Arneb (AKA 56) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1957

Page 1 of 76

 

Arneb (AKA 56) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 76 of the 1957 volume:

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I , 1 I f 1 1 1 - 11 1 1 I I II, I 1 .31 , ' I K 4 1 1 4 1 'l-" ' H' ' f 1 - I 4. 1 ' 1 - I I .1 1 I I 1 I 15' I ' 1 1 I I 1 1 11 1 I 1 1 ' f 1 USS ARNEB AKA-56 OPERATION DEEP FREEZE TWO AND 'ROUAND THE WORLD CRUISE 1956-T957 The world around us is continually revealing new mysteries which await discovery by the worldis scientists. From the time the Antarctic S continent first was discovered in l8-'10 through the present nuclear era, V this "frozen wonderland" has been one mystery ,confronting the scien- tists of the world. ' The United States Navy's Operation Deep Freeze is supporting our scientists in their work at the Antarctic in coniunction with the Inter- national Geophysical Year in l957-58. The IGY program is an effort of 39 countries to uncover many scientific riddles by recording phe- nomena such as weather, magnetism, gravity, anti-glow, and other geophysical elements. Discoveries by our scientists will lead to a better world and the much soughtafter goal - progress for the World and our Nation. The Arneb in six months from November, l956, tothe 30th of April travel- led 3l,472 miles around the world in support of IGY. And inthese pages that part will always be preserved. ' Qizczifz is-3:12 Zfif'r.ri:.":f'1'T ' -2: rr v ir 1 T fy 15. -7' 2 " T 1-" i-' f5fL-ESQ. My 1415? HTORS ic 5 5 in S-'L-A V A Z The USS ARNEB a veteran ot many polar operations including last year's first Operation Deep Freeze to the Antarctic began preparation for Operation Deep Freeze II in early autumn. ComPhrbLant's only I re resentative she was loaded with 5,000 tons of cargo for the expedition at Davisville, Rhode Island, anil when Task Force 43 and Mobile Construction Battalion One personnel were "aboard",the ship was almost ready. . . . Returning to' Norfolk she departed on November 2nd for Panama City transiting the 'Panama Canal. During the ship's short stay in Panama from Nov. 8 to Nov. ll, the officers and men enioyed liberty Cen- tral American style. I The Arneb next dipped her bow into the vast Pacific Ocean and headed towards Wellington, New Zealand, where she arrived I8 days later on Nov. 30. New Zealanders treated the Arneb crew with the friendlinessthat hasalways been known of them, and, while the ship stayed in scenic Wellington from the 30th of November tothe I0th of December,"aII hands" were exposed to this unspoiled way of life. Then ona rainy Decemberl0th' the Arneb set its course for the Antarctic where she was to spend three months contributing to the International Geophysical Year program. . The shipenteredthe 420-mile wide Ross Sea ice pack on December lath, and arrived off Cape Hallett in Northern Victorialand on December 19th. She then was diverted to McMurdo Sound, arriving on Dec- ember 24th under the shadow ofthe towering volcano of Mount Erebus. An estimated one-hundred and fifty thousand penguins greeted the Arneb and the United States Coast Guard icebreaker Northwind, which accompanied her, when Task Group 43.6 arrived at Cape Hallett on December 29th. Morethan9,000 penguinsandtheir offspring were removed from a T00-yard area on Dec- ember 30, 1956. Then on New Year's Eve the Arneb met what could be considered its stiffest test since the day she was commissioned in T943 when a severe continent storm trapped the ship between bay ice and a 200-mi le ice field. The incident markedthe firsttime news ofthe shipappearedin the front pages of many newspapers in the United States, exemplified by the Detroit Times headline, "Antarctic Death Trap . . . Ice Grinds TwoShips." Eventually breakingthe wrath ofthe crushing ice, the Arneb made her way to within 800 yards of Cape Hallett on Jan. 2 where temporary repairs were effected. The next six days were spent erecting Adare Station and transferring cargo to "Penguin Beach" in the first United States amphibious unloading opera- tion in Antarctic history. Le0vilf19C0Pe Hallett on Jcrwvry 9, she steamed to Mcfvlurdo Sound before leaving with the Glacier, the Navy s newest and most powerful icebreaker, and the Greenville Victory, for Knox Coast. On Jan. 3lsttheArneb, again slightly damaged from the heavy pack ice of Vincennes Bay, found herself OICIUFI4 Island, one ofthe Windmill ff K sical Year station. Again the Arneb's boats, Navy Seabees and ship's company personnel ioined hands to fight the F066 pigarnsttrme mbuildingthe station. For as February and March come to the Antarctic, its summer wanesf e air becomes colder and the ice which had broken up in mid-December begins to freeze once again- ? W'ljkeSSmhOn woserecled and the Arneb, Ilef bow facing north, left the Antarctic on Feb. l8th, and s eame to Australia, her Operation Deep Freeze duties completed for 1957-58, E . . Crew nttlcgnglfjlockatoo Isfland Shipyard in Sydney for I3 days for repairs on Feb. 28th, the liberty-starved pon Visited bQ'im30?EfipCT Sydney to the extent that the Australian metropolis was dubbed thebest liberty Th . bourneewigtlililericglhddrudtder repaired, we. left Sydney March l4th and spent two days enroute to Mel- 38 days of Seo panic UTI WOOIYITTPIC 5C"I"'l9 YGChts. From March 18th until April 28th the Arneb SPGYII' As April waded fhldgfq Sf-CTPPIHE For Three days' April wh fo Qlhr GI C-Cpelownf Union of South Africa. mem was unload J ml lar s ores of New Fngland's Rhode Island appeared and Deep Freeze equip.- D . 7 C'lCUmnGV'9Gi"'IQ the world. QVOUP, o nox Coast, to unload cargo for the newest International Geophy- DEDICATION . . Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd, one of the world's foremost polar explorers, and technical advisor to Operation Deep Freeze, died on March ll , 1957 in Boston shortly after the completion of the second phase ofthe present expedition, which he called the fulfillment of his Iife's ambition. Born Oct. 25, 1888, in Winchester, West Virginia, he emerged from rural obscurity to become the most famous American explorer . His iourneys intothe Arctic and the Antarctic are unparalleled in the field of exploration, and he was the first to fly over the North and South poles. Atthe bottom of the world he mapped more than 2,000,000 square miles during his four expeditions in 1928, 1934, 1939, and 1947. And, in l934, he spent months alone in a shack 123 miles south of Little America , which he called his second home, and nearly died there when his companions ,had great difficulty reaching him through raging blizzards. Although he suffered severe physical stress during his long journeys he regarded the frozen wastes of the Antarctic with warm affection. 'After his exploratory flights he was said to have "eyes alight with the wonder he had seen - vast new mountain ranges curving off overthe horizen tortured glaciers . . . and the dismal white wasteland beyond the pole." A graduate of the Naval Academy, he was forced to retire from active duty soon after he was com- missioned because ofa leg iniury but his thirst for adventure could not be thwarted, and he soon returned to active duty with the Naval Air Corp, becoming one of the pioneers of Naval aviation. Serving in both world wars, at 41 he became the youngest Rear Admiral in United ,States Naval History, and received many decorations for his trips to the extremities of the earth. His dream was that someday the Antarctic would become the Big Deep Freezer of Mankind, a place that wouldbanish famine from the earth. He dreamed that the nations of the world might someday use this giant refrigerator, that when countries hada bumper crop they could put the surplus there for use in famine years. Buried in Arlington National Cemetery on March 14, 1957, a 13-gun salute burst near the gravesite. A sailer held aloft the two-star flag of a Rear Admiral. The chaplain read the committal of the dead. There were three sharp musketry valleys, followed by a bular's "taps" in the distance. And, perhaps, if those who "wintered over" on Deep Freeze ll were listening closely they could hear an echo of this buriel ceremony reverberate from the towering peak of Mount Erebus at Antarctica's McMurdo Sound. To Admiral Byrd's memory, from all the members of Deep Freeze on the Arneb who have viewed with awe some of the maiesty of his "giant refrigerator", we most humbly dedicate this boolcf. THE EDITORS . , .. .,.. ., - .,,..f - . ,,,f,,N,, .. ...W-.---.---W-f l l NELS C. JOHNSON Captain, U. S. Navy Captain Nels C. Johnson, USN, commanding officer of the USS ARNEB, is Q veteran of 22 years in the United States Navy. Born in Auburn, New Hampshire, Captain Johnson is the son of Claus Johnson and Adolfina W. Johnson. S He entered the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1930, and upon graduation was commissioned to the grade of ensign on May 31, 1934. He was married to Dorothea Lindall of Bremerton, Washington, on June 16, 1936 in Seattle, Washington, and has one daughter, Veronica M.Johnson. Captain Johnson served as watch and division officer aboard the USS LEXINGTON CV-2 from 1934 to 1938. ln 1938 he became chief engineer and gunnery officer on the USS HERBERT DD-160, the ship being attached to Squadron 40T in the Mediterranean. He was chief engineer aboard the USS RINGGOLD DD-89, and the USS REID DD-369 from 1940 to 1942, and, in the latter ship, participated in World War 11 operations in the Pacific at Pearl Harbor, Midway and in the Aleutians. Captain Johnson was assigned his first command in 1943 when he became commanding officer of the USS MCCLANAHAN DD-615, which participated in Pacific operations, and the North African, North Atlantic and Mediterranean campaigns of World War 11. ln1944 he wasassignedtothe Surface Division, Anti-Submarine Develop- ment Detachment of the U. S. Atlantic Fleet. He served in this capacity until 1946 when he became commanding officer of the USS WITEK DD-848 ln 1947 he was assigned as Fleet Anti-Submarine Warfare Officer on the staff of the Commander in Chief, U. S. Atlantic Fleet. In 1950 he became plans officer th ff ' ' ' NATO. More recently he has been Commander of Destroyer Division 262 which was engaged in operations in Korea and the Formosa Straits. He served in thlsasslgnment until 1953 when he was transferred to the Office of the Chief of Elpvatl Operations in Washington, where he worked in the Strategic Plans rvrsion. on e sta of the North Atlantic Ocean Regional Planning Group of Before becoming commanding officer of the ARNEB this year, he spent a ear as a t d Y I d u ent at the National War College na ditlontothe normal campaign medals of World War 11 and the Korean War, he has been awarded the Legion of Merit with Combqf V, D E P ' ' - A ' ' -A.: "S4's1-c1:-.:--?- -43527741-I+.....?:L:C.f.,f 1. , A - , N, , .- .. .Y V ' 'sr " f-' mv:-z:,4'1.'ff 4,e,L Y-2'g.C.s:-df.,-, H " -f' - LL -:Q, f g-. "OUR xla:c" FRED P. MCDANIEL Commander, U. S . Navy Fred P. McDaniel, Commander, USN, executive officer of the USS Arneb, was bornin Buffalo, Missouri, on January 8, 1918, son of Clarence and Fran- ces McDaniel. Attending Montana State University and California Polytechnic ' Institute, he was commissioned Ensign on November 20, 1940, and received aspecial aviator designation the following month after completing the Naval Aviation Cadet program at Pensacola. Serving as an instrument instructor from 1940 to 1942 he eventually be- came operations officer at a Hollywood, Florida base in 1942 for one year. Further assignments included naval air stations and flight squadrons at San Diego, California, Norman, Oklahoma, Corpus Christi, Texas, and the Philippines. He attended the General Line School at Newport, Rhode Island, from 1949 to 1950, and was attached to the Bureau of Aeronautics from1950 to P 1952. As Navigator of the USS ORISKANY QCVAD in 1952-1953 he navigated the ship around Cape Horn, the first time it had been accomplished by a ship A ' its size. A public information officer at Pensacola, Fla. , from 1953 to 1955, he later attended various officers' short course schools, until, on May 6, 1956, 'S when he became the executive officer of the Arneb. E A 9 R PPPPPP OPERATIONS DECK NAVIGATION T L.L. McCall, LCDR W. E. Wheeler, LCDR DJ, Krejcarek, LT. T SUPPLY MEDICAL I ENGINEERING T. Hamilton, Jr., LT., R.E. Dellinger, LT. W.E, Scanlon, LT fjgj 'x'F 'f"A 3 fe I 'K .a H- shotgun . -YF: Qxfkibf' , :QAM 1 F r edriwml-Jvc-52.3501 .1 Silk: wwf -5.58 -S ,.. 1 4 ,pf , 5' xi W' W or gg? ri? Remaining ShiP'5 ompany fficers 1 N I Lt, ug, Arthur M, 0'Ha1-3, lst Lt. John T. Kulak, Ir. USN USMCR EHS- Jeremy T- Garland, Ens. John R. Seesholrzf USNR USN Lt ij gl Larry K. Wilson, Lt ljgj Leo A. Higgins, USNR 1 USN A R 1 r 1 ix Ens. Peter M. Klein, Ens. George E. Clark, USN USN N i hm. Richard C. McA11isfer , i f i USN a WOfW3 DaV1d A. Elder, WQfW2 Norman B. Grant, WOKW1 Alfred cn, Qlggn, USN S USN USN 4.41 TASK FORCE 43, UDT 21, MCB 1 OFFICERS AND CIVILIAN PASSENGERS I F gl. Z. 5 E' v ,, E p Captain Gerald Ketchum Captain William Calder Captain M.C. Hedbloom Commander Fred Dustin Lt,Cmd1-,Chat-1es Shirley V l K. 4 L l c F' r I L. l . 1. o 1 f P r l L r l w lt. Cmdr. Glenn Glezon Lt. Cmdr. Denzil Myers Lt. Cmdr. Joseph Fernald Lt. Ioseph Grier WOXWZ William Blevins i I r Q Lt Qj gl Norman Olson Lt fj gli John Connelly Thomas Aggson Lt. Raymond Loomis Lt. juan Tur 'p Lt lj gl Richard Griffith Ens. William Grossan WOXWZ Offie Drennan I L V. L r g. l I' I F r . -v-nyvrrygvvr-fvrvr-m-1. ff ' v www '1 L-. v. -1 Deep Freeze Duty Begins X 5 000 TONS OF CARGO LOADED AT DAVISVILLE, R I l AWA'-I-ING S-I-OWAGE. U Propul- SWE LLlNG OUR LOAD. . .Knox Coast and Cape Hallett l Sion Unit for pontoon barge on pier cargo piled high by stevedores. at Davisville. TRAVE LING TRACTOR . . Destined for cold climate tractor is alone in the United States for the last time. FX XX . ERXX REPORTING ON BOARD... Part of sled bed is raised from pier during loading operations. l 1 l l l l l LOWERING DEEP FREEZE CARGO. . .Crated equipment A being lowered into Arneb's holds. Q r l l l l INACURIOUS WAY.. . lt'srope yarn every day before the bed hears reveille inthe Antarctic. - J V A Q. UP... OVER... "Norfolk Necessities" DAVISVILLE, Oct. 27. . . On a crystal clear Saturday morning, the Arneb, fully loaded, left Davisville and arrived in Norfolk Naval Shipyard Sunday where last minute repairs were made. Completed in two days, the ship moved to the Naval Operating Base. Farewellsto friends and relatives were telegraphed, telephoned, mailed and made in person. Last minute Christmas packages were bought and final liberties in the "States" were enioyed. Backstagethe general warm up for the deep freeze sprinkled conversa- tions with energetic enthusiasm. Then the houselights dimmed on the U.S. Curtain Time... Nov. 2, 1956. ll a.m. Norfolk behind us, the show got on the road and the Arneb spotlight shown bright on Operation Deep Freeze ll . GOING. . . ln tune with the times musicians struck up "Anchors Aweigh" GOING. . . Norfolk, Nov. 2. . . We lined upto heartheCOMPHlBLANT band shake, rattle and roll us on our w GY' GONE. . . Beginning swing into harbor leaving the U. S. behind. GOING... So long, see you in the Spring. The Panama Canal PANAMA PASSAGE. . . PGHGWICI- - - Nov. 8. . .Slowly we enterthe mile- long Gatun locks. GATUN HOI.. Passing main office of lock, CN YOUR MARK.. . Locked . , 0 GET SET... All b ln we re going upinthe world 85 feet above S60 l:0YTCl UP 0 via Fresh water pressure, M ULE 'RAIN THROUGH ISTHMUS. . .47-ton mules guide us through. GET READY. . . Heavy gates open allow- ing us to enter. GO. . . Under our own steam Gul Lake awaits to be crossed. k Y R fmxaiffll L, AEN ffgjf 'E.8-5-..ufe:iXe.C9m, 251-. xu:v:u PANAMA BY 'HE SEA. . . -ooking at the old section. ofthe city across the bay. V ' FORWARD LOOK. . . University of Panama spread out on plateau above city. PANAMA 'PANARAMA'. . .Weed's eye view Of Cenfw American skyline. LEADER EXTRAORDINARY .. . . Simon E Bolivar keeping vigil in front of Panama 1 schoo'. A s A ' E YE cms EcRErs1..Keepang our dis- tance from these rare, beautiful birds P gracing the marble lobby ofthe Presi- Pi dential Palace. HlERE'Si HOW T vvoRKs...'hfee nqfavfgl musketeers get owdown on puzz ing pictur-5 machine. CEN"RA AMERICAN WHITE HOUSE OF LEARNING. . .Columns hold - ' ' ' ' SE .... Sea shells set in up decorative educational Institution, HOL A ' marble pillars, starlight walls Colegio de Saint Augustine. Panama WORLD'S LIFELINECOMMEMORATED . . . Las Balbedos tells graphic story of historic building of the Panama Canal. l mark Presidential Palace . Q l r Culture continent presidents signed can Congress in July, 1956. l l I l WESTERN HEMISPHERE SOLIDARITY.. Simon Bolivar views table where Presl- dent Eisenhower and other AmerlC0n Pan Amefl' 41-na , A - J A AIN EQUATORIAL MANNER A E' A EEEA A ' W'-SESAME PUHYWOQS Become Shellbacks NOV.13 BOUNTIFLL BEAUTIES A A A POLLYWCG DEMOLITIQN CHARGE ROYAL BABE. . .KISSIN' SWEET 5 l MISS AMERICA BEWARE i 11 W -- ---- -A 1 1 KING QNEPTUXIEQ FOR A DAY A ,,. .- ..,.., ..4 x A E AH HA, A CAVITY F F DOWN FOR DUNKINO OH MY ACHING. .. vM A POLLY QBLUBD SHELL CBLUBD BACK KW SO YOUNG TO BE BALD 1 "K 4. f' 1 I f f 3' W L HAT ARE YOU? JUNKED JGURNALIST , ,- Wellington, ew Zealand fifm, -Q. ai il "0 'K Z' MELVILLE'S CORNER, HEART OF CITY I BASK NG N .AGOON SUN I HERDING TIME RRRR O DECEMBER BLOQM HARBOR HEAVEN FROM MOUNT VICTORIA I I I I PATHWAY OF BEAUTY.. .BOTANICALCGARDENS 1-i BIRD'S EYE VIEW KIWI CAPITOL HIGH IN MOUNTAINS NEAR WELLINGTON SCENIC SUBURB, ISLAND BAY HIS WQRSHIP - THE MAYQR V-4 , I.,- I1 WW IIII LAST GLIMPSE - BEFORE THE ICE NEW ZEALANDERS WISH US WELL F r ' , f gl. li will lvl i ll N J l i ll ., I' ' l', - it ll l ll i Il 'ly' wi ll l r 5 I, l Antarctic Entrance 'ly V ' A , ,..,- 4.3 ,fy H.: ,S jjm-l - . .. . ' , ,JW --an sxmwfffv ' "mf M, . may Y i 'W' it ' A 5 1 .ev- L in Ross Ice Pack. . . Dec. l6. . .A white wilderness before us, the Arneb i steamed acrossthe Antarctic Circle toward Cape Hallett inthe northern reaches . Q. ofVictorialand. Seabees were destined to build Adare Station, ioint United i , r States-New Zealand International Geophysical Year base. A . n occasional ice berg floated by as if to greet us --- invaders ofthe penguin premises on the frozen continent. The Arneb would unload cargo in Mowbray Bay, Cape Hallett d h ' new United States base. The Antarctic summertime beckoned and the ship proceeded, follow- ingthe Coast Guard icebreaker Northwind's lead, into the 420-mile wide ice ck wh' h pa uc separated the sea from the southernmost domain in the world. I l , an t en proceed to Knox Coast to establish a of J i A December 19. . . Within shouting dis- 'T5'37in'I-fff'l"71W 'WT' '1' """'f' fc" . :f f u s A 51- . .- ,,,,,.,arq,,:,- sw- fs '- . , .,-, f- 1 -Q r. - -. ' ' ' ""' ""-' Decemberl7. . . Pack ice rippeda 30-inch gash inthe hull of the ship early this afternoon enroute to Cape Hallett, Antarctica. Immediate action by the Arneb damage control parties stemmed flooding in her forward most cargo hold. The slash came at the water- H line on the starboard side. y Captain Nels C. Johnson, USN, command- l ing officer, had heavy landing craft swung over the port side to create a 10-degree list thus exposing the starboard hull below the . waterline. Within five hours repairs were made and the ship got' underway again. 1 l UNBALANCED LIFE FoR REPAIRS tance ofCape Hallett, the Arneb received a radio dispatch rerouting the ship immed- iately to McMurdo Sound to transfer one D-8 tractor for use on the landing strip. HELLO ANTARCTICAI . .Cape's towering peaks l I fr , - 'Vii it " r'-l g f -- it yy . fear ,. ' ', J ' -X l f l N --H---.. 'V + - - ' N r 1 Q "9 1" or -s i I f 3:22 " ff f-:z--j!"v.',5fQ ff?" 22- ' n fi , . X Aaour FACETI-lRouoH an Mcmuaoo MARKER. . .aequforf Island Cla.-- ,. .l il 's l l l 4 Arneb Follows ln Northwind's Wake Smoking Peak - McMurdo's Mount Erebus X V WL McMurdo Sound... Dec. 24. . . After tying up alongside the Greenville Victory with the Glacier moored to the starboard side ofthe Victory, work began on the unload- ing of No. 3 hold to get at the huge D-8 which was to be transferred. INTER-S HIP COMMUNICATION. . Signal bridge Hugh D-8 tractor was lifted out Of 1 the hold after two days and trans- ferred to the Greenville VictOfY eventually destined for Little Amef' ica for use in bui ldinga landing strip' l..1-A Iss,wsQa:1:wf1:2g.fJ.1:f,--1-Aff-,-f--V- I Af.. , I. I I ' I I ' if'-f' UM- Al- ff-3---'-4,-f-- Q.-- -Q -C M- '--f:g.,.A 'X . CAPTAIN PRESENTS TWO FAITHFUL STEWARDS WITH CHRISTMAS GIFTS I A! Iifr f W ,fn 1 CHURCH SERVICES ON THE ICE CHRISTMAS MORNING. S f zafifxx . .U . go Christmas Dinner At McMurdo Sound HOT GOBB LER MAKE MINE WHITE ME Y V iw:-' i T ini M 'u A QQXWTITW CARVED FOR CONSUMPTION SANTA CAME TOO. . . RED CROSS PACKAGES 1 .J TASTE T . --sv , fig:-S TEMPTI NO CHOW e 444. YULE SPIRIT IN THE WARDROOM MESS DECK ORNAMENTATION 'McMurdo Sound. . . Dec. 25. . . It was truly a "White Christmas" for us at McMurdo I Sound. 'Most ofthe afternoon was spent on I the ice investigating the nearby land and chasing a few unsuspecting penguins. It wasaday spent in relaxation and in worship of the birth of Jesus Christ thou- sandsofmiles fromthe UnitedStates. Many 4' minds drifted homeward while all hands opened packages furnished by the Ameri- A I I can Red cross. A LARGE CHRISTMAS SEAL I Like our friends, relatives and neigh- A I bors on our home continent, we, at the bottom of the world, made merry on Dec- I e m b e r 25t h . f A I' .I ,,.' - -ILII .,,- J, .I ---I I rf' "s -' . -, jjivxk-.f.-M,-5 agp A-A ,I .- -I ' ,I -S1 2-2. apr 2-I Alf? 'i?aIII.,s-e..aG".2f:1I-.,'i'I I III Vlbkkt V, . ,. .Zi A I I - I-. 'I In If I ,, I. , .. . , ., A AI "" if I F4l5'.3,I.qL 2ciIQ Fifi 'tx' 'SLI-' . 'I l.4.l2-if-iii-I Y .A........ ..II.. ..I.I I ...I.. Im I I Iu.I-I'.v:aI1- I-I-I-.-I..ww 'I' ?I'1ii3I "Mex III' 'M I L ' It ' 1' I , ' I' , .U-A-4 'Zhi ' ,- I , I -....a-'1'X.1IP.'.v""'..'I"" Hx'-1'-I , ,.'-"" ii 'N I - 1-I If-'1H.v.n' 11"'5A--' 'Y' 31:5-I ITU- '1 'I 3 I II ,' S '. . it .nb . Q. I ,. 4 f,e':f,' In-ag' Cifrr' .:.g.:, ,J III .II-gm 9 xg it ,I I -I I f','..-.iEXv.I5sQ:Q'T' . II I-gt,-'H , :zu -I-II -I-.1 il ,ini 1- 1, I III- IzI.A:I -I 1- .' I I , , I ' 5 , ' " YI' Nl W'1lf',a-IGI.--alll. ",'i"'i'5'I'1'i"i5Iu3IfI-251fir. il!-szkffik-'GI'-CII-Qi SWIM-I'E1.a-',--5, -'vi-I 'III 1" Fl' i' " 'I .Q IQ' 5' 'I ' -'Q -' K A .I In "'I1,,-I:I.,,11 CBI. I 3561 'R ' hp-T41 'tijfvii-f"T f1'?f?A - .A I,.,I,.... ...II III.,-I .I.. II .I -I - sr I.. .. . II.. I II ,..1.,.I. .,... NAI IVES BEARING GIFI S . ENJJ rap-gL.r.......- I ,V 1 . ,Q Q ex ,, ' ,5W+. ....-.1 sd oi PORT PUSH STARBOARD STALEMATE CAPE HALLETT, ANTARCTICA, New Years, 1957 - 'Lest we forget - An unpredicted storm of near hurricane proportions howled out of the Ant- xx arctic continent New Years eve and winds gusting up to 60 knots drifted tre- mendous ice floes across Mowbray Bay trapping the Arneb between pack ice and fast bay ice. lcebergs towering 150 feet in the air and the size of two city blocks u loomed out of snow squalls and marched steadily down upon the ship pushing tremendous pressure ridges before them. The ship fought with full power to free herself. ,I Steel side plates of the ship were under continuous hammering and large "l" beams bent and groaned. One large berg wanted to occupy the same area of the world the Arneb was occupying. Seams ruptured and cracks appeared in the hull --- and gallons of sea water poured into the ship. Repair crews fought the Antarctic attack working in 29-degree water for hours that seemed endless. And the Captain remained onthe bridge, ever watchful, refusingto "give up the ship" although at times the situation seemed helpless. Trapped for 48 hours, "The Big Squeeze" ushered in a "Happy New Year" for the Arneb without a "fond adieu" to the old. ICEBERG PARADE OF . .Arneb, stranded, watches menacing review. A ,i.,,A s A Q , .. A dl, 1 ,EQ J." 5 g 'ff 1 " .21 ' i j , :wil L1 "- itil. i T A -Q' t ' ', Y ,..- F .ig QW ,Pkg-A .QQ H 31 .QMZQ N X t Afwrtrdglp-Q43 it 1 I 4. Z f .UD -If , At: Aamir A , ' Qi ' -r Q. 4 V K, VA j . V Y - Y ,R ' , l 2 .' ' W A v - 1, 'j .'-'. 2 . ,V , I is' , ,rf AM' av - . .ew 'ep' x -fm -.1 s - f . I .. ' .' ' ri' ! ati ' ' s ' v-f ., .4-.E i , .A , ' A 1. , I.. KJ.: g, -. xr: F. I ,.' ' . J .. bit., . V-- .. A, Q.. 1, -Q X: - ,- . Q., ,,-3,4 ,V .A ...P fl 4. A . A , i i , . 'A' F at 4 " J ' r, - 1 V Aft' 9,-QI, 5. ii if!!-'ia-I. H4 0 tx ,, - --- . fa-:ze A-'M'-fl-Q .: 1 F 'vip . A - O Y i obv ' A A - ' ,yu - . .-c.-,,'-'A'-sC.' 'fb ,A ar-:Laing , J 41... . V c' Q M,-A g 1 9- Q 'A 0-'A A 4-Lv.: ,..' fs' ', 3' ' - 1, 'I . - V 4 f--v-f '-PP' - .. 4 . ' '. s 5 ', , - -x ' X - v ..-5 'Y 1,5-,. . J" -' ...- A Q , . -r-- ff. fe-,f ,- ' - "' ' ' ' -, - . F4 ' . My A- 1it+:ggajffffgf - 2? . 4. 7 -L V AA b S 1.,-M.. f ., L34 52 , Q , ,,,. , , - , C 4 V ' " -- - - Y is " . . - . ' ' at ' , . Q ,. . . - "f - ., J . H 4 I I I 1 I I I I , . I I ,I "HULL" OFIA PROBLEM IN AGAIN - our AGAIN I k-r 1,..-,, ICE BREAK .... Frozen death grip recedes "NORTHWlND" AID AS ICE LOOSENS . . . . Flooding being controlled Shudder To Shelter Damage control parties and repair crews went into action immediately when water poured into the Arneb's holds endangering the cargo destined for Cape Hallett and Knox Coast. The Underwater Demolition Detachment ofTeam 'f2l went into the holds to investigate the extent of the damage from the pressure ice, and searched in 29-degree water four to twelve feet deep for areas needing repairs. Damage control central recorded the damage as reports from the investigators came in. The bridge was informed and soon the extent ofthe damage to the ship was tabulated. The s'hip's propeller had been damaged , 99 frames had been bent, the rudder twisted I8 de- grees, several cracks were found in the hull, and the former hole in the starboard hull seam below the waterline had been reopened. On the deck ten pumps, including three "high- lined" from the Northwind nearby pulled water out of the holds. The damage control parties were I I I I workingaroundthe clock but the ship, still in herI helpless condition in the pressure ice, lay vulner- able to the treacherous icebergs passing by. We were in serious trouble until early in the morning of January Zwhena crack appeared in the ice, and the Arneb, with the Northwind's help, broke loose from Antarctica's stranglehold and reachedthe shelter ofCape Hallett to bandage her wounds . "GTR I I u. s. NAVAL nIsrAIcII - ::,1:-M-: ,. , 1: " ' OLASFSITXAIISN V- FROM: ADMINO , I Awww USS ARNEB FORCE 43 INFO OOIINANDER TASK GROUP 43.6 f COMMANDER TASK 2 0 OWING YOUR CONGRATULATIONS ON BREAKING OUT X EVERY ONE HERE FOLL ES YOU HOP SITUATION WITH KEEN INTEREST MUCH SYMPATHY AND HIGH E GOOD WORK 'T WILL BE ABLE EFFECT .REPAIRS SUCCESSFULLY X KEEP UP TH vIA H NR 234 ff WRITTEN up Sv SKELLY - NAVY-DPPO SUD ION Q 3 3 2 Z ,Img ITIS WILSON I'If303z IF" ITEJANUARY 57 H I'II55f'Q532z: 'IIIIIIIISI IITI9IRITTBIMIIEIMIUIHIMINI II IFII I I II U. S. NAVAL DISPATCII 5"'---H GEN 19'0Z"'1f: T F"' P ' "' ""' 'I TL' cLAssEEinoN ' PREEEDENCE mo' CQMPHIBIRALANT .D-,.E PLAIN ACTION: U55 ARNEB TTL......LXMMMQHEE..A5KJ3M!2ifELlLDDMBH1BLANI cg 2 1 5 CONGRATLLATIONS ON SUCCESSFULL BREAKOUT X NORFOLK TELEVISION STATION WILL CARRY GOOD NEws ON SIX OCLOCK BROADCAST FOR FAMILIES T0 GET GOOD I . NEWS TONIGHT il ll Il VIA H NR 247 f WRITTEN UP BY SKELLY 'MTE III? WILSON T' I-S2572 DAIEJANUARY 57 5555522 Nnvv-orvo sun lorV I RI' I I I NI 1'ILI'3IfI5III'I9FTIIHEI1TII?I1IIuIwImI2FInILIInI I I I In U. S. IIAVAl DISPATCII sun GEN 1007 CLASSIFICATION' PRr:cEbENcE mm PLA I N DEFERRED Awww USS ARHES NW OTE 43fCINCLANTFLTfCOHPHIBLANTfCTG 43 6 YOUR SKILL AND SEAMANSHIP EVIDENPED IN FRFFIIC' YOUR SHIP AND IIINIMIZING THE EFFECTS OF THE UNEXPECTED HIGH WINDS AND RESULTING PACK ICE ARE HIGHLY COMIIENDABLE X THE EFFECTIVE MEASURES TAKFN TO REPAIR THE DAMAGE AND TO READY YOUR SHIP FOR CONTINUED OPERATIONS SHOWS A QUOTE OANDO UNOUOTE Sp, RIT WHICH I9 FXTREIIPLY 1 CNO -I mmm- H I -I - l 1 1 I I ,I 1 GRATIFYING X I PERSONALLY CONVEYAA QUOTE WARM REPEAT WARIII INEI-L , DONE TO ALL HANDS UNQUOTE X ARLEIGH BURKE I I 'TOR 'Ei T0 DAT I' ..- D .- , , f 1234516 .-- I5 Iasgg I I I I I I7I8I9I1'TI11I12I13I14l1sI1eI11'I1a 19 zo 21 zz 3 za ' - +I' IIITIIIIIII R-EEEASE D 9932 1 JAN1957 5 82 2 NAVY DPPOSNDN Vg Adare Station Jan. Z To Jan. 9 ROAD TO THE BEACH . . . . UDT and TNT blcsf the way LOADED LCM LEAVES SHIP! SNOW SLEDS . . . Over and Out . ww-1'--V HA LLETT FRO NTIER DE LIVERING THE ...Unloading dismnng unif GOCDS ---- Davis' ville fo Hallett shore HOOK, LINE AND GRANITE CLIFF l The first United States amphibious un- loading operation in the history of the Antarctic continent could never have been accomplished without the successful efforts of the Arneb's hatch crews and coxswains who, with the Seabees, were the key fig- ures in the unloading operations. Working in two, I2-hour shifts, around the clock, cargo was transferred in a con- stant flow from the Arneb's holds into the huge landing craft and hence onto the beach. I CARGO LIFT BIG HELP IN THE HOLDS -........,, 4 1 When the unloading was finally com- pleted, the ship's first and second divisions had unloaded and moved to the base site 2,600 measured tons of cargo. ' ON DECK SHIFT BAKER ll ,. NIJ, , I - ll INTO THE "MIKE" BOAT tr l.x W.. ,N A . X. . ll ' " I ' " M, ' H' I - 4 ' W I, V rw., Y sy ,Nw .Y Yiwu, I llllx 't LUMBERING ALONG. . . Housin9 maternal transported to bose Slie ADARE VILLAGE International effort' - A . .. .- Q'-. nf-. 'Y W ' .ef - - - ' '-r'-TOT' 1-if ""' 4' " ' mAP2ln5JiE?fi'o,665 o f t f found on the site selected for the base. Twenty men removed 9,000 in Operation "Penguin-Lift." Then SeaBees of Mobile Construc- tion Battalion One went to work 'D ttt i f ALL RIGHT WHO DID IT? Local gentry pondering recent move IGY constructing the ll-building base. A supply dump was graded and per sonnelworked lntwo 12 hour shifts under the continuous daylnght ofthe Antarctic summer ln eight days the station began to take shape as the detachment of SeaBees erectedthe red steel sided huts on the ground where the pen gums once nested GRADING TERRAIN , , . Ancient volcanic ash gives Way under D-4 POWGI' TURN TO - SEABEE STYLE fl. C!! i T. f Lilfffm .L '3"'5 s J!""'.-...DlM FIRST AID - A LONG WAY STEEL BANDAGE Repqafmqn of FROM HGME work on ice-smashed hull X WELDING WELL 'DONE f CAPE HALLETT DEPARTURE FINAL CHECK BEFORE ICEBERG VEILS FRIGID ANTARCTIC WATERS 1 A-:va ADMIRAL DUFEK lRight of Captain Johnsonl LUNCHE5 ABQARD ARNEB GLACIER PROV DES " KNOX COAST, ANTARCTICA- . . . January' 31, 1957 . . .. lts crew instilled with renewed enthusiasm from the first mail since early De- cember, the Arneb today arrivedat Clark Island, one of the Windmill group, in Vincennes Bay. Reaching the 90-mile wide ice pack on Jan. 25, hundreds of ice- bergsandthick bay ice blocked the path-to the base site but eventually the Glacier found the route. Although damaged once again by thick bay ice, the Arneb crew and SeaBees began work on Wilkes Sta- tion, the last of the IGY bases to be started. Time was essential for the Antarctic summer was waning and each of the days that were to follow would be a little colder and a little darker. +'-.rn-A., f--- -- OW FOR ARNEB The mission completed at Cape Hallett, the Arneb, under orders from Task Force 43 Commander Rear Admiral George Dufek, retraced her steps to McMurdo Sound arriv- ing at the mooring site on Jan. 12. SeaBees and ship's company immedi- ately began unloading the US NS Greenville Victory, and Admiral Dufek and his staff visited the Ar- neb to examine the damages sustain- ed in the New Year"s storm. t soon was learned that the USS G acier AGB-4 would accompany the Arneb and the Greenville Vic- tory to Knox Coast. And, on Jan. 15, the Arneb, refuelled with 216, 223 gallons of oil, left withthe Task Force on the 2,000-mile iourney to the expected heavy ice of Vin- cennes Bay. E"I I I I I I I I I I "MIKE" FOURSOME ARNEB SHIP'S COMPANY SWINGS INTO ACTION AT KNOX COAST CATERPILLAR LIFT 1 l I Q I I I E I I II I I 1 I I -Y" I III. LII BOOM OPERATOR I UN-0ADI NG CARGQ I E A,......m I I I I RECORDING LCM POSITION M BOATS RADIO-TE LEPHONED DIRECTIONS LOADING OIL DRUMS I I HEADING :mo CLARK covE UN LOADING AT BEACHHEAD BEACHMASTER - SHIFT BAKER Working again aroundthe clock to beat the waning Antarctic summer, unloading crews first removed the remaining cargo from the Arneb, and then turned to the Greenville Victory. Careful boat handling was a ne- cessity as the water was quite shal- low in Clark Cove that led to the Clark Island Beachhead blasted out of solid ice by the frogmen. Cargo was loaded on the wagons inthe "Mike" boats, and then at the beachhead, the wagons were hauled ashore by SeaBee construction men in tractors to the supply dump. f - .Y.:.-,.' .1.,f .Q I I I I I. I I " f A"-':f1'.4:.. CLARK IS AND BILLBOARD X: fi ,x 15 IE 1. ,J TRACTORS AT BEACHHEAD A VITAL WAGON FIRST CRANE USED IN THE ANTARCTIC L . 5 iw' GRADING TERRAIN 1 '- if " is-w A 2 SURVEYOR EYES LANDSCAPE' H WEATHER BUILDING EMBRYO BUILDERS AT WORK TEEL WALLS - PROTECTION AGAINST wuNTER'S FURY COMM - 5 UN'CAT'O'X'S HOOK UP AGAINST wuNTER'S FURY F51 - A, F 1 il nd or iw ,-ggi., ,J -,-i.A Mr if wp. , ,,, ,, 1, , f K is gf-I-nf! .nw K, - W ,,,, 4 1, .-,1 A-P- A A R A ,. I i I H I T 7 I Il I N I Ii it JI .T I I I I 5 ANTARCTIC HUSKIES T 4 BLUE Room l Club i V WI LKES STATION COMPLETED T I I 1 T T 1 I I T A HOME IS WHERE YOU MAKECIT I 9 l I ' .II UNDERWATER DEMOLITION TEAM TAKES I COFFEE BREAK AFTER "COOL" INVESTI- I OATION OF THE ARNEP, HULL PRIOR TO I KNOX COAST DEPARTURE. TEAMS UN - L DERWATER WORK PLAYED ESSENTIAL I PART IN MAKING TEMPORARY REPAIRS 1 TO THE ARNEB'S DAMAGED HULL WHILE I IN THE ANTARCTIC ICE. I Y 1- L.. ,jf Wilkes Station Commissioned, Knox Effort Ends February 16th 1 1.- ' 1'i""'qi"1' """',"'L1' Wu--E Ax-75-Vf'J15'.r" '.,fif',?i,1'3'f-'i.z'. A . , . , A 'Y' -- . - -..v, ,wmv 1 ',.,,,,,-,J ,4-L -- ,,YY , I Arneb Leaves Antarcti I As Winter, Ice Moves I BAY ICE MOVES IN WHERE HUMANS DIDN'T FINAL FAREWELL TO ICE FEAR TO TREAD CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS SENDS CONGRATUALTIONS 4 I I ll. . NAVAL DISPATCII ' I I I SND GEN 1007 ' CLASSIFICATION PRECEDENCE 3 PWM own MW- MI p L A I N I ACTION: G'I'F4q . INFO: TF4fgjaTG4Q.Q!c I NC I . I I I I 2 7 1 5 ga 8 Z I I I - CONGRATULATIONS AND WELL DONE TO YOU AND THE OFFICERS AND TEEN OF I YOUR TASK FORCE FOR AN OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE DURING OPERATION I DEEP FREEZE TWO X THE OPERATION HAS BEEN A PERFECT EXAMPLE OF I EFFECTIVE OOORDIIHATICN OF THE MILITARY SERVICES AI--ED CIVILIAN I SGIEIITISTS x ARLEIGH BURKE I RECID VIA G NR 944 I , I ,- 1 A A A --E' - on cn. I neLEAsE CWQNVA I 1058192 IIIIQUXRJS I QIJQTEFEB 1957 2.715082 il I'2III :I I 4'I 5I 6I 7 I a I9 I1o I 11 I12 IISIIII 16 I17 In I 19 I zo I 21 I 22 I 23 I'24I I I T I I N, ' ' ' I NAVY-DPPO sun N9 1 I I l . -,M V x 6 X x - V55 -P:-S-N "iw ii . ' 1 1 . 5 f K . ,E X 1."t, in i Z. 4 - 2 Fifi" X x 91451 ff X 2" xr X I ZMXMK ff fig fgwmf Finalists in the ship's beard contest receive awards from Ensign Seesholtz, one ofthe iudges. Beards, products of 68 days at the bottom of the world, were removed- shortly following our Antarctic departure. C E IQWQ wf fs, -,L :vig . ' -, ,'f"',Q A m y 1- ' ix . 44 'ig f t r -x ' .Lo xx 1- e 'U as 'x I , x 16,3 I Jf 1 A X X NV. 4-11 Q X Pxx 'hcl ig W I 1- it :I "'f' 'li X ' Kiwi --Q ww - tv f .'u,.,f,!7 X I its ix ,I ' IQ? , .x .Q w X i XX Q 1 X IQ gm' X 5 s rg! f. KN X 'nl s Icebergs Make Ideal 40mm Target Practice Viv' ' ' I I I 4 I ARNEB ENTERS PORT JACKSON HARBOR " 5 ON SUN SHINY FEB 28TH MORNING I I I I 0 I SYdl1.eY,.A.'ll.S'h.'H.lia --- FIRST CIVILIZATION IN 3 MONTHS , I I I I I I I I I I d I I T A THRILL FOR us ALL PASSING UNDER . MASSIVE SYDNEY HARBOR BRIDGE . .4 K Y Y 4 :Ar -.... gydneyfs Cockatoo Island Shipyard... Feb. 28th ,- X CAPTAIN ON SIGNAL BRIDGE . . .. Keen eye on entering drydock sAILoR's VIE'W OF ENTIRE Bow -I OPEN- DOCK AWAITS ENTRY SHEARED PROPELLER ING UP . ..Repc1irs begin 1, Thirteen Days HYDE P slmoclows glorious Sf. Mory's Cqfhedrql ARK VIEW . .. Archibald Memoriol Founfoin In Wonderful l Sydney SYDNEY'S DOWNTOWN AREA l l l l T l 7 l I l l l 1 c ,l l l l l l l l l mmm---, RELAXATIONTAT ETHE TAT LER 5 GOVERNMENT HOUSE IN BOTANIC BEAUTY ' -FEE YUPl HE WAS A FINE BLOKE cLocK or 1oo,ooo PLANTS NATIVE KoALA BEARS ASLEEP KANGARO0 P055 The ship, equipped with a new propeller after a 13-day drydock period, left Sydney on March 13 for a two-day tri p to Melbourne through heavy seas and bucking a severe headwind in the South Paci- fic Ocean off the southeast coast of the island continent. On March 15 the ship celebrated the fifteenth anniversary of the United States Atlantic Amphibious Force of which the Arneb is a unit. Steaming through Hobson's Bay, the shiptied up at South Pier, Mel- bourne on March 15, 1957 to load two Olympic sailing yachts. LEAVING cocKAToo. . .WITH New PRoPELLER "' Three Day Melbourne Visit Ends Arneh Stay On Island Continent ! 3 . I I I T A , ' ,if QUARTERS FOR ENTERING V CTORIAN PORT ST. PATRICK'S DAY PARADE ' UNDERWAY FOR AFRICA. . .shaff Colors RETJRN NG "SK PPER'S" SALUTE E DIVISION AT INSPECTION .E 0aptain's Personnel Inspection March30 Highlighted 20-Day launt To South Africa STERN MEN IN IMMACULATE WHITES SHOES SPARKLE INSECQND on VISION CAPTAIN ADDRESSES SCREW F Cape Town, South Africa V .2 3 , SOUTH AFRICAN MOUNTAIN VIEW. . . Granite Rock gateway is stopping point for Arneb sightsee- ers on bus tour provided by the city of Cape Town. SLEEPY CAPETOWN ON SUN- DAY MORNING. . .A South Afri- can city street, its peaceful sob- bath hush interrupted by mofor Moe sounds and sidewalk footsteps, MM Al ollill JROYYI 2 E EDJCATOR OF VlSION...CeciI -ohn Rhodes is viewed by sailorS IW infront of the University of Cc1.Pe" town high ona hill above the city- ' In .l gr-""' QQ-,y-CoATED CAPE rovvN uNuvERslrY QLACKDROPPED BY GRANITE CURTAIN.. lcfuregque university is home of studies if South African students. CecilllGH AND MIGHTY. . . Group of ship's uiloflimera fans treated to magnificent lands- japrglpe of South Africa's sea shore. alll' ANYONE FOR A SOUVENlR?. .South African native displays intricately made gifts to interested Arneb tourists. l r K 1, " ' ' -'-f f' ,fy-4.23-"" ....-f, 9 ' ' if A , -- fN-,-.:- W" Ai' V' ' '4 :ctw :f1'-Q-fl'-s.1,..f.:y ,ff A BREATH-TAKING vnsw mom "TABLE TOP" MOUNTAIN - Fon moss wHo BRAVED CABLE CAR - ,1 'J P SLOWLYTHE LONG JOURNEY TO THE TOP UNSURPASSEDBEAUTY BEGINS TO UNVEIL STARTS VIA THE CABLE CAR. AS HALFWAY MARK IS REACHED. SCENIC SPLENDOR OF CAPE TOWN AND TABLE BAY AS SEEN FROM THE TOP. SOUTH AFRICANS SWARM TOWARDS GANGWAY vTNlnATIVE CLQRIOSTY ON SLINNY SIGNA- BRIDGE. DURING VISITING HOURS. During the Arneb's three-day stay in Cape Town the South African na- tives were as interested in seeing the shipas we were in seeing their coun- tryside. Visitors each afternoon boarded the Arneb and were given guided tours while we boarded bus and taxi to view their magnificent landscape. April 9... Our foreign liberty over, we left Cape Town's beautiful harbor and set our course northwardthrough the Atlan- tic. Having had a fine time in a beauti- ful city for three days, we were ready to spendthe next I8 preparing for our arrival in the continental United States. HOMEWARD BOUND. . . Leaving harbor's breakwater H1.......,u-........-- D -.-. -- -gifs-Q 11, Y V ff M Hours of Work "At Sea" any lt took a great deal of perseverance and plenty of good old-Fashioned elbow grease to keep the Arneb in top notch operation For six months. From the engine roomtothe signal bridge and from the fan- tail tothe fo'c'sle each working day found a beehive of activity. Each of the men aboard are located in a division according to the type of work each has been qualified For. On this page and on several of the following are rep- resentative pictures of these various divi- sions. BUSY SHlP'S orrucr y WINDING IN rAnLoR SHOP MACH NE SHOP REPAIRS V . 1 -ff I , , , , E- 'E ' v 4A , , II -, -- , Slff 4.6 Q 1 a wqgqs UQ? ,, ' rf HN A C ,'1'1tq,. -SU ,, J Q 'A -1 , A ' ET -E E-Ek A A A A A-AL O A-f.f-- D --. . J--3 ,sfffgf? f'f -,.,.C , , FFF It fine, . RECORDING DATA IN SUPPLY OFFICE POST OFFICE Heh Whw where s The mcul? I I , I QJIET MOMENT IN LAUNDRY NAVIGATOR READS SEXTANT 1 I 1 ENCHANTING MELODIES FROM PLOTTING CONTACT IN COMBAT I RADIO THREE. n i Y Y. , , ,-.A- -,. 171, -, 7,5 -5 17 E- 7 E-C .::,,----3 . 171- : -ffgfi tqif-I11"13?'?.3'lE I LOG ROOM VIEW. . . Damage Control Headquarters. Light Repair Near Barber Shop CLEAN SIIVERWARE FRQM SCULLERY BREAD IN THE MAKING. . .SHIP'S BAKERY CNECRINQ INSTRUMENTS IN "ET SI-IAC K" CARPENTER SHoP ACTIVITIES ENGINE ROOM GUAGE CHECK RESET ING VA LVES KW SURGERY IN SICK BAY I I I I I x I x I I I 1 I ELECTR ICIANS AT WORK RAISING FLAG HOISTS ON SIGNAL BRIDGE INTRICATE ADJUSTMENT TO N BAR OMETER . 4 1 H: , Y - lf : ' 1: jg :A3g?.'-lL?""', TELEPHONE TALKER ON FANTAIL Tom Aoosow Qiicieisikkiac Ray scientist Scientific data on the cosmic ray -a wonder ofthe universe - that will prove invaluable to the nation WGS collected during the cruise. Tracking the ray in the "lGY Shack" Wl1lCl'1 was equipped with a lead pile neut- ron monitor, the ship followed GH International Geophysical Year track to and from the Antarctic continent. The ray was stopped by the lead pile and electronic computing devices locatedto either side ofthe pile re- corded the intensity ofthe ray. 15' H-1-B' re Y ,s 'Q - n... I: - ouxn--.U , V .,,,l,, f ,. ,. we - as e Y , ,. , ,Y -Q A 41' wi,e.Zif'cg1wqs"-rim-A.-w.r1'vwin 4- W ,W ..,. an W. A, iW:,,.,,, , M 1-se - W, mf- ,Y ,I-T -,f:.f",-Q.-L-...xi 1- ,V f -s " 'wr uf g,p.55?,f5k-l :v:,,:,,e.1:.3pf,sq-,rg,':L,-53yew,:,v,f,5.11:1-2161-EYr2.'Q:e,.L,2:,g3Jgirkg,qgirriggfsarg:cageKX,-1Riga.-gg-r'QgM'fQ,?sE5j!g?2,wA1Etrim,u,:1tw1--L3S2fyf'J..-el711li-flLf,?xf'w.!fwI':YaJR,Y6!?lftl.1,-il'?"ff5IfflECtwill'9'f5!f1Tiw?4ff':i'T4E:3'3ff"'x'F'lr5 mv'lW'1lAinfT'r"A"A'-Hl':s"' 'KM X 1:5 "", A A Arthur Ortner Frank Belling Charles Maull Allen McGuire Robert Brantley Alfred Joseph Chief Jones Don Blankenship A Thomas Blaunt A Stephen Barker William E. Butler Edward Campbell Thomas Carter Salvatore Catolde Edward Cherrington James Coombs Harry Derr William L. Drake Arthur Dufour jerry Dutton Johnnie Edwards Howard Hanener Earl Alger Bennett Bass Martin Joyce Paul Kulp Martin Lusting Edward McCormick Pat McEray William Armstrong Clinton McHel1 Anthony Mecca Donald Michelson Clyde Miller Cameron Angus Cedric Maier William Lefferts Richard Lucas Eugene Hardy Lawrence Haywood Joseph Haas Gene Hughes Dennis Huber Paul I-Ielfrick John Kania George Kurgl Donald Germain Harold Granitski Wverett Riley Frank Schwarz Phillip Silverstein joseph Swengros jack Stewart Wayne Seeley john Stack Lean Snider Edward Spencer Fred Smith John Albright Ernest Wells Earl Gustafson L. Villamor Vernon Dooke Francisco Rubia Don Timmerman Arthur Faller Thaddeus Collins Doanld Arnholes Billie Shaddix I. Zimmerman Thomas Sullivan Harold Page Thomas Williams James Clark Alfred Ewers William Wilson 101111 -Czerwinski Joseph Roman . Richard Gokey Donald Norman George Roussell George Rynkiexicz David Whaley Clarence Tomner D. Ziminski taff-Task Force 43 E Division . I I I Iliiiizixie R Division Melvin Kiklautsch John Weeber John Curry Ronald Lightfoot Alfred Wollenburg Glenn Cinder Jimmy Kelly Kenneth Bonesteel Richard Bruce Harry Priest Earl Wells Lucious Peace Robert Thurman John Othmer Robert Richard Joseph Salerne Donald Walter Charles Beckham Eugene McCann Eugene Salvatore Donald Stafford Basil Russell James Croff Thomas Giles Larry Shepherd Lyle Gross Thomes Jones A ff' -f'-':.-fe2:'- 1:1-avi-f:e-f-esaaaq, . V N, i, 4 - , r .. ' ff , ' -vi --- - - 1- 1 - ---"D - X- '1 - - g- A 1 1.L-,Y-ff' ,ff-Q 113 , 4 Y - V-fx . i V f ji' - -' ' n f - . A , Y . ,,, Q A i V HV i i v A i i i A it is Y L Y - ' Y ..' ' ' " ' - 'f f"1Y-"f":5-I- Third Division iifiiiifi i i i William Torres Walter Cremieux Vincent Scalise Ira Livingston i C. Breland James Lemes Melvin Horowitz ' Frank Berthe lot George Stefanik Joe Holder Thomas langton Herbert Dinger Ronald Moore I Samuel Gooch Samuel I-Iughbanks I Edmond Zinkewicz 1 Samuel Miller Alfred Bastinelli i ' econd Division Richard Simmons Aiken Caddell Carmine Luongo Anthony Comport i Leonard Myers i i Ray Richardson Ralph Kofroth Earl Desrocher William Farabella Ronald Finn 1 i H of 2::f.zffs ' Y' Albert Hucks Robert McGuirk Irvin Williams David McElreath Gerald Vitocolonna James Singleton Thomas Pardue William Iurgensmeier Donald Campbell Daniel Mahn First Division Donald Magness Paul Parker James Gray Jmes Turner Michell Kolak Joey Balogh Leroy French Austin Rodgers Samuel Lordhak William Bohl Fred Bareiss Alex Budrevich James Parris Arnold Rigsbee Robert Gallimore Albert Adams Clarence Goldsberry Robert Shuford Jess Childress Curtis Whitten Edward Driscoll William Hamilton Q, I -v-wuz-wrwexrvi-rug --rv ,V - --- - f - M j,51.,:'.4. -J: .:.:.A -ia ::,.-L. ' gi A31 , :A 1 . y-...',-'Lair-T:'gt7 -'l 1 5: E 31,5 WILD-L15 Y:x':.f-f-- A-'Y V - I J k Y I i l N 1 1 l l K x f J l ? E 1 1 n J I F w I l l 1 3 1 R l S l 3 ,.-.. , ision Antonio Sanares Edward Griffin 'Y' 1 w w -V xx 1 P , i 1 Wilbert Bentley Luke Walton Floyd Burton Gerald Schloesser Marie Correa Robert Andrews Pete Williams Paul Belisle Apolinar Medina Domingo Paguio Richard Theobold Larry Clark Willie Porter Robert Dennett Richard Van Dyke John Fonte Charles Daniels Frank Panella Ioby Padgett D. Musacchio Gerry Collins james Hyman Luis Salas James Spears Garland Cline Don Kersten Feliciano Quintana Charles Bama Herold Hatfield I fra we aging' i .ff i i i l i I i I 0 Division Salvatore Buttiglieri Anthony Messiner Richard Moroskey Edward Roberts Dale Truley Willie Samuel Isabelo Abalos Harry Davis Hilton Swain Cressencie Ecual Charles Reed Samuel Jarrell i William Smith William Wilson Joseph Adams Richard Wehrly Norman Rosenberg Joseph Whittaker Alvin Wile Harold I-ligley James McKissic Robert Whitburn Calvin Godin Richard Tolley jerry Haman James Bergbower Duane Elliott Arthur Scarpelli Gordon Hope Eugene Schreckeng0Si Ernest Sexton Louis Mungin Leonard Tkaczyk William Schomp john Hughes Robert Steiner ml , '7'-71a-qw-5.7-:.'fv,. , -.-.g-.-rw ' fr Q -Y 4, f: ..--1.--r -fa. za., -4 . ..:ll'-71' " E. Lloyd Knowles Philip Gilligan Howard Adams james Roberts I Arthur Brovm I Edward Bowers Iohn Miner I -ernard Grady if-Ienning Kristransen Elvin Compy Sheldon Burstrom I ames Wall I I I I I I rgx I I I Jack French John Dunn I Jerry Shields Clyde Burgess Leonard Canner I Otho Relder si' I I I 'I II I I I B... Olympus Haines Stanley Weinberg George Diet? Everett Contreras Ronald Hendrickson Norman Smith Gerald Opperman Eugene MCA lpin Wdward Francischelli Verl Rand James Roomsburg Rolland Young Edward Young Harold Sollenberger Verlin Shaffer Elwood Anders Harold Young Paul Wilde Lawrence Gardner M Division V aaa Division E X A Division Fourth Division William Davis George I-Ioleman Robert Kempf Robert Yates George Parady Robert Lundquist Robert Peterson Donald McFee Curtis McVay Charles Thys Thomas I-Iaddy Robert Galen Weldon Eskew Melvin Sexton George Baker John Sprigos William Jones Elbert Harrison Raymond Hovey Otis Perry Charles Marl Manuel Baptiste Donald jeanroy Ronald Simon Ronald Swanson David Sedgebeer Wasby Kanatzar Harry Bailey Herbert Black Ronald Menzie ,,..,L.t:, ,. - . if 's Douglas Bogue Paul Reynolds Clarence Ewing Gary Gre ger Fred Valentino Ioselh Reed George Hill Frank Meszas James Bennett Leonard Silas Johnny' Zamilla James Woolf Edward Langille J. S. Flinchpaugh Don Winebrenner David Kermeen Charles Breedlove Albert Wright Andrew Ely George Kraft James McGee Robert Salerno Robert Ballard Hugh Peddy Robert Mohr Samuel Bailey Charles Stouffer Robert 'McDonald Glenn Reynolds fra' -- - ' f 4 5' ff . ALL., -....,, ,. -, VI I0fl N Division Harry Payne Gilbert Packert Thomas Maclntyre james Hueber Richard David UDT No.2l H Division fd' B R. HAMLIN, PH1 ----- T, J, C T Ana So :mo The Pages Of lHisiory.., When we left Norfolk in Novemberfew of us knew What the r1eXfSiX months would bring. None making the cruise for the first time could visualize the intricacies and tropical beauty of the Panama Canal, the "unhealthy" atmos- phere provided bythe "shellbacks" when we crossed the equator, nor the utter solemnity ofthatSouth Pacific island known as New Zealand. Few knew the breathtaking chill which accompanied the first sight of Antarctica's weird yet uncomparable white mountain cliffs iagged with iCe Gnd SHOW- Nor COUld we forget the stilling danger of the frozen continent's formidable force which gave a resounding birth to our "Happy New Year" of T957. There were the long hours of work involved in building Adare Station at Cape Hallett and Wilkes Station on Knox Coast, and the feeling of accomp- lishment when the work was done. There was the wonderful liberty in metro- politan Sydney, and the most welcome pause in provincial Melbourne and scenic-clouded Cape Town during the long iourney home. ' None wi.ll forget the many hours spent on watch, nor the nightly movies which brought mixed emotions on a moonlit night above the deep oceans. Then, there was our beloved homeland that 'captured us all as April waned and the Arneb steamed into familiar Norfolk, completing a 3l,47O-mile, 176-day iourney around the world. Memories are made of this --- and they will last a lifetime for most of us. On a cold winter's night in future years we'll think back on Panama, New Zealand, Antarctica, Australia, the Cape of Good Hope and the three maior olpceans ofthe world --- and witha thoughtful pause be able to say, "We were t ere". ' N TI-Ili s'rArr OFFICER ADVISER D. J. KREJCAREK, LT., usN EDITOR """"" ASST. EDITOR R C. LUNDQUIST, JO3 R. 5, PHOTOGRAPHIC CONTRIBUTORS ' ART WORK vv. L. cREMElux, SA 'Ttt gg - COVER DESIGN - LT ligl R. R. GRIFFITH HRECKENGOST, SM 3 Published by Tiffany Publishing Co. Colley and Westover, Norfolk, Va. . ---- OLLINS, PH1 ----- R. C. LUNDQUIST, Jos . ' ' -'TIT' -.. . - 19,0 , I " x"'T""--1--K-..,,-M ik P- " ' 1 , "'-2-1 :f,.-4 - ,,, xv' , N X 'V N N 5 "J" 111- ,16 5 W -Y Y V - . K ' ' ",-, f, ' -Y 4 D . ' V I - ,3 f ' -I ' ""' "-fig ,, . ' - X , 1 ' 1 1 'fy rfeffig, ,-,-A Q , ,, . N ' f . -J: gg ayjfg , 5 FV: . 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V . 1 - 1' W . .- ' ff' ' Books mu ' 4 K st be 'ret - Q l 7 1 4 I, , , 1 nth. wrned or 'renewed , . , - , f , I un an two weeks , X 1 1 , A . ' I ' r 7 X f A .11 ' H 'A 'J Q -'IL 4 -Lv":- , ,w 1 "A 'r' X ff! ' ' . .. X in Y. A1 ,1 I- U I, . , ', In ', ' 1 N' f , -1 N LIBRARY B EA .N X b ' UR U CAT. NO. H613 , A,! X v I MM A . , . 5,5 ' '- - - : 1,-,-1----, Y-:,- xr an K ul Q - A J " 'L'N'L'-ifxizi-g:fTl,,,.QQf, 'f'f""'f'Tf'f--H---WP---FA., N f " 'Y-ff?f-er:f2:.lLi?s 1' L' 71,7 ' V' . 1 fffUafQ:U 6 , , , , - - ,, " ,, . . t - , ' ,. x ..w 4 nl"-.el SSPSYIN ff"-A---1-fiFff212f'i'4:ff'5,iiL'+ 123:17 fsiwafrgae-s':+fv,-19.-c2gf.Q:.sae.erf - f fismbw. . ,V - ..- . . . Z . - ..ZHL .,,b L.- '15..,':?.W-.. T 1 it g Q 9 0 ELLNI VNU ElNI'IEI.LVG 'IVNOLL I V X X X h,4.. SOUTH A 7 "vv'tv , -Z Sb NDRTHXAMERICA Suv' . 1PANAMA EQUA 'ron -,- . s .. ., , , PACIFIC , A'1!Y"T-S-Y- ZIP L. ' A 41 1 ' 3. uv A. '?ww" MILES 1779 45 6550 1 779 1 451 451 451 2517 2531 592 7048 6890


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