Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN)

 - Class of 1944

Page 1 of 112

 

Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collection, 1944 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1944 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1944 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1944 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1944 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1944 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1944 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1944 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1944 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collection
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Page 12, 1944 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1944 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collection
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Page 16, 1944 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1944 Edition, Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 112 of the 1944 volume:

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'-'ar 'if , L-ki, ,' gf' f YJ,-E--K Af, :f,.:,- :. .,- ,mx -,wi V, - ,V . , .,.1 Q.: .U-,fr ,z--,zr,.,-V -A-x.. 1- -9, 1, ig L . sl 1 44 S Published by The MAGAZINE STAFF of the ARSENAL CANNON ARSENAL TECHNICAL SCHOOLS, Indianapolis 7, Indicno J U N E , 'I 9 4 4 l ww W QQ? a .fzlfe al 7ecfz .94 a . . determined steps, training for citizenship in tomorrow's world when peace, security, and a comradeship of nations will rise again to supplant the chaos, prejudice, and uncertainty created by a world at war . . . youthful steps, learning to play the game of life, to taste the joy of victory, to accept with courage the sting of defeat . . . eager steps, preparing to seek new hori- zons, to develop ideas into realities, to tit into the scheme of living in a post- war world. Vital, then, are the steps of the youth of '44, trained to meet the chal- lenge ofa changing world. waqmusfflwff-" M'W'-M, , mm if I if 3 lrltk 5. -Y 1,151 - V' gr , +P, .D .FX",iX:-qw?,.r x eras. f , L ' f" : , 1' 'Kb' -- V will -5 ' A 'V , 4.4 'ff' ' 'yy' . If v X1 fak- i ,,, Q4-gf?5 . -A jr 2 s. ,f , 'ij H his-L vyjif Y X: 0 5-K I rw 5 'ax S .4-gy .6 -wr , if , A,.,z-r- -H - . . '. ' , :Digg fr, ' A, fy "U ,' gm ' ' 'E ' "S . . '. -gi "' Q K fx ,:, ':E',"5 gt' ," gf. l+".,J5" if 'ff I .": .'f .1lf:41:' of S" 4 ,kfr J 4- 2, Q 5: 2.55 .y,l'.fi.,. tr. .,kV' 1,3 I A 'AMN Y ' v :iffy 1-. 7 xx. :hh wk qt., ,y ,X LQ.. W .4 If' - -" e Ks'-'Z-vb -' 'ff' 2 :"'f'- ' ' L"""35' I ,A . . 'W Ll' 4 L 51,4 , s., yt X51 , . is W 'Jay - , A: ' , 'gk 1 -tb , Lqfrf fm .n ' fu 1- A A-4-if ffffw 1 J f?"'Lb" ., fs,..n ig' -4- X,-.-,Q w.,im,,w ' fg- --gn f wi- f XM , --5,4 A YQ Avgsitgfntni M-fb., Ffh? yd L E i, 2 A . , ?x In... T 0 SX K, lj QVYI-4' ' , .' : is-xy. A, , 'L f" .V '. A tl. I ' .. 'I . 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J N, I ARSENAL SHOP BUILDING WEST RESIDENCE BARN 3 .ig K I 1 1 , X n I 4 w w W 'r E I I i i ! I X 4,4 A . Q im" j"y:5 v, M. ai J ,v A A LX I I :XE-ill I 'ff "W-i I .ivlnw B I E. , '93 u -.....,.- . 1 7..3',,,,,,, . ,,.,., .,,,i,.e,.qjWf,g x, QI v -- 'J4s,,:q xr .- SHOP BUILDING ..to the WEST RESIDENCE GYMNASIUM PLAZA I -,gggng .I .W I - ..., ,, QUADRANGLE ARTILLERY BUILDING NATURE PRESERVE ARSENAL STEPS 14 7fu3J.aZ'e 7a :zsewrzz .si Mmm TWO TEMPLES lAn appreciation of DeWitt S. Morgan! There was a temple upon a lofty hill, And it was seen and loved by many men, And it was built secure from base to spire. From it there came to bless the countryside All virtues to which men so freely turn, Of scholar, gentleman, and friend of humankind, And it impressed on those who worshiped there Reflection of those virtues in itself, And many in the valley passed that way. . But with the years this temple lost its strength, And buffeted by earthquake and by storm, Still consecrated to its early task, In its sore weakness, paid its toll to time. Now by eternal law this fane is swept away, All classic lines as they were known to men Swiftly and surely for all time removed, Entablaturethrown down and stately columns prone- And no more from the valley to be seen. Yet there remains a temple of the heart, With virtues as of old on this high hill, With grace and truth and beauty over it, And friendliness and faith and love upon it, And these eternal walls shall know no stain, And time shall offer to them no decay. But precious stones shall flash upon them, And stars of heaven shall shine upon them, And on this temple rain shall never fall, Nor mist surround it, nor darkness hide it, But it shall stand forever on the hill, To lead, protect, encourage, and inspire All those who in the valley pass that way. Oka Stanton Flick February 27, 1944 DeWitt S. Morgan, superintendent of Indianapolis public schools, former Tech principal,and nationally- recognized educator, passed away February 27, 1944. The untimely passing of this truly great man, known not only for his professional interests but also for his outstanding leadership in civic affairs, was particularly felt at Tech, for here he spent twenty- one of his twenty-eight professional years. As teacher, head of the History department, vice- principal, and principal, he served faithfully and loyally, under his leadership, the school made untold progress. When, in l937, he assumed the high position of thirteenth superintendent of the Indianapolis Public Schools, Tech was proud to share his exceptional talents with other schools. 13 He had firm faith in youth, stressing always the importance of teaching boys and girls the American way of life. He emphasized what he considered the three "Cs" of education: competence, character, and citizenship. His keen foresight was shown when almost two years before Pearl Harbor, he took steps to inaugu- rate the defense training program in the public schools, and again, as a leader in developing plans for post-war education. Always gracious, always smiling, Mr. Morgan was purposeful and inspirational. He was devoted to his work with youth, and was a national authority on pupil personnel and guidance. Sincere, congenial, straightforward, he endeared himself to all who knew him. His standards were high, his leadership constructive, and he worked always with untiring and unselfish energy for the advancement of education. in jfze Name of Qaeecfam Somewhere in the South Pacific December 20, I943 Dear Miss Howe: I was in your roll room from I937 to I9110. You may remember me because I was the boy who couIdn't be told anything. You probably knew then that I would some day admit my mistake. That day has come and I do admit that a high school diploma is desirable. I am twenty-one and very enlightened on many things. Right now I am in the South Pacific. I have an opportunity to study for credits, in this particular country. Would Tech accept credits from a school located in a foreign country? If not, would it give me an opportunity to take tests for the credits that I lack for graduation? I want a diploma for two very good reasons. One is obvious, I can get a better iob when I return. The other is that I want to prove to myself that I can finish a iob even if I finish late. I have been told that industry and business are increasingly demanding and get- ting a large number of high school students in the United States today. The United States will have a big iob on her hands after this war. She will need all trained men and women available. I say available. They will be the ones in high schools today. Young men and old men are fighting and dying for our own United States, for the principles that have made it great. The men who will return, as did the men who have died, will look to the students to uphold these principles outlined in the preamble to our Constitution, to see that they do not change. Quitting school and getting a defense job may help the war effort temporarily. Some may quit with this in mind. Others may quit because of dissatisfaction, lure of money, or desire to challenge the world prematurely. Urge pupils to do all they can for the war effort after school and in their spare time, but to stay in school until they receive their diplomas. Let the present generation take care of the war now. It is the future that counts most. Our future is in their hands. Their real and lasting way to help the United States now is to prepare themselves for the future. My message to those who wish to quit school and to those who attend half- heartedly is this: For the future protection of what fathers, brothers, and friends are fighting for, finish the one main iob-High School-with credit. Thank you very much for your wishes and helpful advice. Yours respectfully, Ph. M. 3fc U. S. N. Base Hospital Four Navy 733 'A' ir ir ir X 4 3 li x ,, 5? x Q YY: M 542 Wm. , ,Q 1, F B X ,f 5 , 4 QQQQQ ' Q ' ,G fslswf k - xv, g ,,: fx w r QSWQW F Q Qian. Hg - , Q A S fY f -iv S aff' Qs-11 A DETERMINED TRAINING FOR CITIZENSHIP Q 35, fl' ' 55, "' ' "ff-'bm .3 .,,, L Mx- N ' f sw , .' R X xi - i N, "Chg ' , , V525 "' 4 W Q +42 Q 'fi-if . ' -9 .E 'X V 1 S ' 'aw t .L V ,L N , K 1' , , ' xx' T'--if f' 5 Y inf' ,s L 1 , ' 9 'H-'Q' W- . u -' 'X Y - Rn' 1311 4' - -5 any' on funn! U" "3 anna.. L .'d'h,qlVSgpuf1.N.U ' '1 ' s R. - x "Q" 'N , 1 -' S a ' ff Islam ,. , .1 " 9 Mi , ,. h v . . 5 "s Q 'iltgl 5 2 W qi 'Ui .... M. M., ,N w-...,,, ffl' Q Q1 .LX , 'R ' '4fZT'f'..g.,W fx, do-'D - sg, 5 Q f f-1i 2 A ,fl Ma. 1401 an '1U""l", Man about Tech is Mr. Hanson H. Anderson, principal and friend, who is ever ready with helpful ad- vice and counsel for freshmen and seniors alike. During a busy day, a visitor may find him consulting with his head stenographer, Miss Miriam Howe, and the school secretary, Mrs. Lillian Harrison . . . leaving the cam- pus to address a civic or school group. . . or talking with Mr. Theo- dore Locke, president of the Board of School Commissioners. Familiar to everyone, this con- genial man, admired and respected by teachers and students, is a last- ing inspiration to the thousands of young men and women who attend the Arsenal Technical Schools. Wx, '51 1 iifd :- QL e' 14614 Assisting the principal are six members of the administrative staff, each in charge of specific duties, all directly responsible for the efficient management of the school . . . lll If there is a blueprint dealing with the supervision of the buildings, grounds, or equipment, Mr. Horace E. Boggy, school treasurer and gen- eral business manager, has it-but where? . . . l2l Supervising teaching conditions throughout the school, collecting depart- mental fees, assigning and adiusting faculty programs, and helping with the supervison of boys is quite a iob for Mr. Fred Gorman . . . l3l ln addition to adjusting employment programs and helping to supervise the boys, safety at school is in the hands of Safety Director Joe Kettery, and in fire or air raid drills, Mr. K. is the man behind the man behind the bell.. . l4l Absence makes the work grow harder for Mr. C. L. McClintock who supervises Tech's intricate system of attendance and home room sponsorship, and directs the procedure of program-making and scheduling of classes . . . l5l Guardian to the host of freshmen and newcomers to Tech, Mr. Charles Teeters not only directs their counseling but also supervises revision of the program of courses offered to the entire student body . . . lol Supervising social conditions of the school, with emphasis on interests and welfare of girls, co-ordinating Student Center and club activi- ties, directing college guidance, and acting as chairman of the Scholarship committee . . . this is the day of Tech's dean of girls, Miss Gertrude Thuemler. Z""'vf adm? . ,dw I ,mia ,aim W MM e 4g if 7fwoa9!a swyuzq ' Each step in the guidance program is a step in preparation for life. Pupils' individual interests, abilities, and needs are considered with regard to present world conditions in helping them to make the wisest choice . . . lll Through individual and group counseling, sponsor teachers assist pupils in making educational and vocational plans . . . l2l ln Freshman Conference periods pupils are ac- quainted with the rules and courses of the school. They receive supervision of study and assistance in planning programs . . . l3l Boys take tests for qualification in Army specialized training or in the Navy college training program . . . l4l Pupils inter- ested in distributive occupations enroll in the Retail Merchandising class which requires that they spend at least fifteen hours a week in a iob related to the training . . . l5l Mr. J. Fred Murphy, director of guidance and counseling, devotes time to testing, counseling, and research . . . lol From colleges and universities field representatives meet with pupils interested in their institutions for individual and group conferences . . . l7l In the Co-ordination-Placement Office, Mr. Jacob L. Jones and Miss 'da M. Anderson place Techites in gainful occupations . . . l8l Rotary Club members serve as counselors to junior and senior boys talk- ing over educational, vocational, and personal problems. The Altrusa Club offers a similar pro- gram for senior girls . . . l9l Waiting to board the bus which will take them to the industrial plant where they work half day, these boys spend the other half of their time in classes on the campus. 1 t li l il l tl E V: j. it l l E M-w...,, . . v l l i, ti is l ,v 1 3 J 5 H I 1 i r foafawnqdaqanw... : ,mf X" t - K QZQQ Basic in the American way of life, a fluent knowledge of English is not only a social necessity but also the first step in all learn- ing . . . lll Latest trend is the co-ordination of English lll and Botany l, in which stu- dents use the scientific material in botany as a basis for English class work . . . l2l The school librarian explains the facilities and arrangement of the library to a freshman English class . . . l3l Those pupils who have impaired hearing have an opportunity to learn lip reading . . . l4l Ready for a busy day is Mr. D. C. Park, head of the depart- ment. 22 wcfdbwacl With Victory and Peace must also come communication and understanding among the world's citizens. A knowledge of mod- ern languages will help promote this new world citizenship, while the study of Latin will keep alive the culture ofthe past . . . lil Explaining the Italian posters to an interested class is Miss Grace Emery, head of the Latin department . . . l2l Knowledge ofthe arts, as well as the language, oFFers one of the closest bonds between the "Good Neighbors." . . . l3l Important at present for military purposes, German will be vital after the war in promoting trade and improving international relationships . . . l4l Mr. Charles C. Martin, head of the Modern Language department, explains the Alliance Francaise medal to his ad- vanced French class . . . l5l Conversational Spanish introduces the pupil to the lan- guage and customs of Spanish-speaking countries. me ww, m page me p tiff-a E rw WI' A Through Social Science students are developing universal knowledge and interests which will be all-important in successful post-war planning . . . lll The four freedoms, their background and potentialities, are important factors to boys and girls in their study of Government. . .l2l Sociology students observe class differentiation, standards of living, and opportunities in the American way of life . . . l3l "South of the border" are centered the interests of students as they study the history and peoples of Latin America . . . l4l Heading the Social Science department is Mr. O. S. Flick . . . l5l In Economics study centers around fluctuating business conditions in relation to the war effort and to post-war economic conditions. D1 54 Because mathematics is needed in every branch of the Armed Forces and in the rebuilding of nations, pupils who take math courses at Tech will be well prepared for the future . . . lil For proficiency in mathematics, senior boys work problems in War Arithmetic . . . l2l Knowledge of the geometry of spheres, which is necessary in all branches of engineering and navigation, is taught in Solid Geometry . . . l3l "Seeing stars" from the Tech campus are pupils of astronomy who may be future navigators on the sea and in the air . . . l4l Often found in conference with students is Mr. A. M. Welchons, head of the department . . . l5l Modern technology and military and naval tactics demand a knowledge of trigonometry. git Af-W- I ' " fl.. Keyed to the war effort and post-war planning, the entire Science department is emphasizing training which will make more useful citizens for the difficult readiustment to come at the close of the war . . . lll Advising a boy who is making a titration experiment valuable in chemical analyses is Mr. A. C. Hoffman, head of the Chemistry, Zoology, and Agriculture departments . . . l2l By C O I dissecting a frog, zoology students learn relation- ship of anatomical parts and their function and can apply this knowledge in first aid work . . . l3i Physiography students learn that the shortest dis- tance between two points on the earth's surface is a part of a great circle, an important factor in both air and water navigation . . . l4l Acquainting pupils with concepts of the air age and post-war flew! Wm 8 ' ' opportunities in the aeronautical field, Aeronau- tics also gives introductory material to boys and girls interested in the Army or Navy air corps . . . l5l A class in chemistry demonstrates ionization . . . lol Mr. Charles Brosey, head of the Physics department, uses the cathode-ray oscillograph to determine characteristics of a sound . . . l7l Be- coming acquainted with the structure of the flower, botany students are also creating a deeper appre- ciation ot nature . . . l8l Dr. Clare Cox, head of the Botany department, explains various groups of plants and animals to biology students . . . l9l Vegetables for Victory are exhibited by boys in Vocational Agriculture . . . llOl A Victory garden and herb patch are experiments ofthe Botany de- partment. :D it L59 Wore X tlli wwf? Siu- , .,,. , f '51 7!aeZf' .E ' 255 411- mg lsfafln X-, X e M ,,,. Z ,f our , M if-1 V W 44 'ft 'A 1-1' My M Meri' H g, if I .Q,, l I "-': r 1 4' Emphasizing "Not 'art for art's sake' but 'art for war,' " pupils in the Art department find that artis- tic pursuits help prepare them not only for war- time iobs but for the peace . . . lll Design and composition for linoleum block prints and the use of the press form a part of the work in an ad- vanced class . . . l2l Teacher and department head, Mr. Oakley Richey, studies Mercury in his office . . . l3l Art students get a taste of ceramic sculpturing as they model a child's head from real lite, in clay, to be glazed and kiln tired . . . l4l De- signed to prepare pupils for the sign-making in- dustry, Sign Painting class members master the art of designing and making every kind of sign, from placard to billboard . . . l5l Commercial Art, the business art, gives students an opportunity to study art and its connection with advertising . . . 28 ayamawm, at I but ,,,,sf' l6l Still life in oils presents a new problem to young artists . . . l7l Young hopefuls trying for scholar- ships make water color portraits of a class mem- ber. Drafting, the basic craft in modern industry, re- quires men with skill, training, and experience . . . l8l Modern design will make the difference in homes of tomorrow, so modern designers are trained in advanced Architectural Drafting . . . l9l Planes and architecture of the future, drawn by drafting pupils, are previewed in the department's display case . . . ll Ol Classroom theory plus prac- tical experience in after-school iobs will enable these boys in advanced Machine Drafting, taught by Mr. Harold Walter, head of the Drafting de- partment, to secure well-paying positions in future life. 29 js- R. Qtfiiasl I fo 12: F1 A l s ff f14awJem,1f!wJlame... In time of war, music becomes a great con- tributor to national unity for young and old turn to it for comfort, inspiration, and es- cape from the worries of the day . . . lll Under the supervision of Mrs. Elizabeth K. Cochran, department head, the counter- point class composes original music for Wil- liam Herschell's poem, "Ain't God Good to Indiana" . . . l2l Newest and smallest music group at Tech is the Instrumental Trio, made up of violin, flute, and piano . . . l3l The Tech Choir includes in its highlights of the year its operetta, "The Red Mill," and its part in the Easter Sunrise Services . . . l4l Meeting the demand for a small performing group, the Girls' Ensemble ap- pears on school, club, and church pro- grams . . . l5l Traditional part of every school assembly is the music provided by the Concert Band . . . l6l Fifty talented Techites make up the Concert Orchestra, one of Tech's largest music groups, for school programs. amfgallle Waanh :XX j HJ 'Lf J XM:- J . f g 1 ' i i ' ir A Fl gf. i Yi Ae., if iii. 5. si.: A c, M Y 'rx r x 5 1 tt -Q' ij. . - ' , x ff'a'?f:1f4a ff' " 'ff EC si i ,- eww , 'QM' ir-mi X , , -,V V. f N35 eff M . 1 pf? 4 7' Q ,Z ey' 'wi fsggw-X-V H Q' 1, N Y ' K- ., ..s,Rix. ,,..aEX:fg,. . he K, milf in t'tA S Q ? f ,S,,m5 . --Q, lll Rockin' rhythm resounds when the Dance Band plays for social activities and U. S. O. en- tertainments . . . l2l One of the honors of the department is to be named student organist . . . l3l Following the manner ofthe old English sing- ers, the Madrigals, seated around the table, sing old English madrigals and folk songs from many lands. .lv That war permits no letdown of high standards in entertainment is demonstrated by the Division of Program Production . . . lil From his control room the radio engineer checks voice levels as the pro- gram director rehearses the cast . . . l2l Make-up staff practices make-up on each other . . . l3l "The Spirit of Tech," a campus war project model, is completed by Stagecratt pupils . . . l4l lngenious director, Mr. Chelsea S. Stewart, plans assembly programs and stage productions . . . l5l "The Voice of Tech," the Public Address System, reaches each classroom. 2 .. ,- ,4 ' fzweazzfws ' f Business demands more and better work in less time, therefore, four thousand Tech students are taking com- mercial training in order to tit themselves into the post- war office . . . lll The department strives to meet the present need for pupils trained in Machine Calculation . . . l2l Department Head F. H. Gillespie dictates to a student secretary . . . lI3l ln OFfice Practice students do special work for school executives, in preparation for office work . . . l4l To meet the demands of in- creased production pupils study tiling, a vital part of all business . . . l5l Typewriting represents the most mod- ern and fluent mode of written expression . . . l6l Doctor, lawyer, merchant, or housekeeper-all who achieve any degree of success in lite will need some knowledge of bookkeeping. ' ,fm Zlujul .frame In Home Economics both boys and girls study the two essentials of life, food and clothing, to take their places as home-makers of tomorrow . . . lll Buffet luncheons in the practice dining room are a treat to members of the advanced cooking classes, who prepare and serve all special luncheons at Tech . . . l2l Miss Emily McCullough, head of the Home Economics department, discusses a sewing problem with a member of her Clothing IV class . . . l3l Because managing the family budget re- quires a thorough understanding of values, girls taking Textiles are learning the fundamentals of intelligent buying . . . l4l Proper introductions are illustrated in Social Arts, a course that preserves the art of gracious living in wartime as well as in peacetime . . . l5l Chow call brings the boys in Foods, who cook and serve their meal, army style, for a day. 7fae.f ' gsm Those who wish to enter the business world take advantage of the vocational Home Economics courses . . . lil Working with old and new mate- rials, girls in Millinery learn the trade of making hats and accessories . . . l2l In Dressmaking each girl works independently, planning, cutting, and fitting dresses for customers as she would in a dressmaking shop . . . l3l Equipped with expe- rience and training in the fundamentals of baking are Tech's Bake Shop members, who bake bread and pastries for special orders and for the cafe- teria. It is not possible to train tor a post-war era of scientific and mechanical development by encour- ., fzwv '- apffmm aging an educational retreat from machines so the twenty vocational schools at Tech offer boys unusual opportunities for specialized trammg in their occupational preference l4l Because Machine Shop is the basis of all trades, the machm ist must first be trained in this work l5l Having grown into one of the leading trades during this war the forge and welding field will be of even more importance in all metal trades after the war l6l Student interviewing is part of the work of Mr Harold Maves head of the Metal Trades department l7l General Shop broadens the boys knowledge for pre-engmeermg in college training l8l Boys in Sheet Metal Shop learn to construct air-conditioning units which will be stand- ard equipment in post-war homes offices, and industrial plants l9l The printed page as it comes from the press is the mouthpiece of civiliza- tion . . . llOl Skill and dexterity in hand composi- tion are developed in the school Print Shop . . . llll For the production of war-training instruc- tional material, the linotype has proved a valuable machine . . . ll2l Mr. George R. Barrett, head of the Printing department, checks production orders for the coming month. mmf ti I-4, l 9 Qi sl? lll Making use of their training in the armed serv- ices and relieving the acute man-power shortage in the electrical field are boys who have taken Electrical Maintenance . . . l2i From their expe- rience in servicing radios, boys in the Radio class will be trained for television servicing . . . l3l Mr. H. F. Fye, head of the Electrical Shop, demon- strates electro-magnetism in one of his weekly lec- tures . . . l4i To be efficient maintenance men, boys study Electronics, which includes the fiow of elec- trons in vacuum and gas tubes . . . l5i Emphasizing the development of individual ideas, Techites in Model Building design future airplanes . . . l6l Cabinet makers and mill workers train for the post- war building program . . . K ,I ? l7i Under the direction of Mr. Dale Grit- fin, head of the Building Trades depart- ment, each class in Carpentry builds a house, gaining experience for residence construction . . . l8i With Plumbing a growing field because of demands for sanitation, boys prepare to enter this trade . . . l9i Disassembly, assembly, and adiustment of all mechanical units ot the automobile are part of the work in Auto Shop I . . . llOi Training in Airplane Engine Mechanics includes theory and practice on radial engines and all acces- sories to the engines . . . ll li Mr. M. W. Slattery, head ofthe Auto Shop, explains carburetion and engine operation . . . ll Zi In Body and Fender Shop, boys work on students' and teachers' cars, straight- ening tenders, welding and soldering parts, and after sufificient experience, do complete paint iobs . . . ll3i Practical experience is gained in servicing all popular makes of automobiles in Auto Shop ll. TH Never before has health been so important to the nation and its people. Stressing this, the physical education program at Tech has been increased to include almost the entire student body in regular physical education and Physical Fitness classes . . . lll "Up and at 'em" is the rule during a fast game of cage ball in Physical Fitness . . . l2l Junior Com- mandos crawl under barricades on the indoor obstacle course. . .l3lIt's a fight to the finish when boys start a tug-o-war in Physical Fitness . . . l4l Head of department, Mr. R. D. Behlmer, and a gym assistant make the final check-up on gym lock- ers . . . l5l Exercise alone cannot maintain health, therefore, in physiology a study is made of the body and its care. QS 14 lll Competitive games within the class give the stu- dent a clearer understanding of playing fairly and honestly throughout life . . . l2l Resting in the capa- ble hands of these girls trained in the Child Monitor course is the task of caring for children in the absence of their parents . . . l3l Prepared to meet any and all emergencies are Miss Pauline Duffy and Mrs. Mildred Johnston, school nurses, who are in charge ofthe first-aid room . . . l4l Increased war- time needs for nurses and others trained in first-aid places a special emphasis on the nursing course. . . l5l To add interest and variety, special exercises are included in the girls' classes . . . l6l Poise, grace, and skill are three reasons why archery is included in physical education. -Nah 5 ., ,xx , auzgww ww Mazza - vw, JW, vw sb Exemplitying the highest type of Americon youth ore boys in R.0.T.C. which offers excellent oppor- tunity for mentol ond physicol discipline ond incul- cotes ideals of service to their country . . . lil Test- ing their knowledge of the progress ot the wor ore the five field olticers: Codet Moiors Henry Russe ond Donald Woerner, honorory Lieutenant-Colonel Winston Churchill, Colonel Robert S. Smith, ond Lieutenant-Colonel Rolph Howery lkneelingl . . . 6 , 6 CADET COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Bottom row, left to right: William Quillin, Winston Churchill, Ralph Howery, Henry Russe, Donald Woerner, Edward Camic. Second row: Leslie Johnson, Rex Tranbarger, Edgar Featheringill, Karl McClintock, Karl Cox. Third row: Willard Wampler, Richard Braun, Jack Davidson, William Brandon, Richard Armstrong. Fourth row: Jack Realh, William Windsor, Robert Windsor, Ray Lane. Fifth row: Robert Dotson, Charles Ziegler, James Seward, Earl Woodward. w Sixth row: Eugene Edwards, Donald Gardner, Don Hickam, George Stahl, Robert Forbes. Seventh row: Bruce Dungan, Robert Lamb, John Neville, Ramon Secrest. l2i Commandant of the Tech unit is Sergeant Ernest Stringfield . . . l3i With headquarters in the Powder Magazine, Colonel Will H. Brown issues uniforms to all city R.O.T.C. units . . . l4l Sergeant Vernon Bunch gives his personal attention to a cadet's rifle . . . l5l Cadet commissioned officers stand at attention . . . l6 7 8l Cne of the many duties non- commissioned officers perform is drilling recruits . Z K .RN lil A company of Tech's R.O.T.C. stands retreat . . . l2l Ready-Aim-Fire! Cadets perfect their skill on the indoor rifle range for the Hearst Trophy Match . . . l3l The unit holds its annual Father and Son banquet in the school cafe- teria . . . l4l Calisthenics helps boys to build muscles, gsm, R.O.T.C. style . . . l5l The R.O.T.C. Marching Band oFfers competition to the team at all football games . . . lol Pass- ing the reviewers' stand at the annual federal inspection, cadets hope for another honor rating. YOUTHFUL LEARNING TO PLAY THE GAME OF LIFE ,g-" 'Q Mk XE' -an ywuffn .M lg! 1 , wah I Yi", J ff , . ..,, K my ' MF , Vw k,,, Y MU S75 . 'A ..,, fm..-W-4 -A ,ik , 5, .- n, ., -f 'WN airy fw-,gr X, x. X +R --x 1 w N Nw ,I Q1 Q ?'4Y ,, ,Var ,. Aanmwm ,f Q! S .h A . NX k! QW! .330-1 - . .Nav f fwwwm wal M, ,WW ww ww., KNNN y 2, If ff w I n 9 1 Atv ,g - - qt,,v s. qw' 1 I 9 'Nun- f ,Y-rf Q s,,. M.N2j H L.,-ng -Wh H A Ji 0,2s2N3h9gf now aw Jw. .f 'Ha 15 AE ,. "1 If . ZS K E-fx ' veklkj 5,v if , . Z. Qif I No cross section of life at Tech would be complete without clubs, which are as traditionally a part of the school as the Arsenal Tower, the quadrangle, or the fountain. New trends and ideas in club life have been adopted this year. In addition to broadening friendships and interests, clubs have gone "all out for victory!" The campus has fairly hummed with activity, each club plunging whole-heartedly into some kind ofa war drive, campaign, or proiect . . . ..g 4 , ! 17? 3, lll "Quiet please, broadcast- ing" warns the director as the Drama Club presents "Blondie" . . . l2l Dressed in togas, officers ofthe Latin Club bring the activi- ties of the Roman Senate to life . . . l3l The Spanish Club breaks the pinata, a Mexican custom, at the Christmas party . . . 48 C' ,, rf . . lll Boys and girls in the Nature Study Club answer the call ofthe great out- doors . . . l2l At the Social Science Club meeting, final measurements are made for the Indiana State Flag which the club will present to the school . . . l3l Fun + math enthusiasts 2 the Math Club meeting . . . 49 4 . . ,A 57" Q 1 2 1.. mf W , x lll Individual projects of the Physics Club include the making of a telescope . . . l2l Learning the why and wherefore of an incendiary bomb are youthful sci- entists at ci Chemistry Club meeting . . . l3l Members of the Agriculture Club plant bib lettuce for Victory gardens, promising to "grow more in '44" . . . l4l Devoting part of their club time to cut- ting and pasting, the Girl Reserves make scrapbooks for Billings Hospital . . . l5l Making plans for the annual Freshman Mixers and Game Hop are members of the Service Club . . . l6l Campfire Girls, known as the Horizon Club, meet to discuss plans for helping at the day nursery. M Ji 41 . 'E 95 512 if 6 1 04139 .4 e .xfsmwrz L of Adam O CXN ECAC 0 C62 CN4 OYJXX1 X lan QW Y: P- QP vm i xi: Q6 1 W Nl, lk, 3 'Y T7 1 M, a41l.37 H ls' l Sept. Sept. Oct. l Oct. l Oct. l Oct. A Oct. Nov. Nov. VAR Southport . Jefferson Muncie .. Anderson . Manual Cathedral . Richmond . Washington Shortridge ,tkefma SITY FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Tech Opponent . . . . . . I9 O . . . 6 7 . . . O 27 . . . . 6 6 . . . . 15 7 . . . . . . 39 6 . . . . 33 0 . . . . . I4 6 . ...l2 I3 4 I l l Crisp autumn afternoons find a horde of well padded individuals cavorting about the practice field, attempting to perfect their technique of committing legal mayhem on their equally robust foes of the next Friday. Nine times the Greenclad knights go forth to conquer. Five times they succeed, thrice they fail, and once they battle to a stalemate . . . llt 1-2- 3-4-and the Green Wave is ready to go . . . l2l Varsity A takes time out to pose . . . l3l Var- sity B also poses . . . l4l Even the freshmen strike a pose . . . l5t Not to be outdone, up-and-coming Reserves pose. RESERVE FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Tech Opponent Sept.3O Southport . . . . . 6 0 Oct. ll Manual . .. .... I4 l4 Oct. 19 Cathedral ..... . . 0 I3 Oct. 28 Shortridge ....... .... O 13 Nov. 2 Warren Central . . . .. . . 20 0 Nov. 4 Washington . . .... l9 7 FRESHMAN FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Tech Opponent Sept.3O Southport . . . . . . . l3 O Oct. 10 Broad Ripple . . .... 27 0 Oct. 'I4 Southport . . . . . . . 14 6 Oct. i9 Cathedral . . . . . . . 7 13 Oct. 28 Shortridge . . .... 27 0 Nov. 4 Washington . . .... I3 0 A STRING VARSITY FOOTBALL-Bottom Row lleft to rightl: .lack Means, John Brannon, James Davis, louis Steinsburger, Sylvester Wieneke, Robert Cunnings, Frank Springe Second Row: Donald Roller, Reginald Bowers, Robert Orem, William Berry, Gene Lepper, Robert Forbes, Lawrence Pringle, William Robertson, Arthur Kern, John Jordan Top Row. William Taylor, Donald Bauermeister, James Seward, Frank Brinkman, Snowden Gillespie, Robert Meyer, Edward Mclean, Robert Straub, William Mullenholz, Pal Hirt, James Reddick. l l l i i i l RESERVE FOOTBALI.-Bottom Row lleft to rightl: Max Lee, Charles Deardorfl, Harry Docke, Lewis Grabhorn, Fred Halsworth, David McClain, Earl Gordon, Robert Free- man, Charles Ennis. Second Row: Walter Tynam, Robert Mes- lan, Harry Zorman, Dale Overstreet, James Barnett, Nolan Boles, Conrad Shetland, William Roush, Peter Karakasheff, Carl Arvidson. Top Row: Coach R. E. Hamler, Lyle Hiatt, Donald Forbes, Robert Ahlers, Donald Chandler, Nicholas Poehler, Hubert Toombs, R. V. Copple, athletic director. FRESHMAN FOOTBALL-Bottom Row lleft to rightl: Robert Phillips, Jack Peaslee, Thomas Clark, captain, Charles Carroll, Eugene Turner, Lynn Lynch, Don Hocker, Rex Phillips, Lawrence Burnett, Richard Duvall, James Eades. Second Row: R. V. Copple, athletic direc- tor, Burton Fields, Herbert Floyd, Julius DeFabis, Don Stark, Elmer Sawyer, Harvey Klingeman,John Naparin,CharIes Sprankle, Robert Fisher, Robert Harritt, O. W. White, assistant coach. Top Row: Edward Wiltsee, Richard Hast- ings, William Green, John Frey, Richard Bohenkamp, Richard Burns, Dean Evans, Robert Guorley, Joseph Springer, Vernon Huffman, William Eastes, C. P. Dagwell, head coach. Not in picture-George Kirschner, Kent Giles. . ,N.,,,. .-,,,,..,.,,... ...,....., .... ...W d.. -. --W-w- -H ----- - v+ ll- F V K , .., .. ..,...................,.e-.......-,,. .,. W ...... .... ., V .....,.-.... ..-- . , ,., ,,,, ,,, .,,..,...,..,......-,-...---..-...---iA-'N.-- -L 4 W- nf- ---- - V - W -- - '--' in ' " W3 X . FW, . .X , --v. .h----ec.. N--N . - - V ----f-"- f , iii -LLM., 'f:.sp0A?,,.......-2s1'1l..-..., f f I STRING VARSITY FOOTBALL-Bottom Row lleft to rightl: Robert Le Compte, Milton Pate, William Wilson, James Andrews, James Reddick Ralph Kastner Joseph Second Row: Robert Evans, Paul Reynolds, HaroldlGray, Paul Standeford, Richard Braun, Ray Brown, William Craig. Top Row: William Quillin, Richard Pavy, Howard Johnson, Eugene Hobbs, Dean Drummond, Paul Walker, Kenneth Weaver, Jack Himes. QQ' 'Diff wh 'pm an WL F 7,4 4 A 4, ' F F"--my ., ' ' 5 , , . , W st. 2. L J, if , l,.,.,,,. , 3 e A V 4.- 742 Wash Radial' cj o VARSITY BASKETBALL SECTIONAL TEAM-Bottom row lleft to rightl: Richard Peeler, William Spall, Harland Sturgeon, Edward Wirtz, Marvin Fields, George Sennhauser, student manager. Second row: Alvin Shumm, coach, Robert Kurtz, William larsen, Robert Freeman, Robert Hostetter, Richard Moody, R. V. Copple, athletic director. Nov. Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan. Not in picture: Robert Meyer, Richard Wilson. VARSITY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE Tech Opponent 39 27 24 Washington ... Jan. 27 Howe ........ 26 28 Jan. 3 Kokomo .. .. 24 33 Jan. l0 New Castle .... 23 50 Jan. ll Cathedral ..... 25 24 Jan. 18 Frankfort ..... 22 36 Feb 22 Shortridge .... 32 37 Feb 3l Rushville .. .. 37 26 Feb 7 Richmond ..... 30 22 Feb logansport Broad Ripple Anderson . Manual . . . Jefferson . . Muncie . . . Southport .. Marion . . . Shelbyville Tech Opponent 25 48 41 34 I9 36 39 40 33 34 25 39 34 37 52 45 44 37 A severe shortage of victories confronts the Green- clad netmen as King Basketball closes his court. Handicapped by inexperience lfonly two seniorsl, the bucket brigade manages seven wins in eighteen starts. The locals finish strong, however, and go into the post-schedule tournament riding in eighth place in the conference, with a .500 average in city com- petition. Techmen advance to the semi-finals in the Sec- tional, to be disqualified by Shortridge . . . lll Ex- ponents of pass and dribble are the Varsity squad . . . l2l Time-out furnishes the pause that refreshes . . . l3l Cheer leaders say, "Let's make this one raise the roof!" . . . l4i T stands for triumph, Tech, and try-to-get-one . . . l5l Varsity material is found in the Reserves . . . l6l Freshmen win twelve in sixteen. 56 CHEER LEADERS lleft to rightl: Warren James, Neil Redmont, William B. Hoover, Glenn Reasner. RESERVE BASKETBALL--Bottom Row lleft to rightl: Richard Slinker, Charles Fairbanks, Donald Higgs, Richard Green, Harry Zor- man. Second Row: R. V. Copple, athletic direc- tor, Charles Short, Eugene Crum, R. C. Smith, Kenneth Hoy, Charles Wuench. Top Row: Earl Gordon, Robert Freeman, William Shirley, Harry Kimbro, Richard Rinsma, Roscoe Pierson, coach. FRESHMAN BASKETBALL-Bottom Row ileft to rightl: James Burkart, Edward Grit- tin, James Knight, Arnold Maves, Norman Thompson, Robert M. Wilson, Corydon Strawser. Second Row: Herman T. Hinshaw, coach, Edward Wiltsee, William Volk, Lynn Lynch, Delmere Blackburn, Richard Denney, Sam Wininger, Robert Copple. Top Row: John Naparin, Paul Kortepeter, Raymond Thompson, Frank Rexroth, James Eades, Dean Evans, James Dixon. Not in picture: Richard Ryan. RESERVE BASKETBALL SCHEDULE Nov Washington . .. Nov. Howe ........ Dec, Kokomo ...... Dec. Broad Ripple . . Dec. Cathedral ..... Dec. Frankfort ..... Dec. Shortridge .... Dec. Rushville ...... Jan. Richmond ..... Jan. Broad Ripple .. . Jan. Anderson ..... Jan. Manual ....... Jan. Shortridge .... Feb. Southport ..... Feb. Marion ....... Feb. Deaf School .. . Feb. Shelbyville .... FRESHMAN BASKETBALL SCHEDULE Dec. Warren Central. Dec. Southport ..... Jan. Shortridge ..... Jan. Manual ....... Jan. Cathedral ..... Jan. Washington . .. Jan. Tabernacle Pres. Jan. Howe ......... Jan. Broad Ripple ... Feb. Shortridge .... Feb. Manual ....... Feb. Cathedral ..... Feb. Washington . .. Feb. Feb. Feb. 57 Howe ..... . . . Franklin Twp. . . Broad Ripple .. i l -91' Q - ,V Lg 1 X -. ., .HD , I+ , ', ii Y rf as .1""' i A d 'fa r -, - -.wi f css r swf J , mr 521' fi C ! -'V -app XF , w., V, :..af..' WJ- ---4- -ww-.:" i -.f-. 1 gm .-,,. O CROSS COUNTRY TEAM-Bot tom Row lleft to rightl: Emmett McGinley, Lloyd Hill, William Cooper, Don Mclntyre, Richard Pang Second Row: Douglas Bolt Arthur Myers, George Ferree Rolland Jones Robert Hase winkle Robert Wilson Carl San ford. Top Row: Paul E. Myers, coach John Dan John Christ James Worrall Richard Wilson Wil liam Mulford, Kenneth Thomp- son, Richard Brunnhofler, R. V. Copple, athletic director. GOLF TEAM-Standing lleft to rightl: E. W. Ensinger, coach, Stanton Sheppard, Frank Rex- roth, Kenneth Hoy, kneeling- Arthur Conger. 13 .. 'I 1-'f ' EZ- . if FJ' XM uv- qgljf' 'v-L ' ,QV 3 , -f x " fi Q W -on ff ww M ' 'Q i i 4 X 'id' 0 ,- V Ti' ' 'Q' 6 vt. it--1 A I' - ' Tl,-4. yy . ssgiri..-'Qi mmf 4' ver' ? BASEBALL TEAM-Bottom Row fleft tc rightlf Paul Hirt, Robert Post, James Tribby, Harland Sturgeon, Arnold Maves, Vernon Ayres, Donald Gardner, Roy Brock. Second Row: James Andrews, Edward Wiltsee, Thomas Fitch, Duard Ballard, Rob- ert Orem, Robert Meyer, Edwin Mclean, Edward Wirtz, Allen Peterman, William! Taylor. Top Row: R. V. Copple, athletic director,r Paul Brackemyre, assistant coach, Jack Cornwell, Stanley Wright, Paul Koertge,N Robert Carter, William Peters, Joseph Milan,g Donald Stark, Jack Elzroth, Vernon Huff-' man, and C. P. Dogwell, coach. TRACK SQUAD-Bottom Row lleft to rightl: Charles Ennis, Jack Rea, Eugene Hobbs, Paul Raikes, Harry Kimbro, Thomas Mullen- dore, William Duggins, Robert Freeman, Robert Drake, William Kruse, Kenneth Houser, and Robert Parrish. Second Row: Borden Crews, James Dixon, Paul Whitehead, Eugene Crum, Earl Gor- don, Rolland Jones, Fred Halsworth, George Ferree, James Davis, Jack Perkins, Charles Minatel, Dean Murphy, Richard Peeler, and Nolan Boles. Third Row: R. V. Copple, athletic direc- tor, Dale Sare, assistant coach, Donald Bauermeister, James Seward, Robert Straub, John Towsley, Jack Davidson, Keith Brad- way, George Sennhauser, Kenneth Hall, William Cooper, Robert Webster, Carl San- ford, John Christ, Bryce Baldwin, Richard Pavy, Paul Myers, coach, and Reuben Behlmer, coach. Top Row: John Lytle, Loren Montgomery, William Lowe, Hans Schmidt, Charles Thompson, Richard Slinker, Paul Reiss, Warren James, Max Kortepeter, lloyd Hill, Milton Kane, Beri Antreasian, Donald Knipe, Robert Appleby, James Cox, Edward Camic. and Jarvey Brown. sv' - qwmwz, Through work on the Arsenal Cannon stoFls aspir- ing iournalists gain practical experience in pub- lishing the official school newspaper and annual magazine. During staFf periods and after hours in the Can- non omces, creative abilities are encouraged, life- long friendships are formed, and individual interests and talents are developed. -. , - pw far' y xr- 4 tit' x as 5 'H X ,P-f'm'1,fw W are J I lll Editor-in-chief of the June Magazine, Ruthellen Pohlar, checks final copy with pictures . . . l2l Assistant Editor E. Jean Brown makes an appoint- ment with the engraver . . . l3l Virginia Rouse, art editor and assistant layout editor, sketches a ten- tative layout for pages 16 and 17 . . . l4l Ralph DeaKyne, sports editor, consults with Charles Abel, layout editor, about the layout for the ath- letic section . . . M55 'iii' F .,,,,',-. lll Co-editors Patricia Perkins and Jean Farson, Stal? I, and Joanne lnnis and Rosemary Wiggs, Staff ll, edit the weekly issues . . . l2l Heading the weekly staffs is Rebecca Taggart, managing editor, while Betty Clarke is city editor . . . l3l Associate editors, Martha Ginger and Betty Schiefel- bien, count headlines . . . l4l Jour- nalism kiddies, Dolores Burden, cub editor, and Jean Lukie, exchange editor, hold staff iobs . . . l5l Typists Patricia Boyers, Eleanor Nemec, and Betty Gal- breath pound out copy . . . lot War editor, Ruth Payne, and R.O.T.C. editor, William Windsor, dis- cuss their departments . . . l7l Enthusiastic report- ers are: first row, Barbara Thomas, Patricia Palm- er, Calleroy Kerhoulas, Aileen Thompson, second row, Jean Hollansworth, Margaret Tandy, Elaine Lowery, Paul Reams, Robert Windsor, and Sylvia Little . . . l8l Cub reporters help with campus cov- erage . . . l97 Norma Schaloske, Wanda Milner, and Ruth Layton man the copy desk . . . llOl Edit- ing Pages 4 and 5 are Bette Kimmell, Mary Ann Griffith, Patricia Young, and Carolyn Wilson . . . ll ll The boys in the sports room, Ralph DeaKyne, editor, Robert Drake and Jack Davidson, writers, cover Tech's athletic events . . . n-s ii'Q 9 gaxgrtxcg Q x 'llygiiriiytfai i R 'fwii -,. ,. -M, .V l,i?i:i'. . ,gli 15,1 if ...S . , F l Y a . A -,N ' , -,wx ' "" X , ! , . sri' Qc ,, if , in ftll ,.-4 lll Staff presents iournalism books with memorial bookplates to the school library for two alumni represented by gold stars on the Cannon service flag . . . l2l Miss Ella Sengenberger, director of publications, Miss Julia Jean Rowe, assistant sponsor, Mr. Werner Monninger, business advisor, and Mr. Ralph Clark, printing advisor, form the executive stat? . . . l3l Taking Cannon pictures provides experience for the Pho- tography class of Mr. H. D. Traub . . . l4l Helping the layout editor are Miss Frieda V .ss rf -aff Lillis and her Layout class . . . l5l Art pupils mould the eagle for the faculty service Roll of Honor presented to the school by the Cannon stoFf . . . w , at ' K 'il' 5 M 1 ' 5 rv I A xii lv: u. M ' s ' if ---'. 5 K W 1 if 'S-ii -'J2' lil Keeping Tech in the news are Betty Clarke, Patricia Young, Ruthellen Pohlar, Ralph DeaKyne, and Robert Drake, mem- bers ofthe Newswfiting staff . . . l2l Impor- tant to both the magazine and weekly staffs are the boys on the business staff: Larry Sperry, business managerg and Gordon Jones, circulation manager . . . l3l Hi- pressure Cannon salesmen receive pins at the annual awards meeting . . . l4l Known to "Cannon Kiddies" as Uncle Dave, Mr. Ryker keeps the offices in tip-top shape . . . l5l Thursday is Cannon Day when coupons are exchanged for weekly issues. Q 5 .4 f... A -G? me It isn't "all work and no pIay" at Tech for often Techites take time out from classes to attend an all- school assembly or special meeting or participate in some extra-curricular activity. And when 3:45 rolls around, classes end and locker rooms resound with clanging doors and loud voices-sounds that die away as boys and girls leave to loin the "gang" on the Arsenal steps. After exchanging greetings and gossip, Techites scatter to various after-school activities . . . lll Noted author, Emil Ludwig, gives an exclusive interview after speaking at an assem- bly . . . l2l Representing the entire school are mem- bers of the executive board of the Student Affairs Organization . . . l3l Junior Red Cross volunteers paste labels in books for America's fighting men.. . l4l War Stamp corsages are made via the Service Club assembly line . . . l5l Games and more games are rounded up at the Service Club Game Hop for convalescent soldiers . . . l6l "I cleaned my plate today" cards are distributed by Home Economics girls to pupils who know that "food fights for free- dom" . . . l7l Techites purchase a pursuit plane, "The Spirit of Tech High-Indianapolis" with Sl 21,000 in War Stamps and Bonds. l Q A lil Liberty Belle Frances Gentry and Minute Man Robert Meyer receive trophies from Mr. Anderson at the Patriotic Hop . . . l2l Choir members go old- fashioned with box lunches at annual party . . . l3l "Christmas seals do for the home front what War fy Stamps do for the battle front" is the slogan for the Journalism class project . . . l4l From fat to glycerine speed the Fat Friday contributions . . . l5l Every year about this time autographs are the thing . . . l6l Jingle, iangle is the tune at the Arsenal Cannon Junk Jewelry Jamboree to collect costume iewelry for South Pacific barter. . .l7l Results ofthe XYZ Club's Christmas Card Hop are boxes of cards for convalescing soldiers' 5 11 ww .Q 32 ., rl ,gi ss :wif up l ig 2 ' ,S it .S FAT FR NEXT FRIDAY D mos: wAsT: rA'rs ru sore! scropbooks C83 Somebody had o hand nn his Q92 lf s sprung fever, o Io Arsenol steps HOD The Red Mull cost Tokes CI curtain coll H H Two as compony, four s cn crowd." 47 X 1' fa 14 if Hm Anmssaou DISCADDED Cosrume .JEWELDV TH ' I I I I II I1 li I I ef III. III III ,II I V I III ,N II II ,IS I, gn EI I I I I I II I II III II ,I PREPARING TO SEEK NEW HORIZONS 431 ww. . y -v' iw wffsf mf 'Hf,",5.,gy,yf'f' " If W .,., ' , 'Q f , Q. , Wx ,av MQ., f , , wi F255 f- if L W, img. if Y 4' x Q' ' X4 -w XM My ,, X kwa u , ZW-Q 22 , ,w'5,55 -N, 2,5 ZA ff ' . f , ,f 3721.4 A' wyfffffm .ymjhgx V I f, M ,5 'PQ f?i?Mf" -'535?Affffi" ' 1 :QW ave" a' 5 lhfi , f A grxffgg-1' WG' ,. f, 2 , - . Q Y fam 'A 1 f T A , -Jr? ww -WL ff- 5 X' Jw A 64 ' mffiEa.avg,,f 1, 4 :AQ l W V fi X EAW Q? ,. , A, lm, J. x igblif QW: ' , L r , ,Q wwf W., -- - ' m -L f A V f A f Q ..:,- my ,3-.-4 gs P WW' 4 Qxjh I 1. W. K -.f xx gigx .1 an ,vs Sv wi' 'B Q 11 Q w .ff VNV '1 " x K ,f 4 f Qfp A f 1 7: ,N , ,,,X V+: wx fat: . WS' 'i , f- , ' 'J' ' f 2' W vinwerwmc Slefujafl .-S' . ,- Y F N5 Commander--WILMA .BURKART Lieutenant Commander-KARL MCCLINTOCK Captains KEITH BRADWAY EVERETT HAWEKOTTE IVAN TERRY ROBERT OREM TINA BOTERMER FRANCES GENTRY REBECCA TAGGART MARTHA RATCLIFFE DAVID COPPLE MERRILL HINTON WILLIAM MCWHORTOR ROBERT S. SMITH JEAN COWGILL BETTY KEOUGH BETTY ANN MILLS JOAN ROSE Row I denthal, Patricia Post, Charles Norman, liam McWhortor, Rebecca Taggart, Betty Richard Peeler, Virginia Rains, William Peters, Patricia Purdy, Jack Reich, Joan Richey, Charles Reynolds, Virginia Rouse, Wilma Burkart, Karl McClintock, Mariorie Schulz, Thomas Shimer, June Schwier, David Stinson, Margaret Shan- non, Donald Sullivan, Lois Shaw, Phyllis Sheldon. Row 2 Gayle Maltsberger, Betty Short, Richard Pang, Joan Striebeck, Richard Merrick, Thelma Morford, Ralph Meyer, Robert Meyer, Joan Rose, Robert S. Smith, Ver- lin Mocas, Patricia Perkins, Paul Nie- Ruthellen Pohlar, Eugene Nutt, Jack Martin. Row 3 Lester Isaacs, Patricia Trotter, Arthur Kern, Loris Vahle, Orfeo Vian, Patricia Wessel, Robert Ward, Robert Orem, Martha Ratclifte, John Williams, louise Williams, Robert Leuthold, Eugene Mc- Clain, Rachel Lee, Joe McCoy, Helena Logan, Row 4 Patricia Boyers, Winston Churchill, Alice Brown, Ralph DeaKyne, Jean Brown, Robert Drake, Janet Dragoo, Merrill Hinton, Ivan Terry, Betty Keough, Wil- Ann Mills, William Duggins, Janet Enoch, Soterios Georgopulos, Mary Ann Griffith, Kenneth Houser, Marie Ham- mons, Robert Hutchinson. Row 5 Evelyn Archer, Duard Ballard, Dorothy Beatty, James Bastian, Barbara Baxter, Garold Bramblett, Keith Bradway, Tina Bolermer, David Copple, Jean Cowgill, Everett Hawekotte, Frances Gentry, William Brandon, Gale Blaker, James Chasteen, Jean Farson, Ada Johnson, Joann McCord. To pupils who are outstanding in the attributes of citizenship and quali- ties of personal worth is granted membership in the senior honor society, the Tech Legion . . . Ill Legion members are introduced at an all-school assembly and are awarded their pins . . . l2l "Let me call you sweet- heart" sing the boys to the "queens of their hearts" at the Legion Valen- tine party . . . l3l At committee meetings pupils and faculty sponsors, Mr. Charles C. Martin, Legion founder, Miss Hilda Kreft, and Mr. Wayne Walter, make plans for monthly meetings, parties, and special activities. .Q ,fi I i -lisifsiiiii , A, it' s w ish I 'it -X we is-avg' or , Y ,Q 1 f --,X Xu Qfzauprq ' men! 1 i ? 5 ARSENALfTECI-INICAL'SCHOOLS CONSIBTING OP THE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS k ',!ZAIff- iisggfff I N D lA.N.A PID LI S 'I N D lA.N A OFFICE OP THE PRINCIPAL I E It is my very great pleasure to notify you Q that the committee of the faculty in charge of the E TECH LEGION finds that your record for merit citations and for school service makes you eligible for membership in the TECH LEGION. . The formal exercises for the making i of this award will be held in the Auditorium on I Tuesday morning, October 26, at 9:30 o'olock. f You are requested to report to Mr. Charles Martin 3 at 9:00 backstage in the gymnasium. As a member I of the TECH LEGION you will be entitled to wear f the esta blished insignia of the organization which i will be presented to you at the Assembly Auditorium Q program. The first meeting of the TECH LEGION will Q be held in Room 120. on Wednesday, November 10, the E ioth period. I The contribution which you have made to the school through demonstration of qualities which i warrant your election to this organization is greatly E appreciated. I Success is assured to the boy or girl , kwho through habitual practice is able to fix these qualities as permanent traits of character. I L f HANSON H, ANDERSON, Principal 5 October 19, 1943 U 3 1 l l I ln I V l l , i ily' I: '95 en.: I , . iflfgl ' A Rv 4 -Q,--1' - A auf-. ,HUF l I Qwest Ze l' 'te' MV' fqz-..,. we e tl l ' VW- .3 5' , .Jn-.eN.i.g, . : Sui KEITH E. BRADWAY President DUARD D. BALLARD Vice-president B. JANICE ANDERSON Treasurer ALICE BROWN Secretary WILLIAM R. BRANDON Sergeant-at-arms l X I Betty J, Abel 2 an fl 'Wh Qs y Charles E. Abel s . is J. Jeanne Abney I .. I" I I Mildred L. Adams I V ' 'R ' virginia Lee Agnew I is Ja 3 M" " """ 'M' ' - " ' ""I' V WX f nf ff' H . A I ..- if " 1 Q . 'f I ' " 77.2 he . I .D . -,' T .. ' , - ' Q Mn , .1 Mitzi Ann Airhart ,,-, 4 f K - 11 ' ,X '.4'gw.t A Y FQ . it n 55 . 2 We W4 "if " Thelma M'A'be", t hr . . A X 1 1 Q... Mft Betty L. Albertson were ' 1 gb- f an P ff' y Arthur J. Aldrich A 1' R- ' I 'K ,. 151 Betty Jean Aldrich L 1. a figaxiyl. ,, 'Q . -E ., W--. Nfl I e . .Q ..,, .f - I -I . . xml I I fw 1' "2- ,lixo se' ' ,, I ' me .,,,. Q Q fu . ,. . fn' 4""u. ' i vm! t -ww '5Q'l' 'qv .4-1 iv- f.'7e 'CY Av' it l X X x RWM Q 'ih- Jf ,A 'sink e , 4, fy , H' K sz ng be lg! he ur 'C' R rf gfj vfax' -GQ" i f G37 up 1: r 55 S V' ,fy 1 I ' 5, E - ,L-3 I il lf Q ' 1' -l --h y L -fi . -L , J ' ,. 1 H .1 I L C.- L lf-M... - 1-I1 . I' . .. . ., ...,...,.g..z .,..r -.g..-g:.l'z..eZ. A . I I Esther L. Aldrich Joanna M. Alexander Dorothy Ann Allbright George E. Allee Helen Louise Allison 19.2 Jo Ann Allison Edward A. Althauser Wanda R. Ammerman Harry A. Amos Robert E. Amos M. June Anderson Raymond L. Anderson Paul R. Angrlck Evelyn M. Archer Wanda J. Armand Albert E. Armstrong Leah F. Arndt Food makes the man. . Carl Arnold Nina L. Arnold Mary Elizabeth Arvin Bertha M. Asplund Joan Atkins Raymond F. Atkinson Norma Jean Ault Pauline J. Bailey William H. Bailey Vivian Baine George P. Bakas Audrey E. Baker .v Edward L, Baker Rose Ann Baker Bryce R. Baldwin Edwin W. Barlow Vivian L. Barnes Mildred Barnett Robert W. Barnett Rosemary Barringer Lillian Barron Leonard Barrow Elsie C. Bartos James W. Bastian .loan C. Baumgart Barbara A. Baxter Earl J. Baxter Barbara L. Bayse Dorothy J. Beatty Margaret I. Beeler G. LaVerne Behrman Raymond Behymer Leona G. Beineke Paul R. Bender Reuel W. Bennett Silence A. Bennison John W. Benson Paul T. Benton Rosaland l. Bergman Rosemary E. Bergman Catherine L. Bernitt Robert R. Berry X. .r. . .s' sw. ,rv-K l "'3"'KN QR .bun ,QV A in . z.. ,Qi 11 A '-.1 ,. S1 3 ,W 1 V, t., ,?' 43" 5 lv vu , .TN y 1 R .0 dl" 1 - " ' t ' L ' I A - lA,1,Q.'v ...f,'igj,f,w, L " .. ,' 1' I A V, Qt ' I O i ' w. nl 5 is . I 1 X - u I N. Q J ' , 'Q v . av -' 5. .. M. '..J E' ,155-L .' , ,pw J A ::,, -,fr sl . ea-fff fN"" I .-.am in ' .,.,!iI1-if av' ,gn-A hw 'W mp! N w " va 4. 1-.1 X-'ze , -' !'+ are lt. WNY' J 5 1 41" Y:1""'f ' ve.-v' Yf. . 4'N 'E' an . 4 I? X f fv- ab lc' ,, i 7 hw N 'QP' nbos... r- in 'QD 9' if uv '13 Kia I 7 45 5? f 1 6 . enl- fn.. WN we 3 hit' 1 . , y 3 i new IP: . Q. - f P' v . N552-Lflsbf' " 2 14 . f- Q 1--. -. 5 f i' " ' 954 Q .-J cs., il gl. .N hx if lg, I .., QV.: tv M. V ss ir A ,ew .K .AE . : - , .Wg 'ea' fx Q-Q ..-...., 'WW vig, 'Vw gym 'P 'fb . ,gr Q. x W' . J 'C' l.A as-Q 1-g i' j,':,g.me -ef- 9 K'- 3 vers, 'Q H!" J I 141 , ,V . f 2 its ,. .7 5 S 4. mg... ...Lf ' QS 'Wh mal l. 'W- Qu 3 i William J. Berry Donald M. Best Richard L. Bewley Richard A. Bienz June M. Bigelow Richard A. Bisel Carol June Bishop Ralph E. Black Virginia G. Black Doris M. Blackburn E. Gayle Blaker Mildred L. Bless Robert J. Bock Christina l. Bockweg Lester W. Boese Donald R. Boling Doris Jeanne Bolles Jereline Bollman Douglas G. Bolt Robert l. Boothby Jo Ann Bordenkecher Marilyn M. Bossingham Tina B. Botermer Horace A. Bounds James G. Bovard H. Reginald Bowers Richard E. Bowles Patricia J. Boyers William R. Braden Norma J. Bradford Thomas R. Brahany Garold E. Bramblett Albert M. Brand John W. Brannon louise J. Branson Robert L. Bratcher Jr. Mary Frances Bray Mary K. Breedlove Frank A. Brinkmann Dorothy W. Brinson Betty Jeanne Broadhead Roy F. Brock John R. Brodie Jo Ellen Brooks E. Jean Brown Kenneth E. Brown Mary Evelyn Brown Mildred L. Brown Rosemary Brown William R. Brown ROBERT H. DRAKE President ROBERT D. DA VEE Vice-president JANET E. DRAGOO Treasurer WILMA A. BURKART Secretary DAVID R. COPPLE Sergeant-at-arms Richard R. Brunnhoeffer Lurron W. Brydon H. Frances Buchanan Robert L. Buchanan James P. Buckner .S Doris l. Bunch Phyllis Jean Burck Dorothy J. Burdette Frieda C. Burnett Juanita E. Burnett R Dorothy V. Burress Doris E. Butler . John C. Butler Robert F. Butler Harold A. Cameron 139 Edward F. Comic Lewis E. Campbell S. Beatrice Carlisle Robert L. Carmin Thomas L. Carr Betty Jane Carroll Robert E. Carter Carolyn Casey Alfred N. Cave Harold E. Cave .v9"f M551 -- fits 'gg' N79 -Q' AJY f-sq.. 4 Uplw. T91 L 'l we - ,-wr, r . the T: . . Me.. ...g SX '4T"" 1 . x is ti ,b A V F 'A 'I "f'..i' K . x e ke 1 1-, 'li' x , Q in uv gli. .Z .-., lv B P ' ll, I, . B i 1 -7 f -E L Q 5 2. A-elf-2 . .... Q '-T '15 alia:-W Bw , W W9-A 'Qu' 43 E Ann-ou.. wk- Av '39 I... 'Q 'Qu- TA 75'- ,Av 'ik '5- ,- 493' 'IW' 3 I v:'t,:. 'FW' EQ p 5 . 'E 4 Y, I... J 4 Rs. We M.. 'R 179' 4. S, ll C fs Y 9552? '5 . J, 'JW' gn qw.. s., .Viv '55 f-A. L fi-X. ' 'iv .cf M' X , .. X . 52 'B' Nw. 'Af ' ' Q 'iii ' w Y lim' 3 , W 2 5 1 M 1 X nf ,.4..M W- Q Q. gp , , ,. S154 106- 'Sign ,q4.-J.. Worr" Gwv-'Q ' . "kv dwg 1. . Dale L. Chandler James S. Chasteen Shirlee J. Chrest John C. Christ Lena G. Christ Winston L. Churchill Betty J. Clarke Mary Elizabeth Clark Robert O. Clarkson Doris I.. Clerkin Bette R. Clingenpeel Patricia J. Clover Marcelle M. Coffman Wilma Jean Cole Emma R. Collins Thomas M. Conard William E. Conley Step right up . . Cannon's out. Donald G. Connelley Jack H. Cooning C. William Cooper Jack R. Cornwell C. Ashley Coryell A. Jean Cowgill Donald M. Cox Karl T. Cox Joseph A. Craig Gilbert M. Crawley Jack R. Creasey W. Pearl Creviston Donald E. Cripe Betty Rose Cronley Robert E. Crouch Velma M. Crulo Phyllis C. Culmann Carrol J. Cunningham Evelyn L. Curry Jack H. Damrell John Dan Alice Lee Daniel L. Lester Dant Marie E. Darling Jack L. Davidson Rhea E. Davies Charlotte J. Davis Gene P. Davis Nettiemae B. Davis Patsy Ruth Davis Richard L. Davis L. Richard Dawson Patricia H. Day Ralph R. DeaKyne Harry A. DeMunbrun Helen M. Dickey C. Dale Dickinson Elsie L. Dicks James Dillingham Barbara F. Dillon Robert E. Donahue Dorothy L. Donoho Robert L. Dotson Eleanor M. Douglas Clara K. Downard Betty J. Downing Barbara Ann Downtain Patricia J. Drake Dorothy E. Drees William C. Duggins Edwin L. Duke T. Bruce Dungan James D. Dunkman Robert L. Durham Virginia R. Durham Normaiean Earley James A. Eastham . 4 ,sifitr A , za , M., K 9' - 5 f . M 'fy it ,F . V fu- x YUH 'GN PN ,,, . i if ' 1 f 'X 5 'R' L M- 5cx,,-v 1 ' 'ein' it J . l :sr"" K f Rl -Q-. X i L li 1 A I st D ' 'Af J ' if - . gig Q- .Q-' fi 1 Q My , Xerbiyi, l - M .E P, '-IF-5 V ,av , ff . Q S ' ' X . Wk . .fs Q A k W . ' '12 4 " - 1 ' A . 1-- .T YT- 'lf' C... ann- . , , J ""N ' . , L l ' J K . t . ,Wm A xi ,tf:"'wiWn-f.f.i , J A l . y yagngx A J f m :mf at A tm an-5 E. ' i N . . ,f i ' 'A l x M '0! X , ,ga-.... x """""H"' v, if i 'W ' 1 S ' l ,faun- W Q. :fm Qms. Wil WIS' 4-av 0,-M 'KIM fi" 1?- ff' ii! 45-9' Clin... 'Em 4fPw ,wo- 'IR M' VA E 471' '49f'l"'1'l v fi IB' 'Ar' 6' ef' Ihr' W V Ks 5, 'x Ft' f 's i. me? . 13 X QE. ig, F 5.04 If I' W' af!! . A rsifig. I T 6? -cf Was: f 47' QF 'x:""'f ,. is aiiif in Q. ZA' H 5' I. , iafi ,nh "' QLD 5-cs . .f JON W -'CQ' Wi 31 gp.. E? me .fisiiix 'lx '5 Q Lx x M93 .5 ii? aj? s cfs: Q- J' X fl s f i Ja. I ' lx 'gms -Il 1 GR ei- an-an., 10' 469 ,Wx 17' 890' Y ' 'PM Tiindf, ww 'E 'sez' ,H M -ltr, Ar'-A OP' Wav' "Eff -ls T I 'Q' in 'Bn Belly Jean Edwards R. Eugene Edwards Waller M. Edwards Barbara J. Eggerl Harold E. Eibe Paul N. Eilers Mary Erma Eilerl Rose Marie Eisen FRANCES J. GENTRY President RICHARD A. GI LLUM Vice-presidenf DONALD L. R. GOBEN Treasurer MARYELLEN EVANS Secrelary CHARLES E. HECKMAN Sergeanl-al-arms H. Gene Ellis Lois M. Ellzrolh Charles R. Emrick Kenl J. Emry Roberl B. Endly Symfuaa F. Gale Enlow Dorolhy l. Enoch Janel M. Enoch H. Jean Ernsling Edwin F. Eslle Room Jo Ellen Elchison Avonelle J. Evans Wilbur L. Evans William D. Evans Wilma J. Evans 173 Marjorie A. Ewerl William G. Fahrner William L. Faris Jean Farson T. Lucille Farlhing Jack E. Faulhaber Belly Jo Ferguson Shirley D. Fields Aloys E. Fischer Russell E. Fischer Thomas Fitch Juanita Flynn Virginia M. Foltz John M. Forestal Betty L. Foster Kenneth E. Fox Allen G. Foxworthy John H. Fraim Joseph E. Frazer Joann l. Fries Charles R. Frisble Frank O. Fyffe Belly R. Galbreath Dorothy l.. Gano Donald L. Gardner Dorothy F. Garner Billy R. Garwood ls there a motion for adjournment?" John E. Gates Carl Gentry Patricia R. Gentry Emory J. George Soterios G. Georgopulos Mary Ellen Gibbs Donald F. Gibson Edward W. Gilbert Ruth T. Gillespie Robert S. Gilliam Snowden V. Gillispie Marian V. Glatz Joseph R. Glenn Beverly J. Goodwine Mariorie E. Gordon James W. Gotschall Wilma L. Graham nfs X . A . ff' ' ... I 'T mr-N ova .. . N an-.4 f f ff' , f, W nf' in , A .W E if I if VW Q xl nk Z - - ..a' X , if v' 4 '- 'ri if WY! W r . X . . , I it Wx V..- lk. F' f f 1 ,, . 4 V Mm' .........,, "1" . 3'-1 ., ff sw 1: 1418 . 42 io' I QSM' is sh- r 4s--- i U . -J Q , 1-X. is S' W " xx vrlqf' fha ,pf 1 sk ' .f 5-V Q A -- if 'X' 'Q' QL ite 43'- W' W 2 HA if , ,. 1 ' 1 9 I I Y lv -4 n-1 .-1 , x . 'E I... 4 , , v, f iw" ' we i Wilma J. Graham Robert G. Graves Lorna M. Gray Joe R. Green Z. Elsworth Green Ruth Greenstein Carolyn Jo Greer Geraldine C. Greer Lucille M. Gressel Mary Ann Griffith James M. Grimes Lois J. Griswell C. Eloise Grubbs Richard H. Gunther Joan Guthrie Alice M. Haas Joseph A. Haboush Mable Haboush James H. Hahn Lola Lee Haines Frances M. Hall Harry R. Hall Marvin E. Hamilton M. Marie Hammons Betty Lou Harding Dorothy J. Harmon Dorothy J. Harold John W. Harrell Sylvia J. Harriman Mary E. Harris Robert D. Hasewinkle Geraldine Havely Everette H. Hawekotte Betty L. Hawkins Mariorie L. Hawkins Martha J. Hawkins Mary J. Hawkins Charles H. Hayes William B. Heath John C. Hegenauer Anita J. Heisterkamp Georgia K. Henderson Lucille E. Henderson William G. Henderson Charles B. Hendricks Robert A. Hendricks Ruth I.. Henke Melvin R. Herbig Richard S. Herr Kenneth E. Hess Don M. Hickam Edward R. Higgins JACK HIMES President KENNETH E. HOUSER Vice-president JOANNE INNIS Treasurer BETTY J. KEOUGH Secretary ROBERT B. HUTER Sergeant-ot-arms Beulah Mae Hill Jack D. Hill W. Richard Hill Reba J. Hindman Marilyn J. Hinkle Spanaaa Merrill G. Hinton Delores M. Hipsher Robert V. Hirstein Philip J. Hobbs Betty J. Hodges Ream Jean M. Hodson C. Marcelle Hodson Doris l. Hoeferlin Ralph W. Hoffmann Earl A. Hogan 177 Thomas R. Hollenbeck Merritt C. Holman Gladys P. Holt Evelyn J. Hood Norma J. Hoopengarner 'C' ' c 'FR 1 ,-e E, ix -lk fun. fl .:- " , .,,., fx far' W... , X , .h fy' .-f wx ' A f ' it l J" 1252.4 if t -, ' , X --v. X . x gf, f ' 5 " e 1 - 1-A WX 'G+ A Q. K' l 'SL 1 "G 6' s V 1 A ,. K u f . 'A ' gr?-,Z . W W' . Q lf L' i . ." Y:-rr' ,- C- '- ' ' .3 R " 1-W 'zsf .2 ig A5557 if f - . - .x 55' ,. 'si-gWj'.,.y , J 5 . v ,g." 'ff,,. T ' 1 , lr? . if f ,A,Nw'iQiQ":lgbqi'QJ'53rfi if zw hy ' .Q new ' -' .. ff.-J.I.nf: ig. -ne '.-4?fs.2 1fEL5, ""x ' A' ' "" " 'M "' ' 5-:N zfvuvw' """"i" """gF ,A 5. 'sity X any 1 ' "3 . , fiv x X x 5927-. M W.. tw f 'nz ,gh ' W . uf - w l . MT' 1. , . , 5 A -, It J x is S V A ,, we. . ' 4 v' Q, Y. fd dr" ,M 2. 5 , Z N w. I VN, , I 5-'Ji fa 4 'I fir if -l Q "GTP" alfa' ll fC! fu.. W' Q' ."" X A-'Q 1' I L X "1-lil 'V-f I . ' Virgil C. Hoppes Robert D. Hostetter Richard E. Howard Richard L. Howenstein Ralph M. Howery Richard M. Huberty Harley R. Huddleston J. Ann Hudson George E. Huffman Robert E. Huffman Charles E. Hughes Naomi M. Hullett Louis L. Humble Forest E. Humbles Grace H. Humphreys Arnold L. Hunsberger Doris M. Hurt Eugene E. Hussey Richard H. Huston Robert P. Hutchinson Gloria H. lacobelli Elizabeth Ann lrwin Lester F. Isaacs Frederick Jackson Jack W. Jaimet Barbara J. Jarvis G. Richard Jenkins Vincent J. Johantgen Ada Marie Johnson Betty June Johnson Dorothy J. Johnson Leslie Johnson Robert L. Johnson Stanley H. Johnson M. Joann Johnston Mariorie J. Johnston Margaret L. Jones Ralph E. Jones Richard A. Jones Shirley P. Jones John W. Jordan Joe A. Joseph Richard Kafoure George B. Keenan John W. Kehrein Joseph Kellams Robert R. Keller V. Russell Keller Carrie F. Kelley Richard H. Kelley Martha L. Kemper lrma L. Kendrick Arthur C. Kern Jr. Pauline M. Kern Burneth W. Key Georgia M. Kincaid T. Ernestine King The meeting done--the battle won. Ruth C. King William A. Kinkead Mary Jo Kinsey Hildegard C. Kirchhott Robert E. Kirk Belly L. Kirlin Donald J. Kiser Charles L. Kistler Jerome H. Kitchen Jr. Gerhart Kleineweber John T. Knight L. Robert Knight John O. Knox Jean M. Kommer M. Joan Koss Lloyd N. Krause Helene K. Krebs 83 r t .M 6' .. -'ze R. 5- . ' A .4 f -.'1."4s1 J f J am X 7 1 ti f YE W Ag 6 , xg .K it Q- .JL A . -' '29 C ' A Pi. li l 6 H.. 1 .wh 'KN 153' ,rf C .fb 5? J i , M, ,H . L' K' . ' .2 A vi i 5 v L- in ' x . -T.. f "Lf . M :ag l L? 'A ., . . at ag: W: lil 4 3.1 F is ' in yum. ., an K" 'p i x . Q--7 XM- N .ve '16 Qtr' jr? H... ,! ' , 2.31. f ' f ' mf af i . -.2 "K, x A if -, ai ff K Why j if 3 W , If Q A 5-H i . A .f it JK" ,guns-v .451 K '12-7" W 5 fr" Betty J. Kremple Elizabeth L. Kretz Dolores R. Kreutzer Herbert W. Kruse William E. Kruse Paul E. Kubler ROBERT E. MEYER President BETTY ANN MILLS Vice-president EUGENE E. McCLAlN Treasurer RACHEL E. LEE Secretary JACK L. MARTIN Sergeant-at-arms Richard M. Laffey E. Loraine Lagler Robert L. Lahaise Patricia Ann Lahrman Robert S. Lamb Spamaa Virginia M. Lamb Martin A. Lambert Naomi K. Landis Robert W. Langwell Mary E. Lanman Ream Earl R. Laughlin S. Doris Lawrence Raymond M. Lawrence Clara Jo Lawson John E. Leach 300 LuVerne C. Ledgerwood L. Rosevelyn LeMasters M. Eugene Lepper l. Jean Leslie L. Robert Leuthold James C. Lewallen Betty J. Lindzy Kathleen J. List Sylvia C. Little lrma L. Litz 84 Helena E. Logan William W. Logan Jr. Waller B. Long A. Willmore Long Belly Jane Loomis Beverly J. Loop James F. Loop Marion C. Love Donald R. Lowe Joseph L. Ludlow Thomas L. Lukins Barbara J. Luzader Mary M. Lynn Phyllis J. Lyfle John P. McCarthy Alice M. McClain Karl W. McClinlock Lawson O. McCommon Theresa M. McConahay Joann F. McCord Jack L. McCormick Jean L. McCoy Joe K. McCoy Ardifh L. McElfresh Frank A. McGee Laura M. McGilliard Emmelf L. McGinley Belly J. McGraw Eslher M. Mclnlire Ann L. Mclnlyre James E. McKee Lois A. McKibban Margarel J. McKibben Edwin G. McLean L. Ruth McNay Robert E. McNeely Robert G. McNuH William F. McWhorlor William G. Madinger Jo Ann Maffell , ,Gif f ,N . 1 'l .N ' .l .J --v l l ., 5,-it is 1., sl A . t' UQ' ,J , 1-Q . Q . 3 Wi , ' . lu ., .V ., 4 xv. . l Y V , fr: y L if L S er ' J J' J A l 44, if ' l I" i y P.. fit' s .5 ,... -rf r ' ji . x f ' fit ff in . ,,. I af . ,H ? 1 if-'YN' ' 2 X K5 if L 'Z 7 A il 2 Rfiie ' Qi1!'f5g 1 M 522 ' .f . 7 ,a'Se39iff"'.fZg 3 'G' 'QQ-ww 'Mme' i QM A ,Ji R .I K , 5 M. V 3 63, M , '1 'f J . h, , ,Rm , .1 ...f. , H ,iff -:ua A f I I i 4 3 V ' 4 't 1 X312 f .0 AZ' ' 2521 . 1 , " 4.1 1 , A gk, gf' 7, Z 9' V -X 1. i, V . . ,A W .ii ' K .1 '. n N - , 'TW' 4 gif "avi sk' 1 'lx 2' wg,- Z. tb- f wsu ., any ,wygg 'X ' W' ,gm fi Q23 , , , I ff 4 f ' ' - J ' f Q AGL W f- X 4 ,ik I W f f George R. Mahler Joseph T. Maier Gayle M. Maltsberger Martin T. Mandabach Frank R. Maners Wayne D. Manford Robert V. Manier William S. Mapel Thomas Margason Lorraine R. Markus John K. Marlin Edith L. Martin Patricia L. Martin William R. Martin George E. Martz Leslie M. Masters Robert L. Mead Ruth Anne Mead Harold L. Meadows Margaret Ann Meadows John W. Means Lois J. Mears l X period meeting . . 4 up, l to come. John F. Medjeski Delmar E. Medlock William T. Meek Richard G. Merrick Ira A. Merriman Jr. Ralph E. Meyer Norman L. Middlemas Robert T. Miles Barbara J. Miller Dorothy M. Miller Herman M. Miller Marilyn J. Miller Robert E. Miller Wanda Louise Miller Paul Mills Betty Jean Mitchell Robert R. Moates Verle W. Mocos Verlin A. Mocas Martha J. Moews Reba J. Money Frank W. Montgomery William J. Monzel Margaret E. Moore PAUL A. NIEDENTHAL President B. JEANNE PATTERSON Vice-president JOAN RICH EY Treasurer MARIAN NEWLIN Secretary JACK F. REICH Sergeanteat-arms Bruce H. Morehead Emma Dean Morell Thelma M. Morford Lillian B. Moriarity Gloria A. Morris Spangled Ladora Morrow Mary Lou Mosey Jack G. Mass Rosemary Mullally Thomas E. Mullendore Ream William E. Mullenholz Elnora J. Musgrave Arthur R. Myers James O. Myers Dorothy L. Net? Bernard C. Netter Max Neuschaefer Mary Helen Newport Dorothy M. Newton Betty J. Nichols , ,p Q. , ,Q , x A ix 1 WWF' 3, . t Q ,..... 'foe Nr-:v ,'5fXs My lvl -ar' 'ik Y 'Ht' Qrg-fr S' .-Ink' , y, t ,bs X ff' N be r .6--1 51 T X . I fb I 1 5- 'sf , .A A K 6-- -1 L 'W WX K ' wr Q Q X I 'ix Q WK ! ' 1 , , , L ' if S35 I own. , Av- I ,2.v...-- 3. gn. If NX , 1 . HQ' ugh.- S J... , A I QS f K Wu: Q Z . A A ff .- z us if We is. g wTb , , . .- ii 4 . ,.. . gn... ii ab- on... i' Gu- X 'K "'C"" A ,ov TU' l 2. v 6 . 4 L Joan E. Noffke John W. Nottke Charles W. Norman H. Eugene Nutt Earl J. O'Brian Mary L. O'CalIahan James L. Oliger Dorothy L. Oliver Jack R. Oliver Robert L. Orem Robert W. Osburn James G. Ott "We 'Back the Attackl' " Robert F. Owens Rachel A. Palmer Richard B. Pang Ruth M. Parcels Mildred F. Parker Marvin H. Pearcy Peggy A. Pearcy Richard E. Peeler Walter R. Pence Jr. Patricia C. Perkins Allan E. Peterman John W. Peters Janice M. Pettiiohn Elton R. Phillips Roy A. Phillips Donald H. Pike Ruthellen Pohlar Patricia L. Post Robert M. Post Betty I. Poynter Delorus C. Prather Delores J. Price Helen L. Price Ruth H. Price Morris D. Prifogle Lawrence E. Pringle Patricia J. Purdy Anna K. Pursell Betty .lean Putman H. Phillip Quick Ralph J. Raasch Virginia K. Rains George K. Rasley Martha F. Ratcliffe John D. Reoth William E. Reck Mura E. Reed Robert H. Reeves William F. Reichle Frederick J. Reikofski Charles I. Reynolds Jack H. Reynolds William R. Reynolds F. Joseph Rhees Shirley A. Rhinehart Betty J. Richard Robert W. Richards Bobby L. Richardson Lois G. Richardson Robert H. Richter Wilbert L. Ricketts Clark A. Riddell Jr. M. Doris Rigor Reba G. Risk Margaret L. Ristow William C. Ritchey M. Joan Ritter Robert L. Ritter Anna Jean Robb Duane D. Roberts Shirley A. Roberts William E. Roberts . N if A RR -Q Q 'R' ' at in GE-bt ig l , "' is Vi f' ' 1' 1, Qi 14 T J ... .1 ,F"v 4-my 'nv Y1""r we Q41-0 l K6Z3RS?2 d Wm- "H William H. Roberls D. Joan Roberlson Laura A. Roberlson William J. Roberlson STANTON V. SHEPPARD President M. Vl RGINIA ROUSE Vice-president THOMAS S. SHIMER Treasurer DOLORES F. SNYDER Secretary GEORGE J. SENNHAUSER Sergeant-al-arms Fred W. Roessler W. Rudolph Rogers William J. Rohr Donald E. Roller Jack H. Romeiser Spondafz Marlha L. Romeril Max D. Roof James R. Rose Joan I. Rose Mary O. Rose Room Lelia M. Rosemeyer Belly R. Ross Patricia A. Roll Robert T. Runciman Eleanor E. Ruszkowski Charles E. Ryker Carl W. Sl. John George J. Saliba Oakley Sampson Jr. William W. Sanders Carl A. Sanford Urban A. Sauer Alicia N. Scaer Ralph A. Schafer Jr. Herberl J. Schakel Norma J. Schaloske James A. Scharbrough Edward L. Schaub Joyce M. Schenck June M. Schenck T. Eugene Schenck Joan M. Schmitt Elizabeth M. Schniepp Betty G. Schull Marjorie M. Schulz June E. Schwier James R. Schwomeyer Wilma M. Schwomeyer Betty J. Scott David H. Scott Mariorie E. Scrivner B. Jean Sears Af the half . . . Tech 6 Manual O. L. Ramon Secrest Joan K. Seitz George E. Selzer Patricia R. Senteney Patsy J. Shafer J. Eugene Shannon Margaret A. Shannon Bonnie Jean Shaw Lois Jean Shaw Phyllis L. Sheldon Philip C. Shera John H. Shipp Joan R. Shirley J. Faye Shoemaker Betty Jean Short Shirley Ann Short William D. Shuck William J. Shuck Maxine E. Sigmund Betty L. Simmerman Jessamine Simpson Susan M. Singleton 91 J s t J ' ' 4.3 ' '-QR' 3, if . ii-.I 1 A c 4 IR .. .gi ,X 1' V N Qu ,f - . . ii K' l f 'S 6" .rag ::,- f 34 X gy-N, 'f -' ,. 4'-'M ' M .. if , - . ,X A - sn .. Qi JI 'S ...f Mari. W 'Rjy 'Fr-N ilu:-av' B' 'suv v:-fi '19- is' l QQ 553.2 9' AXXQN .9 4 B :- ,gf ': il" -ff!! l - ?"' bg Swv Hildred I. Slaughter Mildred I. Slaughter S. Richard Small Jr. Ruth Small Jack C. Smith Mariorie L. Smith Norma H. Smith Patricia A. Smith Robert S. Smith Virginia M. Smith Keith Snodgrass RoBert J. Snow Bernard A. Snyder Mary J. Soudriette Anna Jean Southwood Fred M. Sparks Marie E. Spitz Martha Lee Spratt Frank C. Springer Harold l.. Springer Arline E. Stafford Betty Jane Stafford Donald O. Staiord Harry R. Stafford Robert H. Stage George E. Stahl Karl V. Stahl Jr. Paul E. Stahmer James R. Stamm Dorothy Stearman Frances M. Steinke Ida E. Stephens Robert O. Stewart David R. Stinson Paul W. Stock Betty J. Stoltz Sibyl Stone , William C. Stone Robert M. Straub Paul E. Streets Leonard T. Slricker Joan Sfriebeck Katherine Slumph Wilma J. Sturgeon Doris R, Suils Donald L. Sullivan Carl H. Summers Edward E. Summers Mary Joan Sweeney P. Lucille Swinford Marilyn Jean Swisher LEWlS WOODRUFF Presidenl REBECCA L. TAGGART Vice-president THOMAS P. TOWSLEY Treasurer KATH RYN J. WILLIAMS Secrelary IVAN W. TERRY Sergeanf-al-arms Belly Lou Taylor Everell W. Taylor Mary C. Taylor Mary J. Taylor William G. Taylor 5 William L. Taylor Winifred A. Taylor Belly J. Teal Marilyn J. Teel Lucella M. Terhune Room Roberl C. Terrell Frank J. Teskey James E. Thixlon Mary Louise Thomas Mason J. Thomas Herbert H. Thompson Joy L. Thompson Muriel A. Thornburgh William J. Tobin Gemma C. Toffolo galil H 1 ' I if Robert J. Tolle Julia A. Touchette Rex A. Tranbarger Marie E. Trees Robert L. Tremain V. Patricia Trotter E. Mabel Tucker Rolley W. Turner Katherine Tuttle Albert F. Uebelhack Frieda F. Ulmer Harold C. Ulrey Loris C. Vahle Norman L. VanArsdale Betty Lou Vance Madeline M. Vance Joseph A. VanDeman Edna A. Van Der Moere Larry C. VanTreese Orfeo Vian Alma J, Vollmer Eva L. VonBurg Wayne L. Wagner Phyllis K. Waldon Robert J. Watford Paul S. Walker Carl J. Wall Minerva L. Walter Howard W. Walters Willard Wampler Jr. Robert D. Ward Chester A. Warwick Rachel Watkins Nancy J. Watt M. Aline Weaver Catherine E. Weaver Donald R. Weaver John R. Weaver Phyllis J. Weaver J. Richard Wells Palricio R. Wessel Harry M. Wessel C. Billy Whinery Marian J. While Raymond R. While Jack A. Whilsell Armilda L. Wickes This is a solid plalferf' Belly Ann Wienke Rosemary M. Wiggs H. Eugene Wilcox Richard M. Wilgus Inez E. Williams John Phillip Williams M. Louise Williams Mildred L. Williams Phyllis J. Williams William P. Willils M. Leon Wills Carolyn F. Wilson Lois K. Wilson Mary G. Wilson Morris H. Wilson Rhea R. Wilson William H. Wimmenauer L. Ann Wilherspoon Donald E. Wille Jerry F. Woerdeman John E. Wolsiffer J. William Wonders Cliflord H. Wood Earl S. Woodward Marlha Jean Woolery Belly Ann Workman James V. Worrall gf i , . . .. - 1 1 , 1 .2 -' I ,. -ef.. I 1' f Q 1 i. X f 5, y f ., 4. " 9 L rf 4 4. in .IZ , , .. . ! y 1? . -- img?-' 'J ' - 'JW' ry' 'v.'f7iU' ' ' is 9 W IQ L Qs r "wx, x if' "L 'Q lr 4 fly ri' f ., 4 5 -- --- - A- 4 1 44 '- l . g Q are M yn! -1.1. l -s in l l ss. 1 gl? nun-..,, -'law 'QE' fiF.K14v. N'.'. . , .3...,., WD? az, t X Joan L. Wortman James E. Wright William A. Wright Richard R. Wysong John F. Wythe David P. Yates Betty Jean Yegerline Janell A. Yoos Patricia A. Young Stanley C. Young Dorothy M. Ylunghans Salvatore Zarro John B. Berfanger Fonda Boling William E. Ferrer Lois A. Hadley Betty M. Horner Norma J. Jackson John E. Morris Harold L. Rice James F. Stout For the first time Recog nmon Day exercises are held in honor of Janu ary graduates. ,.. -swf!" '- ,..., r" was - ' ' rr 4 1"'f-'V'xIi ,af .I . -1. --a,4Z:g1,i ' ' ."::+'-3'-?f3l 4 ,M 'EH 4- -M..-I . cgi , .. ga ',,X'1' ff' 1 M 't."J ' ft - 1 .f -.....,. .fat ' ' "...' Q6 .,.,.. ,Y ' XV,-.1-I Like those who hove gone before, I944 sen- iors will receive their diplomos ot twilight commencement exercises in the Stodium. 4 Seaview S Giving counsel oncl guidonce to seniors during their lost yeor in high school concerning ofter-grciduotion- I plons ore the eight senior sponsors. MISS HELEN ELLIOTT Sponsor Room 192 MISS ALTA WELCH Sponsor Room 300 MISS HILDA KREFT Sponsor Room 6 MISS RUTH STONE Sponsor Room 'I73 MISS FRANCES KINSLEY Sponsor Room 139 MISS LEUNICE HORNE Sponsor Room I77 MISS LOIS SINK Sponsor Room 5 MISS MARGARET AXTELI. Sponsor Room 7 lHead Sponsor! 'tv . Z,5 ' I ." ' iii "Having completed the subiects prescribed for graduation . . . . . t2i "Well, uh, you see, uh . . . and that's why l'm Iate." . . . C33 Signing on the dotted line . . . C41 Back to nature on Senior Arbor Day . . . 453 Seniors' favorite class-lunch . . . store . . . 19? Colors mark the senior . . . HOD Hold that pose! . . . ii ii Autograph hunters at the Senior Party . . . ii 2? "Get thee behind me"-Senior Sacrifice Day. t6i The Judge speaks . . . t7i Speaking of snapshots . . . C83 Buying just one more notebook at the Book- ,v H ,igxl QQ 4' 1 4 2 ? -V52 Inj: Ls. 7fzwZ'.L'1lfefHeZff4a5ev1iaaf5lepfi X 1 1 ,2 x 1 INDIANAPOLIS ENGRAVING COMPANY THE HOLLENBECK PRESS INDIANAPOLIS' s IW, 1 1 .V H," '. 'j 75 flak-'E . . N ,,, 2' , ,N . ,-. .fg.,4- . a. v pn. 3 .- L I Y. bv S '. in ,4 ' J..'v. - ' 3' ff' 4' i'iQ,.Ff1- 1: - ' 9 ww-, W 'ffgvlf' .' mffl. ,LL -- . N ., - . .V W., , A .A ..,:,,,b,.,,1 , '. - vu -' a' A Z' ' S A 'f.'f.fn5?ts':1,5+ ff- If' :vzuxvmm'usJ.z.u.:.:m-xmau' -- :I .FHQT iam: .fwmw af? A Vin, , - L 1 ., v .rf 4 " 'V 'J an fi, :Au 9,1 , .-Y., vu' .H '.-:I wi vw VV, l5,g5fWQQ, , Q jvwx -", ., 3- I. V . , fp .Q ,rl ,I : -5 .SE . . sf. f.-4f37?' 'V r,,,l.,eL H ' s,-I Yr'-1' Qi fi - '43 V-nf ."- s ,wr .wzvl -', 'K '.f 1 ..'- I . , f. I n'V if .5 1."- t., ."" ms,-., '. , 'U F 'a .-7, 1 +3 'f.f fwx f mA q,rWU,,,W ipff '0 I Il' 1,0 .gvz - -, ,AA 5 , U I Q m., Jn. .'lZA' Jef. ,f il li J.. 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Suggestions in the Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) collection:

Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

1941

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1942

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1943

Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collection, 1945 Edition, Page 1

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