Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS)

 - Class of 1935

Page 1 of 98

 

Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 98 of the 1935 volume:

A 1 l 1 ' "▼ : b r GEN. 373 M679 1935 ' The mirror MID-CONTINENT PUBLIC LIBRARY Genealogy Local History Branch 317 W. Highway 24 Independence, MO 64050' |r1 iU ) - ■ '} r ' JJ A- 1$ yjtuj-jff’ r yv Xv inLr AcnXs %M _ ... _....................__ 6 X X 7 -vV Vr A' , J Le J 4 ■ 4 .(i AJLc+a -____ " '''i 57 c - ' v i2» _ Lo-o-y % - f I__|E HAS achieved success who has - • 1 lived well, laughed often and lov- 1 ed much; who has gained the respect 4'd-W'W of intelligent men and the love of little V) C ' children; who has filled his niche and L Y V accomplished his task; who has left the CcX world better than he found it, whether 0- by an improved poppy, a perfect poem v f () or a rescued soul; who has never lack- %l ed appreciation of earth's beauty or failed to express it; who has looked for the best in others, and given the best he had; whose life was an inspiration,- whose memory is a benediction. —Mrs. A. J. Stanley. £. T A CHALLENGE » » » S Ml TOU? h. EDITOR Analee Hill BUSINESS MANAGER Erie VolkUnd PHOTOGRAPHS Cornish Studio ENGRAVINGS Mid-Continent Engraving Co PRINTER High School PressPublished at the Arkansas City High School ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS By the SENIORS of 1935 DONATED BY CLIFFORD LOVE OCTOBER 2003 p’ QJ MID-CONTINENT PUBLIC LIBRARY 3 0000 12458917 1 MID-CONTINENT PUBLIC LIBRARY Genealogy Local History Branchy 317 W. Highway 24 Independence, MO 64050 VV £ WHO march triumphantly along, VV carrying with us the ideals of our school, challenge you who come after us to perpetuate the spirit of A. C. H. S., to uphold its traditions, and to honor and respect its principles. As we march o,ut into life, there is so much to do and learn in so little time. The memory of school days is ever a sacred one, a symbol to lead us to victory in life's battles and keep us unconquered in defeat. If this Mirror brightens your future with memories of the happy and profitable days spent in preparation for life and encourages you with reflections of your school spirit, associations, activities, happy hours and the proud achievements of the students of Arkansas City High School, it will have accomplished the ambition of the 1935 Mirror staff.CUDf mmw Tuhior OftLfSP t PUT THIS TM£ curr vmciM' MO -« f VOX lit MfKMId Hyrjrv 'C 'ill1 ftllounvfl ( Rurn M|H( 5t rK£ Y GOOtMNtf A» k M LCnEKT DOUBLETM 5 HI A i '.JUNIOR 5HfA Iwt" r« »irMR— IM M0T t 0 MCio‘ bvflKp KKCt,t vd 2 8«iA niL PufciA WOULD YOU LIK( TO TA (i Gfo«f r«y, —ITS wmy SIMPLE ’ HOYT C.PJPE- fv se t-TTviHa j cAil HNRDi, IS AY LIN£-0: ,7ohv M •»SCij2- n fROCKED I CRADIF C RICMLI AAVRlCIA s-vJ|ORTON. I l'»ACH soot foil |T«ir5f COtLfCf l »tow ni. Gtf, J'm Gent iG Nopucr fast KLITH CURfA AN S SontTtfiNC-’ WRWG VvITm - 1 ? KIN NAM ON ? yJP' r° NO A THOVSM! £««s no f [no, no. a .. r 1 ° L'•. A nor f N r 5 (t- V Li ThWT TACK '.mat. tnuFouiSr r’n STYHIFD roy n V ILS on 'OeBMt ' T LAM PRACTICING , «KtW»U R ncmt 5WKMIT DIDN’T V 1 . say i hapdaN , BARRYnORt V PROF Uf — 2 JUST ASYFO WHAY '•"1 tmiS iSrttr in 'SA you 7 HO UGHTj Coooic! gooou vO A noon m If » St « pa'- S. Ao LMI H ! J OVIT S. BUY'mo yOKF. " 00 5 F and gpt N y GlGOU« 'WllCRf I nno'f A' lll - HOW ‘- VlL ALICE yjrTPav - I poor thing i its seen itg fifsr I NIGHTG------- W DwarTd 1 ' i kelleher. DONALD k fATSG'L ITS TAKE. HIM TO THE C LEAN BOYS , y p ycK walk p hoSS- -J tCgo rwv J wEre cot" r ( ON Y Jt MAC£ AJ« vApo nc- i r , M CN'y£Z rl MMVC- up |v? ONNA. A5 'm TO 'PAY nt YHt VWW INSTEAD oe By f r'1 -THfc 6AM£ , V £ » 'N s 50 ML OME SAY TWAr STMS S FfLL ON AlAEJM ,OR s £y go you "L. AR CITY-'—' • b AK R| h s Athrovjoh j N'-sthat umi : mn'v . , jACKIEq' IRA FILLER W K AHDIKiON 4flU5 NfW10M ' .FOR A ROW V' ANP Kf FPS AGOIHC ON tlKi AN ? I»AY Kcuock y GOING JO __Rai n .- y Tcm 4 THfY t OornG TWf w GOOD Ot' PULMAV Srw»? AN' RlDIHC OVCR ' pHfM l.lKL AH, ' -2 pp£K bERThS r4, « W'V PAUL. Qv n, ' 75 TH£K£ ►A OOCTOK IN THE . C ? 0|r7 -) ifVior, r0N $«1ATOP ROW. Loft to right: Donald Chandler. Billy Hendryx, Norman Evans. Gail Harden. Donald Beatson, Thcron Harmon. Douglnx Thompson. Kenneth Steele. John Tyler, Myron Webb, Glen Montague. THIRD ROW James Gibson. Vernon Moffltt. Warren Putnam. Charles Allard. R. B. Quinn, Ross Conrad, Victor Bryant, Howard Knglcman. Miss Edna Wheatley. SECOND ROW: Dorothy Winslow, Lois Jean Burks. Margaret Pickett, Captola Shelhamer. Madeline Miller, Ina Southern. Maxine Palmer. Kathleen Thomas. FIRST ROW: Martha J. McCall. Virginia Day. Hampton Barton. Lorene Myers, Alice Newman. Victor Gillespie, Analee Hill. Student Politics Through the organization of the Student Council, the government of the school was effectively carried on during the 1934-35 school year. At the regular fall elections, Hampton Barton, senior, was chosen president of the council by a vote of the entire student body. The members of the organization elected as their president pro-tem Victor Gillespie, and as their secretary for the first semester, Lorene Myers, and for the second semester, Virginia Day. Every organization considered worthy of representation in the government of the school is given equal recognition in the Student Council whose sponsors are Misses Edna Wheatley and Catharine Dean. Membership in the organization is for both semesters. Each year the Student Council choses one project as its main occupation for the year. This year the high school organization cooperated with that of the junior college to work out an effective means of eliminating the traffic conjestion in front of the high school, planning for a junior police force. Donald Evans was elected head inspector from the high school. Other high school patrolmen were Victor Gillespie, Bruce Reid. Richard Colopy, Edwin Maier, and Wayne Thomas. Edna Wheatley, A. B., A. M„ English instructor, head sponsor of the Student Council, and the social committee of the Girl Reserves is a peppy, sincere, person who makes the members of the Student Council feel their responsibilities. The entertainments which the social committee plans such as the Dad-Daughter Feed, the Mother-Daughter Banquet, and the Children’s Christmas party, always have that added bit of ingenuity which only Miss Wheatley can supply. The Student Council is greatly aided by the ability of Miss Wheatley to engineer the work of the orginization so that many projects are completed and many achievements are made. Picnics with Miss Wheatley are a real treat. She cooperates willingly and is always ready to enter into the spirit of a fun making group. 1'AGE ! Administration WITH splendid cooperation, the Board of Education effectively administered the business of the Arkansas City school system during the 1934-35 school year. At its monthly meetings under the direction of Dr. L. E. Brenz, president, problems arising before the board were dealt with and plans were carried out. Dr. Brenz has been president of the school board for eight years ar.d a member since 1921. Supt. St John who for years has been the executive head of the entire Arkansas City school system, helps to formulate our educational ideals and policies. This year’s successful coronation of the Ark-alalah queen was credited to the city schools under the management of Mr. St. John. Mrs. Lillian Adams, his secretary, while she is not so well-known in the high school, quietly and efficiently handles the secretarial work. The many responsiblitics and honors of the school are bestowed upon the man who is most capable of handling all executive duties which a successful school year demands. That man is E. A. Funk, high school principal and Junior College dean. Mr. Funk is a jovial, smiling friend to every member of the student body and spends his time quietly assisting in the undertakings of not only the different school organizations but also of each individual. He is never too busy, with all his duties, to help some student solve a personal problem. Miss Katherine Getter his secretary, amiable passes out advice and slips to the students. Heading from left to right: Supt. C. E. St. John. D. R. C. Young. C. C. Holmsten, Dr. L. M. Beatson. Dr. L. E. Ilrcn h. W. Earloughcr. Guy L. Eercyu. R. C. Sow Jen. E ..I. Barnard. BRIN. li. A. FUNK MISS KATHERINE GETTER SUI'T. C. E. ST- JOHN PAGE 10Class of 35 PRESIDENT— Jack Axley, College Prep. Whether in the classroom or presiding during the senior class meetings, Jack more than showed his efficient leadership. VICE PRESIDENT— Eleanor Stanton, College Prep. Eleanor has certainly added that necessary “something" to make the office of vice-president more than a minor one. SECRETARY— Harry Colopy, College Prep. In a quiet and dignified manner, Harry has proved an outstanding and able secretary. STUDENT COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVE— Kathleen Thomas, College Prep. The senior class found an excellent representative in Kathleen. WITH plenty of school spirit the senior class has upheld the ideals of the Arkansas City High School during the year 1934-35. Not only have the students taken part in the various activities, but have also tried to set a worthy example for the underclassmen. Those seniors who did not distinguish themselves as leaders were all recognized as good followers, willing to cooperate in every project. On the eve of graduation, approximately 185 students will receive their certificates and end their high school careers, leaving behind them a record that will linger in the annals of the school's history for years to come. ■ Senior sponsors are A. E. Maag, head sponsor, Miss Inez Johnson, Miss Gaye Iden, Miss Beryl Harbaugh, Miss Helen Silverwood, and J. D. Davis. Miss Inez Johnson, A. B., A. M., is the teacher of senior English. Much to the pleasure of classes, she punctuates their study of English literature with tales of her trip to Europe several y9ars ago. Miss Johnson, who is a sponsor of the senior class, is a wide reader and willingly advises her students in their choice of reading matter. Miss Gaye Iden, B. S., who teaches physics, is one of the best-loved teachers in the high school. Witty and sweet, Miss Iden makes a difficult subject interesting. As a senior sponsor, she quietly helps the class to do its best. Miss Beryl Harbaugh, B. S., who teaches Spanish, is one of the school's most popular teachers. She is an active sponsor of the senior class, having had charge of the class jewelry and announcements. .Members of the senior council who selected the enior rings, announcements, and carried on the eneral business of the class were Harry Colopy, athleen Thomas, Ina Southern, Eleanor Stanton, onald Beats on, Roberta Bowen, Bill Farrar, ick Axley, and Helen Focht. PAGE 11PAGE 12 Class of LOUKLLA ADKINS General Quiet and friendly JACK ALLEN General A pleasant smile FERRELL ANDERSON Col. Prop Happy-go-lucky VINA HAIR General Reserved and nice MABLE BAIRD General Cute and mischievous LORA HARINGER—Commercial Helpful and friendly HAMPTON BARTON Industrial First class leader ROBERT BARTON -Industrial Short and dark DONALD BEATSON Col. Prep Wise, witty, willing HELEN BECK -Commercial Small but mighty MARTHA BEEKMAN College Prep Cheerful nnd peppy RALPH BEEKMAN General Serious and silent HENRY BERNARD College Prep Unassuming and nonchnlant HAROLD BINFORD College Prep Friendly, polite, pleasing NADINE BLACKWELL—Col. Prep Tall and courteousClass of '35 ROBERTA BOWEN- -College Prep Personality plus KENNETH BOWMAN Industrial Reserved and neat MARION BOWMAN Industrial Industrious and capable MARVIN BRADBURY—Industrial Able and energetic HAROLD BRATCHES Industrial Slender, athletic, quiet HELEN BREEDEN Com. Ever gracious HELEN BREWSTER—General Pleasing and kind LUCILLE BROOKS College Prep Gracious in manner BERNIECE BROWNE—Col. Prep Vim. vigor, vitality CARL BROWN Industrial Quiet but progressive EARLE BROWN College Prep Courteous and industrious ALICE BRYAN General Neat not gaudy MABLE BUECHNER -General Our lady printer ARLENE BURNETT Commercial Gentle and true ERMAL BURNETT—College Prep Fair and sweet PAGE 13Class of '35 MARGARET BURNETT Industrial Still water run deep JOHN BURTON—College Prep What a romeo KENNETH BUZZI—Industrial He walks unconquered ALBERT COULSON General Tall and southern DALE CROUCH General Good-looking chap KENNETH CURFMAN—Col. Prep. An energetic leader MARY CAINE College Prep. An artist plus EVA MAE CARMENS Col. Prep. Always willing HAROLD CARMICHAEL Industrial Strong ill will ERNESTINE CHAMBERS General Laughing is irreslstable DON CHANDLER— Industrial Brevity is wit ROBKRTHA CLACK College Prep. Says little thinks much I.OKEN CONRAD General Courteous and pleasant RICHARD BUZZI Cc»:ego Prep. A reason for everything MABLE COOK Commercial Accurate, capable, successful PAGE Mjag.; .5 of 35 dSS DELORES DAVIS—Collette Prep Pretty and sweet EARL DAVIS Industrial Quiet and thoughtful KENNETH DORAMUS— Indus. Grown-up, yet smnll HELEN EASTERDAY General Wise and gay DONALD EVANS—Industrial Athletic, peppy, dependable NORMAN EVANS—College Prep Smart, studious, happy RILL FARRAR College Prep Popular, yet modest JAMES FINNEY—Industrial Quiet and obliging LEORA FISKE—Industrial Studious, pleasing, courteous JAUNITA FOUNTAIN—Commercial Helpful, sedate, accurate CARRIE FRARY—General Rythmic as her name LcMOYNE FREEMAN -Indus. Rlond and unassuming LURA FITZGERALD-College Prep. Colorful and pretty RUBY FLEMING-General Healthy, wise, happy HELEN FOCHT College Prep. Brilliant and prominent PAGE 16 Class of '35 MAXINE GARRISON General Polite, pretty, peppy HELEN GEPHARDT—General Dependable and Industrious HOOVER GIBSON—Collette Prep Stop! I-ook ! Listen ! HUGH GILLESPIE—Industrial Strong, silent, sleepy VICTOR GILLESPIE—Industrial Fast at football WILLIE GILLILAND -Commercial Cute nnd bashful ILABELLE GILLOCK College Prep A curly-headed doll KDYTHE GILMORE College Prep Calm, nnd sedate HERBERT GLASGOW -Industrial Reserved nnd serious BARBARA GLATFELDER College Prep Pretty, witty, wise MARION GOEHRING—College Prep Ready to serve JAMES GOULD College Prep Full of fun RUTH GOULDEN—Commercial A pound o’ pep MELVIN HAINES Industrial A willing helper ROSE HAM ILTON—College Prep Sweet and popularClass of 35 ROLAND HAMM -Industrial A good follower PATRICK HARDER -Industrial Witty, sagacious, gay CLOVIS HARGER—Industrial Likable and quiet BERNICE HARGROVE General Obliging and helpful HARRY HARLOWE General My speciality-smiles THKRON HARMON College Prep Spice of the class AUBREY HARP College Prep Talented and capable MARY HARVEY College Prep An ambitious poet MILDRED HAYS College Prep Amiable and dependable VIRGINIA HBUSZEL—College Prep Nice and reliable HELEN HICHT General Clever and cute ANAI.EE HILL College Prep An all-round girl RICHARD F. HOWARD College Prep Humorous and witty JEAN HOWES Collette Prep Sweet and lovely RUTH HUGHES—College Prep Kind and considerateof 35 Cl ass rKELMA HYI.TON Commercial Petite and demure MARIE JACKSON General Sweet, tactful, attractive ROSS KINNAMON College Prei An intelligent student ADA KIZER—General Courteous and friendly RUTH KNEDLER College Prep An All-American Girl MAE EVELYN KUHN Com Amiable and attractive IDA MAP: LAMEY—General Dependable and friendly LUCILLE LAMEY General Reliable and courteous ROBERT LEACH College Prep A gallant, likable chap ROBERT LEFLER Collette Prep Popular and cheerful RUTH LEMERT Commercial Vivacious and tray ELSIE LININGER General Skillful and ttraceful CLARENCE LOCK Commercial Quiet and industrious BILL I.OHMAN -General Sportive and entertainintr WILLETTA M. LONG Com Sincere and impartial PAGE ISof '35 Cl dSS ERMA GENE McCAMMON -College Prep Alert and active FORREST McDANIEL Collette Prep Modest but enthusiastic MARY G. McDONOUGH— Col. Prep Talented and ttraceful DOROTHY McGEE General Reserved and neat MARY EMMA McGUAIRK Collette Prep Cheerful, friendly, interesting JUNK McMICHAEL Pretty and sparklintt ELIZABETH MEEK Loyal and true Collette Prep JACK MENISH—Collette Prep Gay. happy, quick LeROY MILLER—Collette Prep Modest, unassuming cheerful LYNN MILLER— Industrious and pleasintt VIVIAN MOFFITT General Quiet and chnrmintt NORA MORLAN—Commercial Willintr an«I sweet PAGE 11) SAMUEL MAIER—Collette Prep Leadership with character HELEN BETTY MARTIN -Collette Prep Cute and chnrmintt BILL MASTIN—Collette Prep Athletic and vigorous Gass of '35 MARJORIE MOYER—Commercial Demure and sweet BUD MUSSON—Industrial Helpful and happy VIRGINIA MUSSON Col. Prep. Quiet ns a mouse I.ORKNE MYERS -Collette Prep A peppy beauty DONAI.D NADEN General Gobs of fun MARCIA NANCE Commercial Always reliable CLYDE NEWMAN Colletro Prep A real ttentlcman LOU BELLE NEWMAN- Collette Prep Popular drum major MAURICIA NORTON Col. Prep A loquacious lady ANITA PACK -Collette Prep Pretty and plea3intt BEATRICE PALMER Collette Prep. Calm and courteous MAXINE PALMER -Collette Prep Amiable nnd nice PAGE 20 LUTHER PARMAN—Collette Prep. Baiter for knowledge LOUISE PFISTERER Collette Prep Friendly and pretty BEULAH POINTER Com. Small and quietof 35 Cl ass WARREN PUTNAM—College Prep Here, there, everywhere R. I?. QUINN- -Collette Prep. Happy-go-lucky ERN ESTINE REED—Commercial Dependable and quiet SARA REEDER Commercial A peppy red-head GEORGE REYNOLDS—Col. Prep Studious and musical HUGH ROBERSON—Industrial Quietly willing ROBERT RYMAN—Industrial Another future farmer PRANCES SANDEFUR—College Prep Ready for service CARI, SCHLECHT- Commercial Oddly wise LEON SCHUESSLER—Industrial Smiles day and night JOE SCHWARTZ Commercial A Brilliant mind EDITH SCOTT—General Mischief in those eyes PAGE 21 ALBERT SCRUTON -General Sensible and reserved ROBERT SCRUTON -General Genial and good humored KAREN NAI)A SEAL—Com. Ready for funClass of '35 MARGARET SEAL— General Blue eyed blond JULIA SHEA College Prep Loyal to friends WILLIAM SHERWOOD -Col. Prep Short and courteous EDGAR SMITH Industrial A friendly chap FRANCES SMITH Commercial Prompt and pleasing JUNIOR SMITH—General Little Beau Brummel MARY PRANCES SMITH— College Prep Willirig and dear INA SOUTHERN College Prop Reliable and sincere AMELIA SNYDER Commercial Plenty of pep CAROLINE S0MERF1ELD College Prep A dependable helper GLADYS SPROWLS General Quietly lovely MAXINE STARKEY Col. Prep Cute and snappy WINIFRED STEVENS General Out for fun FAYE STOKES General Sweet and gracious DOROTHY TOMLINSON- Gen. Willing to serve PAGE 22I’AGE Class of 35 NORMAN TERNARY Commercial Calm ami reserved SPENCER TURNER—Col. Prep He nets there OPAL UTSLER—College Prep Calm and sweet ERLE VOLK LAND—College Prep Tall and good-looking RUTH WAHLENMAIER Gen. A gentle lady HUGH WAHLER— Industrial Pacing life squarely DORIS WALES College Prep Gracious, dependable, sincere WESLEY WALLING -General . An excellent student HELEN WARD College Prep A pleasant person MYRON WEBB -College Quiet but wise DONALD WILKERS—Industrial Tall, dark, handsome DOROTHY WINSLOW Industrial A Dot with dash JULIA WORDLOW College Prep A good worker BETTY TOWNSLEY -College Prep Athletic and peppy Prep JUNIOR YOUNG General Polite and well-dressedMemories ■ On Old A. C. On old A. C., on old A. C. Purple and the gold Take the ball away from . Victories as of old. On old A. C., on old A. C. Fight on for our fame Fight!, fellows fight! And we will win this game. ■ Bulldogs Tear! Bulldogs tear! Bulldogs bite! A. C. High School Fight! Fight! Fight! ■ Go. You Ark City (To the tune of “Go, U Northwestern”) Go, you Ark City, break right through that line. With all your colors flying, we will cheer you all the time, % U rah! rah! Go you Ark City, fight for victory Spread far the fame of our fair name, Go, Ark City, win that game! (Whistle) Go, Ark City, Go! (Whistle) Go, Ark City, Go Hit ’em hard, Hit ’em low! Go, Ark City, Go Go you Ark City, break right through that line, ’ With your colors flying, we will cheer you all the time, U rah! rah! Go you Ark City, fight for victory Spread far the fame of our fair name Go, Ark City, win that game! ■ Who’s Going To Win This Game? Cheer leader: “Who’s going to win this game? Crowd: “A. C.!” - Ch. L.: “Who?” Crowd: “A. C.!” Ch. L.: “Who’s A. C.?” Crowd: “A-R-K C-I-T-Y! That’s the way to spell it! That’s the way to yell it! Ark City!” ■ A. C. will shine A. C. will shine tonight A. C. will shine, A. C. will shine tonight, all down th- line. A. C. will shine tonight, A. C. will shine When the game is o'er and they count the score A. C. will shine. 8 Locomotive Fight, fight, fight, fight, On old A. C.! Fight, fight, fight, fight, On old A. C.! Fight, fight, fight, fight, On old A. C.! On old A. C.! On old A. C.! Go.! a Yea, Team, Fight! (Slowly) Yea, team, fight! Yea, team, fight! Yea, team, fight! Fight! Fight! Fight! ■ Ella Rah Ella rah! Ella rah! Ella rah! Rah! Rah! U-Yah! U-Yah! A. C. High School! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! U-Yah! U-Yah! A. C. High School! Rah! Rah! Rah! ■ Sky Rocket (Loud Whistle) .... BOOM! Rah! A. C.! ■ For an Individual Yea,............ Yea,____________ Yea,............ (Loud Yell) ■ Recipe for a Successful Game Take 185 seniors, 222 juniors, and 272 sophomores. Place in a grandstand or gym, with three cheer leaders placed in front. Stir with some yells, add purple and gold colors, and mix a lot of pep. Then place football or basketball team on the court or field. When at point of score let the students cheer the players. Cover with victory at the end of the game. PAGE 24The Purple and the Gold tr glo rled In tho pur-plc and I. A C High has ever 2- Dur ing gi long years of High School 3- When our So.nool Dayo all aro ov- er the Gold We learn our lee eono well And we labor In the world m t r ■iM=? - I--M— P- M ►— B -----—--b—--r —--- And Her lan-nere ev-er wov-er. In the oky the col-ore Bold But on the .field of Bat-tie, We cer- tain-ly can yell. Our A. C. H. S. Ban-nero In Our hearte are er- er furled. try jiiL-rir f j For we win all Jcinde of Tie- toriee in foot-ball and do- bate And our ehoute are e’er U-nlt-ed, with ech-oeo fron of Old. And there’s nor- er sigh or ead-neea When w turn to aeaorlca old ---------------- . T1------ In bae- ket boll no bet-ter can be found In all the state Till the town re-sounds with glor-leo of the pur-ple and the Gold. Ar.d re- new thoee days of glad-nese ’neath the purple and the Gold, i i i___.___i____, —I----- PAGE 25UPPER PANEL------- GROUP. LEFT TO RIGHT: Roberta Bowen. Doris Wales. Julia Shea. Elizabeth Meek. Nora Morlnn, Jeanne Belt. Cnptoln Shelhamcr. Madeline Miller. Kathleen Thomas, Ruth Kncdlcr, Lu-cilio Brooks. Ilnbellc Gillock. UPPER LEFT: Miss Helen Silverwood. UPPER RIGHT: Miss Lillie Nemccheck. LOWER PANEL-------- TOP ROW. LEFT TO RIGHT Edwin Maier. Kenneth Curfrnan, Victor Bryant. Wayne Thomas, Keith Ctirfman. SECOND ROW John Warren. Cole Dailey. Dick Howard. Jack Axlcy, R. B. Quinn. Donald Beatson. FIRST ROW: Everett Garner. E. H. Piper. Sant Maier. J. Kelsey Day. Warren Putnam. LOWER RIGHT: Sam Maier. president of the Hi Y Roberta Bowen, president of the G. R. E. H. Piper, head sponsor of the Hi-Y PAGE 26Ark Light Press Staff » » » Editorial Staff UPPER PANEL - TOP ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT Harold E. Gish, Reid Holcomb, Forrest Wollurd, Paul Marshall, Douglas Thompson, Robert Ryman, Larnard Raker, Harold Magnus. SECOND ROW Melvin Haines. Patrick Harder, Hugh Roberson, Willy Jack, Jack Maze, Marion Bowman, J. G. Voskuhl, Raymond Custer, Ross Turner. FIRST ROW George Pitts, Leon Scott, Jack Rector, Alvin Scott, Hugh Wahler. Frank Henderson. Virgil Smith, Harold Bratchcs. LOWER PANEL-------- TOP ROW. LEFT TO RIGHT: Hob Letter, Jack Axley. Warren Putnam, Bill Farrar. Harold Bratchcs, P. M. Johnson, advisor. SECOND ROW: Analec Hill, Caroline Somerfield. Theron Harmon, Mary Caine, Eleanor Stanton, Ruth Knodler, Dick Howard, Donald Beatson, Helen Betty Martin. FIRST ROW: Helen Ward. Elizabeth Meek. Marion Goehring, Elsie Liningcr, Inn Southern. Helen Focht. PAGE 27The Blue Triangle “I will follow the blue triangle God’s purpose in life, my quest Through body, mind, and spirit . I will find and give the best.” THIS was the purpose of the Girl Reserve organization for this year, and each girl did her best to live up to it. The symbol for the club was “Knights of the Blue Triangle.” Officers were Roberta Bowen, president; Doris Wales, vice-president; Ilabcllc Gilloek, treasurer; Nora' Morlan, secretary;, and Madeline Miller, Student Council representative. The Cabinet consisted of officers and chairmen of%the various committees. Committee chairmen were membership, Doris Wales; program, Lucille Brooks; publicity, Elizabeth Meek; social, Ruth Knedler; service, Kathleen Thomas; finance, Julia Shea; music, Captola Shelhamer; and ath-'letic, Jeanne Belt. During the year many interesting, entertaining and helpful projects were carried out. A few of the highlights of the year were the “get-acquainted” party, the mother-daughter tea, barrels for the needy, the poor children’s party, community week, the dad-daughter feed, and the mother-daughter banquet. ■ Miss Olive Ramage, A. B., who teaches world history, is the sponsor of the Girl Reserve service committee and the junior class. She gives freely of her store of knowledge to h 5r students and makes her classes more interesting by allowing the students to make special reports on subjects of current interest. Miss Ramage is a quiet, dignified woman who aids the service committee to be a benefit to the whole school. Her ideas for the G. R. yearbook are clever and useful to the committee. ■ As a Girl Reserve I will try to be: Gracious in manner Impartial in judgment Ready for service . Loyal to friends Reaching toward the best Earnest in purpose ., Seeing the beautiful Eager for knowledge Reverent toward God Victorious over self Ever dependable Sincere at all times ■ Helen Silvcnvood, A. B., Latin instructor, is thd head sponsor of the Girl Reserve club and on the board of sponsors of the senior class. Tall, dark, always well-groomed, Miss Silverwood is athletically-minded. She plays a fine game of golf and equally as good a set of tennis. Although the fact is not widely known, she is also an excellent pianist! Throughout the World ■ The purpose of the Hi-Y one of the school’s two Christian organizations, is “to create, maintain and extend throughout the school and community high standards of Christian character.” Every effort has been' mads on the part of the Hi-Y to carry out this purpose. The Hi-Y this year carried on several projects in Jeague with the Girl Reserves for the benefit of the whole schoql. The two organizations sponsored a “Week of Prayer” in the fall, and as in past years, managed the lycoum course presented for the entire student body. Business of the Hi-Y was carried on by a cabinet of representative members which met every Tuesday night at the Y. M. C. A. Sponsors of the club were Hoyt E. Piper and J. Kelsey Day. • Samuel Maier, was president; Victor Bryant, vice president; Ross Kinnamon, secretary; Jay Ruckcl, treasurer; and Warren Putnam, Student Council representative qf the club this year. ■ Miss Lillie Nemecheck, B. S., teaches geometry, algebra, and English. She takes a personal x interest in each student with whom she comes in contact and is a favorite with the sophomores. A sponsor of the sophomore class and of the Girl Reserve finance committee, she is always a willing and able helper. H Hoyt Piper, A. B., instructor of mathematics, with his geniality and friendliness makes a course in mathematics almost enjoyable. The subject loses many of its difficulties if it is explained as thoroughly as Mr. Piper explains it. His classed are made still more interesting by his subtle wit and pleasant personality. PAGE 28■ Paul M. Johnson, B. S., is instructor in journalism, history, sociology, and economics. He is a tall, lanky person with a beaming smile, and a friend of all the students. He is known for his ability to get the work out of his students and make them like it. Anything Mr. Johnson does, he does whole-heartedly and expects all other participants to do likewise. His journalism staff is especially fond of him, because of his understanding of their problems and his ready help. News Hounds EVERY two weeks the Ark Light has brought the news of the school to the students, faculty, and townspeople. It has gained international recognition, and last year was selected Pacemaker, one of sixteen papers in the United States to receive the honor. For the past five years it has been ranked All-American, and for two years it has been given International Honor rating by Quill and Scroll society. Major members of the staff were Editorial Board—Dick Howard, Ina Southern, Marion Goehring Sports Editor ......... Theron Harmon Business Manager........ . Bill Farrar Advertising Manager .... Harold Bratches Those juniors who entered journalism at midterm, the “cubs”, were Sara Stanley, Virginia Day, Dick A. Howard, Duane Grill, and Virgil Smith. They will form the nucleus of the 1936 staff. » ■ According to all reports, the eight journalists who attended the National Scholastic Press Association Convention in Kansas City, October 11, 12, 13, besides learning a lot, had a grand time. Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Johnson acted as chaperons to the group, which included Theron Harmon, Dick Howard, Helen Focht, Helen Ward. Analee Hill, Ina Southern, Marion Goehring, Caroline Somerfield, and Mazie Jackson (last year’s editor who went up for one day). They all stopped at the Hotel Kansas Citian. All the girls were in one room, and from what we hear, they’re still wearing each other’s clothes. More than 800 people registered at the convention headquarters in the Kansas City Power and Light Building, the tallest in the state. The thirty-two floors of this massive building revealed a studio for broadcasting television, a tower from which one could get an excellent view of Kansas City, and Thomas A. Edison Hall, in which the students heard well-known speakers, as well as round table discussions. The entire group also took a tour through the Kansas City Star plant. On Friday night the gang from here attended the dance at the Muehlbach Hotel. Saturday noon the Kansas Interscholastic Press Association met •on the roof garden of the Hotel Kansas Citian for a delightful luncheon, at which Paul Johnson presided. This was the only meeting of the entire convention which concerned only Kansas members. Of course, when so many young people get together there are bound to be a number of humorous personal events, such as our illustrous sports editor, “Si,” and Mazie (she just couldn’t miss a convention) running down the Dean Boys to ge an interview and finding they didn’t have a pencil. On the last morning of the convention one of the girls decided she was pretty hungry, so she ordered everything that suited her taste; then, she had.to plead with the others to help her out! Yes, the little journalists went to the big city; and returned home with a lot of ideas for a bigger and better year in journalism. ■ The press staff of the Ark Light is exposed of those boys who take printing and are on the mechanical staff of the paper. It is to the credit of the press staff that the paper has always placed high in the ranks of the newspapers put out by their own presses. Members are Makeup..........George Pitts, Virgil Smith Advertising................Harold Bratches Presswork . Harold Magnus, Hugh Roberson Sterotvping . Forest Wollard, Paul Marshall Linotype Operator . . Melvin Haines, Hugh Wahler, Patrick Harder, J. G. VoskuhJ, Alvin Scott Advertising Compositors ..... Jack Maze, Douglas Thompson, Robert Ryman, Larnard Baker, Leon Scott, Ross Turner, . Marion Bowman, Frank Henderson, Grant Lundy, Raymond Custer, Harry Grainger, Millard White. '» PAGE 20 «Future Farmers « « « Judging Team UPPER PANEL TOP ROW. LEFT TO RIGHT: John Child . James Foster. Lee McKimson, Archie Gnjre. Gene Birdcell. ■ THIRD ROW: Louis Abernathy, Donald .Evans, Dwight Beekelheimer, Donald ChandUr. Kenneth Wales, Clarence Cook. Homer Ritter. ■ ' fi v . SECOND ROW: ' T. C. Fans. Robert Swaim. Delbert Higbee. Hampton. Barton. Edgar Smith, Hugh Gillespie. John Cook. Arthur Rnhn. FIRST ROW: Robert Owen . Carl Blown. Bud Musson, Jack Craig. LOWER PANEL----- FUTURE FARMERS JUDGING TEAM LEFT TO RIGHT: Carl Brown, T. C. Fans. Donald Chandler. Hampton Bnrton. Hugh Gillespie. Bud Musson. PAGE 30V UPPER PANEL TOP ROW. Loft to Right: Harold Hratches. Albert Coulson, Bill Farrar. Rill Lohman Rale Hines, Victor Gillespie. SECOND ROW:. Donald Evans. Alfred Howard. Ferrell Anderson. Chester Steffens, Bruc« Reid. Donald Chandler FIRST ROW: Kenneth Engleman, Mack Gilstrap, Rill Mnstin. Norman Evans, Ira Stiller. George Griffith LOWER PANEL-------- TOP ROW. Left to Right: Howard Clark. Donald Seefeld. George Wah'.enmaicr. Nora Morlan, Maxine Palmer, Catherine Gibson. Rill Farrar. Dorothy Heathman, Rrucc Reid. Jean Howes, Heloiv Focht, David Mitchell, Sam Maier. FIFTH ROW; Roy Worthington, Hugh Roberson, Dick A. Howard. Margaret Dixon. Jerry Christy. Mary McDonough. Hope Day. Margaret Ogren. Eleanor Stanton, Virginia Day. Donald Naden, Muble Raird. I ois Jean Burks,' Spencer Turner. FOURTH ROW; ' Robert Giboney. Dick F. Howard. Luther Pprman. Ermal Rurnett. Edith Scott, Wanda Christy, Kenneth Messner. Raymond Hillings. THIRD ROW: Warren Putnam. Charles . Allard, Jack Horton. Duafle Crill, Marion Gochring.-lA'ty Townsley. Julia Shea. June McMichael, Ruth GouldcrflPAlicc Newman. Roberta Bowen Bud Gould. Leonard Stevenson.« SECOND ROW; Rob McClanahan. Ross Conrad. Charles Darby. Helen Betty Martin, R. B. Quinn, Bernice Bfownc, Mary K. Kuhns, Dorothy Guffey. Lucille Brook . Krtna G. McCammon, Lorene Myers. Martha Beekman. Analee Hill. a FIRST ROW: John Shea. Marjorie Crill. Arlene Case, Bobby Faulconcr. Pauline Turner. Si Harmon. Ruth Lemert. Lura Fitxuerald. Mabel Buechner. Mary Henderson. Dorothy McNair. Sara Reeder. Bobby CJark. Robert Wilson. Ruth Knedler. ✓ PAC?fc :tl r '■ tM T. C. Faris, B. S., instructor of agriculture, is a pleasant, quiet, and refined gentleman. He does much to make agriculture practical as well as interesting, and receives the respect and admiration of his pupils. All students taking agriculture like Mr. Faris for his aid and for his sense of humor. He is advisor of the Future Farmers and gives valuable help to the students in carrying out their agricultural projects. Mr. Faris also takes a leading role in county farm organizations. Farmers of the Future FUTURE Farmers, the school’s only agricultural organization, is composed of boys from vocational agricultural classes of the school, and was created for the purpose of carrying on a local chapter of the Future Farmers of America in the Arkansas City schools. Throughout the year, the organization carried out many varied educational and recreational activities. In the fall there was election of officers, an educational poultry show, the purchase of 220 head of Western ewes, and many similar projects .The F. F. A. was represented at the American Royal livestock show in October by a large number of boys from this group. The group also sent representatives to the state fair. Officers who served in behalf of this organization were Bud Musson, president; Edgar Smith, vice-president; Carl Brown, secretary-treasurer; and Hampton Barton, Ark Light reporter. 'T. C. Faris was coach of the. judging team and advikor for the group. ■ There is a saying that ‘pretty is as pretty doc3’. This explains Miss Virginia Weisgerber, A. B. Her charming personality has made English a most pleasant course to all sophomores and juniors who have been fortunate enough to study un hr her. Miss Weisgerber is head-sponsor of the Honor Society. The simplicity and beauty of the induction services given each year are largely due to her careful planning. Her friendliness, and her lovely smile have endeared her to all. Honors at A. C. HI A chapter of the Quill and Scroll, national honor society for high school journalists, was organized in the high school for the first time six years ago. Its purpose is to encourage and reward individual achievmcnt in journalism and allied fields, and to take a direct part in raising the standards of this field. There arc scholastic as well as journalistic qualities to fulfill and, much like Honor Society, the student must be in the upper third of his class before he may be considered for admittance. Officers chosen by the group were Bill Farrar, president; Ruth Knedler, vice-president; Ina Southern, secretary; Theron Harmon, treasurer; and Analee Hill, reporter. E Based on the four cardinal principles Leadership, Scholarship, Character, and Service, the local chapter of the National Honor Society wa3 founded eleven years ago. Membership to this society is the highest honor that can be conferred on a high school student. To be elegible for election, the student must be in the upper third of his class, must have rendered service to" his school, been honorable in character, and shown ability in leadership. At the beginning of the year, there were only five seniors to carry on the work of the society. Officers for the first semester were Roberta Bowen, president; Ruth Knedler, vice-president; Analee Hill, secretary; Kenneth Curfman, Ark Light reporter; and Myron Webb, Student Council representative. Nine seniors were chosen members the first semester and nine the second semester. Six juniors were elected to form the nucleus of ngxt year’s group. These were Sara Stanley, Virginia Holman, Victor Bryant, Jay Ruckel, Raymond Ausmus, Grace Newman. Officers for the second semester were Lucille Brooks, president; Kathleen Thomas, vice-president; Doris Wales, secretary; and Myron Webb, Student Council representative. PAGE 32Pep for All THE Sportlight Club first met in September to begin its second year as a high school organization. The club was organized in the fall of 1933 by some of the lettermen who felt the need for some type of group for the school’s athletes. At the first meeting, the following officers were elected to serve for the entire year: Donald Evans, president; Bruce Reid, vice-president; Norman Evans, secretary and treasurer; Bill Lohman, sergant at arms; Victor Gillespie, Student Council representative; Harold Bratches, athletic board representative. The Sportlight club was active in all branches of athletics, furnished ushers for all basketball games, and took care of all official jobs in track. ■ As the whistle blew, official Bud Bishop tossed up the ball, for the game of the century (or could it have been one of Eleanor Stanton’s pep chapels? Since El Dorado brought only four men to the game, the Arks consented to put only four men in the game, leaving “Hot Stuff” Curry to warm benches. (He warmed two of them.) It’s the last quarter of the game, folks, and the Bulldogs seem to be winning. It’s Ark City’s ball. The crowd is in an uproar. The boys are playing about under A. C.’s goal; it looks like a basket from “Are-We-Good” Maag, but no, it’s a miss; however “Never-Miss” Nick grabs the ball from the hands of “Hold-That-Man” Davis and sinks a beauty from the center of the field for the Ark’s. Davis and “Puffy” Johnson jump for it, but the ball goes to “Ketchum” Day, who in attempting to pass to “Can-I-Play” Helgeson, loses to Curry of the Ark’s, who has become tired of warming benches. Just as Time-Keeper Funk blows the whistle for the end, Curry sinks another basket, and the score, ladies and gentlemen, is 45-5 in Ark City’s favor. ■ He can talk faster than most people can think. Amos L. Curry, A. B., who teaches social science and the boys’ tennis team, is a favorite with the students. Mr. Curry can make pep speeches that are really peppy, and his mile-a-minute puns are famous; His “A. C. not Hay Seed! Short and snappy now and let me hear you yell it”—that’s tradition. His war experiences are enjoyed by his classes and Mi . Curry is never stingy with them. His classes are inter-. esting and his rapid fire explanations of various parts of history are concise and conclusive. ■ J. Kelsey Day, A. B., teacher of biology and chemistry, is a teacher who all the students know. Head sponsor of the Pep Club, Mr. Day’s famous “Hot dogs, two for fifteen cents” call is heard at all the football games. He willingly gives his time and manages the booth at the games to raise money for the club. Early mornings in fall find Mr. Day out marching with the Pep Club. If they have to get up, he will too. That’s why they like him. He' also is responsible for the beautiful Christmas decorations of the school. ■ An active Pep Club deserved its name from the opening of the football season making uniformity and organization of school pep throughout the school the aim of the club. Requirements for membership are that the member must always wear his bulldog on his sweater, sit with the club at the games, drill at the half on the field, be present at the meetings, and cooperate with the stunt chairman for pep chapels. Bob Lefler was head cheer leader, Jacqueline Burnett, junior cheer leader, and John Shea, sophomore cheer leader. Recognition should also be given Eleanor Stanton for her unusual and clever chapels, one of which is presented on this page. Sponsors of the club are J. Kelsey Day, Miss Ruth Curfman, and Miss Alice Carrow. Officers were Bruce Reid, president; Lorene Alyers, vice president; Ruth Knedler, secretary; R. B. Quinn, Student Council representative; Theron Harmon, finance chairman; and Eleanor Stanton, stunt chairman. . Special mention should also be made of the untiring work of A. E. San Romani, who planned the original drills which the pep club gave. The most intricate of these was the wheel drill in which the pep club and band divided into six groups and performed simultaneously. S Moans and groans filled the air when the Pep Club marched for the Arkalalah parade, but the drillers really did enjoy marching. In the afternoon, the Pep Club and Band gave an exhibition drill and then led the parade down Summit street. When time came for the night parade, everyone was revived and rested. The boys even got up enough energy to try to imitate that high stepping drum major from ??????. After the afternoon parade, the Band and Pep Club were treated to ice cre m bars by Dye and Fesler’s. PAGE 33Scroll Society Quill Honor an d PAGE 34 I.OWKR PANEL-STANDING: Eleanor Stanton, Marlon Goehrinx. Dick F. Howard. Paul M. Johnson, Kill Farrar, Helen Focht, Warren Put-nam, Theron Harmon. Helen Hetty Martin. SITTING: Elizabeth Meek, Ruth Kncdler. Analee Hill. Ina Southern. Helen Ward. Caroline Somerfield. TOP ROW. Left to Rixht: Donald Chan Her. Raymond Auxmu , Warren Putnam. Bill Farrar. Brio Volkland. Victor Kryant. Samuel Ma:er. Helen Focht. Mary Harvey. Kenneth Curfman. SECOND ROW: Ancles Hill, Eleanor Stanton. Ina Southern. Roberta Bowen. Grace Newman. Marion Goehrinx, Norman Evnns. Row Kinnemon. Jaunita Fountain. Julia Shea. FRONT ROW: Ruth Kncdler, Jay Ruckel, Virginia Holman. Kathleen Thomas, Lucille Brook , Dorl Wale . Myron Webb. Sara Stanley, I»oii Belle Newman. UPPER PANEL Class of '36 PRESIDENT Mack Gilstrap—This is Mack’s second year as president of his class. More pu- »r to him. SECRETARY Virginia Holman—Quiet and resourceful, Virginia will continue in leadership as editor of the 1936 Mirror. STUDENT COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVE Gail Harden—Gail very competently handled the business of the junior class in the student council VICE-PRESIDENT Madeline Miller—Madeline was always “near-at hand” to efficiently assist her president. THE senior class will make no error in passing their leadership on to the juniors of this year, for the class is one of exceptional ability, showing itself in many forms. The junior class is a peppy, intelligent group, acting when opportunity presents itself, choosing good leaders who are willing and able, and being good followers, co-operating for the best interests of their class. Holding a few of the more responsible executive positions in the school, the juniors showed excellent judgment in their second year in senior high. WELDON HUNTLEY ETHEL WOLFE EMMA MUCH CARL JACKSON JERRY CHRISTY BUENA PURINTON EMILY J. YOUNT NELLIE McGEE ENNA WORDLOW MERNA WRIGHT JESSIE WRIGHT H The head sponsor of the junior class is Carl Helgeson. Miss Catharine Dean, Mrs. Daisy Hamit, Miss Esther Denton, Miss Grace Pet%, and W. A. Sncllcr are the other sponsors. PAGE 35 Class of '36 LOUIS ABERNATHY HOWARD ALESHIRE EUGENE ALFORD CHARLES ALLARD CARL ALSIP WALTER BISHOP BETTY BRADY JACK BRANUM NINA MAE BRILL BOB BROWN LEO BROWN VIVIAN BROWN VICTOR BRYANT . LOIS BURKS VEDA BURKS JACQUELINE BURNETT BILL BURNS ALBERT CANNON ARLENE CASE HELEN CASEMENT EUNICE CHANDLER GOLDIE CHILDS ROBERT CLARK HOWARD CLARK MILDRED CLEVENGER COLETA CLOSE RICHARD COLOPY WILLIAM COPELAND ROSS CONRAD ALTA COULSON PAGE 30 RAYMOND AUSMUS PAUL BARRINGER OLGA BAYS DOROTHY BAZIL DWIGHT BECK ELH RIMER HELEN BELDEN JEANNE BELT ANGIE BENNETT MARY BIGBEE VIRGINIAI lass of 36 RUBY COUNTS DUANE CRILL CHESTER CROSS RAYMOND CUSTER COLE DAILEY HELEN DORRANCE HOPE DAY VIRGINIA DAY VIRGINIA DEE NEILA BELLE DEMPSEY BILLY DESKINS IRMA DICKEY LA VERN DICKSON MARGARET DIXON CHARLES EATON CARMEN ELLIS BOB ELSTON AUDREY EVANS HAROLD FANNING BOBBY FAULCONER BILLY FERGUSON FRANCES FIELD BETTY FRANKLIN CONRAD GAGE EVERETT GARNER EVANGELINE GEER ROBERT GIBONEY JAMES GIBSON ALICE GILLIG MACK GILSTRAP FLORENCE GOFF LAUREDA GOFF KENNETH GRAVES GEORGE GRIFFITH DEAN GRIM RICHARD HALL JACK HOLLIS GAIL HARDEN MARGARET HARPER VIRGINIA HARRINGTON PAGE 37Class of 36 HAROLD HAYS HELEN HEARD DOROTHY HEATHMAN FRANK HENDERSON RILL HENDKYX DELBERT HIGBEE MADGE HILL DALE HINES NADINE HOLMESX JACK HORTON ALFRED HOWARD DICK A. HOWARD MARY HUGHES WILLIAM JACK JUNE JACOBS MAXINE JAGARS FRANK KAFKA EDWARD KELLEHER LOUISE KEMPER OSCAR KIMMELL FLOYD KIMSEY VERNF.DA KITTRELL DOROTHY KOGER MARY KAY KUHNS ALBERT LAMBERT JAMES LAWRENCE EDNA REPENHAGEN GEORGE LE UNES ALICE LEWIS GEORGE LIND WILMA LININGKR MILDRED LOCK VIVIAN LOGAN R. M. LONG WILL ETTA LONG MARGARET LOWERY GRANT LUNDY LORENE LUPER ROSA LEE LYTLE MABEL MARSHALL PAGE :f«Class of '36 JAMES MATHISMK1KR BETTY MATTHEWS NOBLE MAYHILL MARTHA J. McCALL BOB McCLANAHAN richard McDonough LEONARD McKEEVER JOAN MEEKER MARK MENDENHALL MADELINE MILLER MARIE MILLER MAEDEAN MILLER DAVID MITCHELL VONCILE MITCHELL BOB MOONEY DOROTHY MORRIS DOROTHY MORRISON WILLIE MURPHY ALICE NEWMAN GRACE NEWMAN ALDO ORIN MARIE OZBUN WILLIS PAYTON WORTH PAYTON DOROTHY PROBST MARGARET PICKETT PAUL QUINN MARY JANE RALE CHARLENE RAMEY KEITH RAMEY ROBERT RAMSEY ROSELLA RANSOME BRUCE REID DORIS RICHARDS LOLA RICHARDSON PAULINE ROBERSON LOIS RONSICK JAY RUCKEL VIOLA RYMAN EDIT!! RYMPH PAGE 30 Class of 36 PAGE iO DALLAS WILHELM CLAIRE WILLIAMS DEAN WILLIAMS DICK WILLIAMS WOODROW WILSON ALVIN SCOTT WILMA SCOTT DONALD SEEPELD TRUEL SHAFFER LUCILLE SHARPE CAPTOLA SHELHAMER ESTHER SHOUPE RUTH SIDENER KATHERINE SMALLER CARL WHITE CAROL SMITH VIRGIL SMITH MARGUERITE SPRATT J. A. SPROWLS SARA STANLEY ANNA LEE STOUT BILL STEWART MARY TINSLEY VERLIN TRUEBLOOD ROBERT TRUITT JOHN TYLER LOUISE VANDEVER J. G. VOSKUHL ROYCE WALKER ARNELL WALLACE E WEISBACH VIRGINIA WELTER MARGARET WERNEKE OLIVE WEST DOROTHY WHITE LEONARD TURNER MARJORIE TURNER PAULINE TURNER ROSS TURNER VIRGIL TURNERI Carl L. Ilelgeson, B. S., Teacher of commerce, sponsors the junior class. He is also in charge of the ushering for all the school affairs. His conference is recognized each year for its out-stand i n g participation in school activities and contests. This year, the contest to arouse pep for the Capitol Hill game was originated in his conference. Mr. Helgeson likes to play golf and to organize things from which other people might derive pleasure. Energetic and capable, he is an outstanding personality in the school. Jolly Juniors Will Woodrow be the president Vhen Bud is a Bishop . And Mary is a Bigbee? '■.'And will Helen be a-Belden Wearing Jean as her Belt? Will Jack fall heir to a circus Or Bob own an Elston And Charles keep on Eaton? Will Bob Faulconer ever hunt with hawks Or Carmen live on Ellis Island And Everett Garner all his wheat? Is James Gib’son and Margaret Dick’s Will Evangeline wear out her Geer Changing it so much? Will Helen continue hearing As much as she does. Or Harold keep all he Hays? Will Verlin ever be a Blueblood Instead of a Trueblood? I’ll bet Mildred will Lock Her hubby in at night And Vivian keep hers in With Logan jelly. Will Willetta never be Long Instead of being Meeker than Joan? The fighting McDonough’s And McClanahans and McKeevers Will keep up the school spirit. I’ll bet Willis doesn’t Pay- any more per -ton Than Roy thinks it’s Worth-a-ton. Will we never be Reid of Bruce, And can’t we Pickett Margaret somewhere? We’ll hang Mary on a Christmas tree As Tinsel(y). Katherine can’t grow Smaller, But Pauline or Ross or Virgil Might Turner into an enchanted person If only they were Sharpe enough. I’ve always wondered if Jessie’s -bach is any Weis-er Than Margaret's -necke, as it Wer-. Jackie can really Burnett it down If she gets Cross. We Heard that someone Custer out The other Day. Our ray of Hope is a Harden-ed woman. The Halls are full of sons of Adam-There’s the son of Gib, Fergus’s son’s sake He hunts Kuhns for a living. How-‘ard Dick and Alfred Take jokes intended to be funny. Nadine will always have a Holme or two At her Beck and (Mc)Call-Bccause she Se-s Felds Sprowled all over New-man's land. Lew-is kinda good lookin’ don't you think? But Yo-unt do that—it isn't Wright. To IIol- your -man, just Kell-e-her-Then Moon-ey around a while, Eat plenty of S(h)oup, Then Turn-eround and take, him, But don’t lock him in the basement, Be-Case he wasn’t -ment For such treatment. And Cole takes his Dailey Exercise playing a Harp-er. Willy’s got the Jack To keep Lytle Rosa Lee In Sid(en)er— We wonder if Cap Hamers her Shel— As much as she is reported to? Noble May- have -hills All over his lands, But we’ll guarantee Mabel has plenty of forces To Marshall into lines. ■ Miss Esther Denton, M. A., home economics teacher in the high school and junior college, has accomplished much and presented many helpful ideas to her classes and to the entire school during her first year here. She has tried to give her students the opportunity to take advantage of all demonstrations and contests in connection with their work. She is Girl Reserve sponsor for the membership committee and is interested in all extra-curricular activities, especially outdoor sports. She has a welcome smile for every student and relates many interesting experiences. PAGE n•titi-bHali L Speech Play » F » » rorensics UPPER PANEL LEFT TO RIGHT: Nadine Holme . J. D. David. director, Emily Jane Yount, Harold Binford, Hugh Gillespie. Marguerite Spratt. Dick Howard. R. B. Quinn, Myron Webb. Bob I-eller. Alice Bryan. LOWER PANEL BACK ROW: Robert Giboney, Victor Bryant. Glen Montague. FRONT ROW: Howard Englcmun. Jack Hall, Everett Garner. "Broken Dishes" Cyrus Bumpsted....................Myron Webb Jenny Bumpsted...............Emily Jane Yount Elaine.......................Marguerite Spratt Bill Clark...................Dick A. Howard Sam Green.................................Hugh Gillespie Dr. Stump......................Harold Binford Chester Armstrong..................R B. Quinn Myra............................. Alice Bryan Mabel............................Nadine Holmes Quinn...............................Bob Lefler PAGE 12Senior Play 'Big Hearted Herbert Herbert Kalness...........................Hugh Gillespie Elizabeth Kalness...............Mildred Hays Alice..........................Eleanor Stanton Andrew....................................Bill Farrar Amy Lawrence....................Helen Ward Jim Lawrence............................Harold Binford Junior..................................Theron Harmon Robert..........................Donald Naden Martha..........................Ruth Knedler Mr. Goodrich....................Ross Kinnamon Mrs. Goodrich...................Lorene Myers Mr. Havens..............................Luther Parman Mrs. Havens...................Mauricia Norton . Davis, A. B., instructor of public speaking and bbsiness English in the high school is that member of the faculty who has charge of all forensics work. All plays given by the high school are under his direction and the sucess of these is due to his management, using just the right psychology to make the actors put the play over. The 1934 Arkalalah celebra- tion, “The Lady in the Clock" was also under the supervision of Mr. Davis. In debate and forensics Mr. Davis has turned out championship teams, making a name for the school in both state and national meets. In addition to high school debates, he coaches all college forensics, and last year a chapter of the Phi Rho Pi, national honorary debate fraternity was organized in the Junior College. PAGE 43Pro and Con "Broken Dishes" TIME ain’t much. No, sir, it really ain’t. Not when you’ve got something pleasant to look forward to,” were the words of Cyrus Bumps ted, one of the characters of “Broken Dishes,” the annual public speaking play. The plot centered around a hen-pecked man whose wife was always “throwing it up to him” that she might have made a brilliant match. The daughter of the family asserts her independence by marrying a man against her mother’s wishes, and is aided by her father. At the psychological moment the old sweetheart of the mother appears and proves to be a penniless fugitive from justice. The story ends happily when the mother realizes the mistake she has made by mistreating her husband and daughter. Marguerite Spratt took the feminine lead, as Elaine Bumpsted, and Dick A. Howard, as Bill Clark, played opposite her. Other parts in the play were taken by Emily Jane Yount as Jenny Bumpsted, the overbearing wife; Alice Bryan as Myra Bumpsted, and Nadine Holmes as Mable Bumpsted, the two sisters whe had let their mother rule them; Myron Webb as Cyrus Bumpsted, the husband who realized that his daughter’s happiness was the most important thing to him; Hugh Gillespie as Sam Green, the sexton, who played “Nearer My God to Thee” as a wedding march for Elaine and Bill; narold Binford as the Reverend Dr. Stump, the slightly deaf minister; R. B. Quinn as the stranger, who turned out to be Mrs. Bumpsted’s former sweetheart, and Robert Lefler as Grant, the detective. Kenneth Curfman was the business manager of “Broken Dishes”, Bill Lohman was stage manager, and Jacqueline Burnett was the property manager. The play proved to be a financial success as well as entertaining to the audience. A matinee and an evening performance were given December 14 to accommodate the crowds. ■ When the debate season opened last fall three former members returned to the high school squad making the year’s debate outlook better than usual. From the 28 who turned out 16 were chosen to make up the squad. The “first line” debaters included Robert Gibony, Everett Garner, Victor Bryant, Glen Montague, Jack Hall, Howard En-gleman, and Alan Jacobson. The El Dorado debate meet was the first to attract the interest of the squad. There was no judging done as the purpose of the meet was to familiarize the debaters with the year’s question, “Resolved: that the government should give federal aid to the public schools.” At the tournament held November 30 to December 1 at Winfield, Victor Bryant and Robert Gibony were among the last six teams to be eliminated from the 92 teams representing 45 schools. On February 9, the high school squad tied with ElDorado for fourth place in the annual Ark Valley tournament at Wichita, Jack Hall and Everett Garner making up the affirmative teams and Robert Gibony and Victor Bryant, the negative team. At the district debate tourney in Winfield February 23, the debaters placed fourth. The district tournaments which had been in progress several weeks previous to determine the district winner who would go to the finals in Lawrence to try for the state championship in debate, March 1 and 2. The debate teams representing the Arkansas City high school at the Invitational Debate tournament sponsored by the local junior college February 25 and 26 were Jack Hall, Everett Garner, Robert Giboney and Victor Bryant. Twenty-four schools were invited to participate in the tourney. The question for debate was “Resolved: that the Federal Government should adapt the policy of equalizing educational opportunity throughout the nation, by means of annual grants to the several states for public elementary and secondary education. This tournament proved to be the “biggest” local meet participated in by the high school debate squad. All members of the first squad will return next year, and a good debate season is expected. Due to lack of interest, extemporaneous speaking was not offered this year. Oratory and girls’ and boys’ reading were also among the extracurricular courses which were dropped. PAGE 44By Seniors Only ONE of the most outstanding events in the dramatic and forensics department of 1934 and ’35 was the annual senior play, “Big Hearted Herbert”, directed by J. D. Davis. Sophie Kerr’s and Anna Steese Richardson’s “Big Hearted Herbert” is a comedy with a wildly hilarious theme which centers around a rich man who prides himself on living plainly and forcing his family to do the same. He loves his family dearly, but disgraces them by his uncouth manner at a dinner given for his daughter’s fiancee. The next night his loving and patient wife, who can no longer tolerate his actions, does the same thing in front of his best customer. In a final riotous scene Herbert realizes he is not so plain, and that his life would be happier if he were more of a father and less of a tyrant. There were four leading roles in the play, two character leads and the two romantic leads. The romantic leads were taken by Eleanor Stanton as the daughter of “Big Hearted Herbert”, and Bill Farrar as the young lawyer from Harvard. The part of Herbert was played by Hugh Gillespie, and that of his wife played by Mildred Hays. The rest of the cast was made up of Helen Ward as Amy Lawrence; Harold Binford as Jim Lawrence; and Ross Kinnamon and Lorene Myers as Mr. and Mrs. Goodrich. Theron Harmon portrayed the part of Junior, the son of Kalness; Donald Naden as Robert, the younger son; Ruth Knedler, Martha, the maid; and Luther Parman and Mauricia Norton as Mr. and Mrs. Havens. Jack Axley, assisted by R. B. Quinn and Martha Beekman, was the business manager of the play, and Alice Bryan, assisted by Ilabelle Gillock, was the property manager. The ticket sale was sponsored by the seniors entirely. ■ For public speaking students. Did you ever have to give an after-dinner speech? In case you have to, hei-e’s a recipe. Three long breaths. Compliments to the audience. Funny story. Outline of what speaker is not going to say. Points that he will touch on later. Two of Shakespeare’s familiar quotations. Outline of what speaker is going to say. Points that he has not time to touch now. Reference to what he said first. Funny story. Compliment to audience. Ditto, to our city, state, and nation. Applause. N. B. For an oration use same formula, repeating each sentence three times in slightly different words. Art Club S For the benefit of those students who wish to take advantageof an offer of aid in a special line of art work, Miss Vera Koontz organized the Arts and Craft Club. With Albert Coulson as president, the club of 10 members meets three times a month to study special types of art. Each student studies the line which interests him most. Some pick modeling, others wood-carving, and still others penciling. Much of the success of the club is due to the help of Miss Koontz, who instructs the club, giving the members a chance to see which kind of art or which craft they prefer, a definite goal to work for. Other officers of the club are vice-president, Virginia Heuzel; secretary-treasurer, Martha Jane McCall; and Ark Light reporter, Vivian Logan. ■ Miss Vera Koontz, A. B., has the ability to accomplish things. She derives a natural pleasure from constructing and organizing, and at the same time is friendly and humerous. She is a most interesting person to talk to, having had the experiences which come to people who have traveled and studied. Miss Koontz is well deserving of the responsible position of art director, which she holds in the Arkansas City Schools, her natural enthusiam being readily caught by students. She is the person the school may thank for the interesting art bulletin board, the annual art exhibit, and many school posters. Although she does not do poster work herself, she is the “power behind the throne”. PAGE 45Girls' Glee Club UPPER PANEL —SOPRANOS ,t0 Ki.Khl—Marjorie Moyer. Mary Half Mnr Alice Rynn. Zulcnc Blair. Doris Wales, Mar voile Cox’ Kemper1 nCk' Nad,n ? Bl w«ll. Prances Sandcfur. I-oui nm ROW Grace Newman. Beulah Pointer. Mable Cook. Ancic Bennett. Esther Reece. Jessie Weisbach. Kvelyn Brodcrson. Maxine Garrison. Beatrice Palmer. Mernst Wright. FOURTH ROW- Margaret Dixon. Virginia Harrington. Marguerite Spratt. Frances Fields. Jean Fitch. Twilah Sec-feld. Esther Sissom. Audrey Evans. Marion Stoffel. THIRD ROW Elsie Rawlings. Viola Wilson. Florence Anna Ward. Dorothy Viele. Ruby Counts. Marjorie Stoffel. Betty Letter. Mary Evelyn Henderson. Betty Lou Sturtz, Dorothy McNair. Mary Bigbee. Lois Burks. SECOND ROW Lois Travis. Mary Millspaugh. Mar-jorie Lane, Betty Franklin. Ruth Wahlenmaior. Louise Pfistcrcr. Mauricia Norton. Ruth I-cmert Juanita Fountain. Margaret Lowery. _ .. , _ FIRST ROW Marjorie Groves. Merriam Greer. Ur-melita Ruder. Charlene Ramey. Mary Emma McGuirk. Virginia Hcuszel. Esther Shoupe. Eleanor Stanton. Voncile. Mitchell. Ernestine Reed. Marjorie Hadley. LOWER PANEL--------ALTOS TOP ROW. Left To Right Catherine Gibson. Elixabeth Lew . Lavcrne Franklin. Ruby Fleming. Hope Day. Mildred Hays. Maxine Howard. Jessie Wright. FILTH ROW—Kathleen Thomas. Doris Trcdwny, Virginia Amos. Gladys Sprowls. Freddie Stevens. Ruby Beebe. Roberta Bowen. Maxine Palmer. Virginia Volkland. Evelyn Connelly. FOURTH ROW Mary Nolen. Bette Hamilton. Mary C. Pickett. Katherine Curfman. Betty Brcnx, Onita Hays. Martha Beckman, Marion Goehring. Margaret Ogren, Evelynne Caine. THIRD ROW -Lola Mae Stocking. Genevieve Ward. Genevieve Wright. Iona Bryant. Alice Lavcrne Wilson. Mary Holman. Helen Wnrd. Helen Betty Martin. Bcrniece Browne. Alice Thompson. SECOND ROW—Dorothy Gutfcy, June Jacobs. Wilma Scott, Dorothy Markland. Bernadine Newman. Virginia Holman. . , FIRST ROW Marjorie Turner. Mary Ixnnse Tinsley. Anna I.ce Stout, Pauline Turner. Amelia Snyder. Catherine Sowdcn. Mary Caine. Wanda CGrlsty. Eunice Chandler. Marjorie Crill. Claire Edwards. Kathleen Pfistcrcr.Chorus W? ROW, Left to RiKht: C. L. Hinchce, director. LcMoync Freeman. Raymond Auamus. Samuel Maier. Erie Volkland. Kenneth Curfman. Uo®3 Kinnamon. Milton Getter, Annlce Hill. FRONT ROW : irginia Day. R. B. Quinn, Alice Newman. Cnptoln Shclhammer, Mary Genevieve McDonough. Virginia Holman. Mar-Karat Otfrcn. John Tufts. Hope Day. CHARLES L. HINCHEE Director of Vocal Music A. E. SAN ROMANI Director of Instrumental Music THE mixed chorus class is for students who are interested in voice training- and offers one credit as every other class does. It is an interesting and constructive class, interesting in that Mr. Hinchee is its teacher, and anyone who has ever had classes under the supervision of Mr. Hinchee knows of his ever abundant stock of witty sayings, and instructive in that there is a large library of the latest music books on subjects that are interesting to a student who cai-es anything at all about music in Mr. Hinchee’s office, always at the disposal of the students enrolled in the music classes. Training in the theory of music, body positions while singing, breathing exercises, lessons on pronunciation, and constructive criticism from the class as a group and from Mr. Hinchee to improve the individual voices are a few of the things learned by this class during the school year. The class spends much of its time in sight singing, and the major part of the singing is done without the aid of any form of accompaniment. PAGE 47■ C. L. Hinchee, B. M., who instructs the vocal classes in the senior high school, Junior College, and junior high school, is a teacher who has many friends among the students. His merry smile and ready jokes make his classes a real pleasure. He spends his falls in the realm of Handel, his winters in opera, and his springs on contest numbers. He is an outstanding choir director, and possesses an excellent tenor voice. Hanging in his office is a placard, “Fishing is a good way of doing nothing without being noticed”, and that tells the secret of how he likes to spend his spare time. Mr. Hinchee is a pleasure to work with, for he is always sympathetic and willing to help a student. He is one of those teachers not easily forgotten, who is always a pleasant memory to those who have worked with and known him. Melodears ANY girl who wishes to do so may become a member of the Girls’ Glee Club. The purpose of the club is to give every girl an opportunity to sing and to learn something about music. This group has a chance to become acquainted with the best in choral literature, of which the school has an excellent library of over two hundred numbers, besides the scores of ten operas. The entire organization was used in the presentation of Handel’s “Messiah”, and some were chosen to sing in the opera chorus. The officers of the group were Hope Day, president; Margaret Jean Ogren, secretary; and I.ou Belle Newman, assistant director. The group was under the direction of C. L. Hinchee. Mary Caine accompanied the club. ■ A. E. San Romani, B. M., is the teacher of instrumental music throughout the entire school system of Arkansas City. In senior high, “San” directs the band and orchestra, lends pep to everything with which he comes in contact, and in general pushes the school along in its extra-cirric-ular activities. Always busy, San is one of those teachers in the school who is always called upon to do a little more, and no matter how busy he is, he always does it. San is short, dark, and curly-headed, with a shining smile which he never hesitates to use. Mr. San Romani is just plain “San” to all who know him, for he is congenial and good-natured. He always does his best to make the school excel in whatever it sets out to do, and no higher praise than that can be given to a teacher. Hallelujah ■ Under the direction of A. E. San Romani and Charles L. Hinchee, the Messiah was given for the third consecutive time in the high school auditorium on the nights of December 18 and 19. 1934. The presentation of the Messiah has become a part of the year’s work of the music departments of the high school and junior college. The three guest soloists who took part in the performance were Miss Florence Goble, soprano soloist from Lindsborg, Kansas; Mrs. It. N. Van Slyck, contralto soloist from Topeka, and Roy Scheussler, bass soloist from Wichita. Charles L. Hinchee, instructor of the Junior College and high school vocal departments, sang the tenor arias again this year. A well-blanccd group composed of 279 voices from the high school and junior college choral groups presented the choruses in a professional manner. A 35-piece orchestra, said by many to have been the best of all three years, provided a melodious background and accompaniment for the choruses and arias. This orchestra was directed and selected by A. E. San Romani, who chose the outstanding players of the two orchestras of the high school and junior college. Mary G. McDonough accompanied the orchestra on the choral numbers. Mrs. A. E. San Romani, accompanying the soloists, was assisted by a sslected group from the general Messiah orchestra. The after-performance picture was not so difficult to take this year, although it was just as amusing as in past years. Mr. Cornish’s apparatus stuck, and everyone was in gales of laughter by the time it finally “exploded”, as the picture shows. Although Mr. Hinchee, Mr. San Romani, and Mr. Scheussler remarked that they felt like “stuffed chickens” in their dress suits, everyone liked their looks, and their singing was the best ever, so they couldn’t have been very uncomfortable. PAGE 4SLyceum A LYCEUM ticket was of value this year to the Junior College, senior high, and junior high school students. The course was comprised of four exceptionally fine numbers: the Pollard players, “Musical Moments”, “A Century of Progress In Music”, and “Kings of Harmony”. October 21 was the date of the first number presented by the Pollard players. “Mr. Lazarus”, a three-act play, was given, and was more than enjoyed by the students and faculty. The plot of the play centered around the lives of a mother and a daughter who ran a boarding house. The old stranger who came to the house to live turned out to be the long lost husband of the mother. He helped them out of their difficulties and saved them from being swindled out of their money by the mother’s foreign husband. November 27 Di Crosta and Lenora Ferrari, a duo, gave “Musical Moments”, an entertainment given with musical instruments. Every instrument in the band was played by Mr. Di Crosta. As well as all the fundamental instruments, numerous novelty instruments of questionable origin were presented, such as the “sweet potato.” Mr. Di Crosta gave a novelty number in which he played in rapid succession the flute, piccolo, French horn, trumpet, clarinet, slide trombone, and baritone. The accordian was well handled by Miss Ferrari. She also portrayed the traditional inheritance of her race by singing. The third lyceum number was given January 21, “A Century of Progress in Music” starring Lucille Elmore. The program was a revue of American music ranging from the time of the “Boston Tea Party” down to the present day. Songs of the old South, of the gay Nineties, days of Washington, and Forty-niners, were used. The numbers included dancing, singing, and sketches by the company. Miss Lucille Elmore, the star of “A Century of Progress in Music”, appeared in numbers in which she imitated Ted Lewis as “The High-Hatted Tragedian of Syncopation” the “Military Tap” and “The Little Girl Next Door”. Last but not least of the lyceum numbers were the “Kings of Harmony” made up of four young men. Many numbers of the day as well as older numbers were sung by the quartette. A novelty number was given by this company with the Swiss bells. This was something that a high school audience had not seen before and was received with much enthusiasm. Each year the lyceum is sponsored by the Hi-Y and G. R. for the entertainment and education of the student body of the school. This year’s lyceum program was an exceptionally good one. Useful Knowledge ■ Perhaps one of the most valuable but little known departments of the school is that of manual training. This department is a great asset to the school since most of the repairs and many of the improvements on the school are made by the boys of the shops. One of the largest projects for this year was the installation of silencers on the sliding doors of the senior high gymnasium. Among the many projects carried out were these: the scenery and stage setting for the Arkalalah coronation ceremony, which involved the making of a huge clock with hands that turned to each hour; the seats for the Messiah; parts for machinery in the shops; a large workbench; repairs on school furniture; a large wooden candalabra for the school opera; and scats and stage for the commencement exercises at the field. Such training is not only entertaining to.the boys taking it, but also gives them knowledge about machinery which will prove beneficial to them many times during their life and that they may know, as one boy expressed it “at least which end of a hammer to use’.’ ■ W. A. Sneller, B. S., who teaches industrial arts is one of the teachers of the school who is little known outside his own department. Mr. Sneller, however, quietly does his bit to make the school run smoothly, and all hard jobs always fall to him to do. It is Mr. Sneller and his classes who fix up all the little things around the school to make it look neat. They also aid in putting up the Christmas decorations and signs for school plays. Mr. Sneller is a very pleasant person to know, and he is always smiling. The boys who take shop are not only students but also friends of his. PAGE 49The Chimes of Normandy" UPPER PANEL John Tufts Lillian Clough Ralph White Alice Newman . . Fletcher Helton . . . Ross Kinnamon .... Eleanor Stanton . . . Analee Hill Evelyn Caine Margaret Seal .... Lloyd Haynes Wayne Thomas .... Richard Hall LOWER PANEL----- STANDING: Jay Ruckel, Mary G. McDonough. Bob McClunahiin. Audinc White. Albert Lambert. Gwendolyn Grow, Bill Stewart. Lloyd James. Jack Branum. Clyde Newman. William Guthrie. Junior Shea. SEATED: Douglas More. Catherine Smaller, Harry Colojiy. Kenneth Curfman. Ruth Knedler. Ross Kinnamon. Gernlilinc Christy. Bud Gould. PAGE 50Band « « « Orchestra UPPER PANEL- TOP ROW, Left to Right: Gilbert Dillon. I-oren Conrad, Hud Gould, George Sisson, Leo Givens. Elijah Simmons, Jim Fleming. FIFTH ROW: Robert Waltz. Douglas More, Clyde Newman. Harry Colopy, James Loyd, Clinton Hobson, Gerald Walker. Edward Jennings, Russell DeJarnett. Bill Stewart. FOURTH ROW: Kill Ferguson. Charles Eaton. Edwin Brown, Alva Turner. Norman Evans, Virgil Smith, Dean Grim. Leonard Turner. Everett Garner, Jack Branum, Junior Shea. William Guthrie. Glenda Harris. THIRD ROW : Albert Lambert. Bob Mooney, Bob McClan-ahan, Curtis Curry, Richard Hall, Keith Curfman. William Galle. SECOND ROW: Sara Stanley. Arnell Wallace, Robert Henderson. Gene Jenkins, Billy Reynolds. Harold Ream, Wilburn Shepard. Jay Ruckel. Roland Gidney, Jack Williams, Rol-ert Long. Gwendolyn Grow, Audine White. Nina Mae Brill, Bill Burns, Erma Gene McCarr.mon. Martha J. McCall. FIRST ROW: Will Etta Long. Geraldine Seeley, Lou Belle Newman. Marguerite Spratt. Lura Fitzgerald. LOWER PANEL------ MEMBERS: Bill Burns. Nina Mae Brill. Jack Branum. Helen Kcldcn. Jerry Christy. Keith Curfman. Kenneth Curfman. Harry Colopy, Charles Eaton, Bill Ferguson. Dean Grim. Maxine Garrison, Gwendolyn Grow. William Guthrie. Everett Garner, Riehard Hall. Glenda Harris. James Lloyd, James Gould. Verncda Kittrell, Ruth Kncdler, Albert Lambert. Mary Genevieve McDonough. Bob McClanahan. Bob Mooney. Clyde Newman. Jay Ruckel, Catherine Smaller. Bill Stewart. Vern Stacey. Junior Shea, Virgil Smith, Elijah Simmons, Willinm Sherwood. Leonard Turner, Audine White. George Sisson, Douglas More. Mary Pickett. Alfred Knight. Bobby Balsters, Carmen Ellis, Alan Jacobson. Gilbert Dillon. Hnrvey Miles, Helen Mingle. Ruth Ruckel. Geraldine Seeley. Curtis Curry. Nnda Clifton, Wilma Dillon, Fern Bingham, Charles Higgins. Manuel Lozano. Dorothea Caine. Idn Laura Shumate. Eleanor Bell. Keith Cummins, Anna Lyn Creighton. PAGE 51If '.'I I V. ■ Mrs. Daisy Hamit, the good-looking blackhaired teacher who presides over the study hall, has a pleasant and likeable personality. She does her best to keep peace in her little domain, and that sometiihes proves to be quite a task. She is the sponsor for the Athletic Committee of the Girl Reserves, one of the most active groups in the organization. Another of Mrs. Hamit’s duties which she carried out to perfection is the keeping a record of all the absences of each person during the entire year. Footlight THE CHIMES of Normandy,” a three act costume operetta, by Panquette, was the annual presentation of the high school and junior college music departments, Friday night, March 3. John Tufts, Ralph White, Lillian Clough, and Alice Newman had the leading roles as the Marquis, Henri, Germaine, the peasant girl Serpolette, the good-for-nithing, and Jean Grcnichoux, the fisherman. Other members of the cast included Fletcher Helton as Gaspard, the miserly uncle of Germaine; Ross Kinnamon as the Bailli to whom Germaine has been betrothed by Gaspard; Lloyd Haynes as the red-headed notary; Wayne Thomas and Richard Hall as the Assessor and the Registrar. The four village girls Jeanne, Mannette, Suzanne, and Gertrude were respectively Evelynne Caine, Ana-lee Hill, Margaret Seal, and Eleanor Stanton. The cast and chorus were costumed in vivid costumes of seventeenth century Normandy, copied after the garb of the French peasants. The general plot of the story centered around an old castle which was supposedly haunted, but which in reality was Gaspard’s hiding place for his money. When the son of the Marquis returned to Corneville, the setting of the opera, the bells which had been silent for so many years rang again, and Gaspard became insane. Papers are found which seemed to prove that Serpolette is the lost Marchioness, but when Gaspard regained his senses, he told them that Germaine was the heiress, not Serpolette. All ended well with Germaine and Henri marrying each other, and Ser-polettc turning to Grcnichoux as her last hope. C. L. Hinchee was the director of the opera and A. E. San Romani the orchestra. Miss Virginia Ford of junior high had charge of the dances. Music Hath Charms Qi During the fourth hour each day, the regular orchestra meets for practice. Inaugurating a new system, this year Mr. San Romani devised a plan whereby any person could challenge the member who was playing the first chair, and play a solo. If, by the vote of the whole orchestra, the challenger was better than the boy or girl then playing in a higher position than he, the contestant would automatically be given his place. Training in ensemble work, analyzation of music, knowledge of the best composers, types of music and fundamental composition are learned in this class. One of the aims of the orchestra is to play better music and to create a desire in the student body for this music. A group of selected musicians of the high school orchestra is called upon to play at all social and formal entertainments of the school. Not only do they play for the school but also for the civic clubs, afternoon clubs, churches, industrial plants, and societies. It is this organization which plays the accompaniment for the Messiah and for the opera. In this way they obtain practice in playing the best in music. Through their experiences playing for the different clubs and functions, they become better musicians in every sense of the word. To the members of the regular orchestra it is quite an honor to become a member of the special orchestra, and each one works with that goal in mind. ' Both orchestras have a large library of the works of the best composers—Handel, Hayden, Mozart, Wagner, Verdi, Schubert, and many others. Officers of the orchestra are Kenneth Curfman, president; Ruth Knedlcr, vice-president; Bill Burns, manager; Junior Shea, official goat; and Jack Branum, librarian.V Martial Music OUR band is one of the best in the state and much credit is due A. E. San Romani for making it so. Instrumental in producing pep at the games and at the pep chapels, the band has also done extra stunts at the half and in all public functions of the city. Several times this year, the band has traveled to other towns to participate in their parades and to aid in their celebrations. The band practiced on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays this year, the change being made in order that the band could be prepared to play at various places whenever wanted. Officers of the band were Clyde Newman, president; James Gould, manager; Bill Burns, secretary; Robert McClanahan, librarian; and Russel DeJarnett, goat. The band should also be given credit for putting on the pep drills at the halves of the basketball games. One of these as seen through the eyes of little Bobby is presented here. “Oh, Mother, look at those funny looking girls”, cried little Bobby at a basketball game. “Why, Bobby, those aren’t girls.” “Well, what arc they then?” “Why, darling, those are boys”. “Oh now Mother, do you expect me to believe that.” “But, Bobby—” “Say, look at that girl with the grass skirt on.” “But Bobby, let me explain—” “Ha! Ha! Ha! Say, Girlie, you lost your head-band” “Say this is plenty swell. Let’s come to all the basketball games if they’re going to have stunts like these. Those girls are plenty swell dancers. Now, Mother, what are you trying to tell me?”. “I was trying to tell you that those were boys dressed up like girls.” “Well, I don’t care. But I still think that girl with the grass skirt—I mean that boy—was plenty swell. Tryouts for Opera ■ To the rhythm of the constant clack clack of trembling knees the glee clubs started trying out for the opera. If any of the supposedly dignified seniors had any dignity, here’s one time they lost it. If you don’t believe that juniors are timid and the sophomores green, you should accidently come up and hear them sometime. Many groans were heard by the chance passerby when Mr. Hinchee calmly informed the glee clubs they were going to sing solos just for him. Though the song the girls sang was “Calm as the Night”, their voices were anything but that. Old Black Joe must have turned over in his grave when he heard the singing Shea twin try to imitate Donald Novis. Many of the students seemed to be of Scotch descent when they tried to keep their voices from the director. It was surprising how many of the deep-chested fellows only managed to put out a thin nasal whine. Many of the girls just couldn’t sing alone for anyone, so had a certain girl start with them. But behold, you couldn’t hear the shy little girl because the volume of the accompaning girl’s voice stood out above everything else. After a few days of this, there wasn’t anyone who had any respect left. Everyone tried as hard as he could, and since fifty were chosen for the chorus, some of them made it. All of them did their best, and everyone worked very hard to make the opera a success. Those who were not chosen for the chorus, sold just as many tickets as those who were in it, which shows good sportsmanship. ■ Grace Petz. B. S., who teaches shorthand, typewriting, and penmanship, and sponsors the junior class and a G. R. committee, is a sweet woman, well-liked by her classes and loved by her conference. A little anecdote about her is that when the conference volleyball team won the intramural contest, it was due to her appearance at the game. Many points behind, when Miss Petz appeared, the team made fifteen straight points, winning the game and the title. Miss Petz’s smile is a lovely thing to behold, and she is always willing to help the entire student body. Students instinctively feel that she is friendly and helpful. Her voice is gentle, soft, and low, and Miss Petz has a smile for everyone she meets. PAGE 53LOWER PANEL— TOP ROW—Mildred Clevenger. Louise Vandever. Julia Shea, Evangeline Geer. Munltin Miller. Ruby Rico. Margaret Seal. Carol Smith. Jeanne Belt. Margaret Pickett. Doris Richards. SECOND ROW—Coleta Close. Arnell Wallace. Marie Miller, Dorothy Koger. Lorcne I.upcr, Vivian Brown. Emily Jane Yount. Dorothy Heathman, Alice Lewis, Erma G. McCammon. FIRST ROW—Arlene Case. Mabel Marshall, Helen Dor-rancc, Martha J. McCall. Alice Newman. Maxine Starkey. Jacqueline Burnett, Lura Fitzgerald. Helen Heard. UPPER PANEL -------- TOP ROW. Left to Right Truel Shaffer. Luther Parman, Bruce Reid. Lynn Miller. Eric Volkland. Jaequo Stover. Samuel Maier. Jack Maze. George Wahlenmaler. Myron Webb. Wayne Reynolds, Bill Stuart. Kenneth Curfman, Raymond Ausmus, Wayne Thomas. FIFTH ROW -Leonard Stevenson. Edwin Maier. John Tufts. George Pitts. Carl Jackson, Floyd Kimsey, Warren Putnam. Howard Clark. LeMoyne Freeman. FOURTH ROW Craig Howe . Jnck Hollis. Ro Kinna-mon. Donald Evans. Victor Gillespie. Ross Conrad. George Sisson. James Finney. Joseph Mattingly. Bill Farrar. Ferrell Anderson. THIRD ROW Harold Hay . Keith Ramey. Leonard Me-Keevcr. Charles Allard. Robert Ryman, Mack Gllstrap. David Mitchell. Spencer Turner. Melvin Haines. Paul Baringer. Hoover Gibson. SECOND ROW—Charles Stacy. Richard Hull. Dean Grim, Duane Crill. Keith Curfman, William Guthrie. George Reynold . Anther Hudgins. Bud Bishop. Forrest Wollard, Jnmes Gould. R. B. Quinn. Junior She . FIRST ROW Melvin Foster. Joe Schwartz. Kenneth Miller. Jack Gibson. Junior Smith. Milton Getter. Marjorie Crill. Bobby Clark. Bobby Faulconer. Glenn Symc . Ray Billings. John Shea. Walter Baird, Lawrence Pipkin. PAGE 549 Cashiers7 Club Mirror Staff UPPER PANEL-------- TOP ROW. Left to Right: Hob Leach, Walter Baird. Hugh Wahlcr. Lucille Sharpe. Margaret Werncke. Dorothy Probst, Mary F. Smith, Alta Wilson. Leon Schuessler. SECOND ROW: Kathleen Pfisterer, Betty Townsley. Audine White. Kenneth Curfman. head cashier, Donald Seefeld, Grace Newman. Marjorie St off el, John Burton. Kenneth Messner. THIRD ROW: Gail Harden. Dorothy Peterson. Frances Sandefur, Ber-niccc Browne, Bud Musson, Myron Webb. LOWER PANEL STANDING. Left to Right: Ina Southern. Marlon Goehring. Warren Putnam. Dick F. Howard. Erie Volkland, Mable Cook, Bud Gould, Virginia Holman. Harold E. Gish. SITTING: Helen Focht, Helen Ward. Mary Caine. Eleanor Stanton. P. M. Johnson. Elsie Lininger. Analee Hill. Harold Bratches. Bob Leach. INSETS: Erie Volkland. Analee Hill. PAGE 55Our Staff SOMETHING different was the goal of the 1935 Mirror staff when they decided to put the annual out in magazine style. A modernistic cover in black and silver was chosen, and blue was selected for pages in the first and last of the book- Three words were written for each senior, the members of the faculty were placed with the organization they sponsored, and informal writeups were made of all the organizations. Applications were received for staff positions, and those seeming most willing and able to do the work were named. Members of the staff were Analee Hill............................'. Editor Virginia Holman..........Assistant Editor Erie Volkland....................Business Manager Victor Bryant . . . Asst. Business Manager Mable Cook.........................Typist Helen Focht....................Bookkeeper Harold Bratches...........Athletic Editor Bob Leach.......................Snapshots Eleanor Stanton.................Snapshots Mary Caine..................Music Editor Helen Ward..................Organizations Ina Southern................Organizations Marion Goehring.............Organizations Warren Putnam...............Organizations Elsie Lininger.................Cartoonist Bud Gould............Advertizing Manager Dick F. Howard....................Classes During the latter part of September, 475 pledges were signed, to be redeemed on or before May 15, 1935. Virginia Holman and Victor Bryant were selected by the junior class as editor and business manager for next year’s annual. PAGE 56 ■ A. E. Maag, A. B., teacher of world history, constitution, and problems, is a favorite of the students. He is full of fun and ideas that are always original and clever. Mr. Maag sponsors the Mirror, is head sponsor of the senior class, and a member of the forensic committee. He is probably the busiest man among the faculty males, for he is called upon to fill in whenever a helper is needed. Picnics with Mr. Maag arc highlights in the lives of his conference members, for there is never a dull moment. Mr. Maag is always in a good humor and is very witty. He will be remembered with a smile many years after the school year is finished. Sing Sing a During the fifth hour on Monday and Wednesday of each week, the boys’ glee club, composed of more than a hundred boys, met for group singing. The only requirment for membership was that the boys should like to sing. No tryouts were held at any time except when the chorus members for the opera were being selected. Although the group did not sing any certain song this year, the favorites seemed to be “Home on the Range” and “Song of the Jolly Roger”. The entire boys’ glee club participated in the Messiah, when it was presented at Christmas time, and the whole club practiced on the opera, "Chimes of Normandy”. Those who wished were allowed to try out for leads and chorus parts in the opera. C L. Hinchee, vocal instructor, conducted the group, and Marjorie Crill was accompanist. Sa ve a Penny ■ “A penny saved is a penny earned.” The senior high school students are really money makers, according to the national high school rating. Each year Mrs. Harriet Winkleman pays at least one visit to the school and tells the student body, in her interesting way, of the progress other schools are making in banking to create a new interest in thrift among our student body. Her plans of banking contests always prove helpful in attaining a higher percentage. A highlight of her visit is her little monkey, Toto, who always saves his pennies. Needless to say, Toto is a favorite with the students and each time they look foward to seeing him. Bank day is a fixed institution in the school and a habit that will continue throughout life is formed by banking each Tuesday.■ Miss Alice Carrow is sponsor of the Cashier’s Club, handles the cards and files in the library, and promotes the beautifying of the court between the senior and junior high school. Students receive more than books from Miss Carrow and because of the advice and understanding of this teacher, many students have turned over new leaves not found in books. One of Miss Carrow’s dreams is to make the court between the school grow into a beauty spot of the city, and because the student body is behind anything she wants to do, it will grow and become a fit memorial to the feeling between this loved teacher and the students. There could be no other name for this spot than Carrow Court. Money Talks CASHIER’S Club is one important organization in the high school about which outsiders seldom hear. The club meets every Monday morning in the library and is under the supervision of Miss Alice Carrow. Members consist of the head cashier of senior high, Kenneth Curfman, his assistant, Gail Harden, and a cashier and assistant from each conference. The object of this club is to stimulate the banking and thrift habit of the students, and to create in school a spirit of saving that will go with each one when he leaves high school. This is often achieved by contests and display of clever posters in the hall. The results in banking show the work of the club. In the first twenty weeks of the year, the high school banked $2,252.42. The highest amount banked any one day was $216.42 and the lowest $76.21. The average percentage of students making deposits was 86.31%. The goal, of course, is to bank 100%. Out of the twenty-four conferences the largest number to bank 100% at one time was fifteen, the lowest six. The cashiers are chosen at the beginning of the year by the conference and the office carries honor points. Members of this organization take a real interest in banking, and the training received in the club will be valuable in later life. The Thrift Almanac lists the Arkansas City school system sixteenth on the honor roll of twenty-five cities in the United States in banking, an honor of which the community may be justly proud. Book Nook ■ Miss Alice Carrow, school librarian, instituted a new idea during National Book Week, Nov. 11-17, in order to arouse more interest in books. A corner of the library was shut off by screens, and a “book nook” was made where students were invited to spend their leisure time. This cozy corner was furnished in soft colors, with easy chairs, lamps, and book cases filled with favorites of students. The homelike place was continually occupied by book-lovers who could come in, sit in an easy chair, read a favorite book, and feel many miles away from the humdrum of school life. Flowers added to the air of “hominess,” and the nook was a popular success. Even after Book Week was over it was retained for several days. In connection with the celebration of Book Week, Miss Inez Johnson’s English classes made posters, booklets, and other pamphlets advertising some well-known or favorite book. The most interesting of these were placed on large screens in the hall, and those students not taking English had a chance to see what books were good and why they were worth reading. Musical Maids ■ During the sixth hour and alternating with gym or study hall, C. L. Hinchee instructs the Sixth Hour Glee Club. They are an organization of girls who want advanced training in vocal work, and some of the best singers in the school are members of this organization. A great deal of a capella work is done, and training in the theory of music and voice production is given by the instructor. The class is one that affords a great deal of enjoyment for the student, and any girl who likes to sing will find it profitable to join this class if she has the time. About thirty girls enrolled in the club this year, and they were all members of former glee clubs or choruses. Margaret Seal was assistant director and Alice Lewis was accompanist. I AG 15 57UPPER PANEL TOP ROW. Loft to Right: Frank Henderson. Jack Mow, Harold Bratches. Marion Bowman. Hush Wahlcr. SECOND ROW: Harold K. Gish, Forrest Wollard, Ross Turner. Paul Marshall, Robert Birgham. FIRST ROW: Alvin Scott. Douglas Thompson. George Pitts, J. G. Voskuhl. Virgil Smith. Other members not included in the picture are: Hugh Roberson. LeMoyne Freeman. Pat Harder. Robert Ryman. INSET Miss Catharine Dean PAGE 68 LOWER PANEL------- TOP ROW. Left to Right: Alice Lewis, Jessie Wright. Dorothy Helen Hcathman, Jean Howes. Ralph White, Willie Murphy, Grace Newman. Jaunita Fountain, Merna Wright. Dunne Grill. SECOND ROW: Helen Beck, Amelia Snyder. Lora Baringer. Arlene Burnett. Edythc Gilmore, Harry Colopy. Joe Schwnrtx. Isabelle Wheeler, Lueillc Brooks. Ruth Knedlcr. Karen Nada Seal. Vivian MoflUt. Worth Payton. FIRST ROW: Virginia Day. Sara Stanley. Ernestine Reed. Esther Shoupc. Dorothy Probst. Willetts M. Long, Marcia Nance. Mae Evelyn Kuhn. Beulah Pointer. Mable Cook. IN FRONT Miss Catharine Dean. Pica Club » » » Speeders ClubG. A. A. Letter Candidates » » » Senior Volleyball UPPER PANEL------- TOP ROW. Left to right: Dorothy Morrison, Mary Jane Ralf, Alice Wilson, Mae-dean Miller. Grace Newman, Doris Treadway. Dorothy Helen Heathman, Emily Jane Yount, Audine White. SECOND ROW: Wilma Lininger, Julia Shea, Ermal Burnett, June Mc-Michael, Dorothy Probst, Betty Townsley, Lura Fitzgerald. Barbara Glntfcldcr, Erma Gene McCammon. FIRST ROW: Helen Hight, Arlene Case. Madge Hill, Mabel Baird, Mary Tinsley, Mary Weisbach, Jessie Wcisbaeh, Virginia Amos, Evangeline Geer. LOWER PANEL------- TOP ROW. Left to right: Julia Shea, Ilabelle Gillock. Erma G. McCammon. Ruth Wahlenmaier. Betty Townsley. Lura Fitzgerald, Lucille Brooks. SECOND ROW: June McMichael. Helen Hight. Barbara Glatfcldcr. Mablc Baird, Margaret Seal. FRONT ROW: Ennui Burnett, Captain. PAGE 59G. A. A. EVERY girl who takes physical education in senior high school for three years has membership in the Girl’s Athletic Association as her goal. This organization is formed on the principles of sportsmanship, cleanliness, good health, posture, ‘ and athletics. Requirements for membership in the association are that the girl must enjoy, participate, and excel in all kinds of athletics; must be able to swim, dive, do headstands, forward and backward rolls, cartwheels, work on the rings; and be able to play tennis, basketball, and volleyball. Each member is required to do forty miles of hiking a semester, have a dental inspection and permit, a certificate of health examination, and be a member of at least one volleyball team. Only girls who are especially interested in athletics and who take three years of physical education in high school are elegible for admittance in the association. Miss Edith Davis, instructor of physical education, chooses the members of the organization from her classes. Officers for the G. A. A. are Betty Townsley, president; Julia Shea, vice-president; Grace Newman, secretary; June McMichael, point captain; and Helen Hight, Ark Light reporter. Learning to Play ■ Physical education in the high school is taught by Miss Edith J. Davis and is one of the many advanced courses offered in the school. Sophomores are required to enroll in physical education and during the year they learn to march and walk correctly, play volleyball, tennis, and to do exercises and rymthic work. Juniors and seniors may take gym if they desire but it is not a required course. In the advanced classes, the girls play basketball, tennis, volleyball, and do advanced rymthic work. Dancers for any performance presented by the school, such as the coronation, the opera, and the assembly programs, are always selected from those girls who are most interested in this type of work in the advanced classes. Preservers of Knowledge ■ The Pica Club, an honorary society for high school printers, was founded in 1932. The club meets during the fifth hour on Friday of every other week, and at the meetings subjects pertaining to the art of printing are discussed. To be eligible for this club a student must make a grade of B or better. One of the features of the club this year, as last was the printing of a four page, two column newspaper,“The Pica,” featuring stories of specia interest to printing students. The officers of the club for the first semester were Pat Harder, president; Jack Maze, vice-president; and Virgil Smith, secretary and treasurer. For the second semester the club members chose Harold Bratches as president, Pat Harder as vice-president, Virgil Smith as secretary and treasurer, and George Pitts as Ark Light reporter. Harold Bratches was the editor of the “Pica” for the first semester, Hugh Roberson for the second semester. ■ Harold E. Gish, B. S. instructor of printing, is the man whose shoulders must support the burden of directing the publication of supplies of the school system, the Ark Light, and this yearbook. In addition to a heavy teaching load, all material which is published for organizations and class projects is under his supervision. His willingness to help and teach the new and inexperienced editors of both the Ark Light and the Mirror each year is evidence of his spirit of cooperation and sympathy with the entire school program. Throughout the years that Mr. Gish has directed the printing of the two publications they have ranked at the top in state and national judging. ■ Miss Edith Joyce Davis, B. S., the girls’s physical education instructor in the senior high and junior college, is a graduate of the Arkansas City schools. Along with her gym work, she also teaches physiology. Miss Davis takes a great interest in all students and does everything she can to improve their physical health and ideal’s She is never too tired or busy to listen to some girl who needs advice, and she always helps her. It is one of the ambitions of Miss Davis to get every girl in the high school to think straight regarding her health and ideals, and many girls have been aided by her careful analization of their problems. PAGE 60ON APRIL 6, two typing teams of the high school won second place in the Winfield section of the state high school typing contest. Both teams were coached by Miss Catharine Dear. Local representatives in the novice team were Dorothy Helen Heathman, Alice Lewis, Ruth Knedler, Merna Wright, and Willis Payton. Amateur team members were Jean Howes, Beulah Pointer, Jaunita Fountain, Willetta M. Long, and Vivian Moffitt. Schools entered from Anthony, Augusta, Attica. Towanda, Winfield, and Cedar Vale. Winfield placed first. The novice team is composed of first year students and the amateur team of second year students. Members of the amateur team are also members of the Speeders’ Club. ■ Miss Catharine Dean, B. S., who teaches beginning and advanced typing and advanced shorthand to high school and junior College students, is one of the pepiest teachers in high school. No student who heard her pep speech this year will ever forget it. Miss Dean has auburn hair and possesses all the good characteristics that go with it. Vivacious, agreeable, and up to the minute on all things in school, this teacher is a personable member of the faculty. She is the sponsor of Speeders' Club, the junior class, and the Student Council. In junior class and council meetings, she always helps with their plans and problems and can usually find a solution to their difficulties. In the Student Council, she guides the student in many weighty decisions. An original idea of Miss Dean’s to teach her students to type with rhythm and ease is to type to music, and her classes are made more interesting by this inovation. Speed Demons ■ The goal of every typing student is to gain admission to Speeders’ Club. The club’s rules require the first year typist to type 40 words per minute the first semester and 42 words per minute the second semester. The requirements of a second year typist is the ability to type 50 words per minute. An additional requisite is an accuracy of 85 per cent. Officers of the club are determined by the merit system, taking speed tests each twelve weeks to determine who the executives will be. Considering both accuracy and speed, the student receiving the highest score is made president; second highest, vice-president; third highest, secretary-treasurer. Officers for the first twelve weeks were, Beulah Pointer, president; Willetta M. Long, vice-president; Mae Evelyn Kuhn, secretary-treasurer; and Karen Nada Seal, Ark Light reporter. Those elected for the second twelve weeks were, Willetta M. Long, president; Carol Slater, vice-president; Vivian Moffitt, secretary-treasurer; Beulah Pointer, Ark Light reporter. ■ Ruth Curfman, A. B.,—the sweet and lovely teacher of the school who can stick pins through beautiful butterflies and find out how the inside of some poor frog looks without any effect on her emotional system whatever. And a not so well known fact—she plays a very good game of basketball. Miss Curfman is small enough to be a student in school but she carries her part of any work with which she is connected with perfect ease. She takes an interest in all school activities and may be relied upon to furnish pep for any occasion. PAGE CJ ij 4 If I1. Jackie, junior er. our peppy chcer-lead- 2. Mr. Lorado Taft, the famous sculptor. 3. Mr. Stacy, one of our nicest janitors. 4. Mr. Heflin, always willing, who is responsible for the building. 5. Mr. Mayfield, a friend of the students. 6. Serpolette, the good for something. 7. Henri, the marquis of C o r n v i 11 e, to you. 8. Those three musketeers. One for all, and all for one. 9. N i c k, our swell coach. 10. The junior picnic. 11. Bathing Beauties. Municipal Park style. I'AGE G2,f. Class of '37 LEFT TO RIGHT: Oconee Pitts, Howard Englemnn. Kathleen Pfisterer, John Warren. LOWER PANEL------- TOP ROW. LEFT TO RIGHT: Walter Foltz. Leon Scott, Raymond I- wis. Major Cremn, Ell Cain, Alex Cain. THIRD ROW: Gilbert Hadley. Jesse Fravel, John Shea. Craig Howes, Wayne Thomas, Warren Peavey, Glen Montague. Walter Ellis, Roy Decker. Leonard Stephenson. SECOND ROW: Marjorie Crill. Elsie Rawlings. Mary Pickett. Kathryn Curfman. Sarah Marie Hellycr, Claire Edwards, Marvel Cox, George Sisson. Milton Getter. FIRST ROW: Bette Hamilton, Betty Lou Sturtz. Betty Brenz. Evelynne Caine, Kathleen Pfisterer, Marjorie Hadley. Margaret Ogren. Virginia Volkland. 1 The head sponsor for the sophomore class is J. Kelsey Day. Other sponsors are Miss Lillie Nemecheck, Miss Ruth Curfman, Miss Alice Car-row, and T. C. Paris. A BOOST for the sophomores! Three cheers for the sophomores! It seems that they can take it this year. They advocate that they add spice to the school. Their motto is,“What is a school without a sophie’s mistakes and green ways of doin things?” The blushes and timid smiles of the newcomers stem to be less and less as the years go by. On the steps the other day, a little sophie was stopped by a proud junior who asked him if he minded being razzed and called a sophomore. The timid sophomore stepped a step higher and with his head held high immediately burst into this long speech. “Don’t you like your spinach green? Then, of course you like your sophomores green. Don’t you like your eggs fresh? Of course you do. Then you like your sophomores fresh. Think of coming to school without someone to razz. We all have our day and the sophomores’ day is coming fast.” PACTS C3 JOHN WARREN President The sophomores were wise in their choice of "the boy with that magnetic smile and winning personality.” GEORGE PITTS—Vice President—The other member of the combination. Warren and Pitts would be difficult to duplicate. KATHLEEN PFISTERER Secretary -Kathleen willingly and capably performed her duty as the sophomore secretary. HOWARD ENGI.KMAN Student Council Representative--A member of the high school tennis team for the last two years and an able student. Howard shows much promise for a successful remaining two years in high school. Class of '37 LOWER PANEL- TOP ROW. LEFT TO RIGHT: Robert Wilson. Jack Hall. Keith Curfman. Jack Gibson. Jaequo Stover. Jack Campbell. Bill Blood. Reid Holcomb. Roy Worthington. FIFTH ROW: Wayne Reynolds, Vernon Moffitt. Ira Miller. Bill Warren. Douglas Thompson. Eugene Malcolm. Joseph dinger FOURTH ROW: Alfred Knight. Warren Morrow. Billy Howard, Ralph Smith. John Cook. Carol Shoupe, Hal Gamble. Robert Gillock. Edward Sherwood. THIRD ROW: Florence Anna Ward. Dorothy Veile. LaVern F'ranklin. Irene Bornhouser. Margaret Beckelhimer. Fllizabeth Rob-ertson, Alice Wilson. Iona Bryant. SECOND ROW: Gladys Hopkins. Doris Tredway. Catherine Sowden. Betty Lester. Mary Henderson. Dorothy Peterson. Evelyn Broderson. Helen Galloway, Betty Taylor. FIRST ROW: Elizabeth Lewis, Catherine Gibson. Mary Hendricks. Bernicce Willing. Dorothy McNair. Lola Mac Stocking. Lottie Inghram, Ina Towles. UPPER PANEL TOP ROW. LEFT TO RIGHT: Stephen Welter. John Givens. Charles Darby. Gilbert Dillon. Kenneth Miller. Marvin Mockerman. John Quinn. Willard Harlowe. Lyle Edwards, F'phriam Love. FIFTH ROW: Jack Millard. John Martin. Melvin Stout. Raymond Billings. Glenn Symes. Loren Kelley. Joe Stafford. Riley F'ishor. F'ugene Scott. FOURTH ROW: Gordon Huff. Marvin Jones. Harold Magnus. Kenneth Waldcck. Ralph Sykes. Lawrence Pipkin. David Benjamin. George Viekcrman. THIRD ROW: Bessie Petty. Genevieve Ward. Virginia Amos. Dorothy Markland. Marjorie Stoffcl. Louise Kelsey. Marjorie Lane, I-ouisc Bigbee, Walter Baird. Verne Stacy. SFXOND ROW: Genevieve Wright. Bcrnadinc Newman. Jessie Ruth Nance. Nina Sue Gabbert, Carolyn Case. Elizabeth Fountain. I»i Travis. Alclha Mason. FIRST ROW: Wanda Christy. Helen Simpson. Helen Weir. Vesta Sears. Viola Wilson. Pearl Bennett, Margie Whydc. Mercedes Womack. Mary Holman. Mary Nolen. PAGE 64Class of '37 UPPER PANEL ------- TOP ROW. LEFT TO RIGHT: Alan Jacobson. Lloyd Cochran. Jack Maze, James Foster. Lee McKimson, Joseph Mattingly. FIFTH ROW: Lewis Johns, Robert lialsters, George Pitts. Gilbert Brewer, Tom Padget. Bill Hollis. Clysto Hatcher, Larn-ard Baker, Bill Stuart. FOURTH ROW: Melvin Foster. Jess Ruff. Charles McAllister. THORD ROW: Jeanette Mockerman, Shirley McCumber. Ruth Ray. Junior Shea. Paul Marshall, Juliun Conroy, Forrest Wollard, Albert Baker, Arthur Kahn. Ernest Hester. Wilburt Richardson. SECOND ROW: Ovctta Kennedy. Catherine Schwartz. Ruby Beebe. Onita Hays. Louise Woolcy. Mary Millspaugh. Maxine Howard. Mabel Foster. Esther Sisson. FIRST ROW: Alice Thompson, Mary Weisbach. Zona Russel. lone Hughes, Della Brown, Eleanor Williams, Evelyn Conelly, LeNorc Buck. Edna Austin. Opal Bair. LOWER PANEL TOP ROW. LEFT TO RIGHT: Kenneth Steele. Edwin Maier. Archie Gage. John Tufts. Kenneth Robinson. Norman Troxall. Robert Owen. Kenneth Miller. Carl McDaniel. Lloyd James, John Vaughn. Clarence Cook. Lehman Mohlcr. FOURTH ROW: Marlin Burkhart. Gene Birdxell, Clyde Bills. Kenneth Wales, Alden Wallings. Jack Craig. Howard Engleman. Kenneth Messncr. William Guthrie, Anther Hudgins, Marvin Laxzclle. THIRD ROW: Bobby Birgham, Erma Easley, Carmelita Rader, Marvin Shackleford, Golden Anna Rice. Mildred Haines, Eunice Hubbard. Louise Hughes. Glenda Harris, Jean Fitch. SECOND ROW: Nadine Stevens. Lois Laurent. Bernice Trenary, Zullcnc Blair. Mary Alice Ryan. Marion Stoffel, Twilah Scefeld. Fannie Palmer. Esther Reece. FIRST ROW: Merriane Greer. Marjorie Groves. Dorothy Guffey. Gwendolyn Grow, Audine White, Thelma Reynolds. Mary Higgins, Lois Jean Burks. Margaret Blass. Clara Nunley. PAGE G5 Jja■ Everett “Nick” Nicholson, B. S, teaches physiology, psychology, physical education for boys, and coaches all high school athletic teams. He is a clever diagnostician of rival attacks, and his teams may always depend on Nick to have the answer to a puzzling problem of a slick forward or a slippery quarterback when they meet for the half-time conference. Quiet, dignified, decisive, he handles his teams with precision and sympathetic understanding, engendering the complete respect of his fellows and of his boys. Hike! a Coach Everett Nicholson’s prospects for a successful football season looked better than usual this year. With ten lettermen reporting back for practice, Coach Nicholson built up one of the best teams that has represented Ark City. Starting out on one of the toughest schedules that has faced a high school team, the Bulldogs first met the Hutchinson Salt-Hawks. Playing inspired football, the Salt-Hawks upset the Bulldogs by one lone point, 7-6. The Bulldogs came back strong against their old rivals, ElDorado, and whipped them by a score of 25-0. Ark City’s next game was with Capitol High of Oklahoma City, claimant of the un-olTicial national football championship. The Bulldogs put up a scrappy fight, but were no match for their bigger rivals, losing out by the score of 33-0. Against Augusta, they eked out a 6-0 win when a thrilling pass, Anderson to Evans, game them a touchdown in the last seconds of play. Coming back strong in their next game, the Bulldogs trampled Pratt, who had previously beaten Hutchinson, 24-6. Newton was next on the schedule, but they did not have a chance. They went home on the short end of a 40-0 score. Against Harper the Bulldogs won out by the score of 19-6. The big Thanksgiving day classic, the game with the Wellington “Dukes”, was played at Wellington this year. The Dukes were slight favorites to win and the dope proved right, as the Crusaders won 21-0, in a game that was played in the cold and rain. Those lettermen who will be lost for next year are White, Bratches, Farrar, Coulson, Barton, Lohman, Chandler, Anderson, Evans, Lellnes, Gillespie, and Mastin. ■ Bill Farrar, center was elected honorary captain of the squad at the end of the season by his team-mates. Bill was a power in the middle of the line and made the second All Valley team. Victor Gillespie, end, another of those red-headed football players, was selected as All Valley second team end. Don Evans, halfback, playing his third year as a regular, proved to be one of the mainstays of the team. He made the All Valley second team. Ferrell Anderson, fullback, was selected as the All Valley fullback, living up to this by his steady playing in every game. George LeUnes, halfback, started out slow, but soon proved his worth in the backfield with his consistent play. Truel ShaefTer, end can be described only as a hard smashing end on defense and a real threat on offense. Millard White, tackle, completed his third year of football, still playing his usual good game. His strength was recognized by all and he was chosen co-captain of the All-Ark-Valley. Ira Miller, tackle, played a good brand of ball all season, although he was small for a tackle. Hampton Barton, guard, with Lohman, turned out to be a “No Trespassing” sign in the middle of the line. He was selected a third team All Valley guard. Bill Lohman, guard, was one of the best defensive and offensive guards our high school has known. This, coupled with his good sportsmanship, secured him the other third team guard position. Harold Bratches, quarterback, from his signal calling position in every game, could break away for some long run or snare a difficult pass. Harold was picked as third All Valley quarterback. George Griffith, tackle, was a substitute who was always ready to go in and do his part. He’ll be back. Donald Chandler, guard, played the whole season as alternate, proving himself to be a valuable man on the squad. Albert Coulson, end, was one of the best pass catchers on the team, and a real asset. Mack Gil-strap, halfback, as substitute proved his worth in all the games he played in. Kenneth Steele, quarterback, played a heads-up game through the season. He will be in there again next year. Alfred Howard, halfback, who is another Howard who can play football, has one more year to play for A. C. Bill Mastin, tackle was a good big man with the ability to go in and break up an opponent’s attack whenever called upon. Dale Hines, center, was one of the deadliest tackles on the squad. His playing was always steady and dependable. He’ll also be back. pack csShoot That Ball ■ The 1934-35 Bulldogs team started out their campaign with a warm-up game at Blackwell, but lost, 26-19. The next game was with the Oklahoma City team, which had beaten the Bulldogs in football. This game was sweet revenge for the Ark Citians, as they downed the Redskins 24-19. Opening up their Valley season in the Wichita gym, the Bulldogs showed a steady brand of ball to win 20-16. Next in line was the always dangerous railroaders from Newton. After one of the most exciting games of the season, Newton finally won, 21-18. Winfield, reputedly the cream of the Valley then, won out, 15-12. Wellington, alone in the cellar of the league, sprang a big upset to defeat Ark City, 21-19, though the next night the Bulldogs came through to smother the 1934 state champs, Emporia, 34-19. Renewing their Valley warfare against El Dorado ,the Bulldogs tamed the Wildcats in a fairly close game, 17-13. Hutchinson, after defeating Winfield, came to Ark City, the favorites, but the Salt-Hawks were defeated by a powerful Ark City attack, 28-13. El Dorado was again defeated, this time 20-16. Winfield, the leader of the Valley at that time, was handed their worst defeat by a plucky band of Bulldogs, 20-12. In a fast and exciting game Newton, the next opponent, finally won out, 32-25. The Bulldogs then took revenge over Wellington by defeating them 37-15. The Redskins of North, in the next home game, could never cope with the superior playing of Ark City, and lost, 32-17. In the last game of the Valley season, Hutchinson won from Ark City in an over-time period, 15-13, this defeat pushing Ark City into fourth place, with seven victories and five losses. ■ Ark City drew Anthony for their first game of the regional tournament at Wellington, and humbled her, 73-16. A victory over Cathedral of Wichita, 30-20, put Ark City in the finals, and with a trip to the state meet at Topeka as the prize for the winner, Ark City defeated Winfield 35-18, playing the best ball of the season. In the first round of the state tournament, the Bulldogs defeated Pittsburgh 30-20. The next game was with the undefeated Chanute team, strong favorites to win the championship. After playing the most exciting game of the tournament, Chanute nosed out Ark City by the close score of 23-22. Chanute won the title by crushing Winfield in the finals, 46-25. The 1935 Bulldog squad boasts a record of 14 victories against 6 losses. Those members of the squad who will be lost for next year arc Millard White, Harold Bratches, Chester Steffens, Bill Farrar, Ferrell Anderson, Vic Gillespie, and Bob Lefler. , 3 Harold Bratches, guard, attained all possible honors in basketball, being named on the All-Valley team, and on the All-State Honor Roll. At the end of the season he was chosen honorary captain of the team. Chester Steffens, forward, was one of the most important cogs of the team. When the game became a close one, you could always count on him to come through. He received honorable mention on the All-Valley team. Paul Quinn, forward, broke into the Bulldog lineup this year, and he is expected to be one of the mainstays of the team next year. He was made a forward on the All-Valley third team. Millard White, center, was the big boy of the Ark Valley, proving his worth by being a tower of strength on defense as well as being offensively strong under the basket. He made honorable mention on the All-Valley team and was named All-Tourney center in the regional. Bruce Reid, guard, could always come through when the going was rough. He should be one of the best guards in the Valley by next year. Bill Farrar, alternating at forward and center this year, played in nearly every game and always made a good showing for himself. Bob Lefler, substituting at guard, although a first year man, played a good brand of ball. Richard Colopy found himself mid-way through the season, and was on the squad at both tournaments. Victor Gillespie, due to an early season injury and a mid-season illness was hindered a great deal, but despite these, he performed one of the important roles of utility man. Ferrell Anderson, playing his third year in the substitute role, was always ready to go out and do his job. “Crash” was never bothered with any stage-fright, and played a steady game. PAGE CDTrack « « « Intramural Volleyball UPPER PANEL- — BACK ROW.Left to Right Alex Cain. Donald Evans. Leon Schucsslcr. Victor Gillespie, Bill Lohman, Kenneth Buzxi, Harold Carmichael, Ell Cain. FRONT ROW: Coach Nicholson, Kenneth Steele. Vernon MofTitt, Paul Quinn, Kenneth Ro'dnson, Marvin Jones, Norman Evans. LOWER PANEL------ STANDING. Left to Right: Emma Much, Marie Miller. Margaret Lowery. Miss Grace Pets. Betty Brady. Alta Coulson, Macdcan Miller. SEATED: Lucille Sharpe. Colcta Close, captain. Mildred Lock. PAGE 70Tennis UPPER PANEL — STANDING. I-c-ft to ri«ht, Arnell Wallace, Hetty Townslcy. Ermal Burnett, Grace Newman, Maedean Miller, Joan Meeker. Barbara Glat-fcider, June Jacobs. SEATED. Helen Dorrance, Jacqueline Burnett. Emma Much, Dorothy Probst, Julia Shea, Lura Fity-jcerald. LOWER PANEL BACK ROW. Left to ritrht: Bob Lefler. Bill Farrar, Bruce Reid, Howard Knjcleman. FRONT ROW. Lawrence Pipkin. Raymond Ausmus, Chester StefTins, Duane Crill. PAGE 71Cinder Men ALTHOUGH last year’s team was a slow starting team, and was characterized by a good many sports writers as the “dark horse” of the valley, they rose to the top of the cinder path, reaching its peak when it brought home the trophy from the annual K. U. relays. Entering the state meet, the Bulldogs also made a record for themselves. This year with the record of former teams behind them, Arkansas City’s track team started out with the will and the courage to win each meet. The seniors easily walked away with the intcrclass meet, which was only natural, as the main stays of the team were seniors. Inviting Winfield for a meet the next week the Bulldogs defeated the Vikings with little trouble, conquering them in almost every event. In the big night meet on thp Athletic Field, Ark City, with its usual form, walked away from the other four entries. Especially powerful in the weights the Bulldogs had three big men, to put the shot, hurl the javelin and throw the discus. White, Matheismeier, and Carmichael carried the heaviest burdens in these events. In the hurdles, Evans, Moffitt, and Gilstrap were the leading contenders, men who could be depended on to do their best for the school. In the middle distance run, Norman Evans, Leon Schucsslcr, Bill Lohman, Kenneth Steele, and Truel Shaffer were the fellows who could be depended upon. In the pole vault, Paul Quinn, Victor Gillespie, and Edwin Maier were the regular men, and the mile relay team, acknowledged one of the best in the state, was composed of Kenneth Steele, Alex Cain, Ell Cain, and Donald Evans. The high jump was a strong event for A. C. this year, and we were always sure of placing in this event. Alex Cain and Ell Cain could always be depended on to jump over six feet and Paul Quinn came in for some good jumping on his part. Those fellows who will be lost next year ai’c Millard White, Harold Carmichael, Norman Evans, Bill Lohman, Leon Schuessler, Victor Gillespie, and Donald Evans. Although it is not possible to give complete results of the season here, outlooks predict a outstanding year in track for the Bulldogs. ■ For many years, intramural volleyball has been played in the school, and each year the commercial department has always had the winning team. This year, the conference team of Miss Grace Petz won, coming up from behind to nose out their rival, Miss Davis’ conference by some brilliant playing in the finals. The team was captained by Colcta Close. This activity, started in order to give every girl in high school a chance to participate in volleyball games, allows those not in the physical education classes to take part in the game. Tenni ms ■ The tennis team for this year was composed entirely of veterans of the last year’s squad, who showed up well in early season games. The team is going to the Tri-State meet at Tulsa, Okla. after which it will go to the Ark Valley meet at Wichita. The prospects for both of these meets are very good as the Arks have shown much power in their matches against Ark Valley opponents. The heavy part of the load will be carried by Chester Steffens who won a third in the Ark Valley meet last year. Bob Lofler, Bruce Reid, and Lawrence Pipkin, a soph who has upset some of the better tennis players this year and a man to watch out for next year, will probably carry the remaining part of a well balanced team. ■ Seeking the championship of the classes, the senior volleyball team, captained by Ermal Burnett, first opposed the sophomores during the winter months. Three games were played, the sophomores winning one and the seniors two to get the right to play the juniors. With teams evenly matched, the two classes played their best. Each team won one game and the third game to decide the winner was a long one, the decision first seeming to be in the hands of one and then in the hands of the other. With a sudden spurt of enthusiasm the seniors won the point to clinch the title and the chanpionship for another year. The members of the team were Helen Hight, June McMichael, Margaret Seal, Lucille Brooks, Betty Townslcy, Barbra Glatfelder, Lura Fitzgerald, Julia Shea, Ruth Wahlenmaier, Mablc Baird, Ilabele Gillock, Erma G. McCammon, and Ermal Burnett. PAGE 72Calendar SEPTEMBER 10. School days begin, class daze begins, sun blaze continues. 11. Lockers assigned to victims. What luck! 12. It looks more like spring than autumn. Every place you look you see a sophie. 13. Will Friday ever come? 14. Conferences elect cashiers, all good mathematicians, of course. Incidentally it’s Friday. Rah, Rah, Rah. 15. More than a hundred boys sign up for glee club. So that was the funny noise we heard. 18. Exactly 121 girls join glee club. 19. Seniors elect Jack Axley president after much cussing and discussing. Other classes hold elections too. 20. First Ark Light appears after many hours of searching for news by a green staff. 21. Friday again. 24. Pep Club elections made. "Tramp, tramp, tramp, the boys are coming.” 25. Student Council meets for first time. What a fight. 27. First assembly. Welcome, dear sophies. 28. Conferences elect officers after much disscn-tion. OCTOBER 1. Miss Esther Denton arrives to take the place of Miss Edith Ames, who has resigned to teach at an Indian Agency in New Mexico. 2. Mirror pledges are issued after many pep talks and passionate pleadings on the part of the seniors. 5. Ray, We're going to have a Mirror. 8. Typical Blue Monday 10. Senior Council meets for the first time to select jewelry. 11, 12, 13. Eight journalists go to Kansas City to attend N. S. P. A. Convention. What fun! We have a big pep rally to celebrate our first home game. 17. The Reverend Poling speaks to us on prohib- ition. He says the country should go dry. It was a "powerful” wet day. 18. We hold a contest to stir enthusiasm for the Capitol Hill game. 19. We lose to the national champs in abig way. 24. First grade cards are out. Is life worth living? Also first lyceum number. Pollard players entertain us. 25. G. R.’s entertain their mothers with a Hallowe’en tea. 26. We beat Augusta in the last few seconds of the game, 6-0 31. Everybody but the pep club gets out of school all afternoon. They have to march in the Arkalalah parade. Such is life. NOVEMBER 1, 2. Rah! no school, on account of the teacher’s convention. Would that school were always like this. 6. Most of the journalism class helps the Traveler get election returns. Now they say they are really reporters. 7. Journalists look a bit tired this morning after an all night session. 9. We play Newton here. Beat’em too, 40-0. 13, 14, 15, G. R. and Hi-Y sponsor Week of Prayer. 15. We have our teeth inspected. We tank we go home. 23. Hi-Y goes to a convention. 27. Lyceum “Musical Moments” given. 29. Thanksgiving game at Wellington this year. Their game, 21-0 30. No school on account of Thanksgiving. Our debate team goes to Southwestern for tourney. 4. Nine seniors are elected to National Honor Society. Congratulations are in order. PAGE 73Calendar 5. Grade cards for the second period arc out. We’ve improved a little bit—a very little bit. 6. Honor Society inductions are held to the tune of clanking of knees. 10. Virginia Holman and Victor Bryant are chosen as editor and business manager of next year’s Mirror. 14. Public Speaking play, “Broken Dishes” is a big success. Marguerite Spratt and Dick A. Howard do well as the romantic young couple. 18, 19. The annual “Messiah” is presented. "Hallelujah, Hallelujah”. 21. School is adjourned ‘til January 2. Ah! Merry Christmas to you and a Happy New Year! 22. We start to catch up with our sleep. 27. We're still catching up with our sleep. JANUARY 1. Lots of bells and noise usher in the New Year. 2. Back to school, looking as if we hadn’t seen a bed even once during the vacation. That’s the way New Year’s eve always effects us though 4. We play Winfield here in a hot basketball game. They beat us, 15-12. Tough. 7. We decide to form a junior police force to arrest people who don’t keep the traffic rules. Better watch your step. 11. Wellington beats us 23-21 in a close game. How sad. 12. Bulldogs trounce Emporia’s state champs 34- 19. What a game. 18. Teachers show up our basketball team with a thrilling game in chapel this morning. Incidentally our own team wins from ElDorado 17-13. This is the end of the semester, too. Only one more to go, seniors. 21. New semester begins. Good luck. Lucille Elmore entertains us in lyceum. 22. Conference elections are held for second semester. 23. Grade cards appear with semester grades on them. Such is life. 25. We trim Hutchinson 28-13. FEBRUARY 1. Bulldogs are victors over ElDorado in a hard fight 20-16. 7. Honor Society initiations are held. 9. Ark Valley debates are held in Wichita. We tied with ElDorado for fourth place. 11. Lorado Taft speaks at the annual presentation of the city teachers association. 14. Valentine Day, today. The G. R.’s entertain their fathers tonight with a big feed in the junior high cafeteria. 15. High school is beat by Newton 32-25. 18. P. T. A. founders day is held. 20. Ambassador quartet entertains us in lyceum. 21. K. U. Men’s Glee Club sings in lyceum. Girl’s, remember we still have a junior college, you don’t have to go to K. U., but, of course, you can. 22. We double the score on Wellington. Revenge is sweet! . MARCH 3. Principal Funk and Supt. C. E. St. John return from annual N. E. A. convention in Atlantic City with lots of ideas to run the school for another year. 13. Ark Valley oratory contest is held at Newton. 14. Regional basketball tournament begins to-day. We beat Anthony in first round of play. 15. More regional. We win another game. 16. We win the regional! Also a grand and glor-rious dust storm is ushered in. 18. Nine more seniors are elected to Honor Society, I'AGB 74Calendar 20. We have a pep chapel to send fellows on their way to the state basketball tourney. Also another dust storm begins. 21. We win our first game in the state. 22. We lost our second game to Chanute, but don’t feel so bad, because they went on and won the tournament. It’s not so much disgrace to be beaten by the champions. Anyway, they only beat us one point. 25. Six juniors are elected to Honor Society. 27. Madeline Miller is elected Girl Reserve president for next year. Will Etta Long will be vice-president, Dorothy Heathman, secretary, Twilah Seefeld, treasurer, and Jeanne Belt, student- council representative. APRIL 4. Honor Society induction ceremony is held in chapel. The Ark Light issues the annual and very famous April Fool edition. 5. Big parade of Christian organizations is held and we get out of school at 3:00 o'clock. Big track meet is held. We win. 6. Ark City’s typing teams placed second in the district typing contest at Winfield. 7. “Chimes of Normandy”, annual opera, is presented. It goes over with a bang. 10. Ark Valley extemp contest is held at Hutchinson. A big dust storm hits the city, and school is dismissed at 3:20, so we can go home and keep out of the dust. We went home? 11. Seniors rush around in a last big effort to sell tickets to the senior play tonight. 12. Senior play, “Big Hearted Herbert” is a success. Hugh Gillespie is a “roaring” hit in the title role 13. G. R. service day is held. 16. Hi-Y elects officers for next year. Albert • Lambert is president. 18. School is dismissed for the Easter vacation. Now for seme rest. 21. We wear our new Easter outfits. 23. School convenes this morning. We were afraid this would happen. 26. Juco play, “In the Garden of the Moon”. is given. The seniors are in the movie3 now. Harold Loucks took films of th?m in front of the school. MAY 1. G. R. Mother-Daughter banquet and installation services held. 4 3. Tigerama! Seniors buy some new clothes, and turn out in a big way for the annual college affair. All about tennis, love sets, and fast and slow balls. Seniors should know about such things, or should they? 7. Ark Light staff puts out the Traveler. They rushed ar.d ran, but there just wasn’t any news to be found. 17. Seniors dress up today for their last fling at youth and gayety. Class picnics are held, lots of fun ar.d lots of steaks. What more ou!d one ask? 22. Mirror party is held in the school. The annual is out ar.d over. Lots of signing and moaning 24. Civilization is saved for another three months. School is out. 25. Baccalaureate is tonight. 27. G:ade cards are issued for the last time this yeai Graduation exercises are held tonight. Goodbye, seniors. PACK 75Index Abernathy, Louis ...................30, 36 Adkins, Louella ........................12 Aleshire, Howard ...................36 Alford, Eugene .................... ... 36 Allard, Charles .............9, 31, 54, 50 Allen, Jack ............................12 Alsip, Carl ............................36 Amos, Virginia .....................46, 59 Anderson, Ferrell ... 12, 31, 54, 66, 67 Ausmus, Raymond ...34, 36, 47, 54, 50, 71 Austin, Edna .......................... 65 Axlev, Jack ....................11, 26, 27 B Baber, Albert ..........................65 Bair, Opal .........................12, 65 Baird, Mabel .................. 12, 31, 59 Baird, Walter ................. 54, 55, 64 Baker, Larnard .....................27, 65 Balsters, Robert .......................65 Baringer, Paul .....................36, 54 Baringer, Lora .....................12, 58 Barton, Hampton ............ 9, 12, 30, 66 Barton, Robert .........................12 Bays, Olga .............................36 Bazil, Dorothy .........................36 Beatson, Donald ... 9, 11, 12, 26, 27, 62 Beck, Helen ........................12, 58 Beckelheimer, Dwight ...............30, 36 Bechelheimer, Margaret................. 64 Beebe, Ruby ........................65, 46 Beekman, Martha ... .12, 31, 46, 50 Beckman, Ralph .........................12 Belden, Helen ................. ... 36, 51 Belt, Jeanne .................. 26, 36, 54 Benjamin, David .................. 64, 67 Bennett, Angie .....................36, 46 Bennett, Pearl .........................64 Bernard, Henry .........................12 Bigbee, Louise .........................64 Bigbee, Mary .......................36, 46 Bigley, Virginia ........:............. 36 Billings, Raymond ............. 54, 64, 31 Bills, Clyde 65 Binford, Harold 12, 42, 43 Birdzell, Gene .................... 30, 65 Birgham, Bob .......................... 65 Bishop, Walter .................. 36, 54 Blackwell, Nadine ..................12, 46 Blair, Zellenc .................... 65, 46 Blass, Margaret, .................... 65 Blood, Bill 64 Bornhouser, Irene .. 64 Bowen, Roberta 11, 13, 26, 31, 34, 46, 50 Bowman, Kenneth ..................... . 13 Bowman. Marion ................. 13 27, 58 Bradbury, Marvin .......................13 Brady, Betty ...................... 36, 70 Branum, Jack .................. 36, 50, 51 Bratches, Harold .... 13, 27, 31, 55. 58 66, 67, 50 Breeden. Helen ........................ 13 Brenz, Betty .......................63, 46 Brewer, Gilbert ..................... 65 Brewster, Helen ....................... 13 Brill, Nina Mae ................... 36, 51 Broderson, Evelyn 64, 46 Brooks, Lucille .. 13, 26, 31, 34, 58, 59 Brown, Bob .............................36 Brown, Carl ....................... 13, 30 Brown, Earl .......................... 13 PAGE 76 Brown, Della ..........................6o Brown, Leo ..........................— 36 Brown, Vivian, ...................36, 54, 50 Browne, Berniecc ..... 13, 31, 55, 46, 50 Bryan, Alice ......................13, 42 Bryant, lone ......................64, 46 Bryant, Victor............ 9, 26, 31, 36, 42 Buck, LeNox-e .........................65 Buechner, Mable ...... ........... 13, 31 Burkhart, Marlin ......................65 Bui-ks, Lois ..................... 36, 65 Bux ks, Lois Jean ..............9, 31, 46 Burks, Veda ..........................36 Buimett, Arlene ...................13, 58 Burnett, Ermal ........... 13, 31, 59, 71 Burnett, Jacqueline 31, 36, 54, 62, 50, 71 Burnett, Margai-et .................. 14 Burns, Bill ......................36, 66, 51 Bui-ton, John .....................14, 55 Buzzi, Kenneth ....................14, 70 Buzzi, Richard .......................14 C Cain, Alex ........................63, 70 Cain, Ell ........................ 63, 70 Caine, Evelynne .............. 63, 46, 50 Caine, Mary ...........14, 27, 55, 46, 50 Campbell, Jack .......................64 Cax-mens, Eva Mae ....................14 Carmichael, Harold ................14, 70 Cannon, Albert ....................... 36 Case, Arlene ............. 31, 36, 54, 59 Case, Cai-oline ......................64 Casement, Helen....................... 36 Chambers, Ernestine . .14 Chandler, Donald 9, 14, 30, 31, 34, 66 Chandlei-, Eunice .................. . 36 Childs, John L........................ 30 Childs, Goldie _______________________ 36 Christy, Jerry 31. 35. 50, 51 Christy. Wanda ............. 31, 64, 46 Clack, Robei ta ...................... 14 Clark, Howard............. 31, 36, 54, 50 Clark, Robert ............ 31, 36, 54, 50 Clevenger, Mildred ................36, 54 Close, Coleta .................36, 50, 70 Cochran, Lloyd ................... 65, 67 Colopy, Harry .............11, 50, 58, 51 Colopy, Richard ...................36, 67 Connely, Evelyn ...................65, 46 Conrad, Loren .................... 14, 51 Conrad, Ross .......... 9, 31, 36, 54, 50 Conroy, Julian ........................65 Cook, Clarence ................... 30, 65 Cook, John ....................... 30, 64 Cook. Mable 14, 55, 58, 46 Copeland, William ................... 36 Coulson, Albei-t ............ .14, 31, 66 Coulson, Alta ........................ 35 Counts. Ruby ................. 37, 46, 50 Cox. Marvelle .................... 63, 46 Craig, Jack ...................... 30, 65 Ciemo, Major.......................... 63 Grill, Duane ... 31, 37, 54, 58, 66, 50, 71 Crill, Marjorie ...... 31, 54, 63, 46, 50 Cross, Chester ....................... 37 Crouch Dale ...........................14 Curfman, Kathryn ........... ” " 63, 46 Curfman, Keith ......... . 26, 54, 64, 51 Curfman, Kenneth 14, 26, 34, 47, 50. 54. 55. 51, 67 Custer, Raymond 27, 37, 67Index D Dailey, Cole ......... Darby, Charles........ Davis, Delores ....... Davis, Earl .......... Day, Hope ............ Day, Virginia......... Decker, Roy .......... Dee, Virginia ........ Dempsey, Neila Belle Deskins, Billy ....... Dickey, Irma.......... Dickson, La Vein ..... Dillon, Gilbert ...... Dixon, Margaret ...... Doramus, Kenneth Dorrance, Helen ....... ............26, 37 .....64, 31 ................15 ................15 31, 37, 47, 46, 50 ...9, 31, 37, 47, 58 ................ 63 Z7.'ZZZZ.'Z' n ........37, 51 -....... I 87 ............64, 51 .........31, 37, 46 ................15 37, 54, 50, 71 Easley, Erma ..........................65 Easterday, Helen ......................15 Eaton, Charles ...................37, 51, 50 Edwards, Claire ..................63, 46 Edwards, Lyle .........................64 Ellis, Carmen .........................37 Ellis, Walter .........................63 Elston, Bob ..........................37 Engleman, Howard ... 9, 31, 42, 63, 65, 67, Evans, Audrey ....................15, 37, 46 Evans, Donald .....15, 31, 54, 66, 50, 70 Evans, Norman 9, 15, 31, 34, 51, 70 F Fanning, Harold ....................._...37 Farrar, Bill 11, 15, 27, 31, 34, 43, 54, 66, 67, 50, 71 Faulconei , Bob ............31, 37, 54, 50 Ferguson, Billy .........................37 Fields, Frances ........................37, 46 Finney, James ..................15, 54, 50 Fisher, Riley ...........................64 Fiske, Leora ............................15 Fitch, Jean .............................65 Fitzgerald, Lura .. 15, 31, 54, 51, 59, 71 Fleming, Ruby...........................15, 46 Focht, Helen .......11, 15, 27, 31, 34, 55 Foltz, Walter ...........................63 Foster, James ......................30, 65 Foster, Mabel ...........................65 Fostei , Melvin ....................54, 65 Fountain, Elizabeth _.......64 Fountain, Jaunita, .............15, 34, 46 Fravel, Jessie .....................58, 63 Franklin, Betty .........................37 Franklin, La Vern ..................64, 46 Frary, Carrie ...........................15 Freeman, LeMoyne ...............15, 47, 54 G Gabbert, Nina Sue .... Gage, Archie ......... Gage, Conrad ......... Galloway, Helen ...... Gamble, Hal .......... Garrison, Maxine Geer, Evangeline ..... Gephart, Helen ....... Getter, Milton ....... Giboney, Robert ...... Gibson- Catherine .... Gibson, Hoover ....... Gibson, Jack ......... Gibson, James ...............64 ............30 65 ..........37 ....64 64 ......46, 16, 50 ....37, 54- 29 16 .47, 54, 63, 50 ... 31, 37, 42 ...31, 64, 46 ...16, 54, 50 .....54, 64 ........9, 37 Gillespie, Hugh . 16. on ,9 Gilftl?1 9- 16V 3i, 54. 66, el; IS Gilliland, Willie ..........................‘H jock, Ilabelle ........ Vfi Ofi ko Gillock, Robert ...........16» 26» g Gilmore, Edythe 7S"g SKMF. 81- sssrasas . - n Go Si0" I.16’ 27' «• « Goff, Laureda ... ................q7 6°: H sfg Graves, Kenneth ............... ’ 37 Greer, Marion .......... .........gg Griffith- George ... 31 37 ka Grim, Dean .... ZZftftS Groves, Marjorie 65, 46 Grow, Gwendolyn ...........50, 65, 51 Guffey, Dorothy .......... 3lf 65, 46 Gutherie, William ...... 50, 54, 65, 51 Garner, Everett ........26, 37, 42, 51 H Hadley, Marjorie ............ 63, 46 Haines, Melvin .........16, 27, 54, 50 Haines, Mildred ............................65 Hall, Jack ................. 42, 64 Hall, Richard....... 37, 54, 66, 51, 50 Hamilton, Bette ..............63, 46 Hamilton, Rose .. 16 Hamm, Roland ............................ 17 Harden, Gail .... 9, 35, 37, 55 Harder, Pat ...................17, 27 Harger, Clovis ............................17, Hargrove, Bernicce, ........................17 Harlowe, Harry ............................ 17 Harlow, Willard ............................64 Harmon, Theron . 9, 17, 27, 31, 34, 43, 62 Harp, Aubrey ...............................17 Harper, Margaret ...........................37 Harrington, Virginia ..........37, 46 Harris, Glenda ................65, 51 Harvey, Mary ..................17, 34 Hatcher, Clysto ............................65 Hays, Harold ..................38, 54 Hays, Onita ...................65, 46 Hays, Mildred .......... 17, 43, 46, 50 Heard, Helen 38, 54, 50 Heathman, Dorothy Helen 38, 54, 58, 59 Hellyer, Sarah Marie .................... 63 Henderson, Frank ......... 27, 38, 58 Henderson, Mary ...............31, 64 Hendricks, Mary ............................64 Hendryx, Bill .................9, 38 Hester, Earnest ........................... 65 Heuszel, Virginia .............17, 46 Higbee, Delbert ...............30, 38 Higgins. Mary .................•-65 Hieht. Helen .............. -17, 59 Hill, Analee ... 9, 17, 27, 31, 34, 47, 55, 50 Hill, Madge ..............-.38 59 Hines, Dale ............ —81, 38, 66 Holcomb. Reid .............27, 64, 67 Hollis, Bill ..................■—g Hollis Jack .... .......................... 54 Holman Virginia - - 34, 35, 47, 55, 46, 50 Holman, Mary ..................64, 46 PACE 77Index Holmes, Nadine .......................38, -12 Hopkins, Gladys ......................38, 64 Horton, Jack ......................... 31 Howard, Maxine ....................65, 46 Howard, Dick A....... 26, 31, 38, 42, 50 Howard, Dick F....... 17, 27, 31, 34, 55 Howard, Alfred ...............31, 38, 66 Howard, William .......................64 Howes, Craig ......................54, 63 Howes, Jean .. ...............17, 31, 58 Hubbard, Eunice .......................65 Hudgins, Anther ...................54, 65 Huff. Gordon ..........................64 Hughes, lone ..........................65 Hughes, Louise ........................65 HugKes, Mary ..........................38 Hughes, Ruth ..........................17 Huntley, Weldon ...................... 35 Hylton, Thelma ........................18 Ingram, Lottie ....................... 64 J Jack, William ............... 27, 38, 67 Jackson, Carl .....................35, 54 Jackson, Marie ........................18 Jacobson. Alan ........................65 Jagars, Maxine ........................3S James, Lloyd ......................... 65 Jacobs, June ................ 38, 46, 71 Johns, Louis ......................... 65 Jones, Marvin ............... 64, 66, 70 K Kafka, Frank ..........................38 Kelleher. Edward ......................38 Kelley, Loren .........................64 Kelsey, Louise ....................... 64 Kemper, Louise ....................38, 46 Kennedy, Ovetta .......................65 Kimmell, Oscar ....................... 38 Kimsey, Floyd '.'f........... 38, 54, 66 Kinnamon. Ross..... 18, 34, 43, 47, 50, 54 Kizer, Ada ............................18 Kittrell, Verenda .....................38 Kncdlcr. Ruth ... 18, 26, 27, 31, 34, 43, 50 58 51 Knight, Alfred ....................... 64 Koger, Dorothy .............. 38, 54, 50 Kuhn, Mae Evelyn ................. 18, 58 Kuhn, Mary Kay ...............31, 38, 50 L Lamey, Ida Mae.........................18 Lamey, Lucille ........................18 Lambert, Albert...............38, 50, 51 Lawrence, James .................. 38, 66 Lazzclle. Marvin ..................... 65 Leach, Robert .....................18, 55 Lefler, Robert ... 18, 27, 31, 42, 67, 71 Lane, Marjorie ....................... 64 Laurent, Lois .........................65 Lemert, Ruth ..............18, 31, 46, 50 Lester, Betty .....................64, 46 LeUnes. George ....................38. 66 Lewis, Alice ... ............ 38, 54, 58 Lewis, Elizabeth ..................64, 46 Lewis, Raymond ........................63 Lind, George ......................... 38 Liningcr, Elsie ..............18, 27, 55 Lininger, Wilma ...................38, 59 Lock, Clarence ....................... 18 Lock, Mildred .....................38, 70 Logan, Vivian ........................ 38 Lohman, Bill ............18, 31, 66, 0 Long, Willetta M....................18, 58 Long, Will Etta ....................38, 51 Long, R. M. .................... Love, Ephriam —......................e4 Lowery, Margaret ...38, 46, 70 Lundy, Grant ................-...rr-jg Luper, Lorene ................... Lytle, Rosa Lee .......................38 M Magnus, Harold ....................27, 64 Maier, Edwin .........26, 54, 65, 67, 50 Maier, Samuel ... 19, 26, 31, 34, 47, 54, 50 Malcolm, Eugene .............-......64 Markland, Dorothy .................64, 46 Marshall, Mable .................. 38, 54 Marshall, Paul ...............27, 58, 65 Martin, Helen Betty ......19, 31, 34, 46 Martin John ...........................64 Mason, Aletha ........................-64 Mastin, Bill ................19. 31, 66 Mathismeier, James ....................39 Matthews, Betty .......................39 Mattingly, Joseph ................54, 65 Mayhill, Noble ...................... 39 Maze, Jack .............. 27, 54, 58, 65 McAlester, Charles ....................65 McCall, Martha J. 9, 39, 54, 51, 50 McCammon, Erma Gene 19, 31, 54, 51, 50 59 McClanahan, Bob ......... 31, 39, 50, 51 McCumber, Shirley .....................65 McDaniel, Carl ........................65 McDaniel, Forrest ... 19, 27 McDonough, Mary G......19, 31, 47, 50, 51 McDonough, Richard ....................39 McGee, Dorothy ........................19 McGill, Nellie ....................... 35 McGuairk, Mary E...................19, 46 McKcever, Leonard ................39, 54 McKimson, Lee ....................30, 65 McMichael, June ..............19, 31, 59 McNair, Dorothy ............. 64, 46, 31 Meek, Elizabeth 19, 26, 27, 34 Meeker, Joan ......................39, 71 Mendenhall, Mark ......................39 Menish, Jack ..........................19 Messner, Kenneth .........31, 55, 65, 67 Millard, Jack ................... 54, 64 Miller, Ira 64, 66 Miller, Kenneth ............. 54, 64, 65 Miller, Kenneth ............. 54, 64, 65 Miller, Le Roy ........................19 Miller, Lynn ..........................19 Miller, Maedcan 39, 54. 70, 71. 59 Miller, Medean ...... 39, 54, 70, 71, 59 Miller, Marie ................ 39 54, 70 Millspangh. Mary ......................65 Mitchell, David ..............31, 39, 54 Mitchell, Voncile ................39, 46 Mochcrman, Marvin .....................64 Mocherman, Jeanette .................. 65 Moffett, Vernon ..............9, 64, 70 Moffitt, Vivian ................. 19, 58 Mohler, Lehman ........................65 Montague, Glen .................... 9, 42 More, Douglas ................ . 50, 51 Mooney, Robert ...................50, 51 Morlan, Nora .................19, 26’, 31 Morris, Dorothy ..................... 39 Morrison, Dorothy ............... 39, 59 PAGE 78Index Morrow, Warren .......... Moyer, Marjorie .............. Much, Emma .............. 35, 70, Musson, Bud ................. 20 Musson, Virginia ............. Murphy, Willie .. Myers, Lorene ......... 9, 20, N Naden, Donald ............... 20, Nance. Jessie Ruth ............ Nance, Marcia .. ... Newman, Alice 9, 31, 39, 47, 54, Newman, Bernadine ......... Newman, Clyde ................20, Newman, Grace ... 34, 39, 55, 58, 71, 59 Newman, Lou Belle ....... 20, 34, Nolen, Mary .................. Norton, Mauricia .......... Nunley, Clara ................ O Ogren, Margaret ..... 31, 47, 63, Olinger, Joseph ........... Orin, Aldo ................ Owen, Robert .............. Ozbun, Marie .............. .....64 20, 46 71, 59 30, 55 .....20 39, 58 31, 43 31, 43 64 20, 58 62, 50. 64, 46 50, 51 46, 50 51, 50 64, 46 20, 43 .... 65 46, 50 .....64 on .30," 65 .....39 Pack, Anita .......................20, 46 Padgett, Thomas .......................65 Palmer, Beatrice ..................20, 46 Palmer, Fannie ....................... 65 Palmer, Maxine ............ 9, 20, 31, 46 Parman, Luther ........... 20, 31, 43, 54 Payton, Willis ........................39 Payton, Worth .....................39, 58 Peavy, Warren ..................... .. 63 Peterson, Dorothy ................ 55, 64 Petty, Bessie ........................ 64 Pfisterer, Kathleen 55, 63, 46 Pfisterer, Louise ............ 20, 46, 50 Pickett, Margaret ........ 9, 39, 54, 50 Pickett, Mary Catherine .......63, 51, 46 Pipkin, Lawrence ............. 54, 64, 71 Pitts, George ......... 27, 54, 58, 63, 65 Pointer, Beulah .................. 20, 46 Probst, Dorothy ...... 39, 55, 58, 71, 59 Purinton, Buena .......................35 Putnam, Warren ... 9, 21, 26, 27, 31, 34, 54, 55, 50 Q Quinn, John .................. 31, Quinn, Paul ........... —- 39, Quinn, R. B...... 21, 26, 42, 9, 54, R Rader, Carmelita ................ Rahn, Arthur .................... Ralf, Mary Jane ................. Ramey, Charlene ................. Ramey, Keith .................... Ramsey, Robert .................. Ransome, Rosella ................ Rawlings, Elsie ................. Ray, Ruth ....................... Rector, Jack .................... Reece, Esther ...............•••-• Reed, Ernestine ...............21, Reeder, Sara ....................• Reid, Bruce .......... 31, 39, 54, Repenhagen, Edna ................ 47, 64 67, 70 62, 50 65, 46 30, 65 39, 46 39, 46 39, 54 ....39 ....39 ....63 ....65 27 65, 46 58, 46 21, 31 67, 71 ....38 Reynolds, George 21 54 Reynolds, Thelma 54’ 22 Reynolds, Wayne .. Richardson. Wilbert Rice, Golden Anna Rice, Ruby ............ Richards, Doris Richardson. Lola .............54, 64 65 54 ....39, 54 39 Roberson, Hugh........... 21 27 n Robertson, Elizabeth .... ’ ’ J54 Robertson, Pauline .................. "'39 Robinson, Kenneth ................. 65 70 Ronsick, Lois ' 39 Ruckel, Jay 34, 89, 50. 51 Ruff, Jess .............................65 Russell, Zona Mae ... ”. 65 Rutter, Homer ......................... 30 Ryan, Mary.................HJZZ 65, 46 Rymph, Edith .......................... 39 Ryman, Robert..................21, 27, 54 Ryman, Viola .......................... 39 S Sandefur, Frances ............ 21, 55, 46 Schlecht, Carl ........................ 21 Schuessler, Leon ............. 21, 55, 70 Schwartz, Catharine ................ .65 Schwartz, Joe..................21, 54, 58 Scott, Alvin ................. 27, 40, 58 Scott, Edith ..................... 21, 31 Scott, Eugene ..........................64 Scott, Leon ...................... 27, 63 Scott, Wilma ...........................40 Scruton, Albert ........................21 Scruton, Robert ........................21 Seal, Karen Nada ..................21, 58 Seal, Margaret ........... 22, 54, 50, 59 Sears. Vesta ......................... .64 Seefeld, Donald .... 31, 40, 55 Seefeld. Twilah ........................65 Shakelford, Marvin ................65, 66 Shaffer, Truel ... ..... 40, 54, 66 Sharpe. Lucille.............. 40, 55, 70 Shea, John ................. 31, 54, 63 Shea, Julia 22, 26, 34, 54, 50, 71, 59 Shea, William ............ 50, 54, 65, 51 Shelhamer, Captola .... 9, 26, 40, 47, 50 Sherwood, Edward 64 Sherwood, William .................22, 50 Shoupe, Esther ................40, 58, 46 Shupe, Carol ...........................64 Sidener, Ruth ..........................40 Simpson. Helen .........................64 Sisson, Esther ................... 65, 46 Sisson, George ............... 54, 63, 51 Smaller. Catherine .............. 40, 50 Smith, Carol .................... 40, 54 Smith, Edgar 22, 30 Smith, Frances .........................22 Smith, Junior ................ 22, 54, 50 Smith, Mary Frances ...............22, 55 Smith, Ralph .......................... 64 Smith, Virgil ............ 27, 40, 58, 51 Snvder. Amelia ............22, 58, 46, oO. Somerfield, Caroline 22. 27, 34. Southern, Ina .... 9, 11, 22, 27, 34, 55. Sowden, Catherine ............... 6‘, 46. Spratt. Marguerite ... 40, 42, 51, 4b. Sprowls, J. A. 00 12' Sprowls. Gladys .................22 46. Stacy, Charles ......................54- PAGE 79Index ------ ...... ........................ oo, 0 1. Stafford, Joe .........................64, 66. Stanley, Sara ................ 34, 40, 58, 51. Stanton, Eleanor ... 11, 27, 31, 34, 43, 53, 46. 50. Starkey, Maxine ...................... 22, 54. Steel, Kenneth 9, 65, 66, 70 Steffens, Chester ......................31, 67, 71 Stephenson, Leonard .............. 54, 31, 63 Stewart, Bill .................... 50, 40, 51 Stevens, Nadine ............................ $5 Stevens, Winifred .....................22, 46 Stocking, Lola Mae.................... 64, 46 Stoffel, Marjorie ................ 55, 64, 46 Stoffel, Marion ...................... 65 Stokes, Faye ......................... 22 Stout, Anna Lee .......................40, 46 Stout, Melvin ...............................64 Stover, Jacque ................... 54, 64, 50 Stuart, Bill ..........................54, 65 Sturtz, Betty Lou .....................63, 46 Swaim, Bob ...........................30 Sykes, Ralph .........................64 Symes, Glenn........................... 54, 64, 50 T Taylor, Betty ...............................64 Thomas, Kathleen — 9, 11, 26, 34, 46 Thomas, Wayne ................ 26, 54, 63, 50 Tompson, Alice ........................46, 65 Thompson, Douglas .................27, 58, 64 Tinsley, Mary..................40, 46, 59 Tomlinson, Dorothy ..........................22 Towles, Iva .................................64 Townsley, Betty .......23, 31, 55, 59,71 Travis, Lois ................................64 Tredway, Doris Ellen ..............64, 46, 59 Trenary, Berniece .......................... 65 Trcnary, Norman .............................23 Troxoll, Norman ........................... 65 Trueblood, Verlin ...........................40 Truitt, Robert ..............................40 Tufts, John ...........47, 54, 62, 65, 50 Turner, Leonard ...................... 40, 51 Turner, Marjorie ......................40, 46 Turner, Pauline................40, 46, 31 Turner, Ross ................. 40, 58, 27 Turner, Spencer ...................23, 31, 54 Turner, Virgil ..............................40 Tyler, John ................................9, 40 U Utlser, Opal ............................... 23 V Vandever, Louise ................. 40, 54, 50 Vaughn, John ................................65 Vickerman, George ...........................64 Viele, Dorothy ...............................64 Volkland, Erie ........23, 34, 47, 54, 55, 50 Volkland, Virginia ..........................63, 46 Voskuhl, J. G.............. 27, 40, 58 W Wahlenmaier, George . Wahlcnmaier, Ruth .. 31, 54 23, 46, 59. 23, 26, 34, 46. Wales, Kenneth Wahler, Hugh 30, 58, 65. 23, 27, 55, 58. 64. Walker, Royce Wallace, Arnell Walling, Alden 40. 40, 54, 51, 50, 71. 65. 23. Ward, Florence Anna 64, 46. Ward, Helen 46, 23, 27, 34, 43, 55. Warren. John ... 26, 63. Warren, William Webb, Myron 9, 64. 23, 34, 42, 54, 55. 64. Weisbach, Jessie Weisbach, Mary 40, 29, 46, 59. 59, 65 Welter, Stephen 64. Welter, Virginia 40. Werneke. Margaret .. ... 40, 55. West, Olive 40. Wheeler. Isabelle 58. White, Audine 50, 55, 65, 51, 59. 40. White, Carl 67. White, Millard White, Ralph .... 58. Whyde, Margie 64. Wilhelm, Dallas . .: 40. Wilkers, Donald Williams, Clara 23. 40. Williams, Dean Williams, Dick 40. 40. Williams, Eleanor 65. Willing, Bernice . ... 64. Wilson, Alice La Vern Wilson, Alma — 55, 64, 59. 46. Wilson, Robert Wilson. Viola . 31, 64, 67. 64. Wilson, Woodrow 40. Winslow, Dorothy 9, 23. Wolfe, Ethel Worn mack. Mercedes '. 35. 64. Wollard, Forrest . 27, 54, 58, 65, 50. Wolley. Louise fiK. Wordlow, Enna 35. Wordlow, Julia 23. Worthington, Roy Wright, Genevieve ... 64, 31. 64, 46, 50. Wright, Jessie 35, 58. 46. Wright, Merna 35, 58, 46. Y Yount, Emily Jane Young, Junior 35, 42, 54, 50, 59. (y A ; n U jdtscX , Y . Autoeraphs U t - 4J4- +SL Zc L TW IL X . (D (jl i. ftp A 3 .9 f'«o- C £ej o f; r y? 3P i u 39. J i f f o ; 6 7r “The day is done The night is come We is all sleepy And we wanta go home. We wanta die We wanta cry We bet you do too Since you’ve read this through Yea! We’re through We’re quitting Good bye Us StalT Members.”■D  t j r (jl a 'c5 —• ,-r v s it '- K JU« ' tLjJidh 3 ] y - ■ S •- Oi 2 . 3 0000 12458917 1 mkw


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