Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN)

 - Class of 1916

Page 5 of 52

 

Arsenal Technical High School - Arsenal Cannon Yearbook (Indianapolis, IN) online yearbook collection, 1916 Edition, Page 5 of 52
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Page 5 text:

THE ARSENAL CANNON 3 of wooded land one and a half miles east of the city, containing 75.14 acres was purchased for 835,500 The site chosen by General Buckingham belonged to Calvin Fletcher, Jr., Allen R. Benton and Herman Sturm. Deeds were secured from them on the following dates: Decem- ber 15th and 22nd, 1862 and November 2nd, 1863. The last deed secured Arsen- al Avenue from Nlichigan Street to Ver- mont. The Government improved the entire length to lVashington Street. East Tenth at this time was a poor, country road. The State ceded jurisdiction to the United States on February 21, 1863. The Government began work in August of the same year, under the command of Captain T. Treadwell. The principal buildings were erected under the direction of hflajor James hi. VVhittemore who succeded Captain Treadwell, February, 186-1. The Store House or Arsenal fthe Nfain Buildingj, bearing the date of 1865 on its front arch was followed by the East Residence, Office, Artillery Building CShopsj, and Powder hflagazine. Later the Barn, lVest Residence, Guard House lbuilding at the gatel, the gateway, and VVork Shop CPower House and Electrical Buildingj were built from 1869 to 1893. Thus we learn that the Government manufactured no ammunition on our Arsenal Grounds during the Civil War. All the buildings were built with greatest care and skill from choicest pressed brick and cut Vernon limestone. The excel- lent condition of the buildings after with- standing all these years of weathering verifies the quality of government work- manship. The grounds, walks, and carriage ways show the work of expert landscape gar- dening. Forest trees were allowed to stand, and their growth encouraged. Nlajor A. L. Varney superintended the erection of the water tower and the iron fence. hlajor Comley added the rose beds, grape arbors, and lilacs. During the years 189-1 and 1895, there was a general movement throughout the country toward the abandonment of arsenals. The Indianapolis Arsenal was on the decline. At the outbreak of the Spanish American VVar in 1898 this Arsenal was raised from a third to a first class when haversacks and knapsacks were made in the Shops and Artillery Building. As the war soon ended, this Arsenal was no longer needed. lylajor Charles Shaler who was Commandant at this time, became the last of thirteen commanding officers stationed here. ln 191-1, he came to Technical High School and talked to the members of the Can- non's Staff. iVith the exception of the period during the Spanish American VVar, this Arsenal stored only heavy and lighter arms and some ammunition. At one time there were 100,000 rifles stored in the second and third floors of the Arsenal Chflainl Build- ing. The usual assignment of soldiers consisted of fifty. The property was authorized to be sold under an act of Congress approved June 30, 1902. The final abandonment of the Arsenal was marked by the firing of the last sunrise gun, April 13, 1903. EDWARD OWEN DREAM OF THE TRADE SCHOOL The question of a trade school in lndia- napolis was agitated throughout the year 1902, with the result that on hflarch 27, 1903, the Arsenal Grounds were pur- chased from the government for the pur- pose of establishing such a trade school. The money necessary for this was secured by popular subscription, and placed in the hands of a committee of Indianapolis citizens who bought the land from the United States Government for ,815-l,000. A year and a month later, on April 8, 1904, the school was incorporated under a board of eight trustees and Sol.C. Dickey was made president of the insti- tute. The school was opened in Septem- ber of the same year. In order to enter the school as a stu- dent, one had to pass a moral, scholastic, and physical examination, and no stndent who was under sixteen years of age was eligible. The tuition for original courses was one huundred dollars a year, or sixty dollars a semester. Wihen the school started out in the fall of 190-1, the following courses were offered, pharmacy, decorative painting, lithography, and electric wiring. Other courses were added from time to time until in 1908, the school boasted of seven

Page 4 text:

2 THE ARSENAL CANNON HJ HISTORY OI" THE ARSILNAL In 1861, when the Ifederal Government was unalbe to furnish the first Indiana troops with ammunition. Governor hlor- ton, on his own responsibility, established the Indiana Arsenal. He was most for- tunate in being able to place in charge Colonel Sturm, a reliable and capable man, who had studied the art of making ammunition, in Germany. Colonel Sturm furnished, to the National Government, samples of his manufacture which were highly approved. The work was begun on a small scale in the north half of the present State House grounds. The State furnished the material, and instructed Colonel Sturm and a detail of the Elev- enth Indiana Regiment to begin work. The bullets were moulded in a shop on the south side of Vliashington Street opposite the State Irlouse. By IS63 the work increased to such proportions that it was considered dangerous. so was moved to Colonel Sturmls ground, into shops facing Vermont Street, south of the Sturm residence, now on Sturm Avenue. The temporary store house or arsenal stood on the south side of Klich- igan Street facing the present Arsenal Building. As the war progressed, it demanded an increase in the working force of both men and women. Before the war ended, the Arsenal worked night and day, employing from live to seven hundred persons and producing three hundred thousand rounds of ammunition every twenty-four hours. Xlr. sl. xl. 13. Hatfield who was employed by the Government from Alarch 1862 to the closing of the Arsenal, tells of one shipment of 6,000,000 rounds of ammu- nition in cases of a thousand each which were shipped from the store house after .... .TECH..... F eight o'clock one night. This extensive manufacture made it possible for Indiana to supply not only its own regiments but also to assist the National Government in preventing serious disasters. Shortly after the establishment of the Indiana Arsenal, the Vlar Deaprtrnent learned that it could buy better ammuni- tion at a more reasonable price than it could from any private corporation. Vllhereupon the National Government and the State entered into an agreement by which the former agreed to pay for all ammunition issued, past and future, at mutually satisfactory prices. At this time the Klagazine on the south side of Xlichigan Street passed into the hands of the United States. Ammunition manu- factured in the shops belonged to the State till delivered to the Rlagazine. At the settlement between state and nation the former realized a clear proht of 2577,-157.32 from its Arsenal. For some time negotiations had been afoot to shift the entire responsibility of manufacture to the Federal Authority. After the fall of Vicksburg and Chattanooga, the Wlest ceased to be a necessary center for manu- facture of ammunition. There was no longer a need for the Indiana Arsenal. It was therefore closed April 1S, 1S6Jf. TI'IIi UNITED STATIQS ARSICNAL Long before the closure of the Indiana Arsenal, provisions had been made for a permanent National Arsenal at Indiana- polis. An act was passed and approved July 11, 1862 which provided for the erection of Government buildings for the deposit and repair of arms and muni- tions of war. For this purpose, the act authorized an appropriation of one hun- dred thousand dollars. A beautiful tract



Page 6 text:

4 THE ARSE N AL CANNON more departments, which were molding, tile-setting, printing, carpentry, machin- ery, applied science, and masonry. Eighty students were enrolled at the school during the first semester. The school continued to grow until the enroll- ment reached five hundred, in 1908. The pharmacy course was directed by J. H. Gertler, assisted by live teachers. This school occupied all three floors of the barracks, and was well equipped. The school of decorative painting was located in the Fresh Air School. House painting, interior decorating, sign paint- ing, and show-card lettering were taught. Assisted by two teachers, G. K. Hen- derson directed the lithography school, which was located on the entire second floor of the main building, or what was then called the Graphic Arts building. The course in electric wiring was taught in the power house, under the direction of R. NI. lNfIurray and two instructors. The course in moulding was directed by E. A. Johnson with the aid of one teacher. This school was located in the west wing of the shops. The students, while learn- ing, also did commercial work, and each student earned four dollars and twenty cents a week besides a percentage of the total profits. The school of tile setting was conducted in the "barn" under the instruction of J. G. Drummond and an assistant instruc- tor. Several tilers' associations recog- nized the value of this school, and authorized the assignment of a number of scholarships. The school of printing was located in the Graphic Arts building. It was first directed by I". Chandler, and later by F. O. Climer, who were assisted by five teachers. The school possessed equip- ment valued at sixty thousand dollars. The school of carpentry was located on the second fioor of the shops and taught under the direction of A. Robin- son. The machinery course was also taught on the second floor of the shops. The students in this course, like those in the foundry school, were given the oppor- tunity of earning extra money from com- mercial work. The course in applied science was a -- l course in civil, mechanical, and electric'a engineering. The students were taught mathematics, drawing, physics, chemis- try, applied mechanics, and surveying. The school of masonry was located on the lower floor of the shops. The National Brick-makers Association was interested in this school, and offered a large number of scholarships. Because of financial failure the school was gradually discontinued from 1909 to 1912. The school of applied science was removed to VVinona Lake, and the school of pharmacy, located in buildings in the business district of Indianapolis, and school oflithography, transferred to Cin- cinnati. The school of printing, under the direction of lXfIr. Tol iXIcGrew, has been in continuous successful operation and is, perhaps, the largest Trade School of Printing in the United States. The school of machinery is also still main- tained in the shops, as our vocational courses in lXfIachine Shop Practice. Thus The VVinona Technical Institute established the types of schools for prac- tical education now carried on in the vocational courses in Technical High School. l- M. D. TECH CCopied from "The Hear Ye." A freshman's opinion of Tech in 1912.2 In the City of Indianapolis, On the north-east side, Stands a school of honor, Ranked among the high. Technical is the title, Uf this school well known. XIay her name be truly honored, And her praises sung. Excelsior's the motto, Of this school of fame. hIay we find each pupil Guarding honor in its name. EXCHANGES The Cannon wishes to acknowledge the receipt of the followingexchanges: "The Shortridge Daily Echof, "The Brook's School News," and "The Bell News," all from Indianapolis. "The White and Goldf' of VVoodbury, N. Y., and "The Advocate," of Lincoln, Nebraska, have "met half way" and are most welcome guests.

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