5'!"y ff? ,f ,1 , JI' .f- X ,f Q' 1' rp' W- L-vL.i',,f2. ,J , ,f ,5 ffm V , , A-,,,,,,,,4 .5 ,f v1,,1,f ,mfyp LJ' ,gf ,QQQ2 Qi' Af' 60' 'UVB 17211-'QVDQ-if! . 1 2 Friendship Feature Thank You For FRIE "Winter, Spring, Summer, or Fall. All you've got to do is call. And l'll be there, yes, l will 'cause you've got a friend." This Carol King song, perform- ed by James Taylor, could have been written about the new at- titude Techites had toward one another. No longer was it necessary for most Techites to belong to each other in a romantic way. Many found that a friendship could withstand more than a romantic relation- ship and was less demanding. Also, unlike a romantic rela- tionship, friendships included anywhere from two to several people, and friendships involv- ed the same or opposite sex. Friendships were chosen over a romantic relationship for various reasons. For some, a friendship provided support, other friendships provided companionship, and still others were simply for group iden- tification. Regardless of the reason, and despite some of the hardships friendships en- During a home football game, senior Michael Curtis and juniors Gilbert Reid and Kevin Knowles, freshman Jerome Valentine and sophomore Kenneth Davis find that because so many of their friends came to the game there is "standing room only." Flutists Amy Grimsley and Angela Smith experience the sharing that comes with friendship as they perform at a home basketball game. countered, friendships were vital to Techites. Not only on Tech's campus was friendship the new craze, but also throughout the country. Friendship was even a universal theme for songs and television shows. Stevie Wonder's song, "l Just Called to Say I Love You," illustrated that friendships do not have the demands and strains that rela- tionships have. Some of the most popular shows on televi- sion, Miami Vice, Cheers, and The Golden Girls had friend- ship as the underlying theme. New interest in friendships did not completely do away with serious relationshipsg however, many realized that friendship was an important part of a relationship .....4.,...Y..4.......A.... ....... ..--....... ..- .. ,m:gmee--.-..--2?- -rm4fe-:ifT:t-ex- --1rfL-fTf:n- f-M A - - 1-:T----w --1--.: --,.. 1- - - - ----nf -- - - - - Friendship Feature 13 We're ff to See WZ "To everything there is a season." As the last summer sun set beyond the horizon, and the leaves dressed themselves in gold and orangish red, the "thing" that was for Autumn was the fall musical, The Wiz. Oliver Wendell Holmes said, "There is no time like the old." But the Tech music depart- ment found itself straying away from tradition. This year's musical, The Wiz, adapted from Braum's classic The Wizard of Oz was performed in the fall. Traditionally the musical had been given in the spring. The directors felt that having the musical in the fall would in- sure a large tryout and enough committed cast to perform The Wiz. The casting of the play also took on a unique twist. The Scarecrow and the Tin Man were played by females. "When l found out l had gotten the part of Scarecrow, l was ecstatic. Playing him was a real challenge," commented junior Lorei McGee. D'Ondra Col- eman who played the Tin Man added, "The hardest thing for me to do was hiding my feminine characteristics, especially my voice." Three performances were given: one to the student body as a matinee, and a Friday and Saturday performance before a general audience. From the moment the spot lights hit the stage until the last curtain call, the cast was transformed from mere high school students to citizens of the Land of Oz. Au- dience member, Jackie Easley commented, "l felt the acting was very professional and l lov- ed the colorful costumes." Mr. Paul Prather, one of the direc- tors remarked that The Wiz was a 'fun' musical for the kids to do. Allison Brinkley who played the part of Dorothy said. "The most thrilling moment for me was during my last song, Home. Listening to the words as l sang them gave me the energy to do my best." After the production was over and the cast members went back to everyday life, they were left with a feeling of contentment and a little sadness. Maybe feeling as Dorothy did during her song, Home - "living in this brand new world might be a fantasy, but its taught me to love and that's real to me." Each cast member felt a little bit closer to the others. "l'm evil with everyone today" is what Tracy Cameron is feeling as she prepares to hang Edwin MacDonald after he brings her bad news. Members of the Wiz cast have their own "Amen" corner during the spirited song, "Y'All Got lt?" performed by Steven O'NeaI. ,L,',.,,v.4i-, 1- .M V, V. -1. .. .ti ,, - ,T ., L! -, b 14 Fall Musical ff, l 'LIL f , t gy Al!! Allen Lang is contemplating the words of The Wiz's song, "Believe in Yourself," wondering if deep inside he really does have courage. l l i Lorei McGee looks out into the star studded sky dreaming of the day she'Il get her brain. "We see you now for what you are: now tell us how does it feel?" scream the four friends when they find out that the Wiz is a phony. .. Fall Musical 15 He Ain't Heavy E'S MY BRUTHER "Like a bridge over troubled waters." This Simon and Garfunkel lyric that was popular in the sixties captured the mood of music during 1985-86. Artists joined together to feed the hungry and made a political statement. Live Aid which was held in Philadelphia, was a concert that raised over 40 million dollars and brought together again groups like The Whog Peter, Paul and Maryg and Led Zep- pelin. Adapting the original idea Bob Geldof had for the Live Aid concert, many rock groups began donating their time and talents like those who par- ticipated in Live Aid. Closer to home, some 50 country and rock performers, with actor emcees, put on a 15-hour show in Champaign, ll- linois. The show harvested S10 million and legislative support for the American farmers. ln- diana's own John Cougar Mellencamp performed to help raise money for farmers in Seymour, where he was reared. Raising awareness about apartheid, Artists United Against Apartheid released an album and video entitled Sun City. This helped to support black South African activists. Superbowl contenders, The Chicago Bears, made a video and cut a record to publicize The Superbowl Shuffle which made the Bear players popular. Rookie, William 'The Refrigerator' Perry was known throughout the country by his appearance on the video. The Bears were not the only athletes to make a video, the professional wrestlers made one as well. Not only did the wrestlers make a video, they also cut an album. Charity did not benefit from the video or the album, but it brought the wrestlers together as a team. Syndicated cartoonists also pulled together in a joint effort. Doonesbury cartoonist, Garry Trudeau, convinced the other cartoonists to deal with hunger in their Thanksgiving Day strips. Through this effort, the strips raised S137 million and the consciousness of the world toward the problem of hunger. Techites, too, became acute- ly aware of these world problems. William 'the Refrigerator' Perry lifts Walter 'Sweetness' Payton after the Shufflin' Crew won Super Bowl XX. During a break backstage, Farm Aid performers take time out to relax from the pressures of performing. 5. 1 6 Musical Friendship 2, -Ea , ' ff .1U!V1"lth1q8'5 atWFMBl FY QTADIIIM 1 r r hi B2 s. in i., , . .--,U 1- P '4 I I Lg" 1.- .y' T Si- qv- '.f r .N gg r-L,, limnf' 3... 10" ' B 2.1301 fs' in 'in'-4+ ann "9 .: -'Wy -Q' M.: 's-Q-1-,f 235225. I' . A 'Iuka vi ,. " , , .11-wifz..' f' Ch '13, i vi W vi i'-zgeem' r l ff s 1 . , W I 1, ,.,f?'x wi A L rf?" Q f "L ' ' , fe , g V f , ' W f ' ,ik f W " xQf ?,' 4..,g,1f W ' : ' Iii. ' , ' W if . A ww -' 1gzf,,. , ,, t ,gk l L ,J ,VW 4 X V Z 4,5 YU I H, ,tr A. ,6f. 5 lf H I Q 1 t fa wif? V ' e r , -'Y fin, ,' vp ,, Q , Having spent all of his energy during his cross-country run in Q n 1 'QV the Tech Invitational Meet, W Q junior Maurice Johnson is sup- ported by a chute marshall as , Y ' he walks the last, agonizing M' f steps to the scoring area. 3 V ,Auf r it 'i SWWF ' 1 VJ, g,f ' M'-4 M 'ff my 'Ma 18 Sports Division SPGRTS "Where's the fire?" "lf you want to talk, you'll have to jog along beside me. l've got practice and, if l'm late one more time, l'll have to run the stairs." "I don't understand. Several of our teams don't even have winning seasons. Why do you even bother to be on a team and practice?" "Maybe our records don't show us as winners, but l know most of us have winning attitudes." A positive attitude was the one characteristic that could make or break a team. Whether one considered the attitude of an individual athlete, coach, or fan, a contest's outcome was often affected by the attitudes of those involved. When an individual player had an outstanding, positive at- titude, it infected the entire team. Like a virus, the positive attitude 'bug' was contagious. One player's positive image of himself as an athlete, a leader, and a winner usually spread throughout the entire squad. When times got tough and The mutual support of Rhonda Miles and Tonya Battle, shown in their pregame ritual of sharing 'high-fives' at the Marshall game, helps to build in- dividual confidence and team spirit. Tech defeated Marshall 86 to 10. team members had a difficult time maintaining upbeat men- tal attitudes, the responsibility of providing positive motiva- tion fell to the coaches. Tech athletes were taught that despite the outcome of a par- ticular game or even the entire season, they should always respect their teammates and their own efforts and abilities. The support of the fans - their appreciation for a per- former's or team's best effort, regardless of the final outcome - also helped to forge a positive attitude on the part of Tech athletes. An enthusiastic and supportive crowd could often lift a team above defeat. In the end, those who par- ticipated in and supported Tech athletics learned to savor victory and to accept defeat by employing a "New Attitude." "Getting your head together" often means developing a proper attitude: for Eric Parrott it means having Seth Peacock and Greg Levell adjust his headgear before the Tech lO-Way match. Sports Division 19 PH Shows in nbroken Spirit ride comes easy when a team is winning. lt is much tougher to be proud in defeat. ln the first half of the jam- boree fa tradition which was revived this seasonj the varsity football team was outscored 7- 0 by Roncalli. The team could have quit at that point but it did not. ln second-half play, the Titans defeated a rugged Scecina team 10-0, by employ- ing an alert defense and a balanced offense. ln the first regulation game of the season, the squad XTT defeated the Manual Redskins 23-10. The win gave the team a feeling of optimism. This new attitude was to be short lived, however, as the first victory of the season proved to be the last. Powerhouse teams such as the Scecina Crusaders, the Washington Continentals, and the North Central Panthers had little trouble outplaying the Titans. Several key players were lost to injuries and other problems. Nonetheless, the team played hard and showed its pride by never giving up. In the Cathedral game, Tech held the Irish scoreless until the second half when they scored two touchdowns. The Irish had lost only to Number 1, state champion, Warren Central coming into the game. Several of the remaining games were extremely close with only one play or one miscue sealing the fate. ln the season's finale, which was the homecomeing game against Howe, despite a truly "last minute" stand, which saw Tech take the ball to the one-yard line, the final gun killed the clock and shot the team's chance at victory. 20 Varsity Football lt may not have been easy to be proud of the season record, but the school could be proud of the effort the team put forth. Coach Lafayette Reed sum- marized his feelings when he said, "the won! lost column was a disappointment this season, but otherwise we had a very good season." Smashing through the Homecoming hoop as easily as he hopes to smash through Howe's offensive line, Darrell Humphrey leads the team onto the field. Y f 5 VARSITY FOOTBALL 41 - 89 TECH oPP. .1 23 Manual 10 . O Scecina 21 if 1 12 Arlington 23 O Washington 31 6 Broad Ripple 7 North Central Cathedral Howe Sectional: Richmond Freshman kicker Marcus Saloane practices before the varsity game. Y,-J' ' -aqvjarf it . -, 7-. . .5 eu -. 1... , .,: ., r . '-1 ::,, ,,t -1-L. 'w"i:'r ' tiff' ijfiz 1 nl e - 1 .,,' ' ,L -wr 'Ei" ' .. 1 M s lytx? 5 LY if ,wg 9 9 O 32 . x '.,V 3 isa 43 , - .ri L f 1- an xfwy 'V 1 stir .0 g af X 3 N- il, A ' 4' 3 ' A , vs ' iw 1. ' 345' ,ire 'J ' ' " , i :J 1 W Q' T Y T f Q -1 in " , .- Q ' , 'f 1 " 4 " 4 ,SL 1 " - Q Q, er L " 15 if T V' - 4' " ' nfl-, Y, 46 X Pts, at . hi is fy? it Y T' , " Gs if em . wx, A R :Er -. w J 1 t . , 3- A 1. X Q lm- ' - 'Y ,Fi Wit , A' Wg I, IJ V ,N J Y a .l.xx? 1 Guy met! 12' fi tf-"N '5' ' . ' A J 5- 1 5 t 4 Nw 1 f , "T" ,x 'gf Q. 1 ' tg :Q -Q ' 1 ,. we ,pf -agar '1 W Q 'S 1 'QI A A, 1. m 1 E, Q Hx 1 1 v ig . . . Y . . K M it 3 P' g N 1 at ,J, Y, f is f N 1 Q -. we 1 st' - ,t ' 1 , A ' X.. 1 N fix - ' in - ' s 1-1 ,Ag , 1 - 1 1 1 .sf 1-if A .31 1-. ...QQ K .. A A 5 N 1 'W 1.3 ,, , ,- - 1 . if- ' , ' . -X , 1 ' w 1 r . x . g . x. Q Q '- x '. r 2 1 - ' 1, - R , 1 . , f. hp we-11. h-1 ,,, . . N G N 1 gk at Q f I .il ,X if U if li T xxx' . 1? . ,:. K S F X .Q A - 1 , J W , - Q I1 Q 1 7 xi . ...M K ' X ,A , - 1 - ----, V- I . ' ' -. , ., 1 X . 'fb I A tt I 'a -'l " 1 YZ? It 4' , !..g,1 1 tx Ve, Ae 1 , .fu , il - - .. -.' - - f-- 5 ' g .. , Senior Clark Williams stumbles into the end zone for a touchdown against Howe. The game ended 14-20 in one of Tech's most disappointing losses. Offensive players Gary Reedy and William Norman huddle with their teammates early in the second half of the Howe game. Varsity Football Team. Front Row: Patrick Holliday, Charles E. Simmons, Dujuan Carpenter, Kenneth McRee, Marcus Saloane, Mark Brown, Daniel Roberts, Kevin Smith, Michael Thomas, Stephen Davis, and Coach James Bell. Row 2: Vorn Taylor, Carey Moorman, Michael Sablan, Mark Jamerson, Seth Peacock, Gary Reedy, Charles Sides, John Marks, Darrel Humphrey, Sam Williams, and Clark Williams. Row 3: Coach Robert Cooley, Coach Tom Walton,Tim Allen, Robert Rush, Robert Franklin, William Norman, Brondon McFarland, Wayne Gilmore, Lee Williams, Shelly Clayton, Coach Robert Woodard, and Coach Ron Fyffe. Back Row: Coach Sam Moore, Dwaine Richardson, Stephen Pittman, Cliff Williams, Marquise Freeman, Tim Lutes, Kevin Brown, Reginald Morse, Jeffrey Valentine, Michael Lakes, and Coach Lafayette Reed. Varsity Football 21 Freshman Football Team. Front Row: Joseph Jones, Larry Shotwell, Kevin Johnson, Gregory White, Aaron Ferguson, Stephen Davis, Gilberto Reyna, and William Ridenour. Row 2: Steve Russ, Michael Pond, Walter Wallace, Larry Cheeks, James Wilson, Dujuan Carpenter, Raymond Shelley, and Marcus Saloane. Back Row: Coach Sam Moore, Carmen Shirley, Michael Sablan, Brian Hoopingarner, Brian Faulkner, Coach Robert Cooley, Derrick Moulder, Seth Peacock, Bradley Keefe, and Coach Ron Fyffe. J, W' --as b - .. . . .,,, . M, W g'H 5 w"l 'A' W-sfo'-w'f..n. .tn -,Q ., .V , A 5, ya s 4 ti SQ ' - - l -mga Sa- K.. we 4 Q 'Q 5 Reserve Football Team. Front Row: William Bray, Patrick Holliday, and Shelly Clayton. Row 2: Dustin Cox, Barry Bostic, Mark Brown, Kenny McRee, Cedric Lloyd, and Coach Ron Fyffe. Back Row: Coach Sam Moore, Kristopher Musgrove, Joshua Douglas, Marquise Freeman, James Glover, John Mehringer, and Coach Robert Cooley. ,. X -bf va -.Tas 7--. -- a. , .g ?.,,yf:,1 fe , ...K Am - Qi 36 .l 7, 533 1. ,.. :gh :L Q Y QM, Freshman running back Raymond Shelley breaks free for a long gainer against Howe. 'A - me fa 1 fa' Mft. ' P-fr ,", f t A' .,,, if- A 4 . Vg., 41 , , 3 ,234 I . -. f 1' V. W Nm X-,Us 'J X "' . ,,.. , A . fast as T X if . , A W t I ,AQ My A A I ' Y IJ V lt, L, 1 fa , .a 1 4. ,gg A fa. , i ' ..-- -4 wwf' f .4 ,, to Vg, A wz.2,AA ,431 V , - W. L '..E, B RESERVE FRESHMAN -. ' FOOTBALL FOOTBALL . .Q ' Q0 - 81 . K3 - 51 ' sr.g A , TECH OPP. T TECH OPP. A K ,gi 1 O Arlington 35 . 6 Arlington 42 y f O Scecina 37 6 Scecina O A C' O Washington 31 4 O Washington 18 1 O Broad Ripple 21 - 6 Broad Ripple 14 0 . , ' O North Central 40 C O North Central 22 The "efe"""e "ne Sufges A o Cathedral 37 14 Cathedral 7 X forward as freshman, Mar- Q. XAV. .. cus Saloane, kicks the ball 6 Howe 32 4 A O Howe 26 into Play during the HOWG W O Manual fforfeitj 1 18 Manual 14 game. V, 22 Reserve! Freshman Football iesty freshmen fought to the finest football record of the three squads. Their 3-5 record was highlighted by a I4- 7 victory over hard-hitting Cathedral and a season-ending defeat of the Manual Redskins 18-14. Several of the freshman team members, including Du- juan Carpenter, Derrick Moulder, Michael Sablan, and Marcus Saloane, showed enough promise that they were allowed to play with the varsity. Marcus Saloane said, "Playing on the Varsity helped build my self-esteem. Coach Reed was a good coach because he showed continuous interest in the players even after football season was over." Marcus and the other outstanding freshman players should provide intense competition for spots on the varsity team next year with enough talented players left over to staff a good reserve team. Declining enrollments in re- cent years have caused serious problems in recruiting enough young men to staff three foot- ball teams at the high school level: freshman, reserve, and varsity. Last year there were not enough players to field a reserve team, and so Tech only played a freshman and varsity schedule. Some encouragement was found in the fact that a reserve team was fielded this year. Statistics show that, despite a winless season, the team had 25'7B more players at the end of the season than at the beginn- ing. Coach Moore and Members of the freshman football team fight for position as the Howe Hornets swarm over a fumbled ball. Tech recovered the fumble but lost the game 26-O. members of the team agree that it was a learning year for everyone. More importantly, a vital part of the 'in-house' feeder system was renewed. Building a better program by starting with a proper founda- tion appeared to be the correct attitude for our football program. C N Unshaken Reserve! Freshman Football 23 qw ali 5' 'I go mi' D' Qu '05 3: 'UF 'U H 0 'U 9'- O U 5 RESERVE VOLLEYBALL VARSITY VOLLEYBALL TECH OPP Lutheran Franklin Central lndnan Creek TECH OPP Lutheran Chatard Ritter Northwest Speedway Broad Ripple Cathedral Arlington Scecma Attucks Washington Marshall Deaf School Forfeit Washington Chatard Park Tudor 2 Manual 1 Howe lndlan Creek Hamilton SE Chatard Ritter Northwest Speedway Broad Ripple Cathedral Arlington Washington Marshall Deaf School Howe Park Tudor Manual 0 2 , ' A C7 - Ml Ql 1 U - lol 1 1 2 . 'r O ' 2 2 "'l 2 1 0 ' 2 it D 5 ,A,- O Franklin Central 2 O Hamilton SE 2 1 , 7 1 0 ' 2 o 2 f 2 ' 1 o ' 2 1 3, ' f O 2 2 0 1, O ' 2 ' 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 ' 0 TE, lgnulv. 55' 1 2 2 0 2 124 , ,.,, ., . 2. 1 . 2 0 . 2 o 2 0 ' 2 4'4f i 2 ' l 2 1 3 2 ' 1 2 ' o ii, O 2 0 2 124 2 O 1 ' if A ' - 2 O 2 ' l o 2 o 2 2 1 o 2 Varsity Volleyball Team. Front Row: Donna Branch, Marion Parks, Lisa Claspell and Sherri Dowdell. Back Row: Sonja Henson, Marveda Tardy, Sharmin Davis, Carwander Hatten, Gloria Davie, and Coach Mary Lou Manka. Reserve Volleyball Team. Front Row: Katrina Weir, Dawn Llpshaw, Stacey Rosales, and Denita Middlebrooks. Back Row: Natalie Henderson, Rachelle Tardy, Stacey Lancaster, Tonya Battle, and Coach Francis Knue. 1 24 Volleyball V 'w""'llsx. Q T1 ,,.,,..,-W Lisa Claspell 'sets' the ball for Sharmin Davis during the Speedway match. The lady Sparkplugs outperformed Tech in a close match, winning 2-1. DE 5Bui1ds as Season Progresses ecovering from a slow start, "our team improv- ed a great deal in speed, height, and jumping ability this year," stated senior Marveda Tardy. The "net set" concentrated on the volleyball fundamentals of bumping, setting, and spik- ing, however, the ability to set the ball remained a major weakness. Following a win in their opening game of the year, the team fell to a 2-8 record by mid season. Although some of the teams that beat Tech are perennial powerhouses, such as Franklin Central, Chatard, and Ritter, the Titans also fell vic- tim to several teams that they should have defeated. After some soul searching, Coach Mary Lou Manka and the team determined that the only solu- tion to its poor performance during the first half of the season was to get more serious about the sport. The team members started working harder, and they started to win. The second segment of the season saw the team claim vic- tories in five out of seven matches. The team played an excellent game against Washington in the opening round of the City Tourney. And, in the second round, they nearly upset the Rebels of Roncalli High School who went on to win the tournament. Meanwhile, the reserve volleyball squad struggled to a 7-14 record. The up and down nature of the reserve girls' season was due in large part to young players who lacked ex- perience. Having been pitted against some of the strongest teams in this area, the players should be better prepared for future encounters. Retiring seniors Sharmin Davis and Marveda Tardy led the team throughout the season. Reviewing this year's campaign, Tardy said, "We had a lot of help this season from 5'll" Carwander Hatten, and we saw big improvement in the play of juniors: Donna Branch, Lisa Claspell, Gloria Davie, Sherri Dowdell, Sonja Henson, and Marion Parks." All eyes are on the ball, as Tonya Battle "bumps" it to Katrina Weir R23 who will set up Natalie Henderson R55 for the spike. ,giQm4m2!!. J . . , X yi pr -pu' s gp as -' , . '2 ,pm a. , 55. ' .im ' Elf ,gf . ffm :if 1 KW' 5 ""--..... f i ,fe - . , .R 5 .1 -fl U H h N ' '---- -mv-u-...,,-...... . , tr , rn , i f W ijt- VoHeybaH 25 W? n spite of a low turnout Qonly six guys and three girls com- pleted the seasonl Titan run- ners performed well as in- dividuals and as a team. Without a single senior on the male squad, the boys team was able to post a winning season in dual meets and advance to the Regionals, after placing fourth out of eleven teams in Sectional competition. Of all the minor sports, Cross Country may well be the least understood. Cross country, as the name implies, is run on a course, usually in a park or at a golf course, which is laid out to test the runners' stamina over flat terrain and rolling land- scapes. Varsity level, male run- ners must complete a 5,000 meter course fapproximately three milesj, female athletes run 4,000 meters labout two and one half milesl, while freshman boys are required to endure a 3,000 meter course lnearly two milesl. Scoring is based upon each individual's finish position. Nor- mally, seven runners comprise a team with the five lowest finish places determining the team score. When the number of female runners fell from eight to three, their chance to compete as a team was lost. Nonetheless, the determined trio did compete against other teams to build their skill and to test their own abilities. They were also able to run for personal glory in invita- tional meets and state competi- tion. Sophomore Khalilah Muhammad won the Washington High School invita- tional meet. She showed great promise for a successful year until she suffered a serious 61175 and Glory Within 26 Cross Country l- The Titan Harriers return to the star- ting line, after a 'run out' in preparation for the start of a dual meet at Brookside Park. illness midway through the season. By the time Khalilah "got her legs back" the fine edge of her conditioning had been lost and she had to settle for a mediocre finish to an otherwise successful season. Capturing the Most Vauable Runner honors for the boys was junior Maurice Johnson. Khalilah Muhammad was nam- ed MVP on the girls team. Senior Cynthia Smith pushes her body to the limit in order to have a qualifying time in the Tech invitational meet. 'tt 9 on 5 . R37 .1 of , 41' 4 S 4214 'T ' Q , x 3. gg, . S? GIRLS CROSS fgi counrnv 40 - 6 - U TECH oPP. E5 lnc Cathedral 15 4 Inc Roncalli 25 lnc Manual 25 lnc Howe 21 'lt' lnc Northwest lnc. lnc Chatard 26 lnc. Lawrence North 35 Sf! , "'N l y, Q .t ar, :N ,Q Egg? ':j:fq,:'T:if sQ.1n Q. , . T ,Jim j-53' ' Vt, "W", if " V -4 5-':'u':'t y4.f.i' Hsssfffeffwef , ti.,,,,gegg:..- ruff 'i?,,e,jfQ.,,,,, jj erf+f:.Nfa:etwfwe,- A. jst . 1 W -A , .. 2:1 ,,-5 . wt -'f vii few- .At .- . fi, ,,-. iykwhqfiziwzftzt Y it 4. 'iwgiv f e-.. -- st.. mf X K, .. t , N' SmSF"5""1- fil tiiit-455 -'ts-T t - ' A L wif-rw timer Sophomore William Miller digs deep within himself to find the strength to fight off a competitor's challenge. Cross Country Team. Front Row: William Miller, Marva Bell, Vincente Vasquez, Kevin Ditchley, and Steven Scholl. Back Row: Coach Julius Kleine, Maurice Johnson, Donald Mueller, Cynthia Smith, and Coach Bruce McGeath. BOYS CROSS COUNTRY U - 47 TECH OPP. 47 Cathedral 16 25 Ritter 30 15 Howe 50 4 37 Roncam 22 3 28 Manual 29 . , 22 Attucks 47 , 1. 22 Arlington 54 gg g , 1 15 Northwest 50 l - 74 Lawrence North 26 Getting their heads ' N together, the team psyches f 74 Chatard 35 up for the Tech invitational. 74 Arlington 109 I 5. - il.-.1 Cross Country 27 IVTEIVSITV lthough the school has had a large, ultra- modern natatorium since I978, the swimming program con- tinued to have a serious pro- blem - small, undermanned teams. Even though swimmers could set records and earn awards in their own individual events, a team victory required the combination of points from all of the events. A lack of par- ticipants reduced the chance of victory considerably. Only an intense individual desire to compete and to succeed made the season bearable. The girls went winless in 28 Swimming their I6 meets. There were received both the MVP and the Members of the victorious relay many times when they wanted to quit and give up, and some did. Those with an intense competitive drive, however, gave their all, which was not easy when there were only seven girls facing a team of twenty opponents. Personal ef- fort led to improvement. The relay team, consisting of juniors Danyl McDivitt, Tammy Alexander, Norma Aguilera, and sophomore Kristin Hoch, swam in the consolation round of the Sectional meet and stroked their way to a first place finish. Danyl McDivitt 1 ?1a,.,,, 'U mental attitude trophies, while Kristin Hoch was honored as the most improved underclassman. Four wins highlighted the boys' season. The team started the year with a promising number of swimmers. Injuries, loss of interest, and grade pro- blems reduced the team to six boys by season's end. Victories were scarce against intense competition, but, the boys managed to duplicate the girls' feat of winning first place in the consolation round of the Relay event at the Sectional tourney. Megs, . team were juniors: Lanny Boles, Joseph DeBruler, Daniel Rosales, and sophomore James Price. Margaret Sweeney, coach of both teams, said, "We really need more swimmers, but l have been very pleased with our spirit and the improvement that both teams have made in their times. Junior Todd Chapman concentrates intently on his starting position as he awaits the crack of the starter's gun to begin the backstroke event. ...Wi ,X ll: -HMS Q -ZAR. WIN, Ig.-24, ' h vfvyw . .- IIIZ 1 af' BOYS SWIMMING Q4 135 TECH CPP Beech Grove 137 Washington Marshall Speedway Lawrence Central GIRLS SWIMMING 10 161 TECH OPP Howe Brebeuf Washington Perry Meridian Roncalli Westfield Chatard Decatur Central Franklin Central Plainfield Howe Indian Creek Center Grove Hamilton SE Brebeuf Washington Marshall Speedway Washington Indian Creek Marshall Decatur Central Hamilton SE Center Grove Chatard Howe Southport Junior Tammy Alexander excels in the breaststroke t , 44 97 3 l,ttr i gg 64 78 'Qi 13 68 57 ' 108 44 90 g 36 ' ' 121 ff, , 53 DeafSchool 61 f'i 35 23 gg 51 , 47 53 75 fj 33 85 1 55 101 f I 67 ' 94 f', 25 135 . - , 56 100 . 36 128 lx 27 , , 122 34 35 1 39 130 f, 53 52 . ' g , 50 109 . 4 33 109 - 5 38 124 1 3 24 136 43 101 ' 30 ' 101 53 103 1 .gf 30 128 42 79 I 36 ' 112 . 2 1 Mm? 44111 ,rf ' . ' X' , ' 5. ' K 4 . 0,-3 1 0 Q . ,xx 4 i .179 ' U I rg: . y At' . S 1 RI 9 i . Boys Swimming Team. Front Row: J. Dallas Dishman, Daniel Rosales, and Joseph DeBruler. Row 2: Coach Margaret Sweeney, Warren Cornett, and Scott Strong. Row 3: Manager Danyl McDivitt and Todd Chapman. Back Row: Scott Pierce, Lanny Boles, Dustin Cox, and Manager Kristin Hoch. , Freshman Deanna Dill swims the free-style stroke. Deanna improved throughout the season, due in part to her own efforts and because of the sibling support provided by her sister and teammate Terri Dill. 11 1 l I R Girls Swimming Team: Front Row: Manager Dallas Dishman, Norma Aguilera, Danyl McDivitt, Kristin Hoch, Jade Robertson, Deanna Dill, Terri Dill, and Manager Kevin Knowles. Row 2: Angela Mathews. Back Row: Maria Haak, Coach Margaret Sweeney, and Tammy Alexander. Swimming 29 Boys Varsity Basketball Team. Front Row: Manager Leslie Dodson, Steven Scholl, John Marks, Phillip Moore, Robert Butler, and Allen Fisher. Back Row: Equipment Manager William Wheeler, Michael Phelps, Cur- tis Evans, Darrell Freeman, Walter Woodard, Steven Rose, Kevin Sims, Coach Virgil Bleill, and Head Coach Frank Craig. Senior Walter Woodard weaves through the defense to score two points in varsity action against Arlington. 30 Boys Varsity Basketball The Muncie Central Bearcats could not stop Darrell Freeman from getting two points on this play. They did deny Tech a victory, however beating the Titans by a score of 63-58. BOYS VARSITY BASKETBALL ' ' 18-123 l TECH OPP l 54 Northwest 40 51 Broad Ripple 81 44 Arlington 54 46 Southport 42 , X . 59 Washington 57 54 Ben Davis 71 g A 7 44 North Central 55 , 72 Attucks 41 1 50 Brebeuf 54 53 Howe 66 83 Ritter 62 54 Marshall 65 ' 1 64 Scecina 39 g . A , . - 46 Kokomo 58 . Steve Scholl streaks . W ,AQ 1 53 Chatard 62 across the baseline for a K x , .A 47 Roncam 45 lay-up against Arlington. - 1 f 58 Muncie Central 63 I ,V it , 59 Manual 65 , 51 Howe 62 A 58 Lawrence North 87 Z . 9, Q.-.. C C ttitude this year was excellent," stated Coach Frank Craig. The varsity played some of the strongest teams in the state: Broad Ripple trated number onel, Muncie Central, North Central, and Lawrence North. The 8-12 season reflected a problem which plagued the team - the loss of players. Eleven young men started the season but only seven com- pleted it. Of the players who com- pleted the season, senior center Walter Woodard was voted W, --an MVP. ln pre-season polls, Woodard was touted as a player-to-watch. Woodard- watchers were not disap- pointed as the 6-5 pivot man averaged I4 points per game and led the team in rebounds. ln the Titan's highest scoring game, an 83-62 victory over Ritter, Woodard scored a personal-high 30 points. 'Tyrone,' as his friends call him, plans to attend college, hopefully on a scholarship, so that he can enter the teachingfcoaching profession. His advice to other students, "Stay out of trouble and work hard at what you do well." Graduating seniors, in addition to Woodard, are Darrell Freeman and Mike Phelps. Juniors Steve Scholl and John Marks, who have each played three years on the team, will be returning next year. Two reserve team members, Jeff Allen and Charles Simmons, were called upon to assist the varsity squad on several occa- sions and eventually were mov- ed up to varsity positions. Coach Craig and Assistant Coach Virgil Bleill were pleased 5: 46 is Jeff Allen makes a free throw against the Lawrence North Wildcats in the final quarter of the season-ending game in the Hinkle Sectional. The victorious Wildcats were beaten by Broad Ripple, the eventual Sectional champions. with the improvement shown toward the end of the season. Craig believes that the season finale against Manual was the strongest game the team played. Manual has been pro- jected as the team to beat in the city next year. Coach Craig said, "Next year's varsity team should be better, with six retur- ning players who have varsity experience." A7777- is Excellent Boys Varsity Basketball 31 Jeff Allen looks for an open man. BOYS RESERVE BASKETBALL 416-ep Northwest Broad Ripple Arlington Southport Washington Ben Davis North Central Attucks Brebeuf Howe Roncalli Scecina Broad Ripple Ritter Marshall Scecina Kokomo Chatard Roncalli Muncie Manual BOYS FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 18-121 TECH OPP Creston Broad Ripple Southport Attucks Lawrence Central Ritter Arlington Northwest Chatard Cathedral Manual Scecina North Central Roncalli Washington Marshall Howe TECH OPP, 38 48 53 58 42 32 35 62 48 43 20 29 34 53 44 26 40 49 39 40 50 39 41 33 58 55 48 58 67 Howe 35 49 Stonybrook 37 54 42 23 45 52 54 39 36 47 42 43 27 59 49 24 51 54 42 22 40 50 49 33 59 46 44 46 45 63 44 56 53 47 43 66 55 :lvl H 3, 41,3 , L14 gr- J ,A , if ,Q J 46 5 t tt, A , A 'Z ' 0 M1 ' , 4,4 .3 1 kk , . f. -'W wwwzfjv ' W' V Boys Reserve Basketball Team. Front Row: Shawn Turner, Darren Neely, Eric Whaley, Stephen Hartwell, Charles Simmons, Glenn Bundy, and Manager Cedric Lloyd. Back Row: Byron Sanders, Robert Rush, Duane Lloyd, Andre Fry, Kevin France, Dwaine Richardson, Jeff Allen, Robert Franklin and Coach Virgil Bleill. I I Q --,T 'fi , J 5 ,gl A372 3 kt 4 iwifgy 32154 f ir I A , H N 'R 7' ' QQ: A , if . Boys Freshman Basketball Team. Front Row: Joe Jones, Manual Hopson, Larry Cheeks, Randolph Pogue, Antonio Meriwether, Jeffery Williams and Larry Capps. Back Row: Coach Charles Battle, George Martin, Robert Lucas, James Wilson, James Jefferson, Jeffrey Bunten, Carmen Shirley, and Coach Art Johnson. 32 Boys Reserve and Freshman Basketball 2.4.41 1 4,11-1.1-.aan-ll"" An airborne Kevin France strains to position himself for a soft bank shot off the backboard. Guard Charles Simmons fills the lane to protect the rebound. The Arl ington Knights won 33-32. RESPE C' 7' QW unners-up in the City, the reserve basketball team lost to the Broad Ripple Rockets by a score of 52-54. The boys' reserve team had the best record of all the boys' basketball groups, posting a I6-6 record. Coach Virgil Bleill had returning talent in guards Jeffrey Allen, Charles Sim- mons, Robert Franklin, and An- dre Frye. Losing five of its first seven encounters did not gain much respect for the reserve squad. Few fans showed any interest in arriving at 6:30 p.m. for the junior varsity game, when the varsity contest did not get under way until 8:00 p.m. The fans' attitude began to change, however, as the reserve team turned its record around, winn- ing all of its remaining games, except for its heartbreaking loss in the City finals. Atten- dance picked up at the reserve games once fans realized that they could see a good reserve game and the varsity contest for the same admission price. The Freshman team was coached by Charles Battle and volunteer Coach Art Johnson. Both men are Tech grads who played on the I97l Regional championship team which Coach Ernie Cline guided to the Semi-State. The freshmen managed to salvage an 8-I2 record, despite the loss of some key players. Team members showed their respect for what their coaches were trying to accomplish by practicing six days every week during the season. The squad became close knit as they en- dured this rugged schedule together. The most satisfying victory of the season was a 56-53 deci- sion over archrival Howe leading into the City Tourney. The frosh defeated Howe a sec- ond time, in the opening round of the tourney, before falling to Marshall, in overtime, 40-42. Coach Battle said, "The future looks good for Tech's basket- ball program which may be a year or two away from making the Semi-State again." As freshman James Wilson drives in for a lay-up, teammate James Jeffer- son sets up for a possible rebound. Arl- ington won 45-42. Boys Reserve and Freshman Basketball 33 regional championship win by senior Timothy Allen and three freshman city championships in the 119, 132, and 155 pound weight classes highlighted the wrestl- ing season. Timothy Allen earned MVP honors by racking up the highest point total on the team and because he ad- vanced to the semi-state com- petition. Tim, who has wrestled all four years, said, "Wrestling teaches self-reliance and self- discipline. lt is a good character builder." The varsity grapplers' 4-12 34 Wrestling record was compiled against such wrestling strongholds as Evansville Mater Dei, Ben Davis, Beech Grove, and Cathedral. Coach John Hurrle commented that "wrestling has grown to be the third largest high school sport, and the com- petition is getting tougher every year." The team was pleased to close out its year with two important wins against John Marshall and Washington. The reserve team included seven first-year wrestlers. Although the grapplers' inex- perience was reflected in their 1-4 record., the young men helped to pay the dues required to build a stronger program. Their presence will add depth to the '87 varsity squad. Compiling an even record in dual meets and finishing third in the city meet with three in- dividual ribbon winners was a positive sign for the freshman squad. City champs in their respective classes were Eddie Hubbard, Aaron Ferguson, and David Ward. Coach Mickey Reed credited an improved junior high wrestling program Referee James Scahill counts off the three seconds which are required for a pin, as junior Donald Mueller increases his pressure on an already pained opponent. with providing young men with wrestling experience for the high schools. He said, "There has been a 180 degree tur- naround in the quality of our in- coming freshmen." Having gone from state wrestling champions through several very poor seasons, the team and the coaches were pleased with the positive at- titude that is returning to the program. Af!!-'IVCL-?m1,11?,Clt-Hint Freshman Eric Parrott works to establish control of his opponent by forcing his head to the mat. ' Varsity Wrestling Team. Front Row: Kenneth McRee, Michael Thomas, William Miller, and Erik Poventud. Back Row: Timothy Allen, Charles Sides Coach Francis Knue, Coach John Hurrle, Donald Mueller, and Terry Johnson. Tfffll Wg! 3 345191 ,st X 45 21 Sq sql 9 , . ,ffm Reserve Wrestling Team. Front Row: Jose Martinez, Jeffrey Sanborn, John Mehringer, Samuel Williams, and Paul Strong. Back Row: Joshua Douglas, Mar- quise Freeman, Coach Francis Knue, Timothy Lutes, and Reggie Morse. I l I. 1 Freshman WFCSIIIIIQ I'eam. Front Row: Larry Shotwell, Coach Greg Levell, David Parrish, and Eric Parrott. Back Row: Aaron Ferguson, Michael Sabian, Coach Lafayette Reed, David Ward, and Eddie Hubbard. VARSITY WRESTLING 4 I Q4-125 A TECH OPP. . 6 Franklin Central 64 , 22 Chatard 43 5 , 18 Howe 60 RESERVE WRESTLING FRESHMAN l h WRESTLING . 45 Kokomo 26 43-3, Q 30 Lawrence Central 42 fl-45 f TECH OPP. Q 48 Marshall 25 TECH OPP. 66 Washin ton 12 F 0 Mater Dei 69 66 Washington 6 . J 42 Pikj 24 T 6 24 Martinsville 50 6 Beech Grove 60 24 Howe 42 ' 24 Western 49 30 Chatard 42 30 Pike 33 y , 21 Cathedral 49 24 Perry Meridian 53 , . , 42 Manual 18 6 Beech Grove 66 y 6 Franklin Central 60 ' 18 Beech Grove 42 4. -- A I Freshman Aaron . V 15 Perry Mendlan 52 E Ferguson wins a match. ': , 24 Roncalli 54 ' 22 Ben Davis 48 1 . . g 63 Marshall 9 V 58 Washington 13 Wrestling 35 v Shown DH! Determination he varsity began its season with three goals: ll to have a winning season, 25 to win the City Tour- nament, 35 to win the Sectional tourney. The team accomplish- ed two of its goals and nearly reached the third. An up-and-down early season record was overcome by a strong second half and the first goal was met. Ritter High School cut short the Titans chance of winning the City tourney by defeating Tech by a single basket in the semi-final round. A double overtime vic- tory in the Sectional champion- ship game allowed the team to reach its third goal. The game showed the squad's determina- tion and was especially sweet as the victory was at the ex- pense of the same Ritter team which had earlier denied Tech the City crown. Three senior team members: Marveda Tardy, Sharmin Davis, and Rhonda Miles played together on the varsity team all four years. In fact, they com- peted as "Vikings" at Har- shman Junior High, where they were coached by Ron Fyffe. Coach Fyffe followed his players throughout their high school careers, and this year he became the first male coach of the Lady Titans. Sharmin Davis commented, "For three years Coach Fyffe watched us play as a bystander, and this year it was different having him on the floor coaching us again." Davis and Tardy will con- tinue to play basketball together next year-not at Tech, but at Tennessee State. Each girl has been awarded a scholarship to the university where they will be roommates. A scout spotted Sharmin and Marveda during the Manual game in which each girl scored in double figures. The reserve basketball team was also successful. The team compiled a 16-3 season record and captured the City tourney trophy defeating Scecina, Manual, Cathedral, and Roncalli. In a rugged collision, Marva Bell and Melvina Muex are determined to pro- tect the ball by placing their bodies bet- ween it and the Marshall Patriot defenders. Yolanda Willis and Kim Patrick react by moving toward the loose ball. rg? 36 Girls Basketball GIRLS RESERVE BASKETBALL 416-3y TECH OPP. North Central Attucks Warren Central Ben Davis Southport Attucks Manual Cathedral Roncalli Washington Marshall Scecina Arlington Howe Broad Ripple Perry Meridian Scecina Manual Cathedral Roncalli 40 l7 36 34 41 I5 ll 25 GIRLS VARSITY BASKETBALL U6-63 TECH OPP- 40 Washington Perry Meridian North Central Attucks Warren Central Ben Davis Southport Attucks Manual Ritter Washington Marshall Arlington Howe Broad Ripple Howe Broad Ripple Perry Meridian Scecina Manual Cathedral Scecina Ritter Noblesville Tonya Battle dribbles her way to a crushing defeat over Marshall. me AW? Senior Sharmin Davis is an eye on the ball, too. It determined to get this rebound. Donna Branch keeps qs. W0 a:,, we .CLE fi Girls Varsity Basketball Team. Front Row: Deitra Taylor, manager, Donna Branch, Sherri Beck, Tonya Battle, Sherri Dowdell, Natalie Henderson, and Khalilah Muhammad, manager. Back Row: Coach Cecilia Mimms, Terri Dowdell, Rhonda Miles, Marveda Tardy, Michelle Bryant, Carwander Hatten, Gloria Davie, Sharmin Davis, and Coach Ron Fyffe, vgsj Q i' .1 ll do Qi-C fir 3' fix Girls Reserve Basketball Team. Front Row: Chandre Rhodes, Yolanda Willis, Katrina Weir, Roselyn Huggins, Yolanda Stevenson, and Melvina Muex. Back Row: Coach Cecilia Mimms, Kimberly Patrick, Sonja Henson, Nicole Crowe, Marva Bell, Marion Parks, and Coach Bonita Kennedy. Girls Basketball 37 Varsity Baseball Team. Front Row: Richard Briles, Bat Boyg Kenneth Lan- caster, Kevin Smith, Michael Phelps, Daniel Roberts, Bradley Thompson, and Tim- mie Smith. Back Row: Coach Frank Craig, Student Assistant Wanda Ann Hub- bard, Trainer Rick Lowe, Daniel Rosales, Ronald Lynn, Chris Clark, Greg Hensley, Aaron Jurgesmeyer, Student Assistant Jennifer Hon, and Coach David George. ' .','n, ' '.l.'.'xI1g r- "'f- 'ii iii ,, ,j "' , V' Z- 1, ' W' wt . ' 1:12 ' -" y if " . j I '. ,. " v t w ' '- .1 ' I ' '- .rg , V, Q 1 ., -, . , - , , . ' ' l' ' 1 ,I' 'lf A Q t' VK I at 'lt 4 3, ,iw NJ Reserve Baseball Team. Front Row: Tommy Roper, Jeffrey Clegg, James Price, S. Michael Craig, Jose Martinez, Gonzalo Reyna, Gregory White, Dave Miller, Gilberto Reyna, and Richard Ware. Back Row: Student Assistant Lori France, Jef- frey Sanborn, Scott Ramsey, Anthony MacLennan, James Craft, Steve Barton, Brian Williams, Kevin Knowles, Stevan Hughett, Student Assistant Penny Benson, and Coach Frank Craig. The essence of baseball is captured as junior Danny Rosales attempts to pitch the ball through the strike zone without the Marshall batter hitting it. Rosales struck out this batter, but the Patriots won the game. 'mamma 1 Q. - ww- -fix 3 , YC, V i , , 255 'ly 'Q ' 3if7i5-:fir i"""J 4' I 1 X --4 ,' ,ez A' X t 7 ' 'fgfl ' 5 A, '- sz' ".,, i ' . 'W - 4 , ' .- ag f, R! as 'IL ,A a " 1 g - V , E , ' ' 4 +4 A, A Q . 12 1 If :::,,. ,dl x V ,Pa fp E' 4 , ' fr,-4 I 5 ' 2 VI -i f " cr 'r-i W 3, A , ,sf Q . ' ,, A pu f g - ,M fi' 1, will 1,2 K' A ' ff' 4 4 J fi fr Di '- Q :f 2 ' - at ' ... ' V35 l",'f-'2,Li"."'f HW "" ff-7 y,.ws1.fa... 'Wv-ek"1f'4Zx- L rv., . lzit A f VARSITY BASEBALL , fg fi 1 42- 16- 15 TECH oPP. e 2 sgg g 2 Ben paws 10 luasrsnve BASEBALL 3 Washington 8 IZ- my ,Q ,'N. r 2 Marshall 16 TECH OPP 1 Z 523358 3 ' 0 Ben Davis 20 A , , 14 Washington 22 fg 2 2 Pike 12 5 Howe 9 A 2 North Central 13 4 Marshall 14 ' . . , ,I 4, A 7 Arlington 17 7 Pike 8 2 Southpoft 12 i 5 North Central 18 g L. ,J ff, ll Roncalli 23 H Arlington 9 I7 " in 'A ' , 5 Rmer 5 2 Southport 13 fifty ' -M I 4 Attucks 10 U 7 Ritter 8 I Vfl. 5 manual lg 5 8 Cathedral 9 A Varsity player Bradley 7 W :fren 2 17 Attucks 4 , Thompson extends himself f 35 IFFJTIU 2 X..g, 3 A 0 Manual 5 ' in an effort to 'snag' a line 512 1? greg: le t 8 ,,.s- i d . i f , OI' Wes K f 1 Qfgfj : ,, nve ,.,. J y l Marshall 6 5 i I I A f is ' .5 A f 0 Scecina 5 g 38 Varsity and Reserve Baseball .egos 5 T WW I 3 , Q 1.1 , . if v-ma fr' f" 2' 'V' " 'ii vw' ww -.fi Wffft.. ' ' -4 ' 4,-f314f?'i"Mff'f""3' i . ' 3 . 3 ' ' fm.-5 W, ,, U - 4 I , xi 5. mf dbwtffi f wif' U . . 4... I , f ,, , ' ?t""'!gg2fw,'Q' : 1 'Q wi., ' m.,,,,,,,, ' ,V .fngiiy Avi -' "' ew people love the great American pasttime more than varsity coach Dave George. And he especially likes watching the game played in its purest form - by young men who play because they enjoy the game. Cf this year's Titan squad, he remarked, "I'm hap- py with this Titan team. They have a good attitude and play very hard at the game." Most of the players were en- thusiastic and played with an undaunted spirit even though rain was the winner many times this spring. Cancelled and rescheduled games were the order of the day. Practicing every day, on the field or in the gym if it was raining, this young and inexperienced team began to gain victories toward the end of the season. ln their lOth outing the varsi- ty tied Ritter 5 - 5. In the city playoffs Tech beat Northwest ll - 8, but lost to Marshall l - 4. The Scecina baseball sec- tional was won by Scecina. They beat the Titans O - 5 and knocked off Cathedral 4 - 3 to . in , ', ,L , ,iff . 4 Q,-l. dwg! 46 fs. wr 'W win the championship. Chris Clark, who improved his batting average from last year, was recognized as the most improved varsity player. Sophomore Ken Lancaster was the team's heavy hitter with a .378 batting average. He was followed closely by junior pit- cher Greg Hensley with a .333 average. Keeping track of both varsity and reserve statistics were Ann Hubbard and Jenny Hon who have loyally logged the teams stats for the past two seasons. EX PE HIEIV CE , 15 ,- X' ,Q Q l,4,,'vnW , . L f . ' 'lei If ,vvugm i " f f fx :A lt' Q ' .yi - 1 ' -Q Uaiisgliif 5 - ' E ' ' '44 mf. , .fr ' 4 " an .3 f - .W . 05,2 ..P L W XQVM3, ..A,,g gs! J I bi, . Y Q ry ' .1 . W 1' 'ialfg S, ff' 3 Y f ' Reserve player Jose Martinez gets safely back to the bag after beating the throw to first base. Martinez had taken a long lead-off, hoping to steal second. The baseball roster included 25 players. Coaches George and Craig rotated the JV players into the varsity lineup to allow them to gain much needed experience against var- sity level competition. The underclass players also were registered to compete in a sum- mer league to further develop their skills. Gained Varsity and Reserve Baseball 39 GIRLS SOFTBALL ' nyyf' be F W g TECH OPP. , -VLL' soumporr 3 ' 'W' Warren Central 1 04 Q , A U Scecina -.r. M' 'rQ-,: .V L Scecina . ' I " Marshall fe -0 - f 1- 1 Attucks Brebeuf 1 Pike Gotcha' Lisa Claspell Broad RlPPle picks off a Franklin Central Rgnqalli runner at third base. Decatur Central ' Ritter 2 10 Manual 8 Q5 105 is L, 13 Arlington a 5 5-2'-fx 6 Franklin Central 23 L1 rw fi 5 23 . 13 22 t , ,, 10 26 ,Q , M1 if ll IO ' 3 18 ' 14 9 10 4 ll 12 , - 23 10 6 12 0 15 3 7 Q ,, gwqrww- I . as is O lot- si ., ,fl 1, ---f --11+-am...- lt's a swing-and-a-miss as Stacey Rosales attempts to start a scoring rally against Franklin Central. The Flashes won 23-6. 1 1 ' ,. , . 1' "' . fm ' ,gf-2, , --5 ro' V ' ,.E1 1.. vg, rf, -1 ' ' as ' "'+"f.af' .vtftlifr 3:1 'wtf' f - - ' , Y, 13? ' . '44 "Q - 1 H ' ww .ew Q' fm 1 '1f',L'..,'43-1" -"z+'ff-- "ff-f .sz " 1- 1 'wif' w 1:405:5,4'g1','2'z-a'1'Q'f+f1 I: .-rf' ' it y xi' f' 'we' 'f'ff"' 'f'f:fw.e'?6 ew1 M41 QW' - aa .ff - 3 ff :aff 1 1 1' ,1 ,55 1 V :"i br 1. Q 1 ' ' 1 f-I -95' Nr. 41 ui. , ffm 1 V ' , 5 ix C rl' , h 1" Af, ' - A . mf "vi -1 -Mx' . il vm ' , in iv ffm . fl 1 2, Pt ' ' L11 fill 1 " LT? ' 'il W 7 -, " 513193, 1 IU: K kg Ik.: it-, 15 rrils fx a 1 1.5 ji 91. 1 Q ww . K hi 54.5.55 1, 1 Y It J 531, , . , " V N. t . ,I . - A.. A 1, . f""'1m52 3 sa, ' A 1- 1 ' tf - - ' - -' s ' 1. ft ' 2 v1.?:1f,i.: Y , 1 1 ,. rf.. , A E I . U i .f 5 .I iggfmk , .J Kass . 3371 A It I 1' . A ,1 1, r 1' . ,N C 1, -.... J I I .VI , , A ,ggi gc, uh ik. 1' J' f -. 3 , . 1 A 0 ' . 1 .1 9? K PM ,, in -' " ' rm qs Girls Softball Team: Sherri Beck, Kimberly Ramsey, Darlene Powell, Tamara ' 4 4 New, Diann Boughner, Chandre Rhodes, Marion Parks, Donna Branch, and ' a. , Manager Kristin Hoch. Back Row: Coach Margaret Sweeney, Karen Smith, Stacey ' Rosales, Kimberly Patrick, Sharmin Davis, Anita Strough, Lisa Moore, Sonja Hen- 1 son, Lisa Claspell, Amy Small, and Coach Cecilia Mimms. ' 'Stealing home' takes on a whole new meaning as Coach Margaret Sweeney appears to be removing the plate. ln reality, she was positioning home plate in preparation for a game. I 40 Girls Softball .T WU Lifts Spirits 6 6 od didn't make little green apples, and it don't rain in ln- dianapolis in the summertime." Well, it may not rain in ln- dianapolis in the summertime, but it certainly rained throughout the spring softball season. fYou may remember that even the 500 had to be postponed for a week due to rain.J Flooded playing fields forced the softballers inside to work on their fundamentals. When the rains finally sub- sided, the team suffered several discouraging defeats at the hands of some of the county softball powerhouses. Morale was, to say the least, at a low ebb. With encouragement from the coaching staff and the camaraderie which resulted from the countless rain- induced practice sessions, the team's spirit picked up. The girls worked well as a team and knew how to pull together when they were in trouble. Freshman Stacey Rosales remarked, "The team was real- ly niceg l enjoyed being on it." The toughest opponent the Lady Titans faced was defen- ding state champion Warren Central. The Warriors defeated Tech 22-13 on their way to capturing a berth in the semifinal round of the State Tournament. The most satisfying victory was an ll-10 win over Scecina in the City Tourney. The remarkable thing about the win was that it reversed a 26-10 drubbing by the Crusaders in the game leading into the tournament. The 14 girls who completed the season were predominantly juniors and freshmen. This strong corps of returning athletes, along with incoming freshmen and students transferring in from Attucks and John Marshall, have bolstered the hopes of Coaches Margaret Sweeney and Cecilia Mimms. Accomplishments were duly noted as awards were presented to sophomore Kimberly Ramsey as the most improved player, to Lisa Moore for best mental attitude, and to Lisa Claspell as MVP. FOUL BALL! The umpire and catcher Marion Parks check to be sure that the ball has landed in foul territory, as the Franklin Central batter completes her follow through. -vs 'I "WX Q at ?'. . r ... -silk' ws' I- ""'-lan... ani---. -wm . im- . f f' K V' - .tp . w . n,-. ' -s, . L . N.. ' AM- ,Limit Girls Softball 41 if ,M ernard Malamud wrote in 'The l'Iatural', "Without heroes, we are plain peo- ple and don't know how far we can go." Golf and tennis are in- dividual sports in which com- petitors have to reach deep within themselves for that 'something extra.' Most valuable player in tennis for the second year was John Wallace. David Suess was medalist in the IPS Invitational Golf Tour- nament. Both of these players have found a sense of purpose in playing tennis and golf. John's tennis career began in the fifth grade when he went to see the Indiana Loves play the Boston Lobsters and got in- terested in the game. A highlight of his senior year was seeing his picture in the ln- dianapolis Star playing against a student from Ritter. "We aren't strong as a team, said John. However, we prac- ticed every day during the season. Strength and skill comes through playing regular- ly. Coach Robinson was quite good at spotting our pro- blems." Both Mr. Robinson and his wife are good players and played with the team in prac- tice. John admitted "she beat me once." Golf team members receiving outstanding awards were David Suess, MVP, and Douglas Warren, for having the best mental attitude. Suess observed, "There are many important rules to the game of golf but the most im- portant rule requires a person to show manners and etiquette. Etiquette is important because it helps you keep calm and gain control of your shots. Another reason for keeping calm during a game is that it makes the game more pleasant for you and for those playing around you." MVP John Wallace shows the strength required to return a powerful shot as he goes high into the air to score a point. Coach Julius Kleine in- dicated that as the varsity players doubled the number of victories I6-63 over last year Q3-85 they began to have a bet- ter, more positive attitude and to believe that their own dedication would determine just how far they could go in the sport. Df r Pays Gff 42 Golf and Tennis Robert Lucas completes his follow through as he drives the ball off the tee. 4 .sr . wi . Affwsgi-+1 Ki,,t-'RTM' 've Boys Tennis Team: Coach Donald Robinson, Gaston Garces, Bradley Thompson, Erik Poventud, James Jefferson, John Wallace, and Eddie Newsom, it A all f las, A if - ' , N' g 6 I A- ' " Boys Golf Team: Matthew Clark, David Suess, Joseph DeBruler, Joseph Benson, nf- 9 1, in - Di a l s , ifj, Y ' 3 1 Wh l 3 Douglas Massey, Robert Lucas, and Douglas Warren. 1 BOYS TENNIS 1 i Q3 - 121 1 1 1 TECH OPP. 1 B028 GSLF A g 4 Attucks 1 TECH 4 - , Opp 5.1 Y 0 S ' 5 ' .. 1 1 ff 1 ,, 1.1 1' 2 3 210 Park Tudor 150 J if 'rf 11. 1 4 Washin ton 1 186 Arlington 208 V 1 -1 0 RMS 5 204 Broad Ripple 240 - ', , 1 228 New Palestine 176 , ft' 1 4 1 Roncalll 4 215 H 206 , 441.532 2534 ' 1 0 cathedral 5 Owe 1 " 1 '53 i j , 2 Manual 3 207 Manual 209 ' -A ,.,. tl f I New Palestine 4 196 Marshall 244 Q ggh, , lj ' 2 Marshall 3 195 Northwest 200 ' --f' ' ' 1 Q, 1 4 A I. 161 Attucks 153 ,gl r mgton 1 219 Scecina 162 Duffer DeBruler surveys Qgffy 1 Broad Ripple 4 Q 222 Howe 209 ' the straightest line to the 0 Chatard 5 CUP' 1 L- 0 Warren Central 5 213 Marshall 241 V p 1 , , , g 2 Northwest 3 5 Golf and Tennis 43 oted n track, being the first to break the string at the finish line usually signifies a winning effort. However, in the case of the boys varsity track team, the string which was broken in 1985 was Tech's string of winning seasons. At that time, the team vowed to get back on the winning track. With an increase in team members to 44, the track and field competitors fought to a 4- 4 season record. ln champion- ship competition, the team finished 3rd in the City Meet, qualified 18 entrants in the Sec- tionals where it finished 4th, advanced 4 participants into the Regionals, and sent junior Maurice Todd and sophomore Reggie Morse to the State. Morse had his personal best high jump of six feet six inches at the State Meet. For his ef- forts, Johnson was awarded both the MVP and Mental At- titude honors. This feat is even more impressive, given the fact that Maurice garnered both of these awards in Cross Country also. When asked to compare the two sports, he replied, "Cross Country takes a lot more endurance, more training and work than Track. ln Cross Country you run three miles." The freshman team, coached by Lafayette Reed, placed 5th in the City. Success had a way of en- couraging team members. Coach Francis Knue stated, "The kids are working harder now and winning is an incentive for them." Maurice Johnson added, "This year our team im- proved a 'heck of a lot'. The boys really pulled together as a team." As he reviewed his four-year rebuilding plan for the team, Knue noted that the boys are exceeding their goals. ln this, the second year of the plan, the team reached its mark of qualifying runners and field events personnel for regional competition. The goal for '87 is to qualify more athletes for the State Meet and then to WIN the State in '88, Summing up his thoughts, Knue stated, "I am very proud of this season." Eye and body strain as senior Stephen Pittman takes advantage of a quick start as he concentrates on step- ping over the first hurdle. 4 A Aff V Lg . A ,,,.,. . X W I "' if 'Zin by .2 4 4 "' u 'll ...W x K x ! Q gg K X X at-mf t e will H330 44 Boys Track BOYS VARSITY 5 RESERVE TRACK TECH OPP. T Lawrence Central 69 ' A Attucks Kokomo P Attucks Ritter Broad Ripple - Cathedral , 1 2,.,, f' ,Jo P11-E44-'.:5i4:f ' ' ' W i' ' ,.1 Maurice Johnson runs toe-to-toe with his opponent in the Tech Inv. IOOM Dash. Y , ,,,. K ,. an f f H Y 'f ,ig 5' ,al . 1' 1 1, 1 5' W--1 1' We . - fy 4 4 'H 5 .if l J mf, , 1,93 , ,W 'sr 26 Q A5 .185 H 81 . 46 W TL .:.,,. 26 Washington 101 of, fi tu J 43 84 ' ,Q Q f , 'Vs fbi, 'Q I .,1 ' 70 38 as ... W ' 70 51 I 84 42 59 67 D' 'ft 5238 N f 4 ' Niewsa, iss ws, 1 , 51. A J ,-we ' 1, 1, W' , l,f1Pf,.rI 5 qi, .4 Y Q Q -bw . , I 9 Ng ' ,, ar tris , A .fkf 1--f, K i 1', V' L5 1 ,- . -21 .3 ,Q tv--rv, ' 71 -' ' as M y .tg f""a ':'Q,t35 6. 'f. 5 . ,QQ 1?fT:.gwi" .1 ,A . .. ' - "vw3J?r" 'A " ' ' '.-X335 ' " 'A 1 'Z ' ' -k,pv-imlm , . 'C' K 26 ' is ' +3 f " rs :Ln ' . D. we 1 -, 5 . , .. an . ...sm 1 .q v 5 1 V ,S Q. . W Mgt E by NUC. -is , ., 'sfnwef w' Q, :ef-.Q '- . - ., , - 5 ' 'P ,fi . ' 3. 4... ,, ' ir?- ' 'f 1 A X- . .' ... - 'Q' 55. " , -' If .. t. f A .1 UNA? -, 4 .atm - ' tr Jifaisf' Est. E s-fi? 'Nia -. .L Wgiv. , 'WN Giving it his all during the Tech Invitational meet, senior Gary Reedy qualifies for the Discus finals. ...gn-.-, M .s - The 'true-value' of a good A.D. lies in well organized events. Howard Catt instructs Tech lnv. officials. 5 P . 'Q'-, ' -av ic: C: ' , fd X U k tg il . W it W 1, fs S. , ' s Boys Track Team. Front Row: Terry Johnson, Juan Leakes, Shawn Turner. Maurice Johnson, Darrel Humphrey, James Faceson, Stephen Pittman, and Gary Reedy. Back Row: Coach Francis Knue, Assistant Joyce Stevenson, Mar- quise Freeman, Mark Mahone, Kevin Brown, Timothy Allen, Robert Rush, Coach Robert Woodard, Assistant Dawn Upshaw, and Coach Lafayette Reed. Boys Track 45 Girls Track Team. Front Row: Khalilah Muhammad, Yolanda Willis, Carwander Hatten, DeNita Mid- dlebrooks, Celeste White, and Terri Dowdell. Row 2: Marva Bell, Marveda Tardy, Rolanda Bolen, Natalie Hender- son, Nicole Crowe, Cynthia Smith, Sherri Dowdell, Melvina Muex and Manager Kim Settles. Back Row: Coach Arnold Lehman and Coach Ron Fyffe. 'M A I x Q' vw ..,. , V . 1, 1 X X Q Q A .3 b f K- 5 ? Ei y ,. W., t,.uw-.-sw - 1. V11 ,lt .,,?iF"'r ,,., 1, A I sw .M N . ,. .. H iiN:PvMNm , 'Weave' xx 3 'mfe wmmstt ,M ,B Extending her body to maximize her distance in the long jump is Sherri Dowdell. She placed 2nd behind her twin sister, Terri, at the Tech Invitational. 3 is Girls Track il! 'HW' My ...gag wanna fwlfff' yi, ,,g,,g6 ff? ffW'9 'fx 2 4' A is we Marveda Tardy kicks to a strong fourth place finish in the 400 Meter run Sherri Dowdell and Rolanda Bolen burst out of the blocks in the 100 Meter Dash at the Tech Invitational. Maicel Malone of North Central won the race in a time of 11.8 seconds. , c ' . 17314 I 2 ' GIRLS TRACK ' TECH OPP Ben Davis Howe Chatard Roncalli Attucks Lawrence Central 52 Arlington Washington Broad Ripple 72 112 Northwest 35 112 72 1 f 2 Cathedral 2nd in North Central Relays 2nd in Tech Invitational 2nd in City Sectional Champions Regional Champions 3 C 7 i 111- li ' 1 ' f " ' ' QTZTQ We C 49 ' 55 7 1 ' l..,.n,. I 'Q , ,, , K K- , . I 4' W . 54 30 C 1 f i n f , C 1 fi 1 75 ' 34 7 j ' Q1 0 he 1 ' 7 f 73 35 8 :aft f fm-my ,nz ',,,w"f 1 Q T, W g V , . ' . ,i,t Q , if 1 C ef 1 1 73 3 3 3 ' s .f-"'-,..mmiyQ.' f. ' Ji,f'f?' 1 f I 7 ' .Q . 'T K I' aw, ,, r V, 73 12 - l x - 1 . . 3 is - 73 46 1 ' C - - ' ' 'fmzi'5'i,:C"' ' ' - ' '- . 'v if r 'f ' f - ' 3 .. 1 ' .. ,'4:"'1 H C 1 3 f 0 81 Scecina 28 - - -1 C ' Z??. zv?' 2 ,-', Vs f . ,. 1 2 . 1 K' 5 - g 7 all 1 29 , 1 1 1 f 7 . 1 o r 1 , ttt 5 T - 1 ' - - - 3 Y It funbu . ""-Cx if fur ffggw, ,-Hg. - 1' ---,rf , S. if , mfg 3 , Q. K Q IV 1 b . . I' Z I . . .. , , , 2 Q, WL? W Q it Mg N .7 ,, ,,,, s ,, . a. . v. 1 I up-W . - - -, ,4 , .M .,. .. ' .4 ,..,, . ,.,,.,, . . , . 4-,'f,,,1t, ' . , f ...S C, -is . ct w .t - s. V... f ' L W A' 'K'-1 ' ' ws. -,I A E. . . .. W ' ., ., ' , , ' ., '. ' ' df.. . ,ff L- ' , 11.25, ' ' ., ' , - gif-, .J . , I -X .. E , , M 2 ' v :wi 5397- '1' V esta? M? g 1 Q Q U ,A U fly. . -gg . N -,. ,A.. 9 Q , ' N ,Q -f e ' is .. ,,. --wg I ww., f "SFS 75 3' pf' " .i ,s ,, - -sm--f , ' +. 't wwf e " ' T ' 1 . ., A fa - i it if 'V' .- g r V, , , X, .N ly ,H js, gt pg,-1,3 .,:' ,Y f . . -K J.. 1, .Q v- ..,,.t. - ,, A -'S 1 --, . 1 U ,cr ...tm . 5? x ...I pw WWE Ag., K Na, , - sf- X Y. n Track, the arms and legs may do the work, but in the final analysis, it is the heart and mind that make the dif- ference. This was surely true of the lady greenclads. After los- ing their first dual meet, they did a complete turnaround, and went on to win their next ll contests. "If the Indianapolis 500 is a testing ground for professional auto racing, then it can be said that the Tech lnvitational is the same for high school track and field. In Marion County, the greatest honor in track is to XXX beat North Central, said Coach Arnie Lehman. The lady Titans threw everything they had into trying to upset the state-ranked Panthers in the lnvitational but came in second, 135-lOl. Thus, when the City Meet was run a week later, they turned in a decent performance, but ar- chrival Howe won with a superior effort. Desire and mental prepara- tion once again came to the fore as the girls geared up for the Sectional and dethroned the defending champion, Ben Davis, 96-54. This was a par- ,:,,,.,? , W ticularly sweet victory as Tech's only regular season loss was to the lady Giants. The girls team was compris- ed primarily of underclass run- ners, including sophomore Natalie Henderson who was voted MVP in the running events and sophomore Marva Bell who earned the same honor in the field events. For the team to be successful in its assault on the state title, the girls must continue to have heart and run smart. For the present, the Sec- tional and Regional trophies YXXX wear' X M ,.-tqy., - Q N4-uri:-qv-vlisvvvu-9.-11.119, as .1 L ,,...f- Sophomore trackster Carwander Hatton steps over a hurdle on her way to a third place finish in the lOO Meter Lows. The points she earned helped boost the Titans to a second place finish in the Tech lnvitational. Her teammate, Natalie Henderson, won first place in both the 100 Meter and 300 Meter hurdle races. which the girls added to their trophy case, along with their newspaper clippings and per- sonal memories, provide them with a reward for their efforts and an incentive to improve. Succiss Pro ides Incentive Girls Track 47 Court jester Edwm Mac Donald proudly accepts his new title 'Lord of Mischief' I , Q from M'Lord Steven O'Neal during the madrigal perfor- - . , , P 'swf mance held in the Colonel s i fi, iz 5 gg' 1 Cupboard. 2 M '- . ,H ' HW "' '.A2YfF 4' -.1 a A - if aww P , f v i'i5f1V E51 Pfj: L 1 :git 'iv 4 4 f f 02' Z f QW fdfyy M ff , 2 4 11 48 Activities Division -il 0741, 1 1'-Qu , fwfr? ACTI ITIE "ls Math club or Student Council meeting tomorrow morning"? "Are you asking me? I don't belong to any clubs and I don't know the schedules." "Hold on! Today is Monday so tomorrow is , . . Math club. Why don't you meet me in the cafe at 7:25 a.m. and we'll go to the meeting together." "NaI I don't want to get up that early!" "Come on. You can go to bed early tonight! We need people to participate." "lt's the middle of the yearg isn't it too late to join?" "No, we're always looking for recruits." Because of the decline in stu- dent enrollment, clubs, organizations, and groups were always recruiting new members. This recruiting in- creased the size of the organizations and also enabled more people to become involved. First year drum major Darlene Powell whistles the band into formation during its special half-time show at homecoming. As clubs grew to include more people, the groups were able to carry out more projects. With new members came new ideas and new activities such as the powderpuff football game and the senior breakfast. Although more students in- volved themselves in a greater number of activities, jobs and homework sometimes in- terfered with extracurricular events. As a result, some of the same people felt the need to become involved in several ac- tivites to help take up the slack. Despite these obstacles, however, activities continued to contribute much to the Tech community. By entering into activities, participants acquired leadership qualities that helped generate a "New Attitude." Senior Jennifer Broyles carefully listens as senior Leona Flanigan recites her initiation pledge during an Office Education Association ceremony in the auditorium. Activities Division 49 Sophomore football player Kenneth McRee and varsity cheerleader Allison Brinkley ride on the sophomore float. Allison shows her support for the class of '88 by shouting jubilantly as she rides around the football field. ' We 1426. o "United we stand, divided we fall, the mighty, mighty Titans will conquer all!" In the minds of the spirit boosters the words of this cheer rang true. From the cheerleaders to the majorettes, each spirit booster did her in- dividual best to support the school and to cheer its teams on. The cheerleaders, sponsored by Donna Anderson, Mable Lewis, and Dorris Raines, showed their support early by having strenuous practice ses- sions in August, which for several cheerleaders included attending an aerobics class with the football team. A sense of camaraderie developed bet- ween these girls and the team through their working together. Because of this closeness, the cheerleaders 'adopted' the team, and often treated them to brownies or cookies. After several games the cheerleaders and the team celebrated with pizza at Noble Roman's. Despite losing a few cheerleaders and having to reorganize the varsity and junior varsity squads, the cheerleaders kept this sense of unity throughout the basketball "You need a very positive attitude and to believe in what you're supporting." season. Freshman basketball coach Charles Battles com- mented, "The support of the freshman squad was certainly appreciated." The Techmates, like the cheerleaders, felt a sense of unity with the wrestlers. Spon- sored by Debby Chestnut, the Techmates supported the wrestling team by attending all the matches and by selling can- dy for the team. They also gave the team a Christmas party. The Majorettes, who chang- ed sponsors midway through the year, also felt unity was im- portant. They spent at least two hours after school each day practicing with the band or with their new sponsor, Cathy Jordan. She taught them in- tricately choreographed dance routines which they performed during half time at home games. When asked what one quality was needed to be an effective spirit booster, varsity cheerleading captain D'Ondra Coleman replied, "I think dedication is the most impor- tant quality needed in being an effective spirit booster. You also need to have a very positive attitude and believe in what you're supporting." 50 Spirit Boosters 'Wwmzq is ,. .5-Mx Front Row: Sonja Mahone. Row 2: Tracey Hopson, Phillip Alexander, Raymond Love, Kevin Brown, and D'Ondra Coleman. Row 3: Lorei McGee, Marsha Johnson, and Robin Sanders. Top Row: Maria l. Camarena, Wzafouaw Front Row: Dawn Roach, Kelly Rogers, Melinda Lynch, Janna Davis, Kim Jordan, Maria L. Camarena, Kimberly Lewis, and Marsha McKenney. Row 2: Berniece Holcomb, Tina Merrifield, Tracy Graham, Yolanda Beamon, Machelle McCarthy, Kimberly Patterson, Tiffany Smith, Melissa Roach, and Brenda Ray. ' YFLZJIKZZHR . ' wxgirf if ffm? Front Row: Celeste White, Allen Lang, Kevin Dodson, and Amy Smallwood. Back Row: Angela Williams, LaDonna Anderson, Detra Woods, LaDonna Thomas, and Tiffani Coleman. ylhtld-'Z Wafwdfq ..x.,i V . A lf, Front Row: Andrea Woods, Charla Garvin, Teresa Mickens, and Jennifer Searcy. Top Row: Erica Woods. . . ' . .T L . ' mi m..eslx-li wa., nur 1 i Y Furry X , .Sli H' VME-5 Nj Qwhllx' 'IU' 4 l swf- .. "", f 1 f Y. 1 ,Z , ,P Al' EEF A 'LJ lggi , REETLIN- 'IES-LIP' TLN 'ifikmr J li 5-1.1.1 . Y Front Row: Dawn Wise, Tonya Monday, Kimberly Ramsey, and Tammie New. Back Row: Jenni Hon, Dawn Herring, Penny Benson, Dyan Glaze, Karla Musgrove, and Missy Anderson. Spirit Boosters 51 gnu Trap. E 31 W . -- . First Row: Scott Pierce, David Parrish, Bernard White, Lonnie Johnson, Karen Morgan, Scott Ramsey, and Fred Shinlever, Row 2. James Murkison, Yeng Vang, Jeffrey Klinck, Missy Anderson, and Sean Cook. Back Row. Robert Jones and Anthony MacLennan 79 rllrll "lib 4 ,V , L E... .M J L u 1f..-f... - , X V, 1 - L f .-ss m f Leslie Dodson, Mansfield Harris, Stacy McCall, and Brian Livingston. First Row. Penny Benson, Kimberly Ramsey, Elaine Spradlin, Amy Grimsley, Angela Smith, Darlene Powell, Amy Small, and Tracy Cameron. Back Row. Randy Spillane, John Mehringer, Gregory Alcorn, Terry Johnson, Beverly Charette, Stephanie Jordan, Bradley Thompson, Harry Murphy, and Jennie Churchwell. 52 Band tl: ,ff of-ff 4? in umm fu 3 7 5 111 ffl if if , if 1 ' if arf, During a basketball game, sophomore Kimberly Ramsey takes a break from pep band and watches the action on the floor. Lonnie Johnson, Karen Morgan, Fred Shinlever, and Clinton Honeycutt 'blow their horns' to the beat of the band at a home basketball game. lf one walked through the Tech campus on any of the scorching August days, he probably been the blare of beat of drums, of commands. would have greeted by trumpets, the and a spree Though one might think from the commotion that the local fort was using our campus for drill practice, they would ac- tually see it was the Tech Mar- ching Band. For many people the month of August was a time for relax- ing at the local swimming pool or taking a last minute trip, but for members of the symphonic fmarching band, August was the month to start preparing for the band season. The two main ingredients re- quired for success as a band member were dedication and endurance. Leadership was another quality needed, especially for the two junior drum majors, Anthony MacLennan and Darlene Powell, who spent a week in Syracuse, Indiana, at the Smithfwalbridge Drum "A good attitude is essential to becom- ing a successful band." Major Camp. While at camp, they learned different techni- ques and band routines. "We also learned that having a good attitude is essential to becom- ing a successful band," said Anthony. Throughout the school year the band marched during half- time at football games and played at home basketball games. Co-drum major Darlene Powell commented, "I thought the senior show at homecom- ing was the best performance we had, and it was also my favorite because Tony and l had a lot to do with creating the sequences." Always keeping busy, the band participated in several functions for the city. They at- tended Butler Band Day, mar- ched in the Labor Day parade Qin which they won a trophyj, and marched in the 500 Festival Parade. Freshman Jeffrey Klinck said, "Although we had to give up free time to practice, I had fun because I made many friends." Z 2? Drum majors. juniors Anthony MacLennan and Darlene Powell proudly display the trophy the marching band won for participating in the Labor Day parade, Band 53 il f -7. 17 fi fffffk f fig' 452 Q ' gs 1 'ff ff? 29? ,5 WM sae f it awww Sophomore Brenda Ray puts her in- strument in its case after an hour-long orchestra rehersal. For the string ensemble, bell choir, and orchestra, busy was the buzz word. Each of these three groups, sponsored by Ms. Mable Lewis, was kept ex- tremely active with a number of performances. Since Tech had the only str- ing ensemble in I.P.S., it was the busiest of the three groups. String ensemble performances included concerts at the Hyatt Regency and Christmas ap- pearances at the Indianapolis Zoo, the Central Library, the State House, and the Claypool Shops. The String Ensemble's hard work and willingness to perform paid off richly. lt received a lst place in the District String Ensemble Con- test. The Ensemble was also in- vited to perform at the Urban League Conference. When ask- WGS' 54 Bell Choir, String Ensemble, Orchestra ffl ed what could account for the string ensemble's success, Ms. Lewis replied, "Hard work balanced by a little play made the string ensemble the profes- sionals they are." The "little play" included a trip to Kings "With much practice anyone can become great." Island in June. Like the string ensemble, the bell choir also kept busy with several performances which in- cluded a concert at the Hyatt Regency and a holiday program at the Indianapolis Zoo. They also entertained the students at Tech during the Christmas season by playing carols in the halls. Though not as busy as either the string ensemble or the bell choir, the orchestra was also active. Through auditions, Tech filled 10 chairs in the All City High School Orchestra. This was the largest number from any I.P.S high school. They also went to contests and performed in a May festival. When asked what motivated him to continue with the or- chestra for four years, senior Edwin MacDonald reflected, "l was really inspired my freshman year by a senior nam- ed Jeff Johnfauno. He en- couraged me to practice more diligently. I sincerely believe that with much practice anyone can become great." 5' 8 f I km Ulu.-,lf X W , Q 4 K Q 5. Hark Silver Bells! Scott Pierce and Machelle McCarthy concentrate intently as they perform the "Carol of the BelIs" during a Christmas concert at the ln- dianapolis Zoo. 0 ,JA .. Front Row: D'Ondra Coleman, Hua Vang, Katrina Weir, Lori MacDonald, Stacy Williams, April Clark, Mary Smith, and Aaron MacDonald. Row 2: Janna Davis, Deitra Taylor, Jan Stutts, Elaine Dodson, Natasha Johnson, Dwuna Hention, Marion Parks, Stephanie Stephens, and Barbara Gaughan. Row 3: Shawnda King, Angela Williams, Brenda Ray, Stephany Simmons, Amy Grimsley, Angie Smith, Darlene Powell, Amy Small, Tracy Cameron, Machelle McCarthy, and Edwin MacDonald. Row 4: Greg Alcorn, Terry Johnson, Randy Spillane, Beverly Charette, Stephanie Jordan, Jennie Churchwell, Harry Murphy, Sharon Smith, and Douglas Warren. Row 5: Clinton Honeycutt, Scott Ramsey, Frederick Shinlever, Karen Morgan, Scott Pierce, James Murkison, Yeng Vang, Jeffrey Klinck, and Anthony MacLennan. Row 6: Leslie Dotson, Brian Livingston, Stacy McCall, Mansfield Harris, Ms. Mable Lewis, and Robert Jones. S 5 Xian., Xt: it Ml lor .t 1 . I "' X Front Row: D'Ondra Coleman, Hua Vang, Aaron MacDonald, Barbara Gaughan, and Deitra Taylor. Row 2: Scott Payton, Janna Davis, Lori MacDonald, Katrina Weir, and Edwin MacDonald. Back Row: Ms. Mable Lewis. Ze!! 64441 X 'Y' .QI UU' Front Row: Ms. Mable Lewis, Jeffrey Klinck, Angela Smith, James Murkison, Jennie Churchwell, and Yeng Vang. Back Row: Scott Pierce, Randy Spillane, Tracy Graham, Edwin MacDonald, Brian Livingston, Amy Grimsley, and Machelle McCarthy. Senior Greg Alcorn , who plays saxophone for the orchestra, also performs for the band during home games. Bell choir, String Ensemble, orchestra 55 7ec4a6z Front Row: Phyllis Smith, Angela Hudson, Kecia Anderson, Kimberly Jordan, Rachel Fitzwater, and Dawn Llpshaw. Row 2: Christopher Martin, Myla Highbaugh, Amy Grimsley, Tracy Graham, Tammy Armstrong, Yolanda Kemp, Allison Brinkley, and Donald Basham. Row 3: Allen Lang, Tracy Cameron, Lanny Boles, Timothy Foster, Erik Poventud, D'Ondra Coleman, and Lorei McGee. Back Row: Lonnie Johnson, Dwayne Sexton, Jeffrey Valentine, Dennis Arnott, Harvey Lee, Steve Pittman, Anthony Abbett, Edwin MacDonald, and Scott Payton. U Fi 5 56 Techoir 1 , 'ff ,, . ,- , Q ff., 7 4 'E -54 1 Knowing how important it is for each person to know his individual part when performing with a choir, Timothy Foster looks over his tenor part before a Christmas performance at the Zoo. What's that noise? Members of the Techoir, who are city-dwellers, are startled by an unfamiliar animal noise and a rustling sound outside the choir shelter, during their holiday visit to the Zoo. M'Lord Steven 0'Neal is not amused by the riddle-filled ramblings of Jester Ed- win MacDonald at the choir's performance of the Madrigal Feaste. ' an From singing for the In- dianapolis Pacers to par- ticipating in the All-City Choir Festival, Techoir was on the move. The choir, directed by Paul Prather, opened its 'singing' 'year with a mini-concert for the Tech Retired Teachers. It then went on to join with other choral groups from throughout the area at Market Square Arena to sing a medley of songs for the Indianapolis Pacers' season-opening celebration. Toward the end of November, many of the choir members participated in the musical, "The Wiz." Like Santa Claus, Techoir was kept extremely busy dur- ing the month of December. At the beginning of the month, the choir visited the Stewart- Warner Corporation, the Education Center, and the ln- dianapolis Zoo to perform ide Christmas concerts. Then, toward the middle of the month, the choir presented its annual Madrigal Feaste. For the past few years, the madrigal had been performed on the stage in Anderson Auditorium, but this year it was given in the Colonel's Cupboard. Michael "Music is something you feel, and once you've sung, you've shared your feelings with others." Cecil, who attended the madrigal, commented, "I thought that both the music and the food were excellent." After the new year began, Techoir still had plenty to do. During the month of February, the choir, along with other choirs from throughout IPS, sang with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra at the Circle Theatre. Senior Phillip Alexander, who participated in this concert, noted, "lt was a great experience." In May, to finish its year, Techoir participated in the All- City High School Choir Festival. For years, the Techoir motto has been, "Canimus ex animo," which means, "sing from the heart." Judging by the numerous heartfelt perfor- mances given by Techoir, it was evident that the members took this motto seriously. When asked why it was impor- tant to sing from the heart, senior Darrel Humphrey reflected, "Music is something you feel and once you've sung from the heart, you've ac- complished something because you've shared what you feel with others." Techoir pauses during its many travels to present a holiday concert for the employees of Stewart-Warner Cor- poration, Tech's Partner-in-Education. Techoir 57 Senior Steve Surenkamp stretches his muscles to prepare himself for a strenuous ride around the Major Taylor Velodrome track. 'z?'mfzd'z?y A wide range of co- and extra-curricular activities, both mental and physical, were of- fered to Tech students. The Brain Game team, which got its name from the WTHR TV program on which the team competes, was under the direc- tion of first-year sponsor Lindy Pruett. The new sponsor brought several fresh ideas to the club. A spelling bee was organized to improve the members' ability to work quickly with words. An Academic Decathalon, involv- ing ten high schools from the central Indiana region, was held on the campus to provide the team with experience in actual competition. Although the Tech team did not win any of the ten team events, several in- dividuals did exceptionally well. Jackie Easley won first place medals in Speech and lnter- view. The most enjoyable "practice", however, was when the team met at Mrs. Pruett's home to view classic Broadway musicals. This exercise enabled the students to expand their knowledge of music and theatre. The Brain Game team "I like a challenge in whatever I do." lost to Ritter in the opening round of competition, but not before gaining valuable in- sights. For Mrs. Pruett, the high point of her first year as sponsor was, "getting to know a large number of bright, young Techites and being involved with helping them develop their intelligence." Math Club adopted an at- titude of service by sponsoring a tutoring project for students having difficulty in math. New sponsor Judy Feigert oversaw the sale of candy to raise money for the club's three-day trip to Ohio's Cedar Point Amusement Park and Sea World. The Bike Club had no official sponsor, although the activity came under the general direc- tion of the athletic department. Senior Steve Surenkamp com- mented that he continued with the bike team, "because I love the excitement of racing bikes at high speeds and l like a challenge in whatever l do." The Lettermens' Club did not sponsor any activities of its own, rather it provided an op- portunity for all major athletic award winners to enjoy fellowship. in-W 58 Bike Club, Brain Game, Lettermen, Math Club ' A 2 if' 4 fm N.-iv Four-sport letterman Sharmin Davis won 10 major awards, Front Row: Kristin Hoch, Darlene Powell, Alison Piety, Lisa Moore, Norma Aguilera, William Miller, Janell Raney, Marva Bell, and Kim Settles. Row 2: Jennifer Hon, Kenny McRee, Brian Livingston, Paul Dailey, Scott Payton, Sonja Mahone, Harry Murphy, Charles Simmons, Misty Blaine, David Suess, Charles Sides, and Todd Chapman. Back Row: Sharmin Davis, Gregory Alcorn, Maurice Johnson, Brondon McFarland, Kevin Brown, Jeffrey Valentine, Reginald Morse, Darrel Humphrey, and Joseph DeBruler. M4434 66:45 Front Row: Dave Miller, Stephanie Jordan, Steven Wright, Jeffrey Klinck, and Yeng Vang. Row 2: Amy Small, Andrea Woods, Yolanda Beaman, Sheena Dukate, Detra Woods, Kimberly Patterson, Jennie Churchwell, and Kim Settles. Row 3: Todd Chapman, Tracy Graham, Paul Dailey, Misty Blaine, Brent Purvis, Harry Mur- phy, Rod Dulin, Tracy Cameron, Amy Grimsley, Lisa Moore, and Scott Pierce. Back Row: Shanell Crockett, Lorei McGee, Donald Kaufman, Randal Smith, Reginald Morse, Robin Sanders, Gregory Alcorn, and Mark Easley. gum Qamefp HM Front Row: Ms. Lindy Pruett, James Murkison, Pamela Riley, Hua Vang, Andrew Robertson, and Michelle Smith. Back Row: Kim Settles, Robin Sanders, Lorei McGee, Marva Bell, Paul Dailey, Jacqueline Easley, and Carla Streeval. '3c'6e 66:4 Bike Team: Machelle McCarthy, Stephen Surenkamp, and Douglas Warren. Bike Club, Brain Game, Lettermen, Math Club 59 , ,,...lig...1-- 26,40 7mm 'gr .,igQg',,f 4 ,K ng'f: ',4ev A ', IA, , :ev-, lr ' . N . A ' A' , ,. ' gr ' fsiflf 1 S, T " , we ',-'G w ,-'G vi V. 5743 "' , I J N , ,K . ' f 2 ' L Q i ' -Q ' Q l IQ Aaron MacDonald, Brian Hoopingarner, John Kroeger, Robert Godwin, Larry Hutson, Devin Warren, Greg Lindop, and John Bullington. 8400 if ' N' 1 s xx ki , '7' " '1 , fu? I 'M . J 'f , n 1, '. . , W ii lb, 0 . f , A , . ! '2 ' L '1' ." ' l -1' . . , I Ib? ll . r , 1? 'V In . .L , X 5 Ky! -xt r . ,... 3 7' 1 C , Q A ' -. . '. -fume X: A 7 , , 1 -'M qt. , -' - i - i 2 - 'vs ' F5 ' ' - -'ff 5' f A A ,ff 'f' 4' I . Z - 'S i ' ' 3 I' 1. f 1 . V' 1 f f-'X . ew ' V f iw, of we ff. -. ,.,, 7 'f - f ,W i -1-all ' . f 1 L Q ,. M123 'f . - M - ,, ' , 7 i A .. 1 --' .f , . a ge , WWW? M 'W. 'E ? 'lcv Wald? tif f .1 4 'W L I in f' jf ? ' , g ,13'1QZ' ' ' , , I , , 135' , , 32, ww M ,ft W A , .f ' :+I , fag ' fga 1 ,3h.g,,,,1Qf- A ,q A ,ff.,, 'Q W, , ..4.,,.,.f . -,, ., , J 'Q ,W f, . M,,w,t . . ,f , ,, ., , V , " - 7 1 -, ,yf 1' y pf 1 ,M A ' ' 21' f' , C ,W . 315 "'nt'V'if '.?,.fWf,f 1. 45221-' Q 4' V 'V ' I i - ,, - ,.+.p,5,.-sq.-7 ' sf.-l if 1 , V Jacqueline Anderson, Alisha Lewis, Sandra Hughes, Marveda Tardy, Patricia Pounds, Denita Middlebrooks, and Viviana Taylor. Zami Que,-ad L . K I-.gg +I-, ., fy. Y , -. , ,, sal . za "1 1 6 ' ' -.' F- WX ffl, - - 3 M i IN .ina ,,l,f'flfU:' ' x I 't " ' ' '-a ,- , -, ft . ,f , gy , , ,Wy I. i . in 'N Wh Front Row: Randall Small, Timothy Baker, Robert Godwin, Larry Hutson, Anthony Abbett, and Brian Hoopingarner. Second Row: Richard Robinson, Aaron MacDonald, Michael Sullivan, Antoinette Ellis, William Cook, Jack Kinney, William Phillips, John Kroeger, Johnathan Bullington, and John Crockett. 60 J ROTC .R i 4 -M ,. v 's I fi fn ., 8 149' 3 -Cx 4 X ATA .1 v sn I NN 1 Front Row: Larry Hutson, Anthony Abbett, and Randall Small. Back Row: Brian Hoopingarner, Devin Warren, Harvey Lee, Richard Robinson, and Jerry Robinson. 6004? Phyllis Smith is the chaplain for Tech's JROTC. 2? ,: ?Ea?T5,g A Q Y S4 X-wie , 4 4 X ' V51 Ring My l-Eur . I. I' MN if Q1 . ,xl Q 9 r, ' 3 ""-gif! A-,."fv' N " MJ ' .. , Ol '- Q-v.a:'T:4 x 'X a ,, 'kt' ' lf . I A .l 1 s L A" Y' 7 ii: A l I' 1 h 5 X . ' Q' . an . I R jf. I 'ng ,J 'Nsx,,!,--i ff 5 if ff sw .f ., , A. X ',, l x . S, f A it l 'r x I The objectives of the Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps program were to prepare the high school student for responsible leadership and to make himfher fully aware of the opportunities and benefits which a military career offers. Many cadets went on to enter the senior ROTC program. Some applied to the military academies, but more entered the military services as enlisted personnel. Although JROTC was once taught by regular Army of- ficers, more recently it has been taught by Army officers from the retired ranks. These gentlemen have taken heir job seriously. As one of them said, "We don't just teach Army, we teach good citizenship as welI." 207 Examples of the cadet's good citizenship activities include acting as campus guides during Open House, serving as band guards during basketball and football games, providing honor guards for IHSAA and "We don't just teach Army, we teach good citizenship as well." school athletic events, and volunteering for the flag detail which raised and lowered the colors each day on the campus. For "fun," the JROTC gave a Christmas party for the cadets. They also had their annual city-wide Military Ball which -'j" -r. , W, it . s was held at the Convention Center on April 25. Senior Phyllis Smith was one student who really used the good citizenship skills she learned. According to Senior Army Instructor, Neris Willis, lst Sgt. Ll.S. Army fRet.J, Phyllis was the only student in Indiana to serve as a chaplain. She started with the program when she was a freshman. Ser- ving as a chaplain is the Army's equivalent of being a counselor. When asked why she wanted to be a chaplain, Phyllis com- mented, "Helping people is one thing that l really feel is impor- tant, and being chaplain was one way to help others." Phyllis plans to continue her career in the Armed Forces after gradua- tion, possibly in the Air Force. . P N. ,. ' 699 "' Members of the boys drill team perform a routine with their rifles. The members are: Front Row: Aaron MacDonald and Larry Hutson. Row 2: Devin Warren. Back Row: Anthony Abbett and Harvey Lee. mwldantfzq ...l.-.--f- JROTC 61 :"'--"'1'....".,1'2 Ur' .ef ,p 1 F .,-it MIN Tired after a long day of skiing, Spanish Club members collapse at the feet of their sponsor, Karen Beck. This is Ms. Beck's first year teaching Spanish at Tech. 62 Foreign Language Clubs my Adventure! This seemed to be the attitude for the foreign language clubs. From going ice-skating at the Coliseum, to eating at a local French pastry shop, the foreign language clubs did it all! After acquiring a new spon- sor, Karen Beck, the Spanish club launched into a money making campaign. Coming from Broad Ripple, Ms. Beck brought with her an enthusiasm for fund raising. Freshman Dawn Herring commented, "Ms. Beck really has good ideas about how to raise moneyg when she wants something, she goes after it." With the funds they raised from selling candy, the club went on numerous adventures. Their first adventure entailed a rendezvous at the Coliseum to ice-skate, and then dinner at ez Chi-Chi's afterwards. The Spanish Club's biggest adven- ture though, was a ski trip to Michigan. The group spent two days and one night at Ski World. Beginning skier, Lisa Claspell commented, "Although l twisted my knee "The foreign language clubs did it all!" pretty badly, l had a great time!" Lisa was not the only member injured during the trip. Freshman Rachelle Pippins broke one of her legs in a fall. To complete the year's ac- tivities, the club visited King's Island. Adventure also inspired the French club, sponsored by Dan de,-4 Stanley. The club sold candy as a source of income which was used to buy club T-shirts. Cer- cle Francais also visited the Claypool Shops and ate at Michael's Baguettes, a French pastry shop. One of the high points for the French club was its visit to La Tour. Lorei McGee commented, "l really liked eating in a French restaurant because it gave me a little glimpse of French culture and a taste of French cuisine." The small enrollment in Latin and German classes precluded having active Latin or German clubs. German student Lisa Moore noted, "lt was disap- pointing that more people weren't in the German club because we were not able to sponsor many activities." -an-u.,,,,u H'-'Q Watchout Rambo, for now there's "Rickbo!" Freshman Derrick Moulder displays the correct way to stand on skis during the Spanish Club's ski trip. Edu! 5. Front Row: Kim Royalty, Marcia Jurgesmeyer, Denise Morey, Elaine Spradlin, Stacey Williams, and Lori MacDonald. Row 2: Hallie Walker, Bonita Luncford, Michele Bates, Charles Gregory, Aaron Ferguson, Lauren Brown, Dawn Ferguson, and Jennifer Searcy. Row 3: Karla Musgrove, Jennifer Medsker, Mark Easley, Cheri McCuistion, Maurice Johnson, Derrick Moulder, and Nicole Brewer. A After sampling the French pastry at Michael's Baguettes, the French Club poses on the steps for a group photo. fzencdfq Zhi M M ,, it M, , 35' , OW ' Fay, it Q5 T3 ', kwa J 1 f -. QSM Front Row: Stephanie Jordan, sponsor Dan Stanley and Lisa Moore. Row 2: Donna Miller, Andrew Robertson, Lorei McGee, Andrea Woods, Rolanda Bolen, and Kristin Hoch. That's the breaks! Spanish Club members Denise Morey, Lauren Brown, and Jennifer Searcy gather around to comfort Rachelle Pippins after she broke her leg. Foreign Language Clubs 63 l S 7mm ,bf Q' ,- 4 .g fa ! sm. I f 1 -1 Front Row: Andrew Robertson, Lucille Perry, Deana Harger, Stephanie Redmond, Hua Vang, Christopher Garcia, Bonita Luncford, and Christopher Lloyd. Back Row: Robin Sanders, Lorei McGee, Sonja Mahone, Cheri McCuistion, Nathan Dawson, Ellen Taylor, Amy Grimsly, Amy Small, Andre Guy, and Charles Banks. Sheff 6-W Front Row: Michael Colwell, Dawn Britt, Jeffrey Klinck, and Sean Cook. Row 2: John Kroeger, Stacey Rosales, Charles Gregory, and Mari Strong. Back Row: Scott Llmsteadt, Todd Ramsey, Bryan Hinton, and advisor Raymond Browne. ,isa - ,- .4 64 Speech, Drama, and Stage Club I nnurw' vt., 1 -A E. if ' Y Qi' 3 3 PNN X A-m "-ew, xr' vdmida--X1 - -aid Stage club president Kelly Hinton demonstrates the special effects built into the 'Howe Hornet' on the club's homecoming float. Duma ew wif- so 'hi 53.9.3 "W FSS Front Row: Deana Harger, Kimberly Lewis, and Tracy Graham. Back Row: Rochelle Thomas, Robin Sanders, Phillip Alexander, and Lorei McGee. William Shakespeare said that "All the world's a stage and the men and women mere- ly players. They have their ex- its and their entrances, and one man in his time plays many parts " These words paralleled the many parts played by the speech, stage, and drama clubs this year. The speech team, sponsored by Judith McBride played its many parts well. Participating in nine speech meets, the team came home with many first place ribbons in individual rounds. Lucille Perry, the team's 41 winner, placed in district and sectional contests, and went on to compete in the state speech meet. Another top ribbon winner was Nathan Dawson. When asked how her first year went as speech team sponsor, Ms. McBride replied, "My first year was very busy, but l really appreciated it . "L 'Y fit, wifi Q P ,, i, W 5 -mf.. Fi? ' A ., vis, ig, 3.13 C iii .U :gy ri fi: Fi P.. .. f. Q 3 . Fil i. X . n 1 , . i.,:. 1 Q' 4 Y ' if the loyalty of the team members. I couldn't have asked for a nicer group of kids." Without the stage club's dedication and hard work, all of Tech's drama would have been 'upset'. The club's main pro- jects included making sets for the fall musical and the spring play. They also entered a float in the homecoming competi- "You must be ver- satile and have a joy for your profession." tion. Besides hard work and dedication to projects, the stage club knew how to celebrate, and did so with a par- ty after each production. Stage club sponsor for 10 years, Raymond Browne, had this to say, "We've had an outstanding group this year as far as participation and effort is concerned." The drama club members were more than just 'merely players'. Sponsored by Mr. Minks, the drama club acted as a facilitator for the productions, meetings were held before and after each show. During one of these meetings, the club had Bruce Pillow as a guest speaker. Mr. Pillow, a '76 Tech grad, gave a talk to the club on the hardships and the joys of being an actor. He once had a role on the day-time soap opera, 'All My Children'. Cur- rently he is starring in the film, 'Hoosiers' which is to be releas- ed this year. When asked what was one thing needed to be a success in the performing arts, Mr. Pillow replied: "You must be versatile and have a joy for your profession." First year speech team members, Christopher Lloyd and Charles Banks perform their humorous duo for students at the annual speech day, as they did for the Internal Revenue Ser- vice during Black History Week. lSpeech, Drama, and Stage Club 65 Newspaper staff members LaRobert Guy, Scott Payton, and Andrew Robert- son confer with Editor-in-Chief John Wallace about a newspaper feature. "The crisis of yesterday is the joke of tomorrow" said H. G. Wells. This attitude was adopted by the staff of the Tech publications after their deadlines were met. And deadlines were usually met, even when it meant giving up half of spring break, and all of the weekends before each deadline. Tech publications, the Arsenal Tower, the Arsenal Cannon newspaper, and the Arsenal Cannon yearbook, worked to give their readers the best quality of writing, the most up-to-date news, and the most complete coverage of the school year that was humanly possible. The 1985 Tower received first place in the Ball State University creative writing con- test, and the 1985 Cannon yearbook received a second place rating from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. Yearbook staff member, Lorei McGee was overheard saying, "Yearbook is not just a job, it's an adventure." Next year the adventure will be led by a new group of ad- visers. Newspaper adviser Cecil Tresslar said, "When l became assistant to my teacher, Ella "Yearbook is not just a job, it's an adventure." Sengenberger, in 1957, Tech Principal H. H. Anderson said he didn't want me to quit the Cannon after two or three years. I don't think he would mind my returning to the classroom fulltime after 27 years as sponsor and Director of Publications. My time as a student editor and faculty ad- viser holds many happy memories of associations with students, secretaries, and year- book advisers." Virginia Jackson who is retir- ing from teaching this year, said, "Getting to know the Tech family better has been the high point of my three years as co-adviser of the yearbook. Michael Cecil, the other co- adviser, said he will miss year- booking but remarked, "The Marines only want a few good men, the problem with the yearbook is that we have a few good people but they are trying to do everything. " As the underclass members of the publication staffs review- ed the hectic times and laughed about all of the problems they had overcome, they pondered what new crises awaited them when a new adviser, and staff members from the recently closed high schools joined them next year. 6 , A ' ,mi p-- AP' A--5 66 Publications . wif' Nu--. if If L V- .Q . 55113 if i L 3 1 11: f sb? fi ref, 1 W z 9 4? 1, El 2 5 b 1 5 f Q 5 --,ta ., as 352' 8 Newest yearbook volunteer staff member, freshman Jeffrey Klinck, is fascinated with the Type Vision software program that is used in printing the year- book. Adviser Michael Cecil shows him what the computer can do to help him fit copy. is ,.', Bottom to Top: Adviser Cecil Tresslar, Robert Lufcy, John Wallace, Andrew Robertson, LaRobert Guy, Benjamin Sanderfer, and Gilbert Reed. Bottom to Top: Adviser Mrs. Virginia Jackson, Patricia Pounds, Deana Harger, Jeffrey Valentine, Lorei McGee, Eddie Newsom, Phillip Alexander, and Patty Rhodes. I' ww in af t ., f a .K ..,... ,,., ,, f 4 26,41 ' if C iff' The long wait is over as anxious staff members Lorei McGee and Kenneth McGuire get their first glimpse at the 1985 edition of the Arsenal Cannon Year- book. This 71st Volume received a Second Place rating from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association, Columbia University, New York. Publications 67 n Wanna? F' Front Row: Hua Vang, Adviser Lindy Pruett, Kimberly Helton, and Pam Riley. Back Row: Michelle VanCleave, Dennis Arnott, Harry Murphy, Timothy Baker, and Michelle Smith. V765 Front Row: Janie Mehringer, Sonja Mahone, Lee Smith, Lisa Cutshaw, Mark Jamerson, Kim Settles, Kimberly Lewis, and Adviser Deborah Cline. Back Row: John Kroeger, Terri Baldwin, Deanna Asberry, Krista Carrig, Richard Robinson, Lee Lawson, James Brown, Carmen Brown, and Tina Price. 68 Human Relations, SAO, and VICA I Q Y Sf 1 5 Q C A 5, y + 1 Q A .V j , ' V- 5 5, 8 s F CK Q, A - 4 ' : 1 4x.5'TfH:" f,.- .' ? is -1 , was .ML Bring on the pizza. Juniors Sonja Mahone and Lorei McGee enjoy a tasty treat at Amadeus Pizza Parlor during their trip to Washington D.C. with Close-Llp. 5,40 Front Row: Jennie Churchwell, Paul Dailey, Yolanda Beamon, Jodi Barnett, Deana Harger, Kimberly Patterson, and Misty Blaine. Back Row: Edwin MacDonald, Gregory Alcorn, Robin Sanders, Phillip Alexander, Lorei McGee, Tracy Cameron, and Sharon Fowlkes. fa Z Wf, ', ,.,, W . f 4 r if . Service to others was a popular theme during the school year. The Human Rela- tions Club, the Student Affairs Organization, and the Voca- tional lndustrial Clubs of America chapter all had service projects as a part of their pro- gram of work. SAO began the year by sponsoring the homecoming festivities. The group built class unity by spon- soring a "Powderpuff Football Game" and boosted school spirit with a Homecoming bon- fire. When asked why he en- joyed SAO, senior Harry Mur- phy replied, "SAO gave me a chance to meet new people -,guuv-2 who had a common interest in serving the school." VICA served its members' needs by providing oppor- tunities for involvement in ser- vice projects and competitive events. Two members, Tina " . . . people who had a common interest in serving the school." Price and Tammi Merringer went to Nationals. Human Relations Council had as its major purpose the foster- ing of better personal relation- alla 4 M' , , ,.- ships. The sale of Valentine's Day roses afforded students a chance to express their positive feelings towards one another and provided money for other projects. Three students, Timothy Baker, Sonja Mahone, and Lorei McGee, received funds from HRC to help defray the cost of their participation in Project Close Llp. As the local sponsor of the Governor's Task Force Against Drunk Driving, the Council held a poster contest. Realizing the importance of rewarding and encouraging good human relations, the HRC Working together at assembling the parts of an airplane wing in their avia- tion class are VICA members Mark Mahone and Robert Harris. VICA membership is open to all Career Center students. also presented certificates to students in each second hour class who demonstrated positive relationships. Serving others was not always a formal program of some organization. On May 25, a number of Tech students chose to become a part of the human chain which resulted from the Hands Across America project to raise money to feed America's hungry. ' Human Relations, SAO, and VICA 69 Reciting her oath of office, senior Jennifer Broyles is inducted as secretary of the 4th hour OEA chapter. Leona Flanigan, vice president, ad- ministers the oath. 70 DECA and OEA "l got a lot out of five days" was the way DECA member Paul Jones described his ex- perience at Atlanta, Georgia. DECA, sponsored by Mrs. Delsie Shoemaker, is made up of students from marketing, sales, and merchandising classes. Competitive events are held at the local, state, and na- tional levels. The same is true for OEA, which is made up of office occupations classes and sponsored by Ms. Cheryl McVay and Mrs. Virginia Jackson. This year both organizations had student win- ners reach the nationals. Paul .Jones competed in Atlanta, Georgia, for DECA, and Ann Hubbard, OEA, won a fourth place in Job Interview ll at Columbus, Ohio. Having an individual trophy winner at the national level is a first for Tech's OEA. Students were not the only ones who benefited from being involved with DECAXOEA. Mrs. Shoemaker was honored by the Indiana Association of DECA as the 1986 Outstanding DECA Adviser. DECA moved into Treadwell Hall from its original home on "I got a lot out of Eve days" the third floor of the Arsenal this year, and the problems of moving kept them from having time to open the Titan Shack as in previous years. quam OEA's biggest fund raiser was the annual candy-cane- gram sale at Christmas, which also served as a service project to the school. Through DECA- OEA, business students had the opportunity to develop leader- ship skills, receive state and na- tional recognition, better understand the free enterprise system, plan civic activities, participate in social activities, and become responsible citizens. Sponsor McVay said, "l think that OEA provides business students with mean- ingful professional and social experiences." Leona Flanigan attended the state and national conferences and thought this was the biggest responsibility she had, "because the other members of my chapter depended upon me." O Outstanding achievers, Paul Jones and Ann Hubbard, compare awards and share stories about their experiences at the national DECA and OEA conferences. 0814 Fourth Period Chapter. Front Row: Tonya Gorman, Vonda Davis, Ann Hub- bard, Angela Franklin, and Adviser Cheryl McVay. Row 2: Paula Wesley, Melody Llpton, Sandra Duncan, Kara Kaelin, and Lisa France. Row 3: Tammy Esteb, Robert Parker, Candice Humphrey, Kenny Moore, and Leona Flanigan. 08 14 T, 5 .ijt 4 fy. A Q -,-., -ji First Period Chapter. Front Row: Adviser Virginia Jackson, Kimberly Wester- field, Angela Wright, Leah McDuffie, Maria l. Camarena, Cathy Sluder, and Dawn Britt. Row 2: Adviser Cheryl McVay, Yolanda Beamon, Sharon Fowlkes, Marveda Tardy, Monica Hill, Tina Dixon, and Tonia Hurt. Back Row: Lisa Alspaugh, Della Maier, Shuron Belk, Rita Vasquez, Stephanie Wilbourn, and Gretchen Breheim. DSA' is-il' "il , --' C Z ,ub- J x Front Row: Tammy Bellamy, Kathie Carson, Ethel Sanders, Lisa Shea, and Deborah Anderson. Row 2: Shirlene Austin, Glenda Dean, Dolores DeIaRosa, Cheryl Logan, Annette Wilson, Bobbie Stokes, Sharon Beck, and Adviser Delsie Shoemaker. Row 3: Yvonda Griffin, Tammi Lightfoot, Kimberlee Cleveland. Carmen Woods, Tina Farmer, Kelly Williams, Lonna Childers, and Gloria Gonzales. Row 4: Laura Judkins, Jeff Stonebraker, Jesse Hicks, Paul Jones, Tony Sarver, Chester Northcross, William VanCleave, and Glen Canfield. DECA and OEA 71 3 " Doing double duty. Jeffrey Klinck helps out with sound effects while not on stage performing. .Q f' Veteran NFL actress, Cynthia Marsh, reads a letter delivered to her by Andrew Robertson setting the scene for the leads to appear. John Wallace, senior, pours out his soul to LaRobert Guy, sophomore, not know- ing LaRobert is taking a cat nap. 72 Spring Play Leads in the 'Matchmakerf Christopher Garcia, sophomore, and Deana Harger, senior, take a break during rehearsal to shoot the breeze. A . -3 -, we ' lull ff MJ If Rod Dulln discusses which props he will need with assistant director Judith McBride. Spring is usually considered a time for new beginnings. For the drama department this was certainly true. After years of presenting the school play in the fall, Tech broke from tradi- tion by producing this year's comedy, "The Matchmaker," in the spring. This Thornton Wilder masterpiece was the in- spiration for the blockbuster broadway musical "Hello Dol- ly." Tech's production was co- directed by Mary Maillard and Stanley Minks. "The Matchmaker" was quite an undertaking for a high school. The play is unusual in that it runs for four acts rather , , 1'pffaJ-vcg,rg11Mqvm?u NM. .W ' 1 4 4 fi: 5 . ' 513. , 1 ' gfjv. ' "UV . ff I I i f :V 7' than the standard three. The cast of seventeen was large and the style of the production was larger-than-life. The basic set encompassed the entire stage and required an equally large stage crew to complete four major set changes and to "lt was a funny play and l enjoyed taking part in it." create "special effects" which included the explosion of a number of tin cans of tomatoes. The actors also took on larger-than-life proportions as they brought to life Wilder's dynamic characters. Three per- formances allowed students to see the play during a school time matinee and the general public to take advantage of two weekend presentations. The combined efforts of the students and staff who devoted many hours to the production of this delightful comedy resulted in a fun filled and memorable performance. When asked what he felt about the play, John Wallace commented "lt was a funny play and I enjoyed being a part I o ' 0 An unamused Michael Gillespie is an- noyed by the attempts of John Wallace and his unsophisticated friends Lorei McGee, LaRobert Guy, and Ellen Taylor to act 'high class.' of it." Mary Maillard added, "I was really pleased with the per- formances. I felt the cast acted very professionally." The music and drama departments were pleased that the new schedule for the drama productions allowed for greater participation in the fall musical by seniors whose schedules are so overcrowded in the spring that they often could not become involved. Spring Play 73 -11 'Or-ange' you smart for selling the most oranges Elaine? Sponsor William McCreary verifies the count as treasurer Tina Folson totals the income from the sale of oranges. Elaine Spradlin was the top salesperson during the spring sales campaign. O ln years past, the purpose of class councils was to lead their class in activities, but this year leadership took on a new twist. As well as targeting on the class as a whole, each council also focused on its individual members and the development of their personal skills. Leader- ship training seemed to be the area of greatest need. Two councils which focused on this need were the junior and sophomore councils. Sponsored by Mr. McCreary, the junior council created numerous opportunities for its class members to strengthen their leadership abilities. One activity which really challenged the leadership skills of each junior was the junior class orange sale. Each member of the class was challenged to sell a certain number of oranges. Several students pushed themselves to their limit and D more than tripled their ex- pected sales. Top salesman for the December sale was David Suessg Elaine Spradlin was the super salesperson in the spring. The funds raised from the orange sale enabled the council to finance their Mothers' Tea and the Junior-Senior Prom. These activities also gave members of the class a chance to organize committees and "To be a leader you must also be willing to serve" plan the festivities of these events. This in turn gave several individuals a chance to try out their leadership skills. When asked how being in- volved helped develop her leadership skills, Jennifer Hon .Z replied, "Being an officer of the junior council has helped me understand the duties of a leader, and how to strengthen my own abilities." Many members were involved with leadership programs outside of school in Project Leadership, the Center for Leadership Development, Girls' State, Boys' State, and Business Op- portunity Lab. The sophomore council was also involved with leadership development. Co-sponsored by Ms. Beck and Ms. McMillan, the group focused on different activities. They participated in homecoming and had a St. Patrick's Day balloon-o-gram sale. Vice president Stacy Mc- Call commented, "Being on the council was a way to better serve my class and to be a leader you must also be willing to serve." ..-. .,t............ .. .1 ' -M -- Hffse- f Ik'-'E Rl- X.. 74 Sophomore and Junior Councils an--K iii 5. Sophomore Council President Amy Small shows a big smile after being crown- ed Queen of Queens at the last home basketball game. We are " 1. Junior male powderpuff football cheerleaders shout exuberantly after the junior girls win the game. 5 Zuma!! Y i . 5, m 5 D 'Syst Front Row: Melinda Lynch, Denise Morey, Janverca Stutts, Cynthia Johnson, and Hua Vang. Row 2: Kimberly Ramsey, Kim Royalty, Stacy McCall, Bonita Luncford. Andrew Robertson, and Kristin Hoch. Back Row: Yang Vang, Dawn Ferguson, Amy Small, Tracy Graham, Sherice Roberson, Erica Woods, and Fred Combs. Hanlon Enamel! iii - ,,Lf-Cl , fl Front Row: Kimberly Lewis, Jennifer Hon, Norma Aguilera, Tammy Alexander, Darlene Powell, and Tina Folson. Row 2: Rhonda Hess, Jennie Churchwell, Douglas Warren, Rachelle Sanders, Sheena Dukate, James Murkison, Elaine Spradlin. Row 3: Michelle VanCleave, Kimberly Patterson, Todd Chapman, Lisa Moore, Yolanda Beamon, Jodi Barnett, and Donna Miller. Back Row: Sonja Mahone, Lorei McGee, Aaron Jurgesmeyer, Shanell Crockett, Anthony MacLennan, David Suess, Tracy Cameron, and Tammy Faust. Sophomore and Junior Councils 75 6 TLB. Q Qffli-Z" Y' wi? ' ju, l fl ' v- pf: is Y v f Q 7 fx .. 51 fm . le: fa . X . ...Q ra 1 '13 flvxy ' " ' . ' ' 4 "ze ' 'QQ f e-- 1 Front Row: Angela Williams, Jeffrey Klinck, and Dietra Woods. Row 2: Celeste White and LaDonna Anderson. Row 3: LaDonna Thomas. ?f..M Fi-444 x X ,QV Q 'ga ,,. X . . , A X fi A ' 5 l X eil ' .. 1 ' ' ,, J t. -X L 1' X X-r X X 3 Ni X Qi Qigx sxxiliglm-QQ xg :W X ummm Q X W X-xx NDR XSXXR Y -.Xb X N: as X. , t - 1 X, .Q Q. Yiexvielzstxx X QSXNK Front Row: Shuron Belk, Remitha Stewart, Tamila Smith, Deana Harger, and Elizabeth Jones. Row 2: Paul Daily and Harry Murphy, Sponsor John Kanouse, Mark Easley, and Misty Blaine. Back Row: Paul Jones, Robin Sanders, Phillip Alexander, Steven O'Neal, Greg Alcorn, and Edwin MacDonald. 76 Freshman and Senior Councils 'i- W x Num! 'BW' wwf., 9 - X LaDonna Thomas, freshman council president, takes a break during half-time to entertain her cousin, Khyla Gray. LaDonna divides her time between cheerleading and leading her class. I 4 lt's an invader! Freshmen wonder what sophomore Ron Washington is doing in their freshman assembly. Someone has said that good things come in small packages. For the freshman and senior councils this statement rang true. Both councils had a very small enrollment, but that fact did not stop them from plann- ing and presenting many class activities. In an effort to improve com- munication, class spirit, and school spirit, a freshman coun- cil was formed. This was a novel concept for Tech and may explain why, even though the class was large, the response was small. Once formed, the Council was able to organize members of the class in time to enter a float in the Homecoming parade. The class also sold Hershey's kisses on Valentine's Day. Council member Celeste White remark- ed, "l think lack of participa- tion was the Freshman Coun- ' 614 677alevw cil's low point, but l still had fun being involved with the coun- cil." Co-sponsors Helen Moeller and Vickie Noel agreed that the class achieved a degree of organization and unity which "Good things come in small packages." should prove beneficial in its re- maining three years. The Senior Council also suf- fered from limited participa- tion, due in part to the fact that the class was the smallest in the recent history of the school. Despite limited human resources, the Council kept busy. The first project the Council tackled was to raise money to have the senior sec- tion ofthe yearbook in color for the first time ever. A sitting fee was charged seniors who had their pictures taken and the balance of the money was rais- ed through candy sales. The Council also initiated a change in the company used to provide commencement supplies. Jostens was chosen to replace Herff Jones. A third new pro- ject was participation in the in- augural Powderpuff Football Game. Council members also planned and carried out many traditional senior activities in- cluding the tug-of-war, homecoming float preparation, Sadie Hawkins Day, and the senior picnic at Eagle Creek Park. Concerning the senior picnic, Vice Principal Donald Oldham commented," I was impressed with the organiza- tion of the picnic. The seniors did a nice job." Freshman council member Allen Lang jokes with senior council presi- dent Deana Harger. Seniors often take incoming freshmen 'under their wing' to show them the ropes at Tech. i , ' 1 A , ,' Q 1 1 , --ft' ' - ,ttf ,..'i' U "f ' ,. l ' . N Tmgxj, 3.-,Q i T v nl! if.. X, ,XJ l . ft., f- 5, ...t xi.: - ,. A 'I-i,aa'SiL-..'kf,' '- .wi-x.-I ' t ' ' -' VK .".r f l HY' 9-on A . U .j ,3,.,.,hul,',gq?h,3 I s-Mick' I X ,nf f.'i'x:'Vf4?fnQj,':4i' it ig? jiyf' ,S ' f X lwi it. 1, ' V6 Yzvjy fY',5fw1,',f r' .43 'Ar - i, ri Q if sf 'ZiF"mfM"walM:3-131 iqjzii Jw 374- . .LH 55:Y5i."'Al?4: "Mg ', 1 12 ' 1 liS'W5 P9 , A T' ' V' ' A -If J: P 'za 3. T. an ., '- .H f, , if -: xi- ,.i1i?i7.".,'f'.i.'X'-ffif--iz"-.:.j'sr'-..L'ss'-'-'ff' ' 1 ig -Era it 3. -'ix f.i,"-9,14 :- . -.. ,. Y, Qsmkfuigifffrh xi.. .vxaq Y-v K4 Zrniqgwt N fl. f'l.q7,.IJy ll ..5'.,g+l"f:i mza4 xfgfsffk Guru P-,l."g'7 "" W ' a,,I"'h ' "' ' V- .A 5 ':- L -ri!! g .yqgzif-1y."', w f., :l,., C 4 ' 'Sims - :HI fqka' , ', ' v'4 ' gf oi gn I .f ' . U s ." " fi ' :r,m.'F P- " i fi " .f"f' if " . .- 2 ' .' I . . "A" - ....-.:Lilr'94:.L af Freshman and Senior Councils 77 , - J ff .,,,,,. M.Q.M,,fMwwff ,Bm ,U After winning the title of 'Mr. Sadie Hawkins', senior Brian Livingston kicks back and enjoys his stogie and his moonshine. vff fvli 'HJ 'vii' ' . f Student Life Division TUDE LIFE "You'd never guess what happened to me today in se- cond period. I fell asleep during the movie. The class said I was snoring real loud. I was so embarrassed." "Gosh, I can imagine! Speak- ing of movies, do you want to go see a movie and get a pizza afterwards with Greg, Tiffany, Susan and me?" "Can't. I have to work tonight." "Why don't you just call in sick"? "Sorry, it sounds fun, but when I got hired it became my duty to be there every time I'm scheduled to work. I enjoy the work and the money, too." All Techites were faced with responsibilities, some were small, but all were important. Students had an obligation to themselves and to their teachers to complete their school work. Holding a job was also an obligation many Techites accepted. While attending a home basketball game, freshman Jerome Valentine in- tently watches the game, wondering who will win. Choosing to work meant that a student would be very restricted in participating in co-, and extra-curricular ac- tivities since most of them re- quired attendance after school. Between school and work, many students had very little free time. What time they had was spent attending school- related sporting and cultural events, movies, dances, par- ties, and relaxing with family and friends. A new sense of maturity resulted from having to prioritize responsibilities. This maturity allowed them to face life with a New Attitude. After being recognized as basketball queens of their respective classes. in an election by the entire student body, the court nervously chats and awaits to see who will be crowned 'Queen of Queens' Allen Fisher escorts senior queen Tammi Poindexterg Kelly Crockett escorts junior queen Lisa Gilbertg Donald Mueller escorts sophomore queen Amy Small: and Dallas Dishman escorts freshman queen Stacey Rosales. The winner was Amy Small. - W 7422522446 Student Life Division 79 T-lm.- 80 Student Life 11- l A K. ik ,xx ,, 1 'li 'U xi, 5' Vg, .. I' . it 4, J mai-in A Look at 'fhe' Book As the final bell rang at 3:10 on Tuesday, September 24, the Fuji Film Blimp hovered in the air above the campus. Excite- ment was also in the air, as students hurried to the cafeteria for the party. They were met by alumni from the Class of '85 who were returning to claim their yearbooks. Although the lines at the distribution stations were long, no one seemed to mind. Graduates and current students carried on animated conversa- tions and listened to the 'jam' provided by DJ Tim Fuller, a '76 alumnus. Selected members of the faculty, along with retired English teacher Emmett Har- diman, distributed books thereby freeing the advisers and yearbook staff to resolve any problems. Members of the administration, notably first- year principal, Dr. Joesph McGeehan, and Deans Dorothy Stout and Fred Kelly, circulated among the crowd obviously en- joying a chance for informal en- counters with students and alumni. Many students, upon receiv- ing their books, immediately went to buy a protective cover for their annual. Others quickly joined their friends at tables where they eagerly flipped pages in search of their favorite section of the book. Comments of "cool", "is that me and "sign mine" were heard above the general chatter. The dance floor was nearly deserted as everyone poured over the yearbook. Then, even though this was the first dance of Q1 , -MIHKJ . I V U X t N-v-N A j I. .AA or party of the year, the beat ol! the music began to draw a fewq dancers to the dancefloorl Soon, most everyone was dan-' cing or watching others dancew The party ended much tool soon for most. The excitement of yearbook distribution con-l tinued all week, however, as students carried their books to class to show them off and tc: have them signed. A The value of a yearboolif became evident to one studenl who was overheard saying, "4 found myself rememberingl things that I forgot every happened." The 'High Tech' story ol' 1985 at Tech High encouragecf' students to approach the coml ing school year with a newl attitude. 3 l ww- ' .. , x A 'fs Nhunw A ' " . - """Q-we-.N-N, ,A r ,- t-It "aid Elaine Dodson and Lisa Shea appear pleas- ed as they share their first glimpse of the I985 Arsenal Cannon. Tech Alumnus Tim Fuller C761 checks out the action on the dance floor. A graduate of Franklin College, Fuller works as a profes- sional disc jockey on a part-time basis. " ' ' 7 ' M353 Xl ,..,.,..-Q-4"'3 ,ix"Sxifw, shlndeu lllilfllli and 'Mickey Dee' find that dancing takes a lot of concentra- tion as they show off a new dance called the 'Boogie Bear.' a lex' " Q U r Making sure the job is done right, senior Michael Williams oversees staff member Kenneth McGuire putting on a plastic cover to protect his new year- book. Meanwhile, senior Robert Lufcy drops everything else to look at his Cannon. F "vb Student Life 81 Misty Blaine and Harry Murphy parade around the gym during halftime in their Sadie Hawkins' Day costumes. , m 1""""M' Q Q 'Q' 2 ' l',,Q was Q, .fi , JF .JV ' , .. "" -If his s f fl ,,,,,6N ,,,, ,i 2 pf ' af M r in Newly elected Mister and Min Sadie Hawkins, Brian Livingston and Tammi Poindexter take their victory stroll around the court. .i-l- 82 Student Life 'nl .la 3 "ll f Zh :kata 'vw' L l v'4,' gi.. A , Referee Francis Knue tells junior Donna Branch that the first team to pull its opponents across the center-court line will be the winner. Stralning to gain control at the 'tug' are seniors: D'Ondra Coleman, Kevin Brown, Tammi Poindexter, Sharmin Davis, and Charles Simmons. Winning the 'tug' are juniors: William Bridges, Shannell Crockett, Harvey Lee, Gareth Hodges, Devin Warren, Jeffery Womble, and Charles Sides. D tw 9 y t,,:,. " 4 Tugging al Traditions Sadie Hawkins Day has been a Tech tradition for over a quarter of a century. lt is based upon the comic strip 'Lil Abner' in which a homely Sadie Hawkins tried to capture Lil Abner before the voluptuous Daisy Mae could snatch him. Originally, the day's festivities centered on a turnabout dance. Dressing in costumes similar to Lil Abner characters soon became popular. With the ad- vent of womens'lib, it was no longer necessary for girls to wait for a special occasion to ask a guy for a date. And, when the strip's creator Al Capp died, the day evolved into a simple 'dressdown' or costume day. The Class of 86, however, returned to the more traditional spirit of the day. Although there was no turnabout dance, there was an increase in the number of 'Lil Abner' type costumes. Another modified tradition is the juniorfsenior tug-of-war. The event originated as a com- petition between the six all- senior roll rooms. When senior roll rooms were disbanded in 1984, the class held an intra- class tug. Finding this format boring, the class of 1985 challenged the juniors - and the juniors won. When the two teams met at halftime of the Muncie Central basketball game on February 22, the defending champions were confident. Unfortunately, the teams were not well organized. Faced with several no-shows, the officials allowed each team to add volunteers. With the teams and the rules finally set, the teams moved in- to position. When the 'tug" command was given, the participants grit- ted their teeth in competitive resolve, muscles bulged as they were flexed to their maximumg feet dug into the gym floor, the rope snapped taut, and, the tug was on. Almost as quickly as it had begun, the tug was over. For the second straight year, the junior class was victorious. The scene was set for the next pull, as members of the Class of '87 team began to plan a strategy to allow them to be the first tug-of-war champions to successfully defend their title. Student Life 83 Todd Chapman and his mother are welcomed to the Mothers' Tea and presented with name tags and a rose by Lorei McGee and Tina Folson. Suited io School sponsored activities are both numerous and diverse. The most innovative activity initiated by any group this year was the Junior Class Mothers' Tea. The garden house in Butler Llniversity's Holcomb Botanical Gardens was the focal point for the social gathering which was set against the backdrop of the patio and garden areas. Members of the Tea Com- mittee created an elegant at- mosphere for the nearly 70 mothers who attended by decorating each table with live plants. The serving table was especially attractive with its silver tea service, crystal pun- chbowl, and lighted candelabra. Each mother was presented with a red rose. 84 Student Life a 'Te ' As the mothers and their children, along with members of the faculty, enjoyed light refreshments, they were serenaded by music from the Butler carillon which included 'The Tech Hymn', the school song, and other seldom heard Tech melodies. Later, members of the Tech String Ensemble assembled on the lawn to per- form a number of pieces from their repertoire. Pouring for the tea were Glenda Adams, wife of Superintendent James Adamsg Dr. Jane McGeehan, wife of Principal Joseph McGeehang Mrs. Sheila Suess, mother of junior David Suessg and, Vice Principal Medarda Pope. The date, Thursday, May 8, was carefully chosen to coin- cide with Mothers' Day which was celebrated on the following Sunday. Many of the mothers who at- tended the tea appeared touch- ed by the honor that was shown them by their sons and daughters. The planning committee for the tea even arranged to have a photographer present to cap- ture this special moment for the mothers and their offspring. The beautifully designed and well kept gardens, together with a picture-perfect spring' afternoon, created a gorgeous setting in which members of the junior class could express loving attitudes towards their mothers without feeling embarrassed. 1,4--no-...,,X wif! Presented with an infrequent opportunity to socialize with parents and students, Dr. McGeehan shares a light moment with the mother of Angela Hudson, Tina Folson, and her mother. Junior Janell Raney has Glenda Adams, wife of Superintendent James Adams, pour a cup of tea for her mother. Richard Noah performs with the Str- ing Ensemble in the lush surroundings of the Holcomb Botanical Gardens. S'-V x- J X51 1 Student Life 85 Surprised and jubilant, Robin Sanders and Dallas Dishman are spotlighted in the first dance following their coronation as Queen and King of the junior-senior prom. A lovely fountain forms the center- piece decoration for the prom. The evening, however, centered around couples like Tony MacLennan and Melissa Gilchrist who paused to model 'promwear , fu 5 'af , xp . f' me mfg W ff uv hi , 'W f 's 5 INV , A 1 or , .ew t . 'ff' Q fl 'Wind' ' x M 'mi' V ' 4 4 mr fg1,.Z'f xii, " A fi ' ' A my AW ' a ,, My N it 4 3334? , .. 'ii xp, F.: ' W t I ' , I , M' ,gy .i 2 kb ,S na' Av., Nw my - . if -fr -i-1'-"f- .4?1,' 1 ' 86 Student Llfe f l 'V Aw 'V . X. ty. ra -1.1.-il.-ii 4' 'mf F 3 4 X xr: Agri' z hx t A ftw M M A 'Prom'inent Memorg ln every student's life there is a prom. Whether one attends as a junior, a senior, or only wishes that he or she had at- tended, the prom is a signifi- cant experience. Held at the Columbia Club on May 23, this was easily the most elegant Tech prom in several years. A doorman greeted couples as they arrived and admitted them to the plush foyer where elevators whisked them to the tenth floor ballroom. Tickets, which served as a prom souvenir, were engraved in metal and made into keychains. Once inside the ballroom lob- by, couples could enjoy a breathtaking view of the Circleg they could order softdrinks at the refreshment bar, or, they could have a keepsake portrait taken by Tower Studio. The sophisticated at- mosphere of the ballroom was enhanced by a fountain sur- rounded by ferns and il- luminated by candlelight. Tables featured live plants and candles encased in clear glass globes. The band Malachi per- formed music which ranged from light rock to traditional waltzes. The couples' toes tap- ped in time to the faster tunes, however, most of the prom- goers chose to dance only to the slower numbers. A highlight of the evening was free trolley rides. Couples, who were assigned times for trolley rides, actively traded tickets in order to be able to ride with their friends. Signs on 1 . 5'- Happy promgoers fill the Titan Trolley for a ride through the downtown area. either side of the Union Station trolley proclaimed that for this evening it was the 'Titan Trolley.' Equally exciting was the selection of the prom queen and king. Senior Robin Sanders was chosen over classmates Marveda Tardy and Alison Pie- ty, while senior Dallas Dishman garnered more votes than juniors Aaron Jurgesmeyer and Billy Bridges. As the partygoers left for the evening, each couple was given a plant to keep as a memento. While some headed for home, others extended the evening by having a late dinner or taking a carriage ride. It seemed as though each person was indeed trying to keep the night,'Forever In My Heart.' Emerging from under the Columbia Club canopy, seniors Lisa Cutshaw and Tanya Gorman leave for a ride on the Titan Trolley. Student Life 87 Hard Work Pags Dividends Hard working members of the senior class have always anticipated three important events which recognize their accomplishments and their contributions to the school. At the April 22 Tech Legion assembly, 32 outstanding seniors received their coveted green and white Legion pins. Four of the recipients, Misty Blaine, Wanda Hubbard, Ken- neth Moore, and Alison Piety, then exchanged their plain legion bars for Captains bars which contain a single star. The highest awards, the bar with two stars, were awarded to Robin Sanders and Robert Ferry. The twin-star signifies the boy and the girl who have accumulated the most merit citations and confers upon the recipients the title of Co- Commanders of the Legion. Supreme Day, also known as Honor Day, was celebrated on May 22, the date on which the Supreme Court validated the agreement which transferred these grounds to IPS to be used for educational purposes. Although many of the scholar- ships, departmental awards, and other honors represent more significant economic rewards, the most sought after honors are the prestigious Prin- cipals' Awards. Two scholar- ships are presented in honor of each of the school's six former principals. Receiving the Prin- cipals' Awards were: Hanson H. Anderson Awards, Wanda Ann Hubbard and Edwin Mac- Donald, Howard L. Longshore Awards, Carla Streeval and Gregory Alcorn: C. L. McClin- tock Awards, Shuron Belk and Kenneth Mooreg DeWitt S. Morgan Awards, Misty Blaine and Mark Easleyg A. Ray Reed Awards, Mouna Carpenter and Phillip Alexanderg Milo H. Stuart Awards, Deana Harger and Harry Murphy. The final honors event was the Indianapolis Career Educa- tion Center's Vocational Cer- tificates Award Program held on May 28. Certificates were presented to 106 graduating seniors who had earned at least 15 credits in their chosen voca- tional area with a 5.0 grade point average or above. Several parents commented that the program was more impressive than any commencement they had attended in recent years. AS A B8 Student Life ' 4:1 S '15-3 3 : . J. elf. X' r 55,-V., .5 ,P -- X :x M y N "P: . e7.."1:::Q .. ,, :I- N 13' .5 ' - 1 .. Sf l X S' 255' als-.X " ' 3s X x 4855 :gases .3 lx-:f-st it X, ul- ,xgiiitj , "-Wit .Tl -Tx . . . , , .qev . , ,X i,iQ ,?5:-- fn ,- Valedlctorian Robin Sanders and Salutatorlan Ann Hubbard sit together at Supreme Day, May 2. Each girl received a faculty scholarship in recognition of her academic achievments. . Ni - X, ., X 1 V, E -W , ,eggs 53 ka 4 Q , . ' :X .- , ,.-:fart ref, ,V W The home economics formal dining room provides an appropriate setting for the Tech Legion tea honoring new Legionnaires and their parents. Tech Legion members are shown with the Captains and Co-commanders occupying the front row. 5 A 1 is i ii Ricky Zimmerman receives con- gratulations from Career Center Direc- tor Robert Stockard. Ricky received a vocational certificate in electronics dur- ing ceremonies at the ICEC awards program. Student Life 89 -1 Y '11 Acknowledging the help of his friends, Leon Gary has a congratulatory hug for Tammy Esteb and Lisa France. The 287 graduates of the Class of '86 com- prised the smallest group to receive diplomas at Tech in many years. . Nella Lewis proudly accepts congratulations from Principal Joseph McGeehan. ---i- 90 Student Life Misty Blaine and Shuron Belk look on as Phillip Alexander admires the 'sheep- skin' which he earned through four years of hard work. 1 l l 1 5 l A 'Grad'ual End "This is not the end. lt is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning." QWinston Churchilll And, so it was. On the even- ing of June 5, the notes of the Tech school song rang out from the carillon in Stuart Hall beckoning parents, friends, and graduates to the 72nd annual commencement exercises. At precisely 6:30 p.m., the con- cert band began to play 'Pomp and Circumstance'. Misty Blaine, who carried the class banner, led the 287 prospective graduates into the West Gym. As the banner became visible, S i the audience responded with ,loud and continuous applause. l The boys who were dressed in ,green caps S gowns and the I girls who were dressed in white caps 8 gowns broke into two lines as the procession moved to the south end of the floor. Parents and friends had an op- portunity to see their special senior as the class passed in review on its way to reserved seats arranged in a block-T for- mation. The lines met at the head of the 'T' and the graduates filed into their places. Once the class was in place, Reverend Nathaniel Hankerson, Jr. gave the invocation. Dr. McGeehan welcomed all of those present and introduced Mrs. Hazel Stewart, a member of the Board of Schoool Com- missioners. Mrs. Stewart gave the commencement address and presented diplomas. Among those who received diplomas was Remitha Stewart, the youngest of Mrs. Stewart's eleven children fnine of whom graduated from Techy. Remitha represented the class as she passed the symbolic torch of knowledge to Junior Class President Lorei McGee. Class Treasurer Gregory Alcorn announced that the class was presenting a cash gift to the school. Mark Easley gave the benediction. And, Class President Deana Harger led the graduates in the tassel ceremony. The graduates made it to the end of their beginning. They were prepared to accept their roles in the adult world and to begin yet another new phase in their lives. Student Life 91 ational American Tra ed S Nothing seemed amiss when the space shuttle Challenger thundered off the launching pad and thrust itself into a cold, clear Florida sky bearing its seven astronauts. The mission that was about to take place was carrying no 'average' crew, among the talented crew members was the first ordinary private citizen to fly in space, social studies teacher Christa McAuliffe. The other Challenger crew members were flight commander 'Dick' Scobeeg pilot Michael Smith, aerospace engineer Ellison Onizukag physicist Ronald Mclhlairg electrical engineer Gregory Jarvis, and electrical engineer Judith Resnik. After several delays due to weather, the shuttle Challenger began a picture perfect ascent. However, 73 seconds into its mission, after a seemingly smooth lift-off, the shuttle with its precious crew exploded into an American nightmare. After the stunned nation realized that the flight that was supposed to be a celebrated American victory had turned to tragedy, pained cries of "Oh, my God, No!" were uttered Official portrait of the Challenger crew. throughout the nation. Long after the wind had swept the last traces of the shuttle from the sky, the mis- sion clocks kept counting up the seconds since lift-off in hopes that the explosion was an illusion, unfortunately it was not. After three days of com- munal mourning, the President and Nancy Reagan joined in a memorial to the seven Challenger heroes. Parts of the shuttle and eventually the crew cabin containing the shuttle member's remains were recovered from their temporary morgue on the floor of the Atlantic ocean. Family members were finally able to lay their uncertanties to rest as they buried these new heroes-explorers of the 'last frontier'. There was disagreement as to whether a failure in o-rings caused the explosion of the hydrogen fuel tank. One point that everyone agreed upon, however, was that the Challenger explosion was the most shocking American tragedy since the assassination of President Kennedy. Shuttle with suspected flaw circled. The last McAuliffe family portrait. ini Mag ational U.S. Retaliates Against Lib a Terrorist attacks aimed at Americans increased rapidly during the end of 1985 and the beginning of 1986, causing America to retaliate against the suspected instigator, Libyan leader Muammar Kaddafi. In- Libyan leader Muammar Kaddafi disputable evidence that linked Kaddafi to the bombing of a West Berlin disco that killed an American soldier and wounded others proved to be the 'last straw.' Driven by years of terrorist attacks on Americans, Presi- dent Reagan lashed out at the world's most visible symbol of terror, Muammar Kaddafi, with howling warplanes and 2,000 pound, laser-guided bombs over Tripoli and Benghanzi. The raid, however, took Reagan far beyond where most of his allies were willing to go. Across Europe a new wave of anti- America demonstrators march- ed and chanted to protest his 'Rambo diplomacy'. French leaders refused outright to let Ll.S. planes fly over their territory. Bombing Libya did not cease the terrorist attacks either: Kaddafi was only one of the ter- The aftermath of a terrorist attack in rorists. Within days after the raid on Libya, a bomb was near- ly smuggled aboard an El Al flight in London. A U.S. Em- bassy employee in Sudan was critically wounded by a bullet in the head. Three hostages in Beirut were murderedg an American and two Britons, in reprisal towards Britian's cooperation with the raid. Despite the raids side ef- fects, President Reagan said, " . . . we have done what we had to do. If necessary, we shall do it again." Buoyed by growing European support for his tough line against Kaddafi, President Reagan made a 13-day Pacific journey to Tokyo for a seven nation 'economic summit.' This was the longest single trip of the Reagan presidency and 'terrorism' plainly dominated the summit's official agenda. West Berlin. fx -,-. I ,. I ' -- .,. Reborn eltdown 8: Fallout fi L .- "" vt' " -:-?vY2-fv4sst+ - : For nearly a hundred years, Although Russia tried to con- Llnion after it had polluted the iff? the Statue of Liberty had been ceal information about its skies over Norway and Sweden. V ,"' f-h' , , it 'U f Ame,-ica'5 most powerful Sym- nuclear disaster in late April, Emergency measures were j x -gig? 'A g """iM' bo' of freedom and hope. ln sources disclosed that it ex- taken in countries directly af- , " A' t order to restore and preserve perienced a major meltdown at fected by the meltdown. K ,j the monument, a nationwide its Chernobyl Reactor. . In the Ll.S., tests were done ww ra 1 , .X C H '- . .. The problem evolved into a to detect possible fallout from 1 j I ij campaign to Keep the Torch . . X ,tj 2 L, H be All f h 230 meltdown of the reactor core, the Soviet accident. J ' 3 'F . gan' 0 t e and while trying to deal with The radioactive cloud that I A million dollars needed for the the meltdown, a chemical ex- hovered over Europe could P K , D restoration Came fmm Pfwate plosion was touched off that have 'a silver lining' in the fact ,V if K donations. Miss Liberty was a ripped the reactor building that experts held out some N I in gift to America from the apart. A second meltdown ap- hope that in the aftermath of if f M Z- - French people, peared to have occurred also. what is now assumed to be the X., it if I ' t 'ii i '-"f-" - t Despite the exaggerated worst nuclear accident ever, 'X reports that thousands had Soviet policy toward the West 53 " . . Q , died, the Soviet government c o u l d g r o w m o r e is 5 ' C. eventually disclosed informa- accommodating. ' M A ' .- tion stating that two people had 9 M A i died and 197 were injured. W 1 'A Shifting Winds blew tbe A London protestor reacts to the - 5 fallout back towards the Soviet Cherngbyl accident- A f ,, , -,X , e ,ee ,ex , J 0 0 E M1111 Mag ""-"' ,I L Mini Mag 93 ' State IDS Hits Home Since 1981, two disabling epidemics have plagued America. One is the physical disease AIDS lAcquired Im- mune Deficiency Syndromej the other is the psychological malady fear. In the face of statistics which showed that over 17,000 Americans have contracted AIDS, killing over half of them, people have panicked in their concern about catching the deadly disease. Despite constant reassur- ances from the medical profes- sion that AIDS cannot be con- tracted through anything less than intimate physical contact, frightened citizens remained skeptical and scared. Treated as modern day Iepers, AIDS victims found themselves shunned by socie- ty. In Indiana, Ryan White, a 14-year old Kokomo resident, has been engaged in a legal bat- tle since December of 1984 to remain in school. A series of legal manuevers removed and then reinstated Ryan as a member of the student body of Western Middle School. When an apparently final decision was reached which allowed Ryan to attend school on a regular basis, a group of concerned parents pulled their own children out of Western to start an alternative, private school. One result of the negative treatment which AIDS victims like Ryan have received is that newly diagnosed victims are keeping the fact confidential. The backlash from the nearly hysterical response AIDS received is that many AIDS carriers are circulating among the very people who would ostracize them, safe from ridicule but suffering in silence, alone and afraid. Ryan and his sister horse around in the pool. Ryan during a press conference. Concorde Visits Indy On April 28, at approximate- ly 3 p.m., business people left their shops and offices to line streets, parking lots, and roof- tops. School children prepared for dismissal and left their buildings earlier than usual. Motorists listened to their car radios and drove with one eye on the road. Their other eye and those of the other curious onlookers were turned skyward to catch a glimpse of the super- sonic transport, Concorde. ini Mag 94 Mini Mag That evening more than 20,000 people sat through traf- fic in near grid-lock waiting pa- tiently to park and walk almost a mile to see the SST on its maiden, and perhaps only, visit to Indianapolis. In ceremonies at the airport, Lt. Governor John Mutz observed, "As of today, In- dianapolis is not a city people fly over, it's a city that people stop in to do business." . If I , I I ,-II I I II. II I Il: I I s II , , ' . ' 1' III-If: " The British Airways' Concorde flies on the Edge of Space. I I I I I I I I I State Hoosier Hysteria Having injected S2 million in- to the Indiana economy for motels, meals, transportation, soda pop, and plywood, the movie "Hoosiers" attempted to portray 'Hoosier Hysteria'. l.U. alumnus, Angelo Pizzo, Gene Hackman cast in the role of coach. Cougar Rocks l I l Indiana-born singer John Cougar Mellencamp rocked two sell-out crowds at Market Square Arena when he came home at Christmas. John Cougar got a powerful hometown welcome from the audience. While performing 'Everyone Needs a Hand to Hold Onto,' Mellencamp pulled an eager fan onstage to join him in singing. Unlike some performers, Mellencamp interacted with his friends and fans. Addressing the audience during the concert he said, "Whenever we play here we always feel more ner- vous, but we always want to play better here than we do anywhere else in the country." lt is from his hometown of Seymour that Mellencamp drew the experiences that he relayed through his songs. John C. Mellencamp at home in Seymour where he filmed his videos. Qwho wrote the screenplay for the movie "Breaking Away"J wrote the screenplay. It is bas- ed upon the story of underdog Milan High School winning the boys state basketball cham- pionship in l954. During the filming, Indiana residents had the opportunity to fill in as extras during the crowd scenes. Having Hoosiers star in the movie gave the movie authenticity and proved to be more rewarding than working with a lot of Hollywood actors. Writer Pizzo com- mented, "They fthe local ac- torsj are not adulterated by a lot of neuroses and a lot of the things that attract people to ac- ting in the first place." 'Real' Hoosiers playing the fictitious Hickory High team are: Front Row. Scott Summers, Wade Schenck, and Kent Poole. Back Row. Maris Valainis, David Neidorf, Brad Boyle, Brad Long, and Steve Hollar. 'Doc' Bowen One of the state's most popular governors, Dr. Otis R. Bowen, joined President Reagan's Cabinet as head of the Health and Human Ser- vices Department. Despite tough questioning during confirmation hearings, Bowen's nomination sailed through the Senate. ff' fi. Mini Mag Mini Ma 95 Local IPS Referendum Defeated Q r :mm Low voter turnout may have been the reason for the defeat of Indianapolis Public School's Referendum in December. Ac- cording to the Indianapolis Star's Computerized Election Service the final results of the count showed 9,351 votes 'for' and 22,424 votes 'against' the proposal to increase property taxes in the state's largest school system. Only 15.1 per- cent of the district's 210,000 eligible voters braved the sub- freezing temperatures to vote. The referendum was propos- ed because the IPS school system faced a S14 million shortfall when the school system lost temporary funding, often referred to as 'soft' money. According to "Info", the of- ficial publication of the superindendent's office: The decision not to support the referendum cannot be inter- preted totally as non-support of education. Citizens had never before had the opportunity to participate in a referendum, and there was a great deal of uncertainity and even misunderstanding about why the election was being held. It is always difficult to ask in- dividuals to vote themselves a School Closings In Board action taken on April 10 the IPS School Com- missioners voted swiftly to convert Crispus Attucks and John Marshall high schools to junior highs. The 4-3 vote to convert At- tucks was greeted by cries of racism from the school's sup- porters, when the board members voted along racial lines. The only black high school before desegregation, Attucks also had the smallest population 19223 of any high school in the IPS system. The 6-1 vote to close Mar- shall High School was met with silence. Few Marshall sup- porters attended the meeting because they believed that Arl- ington would be the eastside high school to become a junior high. "I'm shocked, surprised, hurt, and disappointed. The fact is they have closed the best high school in the system," bemoaned Marshall parent Marie C. Kaufman. It was true that in early October Mini Mag 96 Mini Mag federal officials presented John Marshall with a large, colorful flag with bold letters declaring that it had achieved "Ex- cellence in Education 1984-851' MarshaIl's Patriots did not suffer in silence. During school the students staged a walkout and went by bus, with police escort, to the IPS Education Center to talk to Dr. James Adams. Some of the students also' temporarily boycotted the Iowa Test which was being given that week. The decision by Dr. Adams and the Board to downgrade the schools to junior highs was part of a budget proposal to save 51.3 million and to provide better facilities. Visiting students from John Mar- shall, Crispus Attucks, and Arlington high schools find that Tech has an 'open door policy'. A contest was held to decorate classroom doors to welcome prospective transfer students in the most friendly and creative way. Rooms 114 and 151 tied for the award. ' tax increase. In our community, as in most urban centers, a ma- jority of the people do not have children of school age, and con- sequently, do not sense any im- mediate benefit to themselves. Further, urban centers reflect a high percentage of poverty and thus many citizens oppose any issue that adds to their financial burden. What is needed now is a refocusing on who we are, what we are about and where we must go in the future. All of us must renew our professional and personal commitments to this school district. IPS Superintendent James A. Adams and the Board sought the referendum. . 'rf 9' r,,.- ..,,,.n-wmv' QS l F owlkes APO LCCAL Union Station Re-opened . Union Station, located three blocks south of Monument Cir- cle and adjacent to the Conven- tion CenterfHoosier Dome complex, underwent a S50 million renovation to become a "festival marketpIace" multipurpose center. The 136 year old Union Station played a vital role in railway transporta- This modern logo captures the rebirth of the nation's first Union Sta- tlon into a "festival marketplace." tion until the late 70's. The complex that re-opened in April of 1986 included the Head House and connecting train sh- ed buildings which offered some 80 shops and restaurants. It also contained a museumplex, cinemas, street- side cafes, numerous nightclubs and a Holiday Inn hotel. Renovation of Union Station was a joint development of First Decision Gverruled Gertrude Baniszewski describes her gruesome crime to the Indiana Parole Board. Gertrude Baniszewski, a murderess convicted for brutal- ly slaying 16-year old former Tech student Sylvia Likens in October, 1965, was up for parole in September, 1985. The September 10 decision by the parole board to free her was thrown out by Marion Superior Court Judge Michael T. Dugan. Judge Dugan ruled that the secret vote violated the state's Open Door Law. In between the overruling and the second hearing, outrag- This memorial hangs in the lobby of the Girls Gym! Natatorium complex ed citizens and Sylvia's relatives began a protest. Demonstrations were held out- side the women's prison and petitions were signed. Department of Correction of- ficials testified that Ms. Baniszewski had rehabilitated herself "very quietly and without any fanfare." Despite the efforts made by the com- munity, Ms. Baniszewski was freed and assumed a new identity. atatorium Dedicated Physical education depart- ment head, Mr. James Leap, who succumbed to cancer in 1984 had the Tech natatorium dedicated in his memory on February 5 1986 Mr Leap served as department head at Tech for 11 years and was a driving force in having the West gymnasium remodeled and building a new facility which includes the pool Mr Leapswife Marilyn and daughters Beth and Staci at tended the dedication Former principal Mr Ray Reed made the presentation of the plaque Robert A. Borns' Management Corporation and James E. Dora's General Motels Corpora- tion. The Union Station renova- tion generated the additional restoration of existing struc- tures and the construction of new ones. The largest such project will be a multi-level parking garage and roof-top plaza which will connect the Hoosier Dome, Union Station and the Holiday Inn. O 1115 Tech art student, Tyrone Fowlkes designed the winning Christmas card entry in the an- nual lndianapolis Public School Christmas card contest. In ad- dition to first place, three other Tech art students were runners up. The students were Darrin Hubbard, Kenneth Nolan, and Paula Constant. .Yeas ns ret-hogs The official 1985 IPS Christmas card Mini Mag Mini Mac' 97 7 . . . , . 4 7 . . . . , 1 - . . . . . y . . ' 7 1 . . 4 . . ' ' i '. 1 I ' H. ' I" . . f. i " .' ' 'Z 1- : f'1'i 0 O - 'H -A il-- .i...a is -nr ,i 4-we -'r' ,N ,,,, 'fi W4 -:Q VN d X sn rf r...--M. While visiting Mrs. Gwen 0hmit's FORTRAN class, newly appointed principal, Dr. Joseph McGeehan, displays a friendly attitude as he shares a laugh with Kevin Thurman and Michael Williams. 1-l.i.. Techites Division 'tm I I 5 5, .. K -U- nv. 'T M. us , TECHITE "Hey, Marsha, whatcha doin' tonight?" "l'm gonna go to the game and then out for pizza with the gang. You know, Donnell, Barb, Liz, Kristen, Mike, and me. Wanna come along?" "Do you really think l'd fit in? l mean, I don't want to in- trude or anything. Besides, l've only been here for a few weeks." "Give me a break. No one is an intruder here. We don't care where you came from, it's who you are as a person that counts. Haven't you noticed that everyone here is 'different'? Since the students here aren't obsessed with 'fitting in', everyone fits in." Diversity has been the key to Tech unity. Economic diversity brought together students from lower income families and students from middle-, or upper-middle class families. An unseasonably warm January day provides sophomores Tim Foster and Tracy Graham a chance to enjoy sun- shine, music, a cuddly critter, and each other's company. Educational diversity allowed one person to study foreign language while another was learning building trades. Diverse personality traits per- mitted us to learn fsometimes the hard wayl to live with one another. Cultural and ethnic dif- ferences provided oppor- tunities to understand and ap- preciate a variety of heritages. Prejudice will always exist in any large social group, but with so much diversity among the student body, similarities were more important than dif- ferences. What one person lacked in some area was made up for by someone else who ex- celled in that area. External dif- ferences were still the root of problems on the campus, but acceptance of the individual and respect for each person's uniqueness signaled a belief that, "We've got a new attitude!" SAO president. Edwin MacDonald presents to the class of '87 represen- tatives, James Murkison, Douglas War- ren, and Angela White, the trophy for the winning float. The class of 1987 has defended its title for the third straight year. Techites Division 99 i E l I , f ., , 1 v V fn" 1 - , .. 11, ' 1 V ,,,,, ,, , -.,- I J, ,,,, f , f ,7 , g , 1 , 1. f deas Are Challenged 7 Wax . ', 14- M? ' M 1 A K ' 1 L X U' 4 -49' 1 , " 4 v, X Q34 -lv' Ni ,. M, 11 w 1 , 'Q 533 5' 'ETH' ,MH L1 ,,.f-'H' .Wm -W ' x A WW - 1 ,nu sv 10' -I wx- nz- ' yi sp I 19 , 1, X I U! -1 'K- M ,A 5 I W A Q ff i n I u 5 ' x 4 .5 W, . W W xv " v 1 nu Nfl ' ml' Mama! Y U.1.N.f x1 P W1 N rpg., XMMA-x .' 1- " - ' "' ps: 1' 1 l :1n,.:f -U. .zgglilal In . . U- ,, V Y :l'l'f X' ,x'l'xl el" "., -f, N 'X I ' X 1 ,' ,N - , W. A U A ' 1-.i'I. lc X N '1l,'.i x -3, xx f .A , I ,,' wx v N ' ' .4 1 U ,Aw ." 1 -- L Pllslw. N.: '.' E? '. v WI ' ' " ' X U. ,- nw lf, ' -H,'.Mi' .X N31 - fu 1 3 ., P tug" yggm, X , ,JUN 1' X V W 1 'lfxgii ' 1 .N 'x , If . H :, ., - X ll' X - --.X w'x5' 's 1' Al.- ,V ,X un., I 1: fa ' 1 tw wllffex' 'E' . ,.,,m4, gr J' ,. . . pd .,, - 1,13??ii,!'g,ff I, , f ,- , , - - Z' 2 Basemenv for the varsity cheerleading squad, Raymond Love, Kevin Brown, and Phillip Alexander display a new at- titude about male roles. Although the earliest cheerleaders were men, until recently cheerleading has been the domain of females. The use of basemen permitted a blending of their strength with the grace of the girls to allow for more complex pyramids and other formations. These seniors have chosen careers which also reflect their acceptance of work roles which may seem non-traditional to many. Phillip plans to become a fashion designer, Kevin hopes to play professional football, while Raymond is studying to become a chef. , ill ,. . ... . ' . ' Q H 'i 'wll ,Z , , . , . .. .1 , ' - 'I'f f, 'I 1, ,,' 1 .,If?1.T.iji3 -'ii SQWQPS 1 1 1 ' 'Toward College Change Gia Fw' tm' 'll' . . Brian Livingston, a four- year veteran of the pep band, proudly displays an Indiana University sweatshirt as he plays the tri-toms during the Howe basketball game. Strangely though, when Brian was asked about his goals he said, "l plan to attend Purdue University and play in the Pur- due marching band." Fewer than half of Tech's graduates go on to further for- mal education. But, for Brian and the many seniors who do decide to attend college, wrestl- ing with which college to attend remains difficult. Despite his wardrobe, it seems that Brian has finally made up his mind for sure - maybe. qua. N A -xii: 'Fe' l filo ,V ,. J, sffliilliiy 1 wr iff ji . Y 64,1-" 2, ' ' 2124 l . - l luv' li' i 591.3 W, .mi .--1: '34 51 l 1 2 T7 ' l E ll X :I 5' .2 .l.'l,v, il. 'dllxkf I I fllwl , , ' ' l 41 ., of -,. 3 ,IMI , xl, ,,....IQ ,, i.. --lv. .l.,. X i u lmmi .l ' l I l ull, 4-il. Illl .V-wl-' ll . im-- 1 11-if-11 , -'+i.1.H, 1 1 5" 4 1 .pl ,Xu Lf. ' ,- 1,t 1555. ' ,ae - MJ' 1' ' 1- " iff. 1 1 HVFLJ 1 ,, 'ul 29000411 - 115,343.1 Q. W 1, 1 15 1 , , 1 4 4-4-43,1 -cc.. nAM',,, ak. 'Gyn' -11' . F5 X y.- ' p?f',,- K X11 ' 1-1 A A V .J .rg 1-1-11-n Q W, 111. 1 1.5, 1 .,, 1. .M 1 1 '. 1 . wwjxwh '41, -1. 1 gl? Wi. :'ifBizilifY: T" 'Nfl' 1' 1 if' ,6f1..111 ,. 1-Min' M1 -r 1131 , - ,mf 1 M1412 -" ' f' 121 11 Q41 "g .Qi mfmqe-if -M4 11.1.1111'11 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 11 11 ' 7 1 I , 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 111 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 A 'H 1 1 11 1 V f V 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 ' 1 1 I 1 1 ff 1 1 I , . I i v W w . i x -E , H ,N gp I . , 1 -uw N' ldv' 7 - " , 1' ' A X 141-- z "N is D f -V 'syimgiy X ' -W: ' ' H' -vw, 'C V , i i I gin ,X-5, .v U . Q: L, N, V. 4 . Q . X ,durrl-H.,,W35,k.51lm asa, A , f. ,A C' - W . X .nu Q' tv' 4 - M... , ': mg: 4 M v - ..-"VJ , Iii. l A J ' fs., aa, YY:,.,1HJW:' L1 " 1, ' if A, 3,51 A ,AL - ,i ---4 it ll w L 'I 4,1 X N V , . X tr ,W A ' we-i WL, " . .qv A5 - .4 iiiiiff' 1 . , Q. 4 . o ' :ffl . 4' -T -A Nm 2 1 ,i1.:H , XZ l - AT.-..L. 3 t: ., , ilzfzizii ' ' :,.,V4.5Z, qw A ,X t ,. 'x K-MN.. . VA. g ' ,- ' ' 4 1',.. . K . ,L . , -, ,.. X L if fn" 2 . I X- ' K N N,-, R ' V, X :Tris .V - , l.'-Cliffi gpiliir . ..3 ,, . .,, A X . uk: '., 'IQ' " ' V -- . ,, -K -1- - .. ' :uq..i-'rv -' X' ' - " ... 'H H A ,V . ..... . '..,L-g,m. -.L ' A - . '7"yi5'::fX: 39:11 -iwmir X ff. ,gr ,J X gg 1' . 1 - T1'nx'Hi'iA'.,-1279 5. l 1. . 7 I-"".., XX XX 'X"' Q 1--,f-m.. -Q.:-- . X .. 31 1l11r'5lm...: 1. ::,. X 'q X XX X 'y5:.1,j:.,.r,.-V -, .gn X: U. 'my ,, 'Lal-,'..,..lZ' ,,"- - -Viwiitf :Vx , ,YA -- A 11, ,1u..-vtlz., ,sl K -gy -. I.-K, - X -. 1 . . A -, vu- 'L -4 w W- - 1 I .- -. . .2125 v.,.l- l. -N, - ii-.J .X1f- l ,,.g:g'-, ,Q wh X-' ' M x.-- , - 1 14, g -1,114 ur . , . ' 1-'Q . 112:,1:1:.tN ,..::,.X-M 2. 1" .'. -' - A - ,X ' V X - X X .--.-.,,,n. ..... 1. r. M- -,..g,.: . , 1 .1 , , 5--lily----, Q-, :I X w,! . . 1" 24 . in ' A u'gEE2.4::Y.H:' I I..'f H' .hy ':'3, I-L gy. Y EX' t ' ' -"5XH"f'i-X lm 'XXX HX X BDIOYTS-4 . 1 w LH -N f ' 3g.::5:.s- if 1,. .-- J -, -.... , M1515 ,.. ' 4 Q - yn ,-g::54,l:,,....q35f- I I V Q '11-M1 X , LfX"'LX'f,1 .f.-'ffl fax, XTTKAC ':S"f5'fQf, 'ig-K -" ,V 'J X," ' HWY-fiiii' X Xfzfgrfl 'TLZMQXIJ' ..'!f.XHX' IX fUXX" X .. .N X -'gylliwu urn K -1 44 1 1, .1 . . A ,, 4,,, - ' 1 ., .,,, , ., . .,., -.. . . , .N v,5.,.:,, A. .Nx. X-I .-.M ,. 1 . Y X i1.Af.e'1'Lil'l HHH -'vw :.,--1 -w :lv ' . ' A 1 ',.f...Qm.-., 5, . ,Env ' "IM-,,1l.,X ..,a: N -V, - X ' ,-'By IF Q X 'During one of their early class meetings, Rhonda Miles and Michelle Bryant examine a memory book. ln its efforts to be unique, the Class of '86 broke from the tradition of employing the Herff Jones company as the supplier for caps, gowns, an- nouncements and other com- mencement needs. Instead, Jostens, Inc. was selected to provide a full line of supplies to give a fresh look to the seventy-second annual gradua- tion ceremonies. An informal poll showed that the cost of these items ranks with the cost of senior pictures and the prom as the top three expenses of being a senior. If -gy, 3, me Eli xs 10 si 5 J 'ttiturdesAre A eless ' ': R' S Qf ., it ,,..g5fli, I V, 1-our sm fmw L? x I, QJ' EEF 54, I' jj' As she follows the action dur- ing the' homecoming football game, Lisa Cutshaw wears the official senior button. The but- ton bears the slogan, "Success .is our goal, ,our future's fixed, we're the Class of '86." Although it is not always fashionable to show pride in one's school, most Techites, and. especially those who become seniors and succeed in graduating, develop a pride for Tech as 'well as for their own accomplishments. Each class finds its own way of expressing its self-esteem, and yetthis attitude is a tradi- tional si gn of seniority and one which increases with time. - ,,1. i l i 5'- ii, I. 1.:' mn li . 3,.., 1gi..i g.I-lx1:If-. U' ' YHI1' IWC fro!! , U 'W 1, ', Q ,.:19L"", " k . 1 L j ' ,J ' ull' ,wi "1 1 , ,mg . ,A aw iv I' . . 1 A W , , ., , , V ,!, , V, 1 , f, Q,., , ReflectSMaturit X H . ,UI ,4,,, ' '-,-- X, .. - - X ' 4' N A ' ., ,,,. '1 gg ":,v LL 1" - ,H , v r- , ', -1-J, :z . -g, H '- 1 , A ,, pu ,fqxx . Q-. 3 , 1 . 'I'uf:3i.il" .Lit A '1 1 "l1'N. - '. gt! ii I 'Nl ,' '1:.l.!. xr.-.,l.w.,1-,f., NUM v,-1 3. , vu.,,...-,M... 4. -.,,,,,, , ,, --l1,'.L"'H" 'J :int-' "::-W' 'l V ' f,,v,.. ' 'T 1:..,H -, - ' X-Q if., ...,3: 4, 5. 1 , , ' Y 1 ,v vm, '.,- -,am g,,' .V ,,1 'N ,,, v -,,, 1 ' ,- w.- f, x lf!! . "w-,'f':H,,- '1 X' Xi " ,., 'Q-'I .lil 'V W ,ig ,Q LQ .1, P , X 1- , r-1. . m, ' , ,M X I .,',, x - .Vg , ' ,' ,. . 'V 'v.'1"?'1 fifkl V X- U , ' H ' .Z U ,Al ,1. , Y h ' 'LN 1 , .-m 1' ' 'z Y ' v X , . - 1, ,,, -',. ' ,:,I1'k'i!:" 5' PI' H, ' '- 2 Against the background of e the eampns, Phylesa Stutts models the "new" cap and gown chosen by the senior class. 1 1 r X ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 11il1' SThi11kB1 1 1 1 1 1. 1 11 X 1 11 with 1u1. 1-4.1 .- ' 4 "m11g111'f b f1 ' Q' 1 3 1 1 Q1 111, 'U' 1 ' ' ' 11. Q. . . Z fl' 1 1,1 . 1 - 5 I . V l '. ' , , A I -A ' Ffa I1 1 fn 1, 1 1 1, 1' lf if Jackie Easley's "Homecoming Mum" is real- ly part of the senior float. q 21 VA, -vm-1i, 1 11 sf- ,V 1 in 1 1113 AL W ,wa tan. I , A 11 ' V '11 11.1T, 1 ' 1 X1 1 ,Q 1 1 ,1 ,. 1 1 1 ' A 1 ' 1,12,1111 N 11, 1 -'11-121. 11 1 ' 1 'Wy '..-Y '1 111, ' 1 ' 1 1 :1.. -11 1-11111 1 I '1 ' -2111 1: 1 ' 5" 1 ,11,. A 1 , 1 ',..'1,:1 1 , , - 1 1 K. 1 1. l N11 11, , Semors.. -. 11 11 1, 1' 1141 1 :111:L'1'1'.11, 1, 1 ' 1 1, ' 1 "'11,A .. -. 11-11 1 21h 1.11f,1fj I 1 1 , ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 T 11 1 1 ' 1'U 11 21111111 113111 11 xx .11 1. 1 1 1. .M1-,U11 .1 ,1, 1' 11" 11.1 1111411 111 ' 1' '1 .'11 13.111-,111g1'-4111 11, 1 If "ff ,iv If '53 ,' Nw ff gm,- 7 'I -1150? , Shari Adams Norma Aguilera Kimberly Alvies Paul Arney ., .ml Deanna Asberry ,Q lj, iff? . Q ShirleneAustin i 1-3' ' """' i 3 Jala Bailey V K T ,., , , . 4 1 ' wt .. if H 5,1 Ml. . M :ez 1 I0 4 V 4 J A 0 ' -:Q 2 i . ,Sf We' e Got Spirit, Involvement the Key lf you feel like a junior, and you know you're a junior, say we are the best! YES! Throughout the school year numerous activities were planned to ig- nite the fuse of class involvement. Early in the fall of the year the junior girls par- ticipated in the junior-senior powder puff football game. This activity en- couraged the juniors to unite and work together as a team and win the powder puff game. ln the late fall an election was held to elect class officers. Sponsor, Mr. William McCreary, brought in an official voting machine and set it up in the Timothy Baker Terri Baldwin Bobbie Banks Raymond Banks Douglas Barger Jodi Barnett Steven Barton Donald Basham Adrian Battle Karon Beck Sharon Beck Angie Bell Tammy Bellamy Joseph Benson -t. . t ' x Kenneth Biddle Brian Billingsley Elizabeth Blakey Sharon Bolden Lanny Boles Michael Boling Barry Bostic Donna Branch Karen Bray Thomas Breazil Anita Bridgeman cafeteria. Out of 508 juniors who were eligible to vote, nearly 200 exercised their right. Winning the presidential spot was Lorei McGee. Other officers elected were: Jenny Hon, Vice-President: Tam- my Alexander and Yolanda Beamon, co-Secretariesg and Tina Folson, Treasurer. The officers got to speak with the entire class during one of the junior assemblies where they discussed class activities. Selling Sunkist oranges was the big- gest fund raiser the class undertook. This project raised Sl,O0O to help defray the cost of renting the Columbia Club for the junior-senior prom. Other is . .av . ,ts-.X ' vs t j an A was -it .si 2 N 'X 3 . T. 0 :'.:'-sv v'1C?'FN"':1, r' 1 it 1: 2 2' fsgst N tx .. .1 gffsew gig,--:Qi-lw i Q? si 'fm 3 S . Q f S ,Q ' F ix .ck l'X fund raisers were Balloon-a-grams for Valentine's Day and the sale of class T-shirts. Working together and getting involv- ed in class activities made this class assume a new attitude, one that states, "If you put us to the test, you will find we are the best." Class Officers: Front Row: Lorei McGee, Presi- dent: Yolanda Beamon, co-Secretary. Back Row: Jennifer Hon, Vice-President: Tammy Alexander, co-Secretary: and Tina Folson, Treasurer. XX , .. , ....,., N.. st i X59 t Q W -'dir off' 6 xt X if? X William Bridges Dawn Britt Dennis Brooks Carmen Brown LaTonia Brown Lauren Brown Otis Brown Mark Bryan Steven Bryan Noel Burch nil' ,,.,,,x3ly psf . w e M. it N if fs I' ,J - ig:--sw it - 1 J Q35 -t Q 51' .iff -.Q . . tt, . A W, 5 mt.: .,.,. , . ,Q fw- . . ,,,. A- iiv iii 9? Wet ' V. I 1 Y , v t. Q , t Hit ,mer in vm , , 4 K wqfmiff .- ' tliiibif, Tina Burke ...av Q 4 mr' fn xi I " 4 4' aw gl 15" Q .af r ik ,A : Agp, ff' 2 2, 31,12 71 ' K WWW? ,fc f ,, "RM 24 mf ' . . ' 0- , 3 A t 1 , ' ga 1 .t f 4 . s " ' - 51 M f I 5 AX 5 A ' fl . ' 2 fr as W Q a 5 'W , ,K W ' ' , -, ' hw pf" , B iff , 4 , , f. af 43 559925 2 ' I ff' WM W my 'W ' ,. f Q , , E We J-sv A 59'- l ,H ,Eta .. 1 e 1 ' f -S.. af 05 FW' 9 . , 4, ' . .J , s M ,l r 5fia '2i"f17'f- ' F ' f,r5,xga1 'Z' 2 , 2:-fi.-fig, as Agri Q" If x Kgs , QA -K Vg. H ll A ' -- V . 9, v 3 .. . is - a ,, is is Y t ' " f. l , is .ily t . -- . Q or -r 5 X ex-w' iw :E S ' " M ' , . , .1 1' .. ,. "C " fo- y . , P 3? is si 5 K l ' ,L . S, kt X JM X Na It x. XQV X , - -f , 2-2 ,gi :Qi A we X -was I A . 'L ,mfifmt ,X ,fi .f s,,,.,pl Albert Davis Joseph Davis Michael Davis Michael Davis Johnny Burl George Burns Melissa Burns Richard Burns Clifton Butler Maria I. Camarena Sandy Campos Melody Carnell Kimberly Carroll Ronald Carter Scott Carter Lorene Carver Alice Case Keith Chadwell Kenneth Chadwell Todd Chapman Donna Chastain John Chenoweth Jennie Churchwell Douglas Clark William Clark Lisa Claspell Brian Cline Russell Clubs Aaron Coats Scott Coleman Richard Collins Charles Corn Robert Courtney James Craft Kenneth Critchfield Shanell Crockett Tina Curren David Dalton Robert Daniel Gloria Davie f V D ff' ' A :A 'ij X , m y if' Q :gf gn ,.g. W, Y as E -J a, ,.. 1 , ,. a .W - ,- YI X' ' bd '5""' -. ll Q Q f' 'A' .1 l r l "'x -Tr Nathan Dawson Joseph DeBruIer Lucinda DeLoach Stanley Dennison Cheryl DeViese Tammy Dickinson Joseph Didion Terri Dull Tracy Dixon Leslie Dodson William Dotson Sheena Dukate Thomas Dullen Johnny Dunn Jennifer Durbin William Dwyer Darin Eaton George Edmonds Byron Elliott Jannean Elliott Raymond Emerson Scheryl Emerson Tonya Enoch Deanne Euliss Curtis Evans Tammy Evans Timothy Evans James Fahrenkamp Tammy Faust Charles Ferguson William Ferguson Camea Fields Mary Flinchum L. C. Franklin Marquise Freeman Steven Frost Nevin Gamble Sandra Gholson Lisa Gilbert Joseph Gilliam Wayne Gilmore Dyan Glaze James Glover Crystal Grady Tracy Graham Lenora Grever Steven Griffin Yonna Grimmitt Amy Grimsley Randy Hamilton Craig Handy Erica Harlin Clyde Harrell Rhonda Harrison Robert Hart Letha Hartley Letha Hartley Stephen Hartwell ,Nt f if fn Q, 31' .-nh gr- ' , I 1 ,, 4,-v J, 5 u ffgv 1 .T ,M ag. 4, t 4252! A ' 2 JH-a-'gli Q 1' 4 'iff - lf 41 0 wx 2 P, Q 4 X' 1 1 'U O A ' if .. ws Y , 'rm -4,-f 4,5 .f-4 . -1-f1,..g,, " 4 ii' ff 1 z f 1 ' 'Z' 0 "" ef fr:- :lil 1 2 f 1 ,1 I ., w , ,f .iff ' 1 - ' 152 ' .D TI A , A , , ,. 7 V ,Y , K , ,U Vuqk I in , 'tg .v 2 ' Q -1' fr ' fr if I ' 5 ' sv ' ' -F' ff 2' 15237 1 Eg ,Epi fp N4 ,ienaxr hz' fr rw , ,A 0 G., - ,, '1.,. ,.f 4 mn , . V- vs E In 3 Lk 'f 15 rf af 4 fir F K 5' ff, -V Q Q X , ' f J af :L m ,11- 6 1" -,J . ,, , i " V3 fki iwitifi N, ' U- Q iii: , My - 22' A .' ' ' W' ,. n . , Y V 4,7 1 2' 9 7 7 Y ws -A: ,V 'vw ,, "'?' a . -. -, fig -VT ' ,- . Q i 5 L .f ,g ws XA , . f 4- ff. T. . A N 2 we x , Q ? Oi- ""'Q,Qj-C Q, , nw 1' ,e Q ' 4 Q51 1,52 ev mf fa r, 2 , . C 5 5 1, fa ! Q , I ,. .. 'ffv 1 ' 1' 31 ,,. Wy, it li, a if 'Saab Haskins :. ' 4 . Lg, , .W -viz, . I g i.: EUC Hayes ,, H Frankie Heath uf Cheryl Helms .i " ' ' f ar " " hp Sharon Henley W .,, 2, ff" - , Rhonda Hess ,W 1 4 V X .XJ N if X I """ - :lf fm 1' L, X, 43 jf--21f-......., is fr- ..."?'--.., 'M'--1 - fi- N X l -uv K. 'Nix V xx? . , - X ie , 1, sf: . , .0 Z.. fi ,ity X ,:,z6'X' :-E25-tis" V. I" . r"7 X t we xi At Q SSR i 1, 4. , ., ' J, l ww Ji, Q- xfbit ' xx W X A 'Q Bt Raleigh Hibbard Jesse Hicks Monica Hill Teresa Hite Ryan Hobbs William Hobbs Gareth Hodges James Holiday Regina House Angela Hudson Lasandra Hughes Jocelyn Humphrey Larry Hutson Don Ireland John Jajuga Mark Jamerson Shona Jefferson Diana Jennings David Johnson Denise Johnson Earl Johnson Kathleen Johnson Terry Johnson Robert Jones Super Sponsor The class of l987's sponsor, Mr. William McCreary, stands out because of his innovation, dedication, and expectation. Under his guidance, the class has undertaken the sale of balloon-o-grams, oranges, and class sweatshirts. ln conduc- ting the class elections he ar- ranged for the use of real voting Joining the troops, Mr. McCreary helps David Queen, Rita Vasquez, Todd Chapman, and Kathleen Johnson as they prepare balloon-o-grams. machines. He has encouraged the founding of the mothers' tea and a more elegant prom. Always the last to leave and often providing rides for class workers, Mr. McCreary spends much of his own time and money providing informal ac- tivities and guidance for class members. The class of i987 has excell- ed for a variety of reasons. Chief among them is that "Mr. Mac" has worked to instill In the class a desire to excel. Many members of the class have learned to expect more of themselves - and to achieve those goals. Most importantly, though, Mr. McCreary has carried out his role with kindness and com- passion, living by his favorite quotation, "An act of kindness, no matter how small, is never wasted." Wendy Jones Kimberly Jordan N1 Laura Judkins Aaron Jurgesmeyer Bobbie Kavanaugh Teresa Kelsey Darla Kemper if Dean King Teresa King Tina Knoll W ZWMW f 1 yi f ,.:'i?ff.'s1 1 '. Kevin Knowles John Kroeger James Kuhlmeyer Donald LaFollette Lee Lawson Joseph Lee Alisha Lewis Kimberly Lewis Donald Lippard Cedric Lloyd Dennis Lloyd Kelly Love Timothy Lutes Tina Lynch Anthony MacLennan Latricia Magee David Mahone Sonja Mahone John Marks Christopher Martin Frank Maurer Sandra McCombs Kelli McDaniel Danyl McDivitt Latonda McDuffie Marsha McKenney Michael McKinney Jenny McMillin John Mehringer Michael Mencer Dane Mercer Laura Merritt Kimberly Meyers Teresa Mickens Denita Middlebrooks Kurt Miedema Donna Miller Sherman Minor Michele Mitchell Shellnal Montgomery Ladana Moore Lisa Moore Phillip Moore Reginald Moore Shawn Moore Torina Moore Mitchell Morris Rita Motley I A . , aff' ' -fi 'f'if"f nf ' , I- M 1' if f -,,:q'::A.:' v , , '25 ,Af ' T 5, ii ,?, I was ,- fy ,- 'Z JH ,' :Lf f 4"f , ,, ,I .:,,,, tJ:..S,:,.,., ,. ,v , 1' ff , -: ,..,f W, , ,Lf V , f r 4' ,fl 4 ,V gif' 'UO' , ,Q f r vs ' 127 1 I 71' V' , N 2 1 1 f 4 , 4 , ,, , rn . f Q f , X ,W 4 y 4 s 1 X 72 5 1 I wfgfufbg I ,, . ,i ,, wx, ff 1 4 V A , 1 I ! 34 ' 1 4 F .. ff 3 ' , gp 5 f We ,fi X . f I .. f I if , xx , us, 42. V. . 1 V ? f : 4 is , r ' j ' X' . D-a.,,.. a """"'wwwf..,, 1.1-M9 ig,-0 'NG3' et A ,af 5 at . - 'gi " ST Y 9 . ' Q . A , ' . -. 6 I , W' "1 ' .,'-1' 3' k-25: ' ' L V7 . - -'Wil ' T ' ' M We ,EZ , 4, , 15.5 ' 'fl M, 4 "'. , Z, q , , . . 'M 4 ,, , A , ..., , 'Q ' 1 V 2 ty. V, gl 'Iii' .,: 24 ,IQ gg 'V I- 1 . "fi" ' 1 ' V, -. 3 . - L rj ' ,. I l .u . Q Ll. 5,2,3g,' ' - ' z YM, dll, 'lf Q ' 9 .gflwjf 1 A f f .L : f' .-f -" 1. X , if-"fr T2 2 - f - T 1- f ' ' - I' 1' A ,N D m a y . .,! , . R, : ' ' ' 53 . .. 5 , ,.,.. - 4, f R , 6' v ' ' V ' 1 . A -, tb f i ' ,A . 1? l 3 ' V . V l .- 1 it L I D l - f - ,4.+-. f 1 if ,,, , K, . rw Q -zz ,rr-,,-, fe- - -,W :A-, . , '- ' 314524 ' Y f' ' ' '- ' .33 ..A .' - ,M gg: M , H if N r 1' ., f f ,fe f 1 ' ,M - ' 4 V f , ,ia z a . , iv V 'f ' AT A J i ' W ' as 11 s if Digg -f I , an v 71 -'vs V .rl , i V, . -J' r 1 -in . ' A ' f J! ' . -f . ' " ' . " ' ' , ,if 11,42 ,fir 'bf . - gif' 9. X Z A f 1 1- i 1 1' i ,, g f I , y V ' 9' ,' ,, f W ,Ja wa f X ' Lf ' ' ' , H 1 1 1 f' f is .- Q Q L , fl VY. 'Mi 4 ' f 11, A , M35 , 4 ' -233, "Eff vgfgf' r 7 - , . 3 ,f 5, ' , H B , . A D M A, I ,vu 5 3 . A. V, ., t, ng, ' ., . . lil .V f W- pg ,Q ' , "' as , A - H 1 , I ,, O 'II' I 'fi' . . ,fd : I W -- e .4 , 2,1 ,XJ L f 'fi' V L. . "A 'M f'7 ' , V H f ,H ,, f , W 1' '97 , Q M .. . ' . .,, , -v - ,-1 ,, i, ,,.'.v6,w, ,r 1 l ,. 1 ., fy. . J' l?l ' V ' t-lr?-li - . I Nw vt., 5 X lip "I Wanna Rock!" From the early days of rock 8 roll to today's punk rock bands, young boys have dream- ed of being rock stars. Don Basham was no exception. Don's interest in the guitar began when he was nine years old. "My older brothers and I, along with a good friend, had dreams of being in a band. We wanted to be rock stars. l originally wanted to play the A relaxed Don Basham gives his fingers a rest. ,M - Q' ,, Yr 'mf' 73 f 'VP X W 1 f 2 f 2 M We 4, 4 f f 55.1 ,.,. IZ I ff ff , f fx 4 m 1 , ,, X , f sf 7' f . fx CTL" drums, but my brothers talked me into choosing the guitar instead." At the age of ll, Don started taking lessons. "The first song l learned was 'Tequila Sunrise' by the Eagles. After that, l real- ly got into music. l love it to death." Don formed the TMS Band which was a hit among Tech students when it performed in the l984 talent show. During his junior year, Don Tyrone Motley Melissa Muncy James Murkison Bert Murphy Kathy Musgrove Kristopher Musgrove Darren Neely has taken time to develop his music skills and his personal style by enrolling in a music theory class with Mr. Prather. He stated, "Not only have l learned more about music, but l've learned what it really means to think." When quizzed about his career plans, Don replied, "Whatever l decide to go into, music will definitely be a part of it." Vlsvlzl Hung Nguyen 1 William Norman ',,.A James Oliver ,,, fl " gf, Douglas Osborne Sean Oskins l 1 f, f K 'th 4 1 4 , 'A 2-.WW 'af - Y, .- . ,,,.,, . Qi, 5 1 J' f 5' f 1 '3 'll 2,1 , " 3 4 ff f 1 593 Z, -ga g . y Kimberly Patterson Angela Perry Lucille Perry Rhonda Perry Joyce Phelps David Phillips Aimee Piland Kim Poindexter Erik Poventud ..-- te -...- 1 Darlene Powell William Powell Brent Purvis H Barbara Ramsey Scott Ramsey " " Janell Raney -I Donald Ray 3 Kelly Raymer 'Q 'af' .,.. My 4 Q if il by 1 3 Q -U M 1 r ' ' , ,Aw 1 -' XA 3'-: Ln, V J, 2 I ,m'w:M, 1, 1. J'2t v',,g,.., ' 5 55353, . i " 4,1 Kp . ff A-J ww: ' 0 , ' '1 il ' xi l 3 'lf Gilbert Reid . Frank Rhodes Daniel Roberts Eric Robertson Tracey Robins Elnora Robinson Richard Robinson Daniel Rosales John Rouse Traci Russell Kimberly Sampson Samuel Sanchez Christopher Sanders Brian Sandlin Lester Sandlin Tony Sarver Traci Sarver Charles Sayers Steven Scholl Michelle Scott Mike Scott . . f 'V ' 'T 1 ,V V .yf " ' Q ,rv f , ? , riff , . A f. qw, . , Shawn Scott 1 Dwayne semen " . , 2 we ffi, Charles Sides . t '11 -:i f l . Charles Simmons , 91 , gy M 51,1 3 Q A Ann Simms Ronald Simpkins K V' 1 Carrie Sims ' V- K I , Kevin Sims A ' Michael Skiles ,.-2 ilff A James Smallwood ,, . 1 . -4, .,... ' " ' ,. , ,,,, If 21.2 71 5 Q: "'n ' 'W ,J ' Beverly Smiley Angela Smith Denzil Smith .0 1 f f 1 1 ff 1 I 44 fgfkfyrf 4?2 ffl!-' -rv 1 Randall Small i ff ' if gf 1 2 .J 1369 Kevin A. Smith Mary Smith Michelle Smith Reginald Smith Robert Smith Sheri Smith Walter Smith .,,, .L ' 3g . . .,, , .A ggi inn? l , .au .,-.f 3, Q 1 1 f j if f , . ff ., , ,f 1 fZ fy , f I f wwf ,,,,.W-, . ti I 1 f , ft 2 '45 2 , 1 f f 4 1 42 fi 5 Where Are The juniors There were 420 juniors in March of l986, which is a decrease of 296 students from the 716 who entered Tech as freshmen in the fall of l983. When asked about this 4095 "drop out" rate, Guidance Director Kenneth Bayless said, "Some of these students transferred to other IPS high schools, some transferred to schools outside of IPS, and some will graduate with the class of l986." Mary Spangler Jewel Spearman Randy Spillane Tonya Spivey Elaine Spradlin Kevin Spurr Marcus Stennis Q8 Juniors Only about 157, of the miss- ing juniors actually qualified as "dropouts." They left school for various reasons. Chief among these was to get a job. Fast, easy money Cusually to buy a carb seemed more impor- tant than finishing school. Teenage pregnancies ac- counted for some students dropping out, at least tem- porarily. Marion County had more than twice the national average of teenage pregnancies in l985.. Other students simply became discouraged. Some entered high school with weak academic backgrounds and had parents who did not value a high school education. These students often decided to take the easy way out and quit. An empty chair is evidence of the decline in the number of members in the junior class. Mary Pond, who formerly occupied this seat, moved to Florida. Her absence not only reduces the number of class members, it diminishes the personality of the class. 'we :sv , ..-f 3 ,sir 'K . ' -r . - - 1 - . ' ' 'f ' ', 1y1,W'.,f- j- :' 1, 'L ,rr-1 t 1 '.,,1'1i, .1'N1' '7 ,r Til : 'T 'E " '. it 1. " f - ' Met.. g igj H " . ' ' ' j-. , - X .. ni.. '. -r .. F , 4 Y .' 1" - ' zgwwvl ,-'.L ,,-. . ', Q1 Q, - - ' ' .' . .,,ll4jij5jy.:f,.j'1. ,jx - ,m-I ,I :. r . ' V K - 1 , ,- :-.siwtt .,:-- .. , ' ' 4 A1 .- . Y. , , .t . , - -fwiw ' .. . gl ' p . ' -T' . A . l 1 I G' 1 fv- X sf,Q .A- fm 2 v lv, --..., ... -4 . .x.,.,,,... -rx .. Q.. 5 'x ..1 1 " ,. .. ...vi S.. 4' if '?" rf . . . .B , ,. .1 X.. !.,. A V .JI-Uv." I -1 ff. ...',.v . -.ML " YL ' a ,1',' ' V ' M i.,.S1 4': 1 . ..z -' " 1 5 -:in 1-. Q x-- g,,.,,,,.., A i i.gjj"1i1'.f.-- v--I ' .'1f..,l "'v ' ' " A XM.. af , . -,W,,, -'.-- . ww., , ': , -I , , '3- ' y 1" , 1 v ,yy 2 . .',' .1 . 1"?'i-Z'47'1,1 ' 4.-QL., gsm. 1,- -Ewi w . .- ,H 1:2-5l2f',g'f': ' Y- . vm., av., - .-js: 3 gr- '?'. , .. wi . . .-' .A 1 rg . ff. , , . 'xy .1 'I'71f. vi: 1.2 .t. a, .:"'v'.'f.'--'- 5 "1 "1:'T.fx:q??2 ' 1' 311 , - 1. , ., 2, I . . . .. .: H.-.7.. ...- 'Z-".ff.:4:':1. if vj.','H:.'5:5,v-'.15'.,-V .1 vi.: w- : ' ' QQ...-:,,. -. . .Z -'-.1-11 4 . , f .'s 4 . .. gi ing-is-.gi .p- -'ff1f, -' 4 ' Il-.'.E1'3'1f2" , . I I 11, '45 !1:.j.Ag . ... . 2 f..'- . ..... .-.. , -..,' 1. .Q-' ,...,-'wa-iz.. X 'i "'f"a:.1' ' '.f' 1 .,'1gw31g"5:f2 - ... ,,4. .f .- , 1: z T, Y: f-- ' 'J v. , , 4, -4 I 2.2 HQ .NV ' 5- . V.. . .1 ,, ,,, . W V. .:, A 51 -' m4 .J 5 5.4 'V 5 I., .... - -. ,1 ,R Mig I- ' L. H.. - 4 ' ' .4 ,-.ff . 1.- ' M 5.-5. A.. tu. lzyf- ,N I P ' n ft , Vf- K " 4. 1' ' 'f.'..4 '. ' 91.7 -3.7551 IM... .v li .,'!-,U .- ', .fvl . fx, .Q. -.1 ff 1 - Ji .A ' U, . .. .. 1 umofs 11 . . f 1' ft im' 1 .5 V lx GNL' . 1. 'if' ,l:."'--7.1. 1: z. 1, , 1 . 'og .. : ...-.. . -. 11:1 1 - 1, 2.-..1,.. , . . Lori Abbott David Adams Mechial Adams Paulette Akbar James Alexander Eric Alford Jeff Allen 4'-p-4.-. A .1 ., 4,-.',,f' '88 is Great "'88 is fine, devastating your mind," so said the motto of the 511 members of the Sophomore class. A sophomore council, comprised of 20 interested students was formed in December to organize class activities under the leadership of President Amy Small. Sponsors, Ms. Karen Beck and Ms. Ann McMillan, assisted the council in planning numerous ac- tivities. President Small said that she "was trying to arouse more spirit in our class and get Mark Allen Lisa Alspaugh Yanez Alvies Adrienne Anderson Johnny Anderson Kecia Anderson Missy Anderson Alexander Apostolakis James Armstrong Paula Asher more sophomores involved in our activities." The council was frustrated by circumstances which prevented them from carrying out several projects. But the "luck of the Irish" was with the class in its most suc- cessful project, the selling of green lollipops and green 6 white balloons on St. Patrick's Day. Sophomore Officers Amy Small, President: Stacy McCall, Vice Presidentg Sheila Johnson, Secretaryg and Donald Kaufman, Treasurer. 54 aff 'GM 42 Peggy Asher V4 V, ' Brian Atwell :,, . - f ' 4. 7k . - f Ann Bacon I X Dung Banh ,E . A Hanh Banh 3512? Charles Banks J Robert Barger D, ' Angela Barker :'. James Barton A LaTonya Barton 5 , 5. . - 2: 45 ' 7 Z W f tf Q 1' 1 V It ff' i ! gif " 4 Kimberly Beauchamp Sherri Beck Marva Bell Georgette Bellamy Peggy Bellamy David Bertrand Latanya Billups Jeffery Black 4 ix' V Linda Black Shetlanda Blanche Christine Bolden Diane Bolden Althea Bond Diann Boughner Tanya Bowie if ,fi-Q Q . L' fwfr! .:2fj,E.1fj1'.,f4f of if ' : . if iii' yy Q , if Qiiftzzw D 5-it-f W " PSE-,zf .5 , 4 I 2...--1, -iii ' 4,22 X .1 Q 1 ,,,,,,-an , 1 . ,r ,. ,v, 3 , 'mf ' ,.,t,f,i- f ,J -'fl 5 uf-iw 9 159, 32 ' A ,l 4 , 1979 : '43 f " ifk - f ' W , fi li 72 'fr ' , if , " I ,'-. ,7 1 1 ,f 6 '5 if ., 1 ' . ' ' .. I . , 1 -" 4 V P f 1 I K E2 534' - ' -, If l if f L, W' Z, . at f ff ' 'yi' f 5 ? , Q , , M C X, . ., ,, ly 2. X fri' , 'ji ' 1 if 'iz -. 4-ev F 02 , I ' M ff? f, 3 4 riff' ,, , . ,. if , 4 X ,W E ,., , X K f f f , J X 5 , .Af ' E, '4 .Tiff :Af ""' . I pf W 1, 1 affitzs Q ,. , n 42... .:f, ,: 1- -els, . 1 3,352 ' V ...H ' JMD- " f 2, f f .nf . -1 f , :WU -' -M, V i-F311 , X ' . . ,. " 'X -fs f ' 1 fe , , ff? . 1- Ag' 5 HC' - f ' P f .A ' - , ff. ' ff? f 74 : , I f, X ' 7 , 1,5 1 f Ay fr I lA t X f fi W' iz . G 3 f I Beverly Bowman Tony Bowman Michelle Boyd Rhonda Brand William Bray Danny Brewer Nicole Brewer Tammy Brewer Michelle Bridwell Allison Brinkley Katherine Brock Walter Brooks Diana Browder Darrell Brown James Brown Mark Brown Ruth Brown Traci Brown Glenn Bundy Shannon Burke Anthony Burns Renee Burns Robert Butler Maria L. Camarena Larry Carhee Kathie Carson Jackie Carter Lloyd Carter Susan Carter David Chapman Peppi Chapman Lisa Charles Anthony Christy Lori Clark Tracie Clark Shelly Clayton Chris Coffman Gerald Collins Michelle Collins Fred Combs James Combs Bernita Compton James Compton Rodney Connengham Paula Constant Melissia Copas Margie Copeland Warren Cornett Larry Corrie '22-10 if mnfvai Dustin Cox Sean Craig April Crandall Omar Crayton Herbert Crockett f se , fjiisii , frzfliaii Steven Crockett Nicole Crowe Christopher Cunningham Angela Curtis Alisha Daniels Scott Daniels William Davidson Cynthia Davis Janna Davis Kenneth Davis Lisa Devoto Kimberly Didion David Dixon Lewellyn Dobberthein Annamaria Dodd Shawn Dodson Antionette Dotson Edwin Douglas Joshua Douglas Sherri Dowdell Anthony Dugan James Edmondson Malinda Elliott Antoinette Ellis Michael Embry Pamela Evans Robert Evans Tammy Evans Dwayne Faceson James Faceson Terry Faulkner Dawn Ferguson Kenneth Finch Debra Flanigan Mark Flitcraft Timothy Foster Tyrone Fowlkes Robert Franklin Edwana Frink Dawn Fullington Kimberly Gamble Jerry Gammon John Gammon Gaston Garces Christopher Garcia Tanaka Garland Charla Garvin Barbara Gaughan Carl Gibbs Jeffrey Gibson Michael Gibson Chenlta Gilbert Derek Gilbert Alvin Gillespie 5:11, ' ,T .t... rti 47 K., N' fa uf 1 , ,4 39 f, 4 f X7 W' ff f Lf? 1 ' .L , . I' 5 . 1 , xf. E' "2.-5, vf. CM, Mxlfwf' 4' ,:-:gs-' .4 if Q by f ff: X 2 A41 V ff'11 ,. -it f imp, ,. ., , yr e if I fa f ' 1 ff, . , W, , , f f f, on 'V 'ry V .dtwwq ff , 3 , 1: . 5 Z we A 'f Q, Q, gf- ' .: . 'z "' f f 4 I . - ' 29 3 Ye ' Z , -- s f' l ' ff.. X 5 - 5 if W, , V f I fm, 1, mt ,Q- ---, f f W A ' ' 4 f J rf 2 I nh , .,.,f V. . QL 4 ,. -21,01 5, , A ' " G' 7?J'3?5,.- 1, , ffm '11"7v 3 rf if if 'fi ww'-'s..,.,,,' 'p-u,,., I w- . ws. - - .,,,1eu.,p,,..'f-q, 1..,,W ,W-Y -,I ,,.. v , 1-..,.4.-als.-ww C I , I.,-W -, . V Qggff- .-.vga f 4 ' J 4 Q M - ,, 'f A of Y 112 f " f Wa 'za if L 4 X bl an ..,. I ' IAF J f bg i if V .A , R 7' 1 u X0 V' X ' T ' I I . 1 , f M5 'gif ffgyff I 5 5 .., 41- l X z .4-I "if l r 51:,43'i t If-ff f ,-it 421, 9, 1,1 -7: . f , P ",, Q5 f W, ,. Z Q ,g ' Q, fy f f " 4 4 r EFF T' zen 4,1 , f ff if Z 1 aww if Q 'rw ,fpz wwf, v gifts, 'WU-2 f Q ,., Pf :P ' V ' " ffl -' '34, ur -:ae bf I? 14-4. f a? J, ' of M ia F . I ,x 1 4 W J J'-23 l x 1'-v f .Jn CZ' .4 - -- New , iff ir' r . fl nj? I " 24' ' ' ff, t s 4 4 it 1 I 1 f 1, Q 1 5 w :X as 4 ,,, fm -.X as X , f .f r"" K 1 2.4 I , -, ' l ,tx x if X 1 X s , ... . I X ' is . - 3 A .1 I an lf 1 'isa Nugx 211.3 - xii? qw! '12, Q ix xx 4 6 N , 5 WE 1 xi gt?" W?5:.f 4 Nanette Gillum Michelle Gimbel James Glaser Kelly Glaser Monica Glover Robert Godwin Angela Goodmon ' ' x ' ts Clyde Goolsby A Tracy Graham Lisa Grant Corey Griffin R F352 ti 3- '1 x JK, ' gf 4- . Q L 'Y' 2 t, T ,V E? L, 1 kll f ,asf James Griggs Terry Griggs Larry Grinter Edward Guernsey William Gunyon LaRobert Guy Paul Hacker Glen Hafley -X A Letha Hagan - X Teddy Hager , X Marinda Hall . Tammy Hampton James Hancock W 15? " i Billy Harper ' -t ' Jerome Harris .. QS' ii - Robert C. Harris Q -1 y ' 5 Robert L. Harris Ji T Shawn Hart X X, ,X f Excuses, Excuses, Excuses "Why are you late again to- day?" the teacher demanded. "My alarm clock was under a pile of dirty clothes stacked in the corner of my room, and I couldn't hear it when it went off this morning." the student in- nocently replied. Getting in trouble for tar- Although Andre Guy is sleeping peacefully, once he is awakened by a 'friendly' tap from his teacher he will have some explaining to do. diness was a big fear of the students. A favorite excuse was 'the weather.' You could hear "The snow and ice slowed me raining so down," or "lt was hard I couldn't see my way to class." Students left logic and self-respect behind when mak- ing up excuses to keep themselves out of trouble. The 'trouble' ranged from a minor reprimand to detention and as a final fear the dreaded call to your parents . Situations that called for drastic measures were cutting classes, missing homework, and grades. At home and at school, there was always an ex- cuse buzzing around. Sophomore Rhonda LaFollette commented, "lf we were grad- ed on the originality of excuses, there would be a stiff fight for valedictorianf' Carwander Hatten Michelle Hawkins Timothy Hazelrigg Matthew Hebble Natalie Henderson Sonja Henson Dwuna Hention Sheila Herron Stacey Higgins Myla Highbaugh Kristin Hoch Leigh Hockman Tonna Hodges Berniece Holcomb Anthony Holland Patrick Holliday Lashonna Hollins April Holsey Clinton Honeycutt Tammie Hopkins Jeffery Hostetter David Howard Richard Howard Rodessa Howard Earl Hudson Roselyn Huggins Leigh Hughes Sok Hul Kasandra Humphrey Cathy Hunter Monica Hurley Charri Ingram Crystal Ingram Rosemary lvory Angela Jackson Shara Jeffers Lisa Jenkins Regina Johns Cynthia Johnson Keith Johnson Leroy Johnson Lonnie Johnson Marsha Johnson Natasha Johnson Anna Jones Carol Jones Cheryl Jones Damon Jones Diane Jones Regina Jones Lisa Jordan Stephanie Jordan Kevin Kelley Yolanda Kemp Tammy Kennedy Phon Khull Minh Kieu Jack Kinney Blaine Kwisz Rhonda Lafollette Kenneth Lancaster A Y lf, 2 I , I I :,:,-.W-w 1 ref: We iw it ,, 'wi-4 f , if ,..,: .V -11 ' ,F " . -. W X ri ,:G..,sf 'f' iw , 1-ug' L , :1., ,gf F 1 .v V Q ,J ' Q. 7. , - 9 , ,' zw :1,,: 2 , V i 0 f if .4 1. f , .i A , , Y V , jf W ,S I 'v'. .. K 'i , 9 4.9, Q 1,7 A -5. U gg, 9?-3 1, f I ? its f . Z K J ,' '3f"i. :.. f f,. ffwtx- ..-4 f. Q W 1 , ' ff , f .. .-ffm Q .gjjl - 1 f'i ' f f 1 V5 5 ,iff , f 444, .. 1 fi ' ' M 345. 1, M '35 J , A , f ' A7 4 ,,..,- I Iyvifg o 1 f W, 1 f , 5 V , , iz' ' fi! 9' I 1 1 fy!! 3, , 6 , , ff' X I M I 25, , , P ' f 7 xy: , , i. l l 'L ' ll l 7 137 35 . , ,,, , if 1 ,:,j ' , ' jg: ' ff f Nr Y f .. ff ,i .av 1, fx ., Ziff 49 'Bn M2 4 ', WE' I 2 42 2. . , A , , .. M , ,ld , , x YY I 'Q , il V Y' i if K ,1 z' f - f'- ,F ,f ,.1, , . Civil 1, 9 4' I if MK v 'M' yy. ,, if 44 7 f i ' K 1 ,y 1 f x G .. 4-, mv fi "-an 1.177 , . l l 5 i 'Olly if A Silly Trademark Like the scarlet letter Hester Prynne wore on her blouse, the sophomores had to bear the trademark of be- ing silly that had been pass- ed down from preceding generations. Known characteristics that sophomores possessed were giggle fits, outbursts of bravery, one-day crushes, and professional note- While watching the powderpuff football game, sophomores Beverly Bowman and Stephanie Stevens cannot seem to escape a case of the 'gigglesf passing skills. Once students reached tenth grade, everyone expected them to be silly, and therefore, their silliness was accepted or tolerated. Unlike freshmen, who were too scared to misbehaveg and juniors, who began to prepare for their seniority, sophomores seemed to lose all self respect. Sophomores got the least attention of the classes. Freshmen received attention because they were Julie Lauderman Bryant Lawson Tammy Lay Juan Leakes Carl Ledford Joana Lee because they had only one more year left, and seniors because they had superiority over the others. Patricia Pounds explained, "Perhaps we were silly, but we only acted that way to get noticed." Class president Amy Small commented, "we want to dispel the trademark of 'silly' sophomoresg therefore, we are going to adopt a new, serious attitude." new to school, L15 .Z Y? Q? . .,,, 7. - t . , ,J 41 1 1244, 1 vf .1 N 4. ' 'xii lf , .41 . N- 432 - -fi ,XVI ,I - r - -V , a s-3 ' I fzff if 3, Q13 ll UQ it git J W 0' U , . X .K f l , X f , . ,,,, fs Q W A I 19' 4 5: N ffm' 1 " -'nv 'QQ . yy. g f? 5 W ,, 1 ' ,, aj xv' 1' A .., ,nf s ,nr 4. Z' ,f , 1 ,E juniors Regina Lenoir Kimberly Levell Shannon Lightfoot Christopher Lloyd Duane Lloyd Dionne Lomax William Long Daphne Love Victoria Ludack Bonita Luncford Nicki Lunford Elizabeth Lyles Melinda Lynch Aaron MacDonald Mark Mahone Celia Mancillas Sandra Mansfield Jose Martinez Sandra Mathis Rodney McBrady Machelle McCarthy Stephanie McCombs John McCullah Bernita McFarland Michael McGIaughlin Angenette McGregor Eric McKinney Tamara McKinnion Kenneth McRee Paul Meadows Snphpmores 12 1 l - . , 4 4 . ,. r 4 N 9.4 .- I4'12:.,,iV3tl'.. . . . 4 4 Ly ,r 3 I- 4, . ,,,4, Q, , -.V .4 . , ,.',. V , I - .. r 1 414 'ut' , ,- 1, ,,... - ' , . , y A I , 'gf ., , 31' .ai 'ri ":""fj.11.' ' 1 1 ,r g ", 1.1 i , . -. ,-H112 , .1 Pl ...M-1 "r"f1,.'E"A'N1 ' ' xii. ' ,, ,' . ' f 1 -4 if .1 1 , W V mr -u--T...-......--.....--,- ' ' - .1 H: r U ' 2- . ' ' 3 , 4. 7 -7' ,. '.? -:f,j':'t1',lLEilil - A 9 -L. 1 '- A , L I 1 Vigjqgg ..'--qgtfiffgg 3 ' " Q I ' 5 " J , 4' ' E f, . 24,53 . '.1:'. gg:- , 4 1 f ' - ' ' J K , ' V fi ,, , gfic , N , x .V f --1 -' .' -. f .... l , ,. . , l"'1 ' Dwane Means V ' . . 5. Jennifer Medsker A ' 1, Sandra Mefford B 3 Mi: A f ,V K -my .:' ' ' Wayne Mercer fb X B 3 'D Stephanie Messer , .. wif. , M . , ,, - N ---:Y 1 David Meyer - "M A NR li " 3 .Saul S .ga X J A, 2591 SX X 1 ,, f i tw' Mychelle Miles Dave Miller Dwayne Miller LaTricia Miller William Miller Brett Milton Gary Minardo Robin Mink Richard Minton James Mires Ronald Mitchell Kim Mobley Geneva Moore Carey Moorman Anastacio Morales Charles Moreland Denise Morey LaTonya Morrow Reginald Morse Melvina Muex Khalilah Muhammad Qi -In ..-eq ss! fl., h , 25mg '35 N Htgjwp f :ist E . l -' ish, ,Q " ',.- it ' 1'-ff' AE' ' 4 f l , X-1 RW f' if int A was .W i wt Mfr at ' -'X' ' f-1. 'CHL' I . SMI' - '- vi '- :.: 2l:Q.2:. , " '-zgs. D A 'I - Elm ,. qi .Q-l . - 53 , A-' . X , . ." " 1 . V kx - ' . S :fav K mg ' ' h 1. 5' -,fiv A ' ' .. G.-at 1 . ' , . 'T U, i , , , t H A , 42 W, fe ,. 'D J . , ' 1 35swW ' X, tiswmtsff S5 .. g . 4.. - ' wa- ch- Hz 5 :,.a,.n w px X lg .. . .. '. ttywt .. . .Xl, 'K N- Devon Myers , . . Sarah Myers Kevin Nation vigim 'Wiz' Stars When the casting list for "The Wiz" was posted, several sophomores had captured leading roles. Allison Brinkley, chosen to play the lead, had to perform several solos. Stacy Williams, awarded the part of the good witch, Glenda, had to sing a solo number. Other sophomores played the parts of the munchkins and pieces of the yellow brick road. A junior with experience in several William Neese Margie Noland Kenneth Norris Audrey Osborn Erich Orrick Mercedes Ontiveros Lisa Ollanketo x K N A t ,,.. sf.. 4 S K g I S J t it s t " 1 ,Qt v 3 ' f Nt 'f i 357 ,fs 'ffgms Q . tug. QQ, - .,.. Q-sw .i m ',,..., . ..,.,. S , . A .ELI v 'gg' "' Q , J musical productions com- mented that even though it was nice for upperclassmen to have the leads, she really liked know- ing that the best performer was chosen for each role. During her solo 'Home', Allison Brinkley as Dorothy, can barely control her emotions. Stacey Williams, the good witch, tells the audience and 'Wiz' cast to 'Believe in Yourself.' 4? A J, 4 .. s ef f 'i .W V ls P , I 4 ,tl G 'I lid? , if .X V, .lflh " .,i it i li. 1' - W i .- ' i - - ' i i ' ' . . , ...,.,...,. .. ...s , ...... . ' ,.. . , . 4' ' ,Q-'11-4. -:wg if- R. Q wx- 12 vw eff -. -1' 1: -wh f sh- .ff 5 -gm. -sr1::3.j4f5f'.! stitfxf-EW.:-?l: 'sew PLQE?-215. 'Ziff 151- ' " ' . H Q ee. is 't l lliflvwtm 'iifiwgc-as-isfqg2-'-',i3-i'LeJt2El.2- -u1e.f1:'fJ,l ,WZ .ff:: 7'i?:'fYSxQlt' 'SSC f 'i- . . ' f ' ' ' ,f.............,..M.,..,..,,...,.,,.....,...,...,,,.. g,..,,.,,l2vv1?!f',:'l-ifmmf'Hi.,,,.g.,,-1-,-me 4 wg itj,:.,,g ,R-tp 2,5 ., ,,s?.g4,,,,3.ggf,t-.m. 4.,g:gags23,3-,.,w.-V+8.5 ,-,ff 5355. A 3 Q 1 , S- s . Zz: 2 X .. , ' 2- ' WF- 5 ,I , 75 ., W. .. 7' .,s,,, ,gg ,VJ 1 v i, ,fl ,fm r X 5 r 4' ,HJ i -twig? ,fi L 'sf . v - gl 1+-1 , , 1 1' 1'-1: .1 , , , . , ,, , , , Q 4-H 6,44 iii is Q I 1 C I 7 M S' PL, , .ff ,l 44 Lf ,121 , f f 2 v 1 ' Z' ,, 'ii D tk, .1 f A I J F i Y "lg, .1 -..,' ' , . J fl? ,- , A f A l . 1, , 4 11, 4 I .z A ex 2 5 y, 5 Y h 24 ' ' I fill T55 f QL A ' ' ,iff M Y? v.. fr S.- , V -. , X J ' 7 'M V I l 3 fin, 2 2 www -.-- .0 ,f ' , 4 f- ' V, .--i.1r,f - f ff -aft i m: 4 X V, A i l , xv ,974 ,- .X jgltgg 65 Z ,Q -M Z 1 .vid haw, 'f' ' U - F' . :M V , I if, 'Zi v -, g ., fl f " 5' t ir, b ' " L ' IW 1' S K N NJ ,,- V f 1, ' .gs 7 . 3 L 1 ' ff 1 S we 'fwfr X' , , ,, ' ,W l ft Maw ' ,-,,f--,' 'V " Wfqytf .' wil M- Af V3 ww it 'WA . fl J ,V 1 , , A iz- fig ..l- 12,4 . 4 Y Q .., 4 H :Q V' ,jg ,535 1, .gt ' T , Q P f t r J . ,Z 2 - -- ,, f' QL Q3 i , t if . . ,,- - if ' -' X ' " , we J A 1 fl x I1 .., 9 ' H -1:1 X , E., ,1 5 if-.2 .P .114 -Q, g 6955 " M ' ' 35 M. gg f- 4 ' K, ,r cr gf-A -- xiii Tina Padgett Jarvis Parker Marion Parks Paul Parks Randall Patrick Ronald Patterson Timeka Patton Charles Paul Todd Pero Annetra Pepper Scott Perry David Phams Thol Phann Donald Phelps Mary Phelps Brian Phillips David Polson Royce Polston Gwyan Porter Donna Powell James Price Shannon Price Floyd Proctor James Pruitt Laura Pryor Ollie Purvis Kimberly Ramsey Russell Ramsey Todd Ramsey Jannett Rash Brenda Ray Stephanie Redmond Gonzalo Reyna Karen Reuter Manuel Rhea Chandre Rhodes Dwaine Richardson Tammy Ridenour Jesse Riggs Elizabeth Ripberger Mary Roach Sherice Roberson Edward Roberts Andrew Robertson Audrey Robinson Chalisa Robinson Joyce Robinson Shirley Robinson Tonya Robinson Brian Rolf Elizabeth Rowe Gary Rowe Kim Royalty Robert Rush M fi l 1 ni Jack Russell Jeffrey Sanborn Byron Sanders Ethel Sanders Joseph Sanders Rachelle Sanders Steve Sandlin Queen of Queens Wanting to leave their mark as sophomores, the class of '88 won the basketball "Queen of Queens" title in an all school election. Amy Small, winner of contest, the sophomore defeated the freshman queen, Stacey Rosalesg junior queen, Lisa Gilbertg and senior queen, Tammi Poindexter. The class of 1986 has won the competition each of the last Cecelia Saunders Darren Scaggs Billie Scott Jennifer Searcy ' Angelina Settecasi Jimmy Sexton Lawrence Shaffer two years. In breaking the tradi- tion this year, the class of 1988 began to make a name for itself. This start gave them the confidence they needed to feel respected among the upper classes. Sophomore Kristin Hoch and newly crowned Queen Amy Small are over- whelmed with happiness and surprise after the crowning. . gf X af 1 41 Ar Y I I M. , 5 WB? A I f.. ,,.y'!,.. Moncia Shaw Kimberely Sholar jg it , Stacie Siegman 59' ' 'Q f , Herman Silcox ' A is Juanita Simmons ' Tressie Simmons Aaron Smith W rs f , 5 1 . , , 1 i X y I 5 j . -' -4' f .. , Earme Smlth ' 'Q 'f ww, l"'i' 3, Fredrick Smith ,f N as Jerry Smith Q i 1 1 'f J if I w e A M ' ' . .b . , :.' .- r ' , 1 'Ti if ' , ' .V '- D .4 M ,. ,, A uv fa, ft 'pf 4, Randal Smith ,fm ,. - ' uf- Q I- :gg l we 1-1 gg, - ,f - 4 'lf ,V , 4 X 'Z , . we " -' ' Sharon Smith 'fs .1 X . we ff f Robert Snyder f , A ' Q! X .f : g iiffiswg':ia"A'ff"'f'1ff--' Tina Sparks em a prcer . W , Desmond Squires ' ' f 5- .A Reta Stafford Mark Stanford Richard Staples Lora Starkes Stephanie Stevens Terea Stevens J Angelicque Stewart Jeffrey Stewart ' A 1 Ricky Stigger . . af' s V4 m . , 1 , ,, J- ,sl A, P XL Q syn as M i IT. A 1 , if , .,-'f ,, Af. 'f ,. .., Z. , ,lex I.. r f :gp 133' J ff' M. 1 ' 1 Y l it G 1 X - . A .- ,,,.. L -. J x I .,, . if fx 1' I ff :X ,faq Q if sf E.. at 5,2 i 5' ii M , .,..- qv Wy , l ...--tv Michael Stockman i , Bobbie Stokes 'Ulf' , . Asa' If .... 4 Nts, , X .-.31 , ,-A," A .- 1 ' v -, 'W J.: , t . ' ss win x xy ta L, : X ,E - X .fx 4 s Nt X ' ? K rx 13 f x N Y S X tk 5 VA X R Q Y , ,NI , . , f ,, I 'ka Q . - an A s: w sans ' 5 Q M it ,Q X. Q Q. I os" LJ? N Jf , 40 vf.."K?z Aj as f l, , 1 L .3 - - Q- 'i . Q B is-ze. t E -, i 'Ei su' , ll l X A irillllm x . - ,eh V E tr I . ,5 -. -4 Q? 24, 11 tl N'-11' fy f-3:51.-1, , . . ,.: .Q,. xi +: 1 . 5 8' X S at if 1, X .Q . 4' fr Y A E .,:- X , N et S Sv ' s. Qi if F W r. , - ' . 5145 - N fl, ' se: .M I ml 3' ' f 'I V' vi' l 'V '-Q4 .Wo , A , -- . Q Q fe-A . :szqxf - Q . 5, . , Q .. ,mf W K 2 I . 'S ' E f f , W i 4,5 . Q ,,, A 6' ' - , '1' ' K' Q ,,- - K 5 , ,, THINK SMALL Q ' 1. T ,A 2 is -ii w. :I :Tar , '? ' '. t . -his 4 Q A - .4-f' f N 'lliim zysgs' ilu? ' l ,. 3 lllzlfll 5 531 . Q1 ! a . Qu- - "'l k 4 l I i i n S e q, WP 5 lx 3 . L 1 X 1 v ' 'ty x 1 W 1 AG' , --fr -'QS , ' Q 15133: X 3 Erica Woods Mareia Wright -5: ' 3211357 ' GSS? '1 i Ou - ,i 1 an Dennis Storms Scott Strong Janverca Stutts Vivian Sweat Deitra Taylor Viviana Taylor Kim Thomas Monib Thomas Jerry Todd Rebecca Trammell Dester Troxell Carlton Truax Clevland Turner Neal Turner Shawn Turner Donald Twitty Hua Vang Yeng Vang Vincente Vasquez Julie Ventress Lisa Wade Terri Walters Susie Wallace Pamela Watkins Kenneth Washington Ron Washington Melissa Watts Dennis Weathers Charita Weaver Susan Wenzlaff Helen Wert Eric Whaley James Wheeler Don White Mark White Clifford Wilbourne Tonette Wilkerson Samuel Williams Stacey Williams Monica Willis ldris Wilson Karin Wilson Letitia Wilson Michelle Wilson Shannon Winchester Michael Winn William Woodfolk Don Woodruff Andrea Woods . if 1-.., 4 L t fstsfuy f X 1 - Q , . ' X: ' Q: , ,. .N Q 5 X fl 1 . .5 ,Y 6 S N git -if 'le' ' Tsuleean Wright William Wright Richard Wyeth Jamillah Abdullah Billy Acey Jean Adair Bobbie Allen Deshona Anderson Rona Anderson Sonny Anderson -A lr-s 89 Domg Fme A freshman councrl was formed early to represent the 545 members of the class All of the officers ected were a cheerleaders Already ac trve the class entered a float rn the homecommg contest wrth a banner which read 89 Looking Mzghty Fine Fund ralsers for the class were the selling of Hershey krsses on Valentme Day and Marsha Arthur Meredrth Barley Tracey Barley Jeffrey Baker Llsa Banks Gaetano Barbrern Lrlly Barker Donald Basal Duane Bateman Mlchael Battle Tonya Battle Terry Beach Charles Beasley Sherry Bedford Penny Benson Krmberly Berry Dennls Blackmon Johnny Blackw Dan Boatner Rolanda Bolen Lynn Boles Timothy Bolton Mark B Bowling Matthew Bowlrng Make Bowling Wllllam Brandon Lea Brrdwell Kevln Brinkman Lawrence Brooks Tracey Brooks James Brown Patrrcla Brown Janet Bryant Teresa Bryant John Bulllngton 'Wi a food sale rn the sprung When asked how It felt to be the class presrdent LaDonna Thomas replled lt gives me a feeling of responslbrllty and prlde Advrsers for thrs group were Ms Vrckre Noel and Ms Helen Moeller Class Officers LaDonna Thomas President Celeste Whrte Vlce Presrdent Detra Woods Secretary and LaDonna Anderson Treasurer fYV0YY9q,,'9., .H 'ir 5 , rag, M f I ,X M I '13 we .--5 f l .I- 3 ii, Y J f ' r A, -V tif' tilt ik ' 1 J, W gg WW fat 4-V 1 ink fi ,,f WM! 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V , ,,, 1 ,V, -'A '4 t 4 ff A 45" f la , 3 +V ' S "Fly-' I 1 , f 1 ' 4- N? is V, wax X . .-. -..- ,f l A ' ' :.:':'-..-E956 ' ' fix il I f Q1 22:23 '?-'..-3 1" L Jeffrey Bunten Kenneth Burchfield Randy Burdine Tammy Burks Tony Burruss Luke Butler Duwan Byers Charrise Byrd Diana Cade Andrew Campos Larry Capps Angela Carling Angelo Carpenter DuJuan Carpenter George Carrico Vickie Carrico William Carter Jennifer Cavazos Alan Cazares Beverly Charette Angela Charles Richard Chatman Matthew Clark Theresa Clark Jeffrey Clegg Robert Clements Denise Clemons Tammy Cochran Timothy Cochran Chesney Coleman Richard Coleman Tiffani Coleman Perry Conningham Louis Cook Sean Cook Regina Courtney Beth Covey Victor Covington Kristina Craft LaTonya Craig Christy Crase Stacey Crockett Timothy Cronnon V :fair ' if QW? f I ,Wx C' - Richard Crowe A I' V ,T fm Q, ' A Scott Crowe V " " ' ' James Curtis X T V Tammy Dailey l . Stephen Davis -,H ffm' f 1 'fe ff: India Dawson '.:-4 .. ' Y V gf, Anthony Day - iffy ' Yi Johnny Deane "' M ' "Vt "'l ' Robert Deaton 2 , -Jw ' - 1 James Deloach ' V Vanessa Dennison V I A ' V I s i ' 4 -Lx V ' , . 7:1 .. ' .A ,, Q VV o as Freshmen I 3 1 Richard Deskins Tony Dickinson Deanna Dill Kevin Ditchley Ernest Dodson Kevin Dodson Darrell Doss Paul Duke Penny Dunn Anthony Dyer Donald K. Eaton Marcel Edwards Michelle Edwards Timothy Edwards John Eldridge Ronald Enochs Tommie Epps Fred Eubank Dawn Evjen Angela Fahrenkamp Brian Faulkner Wilbur Faust Aaron Ferguson Ellen Ferguson Raymond Ferguson Cindy Ferris Burnis Fields Rachel Fitzwater Letticia Ford Kevin France Lori France Michael Frison Gerald Frye Rachell Futrell Sharon Futrell Michael Gaines Sharry Gilbert Howard Gillard Kenneth Glaser Mary Glaser Byron Glover Craig Gossett David Gourley Don Green Moya Green Andrew Grever Cheryl Griffith Michael Grrgsby James Grrmmitt Barbara Grubbs Monica Haak Huston Hall Richard Hall Tammy Hall Cynthia Hansford Candy Hardcastle Robert Harper -un- l32 Freshmen gs ty W t, t QW i -N , -52,59 xi -.pe , K -fm ' X "' , ' . cr 1 . N ts: or N . X ,, .ut X Nm Q X f + , 1 s 1 B! V ' X3 ' frfqzgzi ,.'4-firm yr '. it vagal V k .. XS A lrggiff My , time W 1 xxx-gm , 3 if 1 9 xf. 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" ' 1 Q? r If X 1 W' T 4? x ,- I .uf AI ,.i. ,P WF' 1 , Y 1, .fi 4, .74 16 .jp .1 4 XQ' ' ff 'M w - J s ' if 'i f f f 7 41 f -4, a 71 A A1 7414 1- A f Va ' -av -Y-ar Y Karen Harris Robert Harris Tammy Harris Gary Harvey Richard Harvey Nicole Hatfield Shawana Hatfield Derris Hayes Kimberly Helton Kenneth Hendrickson Trina Hendricks Rachel Henley Mark Hensley Michael Hensley Rodney Hensley Christine Hernandez Dawn Herring Kimberly Hess Shannon Hinderlite Jeanna Hobbs Thy Hok Sherry Hoopingar Brian Hoopingarner V ,f Manual Hopson tl ff " Qi, ' ij Stevan Hughett X ' , s Camelli Hurley git gg Tammy Hyatt Shandell Ingram Artez Jefferson 1 I A 4 ,fc 1' Seniors Give Help Freshmen had the sym- pathy of the upperclassmen because of the adjustment they were required to make from junior high to high school. The size of the cam- pus overwhelmed many freshmen but, having once experienced the same feel- ing, upperclassmen tried to be as helpful as possible. Senior Scott Payton takes time away from his school work to help freshman Jeffreyl Klinck with his algebra. not C? .P 'Q s g c A W0 Sometimes they helped with homework and sometimes they just gave advice. Advice varied from help to hindrance. Some up- perclassmen felt that it was their 'duty' to mix up the freshmen. When a freshman asked for directions, he could wind up in auto body shop instead of algebra class. Despite some so call- ed 'do-gooders' most of the frosh managed to survive their ninth grade year. James Jefferson William Jett George Johnson Jerry Johnson Renay Johnson Shirley Johnson Freshmen 133 if , T 1: f is r T. 1: 5 V f 1:1 . C gg x Z. 41 5 1 4-5 3. 1 Q Zi 51 i 5 ti ?: 2 ,Q ifl 3 . 1 2 I4 - 'E W 5 'ff I3 i s. est its ,, rs: .. .5 ' remix H '.L.v62N 75 i. 3- H rs in x. 23 E Cherrie Jones Consuelle Jones John Jones Joseph Jones Michelle Jones Norman Jones Terrance Jones Velvet Jones Marcia Jurgesmeyer Debra Karr Jeffery Keatts Bradley Keefe Trinna Kemp To Khun Windi Kinney Mane Kirby Jeffrey Klinck Kristi Kyle Rebecca Lair Stacey Lancaster Allen Lang Anthony Lasley Bonnie Lawson Lai Le Minh Le Son Le Thu Le Robert Ledger Edward Lewis Mark Lewis Thomas Lifford Greg Lindop Cortez Lipscomb Denise Lloyd James Logan Tammy Logan Aaron Long Johnnie Long Sandy Long James Lowhorn Robert Lucas David Luken Lori MacDonald Lynn Magee Veronica Mahone Leandro Mancillas Tony Marsh Charles Martin Cheryl Martin George Martin Patricia Martin Maria Martinez Kimberly Mason Johnathan Matney John Matthews Deobolique Mavity Christopher May Aki' V ,Q M f f 3 1 r gg, 'Os l fi s. af C 6 7 43 ' . 466' W: 1 f ,. 1 sv, '42 1 1 Q ?m5.f::" P? 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'43 " ' A' ' ,. I ' V V f - ' it g ' 1 ,H A f- ,ga- , - 'rf V i . .,- , M '- Q.. ff R -n X V l ., ii-Irs ., , ' ' ' , tj It . X he , ' . .y. 1 "'-. - ' . . .V M V-1 ,Q ,X ,I . . I I J WM 5' 'xt ft 'ls 1' 1 I ' 4 1 -fx 1 Nl X f. if VQZQ1 5,3552 K li 5 f I Q., f " - in time . ,. . i ,ul A T f - -1,1 V , -f,,,7.ZZz? ' -. ft X we-uw am 'T ., fat. .4 2 'Ss- , . .K Mi-'f -' at 2 '4 i i ii ti i 3, ry ni' 1. 5-i ,. 134 Freshmen ..--...nu--u 1 4 l'1 I X 4 V. :Ji ,i 5, V ,,ll,fz 1: S ,ff 2 .-',. gg., i' '24 ' 1 -mr: V 1' 4 ," 4 .1 1 xy' W f ,. I . 5 1-.Z 5 lv' K - . ,f :Z 6 ' 'Q in 'Nr 'ix S Y wi, efflr. . 5 I J 6.5, .7-,,, ,,t,..,..,i- F, 4 3 S iw Q' R 445 ,f fl f l. f 9, 1 i , Q ga L sf if I 5' A A , f lv .nl i, dfv A' i 1 . ffl fi 7 me z e I. ,ff f , -9 4 W K ff A 52- 3 W . f'f .f 'fifflzl' 'f X ' Q S ik. ,-1 -.Q K-.a x l Vi 'E,i'fIFfF3i' A 1T?!'ST3Ib wi' ,Q ' ' '41 :L A Z ci i. J gg .,.. ""f ,A .s X'-1? N. i if ' V Eric McDowell Cynthia McGaha Lance McGee Demetruis McNeal Tina Merrifield Jason Meyer James Middlebrooks Frosh Find Identit For freshmen, who are highly motivated by peer pressure, the need to fit in was imperative. The size of the campus and the number of students also contributed to the need to belong. Some new enrollees were never able to make a bond within the school setting. ln- stead, they relied upon membership in outside Joining his friends at a home basket- ball game, Derrick Moulder enjoys a favorite weekend activity. , ' M , flag, . f V '4 ' 7 .. , -54 yr E 'fs z 5, 4 ' ,. ,fn I , H ,l Q. is , ,,f:zl' D-35' fl ,lr u f , Hap? , ' 1415 -5 ,,.-' 'iio i "'-3 - lt- .5 ' we! 1 ' .M -,..- , ,A Ziff . . X -4- -on , .iii .A 5 . .. if ' L 'f i , 5 xy g 6 r 45 A' S'- Y ' - 4 3. t H M ZH 'qt ' 1. l ' . l .ft organizations and neighbor- hood gangs to fulfill their needs for group identity. Most freshmen discovered, however, that because of Tech's diverse student popula- tion and the many activities of- fered, it was relatively easy to fit in. Some chose to become involved in athletic teams, clubs, and organizationsg all became a part of the largest single group on campus, the Class of '89. John Miles Glenn Milton Christina Minardo Paul Minor Shawn Molin Tonya Monday Charlotte Moore Sherry Moore Karen Morgan Anthony Morris Daniel Morris Michelle Morris Terry Morris Derrick Moulder John Mumaw John Mundy Charles Murphy Karla Musgrove Lashawn Nance Darlene Nash James Nash Tamara New Cassandra Newsom Jeffrey Nicolay Richard Noah Michelle Oldham Michelle Oldham Richard Odell William Palmer Alexandro Palenci 8 Freshmen 135 11 Jennifer Parks Bruce Paro David Parrish Eric Parrott Kimberly Patrick Seth Peacock April Perkins Albert Pettigrew Bmh Pham Milton Phelps William Phillips Scott Pierce Ruby Pierson W Rachelle Plppms Russell Pliler Randolph Pogue Dereka Pointer Jackie Polston Michael Pond Shirley Powell Jimmy Preston Layman Price Roxane Price Bryan Prlntz if Z Tammy Purcell Melissa Qualls , f Felecia Quinn f Steven Rader Tina Ralston James Rawley Tech s Sp1e1berg What is the effect of freshman Michael Colwell s special hobby? He makes little kids cry Or at least his special effects costume did last Hallo ween Michael and his brother Joe a senior share an mterest in special effects the kind that Steven Spielberg has made famous in his movies ln fact the brothers plan to make their own movie which will showcase their special abilities The public has seen some of the Colwells work as part of the stage club homecoming float In Howe s production of Death Takes a Holiday and in Tech s The Wiz Even more impressive though, is the basement of the Colwell home which serves as a private gallery for a collection of their special effects creations What was the most difficult part of bringing Evlllene s Shauna Ray f A Patrick Reed Sherell Reed Michael Reuter Loretta Rexroat Gilberto Reyna n 4 ,425 ' W V L 4' , .ff , wi ff wmv 74, jf. K M: . T ' -fra. 4-213 T J ,J- ,wf 4- , ' .1-f ' ,icy ' ' .If Z3 . . 4 5, . , ' A M , . ' I Q4 ff K2 if 'f' ' .,:, 'y ig fini i. r ..,,., - I 3 lv e S . . A , , fz , . -za' , Af-.,1-115' 3, ' ., . A " "lr 4 ti '- V, ff' t ix :f t 'iff ' it sl , -wk 4' . N .TV X27 .V if ' I l ,.2e1v"f..f.,f-we ,"'f" '. " "' W - gff f ' ' i 32 51,-. 0 A . f' n iff 4 my f, .1 at 8 I 'f 'V .17 f QW , if I o . u ! Y . . . H . . . . , . ' 9 . H . n ' 1 I I o Y ll ' YI Y 1 U P . . , . ll , vz. 3.l,.,:: -'-g,v,3gef-,e -' uw" 'B '5 6 v- He, ,. l ew , ' ,ca x. x 'gi -2 in 'N D A g gl., fm 1 ' -A ' L5 ' : " 4 ' -J", fn, fd? 34:5 f' ---p..--.u.....--n-- 136 Freshmen if 214: ,am ff' 1-4 ,1 229455 ,,wfj"f" 4, W X 1, V X as . M. fw f - .' M . jg ,. litfd-Wyyfm X, rm l . ,K .X H, V, 2 it throne to life, complete with moving skull and gargoyle, in The Wiz?" Michael stated that it was keeping his balance as he worked the creatures. Knowing that he was trapped inside the costume and couldn't react, mischevious gremlins in the cast kept pinching him. Behind the Skull and Gargoyle, used in The Wiz," is Freshman Michael Colwell controlling the special effects which he helped to create. Sqn? 4 43' R o l 4 x it-Qvqi , K .- , A5 ' - mf i V c . ww J ',:j ff :fr f "' Q it ' ,f fy . " fe: . A 4 ' O f 1, 12 1 5 1 Nw" 'xwf twig Q, W 3 x mia A Q Q 'N -1 l M , s It S, sh, As 7 .N ,s ' x 40' ,W-5 ' A .swf ' S ' ' I W-z. .. ivla 1154- A-sf y , .N ,A .,' 255126, X ,-:gf T' . f 'fu-L of' .av 22 " ' l ,4 " I 1 5 1 Ti, 1 Q ' G' pf-'sr Q fe if ,,, ,ffl W ,QW l Y f X WZ!! X4 9' 1 ,rj t 1 4 f 9 .pf ff' f ff',, if , .,' ,V A Wi: -' . , r, .""s"Z. , 1 . ' KZf""t:' -:F " ' .gp iz,.4F'.f., .- 4, ' I 'Y ' 'E if Fl fi f if W 'S 3 X S netsw... gs, gh we Qi s SX Q if fu ef ff, 'r ov ,A , 1 I- 5:92 N 1-5 .... ""N i v---'-lb! fX 1 Kevin Rhoton Michelle Rhoton William Ridenour Pamela Rlley Melissa Roach Lllhan Robbins Greta Roberts Eve Robertson Jade Robertson Guy Roddy Kelly Rogers Stacey Rosales Deborah Ross Walter Ross Steve Russ Mnchael Sablan Marcus Saloane Dann Sanders Eddie Sarver Angela Sayer Patncla Scaggs Shajuan Scott Teresa Scott Arthur Sexton Charles Shaw Maurice Shelley Chnstopher Shelton Mla Shelton Helen Shepherd Frederick Shmlever Carmen Shlrley Llnda Short Larry Shotwell Duane Shupmsky Wllllam Simmons Llsa Sizemore Monty Sklrvm Tonla Sluder Amy Smallwood Angelena Smith Jason Smnth Kenneth Smith Ronald Smlth Stacey Smith Tiffany Smith Tuna Smnth Gerald Snodgrass Tol Soeun Jada Sorrels Danny Southers Andre Sparks Robert Sparks Kenny Spicer Demetna Spivey Patrlck Spurr Brian Spurrler Jeanette Stearns -.-.-.---.......-...-.-- Freshmen 137 William Stedman Rhonda Steele Travis Steele Beth Stevens Christopher Stevenson Joyce Stevenson Yolanda Stevenson . rf fr- ff' W B .. ,,. Q., 245 3, . a f2f,,ffQ Q? . 4 9 fb Double Trouble This year's freshman class is blessed with double trouble - ten sets of twins. Both sets of twins we interviewed had one thing in common, neither the Willis or Hensley twins had ever been in class together until their freshman year. This year Yolanda and Rodney, fraternal twins, are both in dry cleaning class together. The Hensley brothers, identical twins, started in math together but the teacher transferred them to different sections. Math teachers know that 1 + 1 : dou- ble trouble. On school picture days, Rodney and Yolanda dress alike in the same color coordinates. However, Mark and Mike have not dressed alike since kindergarten days said their mother. The Willis twins have another set of twins in their family, who are sophomores this year. The Hensley pair have twin goals, they hope to become professional baseball players, but our fraternal twins 1 Wilma Stewart Kenda Stiles f" fi A 1 . Tamara Stockman fi I Isaiah Stokes , Mari Strong 4 W -4 Robert Strong ' If Q ' ' 'Y Tammy Strong Anita Strough Mickell Sullivan Sonja Summers . Rachelle Tardy f 1 Dennis Taylor Ellen Taylor Richard Taylor f ff .4 PAM . - ' My , W f 1 , 4 46 f 4? , . . if 51 i , w- ff? ,. .1 "W '.',f1Y" Z lv ' i 1- 11, have different goals. Rodney hopes to own a grocery store and Yolanda is striving to become a professional basket- ball player. She played on the girls junior varsity basketball team this year. The advantages and disadvan- tages of being twins are about the same said Michael Hensley. Fratemal twins, Yolanda and Rodney Willis, have unique personalities and each is working toward an individual goal. f ,R ' .f , fi L, W4 -- i z.. 1' . K, i WZ, 2 if 4' M f , ,.. ,y ., . x Q .-,zn.......ff...2.Lb.f-ss .,. . ivy' Z '25 'K .f .1 K4 - - A :iw -. , gigs... . ,,., . , ... , ......,.--.--nu-n-upuqauqn 138 Fteshrnen 11-5 m.-.QQ-yup.,-.....,--5 : ,- . 'f TerriTayl0r ef' f 4. '.i. Raymond Terry 0 E i"' A Robert Thomas Rochelle Thomas i 'M ff- f Bonetta Thompson fy 35 V, , Johelen Thompson j g if T.. 'Q mp Denedra Todd g f if wget? 2 'J 43 3 "'f, 5 L af, f V ffl Kham Tran fy ff Regina Traxler 1 H - ' 'E ' ' f Renae Traxler 2 ' Jerry Tucker Q '-. Andrew Tudor Z gf- Tonya Turentine 1 I -312, V3 Donald Turner , S - X James Turner f Lavonna Turner Y , Nora Turner l " ' j fff N :ff V S ' Tammy Turner - A' 1, X f 3' Tal if f Timothy Tyler 'I f 43- 'fl ' 1, Jerome Valentine V ft i f 3 Emerson Vance . ' , I , ,' i I, nf .Y , Q , . , X i ,lyk ..,. - .iii ,gpg ffillfzfl H in . . X ff? :xt . ,, 'f:2"'ff'f1 ii f ':?tf1 va Q X Q .X A . 5 Q f ig Q tg, tt if ag if fg- -f X I :ns 21 f We t-4 ?isg?5i H, f .agar It 35, . x ti? ,i"' 40 l M-as Nb R x s i Q X , . tis " l ' t 'iii , sw.-.... -W. . Jia . 1K 5 .N 1-P ff FL N ' J' .i is f5f.f's.,1 .f-f:'1'eyg . 2 fii V' Q Q 7 ' ' X if :fi ' 1 . -I 1' N'-1" ' r - , 1 x, F ' 1 .VW l ,pf X , ff 'Q W ff V 6 at gtg: 2' 55? if 5 1, -V :ff -' 25 Xxx 45" x XI 21 1 9 H Qfg,,j' R ii- XSD Q' 3 X ,A r ,, 551 X 1 6 7 QWF " 9 t 9 Ns -H iff., Q w i, t- wk 5 sf 'fitgirs ni- 1 ! Q ,S ,J w .- '57 K' iii" 'grwft 1 X , W r,3'i55'f'15W S ff " ,g, , limi A-MHZ" ' 3 515 ' , tif v if Q 1 g t 1 ff A 3,1 V I - ' 3' '11 Q." , 1 T452-.l, v fw.t',f . ,swf ' 12' ' . Q .14 ' if 2 +1515 A . : -'ga - 1 .3 'fl l , . W 'T Vi 5 U - I D . V 'y -4 sa- QL, i ty E lcv i V ' , ' f - ' ' . " "H - Q. 1 gif K ,QSM-,J .5 Q- ri . , 'gh' .. fx ' F.. is 3 'J Q 4 W 243291 Mr fl ' t ,. P ', .aa ' P' K 3 . ' f WW' !'f ' f:', - 1 Q' ff 5 "l ' il, A i:'4':f.. '- ' -Q - -i f 9 X , ii i V f' V X x , r qv, X I fl, A J . . f-'- 1 Q- a --"'4 Haig- ' A frfr i - 7? 5' 3 3, .K ,A sg .,, fam? . -,,,, is , ' ' + f K Q .f A' ', 1,2 1 if If - 'ssr 4 J E gl M11 I 'i t if f - F' lt Jg - ffl 1 5 1 B t 'N ft we ..V, A ,, s pw ' f1""x,, XJ www. .W ..-.tl sf as l H' 2 if ,e w ..A, . J X si ' S , at i ,JY N , t , s ..,.. 1-s Q' 'Q is-5 'W g .fn -,. , t .t ' f' :iff L-5 5 -k st: " 2' 2 W 1 ew ,fl gf ,, A s- - Q9 - w 1, ii i gf," l y i M 5 ,, , 4, ,,,. 'ix 54' ' . " l 0355 ll .4 VK .J ., fd. gl six ,sf 1 -- -1 Essxiv'-'X'-9325" :Q if 1 f EE 'lax .J If ' sf' V S .Q ! Q., P . ,gy-,t h I J it Marc Wilson l 15 Q- fi ' ' Alnita Wims . fg, Dawn Wise ' V Vanessa Wise ii Dana Wombles 'ft 'pw-Q4 if , John Woodford c P' tik i, ,Ly l 1 ti : H mm , ' R if: ,ii 'iii ., . ' ' Patrick Woodward i , f ig David Wyeth ' W Kira Yant P Q -L-rx Chariese Yarbrough f f Q Elizabeth Zimmerman 25 fl 3 Melvin Van Meter Francisca Vasquez Pablo Vasquez Stephen Vaughn Patrice Vinson Julie Wagers Daniel Walker Hallie Walker Earl Wallace Mia Wallace Walter Wallace Angela Walter Willie Walton David Ward Richard Ware Linda Warner Henry Watson Deanna Webb Katrina Weir Jonathan Wenzlaff Anthony Wert Chad Wethington Audrey Wheeler Lisa Whitaker Tracy Whitaker Angela White Ronald White Kelly Wickersham Charlotte Wiley Dawn Wilhite Edward Wilkins Angela Williams Derrick Williams Edna Williams Jeffery Williams Kim Williams Pauline Williams Rodney Willis Yolanda Willis Timothy Willoughby Danny Wilson Erica Wilson James Wilson Freshmen 139 'Pri cipals' of Leadership ln its 74th year, Arsenal Technical High School and its administrative team welcomed Dr. Joseph McCieehan, the first principal to hold an Ed.D. degree and Mrs. Medarda Pope, the first female vice principal in over 50 years. lMiss Gertrude Hadley served as Tech's first and only other female vice prin- cipal from 1923 until 1931.5 Early career interests of Dr. McGeehan included becoming a Catholic priest or entering the fields of business or law. His role as an educational ad- ministrator encompasses many of the attributes which would have been required in all of Faculty and administrators gather to welcome new colleagues during the annual Cider Social held on September 25, in the Anderson Auditorium. those fields. Goals which Dr. McGeehan has been working to achieve in- clude restructuring the organization of the school to adapt to its constantly chang- ing mission, increasing school spirit, and improving the at- titudes of students concerning their expectations for academic achievement. Vice Principal Medarda Pope first came to Tech in 1974 as a teacher in the Special Educa- tion department. She quickly learned that in IPS a person is hired into a position, not into a particular place. In the past 11 Only the seventh chief executive of- ficer to occupy the principaI's office, Dr. Joseph McGeehan is in his first year as administrator of the largest IPS school. XX sw, . years, she has accepted six changes in assignment resulting in her current position as Vice Principal of Curriculum and Scheduling. Of the schools she has work- ed in, Mrs. Pope says she likes this one the best. She also noted that, "I enjoyed teaching, but being an administrator allows me to see ideas being put into action." . Y kt .W If ,WE i Talitha Anderson, ICEC Asst. Director Kenneth Bayless, Guidance Director .g , Mahiorz Carlock, Business Manager ? 5 Howard Catz, Athletic Director V za Judith Hamilton, Media Center Director ,.,., ' 1 Rollin Jump, Adult Ed. Director " Q' wt' Frederick Kelly, Dean of Boys Sw 5 Dr. Joseph McGeehan, Principal P' Donald Oldham, Vice-Principal . T , f Medarda Pope, Vice-Principal , . .. it f Robert Stockard, Vice-Principal ' , 5' A Dorothy Stout, Dean of Girls , f ,Sis -fu '1 4 xref? :A .egxg,,:9+,i N553 Egg ggfiriz tix 15: Qttggzfpz pf 4.1: 1 -sflU"'0f ,gi - - . like Cir. 1140 Administration i -M M , , 5, 9 P I .-, 'X 1' .nz NIM- X tt "', me. . f. w -f i E to V- , ff , , -fi fe -,s -f , i A - . . sk q f 4 wh I ' 4 .44 -QQ f .W ti-'-Q" I f . in 5, 54.8 1 uv' 1 ia '51 M I Bfrf' Z X24 I lag Q 1 Q43-el-.Iwi l all Algebra ll students in Mrs. Feigert's 4 first period class listen as she unravels the mysteries of mathematical equa- tions. Even though there are many specialized learning labs on campus, most instruction still takes place in traditional classrooms equipped with arm chairs, blackboards, pencils, paper, and books. Glenn Adams, Career Center Richard Allen Health and PE Howard Beall Career Center ,R Karen Beck Foreign Language Duane Blankenhorn Guidance Jam Borshoff Mathematics Martha Bradshaw Social Studies Stephen Brlnkerhoff Career Center Jrm Brown Mathematics Joan Brown English 'Q -,W Joseph Brown Mathematics I i m - ' ,ij ' l 3 V 5:9 , ' ' . f" I ' f I C ei 1 - .' 5 ' I M A Cs r ,Q ' ' , ' SRS 'Ru . H- -gy A F .. W . i ' - 1 n L A " ' M ' t 4 B l , , 5, C Q , 1 y , tg.-f E, -. Raymond Browne, Art i f 1 if ' fi 75? 'gy .3191-,""l' X YQ ' 'A'Ji?.kilfl-'E'f"":"-'42in3" A C l 5 J Qu: , X e .. A A-1::1l1::'-,-wil'-4' ' ' ,- 1 V+ "KK ff 1: . 54 C , X 5 rt 1916- rl ' ':1:::11:'1Lx13:Sl,-ffl,ff-.l'2' ' K ,g jpg, 535 ,,Q,,gM ,Z 14. E ,,g5Qg - .1 . .. el xl V , ,.....,- , . l . I , M li J Faculty 141 Leamlng how to properly caulk and seal a pipe joint are Lawrence Shaffer and James Meyers under the supervi- sion of plumbing teacher Lemar Barnett. The 36 vocational programs offered by the Indianapolis Career Education Center, which is housed on the Tech campus, had an enrollment of 1,162 full-time and 147 part-time students. 1 1 Q Patricia Burton, Home Economics Michael Cecil, Business Education A Cheryl Chambers, Special Education f 5 Debi Cline, Career Center Ernest Cline, Guidance Robert Collins, Science q Diane Comstock, English Z I Robert Cooley, Career Center Z Janice Cooper, Guidance 1 Frank Craig, Health and PE -L , E2 Faculg 4 Looking Appearing on the Flamingo Club's list of the ten best dress- ed men in Indianapolis for two consecutive years is quite an honor. Tailoring most of the I I Sew Fine clothes that earned him that recognition magnifies this honor awarded to William Harrod. Making and modeling the wan., I wardrobe which won him this distinction allowed Mr. Harrod to be the perfect role model for the 17 students in his tailoring class. Before coming to Tech in 1977, Mr. Harrod taught at Crispus Attucks. His formal training includes an undergraduate degree from St. Paul's College in Lawrence, Virginia, and a masters degree from Indiana State University. Practical experience resulted from spending five summers in New York City gaining a knowledge of trade shortcuts and trade secrets from German and Italian tailors. Along with A nattlly dressed William Harrod ap- pears well suited to the plush surroun- dings of the Home Economics formal dining room. working in clothing stores in New York doing alterations, he owned and operated his own dry cleaning and alteration business, until the partnership was dissolved. In addition to his teaching duties, and his personal tailor- ing work, Mr. Harrod serves as head of the Service Occupa- tions Department in the Career Center. With all of his respon- sibilities, it is fitting that his philosophy is "I like a challenge." Looking ahead to future challenges, Mr. Harrod plans to go back into business when he retires from teaching. JROTC instructors lst Sgt. Neris Willis and MSgt. Dock Hughes are housed in Civil War vintage barracks. ROTC has been taught here since 1919. 'is 7, ,A Betty Crowe, Adult Ed Counselor Tom Darzheiser, English Anthony Denson. Career Center Britt Dickinson, Career Center James Duckworth, Career Center I . 17:1 A I -mg 1 D. Reid Evans, Career Center . W is f r Edward Evans, Music K Q.. f x , ' Judith Feigert, Mathematics f I " ' Q if NE 'I fr Joyce Freeman, Business Education U- ' D ' "'- j x. " X . i 1 Lois Frye, Business Education . . 1 ... y 1 is 2. ' . . x ' M ' 9 JXP! I N ' ,, ii: I li Faculty 143 V355 Ieff Georges Dad Most parents only dream of having a child who is rated 'fl in the entire country, however, for business teacher David George it became a reality. Mr. George's son, Jeff, the Warren Central Warriors' star quarter- back, received the title of number one high school foot- ball player in America. Winning a trip to the New Applied Economics students, Elaine Spradlin and James Allen discuss how to make a profit. This class formed a corporation, sold stock, made memo boards, and sold them to better unders- tand the American Economic system, Orleans Super Bowl, meeting Chicago Bear quarterback Jim McMahon, and being invited to Washington D.C. for a formal black tie affair, were just some of the rewards that Mr. George shared with his son. The George family did not, however, have to travel any far- ther than their living room to meet famous college football coaches. From December 1, until Jeff signed with Purdue University on March 1, the George household was anything but calm. Almost every night a coach from a different universi- ty would visit the George home to inform the Georges about his university's athletic program. The George household was so hectic that the phone had to be taken off the hook in order to have a peaceful dinner. Life was not always hectic for Mr. George and his family. When Jeff was five, six, and seven years old, he used to sit on the bench with his father during a game and watch the Tech freshman basketball team play. Jeff would also accom- pany his dad to practices. One day, while Jeff was shooting baskets in the gym, Coach Er- nie Cline predicted to Mr. George that Jeff would be an all-state athlete in three sports. When asked what it felt like to be the father of "the famous Jeff George", Mr. George replied, "We realize that we are blessed and we thank God every night." Dave George congratulates his son, Jeff, after Warren Central received its trophy for winning the state football Class 4A championship game against Valparaiso. ..-faq, W, David George, Business Education Lucia Gonzalez, English C . William Guess, Business Education 1 W1 fi, Margaret Hahn, English 1 A. Tanya Hairston, Career Center "' . I ' , i L., Q L12 5 , , ggi. f' ' lk :R I V We , Lf? 'g T flfk? N 4 ' K , '1 ' IN.. ' I Hester Hale, English 2 I Alexzene Hamilton. Career Center ml I 'i.l I William Hama, cmeercenger W , p A Marilyn Hoffman, Mathematics ' s Y V Ernest Holmes, lndustrialIArts ,mg f ' I , -, - 4' .Q ff I 144 Faculty It I , yf 1. 5 . . .ibl YEEK , t- - cv 'H A2 . I I . X I I I at ' 1 I A I t I I Q' I I I I Chemistry student Mark Easley carefully weighs a chemical before he heats it over a Bunsen burner. Former Tech teacher, James Easterly, who returned the second semester, checks ,, Mark's results for accuracy. Cx X 1 David Hon, Science :SN f N V Garlan Howard, Science ' ' 'F f ' John Hurrle, Health and PE -7 If I Virginia Jackson, Business Education X 'QQ Norma Johnson, Career Center fr f cgi tn Y, ' Q 3' 1 J ity 1 , 174 'S ' if i I Roy Johnson, Career Center John Kanouse, Social Studies l 6.0 John Kern, Science John King, Guidance Paul Kinser, Career Center Faculty 14-5 ,or"""""" Having to eat what you cook has always been a challenge in foods classes. Kimberly Douglas finds that using chopsticks is an equal challenge, as she enjoys her oriental meal. Notice, though, that Kim has a fork close at hand for "emergencies"-like starving to death while trying to master the use of Eastern eating utensils. JY ' Y Julius Kleine, Health and PE 4 Arthur Kirsch, Science Francis Knue, Health and PE Arnold Lehman, Mathematics Q A A Mable Lewis, Music Cliftonilloiaelace fffareerfjeriter i it HMary'LouQManka: Health andPE it i V Lewis Marshallg Mathematics' Q ' ' 'l 1 Ezzenimarzfnfausiness Education Q 17 s iDorzMason5XMathematicsa ' 5 ' 1. , .. 2 -fi, E33--,X s Q' ev 1 46 Faculty 5 5 Y , ,x Q5 N we ,J-'W :is , A ' S if - XY Q in - 5 X Rh W gi V. A J .1 - M3 XM 3 1, t, K , v f . Vw 5- 5. ,,. K' ,rf-" '-V. if s its - -b,,f A N , t i s i c t i s '3 an t el 1 X f s f y if A X t ' if , x ' , ,ly ,N Z 'tw::!if., ?? 1 ' l ' X V ,sf ' H 3 1 r ,. .E --- ,Qgli , X -, '-4 .4 53 - Y ' ' ' l ,A - hx 'Q K 1 ' f V 4:- . - e.-5 1 jp 1 , 1 '2"f"" 1 Q i 5' .',E5Z,3 , il 5 .g U i .0.:l-M Q 4 -5 e 1 3 1 Carol on, Carillon On crisp winter mornings last December and commence- ment evening this spring, the clear, crisp notes of the carillon 'lilted across the campus. For many of the students and staff members who en- joyed these peaceful interludes, the existence of the carillon was a surprise. Many, in fact, probably still do not know ex- actly where the music came from. 'Cutting up' in Biology class, Stephanie Stevens, Stacey Williams, and Steve Hon enjoy the laboratory ses- sion a great deal more than does the frog which Stacey is dissecting. The carillon is located in the tower of Stuart Hall. But very few people showed an interest in it. That is, until Doyne Swin- ford was informed about its ex- istence by students in his classes. Mr. Swinford, who teaches Latin part-time at Tech and at Howe High School, began tak- ing piano Iessons at the age of eight. He studied music and has served as a church organist for six years. Music strikes him as being scientific, mathematical, and logical as well as entertain- ing. After considering a career in music, he opted for teaching because, " . . . teaching fwork- ing with young peoplej is more interesting than the performing arts." Playing the organ is now only a hobby. When the carillon was rediscovered, Mr. Swinford found that it was in need of repairs. He quickly convinced Dr. McGeehan to have it repaired. With the system once again operational, Mr. Swinford revived a tradition of playing carols each morning before school for the three weeks preceding Christmas. The other traditional use of the carillon was for the Vespers service which, in the past, preceded commencement. Although Vespers are no longer held, Mr. Swinford thought that it would be nice to restore part of the dignity which this ceremony lent to graduation. Of his willingness to provide this delightful service, he com- mented, "l feel that it is a tradi- tion which merits continuance." Junior Anita Bridgeman observes, as Doyne Swinford plays Christmas carols on the carillon. Anita was in- strumental in reviving this holiday .P""- ju- ., Af .- gk 9- I -1113.2 tradition. . ,v XD . -,., et"-Q, 'X J mwa- -ww-fv ,I,lg'7':ff James May, Science Judith McBride, English Dennis McClain, Industrial Arts William McCrearg, Business Education Bruce McGeath, Social Studies Ann McMillan, English Cheryl Mcvay. Business Education Walter Mendel, ,Career Center Robert Meyer, Social Studies Frederick Miessen, Career Center . "St, ...,.., ,, .,.. , 4- -r-.-'-.:?'-x. 'f'-W' SHAW - "IT-4 'z U , 1 P11 ' V , J , lf' 2 f l ' + ai l 1' . r ,awk ,. g g , . , z .I N I 3' 1 ll ,refs I ' " r 'Q' 4 XA Q FN: pines' I . ' 'W ' ' tw! ' ' l w Lf. I ' ' a 9 ix liz f 5. g ' X N . Y, a 'M savv- --dnw al l ,Y A 1 Faculty 147 Satisfaction Comes From Students The Billy Thom award, spon- sored by the Indiana High School Wrestling Coaches Association, was presented to head wrestling coach and Physical Education department head John Hurrle in February. Mr. Hurrle, who had previously been inducted into the IHSWCA Hall of Fame, received the award based upon his outstan- Sophomore William Wright, an ad- vanced cabinetmaking student, and his teacher, Anthony Denson, inspect a cabinet being constructed by students who are building the Career Center house. .-,.-......1 L..m,,,,,, . my W4 ding contributions to high school and freestyle wrestling. Mr. Hurrle began his wrestl- ing career by participating as a high school wrestler while at- tending Southport High School. He went on to wrestle at ln- diana Central College and in the Army. When he was discharged from the Army, he took a teaching job at Scecina Memorial High School where he started the school's wrestl- ing program. Bill Treichler, who was Tech's wrestling coach at that time, helped Mr. Hurrle form the Scecina program and later was responsible for his be- ing hired at Tech. ln his tenure at Tech, Coach Hurrle has guid- ed his wrestlers to two state championships. Mr. Hurrle considers Greg Levell to be one of his greatest success stories. When Greg began wrestling, he weighed in at 76 pounds. Greg finished his freshman season with a third place in the city meet. He com- piled a record of 59 wins and only one loss during his junior and senior years and, as a senior, he was a state cham- pion in the 98-pound weight class. Producing a champion was not the only satisfaction Mr. Hurrle got from coaching. He stated, "There are times when the greatest satisfaction comes from seeing a kid start as a freshman, with little wrestling knowledge, and go on to become a good wrestlerg or, even to struggle many times and finally win a match." Sports news is made as John Hurrle, wrestling coach and Physical Education department head, receives the Billy Thom award for his outstanding con- tributions to wrestling. le ,oft .,,. - s-Q--I L'e113fq,t.,w ---mn-f,,.-,,MW, qggiw, , ..- . t 9 ,, 2-Jr! --Cyp i V ,fx .- ....-..,..E 3 f ' , Q if 3 X-. an V ef ft 1, , . ' ff 2: fc A F ff A '32 of , 5. ' 1. 4 , I '9 , .V U 'zfifgygi xr, 3 iw vi rin f ' ' E f X , - , if Ax .?Q'f'?' ,ff ,Q .- I Q, 9 .F .t.f 1 ' ' V as I It I s P 9 , as -. 1 - gg- 1 ,f '- 1- F tw ....,. 3 Q csv v --V - i' f - 2 , ill: , t . ' sf ' its 1 , 1 fr i 'if . . Lifl - fs VY -+-- It f -X "- if " I f I l 1 ' t Q gs, 1 ll 4 1 48 Faculty I -. ew Y 4: ,V . l x ""1"a X, wwixii-'5bf'y. Q, , Q ws", 23' 'SM x .S gg, 1 5. . en. SG Q M532 it " f' wqrgg I 4 'I ' Q. Zum sz ':2,l'f5?7f' , if 'KDS' ei 'fe -lf' Mm' 5,5 . . 5. Q uf . I 'X David Cruser. advanced weldrng 1 NIJ,-2 -"- 1 4 '5- 'Q of A NN . . . . 32523 Q,gW.x',S, ,E ' .,,. sk ,...:1.,, fe H, gtg, me ns. teacher, instructs Ronald Srmpknns an - - We -r ' ,N-me ,, - e ' .. - A -. , Q . . , S ,Q 532. g.,,,51, . L L., A rf - X- the finer points of welding. gif' x ' ' Sharon Parrett, Guidance Elaine Pierce, Guidance A Q V Kenneth Poole, Career Center l I I scifi, . -Mk Paul Prather, Music ,fl .V it 'Li' ' Y WendrelPnce, Art 1 P I! X ' L1na'yPruett, Special Education Q, e Millard Qualls, Career Center ' Dorris Raines, Career Center f Natalie Ransom, Home Economics ' Lafayette Reed, Health and PE ' " Lewis Robertson, Business Education 1 5 Donald Robinson. Mathematics l . l I Fa-a1'lty .-Quik Sharmin Davis asks her American Studies teacher, Miss Mary Maillard, for help with an essay she is writing about an American author. 1 v A -P -lKbf1iiSChneidefQ SooiafStiidies A V W 5 A Ricfiiard,ShockSpeQia!fEducatibnt- if V .f 'Q 'N . Delsge.Sfjbeqijakhfibusiness Edngfatioh s V' Qudlliarhrtsiedlecki, SbciaifStiddies i , A 2 f s tgitQrfCafoQSmithf55c1ende Q1 f 5 JV, M ,,,!!g ,,Z,f,13.gi:?,tgi 'lewafzzsraafeag:FQrdiQnQyahswQe 1 r ' V iiir j ff?J6efSteQe,,Caireei:lQengeif'" gif-i ' ,i 1 4 if f W f11llQhfUTQ!f?99 Adii!,34f3Q!i3li1S0lif 'Q fi mai - ' 3, .24 L, yyqf Jig, . 1 2 .. '- ' 2- rg 2 , ,, sy . f N A 5. A ., Q yf. VV W 5 ' we My ,::fg,:i,.H' '- 'f , 1. I' 5. E 'N , 'R-1. 4 """b-....,,,m . ,, Qffdfx., , X v9.'N'?A5-79: in ls..-,-gsm, V if s P wWi"""""w:wM Vx, is X M., ,sf ,r-, , at . -'lo-wi Rx f we IX ,v-AAS f ' ., f ,W me We K V it 12:5 1 f',, 11X r iw, . .- : 1: 1 ,ws-,, sv , - lx: 1, X, 1.9 1' Y-'Q . ,J 2 X ,QF-.' -J., ' V, 1 2 i .W K fxi A XX ,gh rf A .. . , ,. x is K in fi r A! 4 -X T-.1 -Mm Q ,Q . ,X Q, 150 Facility? 1 2 Q 2, f, f 'Z S4 f gg .N as J 9 uk A S S, X S A X I is f A it A lk If 'J 4 1, 4, J . E kc 1 N rl wr Q, 4 ..f 'fi 1 5 x .L R. 2. 5 2 2, 2' 'L :nu Achievement is an Attitude Mrs. Delsie Shoemaker was honored by the indiana Association of Distributive Education Clubs of America as the 1986 Outstanding DECA Advisor. Mrs. Shoemaker has worked with DECA students at Tech for the past l5 years. ln a testimonial letter, a former stu- dent stated, "She was always ready and willing to help her students prepare for the real business worldg help them solve problems, accept Joe Steve points out the alternator to advanced auto mechanics student Michael Sullivan. A.. ft -X' I challenges, and achieve their goals. l personally thank God she did. l do now, always have, and always will feel very grateful to this individual and to DECA for their positive impact on my life." During her years at Tech, Mrs. Shoemaker's DECA chapter produced several district and state officers, as well as a national officer. She has had competitive winners at district, state, and national DECA contests. Her parliamen- tary teams placed first and se- cond in district competition this year and third and fourth in the state contest. Mrs. Shoemaker took senior Paul Jones to the National DECA Conference held in Atlanta, Georgia, in April to represent Indiana in the General Marketing Series. The Office Education Association, a group for secretarial and clerical students, also had a chapter at Tech. In March, the chapter won the state plaque for the largest gain in membership. They, too, had competitive winners at district, state, and national. Ann Hubbard, a senior, was accompanied to the national contest in, Columbus, Ohio, by her advisor, Ms. Cheryl McVay, to compete in Job Interview ll. Ms. McVay is one of the six members on the State Advisory Board of OEA. Achievement is an attitude which is encouraged in the business department. DECA winners showing off the trophies they won at the state DECA Conference, held at the Adams Mark Hotel, are: Front Row: Bobbie Stokes, Sharon Beck, Lisa Shea, and Honey Givans. Back Row: Adviser Mrs. Delsie Shoemaker, Gloria Gonzales, Tresa Shea, Tina Farmer, and Jesse Hicks. xi.. ,gf ......., X sry- W f' S "Hur 'K-'vs N5 'fr ii ' -i-fee? l David Tess, Special Education Cecil Tresslar, English Stella Vandiuier, Special Education Emrnagee Washington, Art . i Wanda Watts, Social Worker kv P Q Q 'Rf 'ffl 1 iirvmizqygfit- 1 .gm fill." I au- l if"-C's:.ll' if ftli i' Z:,'-.,. ,' if-i - . A Ralph Webb, Career Center Ward Whalin, Science -' William Wheeler, Mathematics Elizabeth Wilson, English Harold Wise, Career Center 'Q Q-A Robert Woodard, Health and PE - T " Lester Woolard, Career Center .f xii ' L' MS . -X 351' , 5 T' C' ' 55311-' F- 1' ' T' ' "' N ,sq L A -E g , ' f . f- 1' TT 1 ill! s - , 3 x K 1,! fu .. 'QI Q, 332 if i , Q' - X 3 if fre- 5 I fc.. i' i is 'I' L...f - ' ' -f ' vs. . K ' x ' ., ' A :1 i ,V - .f W 1, .lj my f . 1.1 A 1' A W W . , .. , . . , . . . . . iris, fy., S' Fx., 7.1. ...ix sf ye, : . , W 1 X Eff, "-" i T332 1 ' ' i S ' l Faculty 151 Computer Aids Attendance Staff If necessity is the mother of invention, Ed Davis may well be its stepfather. Skepticism met the announcement that Mr. Davis was designing a com- puterized attendance system. A similar attempt in 1971 was un- successful due to inadequate development time and a lack of enthusiastic support by the faculty. However, a continuous reduction in faculty and staff in the ensuing years created a new attitude of acceptance for such a plan. Mr. Davis had been employed at Tech for 7 years .1 A, -w " 1' S -..Q .'L'5sT X Y A sz 1 xg... 5? Freshman Larissa Johnson has her temperature checked by school nurse Mrs. Shirley Lundgren. The lone staff member of the health center, Nurse Lundgren diagnoses about 50 students per day whom she treats or sends home, to other health care providers, or back to class. Secretaries are the 'behind the scenes' staff that keep a school operating smoothly. Seated: Shirley Thomas, Patricia Littell, and Bonnie Jones. Standing: Bernadlne Pool, Julia Thompson, Deborah Winn- ingham, and Gloria Robbins. Mrs. Rob- bins was honored by the IPS Ad- ministrative staff during National Secretaries week with a plaque. She has served for 42 years as a secretary to five of Tech's seven principals. 152 Staff !.'.'-" as accompanist to the music department before assuming his current duties. He, along with Paul Prather, music department head, began to develop an attendance program on their own, to see what could be done. After many hours and numerous revisions, their plan was submitted to the school ad- ministration for consideration. The plan was well received and accepted for adoption. The manual portion of the system is simple and direct. Each student in a class is assigned a code number by the S film. C, , . Mmimaz.Lf:. 'vi . system. Attendance is taken by recording the code numbers of absentees on a form. ROTC messengers deliver the forms to the attendance desk for in- put into the computer. Along with reducing the tedious record keeping of at- tendance, the new program has been merged with new and ex- isting procedures. An automated calling device picks up from the computer the names of students who are ab- sent and then telephones the home of the student to inform the parents. Also, program changes can be handled by the computer, thereby reducing paperwork and preventing students from being lost in the shuffle. Mr. Davis knew that any computer program as complex as this one would contain 'bugs'. Nonetheless, the response to his system has been overwhelmingly positive and with time to refine and ex- pand the program it has the potential to become a perma- nent fixture. Edward Davis 'attends' to his stu- dent records program. ,DMR W.. lar Olly - 1 xun er cfcvlnvf Jay 1 urnj ,. Jrffij 32 Hull! KLIIILPII Url! . ' Jon 1 arllru bra A :au IJ 3. bm..1w , rrman Ju njlpin . jul dburln 1 il mel, Cori fling,-151.6 IW' func' onufvz z lull ur ner 0 4. 1 1 fa . U C11 '31 Kelly Crm., I8 9. ,bu 211 . unalncl .-D IJ .3 W WA fl. ,Dm W L10 umm ,Di lzlzf i ' annie riur GD1111 ey ,Zig ML 1Lr'parfrnz':1f :Wy ?fQ,1f.l. .11 fm. 1 , . lim 33 2. 1' Pdena Cll'll'l0I'l 6lfl"0I'l.'5 The persons listed below are true Techites. These alumni faculty staff and friends of the school continue their commitment to the is most appreciated. L9 J-ll. ilzgwf o efgn ar guage' jaw Sam... CAQJO11., l80Lef11.m J .Spanner 7 argaref Jann anya qua' Jfo wh ,fdnne a 1 1' ia n cjfarrocl larifyn Juoffman Q. .Juowaral Eu me enrit nl Jalan an largarel .jvlurrg 35651575 5- K irginia no 1 err? jam: 72 4 lfzur .Kerri 28 Pan H3011 Pl ff ranzia nue ar ara ruje .Xu I .ffruae 7 er e CT. gfewio PM fm.. onlleff 51 ' 4 ,D nz! . uman o z 2 r Ing U-lunflgruz 1116. ,, 111 -ff.. .1 W.. , .1 111..,.i.. .xdndrew I. ilarfil 511 Qi 111...1.-,, 'Wi' I. f .7 Wlu li lt 'Wlam uclfn 7lfl'Zgr'zJe iam lylflffreary ,1 111. If , . rancid JJL 218 .mcuizl Wlflifgr 37 .Karen iclwarala lflalein 5 olrn Miner fy f Tlflilzer Sian Wlflinlu goin 111.11i1,,.,., erman J. afw 4- 1 ' iam od. Oahu, r. Gwen Amif Qfucife ff' ' G IZQFLP .S,Al.l'Ay 14. inf - 0 '.".3' ' ln Recognition of Service to Tech Adult Edcuation Programs " ln Memoriam Pauli mllwf on' I I-Jr' JI fl , '7.'1l1'n9 qua frnrnl 7' .ff 'WI . llfwnpl 11111 -11 fe., I3 .1 111,..,1,.. 9. fe., wtf, fe- 1, .1 c I fiugenc J 56 ,u u ,fff 1 urge: 27 olincl jkfrner .Silva 2 . 8 0 Jie cgfrocma :er fo W1 Ml ,Smiln 5 I uf,'0f.'p 111162 Sim 43 My-A J 4. SMA! 43 ..zn.1e.,..f,1y.51 .11 1. jam .Sl uin . 8' 571 A flm flvtff ni ,7rmJ ur V n 8 Qfor-ia llflfleegfr - 1.1f,t,11, ,, .b.,,.,.1,.1 gfmff I oaafynne yarns' 5f best traditions of Arsenal Technical High School. Their patronage Cl f W' J '74 u 1 'ng ' I ' 7 at I1 fl fu: 3 r I 1 .LD fa rl nl r ai r r ' uf 'J yan' 'f 1 1, L... 711411, Lb ,. Lb . f 1 'GQ f 91.11 '1 J 1 , 11, ' ,, ' , 2, Lynn fl ,off u 1 .f I G lr '52 I en .Lborru W! ' J! 1 ll IC ae 1 ,. f W I 1 j ir n on 1 X ll ar .1 '60 ll 1' . '11, JJ ., JJ A y . . . 1201 , ' ,.1,.,.1 ' 1 1 , 111, .11 f fn 1., 3 .1 2 ,zur nrrf arc! 6aH Jann .jslofllnzarz In cyoupir Wlfltgieelzun gangs' CY. .gyzearer '58 'WI I ' ' f 'W CAN ' Ll ' Ll 1 1 's ' 9 51 111. ., ,. ... ' Q15 C I ' J W 1 ' LD f ' 1 I jf Q' J C . Vs ' uf W 11.00 ' W, '7 HL ' '5 'WW II 'I '. , 'lf jml , Q 7 'WI J' ' NV 2 H j l I ' , a ur gf fx W1 X 1 1 s 1 ' 1 ll " ' 1 1 y 1 ' G LD f K 'G 9 9.1 J1 .11 '7 1 '. e, I 1 ' K 1 ' 3 JC Sl. I' O I V1 H C LQ X JJW 'ff 167 A JI H M!! Q '41 C K M f 51 by 3 ' f ,Q 1 ' O 1 ' I I K ' W f '411 Q 23 7911, . W. ' ' 1 ' n R ' 3 I K ' I 1 a J Q It 02 r ,loaf 2 8 t 'iii l TECH TEEN CLINIC. School Nurse Shirley Lundgren consults with Teen Clinic Coordinator Val Barkley-Bellew. The teen clinic has served 425 students, since opening its doors in November. Working with students were nurses, doctors, counselorsfsocial workers, and part-time nutritionists. Over lOO students have been served in the nutritional area. The Clinic did not give complete diagnostic physicals, but only checked for specific problems. Eye, ear, nose, and throat infections have been the most common health problems. Skin related problems have been second. Thirty-seven students were referred to other health care pro- viders for treatment of chronic illnesses. PatronsfStaff 153 w-W X 25? ,ig . 'fd if r S25 pfpslg mf? W mm H some 5252 5 ll di!- There are certain a vantages to working at the concession stand during home games. Junior Dawn Llpshaw earns extra money gets to see friends and keeps up on scores as the games are played. " ' 1.. ' vri I 7 , E ,il rg 4 fig 54 Ads Division ,,,,,,............ rj' "Do you have plans for Saturday afternoon?" "Not really. Ijust have a den- tal appointment early in the morning. Why?" "I am going shopping for clothes and I was just wonder- ing if maybe you'd like to go with me? "I'm sure my mom will say okay. I only hope she'll give me some spending money." "You have a job, why don't you use your own money?" "Are you kidding? After I pay for lunch, gas, and insurance, I barely have enough to buy a pencil from the bookstore." As students progressed through high school their at- titudes about independence and finance changed. Parents who reluctantly gave their sons and daughters more freedom to control their own lives often gave them less financial support. Freshmen, who discovered that high school offered a more varied social life, also found that admission to sports events, movies, and dances put a real crimp in their meager budgets. Money-wise seniors were After visiting the concession stand, Duane Loyd enjoys freshly popped popcorn, a cold Pepsi, music, and the Muncie Central basketball game. ,ga . N M ilmntrz'-'9' amused by the economic pro- blems of the underclassmen. Seniors had real expenses: senior pictures, an- nouncements, a yearbook, the prom, graduation, and for some, saving for college. They not only had to find the best buy for the buck, they had to seriously consider getting a job to offset their bloated budgets. Popular places for high school employment were the fast-food restaurants. McDonald's and Hardee's employed many Tech students because they were close to the campus and students could work after school. The malls employed students in such areas as fast food, clothing stores, and record shops. Money the students made was spent in the businesses which employed them and throughout the entire business community. Actual experience in the business world led to a respect of economic interdependence which for many was a "New Attitude." Sophomores Allison Brinkley, Tracy Graham, and junior Maria I. Camarena make a toast "to friendship'-' while relaxing in the music office before cheerleading and majorette practice. Ads Division 155 ,- A-I, -,, I 1 W W-4 WEBER I Q Lakevlew Marma 2090! N Hague Road AAI' Nobles Ile IN 46060 5 World Closs Boots Z... H 0 n. n um nmnun nfmmmm mu ,Ay Johnson mmm was SIAHCHAFTJ Sk: Supreme OWNED AND OPERATED BY jeff and Amta QI-Iuberj Lmgenfelter C f 0 r an " 3 - ' l Q .....,- E I Q 3, 4 S N ' - Fl 1 ". - . . '."'.'.'.-".' 1.9 ' 'wi-'-' .S-7 ' ' .9.'k:':S'.?vi Ai. 'Kiln' "E: "' 2 9 X '25, .f.g 1 1. 'Q A 2 . o". ' . ' I: -.1 9' Hs-15-:H - "' 5 Q C vi , i I N K fm 0 1973 J lo I4 ref -94 . S 'Me' ? f:M' ,fc 5 r TEE KAY FLOWER 8: NOVELTY SHOP 3501 Brookside Pkwy. South Dr. 638-4264 B ,mills Calto 8: Corsaro Produce Co 428 SOUTH NEW JERSEY STREET INDIANAPOLIS IN 46225 637 7638 . FA g ,, I. ' Cx! T1 f Q .. f ., , ' 4' NSW , ,-q ' f eve. 5-i'Qrg,:f1flf,,, l l - , I '-uif-u'?I,!vg,t ' -:'k5 .l'-9711f?ff- - fw . 4.1 ' , u,.34x'A. 'gvj f x ,fjfgg tt- in ,-,fr if , ., -,I 'Ta ff ff? f fi CRUSH' nu uf harold s Steer ln 5130 E 10th Street Th Hoosier splrlt X ,E RCA s got lt' Q Our Hoosier heritage us an asset as real as the made rn lndlana that carry the RCA nameplate We ve learned that what makes lndlana a great place to llve and work IS Its wlde eyed optlmlsm mlxed with a healthy dose of f 'af' S X ln l 9924 X mett ff! .M ,, X WR NX s Jil common sense No matter how sophustncated RCA products become our lastlng success stall depends on old fashioned values luke hard work and stuck to It ,,-fy, l ,gg N,-,Ei lveness Thats the klnd of splnt that prevails In Indlana and 3 M I Ill-III-I mum: wr I H we re glad nts rubbed off on us K P J P x M Q 1 t M ll - . I ,4 , un I 1 1 . 1 'nl 9 o 3 2 ' I Q ,.,l,l 3: T:fi3ffQf517i'Qi5f3?E2 if 1if'E?f3iZg7f'f 'Q ' ' ' I 5 ' I fe- 1Q5?Q2QfEQ'5QfQZ ffffiiilefiiifiifffliliiiQQ l2il35'5?Qff-195:50 3432552 - 5- ' Q nefne entertainment products rg S , ,.,,.,l. 1.1 ,,,,.,,-, C 1 , . fi ' .s "'--'- -'1-1:1:5:5:::,5:2'2-1 S . . . . . blk, Q i , ..,.. x I ws ,I M, - V S-. X " lu n txt l S P . , Vf 'fn-exe e X nl ff y yt l y , I 'L r X - ' X ' A ll? IJ Q . X , xxx I , I' 5 I f , je- - S xt, fre, is l, . . ,I ff, f I , n fx N If 5 a 7, 1 , -ZIFVPE I - 'I' l ' J'-QR V' X 1 . ' . . Jw. :,,i 4 l I l X -Aexe ll' . , A ' ' l .Qlksj X - l ' l 33 -Rf' I I ' . . . '-5 I l '- zfn vft- U ' y I - , V' Q :QW feuzfaam- - f YY ig 1 ' . :wii-5275-:r9:'.r. --- - A , , I Y f I ' A S - Ads 157 li Current student Cedric Lloyd looks over an advertising banner as a passerby Sales have been brisk as graduates, who missed a chance to buy a yearbook helps yearbook adviser, Mrs. Virginia Jackson, set up a booth at homecoming. when they were students, eagerly took advantage of the opportunity. The fur- Each of the last two years, remaining copies of old yearbooks have been of- ther removed alumni became from their high school experience, the clearer it fered for sale to alumni returning to campus for the homecoming festivities. became that even though their memories might fade . . , ,4 64 .f I l gig 9 999 9 T P. O. BOX 1392 SAN ANGELO. TX. 76902-9990 l l 19157 949-3776 f 158 Ads F W PhllIlpR.Duke 8zAssoclaies Congratulcrte the Class of '86 H g fth y book T gth Ell gebeg Shl p Arsenal Cannon Alumm ASSOC1Ht1OH K PLAN FOR YOUR FUTURE TODAY' Data Processrng Accredrted by A I C S ,WM it Word Processnng Funancral And Avaliable Accountrng Job Placement Asslstance Admrnrstratuve Over 90 Years Experrence Swag Medrcal Assrstrng rn Career Trarnrng Pontlac Buslness Instltute 47 East Washlngton Indranapolrs -' can 13171634 2901 e e rafmg 60 geara o aeruzng A Comrnunrty Ads 159 lF.L'. STEWH - HFINEFI, We 7mm 71,4 70654 'N'-S-.,,, is T A f Computer programming student Tammy Austin recenves noteworthy mfor matron from James Daniels of Stewart Warner about nts data processing applications Senior computer students Michael Wrllrams and Kevin Thurman receive an explanation of S W s computer usage from employee Denise Kirsch -vw llllll I '-rs: 4-1 wwf fs N? 233593 54 South Wind Division was 'P as ' Nancy Brigham of S W Lisa France secretary Rlta Timmons and Cathy Sluder have their dlscussnon of the use of tub files Interrupted by the photographer 13' Jknf Intensive Ofiice Lab student Tonya Hurt quizzes Jan Olmstead about her duties as a secretary at Stewart Warner Give-and take IS Important rn a partnership In addition to taking assistance from Stewart Warner Tech gives enjoyment to S W employees as the Techolr per forms a holiday concert 160 Ads . . . . . . . - - I I I ' t J Q, QKZQM f f , ' If J 2 . V fi ' ' , I . . . . . . . . . . . . 'W -:X In- --,.....I ..., ,. ,,,,,,, X , ,,fq:,,:? l mt -.sg fl2,,2- A 1 5-5724 4122? is 9243 'Vi' N -i ??gs'aV7'15'f5' 44' lx: Q wtftififi " 11, "'1gf1ge4s2:s Q:4a3wf,z,,sfr ': t Q ' :L 'Q'--Hz!! fri? Qs- Aa- A . , f It 'ity 2-fast'-to . ,-.W ' . ' n ' - ' AAQ 7 Disc Jockey 1 1-1 . X ' , Q al ClIucL f jim 51.4 ii 317 462-4245 f e 86 racluafed 4 4 W PQUI E. Lewis I JOSTENS Aw ami an g enes AMW would like to congratulate We 00 o 1 ef ll , G ofa rf K X f d IR M IE IR the Tech graduating class of 1986 J 4425 E. 21st sr. 4 Indionopolis, IN 46218 1095 MARKET 1402 E. Ohio 3 fx K J 638-9972 I , Best Wishes, Tech Grads! Call or visit American Fletcher for all of your banking needs, including: 0 Checking Accounts A 0 Savings Accounts 0 Loans for any worthwhile purpose H Woodruff Place ' I I 2122 East 10th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46201 E N, 13175 639-7269 Eastside I 4710 East 1Oth Street, Indianapolis, IN 46201 . C3175 639-7069 I 3 Michael H. Kennedy, Assistant Vice President A AMERICAN FLETCHER NATIONAL BANK g gggggngggggggggg Membef wc Q I K I 7 I is Advert sin .....l-11 Q - I . I C"Tigd""' """""' seg' . U ' 'h I ROOT HELPS YOU TO REMEMBER th 5' ttphtog ph "QMS - - REMEMBER OFFICIAL PHOTGGFIAPHER EOF? ARSENAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHODL ROOT PHOTOGRAPHERS 1131 vv SHERIOAN CHICAGO 4 ,..,. ef' H-K Nw, if , ,I f' Q' ' W ,O rf " :- . K I I 3 xx N X 1 KW -, A I ,, 0 xg, we I WO-Ps NR - a . nlor Kevln Smit will develop newa 1 u es as he goes throu h hfe However, he wlll always ' ' ' be a e o reflect upon IS hug school experience because e oo o ra er cau lm ln action, and 0 0 I 162 Ads 3? ii n !A : neurons' Tech '61 'V H 0 on Now 8 Locations' 95,5 To Serve You Better . I -2-L 1966 Joe OMolio opens his 1st store or 106rh 8 10450 N. College. 1968 Joe O Molio opens his 2nd store or18O S. Rongeline Rd. in Corrnel. 1978 Joe 1976 Joe 1978 Joe OMolio opens his 5rh srore or 116th 8 Westfield in Cornnel. 1982 Joe 1982 Joe 1985 Joe We Could Go On And On And On And We Will. ln foci, in 1986 Joe O'Molio will open his9rh srore downrown or Loclserble Morlserploce OMolio opens his 8rd store in Noblesville. OMolio opens his Arh store or 56rh 8 Emerson. CDMolio opens his 6rh store or 126th or Groy Rd. in Cormel. OMolio opens his 7rh srore or 86rh 8 Township Line Rd. OMolio opens his 8rh srore or 1Orh 8 Girls School Rd. J : E 4 , . in : 4, 0 llflll ' I ' nn ":.'r.::.'::u...,f" 413 I O Sue Harger, Realtor X K H M GRAVES C0 INC REALTORS W 910N Shadeland Indianapolis Indiana 46219 Office 317 359 9241 Home 317 898 5185 Em Ill' - - W ll jf' 'F F, Ploneers In Bankmg. MGTTWDSYF y sf I - "'llIl i 44 - "" f ' SSOCIATION 7' J x . . , . .g,72Cll1lZlllglllpI'0,I2I'fy0fl Ile GJLHJB j 1 .-L. ...gg X I d' N I' I ,, I gs, n Iana a Iona . I Ir- . l I Ill 'ilfllw' . Y .Alfa . sb Ads 165 po tunlty checklist Do you or will you receive at least S639 per month plus free room and board? Do you or will you recieve at least 30 days vacation with pay per year starting your first year? Do you or will you receive the opportunity to become a supervisor In 32 months? Did you or will you receive at least S475 worth of new clothes plus an upkeep allowance? Do you or will you receive shopping privileges with discounts of up to 30'X:" Do you or will you have access to recreational facilities such as golf courses swimming pools gymnaslums theatres clubs and hobby shops at little or no cost' Will you or have you been trained in a skill at no expense to yourself and did you or will you recieve full salary and benefits during your training? Is the technical training you receive worth up to 30 semester hours of college credit? Will you have the option of quitting after 3 years to go to college' Along with that option will your employer contribute S25 200 towards the cost of that education? Will you receive up to a S8 000 bonus upon reenlistment and accepting a challenging position In certain career fields? A IF YOU ANSWER YES TO ALL THESE QUESTIONS YOU HAVE A GOOD JOB' IF YOU ANSWER NO THE ARMY OFFERS ALL THIS AND A SECURE FUTURE WRITE OR CALL YOUR ARMY REPRESENTATIVE sur, g - LOARD A. HILL 'I SERGEANT my U.S. ARMY RECRUITING STATION sa moi pol ,IN 46204 on Ph 13175269-7691 I I N 0 1 Will the employer pay up to 75M of the tuition for any college courses you decide to take? l l. , . , . C ' Jnlfi' 8 I I , Nor e awa St I Indiana is one 164 Ads COSSEY'S AUTOMOTIVE INC. Complete Automotive Service Since 1921 2229 E. New York St. we wiall for you a aucceufuf Afe 631-5010 and lraplnineaa in flue fufure. Mondoy-Fridoy, 7:45-5:45 3906 E. 10th St. 353-9397 X j All Makes a. Models Air Conditioning-Repairing-Recharging K Brake Work .. 2'-ffe Carburetor Rebuilding iglll f , Cooling System Service-belts, thermostats, hoses, flushing Sz radiator repair ax 4 Cruise Controls-installation and repair Speedometers repaired f n ' f I TUNE UP WORK-MAIOR 8a MINOR 1 ' Q 7 ' - 1 7 fx 7 ' Custom Window Defoggers Installed bl mII.Eg..l,D,:,.l- ns' All work guaranteed for 90 days or 4,000 miles The oldest F unegaii sllggllfgggeni in Indianapolis 1601 E. N York Street, Indianapolis, India 46201 13171632-5374 Youth Job Preparedness Program, Inc. Are you 14, 15 or 16 years old? Do you live on the Near Eastside? X Are you enrolled in school? A ' ' . Here is what YJPP can offer YOU . . . ' 1 1 Training I ' ' Counseling I 4 ' Work Experience i is Weekly Stipend f 4 Monthly Bonus - Work Schedule Compatible I with School Hours For more information call 634-1414 p l l Mary Armstrong-Smith l 4115 North State Street 1 P.O. Box 11465 - Indianapolis, Indiana 116201 J Ads 165 Terry Cole, Phurmuclsi Dwner We offer fast efficient low cost prescription service plus communication between patient and pharmacist if a perti- nent question is asked or if the prescription needs explana- tion This is the PERSONAL TOUCH that you can expect from Low Cost RX. Low Cost RX is not a traditional drugstore. I believe prescriptions should be filled with accuracy at the lowest possible prices The reason for this is that a great percentage of prescriptions come from the chronically ill retired people or the elderly and these segments of our population can least afford the cost Low Cost RX would like to be your pharmacy. You ll have a hard time finding a pharmacist who appreciates your business more or one who will try harder to please Ou' Sincerely 7"MA4'1. Registered Pharmacist-owner .jgegzffone - Wadcaon .14 787-7205 881-8262 WE' . -f" ' ' H gym. i .. -5 , ' " t v- U f, ' V .., I , .,...-. A WW, . , . A , , . vw ' ...X .. f " .,,, 0W CDST RX Pimnmncv 31. CTL fl! f f f, fl. J Afff f L THE CQLAQQ TF nano ? f W Q of 0 i e i4 wound Lu once Aim! no man lm Ae ,www jo fef 'u4 w en llle Aan 4 wiffafop a Q, of earfy lwuf. 7701014 flw mf, fame you own. live, fave am! foif wif!! a wifg pface no fault in fom offo w, jar lie JOCL may lfzen Q mf! X ssmons of 1 986 J K X East New York Flower Shop ,bgqggeifi Lgwggig- T ?awmp4 aeeaemumd gg? 2838 E. New York Sr. 636-2313 NJ f 9201 E. Washington St. f " T A A -o,M898-1198 'ocdions - 1 an: I A direct dep slt T A PAINT AND AUTO SUPPLY CORPORATION T 2114 E. vvAsHnNoToN STREET A J 1NouANAPoLls, INDIANA 46201 Rgmq Auromonvs PAINT sPEc1A1.1sTs 637-5303 Q , N Feamers U I. "Q -1 'T Q '- ' Sass I - un: my Q Q 11111111111 A g- g g 1 A T 2331 N. Meridian 4562 N. shaaeland , F Lagifan I x A Indianapolis, IN Indianapolis, IN Q' A 2 1Owf'1f OPS WL' 45255 45225 FTD .ND.2Li8pEgE','iI'S.i'1f1 kC317D 926-1526 Cam 542-1222 J 2-4 gg Ad 167 - 6,56,68,100 7 A,H,M Graves Co , lnc ,Realtor .. ,.,163 Abbett, Anthony . .....,. , . 56,60, 61, 100 Abbott, Lori . . . . Abdullah, Jamillah . , , Acey, Billy . , . . Adair, Jean ,,.. Adams, David Adams, Glenda . Adams, Glenn , , . Adams, Mechial , . , . Adams, Shari . , . Aguilera, Norma Akbar, Paulette , , ,120 ..130 ,,,130 ,,.130 ...120 U85 ., ,141 ., ..,120 112 .. .29,59,75.112 ., ,. ...120 Alcorn, Gregory . , . 52, 55, 59, 68, 76, 100 Alexander, James ,.......120 Alexander, Phillip , . , 11, 51, 57, 64, 67, 68, 76, 90, 100, 101 Alexander, Tammy . , . . 29, 59, 75, 112 Alford Enc , , 120 Allen, Bobbie , , , . , , 130 Allen, James , , . , 6, 100, 144 Allen, Jeff . , . .31, 32, 120 Allen, Mark . . . Allen, Richard . , . . , .,,.120 .. 141 Allen, Timothy , , , 21 , 35, 45, 100 Alspaugh, Lisa , . . Alvies, Kimberly Aluies, Yanez . American Fletcher National Bank Anderson, Adrienne . , Anderson, Deborah , Anderson, Deshona , , Anderson,Jacquel1ne . . Anderson, Johnny . Anderson,Kec1a , , . Anderson, LaDonna , . . , Anderson, Missy , . . Anderson, Robert Anderson, Rona . Anderson, Sonny . . Anderson, Talitha , , . Apostolakis, Alexander , Armstrong, James . . Armstrong, Tammy . , Arney, Paul . , , Arnott, Dennis . . . Arthur, Lora , . Arthur, Marsha , . , Asberry, Deanna 71,120 , 112 , ,, ,,..120 .,161 . .,120 71,100 ,,, 130 60,100 .. .,.. 120 ,. 56,120 , 51,76,130 .51,52,120 . . . 100 130 , 130 , 140 ., 120 . .120 , , 56,100 .. , .112 .. .130 68,112 Battle, Adrian . Battle, Charles , . Battle, Michael , , Battle, Tonya , . , . . Bayless, Kenneth . . . Beach, Terry . . , , . Beall, Howard ..... Beamon, Yolanda . . Beasley, Charles ..., Beauchamp, Kimberly Beck, Christopher . . . Beck, Karen , .. ... Beck, Karon , , , Beck, Sharon ,... Beck, Sherri . , . , . Bedford, Sherry .... .,,.112 ....,..,..32,5O ,..,..... ,130 .19,24,25, 37 130 ........11814O 130 ,.51,59,68,71,75112 .. ,...... ..... 1 30 .. ,.,. 120 100 52 ..,,71,112 .,,,,.,,37,40, Belk, Shuron , , . 4, 12, 71, 76, 90, 100 Bell, Angie , . . . , Bell, James . Bell, Marva . , . BellChoir .. . ... Bellamy, Donna ..,. Bellamy, Georgette . Bellamy, Peggy . . Bellamy, Tammy . . . Benson, Joseph ..,. Benson, Penny . Berry, Kimberly ..., Berry, Samantha . , , Berry, Shannon ..., Bertrand, David . . Betker, Katherine . . Biddle, Kenneth , , , BikeClub.. Billingsley, Brian . Billups, Latanya . . . Black, Jeffery . , , Black, Linda . , . Blackmon, Dennis . , , Blackwell, Johnny . Blagraue, Steven . . , 27, 36, 37, 46, 59 141 112 151 120 130 .176 112 ..21 120 54, 55 ,, ...71, ,,...,.43. . 38,51,52. 100 120 120 112 112 130 130 100 101 120 101 112 . ..58,59 112 120 120 120 130 130 101 Blaine, Misty , 8, 9, 59, 68, 76. 82, 84, 90, 101 Blakey, Elizabeth , . , , . .,..... . , . 112 Blanche, Shetlanda . , , .,,. . 120 Blankenhorn, Duane , , . .... 9, 141 Bleill, Virgil , , ..,,,, . . . 30, 32 Boatner, Dan , . , . . . 130 Bolden, Christine . . . , . 120 Bolden, Diane . , .,,.... 120 Bolden, Sharon . . . . , . 112 Bolen, Rolanda . . ....46,63, 130 Brain Game .... ..,.,......... . . . Branch, Donna , . .6, 24, 25, 37, 40, 82, 84, Brand, Rhonda , . ,..,...... ,.... . . Brandon, Veronica . Brandon, William . . Bray, Karen ...... Bray, William .... Breazil, Thomas . , Breheim, Gretchen . Brewer, Danny ,.., Brewer, Nicole ..., Brewer, Tammy , , Bridgeman,An1ta , , Bridges, William . . Bridwell, Lea ..,. ...22 ..71 ff'53' . ...112 ,..82 Bridwell, Michelle ....,., ,,,, . Brinkerhofl, Stephen ..,.. ....,,.,, Brinkley, Allison . . . . 14, 50, 56, 121, 126 Brinkley, Freda , , ,,., , , . . Brinkman, Kevin . . Britt, Dawn , , , , ff521,71 Brock. Katherine ,.,. .,,.... Brooks, Dennis . , . Brooks, Lawrence , Brooks, Tracey . , Brooks, Walter .... Browder, Diana , . Brown, Carmen , . Brown, Darrell ..., Brown,James . . , Brown, Jim . . . Brown, Joan , , . Brown, Joseph .,.. Brown, Kevin , . , , Brown, LaTonia . , Brown, Lauren , , . Brown, Mark ,... Brown, Otis , . . , Brown, Patricia . . . Brown, Ruth ,..,, .ffes f 55,121 ,'21f4s,'51, 59, 52, aa' Brown, Traci ..,,,,, Browne, Raymond , . . Broyles,Jenniler , Bryan, Mark ...., Bryan, Michael . . . Bryan, Steven . . Bryant, Janet , , Bryant, Michelle . . Bryant, Teresa .... Bullington, John , Bundy, Glenn , . .. .,.... 63 ,,..21,22,121 .fblsiss ,, .,,49,70 '.'..j7 ,eo ...32 58, 59 112 121 101 130 112 121 112 101 121 121 121 147 112 130 121 141 155 101 130 112 121 112 130 130 121 121 112 121 130 141 141 141 101 112 112 174 112 130 121 121 141 101 112 101 112 130 105 130 130 121 l Cade, Diana .,................,...., Caito and Corsaro Produce Co. ...,..,. , Camarena, Marial ..... 5l,71,113,121,155 . Q 1 3 131 1 157 1 i 1 Camarena, Maria L. , .,.,..,....... 51,121 1 Cameron, Tracy . . 14, 51, 52, 55, 56, 59, 68, 75 Barker Asher, Paula . , 120 Asher, Peggy . . , , 120 Atwell, Brian . . , , . 120 Auburn Plastic and Rubber , , 161 Austin, .Shirlene . , 71, 112 Austin, Tammy , , 100, 160, 176 Bacon,Ann ,. , . 120 Bacon, Carla . . . 100 Bailey, Jala 112 Bailey, Meredith . . , . . 130 Bailey, Tracey . . . , . . 130 Baker, Jeffrey . . . . , . 130 Baker, Timothy . , . 60, 68, 112 Baldwin, Terri . . . . . ,68, 112 Band,,,,,. ..,.52,53 Banh, Dung Banh, Hanh ..,, Banks, Bobbie , . Banks, Charles , . Banks,L1sa , . Banks, Raymond Barbieri, Gaetano , , . Barger, Douglas . Barger, Robert ,Angela . . ,.,.120 ..,,.,.120 ..112 ,...64,65,12O . ..... 130 ..,112 ....130 ,,.112 ..,.120 .,..120 The Arsenal building, completed in 1862, is the oldest structure on the campus. The main office, computer center, and several non-school programs are housed in the building which is scheduled for major renovation. Barker, Lilly , , . . . , Barkley-Bellew, Val . . Barnett,Jodi , . . Barnett, Lemar . , Barton,James . . . Barton, LaTonya , . Barton, .Stacey , . Barton, Steven . , . Baseball ..,.. , Basham, Donald . Basil. Donald . , , Baskerville, Steve , , Bateman, Diane , Bates, Michele . . ...-.. .-- l68 Index .,130 ..153 ,,..68,75,112 ........142 .......120 .. .120 ,..100 .,.,38,112 ...,,,38,39 , ..56.112,117 .,,.,....130 .100 ...,,.,130 ,,..63,1O0 Boles, Lanny ... ...29, 56.112 Boles, Lynn .,,. ....... 1 30 Boling, Michael ..,, .... 1 12 Bolton, Timothy .... ..,. 1 30 Bond, Aithea ,... ,,.. 1 20 Bond, Lloyd ,.,, , . . 101 Borshoff Jim . . . ,.... . 141 Bostic, Barry ..., .,.. 2 2, 112 Boughner, Diann . . , , . .40, 120 Bow, Deanna ..,. ,... 1 01 Bowie, Tanya ,... .,.. 1 20 Bowling, MarkB , . , . . . . 130 Bowling, Matthew . , . . . . 130 Bowling. Mike ,.... Bowman, Beverly .... Bowman, Tony , . , . Boyd, Michelle . . . Boys Basketball . , . Boys Tennis . ,... Boys Track ,..,... Bradshaw, Martha . . . .,.121, 130 125 121 121 ...,30.31,32,33 ,.,,.,..42,43 ...44,45 ...,141 Bunten, Jeffrey . . . ,..32, Burch, Noel ......,, .,... Burchfield, Kenneth Burdine, Randy ..... . , Burke, Shannon . . . Burke, Tina , . . Burks, Tammy . . , Burl, Johnny ..., Burns,Anthony , . . Burns, George . . . Burns, Melissa .... Burns, Renee ,... Burns, Richard . . , Burruss, Tony . . Burton, Patricia . . . Butler, Clifton . . . Butler, Luke . . Butler, Robert . . . Byers, Duwan . . . Byrd, Charrise .... ...30. 131 112 131 131 121 113 131 113 121 113 113 121 113 131 142 113 131 121 131 131 Campos, Andrew .................... 131 , Campos, Sandy ..,..,.,,.,.,...,,,.. 113 2 Canheld, Glen ........,.., . . . 71, 101 ' Cannon AlumniAssociation . . . .,,, . 159 Capps, Larry .........,.. ..,32,131 ' Carhee, Larry ,.. .,.. . 121 Carling, Angela . . . . . . 131 Carlock, Mahlon .... , . . 140 Carnell. Melody . . . ,.... 113 N Carpenter, Angelo .... .,,.,,... 1 31 Carpenter, Dujuan . .. . , . 21, 22, 131 Carrico, George ,.... .,,.... 1 31 Carrico, Vickie .... . . 131 Carrig, Krista ,.... .. .68 Carroll, Kimberly ,,., ,.,. 1 13 Carson, Kathie ... ... 71,121 Carter, Jackie ..., .... 1 21 Carter, Lloyd , .., .. 121 ' Carter, Ronald . . . . . 113 Carter, Scott ,,., . . 113 Carter, Susan , . . . . 121 Carter, William ,.. ... 131 - Carver, Lorene ... .,. 113 1 Case, Alice ..,.. .... 1 13 Catt, Howard ...,.. . , . 45 140 Cavazos,Jennifer . . ,.,.,..,. 131 Cazares,Alan ,.. ...,... .. 131 Cecil, Michael , . , ,... 57, 66, 67 142 Chadwell, Keith ..,. .....,..... 1 13 ' Chadwell, Kenneth , . . ........ . 113 Chambers, Cheryl ..,. . . 142 Chapman, David ,... ....,,,....,... 1 21 Chapman, Peppi .,,,,..,.,......,,.. 121 Chapman, Todd , , .28 29, 59, 75, 84, 113. 115 1 Charette, Beverly . . . ,.,,..,.. 52, 55 131 Charles,Angela ,.. .. .... 131 Charles, Lisa ,, .. ...,, 121 1 Chastain, Donna ,..,. . . 113 1 Chatman, Richard ,,. ... 131 N Cheeks, Larry ,..... . . . 22, 32 Cheerleaders . . . , . , .50, 51 Chenoweth,John ,., .... 113 Childers, Lonna ..,.. .... 7 1 101 , Childress, Deborah ., . ............ 2 102 ' Christy, Anthony ,,..,.......,...,... 121 1 Churchwell, Jennie . . 52, 55, 59, 68, 75, 113 1 Clark, April .,......, ..........,.... 5 5 Clark, Chris . . . ..., 38 102 Clark, Douglas . . ...,. 113 Clark, Karen ..., . . . 102 ' Clark, Lori ,..,. .... 1 21 Clark, Matthew ... , . .43 131 I Clark, Theresa .... ,. 131 ' Clark, Tracie . , . ....,... . 121 Clark, William . . .,....,... 113 Claspell, Lisa , . , ,... 24, 40, 62 113 Class or 1987 ,.. ,......,.,. 167 ' Clayton, Shelly ... ...21, 22 121 Clegg, Jeffrey .... ..,.. 38 131 Clements, Robert , . . ..... . 131 Clemons, Denise ..... . , 131 Cleveland, Kimberlee . . . . . . . 71 Cline, Brian ,.,.,,.. .,,.. 1 13 Cline, Deborah ... . .. 68,142 , Cline, Ernest ..... ..... 1 42 ' Clubs, Russell .... , . . 113 Coats, Aaron ..... ,, 113 Cochran, Tammy ... ... 131 Cochran, Timothy . . . . . . 131 Coffman, Chris ..,..... ...... 1 21 Coleman, Chesney ,.....,,,,,,..,.... 131 Coleman, D Ondra .. 11, 14, 50, 51, 55, 56, 82. 84, 102 Coleman, Richard ,... . ,.131 2 Coleman, Scott ...., ,.,.. 1 13 N Coleman, Tiffani ,.., . . . 51, 131 Collins, Gerald . . . .,,. . 121 Collins, Michelle ..,. , . . 121 ' Collins, Richard . , . . . 113 Collins, Robert . . . . . . 142 , Colwell, E Joe .... ...,.. 1 O2 Colwell, Michael ..,. . . . 64, 136 Combs, Fred .,,. ...75,121 N Combs, James ... .,.. 121 A Compton, Bernita . . . . r - 121 Compton, James .... . . . 121 Comstock, Diane . , . 4 - - 142 Conningham, Perry . . . 4 - - 131 N Conningham, Rodney . . . . --121 Constant, Paula ...... - A - 121 Cook, Calvin ,... ....-- 1 02 Cook, Louis .,, ....,.. .131 Cook, Sean ...,. ,,.52.64,131 I Cook, William , . . .......... 60 i Cooley, Robert ,.. ...21,22,142 , Cooper, Janice ,. . ..,... 142 1 -J Copas, Melissia .... Copeland, Margie . , . Corn, Charles .,,.. Cornett, Warren ...,..., Corrie, Larry ..,..,. . . . Cosseys Automotive, lnc. Council, Patrick ....,.,... Courtney, Regina ....,,. Courtney, Robert .... Covey, Beth ..,.,.. Covington, Victor .,.. C ox, Dustin ...,.,. Craft, James .,.. Craft, Kristina . . . Craft, Lesley . , . Craig, Frank .,... Craig, LaTonya .... Craig, S. Michael .,.. Crandall, April . . . Crase, Christy ..... Crayton, Omar . , . ,. Critchfield, Kenneth , . . Crockett Herbert .... Crockett, John . . . Crockett Kelly .... Crockett Michelle . . , Crockett Shanell .... Crockett Stacey . , . Crockett, Steven , . . Cronnon, Timothy . , . Cross Country ...., Crowe, Betty ,... Crowe, Nicole . . . Crowe, Richard ..,. Crowe, Scott .......,. Cruser, David ,.,.. ,..... ....121 ,.,.121 ..,..l13 ,.,.29,121 . ,.,... 121 .,..165 ...2,6,102 ..,..131 ,.,,113 .,..,..131 ........131 .,..22,29,121 .,.,..38,113 .,.131 ....30,31,38,44,142 ...,,..,,38,121 ,...121 .,,,131 ...,121 ,.,.113 ...,121 ,..60 ......,,,...102 ,..59,75,82,113 .,.....,,.131 ....l22 ,.,131 ,.,.26,27 .....,.143 ..,37,46,122 .,...,131 .,..131 ...,149 Cunningham, Christopher , . . . . . . 122 Curren, Tina . ......... . . Curtis, Angela , . . Curtis, James .... Curtis, Michael . . Cutshaw, Lisa . , . ,,..113 ,,,12,122 .,.......,131 ........ ,.13 ..68, 87, 102, 106 Dailey, Paul ,.,. Dairy Queen , . . Dalton, David .... Danheiser, Tom ..., Daniel, Robert . . . Daniels, Alisha . . . Daniels, Scott ..... Davidson, William . . . Davie, Gloria .,,... Davis, Albert . , . Davis, Cynthia . . . Davis, Edward . , . Davis, Janna .... Davis, Joseph . , . Davis, Kenneth . . ..,59,68,76,102 .......,..165 ....113 .,,.143 .. .113 ..,.122 ,......122 ,.,....,..122 .,..24,37,113 ...,...113 .,.,..,122 ..,.,,..152 ...,51,55.122 .......,.113 ....13.122 Davis, Michael ,.........,,...... . . . 113 Davis, Richard .,.,.,........,...,... 102 Davis, Sharmin . 24, 36, 37, 40, 59, 82, 84, 102, 150 Davis, Stephen .. Davis, Tammy . , . Davis, Vonda . . , Dawson, India . . . Dawson, Nathan . . . Day, Anthony .... Dean, Glenda . . . Deane, Johnny . . Deaton, Robert .... DeBruler, Joseph , . . DEO1 ..,...,....., DetaRosa. Dolores . . . Deloach, James . . . DeLoach, Lucinda . . , Dennison, Stanley . , . Dennison. Vanessa . . Denson, Anthony .... Deskins, Richard .... DeViese, Cheryl ..., Devoto, Lisa .... Dickinson, Britt .,,. Dickinson, Tammy . . , Dickinson, Tony . . , Didion, Joseph ,... Didion, Kimberly , . . Dill, Deanna .... Dill, Terri .,..,.. Dishman, Dallas . . . Ditchley, Kevin . . . . Dixon, David . , . . . . Dixon, Tina ......., Dixon, Tracy ......... Dobberthein.Lewe1lyn , , Dodd, Annamaria ,.... Dodd, Anthony ...., Dodson, Elaine .... Dodson, Ernest .... Dodson, Kevin . . . Dodson. Leslie . , . .,..21,22,131 .,.,.,...131 ....71,102 ,....,.131 ...,64.113 ....131 ...71 ,......,,131 .....,......131 .,.29,43,59,1l3 ..,.,..70.71 ..,.71,103 , .... 131 ....113 ,,.,113 .......131 ...143,148 ..,,,132 ....113 ,...122 .,..143 ....113 ,...132 .,..113 .,..122 .........,29,132 .,.....,,,..29,114 ....6,8,29,79,86.103 ....,...,...27,132 ..,.71 ..,114 .H12 .,..122 ..,,103 ..,.55,81 ,...,,,,,132 ........51,l32 .,.,30,52,55,114 Dodson, Shawn . . , Doss, Darrell . . , , , Dolson,Antionette , Dotson, William ..... Douglas, Edwin . . Douglas, Joshua .... Douglas, Kimberly . Dowdell, Sherri , , Dowdell, Terri ,,., Drama Club ..,.,.,, Duckworth, James Dugan,Anthony , . , Dukate, Sheena . . , . .122 , 132 .122 ,..114 122 , 22, 35, 122 . ...,... .,,, , 146 2, 24, 37, 46, 122 . .,2, 37, 46 ,...64, 65 143 .,,......122 .,,59,75,114 Duke, Paul ..., . , 132 Dulin, Rod .,.... ,.,, 5 9, 72 Dullen, Thomas , . 114 Duncan, Sandra , . , 71, 103 Dunn,Johnny ,.,,114 Dunn, Penny ..,,. . 132 Durbin, Jennifer . . . . . 114 Dwyer, William .... . . 1 14 Dyer, Anthony . . , 132 Easley, Mark ,.......,.. . 14, 59,103,110 Easley, Jacqueline , ,..... . 59, 63, 76, 103,145 East New York Flower Shop . . . . . . 168 Easterly, James .. Eaton, Darin .,.. Eaton, Donald K ,... Edmonds, George . . Edmondson, James Edwards, Brian . . , Edwards, Marcel . . Edwards, Michelle Edwards, Timothy Eldridge, John .,., Elliott, Byron .... Elliott, Jannean , . Elliott, Malinda . . , Ellis, Antoinette . . . Embry, Michael ...., Emerson, Raymond Emerson, Scheryl , . Enoch, Tonya ,. , Enochs, Ronald . , . Epps, Tommie . , Esteb, Tamara . , . Eubank, Fred . . . Euliss, Deanne .... ., .,145 ,, 114 ,132 ...114 ,.122 ,..103 .. 132 .,132 ,132 ..,132 114 .,,114 ,,....122 ,.,60,122 . ,,122 .,.114 ...114 .114 .132 ,,132 .,.71,90,103 .,132 .. ..,114 Evans, Curtis .... - 30, 114 Evans, Edward . ,. .. .-143 Evans, Pamela .,,. . . , 122 Evans, Robert . , . ,,., . 122 Evans, Tammy .. . , .. 114,122 Evans, Timothy .., ...., .114 Eiyen, Dawn ,.. .. 132 Faceson, Dwayne . . Faceson, James . . , Fahrenkamp, Angela Fahrenkamp, James Farmer, Tina ...... Farrow, Lisa ...., Faulkner, Brian , , . Faulkner, Terry . , . Faust, Tammy . . . Faust, Wilbur ..,. Feigert, Judith .... Ferguson,Aaron . . Ferguson, Charles . . . Ferguson, Dawn . . Ferguson, Ellen ..,, Ferguson, Raymond Ferguson, William , . Ferris, Cindy .,,.. Ferry, Robert .... Fields, Burnis . . Fields, Camea .... Finch, Kenneth . . . Fisher, Allen .... . Fitzwater, Rachel . . Flanigan, Debra . , . Flanigan, Leona .. Flinchu.rn, Mary . . . Flitcraft, Mark , , . Folgers, David , . . Folson, Tina . . . Football ...... Ford, George .,., Ford, Letticia ........ Ford, Von , . .,......... . ., .122 ...45,122 ...,,,.132 ,.114 ..,.71,103,151 ..103 ...22,132 ...,.122 ..,75,114 ......,..132 ,,22, 35, 63,132 ....,..,...114 .,.63,75,122 , ,..,., 132 .,.132 ,.,114 ...132 ...103 N132 ..114 .,,.....122 ...30,79,103 .,.,...,56,132 ....,..,.,,122 11,49,70,71,103 ...,,..,...114 .,..,....,.122 ....74,75,8-4,112 ,.,20,21,22, 23 ..,..,...103 ..,...,.132 ,,,.,,103 Foreign Language Clubs .... ....... 6 2, 63 Foster, Timothy ......,. . .,...56,99,122 Fowlkes, Sharon .... .... 1 1, 68, 71, 103 Fowlkes, Tyrone , , France, Kevin . France, Lisa France, Lori , , .. Franklin, Angela . Franklin, L C Franklin, Robert . Freeman, Darrell , . , . . Freeman, Joyce . Freeman, Marquise . , Freshman Council Frink, Edwana . , Frison, Michael . . Frost, Steven Frye,Andre . . Frye. Gerald . , Frye, Lois , , Fuller, Tim . . . . , . , , 122 ,32 132 71,90, 103,160 ., .38 132 . 71 103 , 114 , .2l,32 122 30 .143 ,21,22,35,45,114 , . 76,77 122 .. 132 . 103,114 , .. 32 . 132 143 161 ., 81, Treadwell Hall t"The Main"1 is named in honor of Captain Thomas J. Treadwell who laid out these arsenal grounds and supervised the construction of the Arsenal. It was built in 1921. Fullington, Dawn . Futrell, Rachel! . . , Futrell, Sharon . . , Fyffe, Ron . 122 132 132 , ,21,22, 37,46 Gaines, Michael , Gamble, Kimberly Gamble, Michael . Gamble, Nevin , . Gammon, Jerry . , . Gammon, John . . . Garces, Gaston , . Garcia, Christopher . , , Garland, Pauline . , Garland, Tanaka . . Garvin, Charla . , Gary, Leon , , . Gaughan, Barbara George, David ,... Gholson, Sandra , , Gibbs. Carl . . , . Gibson, Jeffrey . . . Gibson, Michael . . Gilbert, Chenila , , Gilbert, Derek . , , Gilbert, Lisa . , Gilbert, Sharry , . , Gilbert, Stanley . . Gilchrist, Melissa , Gillard, Howard , . Gillespie, Alvin , . , Gillespie, Michael . Gilliam, Joseph . , . Gillum, Nanelte , . Gilmore, Wayne . . Gimbel, Michelle , . Girls Basketball , Girls Track , . . Givans, Honey ,,.. Glaser, James . . Glaser, Kelly .... Glaser, Kenneth , . Glaser, Mary , . , Glaze, Dyan , . . Glover, Byron . . . ,. 40, 43. ..,.64, 72, Q51 ,,..90 55 , .,79. 21, 132 122 104 114 122 122 122 122 104 12 122 104 122 144 114 122 122 122 122 122 114 132 104 B6 132 122 73 114 123 114 123 . ..36,37 ...,46,47 104, psi, 151 123 123 132 132 114 132 Glover, James , 6, 22. 114 Glover, Monica 123 Godwin, Robert , 60, 123 Golf , , , 42, 43 Gonzales, Gloria 71, 104, 151 Gonzalez, Luria 144 Goodmon, Angela 123 Goolsby, Clyde 123 Gorman, Tanya 71 , 87, 104 Goshen, Mark ' 6, 104 Gossett, Craig 132 Gourley, David . 132 Gowdy, Tony . 104 Grady, Crystal 114 Graham, Tracy 51, 55, 56, 59, 64, 75, 99, 114, 123. 155 Grant, Lisa 123 Green, Don , , 132 Green, Moya , , , , , 132 Gregory, Charles 2, 63, 64, 104 Grever, Andrew . , . . 132 Grever, Lenora 1 14 Griffin, Corey 123 Griffin, Steven , , , 1 14 Griffin, Yvonda , 71, 104 Griffith, Cheryl 132 Griffith, Rhonda , . 104 Griggs, James 123 Griggs, Terry , , . 123 Grigsby, Michael 132 Grimmitt, James , . . 132 Grimmitt, Yonna . ,,., ,,., . . , . 114 Grimsley, Amy 13, 52, 55, 56, 59, 64, 1 14 Grinsteiner Funeral Home , . 165 Grinter, Larry . , , , , , 123 Grubbs, Barbara 132 Guernsey, Edward , 123 Guess, William , . 144 Gunyon, Kristine Gunyon, William Guy, LaRobert . , , Guymon, Kimberly , , , 104 , . . 123 , 64,66,67, 72, 73,123 , . . 104 I Haak, Maria , . ., 29, 104 Haak, Monica , , . . . , 132 Hacker, Patil . , 123 Halley, Glen , . 123 Hagan, Letha , . . 123 Hagedorn,Amie . . 104 Hager, Teddy . , , . 123 Hahn, Margaret 144 Hairston, Tanya , 144 Hale, Hester . . , . . 144, 174 Hall. Huston 132 Hall, Marinda 123 Hall, Richard . . , 132 Hall, Tammy . 132 Hamilton, Alexzenc , 144 Hamilton, Judith 140 Hamilton, Randy 1 14 Hampton, Tammy , . . 123 Hancock, James 123 Hancock, Jody , 123 Handy, Craig , ,. 114 Hansford, Cynthia 132 Hardcastle, Candy , 132 Hardin, Cathy , . . 104 Harger, Deana 104, 176 Harlin, Erica . Harolds Steer-in Harper, Billy , Harper, Robert Harrell, Clyde Harris, Jerome , , Harris, Karen . Harris, Mansfield Harris, Robert C, Harris, Robert L Harris, Tammy Harrison, Rhonda Harrod, William Hart, Robert , Hari, Shawn Hartley, Lelha Hartwell. Stephen Hart-ey, Gary , Harvey. Richard Haskins, lsaac Hatfield. Nicole Hatfield, Shawana Hatten, Carwander Hawkins, Michelle Hayes, Derris . Hayes, Eric Hazelrigg, Timothy Heath, Frankie Hebble, Matthew Hedgespvth. Lamont Helms, Cheryl , Helton, Kimberly 5, 8, 64, 67, 68, 72, 76, 77. .. 114 157 123 . 132 114 123 133 52.55 , 69,123,133 . 123 , 133 114 143,144 114 123 114 ., 32,114 133 133 115 133 133 , 24, 37,46,-17,123 , 123 133 115 123 115 . 123 , 104 .. . 115 .68133 Index 169 Hoopinga rner, Brian .,....124 gli 1 A. rlnwfrw 5 e ,mmm-1 1 KlR1"""!tfA'5' Henderson, Natalie , Hendricks, Trina . . , .....,24,25,37,46. Hendrickson, Kenneth . . , . . Henley, Rachel ..,. Henley, Sharon .,.. Hensley, Greg . . . Hensley, Mark ..... Hensley, Michael . . Hensley, Rodney , . . Henson, Sonja ..... Hention, Dwuna . . Hernandez, Christine Herring, Dawn ,.... Herron, Sheila . . , Hess, Kimberly . . Hess, Rhonda , . , Hibbard, Raleigh , . . Hicks, Jesse ..., Higgins, Stacey ..,. Highbaugh, Myla , , Hill, Monica . , , Hinderlite, Shannon Hinton, Bryan ..,. Hite, Teresa ..., Hobbs,Jeanna .. Hobbs, Ryan . . , , Hobbs, William , , , , 1 , 124, 37,40 . . ,.51,62. ,TQ75 .,,71,115 . ..., 71 ,fffi-sa Hoch, Kristin ,..,. 29, 40, 59, 63, 75, 124 Hockman, Leigh , . Hodgens, Sandra . Hodges, Gareth , . . Hodges, Tonna , , . Hoffman, Marilyn . . Hok, Thy ,.,. ,.., Holcomb, Berniece . Holiday, James . 82 ,,..51 Holland, Anthony .... . . , . Holland, Lisa , , , , , Holliday, Patrick . . Hollins, Lashonna Holmes, Ernest , . Holsey, April . Hon, David . Hon, Jennifer ..., Honeycutl, Clinton . Hoopingar, Sherry . . 251,22 .,145 . 38,51,59, 74,75 . ,52,55, ., ...22,60 123 133 133 133 115 38 133 133 133 123 123 133 133 124 133 115 115 151 124 124 115 133 104 115 133 115 115 128 124 105 115 124 144 133 124 115 124 105 124 124 144 124 147 112 124 133 133 Jefferson, James .... . . .32, 33, 43, 133 Jefferson, Shona ,.., ...,,..., 1 15 Jenkins, Lisa ...., . , . 124 Jennings, Diana . . , . . 115 Jennings, Shelia . . . . . . 105 Jett, William .... . , 133 Johns, Regina . , . , . . , 124 Johnson, Art ...... ....... 3 2 Johnson, Cynthia . . . .... 75, 124 Johnson, David ,.., , ..... 115 Johnson, Denise , . . , , . 115 Johnson, Earl ..... , , 115 Johnson, George ..., . . , 133 Johnson, Jerry .,.. ....,. 1 33 Johnson, Kathleen .. ... 12,115 Johnson, Keith ..,. .... 1 24 Johnson, Kevin . , .,,. 22 Johnson, Larissa ..., ,.,... 1 52 Johnson, Leroy .... ........ 1 24 Johnson, Lonnie ..,.,...,.,,... 52, 56, 124 Johnson, Marsha ..,.,. .,.,.. . . . 51, 124 Johnson, Maurice , . 18, 27, 44, 45, 59, 63, 119 Johnson, Natasha . .,,,.,.,,..,,.. 55, 124 Johnson, Norma . . , . . 145 Johnson, Renay . . . . 133 Johnson, Roy . . . , 145 Johnson, Sheila , . , .,,..,.... . 120 Johnson, Shirley , , . ,.,,.,,.,.... . 133 Johnson, Terry ,,.. , , . 35, 45, 52, 55, 115 Johnson, Traci . . . .,..,,..,.. 105 Jones,Anna ..., ,... . . , . 124 Jones, Bonnie . . . . , 152 Jones, Carol . . . . 124 Jones, Cherrie . .. .. . 134 Jones, Cheryl , . , . 124 ...:yr th ,I ,Q ' , A X- fxyay - LV , Hopkins, Tammie Hopson, Manual Hopson, Tracey Hostetter, Jeffery House, Regina , Howard, David , Howard, Garlan Howard, Richard Howard, Rodessa , . . Hubbard, Eddie .,.....124 .,..32,133 .,..51,105 .-.124 .,.115 ...124 .,,9,145 ,.,,124 ,,...,,,.124 ..35,133 Hubbard, W. Ann .,,. . .38, 71, 89, 105 Hudson, Angela Hudson, Earl . . Huggins, Roselyn Hughes, Dock . . . ...56,115 . .,.., 124 , ,..37,124 143 Hughes, Lasandra .,. . . 60, 115 Hughes, Leigh . . Hughett,Slevan ,, . Hul,Sok. , ., .. 38,133 .. 124 Human Relations Club ...... ,.,.,. 6 8, 69 Humphrey, Candace .. .71,105 Humphrey, Darrel ...,, 20, 21, 45, 57, 59, 105 Humphrey, Jocelyn Humphrey, Kasandra Hunter, Cathy .,... Hurley, Camelli . . Hurley, Monica , . Hurrle, John . , . Hurt Tonia ..., ., ..,.115 .,..124 ...,124 133 .,,.,,..,124 35,145,148 ..71,160 Hutson Larry ,, ., 60,61,115 Hyatt Tammy ...,, , . . . 133 Hyche Fredrick , . . . , , 105 Indiana NationaIBank . . Ingram Charri . ., . lngram Crystal ,, lngram Shandell, , Ireland Don ...,. Ivory Rosemary . . . ...163 ..,.124 ....,124 ,..81,133 .,.115 ,...124 Jackson Angela . , . Jackson Virginia . , , Jajuga John .,., Jamerson Mark , . , Jeffers Shara .... Jefferson Artez ,... 1 70 lndex 3 1' 1 E 1 3 , ' 3 .....,....124 ,66,67,71,145,15B,174 ,.,.21,68,115 ...,.,..,124 ......,l33 -1 Q39 2 , z-QQ'f?5l5 , H ff , ' z - ,.,., t .-1:-:.y3g,i,:g .W ,, . ., -Lf.-'-wr, N if , wi J' ' s W.,-, si. 1 .,, L I .- 'fi 'file-ms:4.ea..:.sM . 4' 1 . W-Y X N Q 4 1 f A- g Y at X 1 we -x + I :ix Q 'Nw Mfr as ' f 4 L 3' ' f fs. -1 5 1 'N ,fe t ess 1 1 NX 'P X X- 1 tw S7 ' 15.-, f 'iavwza .2 .. X ,rams ' "gg - S fy fi " iigftl , -r, , V Q S, . 1 Xa X t 1 K .. Ar Q. . PA f , 1' X m , at x ' Q ,sw 3' T X HQ 1 , RQ: QQ '4 3 1 1 A Q XJ mx x s 1 X ,4 9? 3 X f rf' is X fx ' N A, X i T43 3 MVK ,XFX X: I N Q gtg 1,1 xc, xi 1 , Q 4 fig? fa , Q M , Y, N. F , , me ' V r 1 . 'I The West Residenc e is home to the CoIonel's Cupboard, a student- operated restaurant. This building was originally the home of the ArsenaI's Commander. Jones, Consuelle . . . Jones, Damon ..... Jones, Diane ...... Jones, Elizabeth . . , Jones, John ..... Jones, Joseph . . Jones, Michelle ..,, Jones, Norman ..,, Jones, Paul ..... Jones, Regina . . . Jones, Robert , . , Jones, Terrance . . . Jones, Velvet .... Jones, Wendy , , . Jordan, Donald ...,. Jordan, Kimberly .... Jordan, Lisa ..,... Jordan, Stephanie . . . Josten's, lnc. ..... , Judkins, Larry . , . Judkins, Laura .. Jump, Rollin . . . Junior Council ...... Jurgesmeyer, Aaron . , . Jurgesmeyer, Marcia . . . ...134 ,,,.124 124 ....76,105 .......134 ,..22,32,134 ..,...,,.134 .,,.,,,.,.,.134 ,..70,71,76,105 ....,,.,..124 .,.52,55,115 ..,.,..134 ....134 .,,..,115 H105 ......51,56,115 52, 55, 59.63, 124 ..,..,..,..,161 ..........105 ,..71,115 ,.......,14O ,..,.,.,..74,75 ....6,38,75,115 .......63.134 Kaelin, Kara . . . Kanouse,John ,, Kanouse, Steven . . . Karr, Debra .....,. Kaufman, Donald . . . ....,.71 .,,.76,145 ..,...l05 .......134 ....1,59,12O Kavanaugh, Bobbie .. ... 115 Keatts, Jeffery .... ...,... 1 34 Keefe, Bradley .... .... 2 2, 134 Keithley, James . . . . . 106 Keller, Leo ,.... . . . 106 Kelley, Kevin ,,.., . . , 124 Kelly, Frederick . . . , , . 140 Kelsey, Teresa ..., , . . 115 Kemp, Trinna . . . ...... . 134 Kemp, Yolanda . . . . . . 56, 124 Kemper, Darla ..... , , . 115 Kemper, Kimberly . . , , . . 106 Kennedy, Bonita .... ..., 3 7 Kennedy, Tammy . . , . . , 124 Kern, John ,..,.., . . . 145 Keys,Arigel ,., ...106 Khull, Phon ... ,,, 124 Khun,To.., ...134 Kieu, Minh ..... .,.., 1 24 King, Christina ,.. . . 2, 106 King, Dean ,.. . . 116 King, John ,.,. ..., 1 45 King, Kevin ,.., ,., 106 King, Shawnda .. , ...,55 King, Teresa ..., .,... 1 16 Kinney, Jack . . . .... 60, 124 Kinney, Windi , . ,.,.. 134 Kinser, Paul . .. ....145 Kirby, Mane , , .... 134 Kirsch, Arthur .,..,,,,,..,.......,... 146 Kleine, Julius ,,,..... ....,...,.,. 2 7, 146 Klinck, Jeffrey . .52, 53, 55, 59, 64, 67, 72, 76, 133, 134 Knoll,Tina. ., .,..,... .,.,l16 Knowles, Kevin , . . .....,. 13, 29, 38, 116 Knue, Francis ,.. . . 24, 35, 45, 82, 84, 146 Kroeger, John ..... ....... 6 O, 64, 68, 116 Kuhlmeyer, James . . . ..,.......... . 116 Kwisz, Blaine ...,,. . , . 124 Kyle, Kristi ,.,.., ..,. 1 34 Lacy, Terrence .,.,,. . , . . 106 LaFollette, Donald , . , ...,. . 116 LaFollette, Rhonda , . . .,.. 123 124 Lair, Rebecca .,.... . ,... 134 Lakes, Michael ,.. .,.. . .21 Lakeview Marina . , . . , . . , 156 Lancaster, Kenneth . . . .,.,,,., 38 174 Lancaster, Stacey .,...,......,..,. 24 134 Lang, Allen ..,,,....,,.,, 15, 51, 56, 77 134 Lanman Flower Shop, Inc, ,.,,......., 167 Lasley, Anthony , . . ...,., . , . 134 Lauderman, Julie ..,.... , . . 125 Lawson, Bonnie .,.. . . . 134 Lawson, Bryant . . , . . . , 125 Lawson, Lee ... .. .68 116 Lay, Tammy .... ..,.. 1 25 Le, Lai .,,,... . . . 134 Le,Minh 134 Le, Son .... , . 134 Le, Thu ......,. ,..,. 1 34 Leakes, Juan , . . .... 45, 125 Ledford, Carl . ,. ..,,.,... .125 Ledger, Robert . . . ,.,,........ . 134 Lee, Harvey ... . . , 6, 56, 60, 61,82 Lee, Joana ..... ........... 1 25 Lee, Joseph ...,.. ..,. 1 06, 116 Lehman,Arnold . . . .... 46, 47, 146 Leininger, Michael , , . .,., . . 106 Lenoir, Regina ..... .... 1 25 Lettermen ..,.. . . . 58, 59 Levell, Greg ...,.. . . . 19, 35 Levell, Kimberly .... ..,.. 1 25 Lewis,Alisha .,.,. ......,..... 6 0, 116 Lewis, Edward . . . ............... . 134 Lewis, Kimberly .....,.. 7, 51, 64, 68, 75, 116 Lewis, Mable ..... ........., 5 4,55 146 Lewis, Mark ..,. ..,......,.... 1 34 Lewis, Neila .... ..,. 9 O Lewis, Teresa .... . . , 106 Lifford, Thomas ..,... .... 1 34 Lightfoot, Shannon . . , . . . 125 Lightfoot, Tammi . . , ...... . ,71 Lindop, Greg ..... .,.. 6 0, 134 Lippard, Donald ..., ..... 1 16 Lipscomb, Cortez .,.,....,........... 134 Littell, Patricia ...,.,..,.............. 152 Livingston, Brian . 52, 55. 59, 78, 82, 102, 106, 176 Lloyd, Cedric .....,........ 22, 32, 116, 158 Lloyd, Christopher . . ..., 64, 65, 125 Lloyd, Denise ,.., ,..,,.., 1 34 Lloyd, Dennis . .. .....,.... . 116 Lloyd, Duane . . , .... 32, 125, 155 Logan, Cheryl , . .......,,., 71 Logan, James , . . , , 134 Logan, Tammy ... ... 134 Lomax, Dionne . . , . . . 125 Long, Aaron ,... ..,. 1 34 Long, Johnnie .... . . . 134 Long, Sandy . . . Long, William . . Love, Daphne .... Love. Kelly ......,. Love, Raymond ....... ...134 ...125 .,..,....,l25 ......,....5,l16 .,..6,51, 101, 106 Lovelace, Clifton .,...... .....,..... 1 46 Low Cost RX Pharmacy . Lowe, Rick ....,..,.,. Lowhorn, James . , . Lucas, Robert ,... Ludack, Victoria . . . Lufcy, Robert .... Luken, David .... Luncford, Bonita . . , Lundgren, Shirley .... Lunford, Nicki .,... Lutes, Timothy . . . Lyles, Elizabeth ..., Lyles,Jacqueline .. Lynch, Melinda . . Lynch, Tina ..,. Lynn, Ronald , . . ...lee . ,...... 38 ....,..,..l34 ....32,43,134 ........125 ....67,81,106 ..,......,,.134 .,..63,64,75,125 ..,....,l52,l53 .......,....125 ,...11,21.35,116 .....,.....,125 ..........io-5 ....51,75,125 .......,116 ...38 MacDonald, Aaron ...,. MacDonald, Edwin . . 14, ..,..55,60,61,125 48, 54, 55, 56,68.76, 99, 107 MacDonald, Lori ....,...,...... 55, 63, 134 MacLennan, Anthony . . . 10, 38, 52, 53, 55, 75, 86, 1 16 Magee, Latricia . . , Magee, Lynn . . . Mahone, David . . . Mahone, Mark . . . . Mahone, Sonja .....,. Mahone, Veronica ..... Maier, Della ....... Maillard, Mary , . . Majorettes ......, Mancillas, Celia ..,, Mancillas, Leandro . . . Manka, Mary Lou ,... Mansl7eld, Sandra . . . Marks, John ..,.., Marsh, Cynthia . . . Marsh, Tony .......... Marshall, Lewis .....,. Marshall Building Supply Martin, Charles .,.,... Martin, Cherise , . . Martin, Cheryl .... Martin, Cheryl ..... Martin, Christopher . . . Martin, Dorothy ..., Martin, Ellen .,... Martin, George . , . Martin, Patricia . . . Martinez, Jose .... Martinez, Mana , . . Mason, Don ..,... Mason, Kimberly . . . Mason, Roosevelt ,.., Massey, Douglas . , . Math Club .....,. Mathews,Angela . . . Mathis, Sandra .,.. Matney, Johnathan .. Matthews, John ,... Maurer, Frank ,.... Mavity, Deobolique . . . May, Christopher , . . May, James .,..... McBrady, Rodney .... McBride, Judith .... McBuddy, Rita .,...... McCall, Stacy ........ ,,..116 ,......134 ,..,....,45,69,125 51,59,64,68,75,116 ...,...,71,lO7,175 ...,73.150 ...50.51 .,.125 ....24,l46 .,..,.,...125 ....2l,30,116 ...134 .. ,... 146 ...157 .. .... 134 ..,l07 ....107 ....56,116 .....107 ,......146 .,..32,134 .....,,.134 ...,35,38,l25 .,..146 ,...134 ,..,.l07 ...,43,107 ..,58,59 ..,29,lO7 .....125 ...134 ..,134 ...116 ....134 ...134 .,.....147 ......,.,.l25 ..,.....65,72,147 . 1, 52, 55, 74, 75, 120 McCarthy, Machelle ..,...... 51, 55, 59, 125 McClain, Dennis ..... McCombs, Sandra . . . McCombs, Stephanie . . , McCreary, William .... McCuistion, Cheri , . McCullah, John . . . McDaniel, Kelli , , . McDivitt, Danyl . . . McDowell, Eric .,.,. McDufl7e, Latonda . . . McDuffie, Leah ..... McFarland, Bernita , . . McFarland, Brondon . . , McGaha, Cynthia .... McGeath, Bruce ....,.. McGee, Lance ...........,..,..... McGee, Lorei . 14, 15, 51, 67,68, 73, 75,84, 112 ....,,....147 .........116 .125 ,.. ,9,74, 115,147 107 .......125 .,..,63,64. ..,..1l6 ...29,116 .....135 .....116 ,..71,l07 ,.,,21,59.107 ...,....135 ,,,........27,147 . . , 135 56, 59, 62, 63, 64, 66, McGeehan, Joseph ....,... 2, 84, 90, 98, 140 125 McGlaughlin, Michael ...,... ,..,...... McGregor, Angenette . . . McGuire, Kenneth .... McKenney, Marsha . . . McKinney, Eric ..,.. McKinney, Michael . . . ....,..,,125 ....67,8l,107 ..,.51.l16 .....l25 ...116 McKinnion, Tamara . . , McMillan, Ann .,.,.. McRee, Kenneth , . 2 Mc Vay, Cheryl ,..,.... Meadows, Paul .,., Means, Dwane . . Means, Patti .,,... Medsker, Jennifer . . . Melford, Sandra . . . Mehringer, Janie . . , Mehringer, John , , , Mencer, Michael , , , Mendel, Walter . . Mercer, Dane .v.., Mercer, Wayne ,..,.. Meriwether, Antonio . . , Merrifield, Tina ,,.., Merritt, Laura , , , Messer, Stephanie . . . Meyer, David . . , , . Meyer, Jason ,,.. Meyer, Robert . . . Meyers, James . , . ...,125 .. ,147 ,...,..,116 McMillin, Jenny ....... McNeal, Demetruis ......, . 1, 22, 35, 50, 59, 125, 174 ,.,,.,..,135 ,,,,..,.,7O,71,147 ,,.,...125 ,.....126 ,.,12,107 ....63,126 ,....,,,,l26 . ..,.,.,... 68 .,.22,35,52,116 116 ., .,,147 ,,,.116 .,,,126 ,,......32 ....51,135 .,,,116 ,, 126 .,.126 .135 ...147,174 . 142 . . 116 Meyers, Kimberly ,.,. Mickens, Teresa . , . Middlebrooks, Denita , . Middlebrooks, James ,.,. . Miede ma, Kurt ....,.. Miessen, Frederick . Miles. Miles. Miles. Miles. Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Milton John Mychelle ,,.. Rhonda . Thelma . . , Dave ,,., Donna ..., Dwayne , . LaTricia ,, William . . ,Brett . . . Milton, Glenn ..., Mimm S, Cecilia .,., Minardo, Christina . . , Minardo, Gary , , . Miner. John ,,., Mini Mag . . Mink, Robin ..., Monday, Tonya ......, 116 Minks, Stanley . , , Minor, Paul ..... Minor, Sherman , , . Minton, Richard . . . Mires,James .... Mitchell, Brian . . . Mitchell, Michele , . , Mitchell, Ronald , . Mobley, Kim . . . , Moeller, Helen , . , Molin, Shawn . . . . Montgomery, Shellnal . , Moore, Charlotte . . , Moore, Geneva , Moore, Kenneth ..., Moore, Ladana .... Moore, Lisa ,..., . . . Moore, Phillip ..... Moore, Reginald . . . , ...., 135 Moore, Sam .,.,. Moore, Shawn . . , Moore, Sherri . , Moore, Sherry , , . Moore. Sinita .... Moore, Torina . , . . Moorman, Carey ,,.. Morales,Anastacio , Moreland, Charles . , Morey, Denise .,... Morga Morris n, Karen .,,. .Anthony , , Morris, Daniel . . . Morris, Michelle . . . Morris, Mitchell , , . Morris, Terry ,.,,... Morrow, LaTonya , , , Morse, Reginald . . , Motley, Rita .,.., Motley, Tyrone . , , Moulder, Derrick . . . Mueller, Donald ..,. Muex, Melvina ..... Muhammad, Khalilah Mullennax, John ,.,,.. Mumaw,John . , . Muncy, Melissa ..., Mundy, John ...... Murkison, James ...,.. Murphy, Harry . 52, 107 Murphy, Wesley . . , Murphy, William . . . Musgrove, Karla . . , Musgrave. Kathy .... Musgrove, Kristopher . . Myers, Devon .,..,, Myers, Sarah ...... Murphy, Bert .,.,.,.,. Murphy, Charles ...... 55, ,. . .51,116 . ...24,46,6O,116 .,,,,,.135 ,,...,..,116 ,.147,174 ,,.,135 ., ...., .126 ,,19,37,105,107 .,.38,59,126 .,.63,75,116 ..., .126 , .. .. .126 27, 35, 59, 126 .. . ,126 ..,.,..,135 ,,..37,4O .,,.135 . .... ,126 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97 ,. , .,..,,, 148 ....135 .,.116 . . 126 ., .,,.. 126 ....6,8,10,107 ...116,174 ,,,...126 .,..126 .. ,148 .135 , .... 51,135 , ,,,,., 116 ...,135 ,126 ,, .71,107 40, 59.62.61 75, 116 ,.,,.,...,.30,116 , ,21,22 ..,,116 ....8 .,..135 ...,107 ,..,.,,116 ,,,,21,126 ....,.126 126 ,, 63,75,126 52,55, 135 ,.,....135 ,,135 ..116 .,,,..,,.135 ..,.,,.,,.126 , ,21,35,59,126 , ....... 116 ,,.,...,,117 . ..,., 22, 63, 135 .,..27, 34, 35, 79 ...36.37,46,126 . ..... 37,46,126 ,,,,,..,,148 ., 135 52,55,59,75,99,117 ,,,,.,117 ..,.135 59, 68, 69, 76, 82, 84, ......,148 ...51,63.135 ..,..,,...,117 .,.6,22,117,174 .........,126 .,,,,....126 Nance, Lashawn . . . . 135 Nash, Darlene , , 135 Nash, James . , . . , 135 Nation, Kevin . . , . 126 Neely, Darren . ,, ,. , 6, 32 117 Neese, William . . ,.,,.. 126 New, Tamara ..,.,. . 40, 51 135 Newman, Ronald . , , 117 Newsom, Cassandra . . , . 135 Newsom, Eddie .,,,. . , .43, 67 107 Nguyen, Hung , ,. , ,,,. .. 117 Nicolay, Jeffrey . . . . , 135 Noah, Richard . ,. , 85 135 Noel, Vickie . , , . 148 Nolan, Kenneth , , . 108 Noland, Margie . . , , 126 Norman, William . . , , 21 117 Norris, Kenneth . , . . , 126 Northcross, Chester 71 O Dell, Richard . . , 135 O Dell, Sean .,,. 103 ONeal, Steven . OEA , , 6, 11, 14,48,56,76, 108 ..,.70,71 Ohmit, Gwen , . .98, 148 Oldham, Donald , . . 77, 140 Oldham, Michelle , , . 135 Oliver, James .,,., . . 117 Ollanketo, Lisa . . 126 Ontiveros, Mercedes . . 126 Orchestra . , . 54. 55 Orrick, Erich . , , . . 126 Osborn, Audrey , , 126 Osborne, Douglas , . , . 117 Oscarson, Paul . . , . 148 Oskins, Sean , . , 117 Oum, Rim , , 108 Owen, Gordon . , . 148 Padgett, Tina . . . , . . , 127 Palencia, Alexandro 135 Palmer, William . , . 1 135 Parker,Anna , . . 148 Parker, Jarvis . . , , . . 127 Parker, Robert . . . , 71 108 Parker, Venus , , , ......,. , . 108 Parks, Jennifer , ....,... . , . 136 Parks, Marion , , . . , 24, 37, 40, 41, 55 127 Parks, Paul . . , , , ,..,.,, . . 127 Paro, Bruce .,... ,..,. 1 36 Parrett, Sharon .,.. ..,.,, 1 49 Parrish, David . . . , 35, 52 136 Parrott, Eric , ,. ,,. , 19,35 136 Patrick, Kimberly . . . ,... 36, 37,40 136 Patrick, Randall , , ..,,... , , . 127 Patterson, Kimberly , . , ,51, 59, 68, 75 117 Patterson, Ronald . . .,....., . , 127 Patton, Timeka , . . ,,.. . . . . . 127 Paul, Charles , .. ,,.. .., . ,. 127 Payton, Scott ..,. . 5, 56, 59, 66, 108, 133 Peacock, Seth .,.. ,,.,.., , 19, 21, 22, 136 Pendegraph, Therese ......,.. 108 Pepper, Annetra . , , . . 127 Perkins,April . . , , , , , 136 Pero, Todd ,,., , 127 Perry,Angela . , , . 117 Perry, Lucille ..,, . . 64 117 Perry, Rhonda . . . , , ,117 Perry, Scott .... . . . 127 Peters, Donna . , . . . 108 Pettigrei.v,Albert . . , , , 136 Pham, Binh ..... , , 136 Phams, David . ., , 127 Phann, Thol ,,... . , 127 Phelps, Donald .,.. . , , 127 Phelps, Joyce , . ,.,,., 117 Phelps, Mary ..,.., , , , , . 127 Phelps, Michael . , , , , 30, 38, 108 Phelps, Milton , . . ..,. , , 136 Phillips, Brian . . . . . . 127 Phillips, David . . . , . . 117 Phillips, William . . . .,....... 60 136 Pierce, Elaine .., ,.. ,.., ,..,, 149 Pierce, Scott .... . , . 29, 52, 55, 59, 136 Pierson, Ruby . . . ....... . . , 136 Piety, Alison . . . ,..,...,. 59, 108 Piland, Aimee , Pillow, Bruce Pippins, Rachelle Pittman, Stephen Pliler, Russell . 117 65 63,136 ,11,21,44,45,56,108 , , ,, 136 Pogue, Randolph . 32, 136 Poindexter, Kim . , , 1 17 Poindexter, Tammi , , . , , . 79,82 Pointer, Dereka , , 136 Polson, David . 127 Polston, Jackie 136 Polston, Royce , , . , 127 Pond, Michael ,22, 136 Pond, Tami . , , 108 Pontiac Business Institute 159 Pool, Bernadine . . , 152 Poole, Kenneth , , , 149 Pope, Medarda . , , , 140 Porter, Gwyan . . 127 Poston, Sandy . , , 108 Pounds, Patricia , . , 60, 67 Poventud, Erik . . . . . .35, 43, 56, 117 Powell, Darlene 10, 40, 49, 52, 53, 55, 59, 75, 1 17 Powell, Donna . . . , . . . 127 Powell, Shirley , 136 Powell, William , , , , 117 Prather, Paul , . . 14, 149 Preston,Jimrny . . ,.., 136 Price,James . . . , 38, 127 Price, Layman ,., .. , . 136 Price, Roxane ,.,, 136 Price, Shannon , . . 127 Price, Tina . . .68 Price, Wendrell , . , , . . . . , 149 who 'FW Stuart Hall, built in 1940, is named in honor of the schoo1's first principal, Milo H. Stuart. The building currently houses the Day Adult Division, the Learning Center, and a number of classrooms. Printz, Bryan , ,.,. . , , 136 Proctor, Floyd , . .,., , . . 127 Pruett, Lindy . , 58, 59, 68, 149 Pruitt, James , , , , 127 Pryor, Laura , . . , 127 Publications , . . . , 66, 67 Purcell, Tammy . , ..,, 136 Purvis, Brent .6, 59, 117 Purvis, Ollie . , 127 Qualls, Brian , , , , . 108 Qualls, Melissa , , , , 136 Qualls, Millard . , , , , 149 Queen, David , , , , . 115 Quinn, Felecia . ,, ,, 136 Rader, Steven ,.,. , . 136 Raines, Dorris , , , , 149 Ralston, Tina , , , , . , . . 136 Ramsey, Barbara . , , , . 1 17 Ramsey, Kimberly . . , 40, 51, 52, 75, 127 Ramsey, Russell 127 Ramsey, Scott 38, 52, 55, 117 Ramsey, Todd 64, 127 Raney, Janell 59, 85, 1 17 Ransom, Natalie 149 Rash, ,lannett ,.. 127 Rawley, James . 136 Ray, Brenda 51, 54, 55 127 Rdy,Dryr'1ald Q 117 Ray, Shauna 136 Raymer, Kelty 1 17 R011 . 157 Redmond, Stephanie 64, 127 Reed, Cnlbert 67 Reed, Lafayette 20, 21, 34, 35, 45, 149 Reed, Patrick 136 Reed, Sherell 136 Reedy, Gary , , , , 21 , 45, 108 Reeves, Airrenette , 108 Reid, Gilbert 13, 1 17 Reuter, Karen 127 Reuter, Michael 136 Rexroat, Loretta 136 Reyna, Gilberto 22, 38, 136 Reyna, Gonzalo 38, 127 Rhea, Manuel 127 Rhodes, Chandre , 37, 40, 127 Rhodes, Frank ,. 117 Rhodes, Patty , , 67 Rhoton, David . 108 Rhoton, Kevin , , . 137 Rhoton, Michelle . 137 Richardson, Dwaine 21, 22, 32, 127 Rtdenour, Tammy . 127 Ridenour, William 22, 137 Riggs, Jesse , 127 Riley, Pamela , 59, 68, 137 Ripberger, Elizabeth 127 Roach, Mary . 51, 127 Roach, Melissa , 51, 137 Roach, Stephen , 108 Robbins, Gloria . 152 Robbins, Lillian , 137 Roberson, S-hence 75, 127 Roberts, Daniel . 21, 38, 117 Roberts, Edward . , . 127 Roberts, Greta . , . , . 137 Robertson, Andrew 59 63, 64, 66, 67, 72, 75, 127 Robertson, Eric 1 17 Robertson, Eire 137 Robertson,Jade . . 29, 137 Robertson, Lewis , , 149 Robins, Tracey , . . 1 17 Robinson Donald . . , 43, 149 Robinson, Audrey 127 Robinson, Chalisa 127 Robinson, Elnora 117 Robinson, Jerry . . 60 Robinson, Joyce . , . , 127 Robinson, Markyta 108 Robinson, Richard , 60, 68, 1 17 Robinson, Shirley . 127 Robinson, Terry , , 109 Robinson, Tonya 127 Roddy, Guy . , , 137 Rogers, Kelly . 51, 137 Roll, Brian . 127 Root Photographers 162 Roper, Tommy . 38 Rosales, Daniel , , 29, 38, 1 18 Rosales, Stacey . 24, 40, 64, 79, 137 Rose, Steven , . 30, 109 Ross, Deborah 137 Ross, Walter 137 ROTC , .6O, 61 Rouse, John , 118 Rowe, Elizabeth , , , 127 Rowe, Gary , , , . 127 Royalty, Kim 63.75, 127 Rush, Robert 21, 32, 45, 127 Russ, Steve . 22, 137 Russell, Jack , . 128 Russell, Traci 1 18 Sabian, Michael , 11,21, 22, 35, 137 Saloarie, Marcus 21, 22, 23, 137 Sampson, Kimberly , . . 1 18 Sanborn, Jcllrey , 35, 38, 128 Sanchez, Samuel 118 Sanderfer, Beniarnin 67, 176 Sanders, Byron , , 32, 128 Sanders, Christopher 1 18 Sanders, Darin , 137 Sanders, Ethel , 71. 128 Sanders, Joseph . 128 Sanders, Rachelle , 75, 128 Sanders, Robin 4, 1 1, 51, 59, 64, 68, 76, 86. 89, 109 Sandlin, Brian . . 1 18 Index 171 Sandlin, Lester . Sandlin, Steve SAO, Sarver, Eddie , Saruer, Tony , . Sarver, Traci , Saunders, Cecelia Sayer, Angela Sayers, Charles . Scaggs, Darren . , Scaggs, Patricia ..., Schneider, Karl , . Scholl, Steven Scott. Billie . Scott, Michelle Scott, Mike , . Scott, Shaluan Scott, Shawn . Scott, Teresa . Searcy, Jennifer Sells, Steven , . Senior Council , , , Setlecasi, Angelina Settles, Kim Sexton, Arthur Sexton, Dwayne Sexton, Jimmy . Shaffer, Lawrence , Shaw, Charles Shaw, Moncra Shea, Lisa Shea, Tresa . . . Shelley, Maurice Shelley, Raymond . Shelton, Christopher Shelto Sheph n, Mia erd, Helen , , , Walters, Shrnlever, Frederick Shirley. Carmen , , Shock, Richard Shoemaker, Delsre Sholar, Kimberely . Short, Linda . Shotwell, Larry , Shuprnsky, Diane Sides, Charles Siedleckr, William . Siegman, Stacie Srlcox, Herman , . Simmons, Charles E Simmons, Juanita . Simmons, Stephany Simmons, Tressre . Simmons, William . Simms, Ann . Srmpkrns, Ronald Sims, Carrie ,. , Sims, Kevin Sims, Lynette . Sizemore, Lisa Skrles, Michael Skrrvin, Monty Sluder. Cathy Sluder, Tonra Small, Amy 1, 5, 120, 128 Small, Randall Smallwood, Amy . Smallwood, James Smiley, Beverly . Smith, Aaron Smith, Angela Smith. Angelena Smith. Carol . Smith. Cynthia .. Smith, Demanda Smith, Denzrl Smith, Earnie Smith, Fredrick Smith. Glynis Smith, Jason Smith, Jerry Smith, Karen Smith, Kenneth Smith, Kevin Smith, Lee . Smith, Mary Smith, Michelle . , Smith, Phyllis Smith, Randal .Smrth, Reginald Smith, Robert Smith, Robert E . . Smith, Ronald , , , Smith, Sharon Smith, Sheri Smith, Stacey Smith, Steven , . Smith, Tamila . Smith, Tiffany , . Smith, Timmre Smith, Tina . Smith. Walter . . . Snodgrass, Gerald Snyder, Robert . , , Soeun, Tol . , . . Softball ,,.. ,. . 118 ,.,,128 ., 68,69 ,, ,.137 ..,71,118 .. 118 ...128 . 137 . 118 128 ..,,.137 ., ,..., 150 ,27,30,118 128 118 ...118 , 137 .. .,118 ..,137 ,. 51.63.128 ...,,,..109 , ,... 76,77 , ,..,. .128 46, 59, 68, 109 ., .. .137 .. ..,56,118 ,.,.,...128 ,, 128,142 , 137 , H128 71,81,109,151 ..109,151 137 , ...22 137 137 ,. .137 ,..52,55,137 . 22, 32, 137 , .. , 150 ...71,151 128 , , ,137 ., 22,35,137 . 137 21,35,59,82,118 . 150 , ,. ,, . 128 ., , ., 128 21, 32, 59.82, 109, 118 . ,... 128 .55,109 , 128 . 137 .. 118 , 118,149 . 118 6,30,118 109 . 137 . 118 . 137 .. , 71,160 .. ,, 137 40, 52. 55, 59, 64, 75, 79, .. 60,118 . ..51,137 , 118 , , ..1I8 , ,, .,,. .128 13, 52, 55, 118 .., ,.137 ., ,..15O 27,46,109 .,.,,,128 .118 . 128 . 128 .109 , 137 ..128 ., ,. .40 . ,. 137 21.38,109,118 .,,55,118 , 59,618,118 , ,56,60,61,109 ,,. . 59,128 ..110,118 .,,,150 . 118 . 137 .. 55,128 , 118 .137 ., , 150 ...76,110 .. 51,137 ..137 ,, 118 ..137 ., ,,12B .137 .. ,,.40,41 ...74,75 Sorrels, Jada . . South, Sam . ..,. Southers, Danny . . Spangler, Mary , Sparks, Andre , .. Sparks, Robert . Sparks, Tina . . , Spearman, Jewel Speech Team Spencer, Roy , . Spicer, Glenita . . Spicer, Kenny .,,, Spillane, Randy Spivey, Demetrra Spivey, Tonya , , . . . Spradlrn, Elaine . , 52 Spring Play . . , , . , Spurr, Kevin , . Spurr, Patrick , Spurrrer, Brian ..,. Squires, Desmond . . . Stafford, Reta , Stage Club ,. . Stanford, Mark Stanley, Dan , Staples, Bridget Staples, Richard Starkes, Lora , Stearns, Jeanette Stedman, William Steele, Rhonda . Steele, Travis . . . Stennrs, Marcus , Steve, Joe . Stevens, Beth . Stevens. Shawn . . Stevens, Stephanie , . Stevens, Terea . , Stevenson, Christopher , Stevenson, Joyce , Stevenson, Yolanda Stewart, Angelicque , Stewart, Jeffrey . Stewart, Remrtha . .137 ....11O ....137 ,,118 ....137 ...137 ...128 .,118 ,,,64,65 ....11O ...128 ,..,137 . 52,55,118 . . 137 ,.. ....., 118 .63, 74, 75, 118, 144 . , . .. 72,73 ,..,...118 ...137 ...137 ..128 , ..128 .,64,65 . ,..,, 128 . 63.150 .. 110 ,..128 .,128 M137 ..138 ,. 138 M138 ...,,118 150,151 ,,,138 110 55, 125,128, 147 .... ,.12B .138 , 45, 138 , 37, 138 , 128 ., ,.., 128 .. .11,76,11O Surenkamp, Stephen , , Sweat, Vicky ......, Sweat, Vivian ....... Sweeney, Margaret ..., Swenson, Kermit .... Swimming ,....... Swinford, Doyne . , . 58.59.110 ..,..,,..119 ,,.,...129 ....29,4O ...,150 .,.28,29 . ,, 147,150 Talley, John , . . .,,, , , . . Tardy, Marveda . . 24, 25, 176 Tardy, Rachelle , Taylor, Curtis , , Taylor, Dertra . . Taylor, Dennis , . . Taylor Ellen ., . Taylor, Richard . Taylor Terri , , . Taylor, Vivrana . . Taylor, Vorn ,.... , Teachers' Credit Union Tech AlumniAssociation Techmates .,,... , . . , , Techorr Tee Kay Flowers ,. , Tepner, Karl ...., Terry, Raymond . , Tess, David , . , Thacker, Larry , . , Thomas, Kim ,.,... Thomas, LaDonna . , Thomas, Michael , , Thomas, Monib , Thomas, Robert Thomas, Rochelle . , Thomas, Shirley , , . . .,150 37, 46. 60,71. 110. ....24,138 119 ,, ,37,55,129 .138 ,.64,73.138 ,138 ,. .,138 .,,.60,129 ,...,,21 . ,167 . , 163 ..5O,51 ..,56,57 ...157 ...119 .138 . .151 ,. .,.119 .,..,,...129 . .51,76, 130 . 21,35 ..129 . ...138 ..,.64,138 ,,.,...,152 Turner, Neal , . , Turner, Nora . . , Turner, Shawn . , . Turner, Tammy . . . Twitty, Donald , , , Tyler, Mark .... Tyler, Timothy . . . Tyler, Vanesa .,.. ,....,129 ...,32,45,129 ...129 ..,,119 ....138 ...,111 US Army ..,,., Llmsteadt, Scott . . . .....,.,,..., 64, 119 Llpshaw, Dawn ,....., 8 Upton, Melody . . . . , .24,45.56,119,154 ,,.....,.,71,111 Valentine, Jeffrey .,,, Valentine, Jerome . , . Vance, Emerson ..,... VanCleave, Michelle , . VanCleave, William . , Vandivrer, Stella . , Vang, Bee .,,.,, . . . 4,21,56,59,67,111 ,,,.13,79,13B, 174 ,.,68,75,119 ....6,71,119 Vang, Hua ..,. . , . 55, 59, 64, 68, 75, 129 Vang, Yeng ,,.... . , . VanMeter Melvin . . , , Vasquez, Francisca , . Vasquez, Pablo . , , . Vasquez, Rita , . . , Vasquez, Vincente . , , Vaughn, Stephen . , Ventress, Julie . . . V19 ,..,,., . , Vinson, Patrice .,.. .52, 55, 59, 75, 129 ,..,...139 ....,....139 ..,71,115,119 ......27,129 .......139 .,....129 ,...68,69 ,..,,.139 Slgwarf W,1ma V V Q 138 Thompson, Bonetta ,,,. . , , . . 138 Stewart Warner . . . , 160 Thompson, Bradley . . . . 1, 38, 43, 52, 119 Sngger, Rrqky , A 123 Thompson, Johelen . , ..., . 138 Stiles, Kenda , . 138 Tl"OmDson, Julia . , ,,,, 152 Stockard, Robert , , 139, 140 Thompson, Latasha , . , ,,.... , 110 Stockman, Michael , , . . 128 Tl'10mP50"11Ml'll55a - - V 1 - . 119 Stockman, Tamara , , I V V V V 133 Thurman, Kevin . . , . 98, 110. 160 Stokes, Bobbie . . 71, 128. 151 706161. Dffledfa . . , 138 Volleyball .,... . , . . .24, 25 Wade, Lisa ..,, ..., 1 29 Wagers, Julie .,.. .,.. 1 39 Walker, Daniel . . , ,.., , 139 Walker, Hallie , , .... 63, 139 Walker, Judy .,,, ..., 1 19 Walker, Robert .,. ,,.,. ..... , .....119 Wallace, Earl .......,. Wallace, John ..... 42, 4 Wallace, Mia .... . . . Wallace, Susie . . . Wallace, Walter .... Walter, Angela . . . Terri . . The West Gym, built in 1928, serves the physical education and athletic programs. 1t received an extensive renovation in 1978 when the East Gym and Natatorium were added. Stokes, Isaiah . .. ,.. Slonebraker, Jeffrey , . . Storms, Dennis ...... Stout, Dorothy .... Stowers, Ivan , . Streeval, Carla . . String Ensemble . , Strong, Marr , , Strong, Paul , Strong, Robert , . , Strong, Scott , . Strong, Tammy , Strough,Anita . . , Stutts,Janverca . , , Stutts,Phylesa , . Stutz, Marie ..,. Suess, David . . . . . Sullivan, Michael . , Sullivan, MichaelL , . Sullivan, Mickell , . . Summers, Sonja . , ....71,110 ,,..129 ...14O . .,., 119 .,,.59,110 ,,..,54,55 138 ..,.35,119 ......l38 ....29,129 .,..40.138 .. 55,75,129 .,..I09,11O ...,.,,,.,119 ....42,43,59,75 ..,.......110 ,,,,.6O,151 138 ....138 Todd, Jerry . . Tolrver, Doris . . , Tom, William ..... . . Trammell, Rebecca .... Tran, Kham ....... Travroli, Lonnie ..., Traxler, Regina . . Traxler, Renae . . . Tresslar, Cecil , . . Troxell, Dester . , , Truax, Carlton . . Truong, Nhon . . , Tucker, Jerry . . . Tudor. Andrew , Tudor, Ronrico . . . . . Turentine, Rochelle .... Turentine, Tonya ..,, Turner, Clevland . , . Turner, Donald . . . Turner, James . . . Turner, Lavonna . . , ..129 .,..11O ,...119 .,..129 .-.138 .,..119 ....138 . ..66,67.151 ..129 ,,.,129 ,.,.119 ...,138 ,..,138 ..,.119 .,..119 ,,,.138 ...,129 ,.,.138 ....138 ,...138 Sophomore Council 1 72 Index Walton, Tom , , . Walton, Willie , . . Ward, David . , . Ware, Richard . . . Warner, Linda ..,.,..,, Warren, Devin .,.,,, . . Warren, Douglas , . 8.9.4 Washington, Emmagee . . 3,66,67, 72, 73,111 .......129 ....22.139 ,...139 ..-129 .,...21 ...,.,.139 ....35,139 ,,,...38,139 ..,..60,61,82,1l9 3. 55, 59, 75, 99, 119 ,151 Washington, Kenneth . . ....,., 129 Washington, Ron ,,.,., Washington, Terri ..., Watkins, Pamela . . . Watson, Henry . . , Watson, James ..,. Watts, Melissa . . . Watts, Wanda .... Weathers, Dennis ..,. Weaver, Charita , . . Webb, Deanna , , . Webb, Ralph , . . Weir, Katrina , . . Wells, Macheo ,...., Wenzlaff, Jonathan ..,. Wenzlaff, Susan . . . Wert, Anthony . . . Wert, Helen .... Wesley, Paula ,...,,. Wesley, Tim ,..,...... Westerfield, Kimberly .,,. Westmoreland, Denise . , . Weston, Johnre ...,... Wethington, Chad . . . Whaley, Eric .,.,.. Whalin, Ward ..,. Wheeler, Audrey . , . Wheeler, James . . , Wheeler, William . . . ..,.76,129 . ,,.. 119 ,...129 ...,139 ...,119 .,..129 .,..151 .,..129 .,..129 139 151 , 24, 25.37, 55, 139 119 ....139 129 ..,,139 ..,.129 ...,.71 111 119 ...,111 119 139 129 151 139 129 151 ,jfiif f f f f 52. . Whitaker, Lisa . . Whitaker, Tracy . , While, Angela White, Anthony , While, Bernard , . . While, Celeste ..,,. While, Christopher , . White, Don . While, Gregory . While, Mark . While, Ronald . White, Tracy . While, Wayne . , , . Whyde, John . . Wickersham, he-lly Wilbourn, Stephanie Wilbourne, Clifford , Wiley, Charlotte . . , . Wilhite, Dawn , . . Wilhite, Michelle Wilkerson, Tonetle . . . Wilkins, Edward Williams,AngeIa . Williams, Brian , Williams, Clark .,,. Williams, Clifford Williams, Connie Williams, Derrick Williams, Edna , . , 139 Williams, Jeffery , . . . 139 Williams, Kelly . , . . 99, 139 Williams, Kenneth . .. . .. 119 Williams, Kim .. . . . ,,...... . . . 52 Williams, Lee . . 46, 51, 76, 77, 130 Williams, Michael , , . . . . 119 Williams, Pauline . 129 Williams, Samuel , 22, 38 Williams, Shawn . , 129 Williams, Stacey . , , . 139 Willis, Monica . . 119 Willis, Neris . , . 119 Willis, Rodney . . 1 19 Willis, Yolanda . . . 139 Willoughby, Timothy 71, 111 Wilson, Annette . , 129 Wilson,Anthony . . . . . 139 Wilson, Danny . . . , 139 Wilson, Elizabeth ., . 119 Wilson, Erica ,., . . , . 129 Wilson, ldris . , Wilson, James . Wilson, Jeffrey , , Wilson, Karin . . . . . 139 ., 51,55,76,139 . 38 . . . 21, 111 Wilson, Letilia . , . 21,119 Wilson, Marc ,.. . , 1 19 Wilson, Melissa 139 Wilson, Michelle . . 139 Wims,Alnita 32 . 71 21 , B1,98,111 21. 35 55, 63, 126, 129 , .36, 37, 46. 71 . 22, 32, 33. colophon Volume 72 of the Arsenal Cannon conveys the theme New Attitude throughout its 176 pages. Three hundred copies of the book were produced by Newsfoto Publishing Company using 80 lb. Saxmatte paper and off- set lithography. Staff members created the cover using a green red and gold foil-stamped design. Endsheets are printed on "'23 tan Vivi-Text paper in emerald green ink screened to 807. All body copy is in 10 pt. Korinna type. Captions Typevision and lndexvision software packages were used to typeset the copy. Input to these programs was via an IBM-PC with dual-sided dual disk drives. Headlines in the opening and on the division pages are set in 60 pt. Palatino type. All other sections have headlines in 36 pt. The activities section uses Brush, the sports section features Letraset s Isometric lettering tenlarged to 60 pt.1 the student life section employs lm- pact while all other heads are set in Palatino. Formatt 45458 is the script type used on the cover in the open- ing, and in the closing. Root Photography of 1131 West Sheridan Road in Chicago lllinois photographed all faculty groups, seniors, and the majority of candids. Inter-State Studio of Sedalia Missouri, did the underclass portraits. Student photographers Kenneth McGuire Lorei McGee Jeffrey Valentine, and Steve Kanouse took some of the candids. Sincere thanks go to photographer Richard Dickus and the processing staff in Chicago Ray Dobbs and Betty Fellers who collected the senior sitting fee. Our gratitude is also extended to Dick Kennard, our Newsfoto represen- tative, who was always available when we needed him teven when he called us from Jekyl Island S.C. during spring break.1 As this is the last yearbook that the current advisers will be producing, we would also like to express our ap- preciation to all of the members of the Tech family and our own families who have made a difficult job easier. 139 119 119 139 111 160 139 129 119 147 129 143 139 139 139 111 119 139 151 139 129 139 119 129 129 139 8 129 139 O panels, and the index are in 8 pt. Korinna. Newsfotds 1 1 1 1 ! Winchester, .Shannon 129 Wyelh,Dal1id 139 Winn, Michael , , . 129 1fVyell1, Richard 129 Winningham, Deborah 152 Winsemann, Donice 119 Wise, Dawn . 51, 139 Wise, Harold . 151 Wise, Vanessa , , 139 Womble, Jeffery 82, l 19 Womblcs, Dana 139 Wombles, Otis 119 Woodard, Robert . , 21, 45, 151 , 1ant,hira 139 vltggjfgzi' ' 30' Yarbrough, Chariese 139 Woodfonirtwhn A 'V '39 Youth Job Preparedness 165 Woodruff, Don , , . . . , 129 Woods,Andrea . . . 51, 59,61 129 Woods, Carmen . . 71, 111 Woods, Detra , 51 , 59, 76, 130 Woods, Erica . . .. ., ,51,75,129 Woods,Lisa .,.. . . .,.111, 175 Woodward, Patrick . . . . 139 Woolard, Lester . . 151 Zaye, V 1 159 Worlafd' Anthony ' ' ' 1 1 I Zimmerman, Elizabeth 139 WTS! mg ' 34' 35 Zimmerman, Ricky 39' 1 1 1 Wnghl' Angela 71- '11 Zimmerman, Ronnie 111 Wngm' Irldmld ' 129 Zinneiman, Aaron ll, 1 11. 1 IQ Wnghl' " 'even 59 Zulkouiski, Patrick 1 1 1 Wright, Tsulcean . . 129 Wright, William 129, 148 Phillip Alexander Senior Editor Deana Harger Layout and Design Jeffrey Klinck Computer Typist Lorei McGee Activities Editor Patricia Pounds Underclass Co-Editor Patty Rhodes Underclass Co-Editor Jeffrey Valentine Sports Editor Cjonfribufora Elizabeth Blakey Kenneth McGuire Annamaria Dodd Eddie Newsom Maria Haak Steven O'Neal Kristin Hoch Keuin Smith John Kroeger Elaine Spradlin Rhonda LaFollette Dauid Suess Cb-aafuiaera Michael Cecil Virginia Jackson l x -' wx X H ' ' Q Q f ' ql' , IK ' " ' ms 7 1 5 g 6 ,1 1 1.0 . . , , , . it U 1 ,. it ff-1 1 Index 17 3.2543 ,gfff Hope and confidence are synonymous with youth. Students Jerome Valentine, Mark Brown, Ken- neth McRee, Kristopher Musgrove, and Michele Mitchell exude optimism as they await the start of a home football game. Despite a lackluster season, hope will surely renew their enthusiasm by the time football season returns. The passage from fulltime teaching into yet undefined lives as retired per- sons does not appear to dim the hopes of faculty members Hester Hale, Fred Miessen, Virginia Jackson, and fat the far rightj Robert Meyer. Each of these retiring teachers indicated that retire- ment was not an end but rather the beginning of a new phase in hisfher life. 174 Closing i Living Gut New Attitude 4 gt 'I QA K 4 vi A , .V ff'-sf . The more things change, the more they stay the same. Although human beings create measurements of timeg hours, days, semesters, calendar years, life is a continuum. ln September, a number of changes were thrust upon us. We assessed our reaction to these changes as a new at- titudeg one which would allow us to assimilate these changes into the structure of our lives and thereby control their impact. We were wrong. Responding to current changes only helped us to avoid being overwhelmed by the present. lt is true that school spirit was improved by organizing the classes and involving them in more activities. A computeriz- ed attendance system did free teachers from unnecessary paperwork. New activities such as the Powderpuff Football Game and Mothers' Tea did fill some gaps in the program of school activities. None of these things, however, prevented change or resolved fundamental problems of the school. The false sense of being able Ageless attitudes are seen in senior Della Maier who obviously enjoys cud- dling the critters which her Applied Economics class sold. Hope blurred by tears will give way to new attitudes of expectation for Lisa Woods who has completed one phase of her life in preparation for the next. to control our destiny which we had built was constantly shat- tered. ln December, the citizens of Indianapolis turned thumbs down on the lPS referendum. ln January, we witnessed the ex- plosion of the space shuttle Challenger. ln April, the IPS Board of School Commis- sioners converted Crispus At- tucks and John Marshall high schools into junior highs and reassigned 217, of high school students. ln June, it was an- nounced that Dr. McGeehan had been appointed to the posi- tion of assistant superintendent and that Tech would face yet another school year with a new principal. What we perceived as a new attitude in September was in reality just a rebirth of an at- titude which sustains us throughout life - an attitude of hope. On June 5, as members of the Class of 1986 turned their tassels, they marked an end. But for the Class of l987, the same ceremony signaled a beginning. Perhaps that is what this year was for the students of Tech: an opportunity to discover that despite the change and uncertainty which we face as we pass through the stages of our lives, if we can hold on to hope, we can always face life with a new attitude. Closing 175 The thrill of graduation and the agony of adult responsibilities face members of the class of 1986 as they assume a new attitude and a new role as productive, contributing adults. Marveda Tardy has a scholarship to attend Tennessee State University: Benjamin Sanderfer hopes for a career in musicg Tammy Austin may enlist in the regular armyg Brian Livingston is headed for Purdue: Shuron Belk intends to work at Lilly's after earning a business degree at Butler University: and, Deana Harger will study at either DePauw or Indiana University. Subht 'gill 'MN iff ,aw Paw vw New we 'fs Q K -S "' f - L ' - f . -, . - ' , ' P 'fr ft A '- ' S ' 5 fig" I M " V gf, LEX N ifgw, wk? , U at ni' if Lad 1' ," f x f . iii: , Lf ,Iv .4 dry , V i , ff f 1 ff' 5 N F W Mfr' u 5 r'f!I S!! ,X X A , iX-',r 6 ff E, 3 QQ s V WWA., ' '?' , ' , gf! -V1 4 . M A. M, -f .K Q ,swf ,M KNAW .X A F ,V t. may , ff- " i "' f"'fi"'i ' ' ' My .F if K H' X . ,, ' Mis M3 A my r A A . MPM . , , -fe' V' 1 " ' .i 3 4 -ix M' at U si 1 use s s A si f-tg' 1' 1 176 Closin -111'--ii., I! 1. ,f ,M .v 'E vt ' , . ,Ji Q. 'f 43.- , 4. wwf' V 5. ww 1, ,,., ... '..w.! , ,,, 1, -a 4 . J, H' 5 '1 - f mn .. . ,. , ,, X , 'ir' w -J ii , . uri.. ,L .Ig X X A9-f ,gig V M, z N 7- -f x :r3"f',. if u L -. .1 4 , n--1, Mr. 1 ' 'T' v s . i?fi'j ' L -GN n 1 v 1 ' .-. n 1. -f VT -, FI W 4 V ' if 55' an y ' ' ' 4 ol L. - 1 4 L - x 1, . . L. 1 cfm-S..


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