Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS)

 - Class of 1915

Page 1 of 106

 

Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection, 1915 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1915 Edition, Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1915 Edition, Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1915 Edition, Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1915 Edition, Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1915 Edition, Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1915 Edition, Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1915 Edition, Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1915 Edition, Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection
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Page 16, 1915 Edition, Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1915 Edition, Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 106 of the 1915 volume:

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Euptun This ,Allllllill is resperifllllg hchiratrh lvg tlyv flax-55 nf Ninvtnrn iiiunhreh jHiftcvn FI BOARD OF EDUCATION B. F. GIGESLIN President W. I-I. l,IGH'1'S'l'ONE ' KATHERINE P. SEYFER H. H. ALLEN A. E. LOSTOURGEON B. W. HOA RDMAN Q S FACULTY J. F. HIGNIJICIR KFOFIIH-Bl' Superintendent! ' J. U. HEFl1'l'll,F1NG Superintendent .l. l+'. llIl,I,ll..XNlJ l'r'im'ipz1l lj'Sil'S, Vixivs. I'l1ysiuloggy :xml Hvviows , lj ,g- - 14 K4 I JOSEPHINE FRAZIER MARY HUME Latin, English, Methods German, English FACULTY I l,. U Wet IVY H.'XSKI'1'l"l' ,vw- English Language ' MA BEL ANDERSON History Z5 CLARIBEL LUPTON General Science, Agriculture, VERA ATKINSON Botany, Geography English, Algebra- FACULTY IPIQANCIS A. SUHMIDT Athletic Director ISLANVI-IIC KISLING Algvlwzl, Geometry I E, M. DRULEY JENNIE LONG Director of Orchestra. Music FACULTY C. S. HUEY Principal Manual Training I 'HAZEL CHILDERS . -Domestic Art ROBlQli'l' GREEN Woodwork, Mechanical Drawing g-g FLORENCE HARRISON Domestic Science IN Pi" In SNICI"IIg1EI DNINIVHJ. 'IVDNVN ANNUAL BOARD I emi-'if Editor-in-chief .. ........ Leroy Peek Assistant Editor ....... ., . Ormond Warner llnsiness Manager ........ .... I Jouis Morgan Secretary and Treasurer ................. Lena Pittenger ASSOCIATE EDITORS Ruth Wilson Corinne Lesh T Elmer Fagan 5Louise Hodge Elmo Berroth Hugh Scott Tracey Cary Hazel Clubb Kal l1fFl'j ne Henneberry Bch muh Ihiluc CE'1'ish, Lfrash Q1'ruzh 6E'1'ur Ll-9 :hears fur the Bch muh Blur. well QI wish ll hah at havrzl nf rum Sfugan: 31111 pnunhs, Qlhapcl hell in stir it in Qllappev tu mix it 'rnuuh, Drink tu the health nf A. QI. The prnttg girls far sinh near, lHu1: 1uv:'vv the '15 :lass nf LA. QI. A 5011-Uf-El-511111 fur hvcr. Bch Qmxcrican Iklrautg Buss SEN IORS CARROLL MCDOWELL Delphian, Latin and German, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '3, Orchestra '4 "When 'ere she fails to make a I, the world will stop moving and life will be done." LUCILE JOHNSON Philomathean, Latin, Orchestra. Glee Club '3, '4 For each thing I have a way of my own." ORMOND WARNER Philornathean Sergeant, German, Assistant Editor of Mirror Staff "Nothing pleases me more than something to study all night." ANNIS THOMPSON Philomathean, Normal, English "RGD1'0Of on her lips, a smile in her eye." SENIORS RUTH BURNETT ESTHER ENDICOTT Delphian, Normal, English Delphian, Normal, Y. W. C. A. 'Laugh and the world laughs with Cabinet '4 you " "Her ways are ways of quif-mess," LAURENCE CHAPLIN JOY COZINE Belles Lettres, German, Class Ser- Philomathean, Latin, Arkansan, geant '3, Foot Ball '1, '2, '4, Orchestra '4, Glee Club '3, '4 Basket Ball '11 '21 '4- Track ,ZY ,4f "A good bass voice and a. slide President of Athletic Association trombone is a high enough am- "Men of few words are the best bition for any man." men."- SENIORS MARGUERITE GREGORY BANNER TITUS Philomathean, Arkansan, Y. W. C. Delphian, Normal A' Cabinet .'3- Y- W' C- A- He has been neither good nor dis- H President '4 creetg yet we have nothing "It matters not how long we live upon which to roast himj but how." ' UNA NICHOLAS svnvm HADLEY Belles Lettres, German, Basket Philomathean, Normal, Y. W. C. A. Ball, '2, '3, '4 Cabinet '4 "She builds her rosy castles in the "A smile may be heavenly but this air, and its cornerstone is a not to suggest thatfgiggling is solitaire." holy." , 'FL' xi ,v SENIORS ELMER FAGAN WINNIE GIBSON Delphian, German, Mirror Staff Ilelles Lettres, German, Gle-e Club A bachelor's life for me. '15 When angry, count 10 before you speak. LOUIS MORGAN CLARA ROTHFUS Philomathe-an, Latin and Gorman. Philomathean, Normal, Basket Ball Mirror Staff, Foot Ball '4, Gloe '2, '3, '4, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '4 C111b'3- '4 "When dates and lessons Clash, There is always lots of Brass in let the lessons go to smash." the composition of a knocker. ' I- e wma-f5g,,a ' o SENIORS PAUL PARMAN 'ERA SLILAUGI-IAN Philomathean, English, Arkausan Belles lotlrcs, Gcriuzm, Gluc Club --Chase rue gil-ls, yve got the '3, '4, Class Soc1'cta1'y '4, Basket nickels." . B211 '4 The girl we like to have with us. JOE FENTON RUTH WILSON Belles Lettres, Sergeant, English, Belles Lettros L34-cn-1zx1'y, English, Class Prvsidont '2, Sergeant '13, '4, Al'kiil1S2ll1, lUll'l'0!' Stuff, Y. W. l'. A. Foot Ball '3, '4 Cabinet '3, '4, Glce Club '23, '4. "Many are called but few got up." "Much studying is a. weariness to the 1l0sl1." SENIORS KATHERYNE HENNEBERRY Delphian Secretary. Latin, Mirror Staff "Merry mischief sparkles in her eye." LENA PITTENGER Plvilcmathean President, German, lrkansan, Class Secretary and Treasurer '2, '3, Vice President '4, Student Council '3, '4, Vice Presi- drt of the Athletic Association '3. Glee Club '3, '4, Orchestra '4 "Queen rose in the rosebud garden of girls." ANTONIO WTC.-UW.-X31 Delphian President, Latin, Vice President of the Student Council. Glee Club '4 "What shall I do to be forever known." ELMO BERROTH Philomathenn. Arkansan, Mirror Staff, Foot Ball "Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow." SENI . f ,J nr LOUISE HODGE Belles Lettres, German, Mirror Staff, Glee Club '3, '4 "From a little spark may burst a mighty flame." - IIA RRY THOMPSON De-lpliian Vice President, Latin, Vluss President '4, Vice President '3, nl, Student Council '4, Arkansan, lluskct Ball '3, '4, Foot Ball '4 resilient ol' the class but a good student." EDITH BRISCOE Belles Lettres, English, Arkansan, Glee Club '4, "l'n1 going back to Lathamg that's where Tommy is." HHAINARD TAYLOR livlphiun, Gllflllilll, Arkansan, Foot hall '53, '4, Gloe Club '3, '4 Iflv hailed from Wisconsin, we do not know whether they let him our or he just escaped. SENIORS CORHINH LESH IRNA SIMS Belles Le-ltros, Latin and Gorman. Flzilomatlwan, English. Glvo Club Mirror Stall, Class Treasurer '1 '4, Arkansan. "My Glcry, I try to bo truc to them "You can'l .xlways toll about mix' am.. LEROY PEEK Bolle-s I,ett1'es, Gorman, Foot Ball '11, '4, Basket Ball '3, '4, Glee Club '11, '4, Class President '3, Vice lwosidont '2, Student Council '3, Editor-in-rliiof of tho Mirror Staff. Foot, Ball lllauagor '4 "His 5-illlllfl :md r-you lmvo Wim him uwuuy f1'ie11d5." HAZIQI. CLUBB Belles Lettrcra. Latin. Gloe '4 '11, '4, Arkausan "l just can't lllfllill my c-yes be- have." l SENIORS TRACY CARY HUGH SCOTT Uollos Lettrvs, I.:xti11. Mirnm' Staff Xie-lphian, German, Mirror Staff, "I ai11't no teacher's pet." Foot Ban '4 "Wc1'ds, words, words." MARY VAWTFJR Dolphian, English Merry Mary play those eyes. Y, W" . SENIORS ROY ROBINSON Phllomathean, German, Track Team '3, '4 "The most mannerly boy in the class." CORA CARPENTER Delphian, Normal "Speech is silver but silence is golden." il- EDITORS NOTE In passing through the stage of "An- nual-litis" we have been severely bent- possibly cracked, but like a worthless ar- ticle, we still remain unbroken. We rea- lize, but alas too late, the egotistm of our philosophies, our over-stocked self confi- dence and esteem, and our exaggerated indifference to the world at large. Fur- ther in passing through these unknown heights, and depths, despite the ambrosial qualities of a high and ever conscious aim to publish a souvenir that might be cred- itable to the institution it represents- our ambiguous and obnoxious ideas have caused a certain amount of ingratitude or dislike between ourselves and our fellow beings. In other words, being not wholly guiltless, We have made some enemies. To these individuals we, like a man pre- paring for that celestial world and land of eternal joy, make open confession of our guilt and now apologize from the depths of our hearts, before entering that hazy and unknown world that seems to open with commencement. Even before this book was published we thought of things that we wished had been omitted but like many other realiza- tions they came too late, so we beg of you to wear the shoe and smile even though the fit be poor and the idea somewhat an- tiquated or rude, and to our host of friends that by their co-operation and ever ready assistance have made this book a success, we hold a sense of deepest gratitude and extend our hearty thanks.-M. L. P. CLASS HISTORY WISE AND OTHERWISE The High School of Arkansas City first realized our presence on a "September Mom" in the year of 1911. When we came they did not think that we were an unusual class except for our size. This was exceptionally large for Fresh- men year but the way has been long and the cleserters many. For our President in the first year we chose Don Wright. He was a leader of unusual characteristics and under him we had some very good times. Our first venture was fraught with dire conse- quences. The Sophomores, our tradition- al enemies, held a party at the home of Pauline Mumaw, north of town. Our "huskies" went thither to muss them up a bit and we succeeded but we got a lit- tle of it ourselves. Next we agreed to have a long moonlight ride to the Mc- Adam residence some 'miles south of town. The party left town about dark. We were followed by the Sophs., who were glad to get a chance to retaliate. About the time for refreshments we were suddenly sur- prised and for a few moments the lawn resembled the pass of Thermopalae. Per- haps we may have been victorious but peace was declared and we generously gave them some of our eats. One morning soon after this as we were going to school we found the Senior colors placed upon the school building. We were young and inexperienced in such matters but followed the lead of the older classes. This was the occasion of much excite- ment which finally ended with the doors of school being closed against us. That afternoon, before our conscience began to hurt us we enjoyed a picnic at the Natural Bridge. The next morning we all came back with our fathers or mothers who promised our future good behaviour. The next occasion for festivities was a party at the home of Mildred Popplewell. 23 At this party we were again molested by the upper classmen but not seriously. We had commenced to realize by this time that they were only trifles in the school life as compared with the class of Nine- teen Hundred and Fifteen. But peace was declared and at the close of the school year we all had a large union picnic at Green's Farm. Thus closed one of the best years of our whole school life. The Sophomore class was not so much adictded to merrymaking. We had com- menced to see the seriousness of our po- sition and we saw the need of study. For our President we chose Joe Fenton. The second year of school was unusually quiet. It is the popular opinion that the Sopho- more class is the most big-headed but we did not seem to be this way. But even if we did not have very many fights we did not cease in our good times. Early in the year we decided to have a party at the home of Irma Sims. As she lived east of town we combined a hay-rack ride with the party. It may be well tu note here that upon these rides was the time when we developed our extraordin- ary vocal powers, and the class is noted for its singing talent. Before the year closed we held a line party at the "movies" and a long moon- light ride to the 140 Foot Hill. This hill appeared to be our favorite for we journ- eyed to its lofty eminence many times after this. In our Junior year we elected Leroy Peek for our President. He was our first presidential "dark horse" as he was chos en by the women's vote and their majoi- ity was unrealized until this time. It i.- not the place in this chronicle to relat. our illustrious deeds and our fame s.. we will leave that to you as granted. So it devolves upon us to tell you only of ouq adventures in the world of joy making. CLASS HISTORY On St. Valentines day we inet at the home of Lena Pittenger. There we ex- perienced one of the best times in our whole High School life. Then we did some- thing never tried before by a High School class. We planned a ride to Ceuda Springs. We went and woke the town up for once. Our reception given to the S1n1or class was truly something to be proud of lt was held in the lfifth Avenue ball roogn. The hall was decorated in the colors oi' both the Senior and Junior classes. The following will show in substance the eve-- ning's program : Fifth Avenue Hotel April 25th, 1914 Dinner 8:30 O'clock. Alice Blair, President of the Seniors. I". A. Schmidt, Athletic Coach. Prof. J. F. Bender, Superintendent. Prof. J. G. Gilliland, Principal. Toastmaster - - - Leroy Peek MacAllister's Crchestra Miss Hodge - - - Vocal Solo Violin Obligato by Miss Gist Miss Boylan - - Whistling Solo Orchestra ' Louise Morgan - - Piano Solo Miss Warmbrodt - - Reading F. A. Schmidt - - - Vocal Solo Eghty-seven Present MENU Consomme eu Tasse Paupieties of Halibut Hollandaise Sauce Sliced Tomatoes. Roast Philadelphia Capon Stuffed Giblet Sauce New Potatoes in Cream Golden Wax Beans Salad of Fruit Wafers Strawberry Ice Cream Assorted Cake ' Cheese Wafers ' Cafe Noir It was said by those who had been pres- ent at several receptions that the decora- tions and all surpassed any of the former functions. It was declared by all to be a great success and we deserved it because we put in many days of hard work upon it. We now come to the last year of our school career. Our numbers have de- creased down to thirty-three with a rec- ord of about one hundred and eight in the beginning. But those who have perse- vc red will never regret their course and our only regret now is that we do not have a few more years of happy school life. But this is not in the chronicles of our history and so we will now relate the last act of our drama of High School life, vqhich is but the prelude to the great play of life. ' For our Senior President we decided upon Harry Thompson. This year has been spent for the most part in hard study for a Senior is only commencing to find that he knows very little and that his chances for graduation are very small. We have held a few parties to the motion picture shows. The great event of the year was a kid party held at Christmas time. We all came dressed as little chil- dren. Harry Thompson played the part of Santa and gave each of us a small present. This closes the history of the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Fifteen. Perhaps none of us will ever be famous but we hope that the High School will remember us. Even if it forgets us we will always remember it for there we have spent four of the happiest years of our life and we fondly hope that our dealings with the outside world will be as pleasant as those of our High School life. Some will go on to halls of higher learning while others will enter the world, but each will keep a place in his memory for "Our Dear Old High." 24 CLASS PROPHECY May 1, 1930. Of what particular inter- est is this date to me? Why should it mean more to me, than any other of the three hundred and sixty-five days of the year? These were the qutstions I asked myself as I gazed at the calendar in loe- wilderment. Iiike a flash those qticstions were answered. Fiftean years ago the Class of 1915 of the A. C. H. S. were en- joying themselves at one ol' the many pai'- iies given by that class. It was on this night that those present unanimously: agreed upon a proposition suggested by Harry Thompson, president of the class. How well I remember the manner and the exact words used by my old schoolrnate in putting his propositon be-fore us. He ludicrously stepped to the center of the room and said: "Listen a minute, guys. Ihave something else up my sleeve be- sides 1ny 'mighty arm that I want to tell you about. Fifteen years from tonight the members of this class will meet to- gether at the home of that member of the class who first succeeds in receiving the death wound of Cupid's arrow and this member must send announcements of his death to every other member of this class." Cupid wishing to make a sure shot aimed his deadly arrow at the broad breast of Louis Morgan who is now a fa- mous surgeon residing at 1915 Orchard avenue, Los Angeles, California. Will all of them be there? Will they be glad to see this little bald-headed bach- elor? These were the questions that passed through my 'mind as I sped away from San Diego toward Los Angeles in my 1930 model Hupmobile. Upon arriv- ing at my destination I alighted from my car and walked to the door of a magnifi- cent California bungalow. Upon ringing the bell I was heartily received by my old chum Morgan who grasped me by the hand and fairly shouted "Hello, 'F' old boy!" Ile then conducted me into an ele- 25 gautlv furnished room in which there was a very large table richly spread and encircled by many handsome men and women. Dr. Morgan told me that some of the members of the class were unable to be present but had sent their regrets and told of their respective achievements. Following the dinner, which was well seasoned with "Don't you remembers," the guests informally as in years gone by gathered in the drawing room and of course Tommy, our former manager, took charge of us for the second time. "I am sure," said Tommy "that we are all very sorry that it is impossible for every mem- ber of the class of '15 to be with us to- night but nevertheless we have received word from the stray ones and we will now learn what has become of them." He then held up a newspaper that contained as much information as the world's al- manac and as much news as the Kansas City and Denver Post combined. "This," said Tommy, "is the last edi- tion of th Arkansas City Daily News, now editef? by Elmo Berroth, showing the permanent effect of that Senior year of Journalism." Next was a letter from Brainard Tay- lor which read as followsi "I am very sorry that I cannot be with you but I am conducting a, series of evangelistic meet- ings at Hackney and it is therefore an utter impossibility for me to be with you." I was not at all surprised to hear of Taylor's outcome because I always knew he had that mighty voice for some great mission. The following information was obtain- ed from the other letters: Ruth Burnett-Florence N ightengale II. Laurence Chaplin-Seal fisherman in Behring Sea. 'Joe McCarty---President of the A. C. Ice Co. CLASS PROPHECY Ester Endicott-Teaching history in A. C. H. S. Antonio McAdams -Famous Novelist, latest work, "Why She Never Married." Ormond Warner- Farn. demonstrator of Sumner county, Kansas. Marguerite Gregory--Secretary of the Y. W. C. A. Sylvia Hadley-Married to a wealthy farmer. Mary Vawter-Milliner, shop 315 South Summit street, Arkansas City, Kansas. 'Annis Thompson--Teaching botany in A. C. H. S. Joy Cozine-Trombone Soloist of U. S. Marine Band. Una Nicholas-Wife of a Kansas City banker. "Now," ,said Tommy, "that we have learned how well the absent members have prospered, let us see if those present have done equally well. Now each ln turn state your position in life." Hugh Scott-Ring-leader of a circus. Tracey Cary-Traveling salesman for the Alfred Benjamin Tailoring Co. Elmer Fagan-Serving second term as U. S. Senator from California. Joe Fenton-Admiral of U. S. Battle- ship Arkansas. Louis Morgan-Surgeon. Paul Parman-One of the greatest elec- trical engineers in the United States. Leroy Peek-Steel structural engineer. Hazel Clubb-Wife of a French Noble- man. Winnie Gibson-Wife of a Silverdale ranchman. Katheryne Henneberry - Member of Kansas State Legislature. Louise, Hodge, Ora Straughan, Ruth Wilson, Lena Pittenger- Musical com- pany making tour of the world. Corrine Lesh-Unclaimed blessing. Carroll McDowell-Kindergarten teach- er at Denver, Colorado. Clara Rothfus-Coach at Lady Jane Grey School for Girls, at Binghampton, N. Y. Irma Sims-Aviatress. Harry Thompson-Coach at Wesleyan University of Illinois. Banner Titus-County Attorney of Cowley county, Kansas. After having spent a very pleasant evening talking over old times the guests departed for their respective homes, each fellow proud of the other and also possess- ing a feeling of great pride for the class of 1915 of the A. C. H. S. 252 if L J 26 SENIOR PLAY '15 "THE DREAM THAT CAME TRUE" RANNEY'S FIFTH AVENUE OPERA HOUSE May 25th, 1915 CAST OF CHARACTERS Nan Worthington ----- Ora Straughan Gordon Clay - - Harry Thompson Margaret Byrnes - - - Hazel Clubb Mrs. Jenkins - - Irma Sims Florabel Mullins - Carrol McDowell Emmy Lou Norton - - Corrine Lesh Nora - - - - - Ruth Burnett Delphine Norton - - Katheryne V. Henneberry Peggy Gilbert - - - Winnie Gibson Angelina Maud - Louise Hodge Jack Brown - - Louis Morgan Miss Louisa Hawkins Una Nicholas Miss Mehitabel Biddle - Winnie Gibson Bobbie Burns - - M. Leroy Peek Billy Best - - Laurence Chaplin Mrs. Allair - - - Winnie Gibson Doris Hall - - - - Lena Pittenger Lord Algenon Regnold - - Tracy Cary Charles Norton ---- - Hugh Scott SONGS "On the Old Missouri Shore" - - - Chorus "Just A Wearin' for You" - M. Leroy Peek "Underneath the Irish Moon" - - - Chorus CHORUS Joy Cozine Antonio McAdam Lucile Johnson Brainard Taylor Ormond Warner Annis Thompson Marguerite Gregory Ester Endicott Elmer Fagan Clara Rothfus Paul Parman Joe Fenton Elmo Berroth Edith Briscoe Foot Ball Parts, etc - Junior Boys CLASS OF '16 OFFLCERS v Simeon Harrington ----- President Vetis Ammons - Harry Woody - Gladwyn Boardman - The ever victorious class of lvineteen Sixteen, started their Junior year off quickly by affording plenty of amuse- nients for us to attend. Our class, other- wise known as the athletic class, is cer- tainly "THERE" when it comes to pro- dusing athletes. In order to carry on ath- letics in the best way possible we must first have a good leader. To select good ones they chose from the class of 1916 Carl Amnions, the speedy foot ball man, who was also the captain of the foot ball team. His most noted brother, Vetis Ammons, was the captain of the basket ball tcam. The second team is composed of three Junior boys, Harry Howard, Harry Woody and Bryon Grove tcaptainl. There were four third year High School men who starred in the Winfield vs A. C. game. Also there were six letter men in foot ball from the Junior class. In the girls' basket ball team we have three girls 1 - Vice President baecrctary and Treasurer - - Sergeanat-Arms namely, Ruth Weddle, Vera Downing and Alice Hestwood. The following is the synopsis of our so- cial functions: The first act was our party given at Ruth Burkey's home, the specialty after the first act was a moon- light ride given by Juniors and Seniors. ln the next act our greatest "stunt was pulled off" by having a Hallow'een party in the "Gym," The special guests were the Faculty and the remaining fool ball squad, who were new members of t'Sixteen." The last act consisted of a party given at the home of Rachel Horton, which was indeed a decided success as are all things the Juniors do. Now we bid you one and all good bye as Juniors and will be ready to say "How do you do" as Seniors. Then we will be the largest and best class of graduates that A. C. H. S. has ever had- Boots '16. Vetis Ammons Dan Bloomheart Gladwyn Boardman Walter Brandhouse Lee Bumgardner James Cummins Mark Davis Philip Doane Bryan Grove Simeon Harrington Harry Howard Marion Howland Martin Jarvis Fred Leach Forest Livingston John Long George McCulley James McPeck Glenn Primm Fred Shepherd Robert Stephy John Wiley Edward Wilkinson Harry Woody Herbert Younkin Alphonso Robinson Gladys Baker Azie Barton Margaret Birdzell Georgia Booton Alice Boyer Mildred Boylan Ruth Burkey Mary Callahan Marie Carlton Julia Dennis Laura DeMott Mary Gardner Eunice Goodwin Ethel Green Pauline Green Stella Gregory Pearl Gribble Alice Hestwood Ola Holland Rachel Horton Maisie Hoyt Edith Klink Lorene Lohmann Zetta McCarty Louise McPherson Mary Parker Alice Pfisterer Dorothy Ralston Marie Robson Nila Scott Hazel Smith Vera Taylor Virginia Vawter Ruth Walker Ruby Warner S Edith West Helen West Lillis White Helen White ' Carl Amnions - 1 'LD v-1 IL C FD ffl 'TZ V CLASS OF '17 OFFICERS William Hardy ------ President Ornie Payden - - The Sophomore class of this year is known as the color "Hoisters," on account of their various attempts to place their colors, the black and yellow, in conspicu- ous placcs about the High School. The class is also noted for its parties, moon- light rides and wienie roasts. The first act in a social line this year - Secretary and Treasurer was a moonlight ride to the home of William Hardy, next was a wienie roast, then a party. at the Spangler home on New Year's Eve, also a watch party at the "Gym" and last a surprise party on "Slim" Payden. Many more parties and moonlight rides are anticipated. CLASS ROLL Max Baker Dena Day Carl Zimmerman William Bell Verna Day F1'8HCiS THYIOI' Garnett Clarey Arthur Cooper Algie Fitch Amos Frazee George Gardner James Gilbert William Hardy Iauther Harris Ernest Howland Forest King Leslie Knapp Virgil LaSarge Floyd Light Lloyd Light Louise Addington Hazel Beeks Lula Bell Gladys Bivens Katherine Brock Muriel Burns Ivy Campbell Ethel Carlton Nomi Case Flossie Chaplain Grace Davis Verna Downing Georgia Drumgould Erna Fesler Leta Frost Hazel Gamble Anna Gannon Murrel Garner Mildred Grove Mvra Hardy Gladys Harp Fern Houston .Tulia Hynd . Ella Lawson Endna Light Alberta Lohmann Francis Means Forrest Moore Charles Newberry William Parkinson Ornie Payden Albert Rau. Herbert Snyder Robert Warren Raymond Warren Charles Wells T, Arthur Walker Ellen Matlock Alice McAdam Ruth McCluney Lillian McNaughton Dorothy Mowatt Abbie Ramsey Dcssa Richardson Ruth Roberts Helen Rothfus Ethel Ruf Winifred Scott Charlotte Scruton Mary Sloan Oval Stone Gertrude Tipton Florence Tipton Edith Vaughn Frith Weddle Margaret West Elsie Whitacre Garnett Thompson .Helen Pack Ruth May Eleanor Moore W ' ' 'Y iiwrf 0- " w 1 E, . '31 I CLASS OF '17 CLASS OF '18 OFFICERS Frank Denton - ----- President Lovclle Gragg - - - -Vice Presdient Ircne Bloomheart - - Secretary and Treasurer Earl Balleu Lyle Bellamy Fernie Bienfang Thomas Buzzi Drayton Carter Lynn Crump Eddie Curtis Frank Denton Ray Eagan Fred Endicott Glenn Felton Lester Foltz Blanche Allen Ida Allison Rama Barnes Katherine Blevens Helen Blevens Irene Bloomheart Leona Bonewell Edna Brown Goldie Case Lila Coggins Bertha Cordary Theresa Crouse Eula Day Angie Ermcy Nora Ford Ernest Gannon Lovellc Gragg' Kenneth Hay CLASS ROLL Merle Hinton Carl Holiday Arthur LaSarge Ben Lewis lfrank Lewis Lester Lewis Herman Magnus Orion Miller Noble Nelson Harvey Nunley Ethel Gardner Gladys Gibson Verna Godfrey Sylvia Green Laura Ham Beulah Harp Mary Harp Ola Harp Hester Humm Katherine Knapp Emily Lester Marie Lomax Grace Lonneke Ethel Lytal Inez Mocherman Viola Monsey Olivia Moody Auqustine iMoncravie Myrl May Samuel Payden Danzil Potter Earl Rinehart Omer Roberts Harold Seyfer Jay Shaw Charles Shirley Raymond Short Alonzo Stewart Glenn Thompson Arthur Williams Everett Wingate Carl Wright Darwin Wright Edith Penfield Lula Pingry Mary Reynolds Leo Shacklett Mattie Sloan Mary Sterling Eddie Stevenson Sadie Sweeney Mary Thompson Lizzie Tilsen Sarah V cdder Birdie VV2'l1'l'lf'l' Jessie Warren Mable Williams Golden Walker Nellie Richardson K? ,S gi, 1 '. M " ' 4 X ,QL z f rl W 3, K A ,. V Ag I 1 ff q 4 , af al . f I fi ff I u 1' "5 1' ' '5 ,mg l ,I . MW' . if ,I - . . ,. .f ff1.Q ':,3:. f, . "J .33 . I , 9339555 . ggi ' Mn' 5 1+ fe 4 , i - . 3,1 L cn v-4 7- p .. C VD UD 'C .-I L1 V '1 5 I 1 W Ii S QI'XIi'I'l"'l"l'F .k. x 4 4 H. S. O RCIIIQSTRA Y. W. C. A. no A ,fm 1 Y. W. C. A. OFFICERS Marguerite Gregory - - - - President Ruth Wilson - - Vice President Alice Pfisterer - - - Secretary Ruby WH11191' - Treasurer The Young Women's Christian Associ- ation ol' the High School has had for its purpose the past year the development of Christian character and higher moral standards. A number of activities this year have been the Weekly meetings on Wednesday afternoons, led mostly by students, an in- teresting Bible studv class taught by Mrs. Cotterman, the opening reception for all High School girls, the Christmas tree and party given to about fifty poor children, a mission reading circle, a number of candy sales and a few social affairs made up most of the more prominent activities ol' this organization for the year. The association sent one delegate, Mar- guerite Gregory, to the Western Student Q3 0 Conference at Estes I'ark,,Colorado, last summer and hopes to send one or more this year. Six of our girls attended the State Y. W. C. A. conference at Eldorado last fall. Although the Y. W. C. A. work has not been as extensive this year as we would have liked, we feel that it has been an in- spiration to'a nu'mber of girls, that it has helped to develop leadership among its members and afforded an opportunity for a week day expression of our religious lives. We hope that in the future our Y. W. C. A. will include all the girls in High School and any others who care to join, and that it will become a greater factor for good in our school than it has ever been in the past. Q K E i ST UIJENT f'OUNf'IL-FIRST TERM r,..,,,..F . ., , l If s I f E1 d L r Q U E . PI , . -1 ru. .3'+?Ww,.. ' . , a.,,,,l, I as---fanny , W A.................. ...., - , . . , s'rUDEN'r COUNCIL-SECOND TERM "'T"?""T'?" wi" , If , ' iz. ?- A, ,4. i lj' M Lf F Ei ' K. E: r 1 i .-A I 5. . I . 9 K 5 . ef A ,4 1 4.3 -, uk. . ,, . -W- ..,.3,,....,., .. , ,V ,- F , .af-Ji' GLEE CLUB L05-3!'S3 'i.9Ci.9 i"N..? C"'-..9f"xIl5"-3 ' OFFICERS Antonio McAdarf. - - - President Harry F. Thompson - Vice President Katheryne Henneberry - - Secretary Helen M. White - - Treasurer Elmer Fagan - - Sergeant ROLL Gladys Baker Azie Barton Max Baker Gladys Bivens Lula Burns Ruth Burnett Margaret Birdzell Dan Bloomheart Lee Bu'mgardner Walter Brandhouse Mary Callahan Ethel Carlton Cora Carpenter Bernice Cummins Arthur Cooper Grace Davis Julia Dennis Georgia Drumgould Ester Endicott Elmer Fagan Algie Fitch Leeta Frost Edna Gamble Georgia Gardner Bryan Grove Pearl Gribble Gladys Harp William Hardy Mazie Hope Ernest Holland Harry Howard Edith Klink Ella Lawson Carroll McDowell Lillian McNaughton James McPeck George McCluney Ruth May Ellen Matlock Dorothy Mowatt Glenn Primm Dessa Richardson Marie Robson Abbie Ramsey Roy Robinson Fred Shepherd Harry Thompson Brainard Taylor Banner Titus Francis Taylor Mary Vawter Charles Wells Edward Wilkinson Ruby Warner Helen White Edith West Miss Helen May White represented the Arkansas City High School in the Reading Contest held in Richmond Hall by Southwestern College on May 7, 1915. 4 88 L Lena Pittenger John Wiley - Alice Hestwood Fred Leach - Vetis Ammons Philip Doane Marion Howland Fred Leach John Wiley Alice Boyer Mary Gardner Alice Hestwood Vesta Howland Nila Scott Virginia Vawter Elmo Berroth Louis Morgan Ormond Warner Sylvia Hadley Lena Pittenger Irma Sims James Gilbert Ornie Payden JPHIELOMATHEAN OFFICERS ROLL Erna Fessler Mildred Grove Fern Houston Alice McAdam Ruthert Roberts Winnifred Scott Mary Sloan Margaret West Ja'mes Cummins Simeon Harrington Martin Jarvis Robert Stephy Laura DeMott Pauline Green Ola Holland Mary Parker Helen Smith Ruth Walker Joy Cozine - President Vice President - Secretary - Sergeant Paul Parman Marguerite Gregory Lucile Johnson Clara Rothfus Annis Thompson Leslie Knapp Forest Moore Carl Zimmerman Naomi Case. Anna Gannon Gladys Harp Julia Hynd Ruth McCluney Helen Rothfus Charlotte Scruton Edith Vaughn Elsie Whitacre vllrs ivttrrs OFFICERS Gladwyn Boardman - - - - President John Long - - Vice President Ruth Wilson - - Secretary Mildred Boylan - Treasurer Ioe Fenton - Sergeant ROLL Carl Ammons Louise Addington Gladwyn Boardman Mildred Boylan William Bell Hazel Beeks Edith Briscoe Georgia Booton Ruth Burkey Katherine Brock Tracy Cary Hazel Clubb Ivy Campbell Laurence Chaplin Flossie Chaplin Gertrude Cox Garnett Clary Verna Day Mark Davis Verna Downing Joe Fenton Amos Frazee Winnie Gibson Hazel Gamble Eunice Goodwin Merle Garner Rachel Horton Myra Hardy Louise Hodge Corinne Lesh. Forrest Livingston Virgil LaSarge Alberta Lahmar Joe McCarty Zctta McCarty Louise McPherson Francis Means Leroy Peek Alice Pfisterer Dorothy Ralston Albert Rau Ora Straughan Hazel Smith Ethel Ruf Opal Stone Vera Taylor Gertrude Tipton Florence Tipton Garnett Thompson Lillie White Raymond Warren Robert Warren Harry Woody Helen West Ruth Wilson Herbert Younkin Helen Peck CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 7-Prodigals return. Yenz kept busy sweeping up hay seed which fell out of Freshies' hair. 8-Foot ball practice begins. 9-Freshman asks Gillie if she can take glee club work. 10-Juniors organize. 11-Seniors organize. 12-Seniors elect annual board, and take in picture shows. "Poor Tommy." 14-Circus day. 15-Payden shot off too much. Iodine, eggs, ice and a lot of rumors-that's all, except soda. 16-Every one quiet. 17-Physical Training commences. 18-Seniors go to 140 Foot Hill. Who said watermelon? Freshies swipe Sophs' eats. 19-Sophs sore. 21-Beauty show. Large number of High School boys in attendance. Sophs get the Freshies, cops take them awa from them. Fall festival starts. 22 - Half holiday-Schmidt advertises for epirdermis, guards and centers feel puffed up. Circus day. 23-Freshies have a party-lots of ice cream and "Postoffice." 28-Foot ball scrimmage. 29-Woody gets canned. 30-Elect cheer leader. Sophs put colors on fire escape. OCTOBER. 2-Freshies trim Manual squad. 4-Doctor Hamburger lectures in Chapel. Grade schools attend. 5-Vote cast for Student Council. 6-Board hears about Kaw City's spir- it. 7-Board's constitution weakensg he hears more Kaw City dope. 8-Board recuperates. 9-Skunked Kaw City. Lots of mu- tual feeling and also brotherly love. 41 Schmidt had to do some arbitrating. High School boys occupy peanut row at Rex.--Hints on toe dancing. 10-Some A. C. H. S. girls hike to Chi- locco. World series start. Some of squad to Wichita. Too much harmony goes hard with Morgan's car. 11-Crook goes to Sunday school. 12-Boston wins again. Exams. 15-Boston wins pennant. Notable de- pression in finances. 14-Climax-first physics exam. 15-More exams. 16-Poor Newkirk-we didn't like to do it, but we had tog A. C. 99, Newkirk U. 20-Lecture in Chapel. 23-Gillie accommodates foot ball squad and read their telegram from Blackwell to class rooms. YES? We play Black- well "?" Nero gets desperate. His man- ners as a Mascot wouldn't pass, so he lost his job. 24-Morgan and Co. gets home. 26-Long, Woody and Tal quit school. 27-Tal, Woody and Long start back to school. 30-We clean up on Wellington, 35 to 13. Junior party at Gym. 31-Hallowe'en. Tal finds a spook. NOVEMBER 2-High School boys attracted by photograph display at Newman's. 6-We have some foot ball enthusiasm in Chapel. 7-We go to Wichita. We weren't web-footed so therefore could not score. 8-The morning after the night before. Elmo dissipates and is christened by a new name-"Tre," A. C. boys invest in Wichita stock, at stock yards. 10-Solo by Gillie. 13-We skin Southwestern seconds, 27-6. 19-Perry High School trimmed by A. C.-20-0. 22-Senior girls defeat Freshies in in- CALENDAR ter-class tournament and Junior boys de- feat Sophs. We start selling tickets for Thanksgiving game. 24-Lots of enthusiasm in Chapel. Tal delivers a deaf mute oration. Peeky soliloquizes. Schmidt ditto. 25-Turkey day. Foot ball boys soreg can not eat turkey for dinner. Wellington eats too much turkey. We have the largest crowd ever turned out to a foot ball game, more than 900. 26-Everybody happy. We end up the most successful season we ever had. 27-Scotty saws some wood. 30--Spelling omitted to celebrate. DECEMBER 1-Spelling. 2-Senior boys lose to Freshies. Soph girls lose to Junior girls in inter-class B. B. tournament. 4-Senior girls carry off inter-class cha'mpionship by defeating Junior girls, 21-19. A. C. H. S. swamps Ponca City, 57-5 in first B. B. game of season. Sounds like one of the foot ball scores. 7-Some Senior girls entertain a del- egation from Southwestern. 11-A. C. cleans up on St. Johns, 59-4. 12-Bunch of Junior and Senior boys dissipate. CNel1ie, where art thou ?J 13-Sunday. Same bunch goes to church to atone for their misdeeds. 14--Senior girl puts on Phoenix dis- play. 15-Pay day, when we all wish we were working for A. T. S. F., and so do Curtis AL Ames. 16-Have they got your name yet? Certain A. C. H. S. boys get the "willies." First good skating. 17--Snow storm. Seniors held c1as.s meeting and decide to have a kid party. 18-H. S. orchestra renders several selections in Chapel. B. B. boys make first trip of the season to Kingman and win by a score of 28-27. Second team clean up on Ponca City, 32-20 and H. girls win from B. C., 24-2. Frankie Adams puts the jinks on Hanson's aspirations for the lightweight championship. 19-B. B. boys lose to Wichita, 39-42. Tommy some man. 21.-Smitty takes in Neptune's Daugh- ter, stays for two showsg pronounces An- nette Kellerman some mermaid. 24-Christmas Eve. Y. W. C. A. gives Christmas tree to kiddies. 25--Christmas day. Alumni plays regular H. S. boys and are defeated, 34-20. 28.-Seniors have a kid party. Some of the Lots have trouble over mistletoe question. Lots of candy, curls, toys, gets in bad with some one but they kiss and make up. 29-H. S. boys clean up and remodel letters north hills. h 3?---New Year's Eve. Sophs have watch party but forget to watch their eats. Some upper classmen pronounce Sopho- more girls good pastry cooks. Big bunch H. S. boys celebrate at-? JANUARY 1-New Year's ball at Highland hall. 2-A. C. Boys beat Kingman, 38-19. Girls beat Ponca City, 39-9. 4-Monday-back to the bushes again. Bender gives us a fatherly talk on discip- line and offers us some New Year's reso- lutions. 5-Election of officers for literary so- cieties. 6-Peggy Grove discovers something in Botany class. Innocence is bliss. 8--Foot ball boys step into limelight again. Get their letters and Vet gives an oration. H. S. orchestra in Chapel. We get up pep for Winfield game, but lose game by 2 points. A. C. girls beat Winfield girls, 15-5. Tal and Leach drown their sorrow in "Spirits of Turpentinel' 11-Reverend Coombs address in Chap- el. . 12-Peeky loses section of one of his Incissors. 42 CALENDAR 13-Gillie gives a lecture on morals. Foot ball boys have Stag at Ammons' and hold a pool tournament of which Joe F. and Chapie are champions. 15-Yell practice, Leach and Harring- ton. We get another B. B. scalp-A. C. 335 Hutchinson 24. A. C. seconds 105 Chilocco 11. 18-Senior class meeting. 19-Joe McCarty and Art Wallace bc- come silent partners in prominent A. C. firm. 20-First term of school ends. Final exams. 21-We have a vacation and the basket ball boys go to Newton with two vacan- cies. Board has an attack of backache and can't go. Tal decides to stay home and study. Newton trims us, 47-22. 22-We come back by cleaning Halstead 26-24 under a great handicap. A 23-The boys return home. Joe Mc- Carty tells of fabulous beauties which he found at Halstead. He got a 5 cent shoe shine and also a ten cent shave. 24-Several changes in program. Ed. Wilkinson returns to the fold. 25-Mr. Lash gives a lecture in chapel 26-Committee on finances make call on John Long's pocketbook while he is partaking in one of the S. S. B. B. league games. 27-Juniors have a class party at the Horton plantation. 28-Big doings in Chapel, yell practice The Seniors formed a line party to the Rex after which the girls entertained the boys with a swell feed. 30-Nickerson gets our goat. Seconds lose to St. Johns, by two points. Our cheer leader gets a purse. 31-Blizzard. Record attendance at gentlemen's aid society which 'met at the Fifth Avenue Synagogue. FEBRUARY 1-Senior boys revised the songs in J Chapel. Miss Haskett gets peeved. 43 2-Bender has a talk with four Senior boys. 3-Practice yell in chapel. Gillie talks in the right spirit. We clean up Newton 34-17. Several of the boys become flush. Business College enjoy the game. 4-Spelling omitted to celebrate. We have Chapel and Gillie supplies us with a rare variety oi' wit. Newton defeated Winfield, 33-21. 5-Number of the boys go to Wichit. to older boys' convention. September Morn at opera house. SOME SHOW. Del- phian plogram. 8-Arthur Cooper has hard words with Glllie. Ht goes on a vacation. 5?-Sophs have their class picture taken. Nominations for student council. 10-Election of student council officers. Tate ruins "an Artist's Pride" on TayIor's head. Tal and Sam also have few unchar- itable words and resort to something else. 11-Freshmen have their picture taken. Camera ruined. 12-B. B. boys go to Nickerson. They lose a hard fought game, 26-34. Gillie leads a very enthusiastic and inspirinf' Chapel services. Dwells on the ruinous effects upon the character which the crime of treading upon the grass exert upon the student's mind. Leach and Gillic war. Literary program. A. C. girls trim Newkirk girls 37-4. Second tea loses to Business College first team, 23-28. 13-A. C. wins from Hutchinson. Pe-eky makes a friend. A. C. boys pro- nounce the Hutchinson bunch very good losers-Like 1. 14-B. B. boys return home.Peeky looks like a Hebrew. 5-Orchestra in Chapel. Mr. Bender gi es a magnificent talk upon morals. A. C. H. S. B. B. girls wipe up on S. W. Freshmen, 28-5. ' 16-Only two students in the entire school had to come to spelling conference. This school is going to the dogs. CALENDAR 17-V. Creighton gives a lecture on ef- ticiency. 18-Lyceum, Oxford company. 19-Belles Lettres gives a very magnif- icent program. Second team goes to vvichita. Gillie gives a very inspiring and enthusiastic speech in Chapel, calls down the boys in the rear. Yell practice. Freshie makes a break and sits on the ros- trum during literary program. 20-A. C.'s Gala Day. 'Girls and sec- ond team boys carry off tournoment at vxichita and bring home two big silver cups. Eighth grade trims Winfield Eighth grade, 29-26. A. C. first team de- feats Wichita 28-27. The game was so close that it was terrifying to a few A. C. boys who were particularly interested. Ministerial Association starts a reform movement. 21-Rain. 22-Washington's birthday. We get a holiday. 23-Spelling omitted. Mr. Gilliland dei- livers another very enthusiastic speech. Bryan and Mildred Grove also make addresses. 24-Tommy gets down with the mumps. SWELL GUY. 26-A. C. plays last game of season on home court. Trims Halstead 31-29. Morgan has pugilistic aspirations but stubbed his toe and the sidewalk knocked it out of him. 27-Delphian society puts on a play- "Every Student." 28--Rain. MARCH 1-Exam. week. Hi 2-Some boys take up physical train- ing. 3-Bender makes a farewell address. 4-Physics exam. 5-A. C. girls to Newkirk. We trim them. 6-Seniors form a line party of four couples. Boys have slumber party at Tate Cary's. 'I-Annual board picture taken. 6-Gillie ANNOUNCES a song. 9-J udge Freeman lectures in Chapel. A. C. girls trim Cooper college, 20-5. 10-Grade cards. High School presents Mr. Bender a present. ll-Peace. 12-A. C. demoralizes Winfield. Girls win, 39-11. Boys, 37-31. 15--Gillie makes a speech. B. B. boys presented with carnations for their ex- cellent work at Winfield. Another slum- ber party at Tate's, according to Hoyle. 16-Cicero class gets a lecture on pro- hibition and woman's rights by Miss Fra- zier. 17-Hurrah for Ireland. 18-Gillie starts a canning bee. 19-Literary program. 22--Senior party at Parman's. Tickie breaks up the china ware. Best attended party of the season. 24-Mrs. Shreeves of Winfield W. C. T. U. stirs up enthusiasm in Chapel for the coming tag day. 25-B. B. teams go to Lawrence. 26-Vacation. Junior-Senior boys take a hike. Leach jumps off straw stack, soft landing. Both teams win. 27-Signs of approaching spring. Jody gets a haircut. 28-Hail to the conquering heroes, bas- ket ball teams return. 29-Mrs. Seyfer comes with consola- tion. 30-Philomathean program. 31-? and son entertain us in chapel. APRIL 1--To hell with yuh. 2-Delphian program. Sophs had a wienie roast that wasn't. Have you heard of the two Junior hoboes? 5-Hair cutting time for Seniors. 6-Freshies follow suit. 7-Gillie loses his pedestal. Rex M CALENDAR theatre is installed in Chapel. 8-Miss Haskett plays guardian angel for the annual board and gets her wing singed. 9-Annual board on carpet. Plead guilty. Sophs have party and pass out the eats. 10-Miss Haskett makes retribution. 11-New prof. makes a speech. Nose holding contest in room 4, class dismissed, some perfumigation. 12-Sixteen appears on steeple and then disappears. Juniors wail. 13-Belles Lettres program. Ladies home companion. 15-Junior moonlight ride to Green farm. Senior visitors. Seniors to the picture show. 19-Seniors to reception at Winfield. 20-Dead bunch. 21-Delphian program. 22-Juniors do the heavy. 23-Junior-Senior reception at Fifth Avenue hotel. I never reared my boy to be a soldier. 24-Rain. 25-More rain. 26-School starts at eight o'clock. Foot ball and basket ball boys have wienie roast at Headgates. Some new members initiated into the ancient Order of Royal Stuck-ups. Woody elected foot ball cap- tain. Vete is elected basket ball captain. 27-Skinnie Ammons gets 'married. Tommv has a birthday. Cops run bunch of H. S. boys off Summit street. Sim Harrington gets Stuck-upg Federal build- ing 12 P. X. 28-Tommy treats the gang. 29-Inter-class meet. 30-Spring Fanatics. r MAY 1-High School wins first prize at Merchants Exposition. 2-Same old story. 3-Mildred Boylan whistles in Chapel. 4-Seniors have a five o'clock break- fast at Headgates. 5-Canned music in Chapel. 6-Belles Lettres program. Enthus- iasm in Chapel for track meet. Miss White gives a reading. 7-Track meet. A. C. gets her usual third place. 8-Everybody sleepy. 9-Junior lads go kodaking. 10-Phonograph sings for us again. Gillie hates to wear out more than two needles at a time. Mrs. TeWalt here for class play. 12-Mrs. TeWalt gives reading in Chap el. 13-Seniors sore because Profs. won't let them conduct Chapel on account of not supplying any spiritual food for which the services are conducted. Track team to Fairmount. Chap. breaks high jump record. 17-Physics Exam. 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J f - " "M f 1 I Q , I , f f f f f X 1' Qfff l Xf' .X f X - r INTER-CLASS TRACK MEET l In the track meet between the classes the Seniors won with 545 points. The Jun- iors took second with 47 points, then fol- lowed the Freshmen with 35 1-2 points, and the Sophomores last with 6 points. Pov Robinson of the Senior class set a new reeord with G firsts and 3 seconds, making E9 points. He won all the field events except the shot which was won by Bryan Groveg Fred Tieach won the 100 and 2209 Dan Bloomheart the one-fourth and one-half mile: Hinton the mile and Robin- son the hurdles, and the Juniors won the relay race. Ribbons were awarded those finishing first, second and third in each event. In the first annual inter-class cross country race the Juniors won first, Fresh- men second, Sophomores third and Se- niors fourth. Merle Hinton finished first, Carl Ammons sc-cond, Sim Harrington third. Raymond Warren fourth and John Wiley fifth. The winner received his High School Letter. . INTER-CLASS BASKET BALL More interest was taken in inter-class basket ball than formerly. First team players were barred on both boys' and girls' teams. Many new players took part and the games were closer and more hardly con- tested flmn in previous years. The Senior and Junior girls' teams were tied for first place, in the play off the Se- niors won the inter-class championship. In boys the Senior, Junior and Fresh- man teams were tied with the same num- ber of victories and the triple tie was not played off. 47 Scores by girls were: Seniors 45 Juniors 9. Freshmen 143 Sophomores 18. Juniors 155 Freshmen 18. Sophomores 10g Seniors 12. Juniors 195 Seniors 21. Boys' inter-class basket ball: Freshmen 355 Sophmores 15. Seniors 153 Juniors 7. Seniors 183 Sophomores 11. Juniors 163 Freshmen 13. Freshmen 16g Seniors 10. Juniors 183 Sophomores 15. 'Q , ' af ni' ' 1 :L 1. H-,. .-3. . 4 . . my Nix. '.f'w f y,.,Q,.x A FOOT BALL SCORES . . . . 3 Southwestern 2nd 0. A. C. H. S. 73 Kaw 0. A. C. H. S. 91 g Newkirk 0. A. C. H. S. 353 Sumner County 13. A. C. H. S. Og Wichita 0. A. C. H. S. 375 Southwestern 2nd 6. A. C. H. S. 273 Perry 0. A. C. H. S. 305 Sumner County 0. Total-A. C. H. S. 2505 opponents 19. VETIS AMMONS QilE1I'f91'b21Ck. Weight 142 CARI, AMIXIONS fCaptainJ Left Hallfback. Weight 142. '16, JOE MCCARTY Centvr. Weight 152 '15 LAURENCE CHAPLIN Fullback. Weight 158 '15. HARRY WOODY Right Halfback. Weight 155 Leroy PEEK Right Tackle. Weight 165. '15. JOE FILNTON Ioft and Right Tackles Weight 140 GLADWYN BOARDMAN Right Guard. Weight 185. ' '16 HRAINARD TAYLOR Left End. Weight 154 FRED LEACH End and Halfback. Weight 145 '16. HARRY THOMPSON Left Guard. Weight 175 SIMEON HARRINGTON Left Tackle. Weight 155 '16. A i .-.11 LOUIS MORGAN Guard. Weight 140 '15. N SAM PAYDEN End. Weight 135 '18. HUGH SCOTT End. Weight 140 '15, FOOT BALL The High School eleven finished their 1914 season in a blaze of glory, defeating Sumner county 33 to 0 in the last game on Thanksgiving day. Not a game was lost by the Purple and Gold warriors and the record gives Arkansas City the best claim to the championship of southern Kansas. The Southwestern College Seconds with their usual husky bunch were subdued in two contests by the largest scores made for several years. Perry, Oklahoma High School with a strong team met a similar fate and the Sumner County High School of Wellington likewise lost two contests to A. C. H. S. by a large majority. The plucky Newkirk boys were swamped and at Kaw under the old style "Three down and five to go" rules the Purple and Gold were victorious. At Wichita, play- ing during a heavy rain and through a sea of mud, a nothing to nothing game was staged. In all but two short periods of time Arkansas City carried the fighting into Wichita's end of the morass and had it not been for the great defensive work of Elam, A. C. would have emerged victor- ious. The season was a success financi- ally as well, and dark blue jersies with gold felt monograms were awarded to the fifteen regulars. Unlike the teams of the lastfew years Arkansas City had a very heavy line and a heavy, fast back field. The team rounded into shape early owing to the large number of last year's team who were back and because of the foot ball camp held at Green's ranch the week be- fore school started. Captain Carl Am- mons whose work had attracted attention over the state for the last two years, played the best game of his High School experience, his fast runs around end and twisting runs through broken fields again earned for him recognition as half on the "All-State High School" selection. Harry Woody, captain-elect for 1915, played end last year and in the early 53 part of this season, when on account of his excellent blocking, speed and ability to give interference he he was moved to right half-back where he played a steady game all year. On defense he played end. Laurence Chaplin who captained the 1913 team played this year at full-back where his hard plunges, forward passing, and goal kicking together with his defen- sive line backing made him one of the mainstays of the team. Vetis Am'mons at quarter played the best season of his High School career. He has played this position three years, he handles the ball clean, passes well and mows down his man in interference like a Maxim. Above all he keeps a cool head and uses very good judgment in running the team, in- variably finding the weak points of their defense and taking advantage of their mistakes. Joe McCarty after trying other line positions with varying success became a fixture at center where his smooth, even passes and blocking on of- fense and aggressive charging on de- fense earned him a respected reputation. Harry Thompson, 186 pounds, at left guard was a "stone wall" on defense. Often his hard charges carried him through the opponent's line, nailing their back field men in their tracks. He is one of the best High School guards in the state. Gladwyn Boardman, 188 pounds, play- ed right guard and was the third member of the trio center on which many a well ai'med play of the enemy went on the rocks. Louis Morgan also played guard and while lighter than "Board" he filled the place with credit to himself and the team. He is fast down the field, on kicks and meets plays low on his position. Si- meon Harrington, in addition to holding numerous other positions, held down left tackle on the team. Sim has the knack of being on the spot when the opponents FOOT BALL make a "fluke" and grab up the ball. This is his third year regular on the team. Une play this year Sim did not get away with was his attempted criss-cross with the ref- eree in the Wellington game. Leroy Peek, manager, 1914, played regularly at tackle the first part of the season until he injured his knee. Roy is a good, steady man on defense and hits the line hard when carrying the ball on a tackle swing. Joe Fenton played tackle on both sides of the line and is one of the most aggres- sive, nervy players on the team, he never gives up and always comes back hard. Arkansas City had two pairs of ends both above the average. Brainard Taylor at left end played a cool, steady, depend- able game, using good judgment in tackling and spilling the play if he could not get to the 'man with the ball. Sam Payden also worked at left end. Sam's "long suit" is catching forward passes in most any position. He is the only Freshman to make the team. At right end, Fred Leach played brilliantly, always down fast on kicks. On defense, he played safety, where his speed and dodging caused him to be one of the best ground gainers on the team. With this year's experience and a little improve- ment in blocking interference he will make a back field man hard to stop. Hugh Scott also played well at right end. He has the grit and resolute de- termination that make him a dependable player, he "boxes" his tackle well and tackles hard. Arthur Wallace played a star game against Southwestern seconds, kicking a placelkick and running with the ball for long gains. While Chaplin, McCarty, Taylor, Thompson, Peek, Morgan and Scott grad- uate and their loss will be much felt, the remaining seven regulars form an excel- lent foundation on which to build an- other championship. Others who played on the team were Elmo Berroth, Bryan Grove, Garnett Clary, Ornie Payden, Robert Warren, Herman Magnus, Homer Williams, John Long, Ed. Davis and "Red" Lohmann. .. . 532' - 'f ii .f - ' E ., 1 5::..!2.?-5z2?g.l' ip " 2?!ll!lJt?l f A . -. ff - ,L ' f 4:59 -- -fx 54 FOOT BALL EXPERIENCE The Arkansas City High School, stu- dent body and faculty have always been proud of their athletic teams, and espec- ially so when witnessing a foot ball game in which every nerve is tingling with loy- alty for the eleven who are endeavoring to uphold the honors of their school. While the High School can justly be proud of the records established by form- er teams, we doubt if any class has a right to feel more proud than the staunch, ever-loyal class of Nineteen Hundred and Fifteen. Eight of the fifteen letters pre- sented were won by members of this class. Our team met teams of greater weight and beat them, they met like sized teams and beat them, and met smaller teams and whipped them. In fact, the team of this year can rightfully claim the championship of northern Oklahoma and southern Kansas, and can boast of a total of two hundred and fifty-six points to her opponents' nineteen. Every one was confident of a winning team this year and no one more determined than the squad who sacrificed one week before school commenced, indulging in foot ball practice, when the thermometer registered 100 degrees most of the time, and continued regular practices until the season closed with a big victory. The team was toughened by scrimmage with the Business College and the sec- onfl team: and ready for their first game, which was with the Southwestern Seconds. For some reason they did not cross our goal line while we ventured across theirs for three touchdowns. A week of light practice passed and the meek and lowly ones from Newkirk came, not to minister but to be ministered unto. It was a long race, an average of about five downs for a touchdown and when the 55 whistle blew we had a total of ninety- nine points. The team seeking unconquered worlds invaded an Indian camp known as the Kaws, and emerged from the charred and grim colored territory, with not many scalps, but with a victorious squad. The Southwestern Seconds came again with vengeance plainly written on their brows. The whole team played wonder- fully and deserve special praise for the ex- cellent interference and running. The final score for this game was thirty-five points for Arkansas City and six points for Southwestern. Wellington was the next to meet our undefeated squad, and with many long runs and good offensive and defensive work on both sides the score ended thirty-five to thirteen in our favor. 'Ihc most important but not the best game of the season, that with Wichita, followed. It is said "the history of the game lies in the mud." It was a case of two very anxious teams seeking to score and neither side was able to do this. The best and cleanest played game of our experience was the one with Perry. The Perry squad was a bunch of good na- tured and gentlemanly fellows. The score was thirty-three to nothing in our favor. The last game of the season was on Thanksgiving day with Sumner County High School. A splendid effort was made to sell tickets and nine hundred en- thusiastic rooters witnessed the closing game of the greatest foot ball season we have ever seen. We made five touch- downs and kicked three goals, thus de- feating them by a large score. Every man is to be congratulated on the clean gentlemanly game he played. JSSQYS JS3ASKlE21F JBSATLTL. The boys' basket ball season for 1914- 15 has been a great success both in the number of games won and in a financial way. The team played good, fast, consist- ent ball throughout the year. In the Ar- kansas Valley League, considered the fastest in the state, Arkansas City finish- ed third, Newton and Reno ahead of them, Wichita was also tied for third place. Every team in the league with the ex- ception of Reno was defeated at least once. Our ancient and honorable rival Winfield came down early in the season and nosed out a two point victory but we evened up matters in the last game on their court, winning from them 36 to 31. The team entered the state tourn- ament at Lawrence and defeated Baldwin but lost out to Atchison. Those players who were awarded letters for the 1914- 15 season were: Vetis Ammons, Carl Ammons, Laurence Chaplin, Gladwyn Boardman, Harry Thompson and Leroy Peek. Others who played with the first team part of the season were John Long, Harry Howard, Hugh Scott, Bryan Grove, Lovell Gragg, Joe McCarty, Sam Payden and Arthur Cooper. Vetis Am- mons, Captain and re-elected for 1915-16 was the main reliance of the team all year. His steady passing and team work over the floor together with his field and free goal throwing were largely responsible for the team's showing this year. Carl Ammons at the other forward was prob- ably the fastest moving player in the league and for that reason one of the hardest players to keep covered. Tal's clever, sensational goal throwing in the last half of the Winfield game insured us a victory. Arkansas City was fortunate in having two good jumping centers. Both Board- man and Chaplin took the tip quite reg- ularly throughout the season. Gladwyn Boardman, Captain of last year's team has height and strength, two valuable as- sets for a center and these give him an advantage in passing the ball and guard- ing his opponents. Laurence Chaplin played a steady, consistent game through- out the year, he has the habit of out jump- ing his taller opponents regularly and is al- so a good guard and goal thrower. Harry Thompson and Leroy Peek played reg- ularly at guard and through their defen- sive work, our opponents were held to low scores. Peek plays an aggressive, close guarding game, covering his for- ward well but is more inclined to foul them than Thompson, who with his six feet two inches height and reach was able to get around and over his man effective- ly and without fouling. "Tommy"' is also a good goal thrower. The two guards and Chaplin graduate this year and their places will be hard to fill. John Long played guard the first semester but did not continue the later session. Harry How- ard at guard during the last Winfield game, showed class and will make a strong bid for the place next year. Hugh Scott by his aggressive work in the Halstead game helped win a close, hard contest. 56 BOYS BASKET BALL The season's record follows: February the twentieth will long be re- A. C. H. S. 57g Ponca City 5. membered in basket ball in the A. C. H. S. A. C. H. S. 353 St. John's College 17. On that day teams from our High School 28 38 38 31 A. C. H. S. 22 A. C. H. S. A. C. H. S. A. C. H. S. A. C. H. S. A. C. H. S. A. C. H. S. 26 A. C. H. S. 17 A. C. H. S. 33 A. C. H. S. 25 A. C. H. S. 28 A. C. Il. S. 28 A. C. H. S. 31 36 14 A. C. H. S. 9 A. C. H. S. A. C. H. S. A. C. H. S. 35 5 Kingman 27. 3 Wichita 42. 5 Kingman 19. 3 Winfield 33. 3 Hutchinson 25. 3 Newton 47. 3 Halstead 24. 3 Reno 34. 3 Newton 18. 3 Reno 34. 3 Wichita 27. : Hutchinson 21 9 Halstead 28. g Winfield 31. 3 Baldwin 5. 3 Atchison 24. 3 Alumni 18. The final standing of the Arkansas ley League: Team- Newton ...... Reno ...... . . Arkansas City Wichita ...... Winfield .... Kingman . . . Halstead ..... Hutchinson . . . Newton won with Reno. Won Lost ....1.1 3 .. ..., 11 3 5 .. .... 9 5 ....8 6 ....3 11 11 12 the title on the play won seven straight victories, winning two silver loving cups and defeating the league leaders in the Arkansas Valley League. The teams defeated were Wich- ita Seconds, Mullenville, Anthony boys, Spring Township girls, Anthony girls, Winfield Manual and Wichita High School. . . .. R.. Vale 5 5 Pct. .786 .".. 'X .786 t'tS 643 it vw ' g. .643 ' .571 ' .214 .214 .143 Q 1 off "SP BETHEAN H ARRINGTON 57 mms ff" 'mx " ' I .u1.?, - BASKET BALL EXPERIENCE ii-.-.li This year as our third year in the Ar- kansas Valley basket ball league proved the most successful of them all. Our first Arkansas Valley team took championship of the cellar. Last year the team began to work better and we finished in fifth place. This year we tied for third place with Wichita, who took the championship at the Emporia State Tournament. From the result of these years it can be seen that it takes time to develop a team. The first league game of this year was played at Kingman in which we nosed out a one point victory after a hard fought contest. The next evening in a fine game we lost to Wichita by only a few points. Our next trip was up to Newton and Hal- stead. We lost at Newton because of the backache and ineligibility rules kept too many regulars at home. Mr. Hugh Lee Scott came to our rescue about this time and in a whirl wind game we beat Hal- stead the next night. On the Nickerson-Hutchinson trip we lost to Reno and won from Hutchinson. On all these trips one game was lost and the other was won. Not only on trips but also at home we seemed to have al- ternated success. The week after we de- feated Hutchinson we were scheduled to play Wichita who was then leading the league. As the time grew nearer every man was determined that we should break our 'Jinx and win from Wichita, which would be two games in succession. On the day of this game a tournament was held at Wichita and our girls and boys sec- ond team won the championship of south- ern Kansas. Not being wholly satisfied with the idea of a second team man hav- ing more glory than we, every man went into the Wichita game with a determina- tion which no previous Purple and Gold supporter has ever surpassed. With such spirit there was only one outcome and that was victory. In the best game of the season we avenged our defeat at Wichita and when the timekeeper's whistle blew the score stood 28-27. Our "jinx" broken we easily won the two remaining games with Halstead and the last one with Winfield with whom we had tied in the league and therefore was an important factor as to whether or not we should surpass our old rivals. The team was sent to the Lawrence tournament March 26-27 and secured a victory over Baldwin in the first round of games. After that night the officials would not let us play in the tournament any longer for some reason or other, so we came home. With the termination of the season came the end to a team which was bound by the closest ties of friendship. Of the six regular men, Peek, Chaplin and Thompson will graduate. Carl Ammons has left for the West, but there is still a chance of his returning next year, and Vetis Ammons and Boardman who are the only regulars that will be back next year for sure. Besides these six men, second team men who have participated in games are How- ard, Scott, S. Payden, Gragg, McCarty and Grove. With all of these men back next year with the exception of Scott and McCarty and with an additional number of second team men such as Woody, Wiley and Bloomheart, .and plenty of raw material which is fast de- veloping, the old Purple and Gold will again have a team next year which will be as good as the best of them. I , BOYS BASKE T BALL-Fill S 1' '1 EAM GIRLS BASKET BALL The A. C. H. S. girls' basket ball team elected Mildred Grove captain and Clara Rothfus manager for the season of 1915. The season opened with class games which caused much excitement and rival- ry between the classes. The Senior girls' team proved to be the best of the four teams by winning inter-class champion- ship. Then things began in real earnest and the team consisting of Verna Down- ing, Charlotte Scruton, Ruth Weddle, forwardsg Una Nicholas, Clara Rothfus, centers, and Mildred Grove Ccaptainl, Ora Straughan, guards. We played our first game with Ponca City January 2, our girls winning by a large score. This success continued until we struck our Waterloo and even then we were not out- classed. We played two college teams, Southwestern Freshmen and Cooper col- lege, both teams were composed of husky girls who never dreamed of being beaten by a high school team although at that same time the A. C. girls held the title "Champions of Kansas." The Cooper girls were held to a no-field goal game, which was due principally to the good work of the guards, although the for- wards and centers plaved equally as well at their positions. But we were a little better to Southwestern girls, letting thanx have one field goal, while we were success- ful in getting eleven of the same. Per- haps of all the games played the two with the Winfield girls were most exciting. The rivalry of our towns and the loyal boosting accorded each team added to the game and the weaker team played with vigor and vim. After defeating all the teams in this part of Kansas and northern Oklahoma, we entered the tourn- ament at Wichita and added another title to our list, "Champs of Kansas," also an- other cup. Since this wasn't enough for us we went after larger game, entering the tournament at Lawrence. All the teams were on the lookout for the A. C. girls and each dreaded to play us. We were successful in our first game with Rosedale, however, we were doomed to disappointment a few hours later when we met Whitewater. As the old saying goes-"Heads I win, tails you lose"- well, we brought up the rear. During the last two years the girls have played thirty-four games with other High Schools and colleges and lost one game out of the entire list which is a record any college would be proud of. The girls were lead by the classy little captain, Mildred Grove, who played 'her position at guard probably unsurpassed by any in the state. Her working partner, Ora Straughan, having the uncommon ability to make an accurate pass with either hand, proved to be one of the most con- sistent guards of years. Una Nicholas seldom missed the tip at jumping a center, and Clara Rothfus, the speedy little second center never failed to pass the ball to the fastest of forwards, Charlotte Scruton, Ruth Weddle and Ver- na Downing who were sure to cage the ball. The girls feel that they owe their success to their coach, Francis Schmidt because of the efficient training and per- sonal interest he has taken in each and every girl of his team. Since only two members of the team graduate, the pros- pects are the brightest for a winning team next year. J RECORD OF 1915 Ponca City 9. Winfield 6. Ponca City 14. Southwestern KFreshJ 5 Newkirk 4. Spring Township 12. Anthony 10. Newkirk 10. Cooper College 5. A. C. H. S. 39, A. C. H. S. 14, A. C. H. S. 263 A. C. H. S. 283 A. C. H. S. 37g A. C. H. S. 245 A. C. H. S. 353 A. C. H. S. 345 A. C. H. S. 203 A. C. H. S. 303 Winfield 11. Rosedale 9 A. C. H. S. 13g . 10.5 Whitewater 13. 'c' so A. c. H. s. he x fx, L 29 i ' ' F , ?4,.r 'L 1 We-' K ' L 1 X , VIS X f,- A K . 5 r I 1 GIRLS BASKET BA L-L-FIRST TEAM BOYS BASKET BALL---SECON D TEAM The High School second team 'made a record this season which would have been a credit to the first team a few years ago. In addition to defeating several local teams and occasionally turning out and playing the regulars to a standstill, they defeated Ponca City High School and held the fast Chilocco seconds to a 10 to 11 score, also held Southwestern second team to a 21 to 19 game. February the 20th the team entered the Southern Kansas tournament at Wichita and won three straight games, defeating Wichita sec- onds, Mullenville and Anthony High Schools and thereby won -the beautiful silver trophy cup given by the Southern Kansas Teachers association. The players on this team are in direct line for the first team and will undoubtedly give a good ac- count of themselves next year. The play- ers and positions were: Sam Payden, Lovell Gragg and Louis Morgan, forwards5 Bryan Grove, captain and center5 Harry Howard, Joe McCarty and Harry Woody, guards. Arthur Wallace played a good game at center the first of the season. O. Payden and G. Clary also played. The year's record is as follows: A. C. H. S. 325 Ponca City 20. A. C. H. S. 205 Business College 22. A. C. H. S. 105 Chilocco 11. A. C. H. S. 195 Southwestern Acad. 21. A. C. H. S. 185 Wichita 17. A. C. H. S. 175 Mullenville 15. A. C. H. S. 265 Anthony 19. 62 -as-....-.......... BOYS BASKET DAIAI.-SICUONIJ TEAM E Ki Cfi9G 3iQ Gi9Csif9Q9UK9 ..l Ggoeicsxac-ri-9G G vGiiJ 9s'QG5 TRACK g9C4?'DG'i:5D Cr'E9 2DQ90Q9 Our track team did not finish as suc- cessful a season as our other athletic teams. Several of the events in which our last years showing was good and we had built up hopes of winning in, proved to be weak places this year. Bloomheart and Robinson of last year's team were out again as was Chaplin of the 1913 team. Around these three veterans the team was built. At the Southwestern meet Humboldt won with 24 pointsg Anthony 23, Winfield 15, Arkansas City 12. In the meet at Wichita, Anthony made 303 Caldwell and Winfield each 203 and Arkansas City 19. Captain Laurence Chaplin set a new Ar- kansas Valley record in the high jump with a leap of five feet nine and three- fourths inches, winning thereby a gold medal. He also won second and a silver medal at Winfield, in the same event. Daniel Bloomheart won first and a gold medal in the 440 and third in the half at Winfield and third places in these events at Wichita, each place carrying a bronze medal. Roy Robinson was undoubtedly the best all-around track 'man in the school but because of the arrangements of events and a lame hip he was prevented in the meets from coming up to his practice marks. As it was he won five bronze medals for third places in the pole vault, broad jump, discus and 120 low hurdles. Bryan Grove improved rapidly as the season progressed and put the shot 41 feet at Wichita, getting second place and a silver medal. Merle Hinton, the little Freshman dis- tance marvel running against a Veteran -o J0QGi9JC4i:"J 9 , C5i9J field secured third place in the mile in the Wichita meet. Fred Leach, manager, running his first year did Well in the hundred and two- twenty and next year by faithful training should be a point winner. Gragg, Woody, Shaw, Ornie and Sam Payden, Ray ond Robert Warren, Curtis, Harrington, Wiley, Nelson, Howard, Car- ter and Knapp were on the squad. Chaplin, Bloomheart, Robinson and Grove made their track letters this year. One of the problems for next year will be a suitable place to train. The nearest available place is the block and a half of round just south of the City Water Works building, which is large enough for a quar- ter mile track and is only two blocks from the Gymnasium. It would make an ideal plavground in summer and a valuable ad- dition to Paris Park. A. C. H. S. records made in competition with other schools are: 220-yard dash, U. Gribble, '09-.23 100-yard dash, U. Gribble, '09-.10 2-5. 440-yard-dash, U. Gribble, '09-.53 3-5. 880-yard run, H. McMillan, '09-2.07 2-5. Mile run, Harrington, '14-4.58 3-5. 220 low hurdle. E. Animons, '11-.27. 120 low hurdle, R. Robinson, '14--.14 4-5 Broad jinp, E. Ammons, '10-.19. High jump, L. Chaplin, '15-5.9 3-4. Pole vault, R. Robinson, '11-10.2. Shot, R. Leekley, '12-45.1. Discus, R. Leekley, '124111 feet. Hammer, H. McMillan, '09-123 feet. Javelin, H. Snyder, '14-137.1. y Half mile relay, '11-1.40 2-5. Mile Relay, '08-3.52 3-5. , 64 .Z wx QL -m .Q TEAM TRACK BASE BALL The base ball team of A. C. H. S. began practice with the first warm days of Ap- ril, which consisted mostly of taking the kinks out of their arms by playing catch. Base ball as a game has been greatly handicapped because it comes at a time simultaneous with the track season. And if a good track team is to be had, attention cannot be given to both. Coach Schmidt has handled the thing nobly in supervising and training both the track and base ball teams. There were several practice games, one with a local bunch whom we defeated, the score being 5 to 4. Next we had a game with a bunch of rustics called Prairie View whom we again defeated to the tune of 18 to 8. A. C. H. S. has some excellent material and would develop one of the fastest High School teams in the state with a little more practice. At the time of this writ- ing there is a good prospect of several more interesting games, including several trips to nearby towns, Newkirk, Ponca City, Fairfax and others. The team was composed of the follow- ing players: Taylor, Groves, Robinson, Morgan, S. Payden, Gragg, Orendorf, O. Payden, Carter, Cooper, Howard, Woody, Brandhouse and Warner. 27' 66 Zfwcwsacwcweefgfwfwcwvsaofb cimfswacqxacwgcivexaaxockeq HTERA V WHO'S WHO AND WHY. On a windy day in March, in 1894 a tiny bald-headed baby girl was born into this dreary world-She was born on a farm in the northern part of Cowley County and spent the greater part of her earlier days with her two sisters and brother roaming over the hills, playing in the creek, riding horseback, and many other things a farmer's daughter ever did and many things that no other ever did. When five years of age she started to school and went about six months out of the year. One summer her mother and father traveled for their health so they drove over Oklahoma and southern Kan- sas in a wagon, and on this trip for the first time she saw Indians. After spend- ing several years in a country school she moved with her mother and sisters to Latham and was in school there one year. The next year she went to Blackwell where she gained 'most of her book knowl- edge. After finishing the grades there, she attended the academy of the State Bap- tist college in Blackwell but after two years school closed so she had to hunt an- other school which was Latham High School. As that is a small school with few advantages it was not hard to per- suade her to leave it for A. C. H. S.--in which school' she is a member of the Senior class and will finish High School work this year if it should be her luck. Eighteen years ago, on the fourteenth of February, some parents rejoiced over the 67 birth of their fourth baby girl. The father tells her that another baby never cried more nor harder than she and that he walked the floor with her for two years. She was very fond of chewing gum in her youth, especially of chewing that which someone else had previously chew- ed. She would not stop until one day her father put some tobacco in some gum which she found and since then she has not cared for gum. She was very anxious to start to school when her playmates did, because she could not "keep house" by herself, but when she started, it was not as interesting as she had hoped. She was told she would like it better later, so lived on hopes. Her father, sister and she went to the Wor1d's Fair at St. Louis for three weeks according to previous decision where they had a very enjoyable time. She only went four years to school in the little town and then they moved to a city. The children were very lonely but felt more at home after they began go- ing to school. Nothing important has happened besides the eighth grade grad- uation and the time when sister and she, when going back to their home for Christ- mas, were put on the wrong train and walked home the thirteen miles from the village where they got off. A few years ago her parents moved from Wichita to Arkansas City where she entered High School and enjoyed ev- ery moment until confronted with the in- junction, "Write an autobiography." LITERARY On the last day of July, 1897, in Brook- ville, Kansas, a new citizen came to the United States. He was not an exceptional child and nothing unusual happened dur- ing the first five years of his life. When he was five this family moved to Canyon City, Colorado and there he lived for two years and received his first taste of school life. In 1905 his parents moved to Arkan- sas City. He entered school here in the third grade and there are still a few who are 'members of his class. On entering High School he was very studious but still liked fun. In his Freshman year he with several others at- tempted to break up a house party at Pauline Mumaw's but were not successful. When a Sophomore he settled down to studv and was progressing well, when he was tempted by strike and received two days vacation. When a Junior he awoke to the, fact that school is not all study but pleasure. That year he joined a group of boys called "Night Owls." They were chased from the streets several times but he persisted and soon won reputation for bass singing. This. his last year, has been uuiet with only a few minor class scraps. The "Night Owls" have not sung lately but they will soon be heard again. On Thanksgiving morning several years ago parents rejoiced over a sweet little baby. This was a girl and at that time they thought there was no equal but many have changed their minds by this time. At the very earliest age she developed a fancy for cats, which is an -indication of a typical old maid, but she has not come to that stage yet. Other such old maidish traits seemed to attract her also. ning to learn table manners, etc. She also had become rather rough and played In- dian like a regular tomboyg took a great delight in making playhouses, getting into scraps, standing in corners, pinning strings and papers on people's backs, etc. When she was six years old she took a fancy to riding horseback. The first at- tempt was a failure when trying to ride a pony, so she had to walk home. She also tried to ride a pet monkey which greatly surprised her by giving her a firm seat on the ground. At the age of eight she had a great ex- perience with pumpkin pies. One day while her mother was gone she thought that the pie on the shelf looked good so she put her fingers into it. As she was very mischievous, she de- cided to scare her sister but the joke was on her, because the dog took after her and she had to cry for help. Our grandmothers say that children are foolish who do not get falls. She has received many falls and we guess the say- ing is true for she has proved to be bril- liant in all her classes, especially in his- tory f?J An only child was born February 12, 1895, on a farm six miles southeast of Newkirk. At the age of six she started to school. It was a country school with a lady teach- er of whom she was very fond and was teased by the children as being the "teach- er's pet." One day while playing "Black- man" she accidentally tore another girl's dress and the teacher said she must bring a needle and thread. But the next day she was instructed by an older girl that she didn't need to, so she didn't, and the next day the little girl's dress was neatly patched. At the age of four she became as stub-il Her mother and she spent one summer born as' all good children and was begin- in Colorado but she was so small that she 68 LITERARY didn't remember very much about it, but what interested her most, were the animals at the city park and the little train. When she was eight years old, she at- tended a country school and gathered per- simmons and hickory nuts and then when there was snow, went coasting. to Wichita she Moving from there lived next door to her grandfather, who used to tell her many stories and then when interesting war she had to write compositions she used some of those old stories. They then moved to Arkansas City, where she attended school at the Fourth ward but nothing exciting happened ex- cept when some one was sent to Mr. Ben- der or when the boys would bring a lizard to school and scare the girls. She entered High School and has suc- ceeded in getting through four years and she dreads to think that these are her last High School days. One Senior boy's advent into this world came on April 27, 1897, on a farm near Ponca City, Oklahoma. Not liking the sur- roundings very well, he moved to a much better town, known as Arkansas City, Kan- sas. At the age of six he began his education- al career, at the Second ward school. For a while things went off smoothly but he then began to have a streak of bad luck. It started off in this manner, when a boy hit him with a tin can which split his up- per lip and he was compelled to go with that scar for several months. In the fall he built a playhouse-built it all but the roof. One day in attempting to climb upon the playhouse he slipped and fell on a pile of boards. He managed to get up and run to his mother crying for help. When the doctor arrived his verdict was a broken arm. In his boyhood days, time went on for another year without anything of import- ance happening. But this luck could not go on. In the next summer he fell through between two boards, one having a nail in itg this time he had to have five stitches taken in his knee. He was just recovering from this when he got into a smashup and a ladder fell on his arm, breaking it at the wrist and elbow. Two years passed without anything hap- pening and he was beginning to think his "jinx" had left him, but he fell from a horse and broke his arm. He then started carrying papers for the Daily X-Rays and later for the Traveler. Yes, he is still going to school. From the ward schools he came to the High School and joined the class of '15. A certain Senior was born on September 21, 1897. When she was a mere child her parents moved on a cattle ranch in south- ern Oklahoma. Having no companions, but stock she became a peculiar girl and talked much to herself and the animalsg seemed much older than she really was and became very quiet. After many odd experiences on a ranch she started to school at the age of eight and went to this country school for one year. Then her parents moved to a small town, where she grew up with many other children but because of being so daring and unafraid was called a "tomboy." Later she moved to Arkansas City and has lived here for five years. She gradu- ated from High' School this spring. Since moving here she has changed greatlyg is now tall and has dark hair and eyes. She has also changed from being quietg'and,.is so lively that but a few will ever believe that when a child she was quiet and rather reserved. ' - p '1'. .iii I.. She was never a very popular little girl although she had 'many good friends. She always believed in havingra good, time and LITERARY always saw the funny side of everything. But like everyone else there were two sides to her disposition. She had some "tem- per" which she has shown more or less all through her life--the fact that she cried most of the time during the first three months of her life goes to prove that when she didn't like things she let folks know about it. She first walked when she was eleven months old and her father says he can't remember the time when she didn't talk. This little girl always loved to roller skate. She skated to school, from school, during recess periods, all noon, except for about three minutes for refreshments and after school until dark. The way she liked best to skate was to catch hold of the back of a bakery or fruit wagon and after a short ride she would stop off for a few minutes for light refreshments. Now of course girls do not always stay small so like the rest, had to grow up. She now clerks in a store. Not long ago she stepped on a lemon drop and sprained her knee. This Senior is now seventeen and has better times every day. Every morning starts a new puzzle for her and she won- ders what it will turn out to be. A girl was born in Bloomington, Indi- ana, February 10, 1896. She moved with her parents in 1902 to Arkansas City, Kansas and has lived here ever since. The first winter in Kansas she- had the mumps--the second winter brought her the measles but nevertheless she liked Kansas. At the age of seven she started to school at the Fourth ward and went there for eight years. She is a member of the Senior class in the High School, but recently went to a neighboring college. The person under discussion began life upon a farm Cnot by his consent, however! but the time spent there was short and un- eventful. From the farm he moved with his parents to town, where he was first in- troduced to the trials of school. The mys- teries of the first grade were solved in the school of that city, which was in Missouri, and then he was again moved, this time to the state of Kansas and to a fairly large town where he went through the usual routine of boys-marbles, tops, ball, shin- ny, and as little as possible of books, es- pecially dreading speaking day. Work at home was not unknown to him for it was early discovered that he could paint and his acquaintance with a brush covers many years of his early life, his ex- perience was with solid calcus only and could hardly be classed as artistic. When he reached the Seventh grade he was again moved, this time to Arkansas City, Kansas, where he began his school work at the First ward. The first year at High School was the most eventful and trying of all his school life, having a horror of speaking in Chapel. The later years brought forth nothing so very exciting, but much hard work. The social events of his class somewhat re- lieved the continuous grind of school duties. ' T-:STN 9ff:fl?I-E,'- ills 70 LITERARY HIGH SCHOOL JOURNA-LISM The purpose of a High School course in journalism is two-fold, to broaden the stu- dent's mind and educate him, to employ language as a means, and to develop a friendly feeling toward all people. Journ- alism vitalizes composition work. The English language is given a practical use, and the desire of the serious student is satisfied when he sees his own work in print. Newswriting develops character, for as the Work must be done by the re- porter method-asking questions, the in- terviewer must acquire tact, culture, pleasant presence, quick perception of news values, integrity, charity, and men- tal breadth. The student must have a retentive memory, a sense for apt phrases, an ability to think, listen and talk al'most simultaneously. From a High School course in newswrit- ing, it is impossible to make each individ- ual a Dickens, a Thackeray, a Bowles, a Walters, a Mark Twain, a Kipling, a Davis, a Sinclair, an Ade, an Irwin, a Cobb or a Corey. Our plan is to create a taste for the use, and an appreciation of the pure English as used by the conservative ed- itors of this country. Local occurrences, features, ideas, places, and personalities can be made the basis of High School composition, for this vital element of news, interests the stu- dent. He cannot make something definite nor concrete unless he has the material. The reason that many students dislike composition is that it deals too much with abstract and intangible subjects. Thought building in news work comes from asking questions. Ideas spring from the same source. The secret of skill in this work, however, is not knowledge but practice. Irving Cobb addressing Yale men in journalism, indicated his keen insight and philosophy by the following examples: 71 "Writing is a trade to be learned, like bricklayingl' "I don't believe there is such a thing as a born writer." "An education neither makes nor mars a man if he is born to be a newspaper man-I do not say born a newspaper man." "Good reporters are the scarcest and most valuable things in the newspaper business today." I "One of the best features of a course in journalism is that it is as good as an antidote for too much English. The tendency of many courses in literature is to give the idea that the English language is an end and not a means." In our course in journalism this year we have studied the three types of stories, news, human interest, and feature 5 also the technical form of exposition known as the editorial. In these forms we have observed that the regular rhetorical laws are usually set asideg that the answer to the questions who, what, why, where, when and how constitutes the lead. Con- trary to literary narration the climax is placed near the beginning. The difference between rhetorical narration and the news story lies in its structureg the primary motive of the news story is to inform. Built on a shred of news, the human in- terest story is designed to divert, amuse, or entertain. Three classes are based on the qualities of humor, pathos, and unique- ness. Taken from the realms of experience, history, literature and science, the feature story with very little of the news element, either instructs or entertains. The editorial is the expression of the pa- per's opinion on current affairs and is cal- culated to influence the reader for or against certain lines of action. Its range covers all news. The purpose may be to LITERARY inform, to convince, to persuade, or to en- tertain. Combined with a knowledge of history, science and religion, the student of journ- alism is equipped to become an intelligent member of his community. The United Amateur Press Association of America has recommended students of our High School for membership. THE SPRING FANTASY The Spring Fantasy or May Day Festi- val has, in two years stepped into our school as a permanent organization and one of the chief events of the year. Upon these occasions the entire work of the school is taken into consideration and pre- sented before the May Queen. This honor was held last year by Miss Ruth Wilson, and this year by Miss Lena Pittenger. The descriptive dances presented under the direction of Misses Hodge C'14J, and McCluney C155 proved to be one of the most interesting and beautiful features of the play. Miss Haskett of the English department deserves the credit for making these occasions a success. .i,l "THE STALLED AUTO." fBy a Freshmanj As I was going along the road on a horse and I heard an automobile comming behind me. I gave part of the road but he never and when we came side and side I was in the ditch where I had been pushed by the auto. I sonn cralled out and no- ticed the number it C8847 Kan.J Then one day I went to town in the waggen and I met this same man and he would not give me ony road agin and it was the same man. Then I met him again when I was comming home from town and he was stuck up in a mud hole and had been there for an hour. He asked 'me to pull him out but I do not. THANKS TO JOE The Annual Board wishes to express their gratitude to Mr. Joe Fenton for his splendid work on this year's calendar. We believe it is the best one "up till yet." For the benefit of our readers we will state that Mr. Fenton did not insert the impro-? Yes you have it, they came from an outside source. '1 THE WILL OF THE CLASS OF 1915 Brainard-His artistic writing to Louise McPherson. ' Lucile-Her exceeding tallness to Slim Payden. Clara-Her place as second center to Mary Helen Gardner. Banner-His-silence to Peg Grove. Ruth W.-Her poetic ability to Vera Taylor. Ormond-His spelling grades to Philip Doane. Carroll-All her hair switches to Clari- bel Lupton. Paul-His love of girls to Sim Harring- ton. Winnie-Her curly hair to Alice Pfis- terer. Harry-His striped tie to Sam Payden. Louise-Her ability of concentration in Psychology class to Hack Clary. Joe-His pipe to Ed Wilkinson. Hazel-Her little black and white hat to Lillas White. Esther-All her noise to Ivy Campbell. Elmo-His journalistic ability to R. C. Howard. Katheryne-Her monopoly on Gillies' of- fice to Runt LaSarge. Tate-Miss Haskett's love for him to Fred Leach. Marguerite-Her gift of gab to Helen Peck. Elmer-And bequeaths his unpopular- ity with the feminine gender to Dan Bloomheart. Sylvia-All her black hair to Helen Dlevens. Ruth B.-All her freckles to Albert Rau. Antonio-The Delphian society to the care of Max Baker. Corinne-Her crooked steps to Miss Anderson. Leroy-His bashfulness among the la- dies to Mark Davis. Ora-Her popularity among the Senior boys to Rachel Horton. Una-The twelve cents that Bryan Grove owes her to Vetis Ammons. Joy-His sweet tenor voice to Harry Howard. Edith-Her domestic science note books to Verna Downing. Laurence-His athletic ability to Slim Payden. Lena-The piano stool to Augustine Moncravie. Mary-Room 15 in A. C. Hospital to Ola Holland. Scotty-His quiet dignity to Herb Youn- kin. Irma-All her unused permits to Helen White. I Annis-Her "Hello Girlie" to Ruby Warner. Cora-Her knowledge of Physics to Gil- ly. Louis-His monopoly on Mildred Boy- lan to Frank Denton. dugg, 73 l , ,Er .ii . Z 5 Mflww X 1 Ak , llfwlflffmfi J . QL- 'Cl if . -'--' 3.1. I K " f , 'A Q f ' 'L f 9l if . ' - I .. .A - ..'.L,-'- ff - 'LL "SS A-1 :",." --.:' ' ' , -V- ' Xzff 1 2 H ILT gf- F." ' 4 ' 1.- --4 -L N I S' . was n I I If ' Qi " 1 I' 'Eh ' 3 O elf 440' avian . O 4 1551. ' .. f , as it y H ' f H! ., ' :'-. .4 Wlii -A .-1,-rj:-I LQ - , ? J , C' I :l 4 t lt? M im WMU!! wily.. . ' W Q l"il fa3'f' 74u'w,7 f, jl' DEAD I ' f .Q -ff .Ft 3' it eb- H" ' NN K ,I Q' Q S H f I STRAY LEAVES FROM CHAPEL HYMNAL 1-"I never noticed him until a minute ago. How angelic he looks. Wonder if he knows how to play pool? Watch him roll his eyes aroundf' 2-"You need the sleeves of Lewis' coat." 3-"Every once in a while Mr. - steals a look at Miss Sleeth and she returns it." 4-"Scots, Wha Hae" Benders Favor- ite. 5-"I wish I had a date for the game." 6-"A tea-kettle sings when it's full, but who in the H- wants to be a tea- kettle '?" 7-"Mine eyes have seen the cutest fellow in Winfield." 8-"I am setting on the front seat- Lots of fun up here, believe me!" KH. C. on front seat in Chapel for talking.J 9-"Bender has one at homey maybe this is his." 10-"Hazel said you had the best look- ing eyes and hair." 11-"Alpha Hatfield said that Lena Pit- tenger said that she thought you were just simply beautiful"-Katheryne and Corinne giving trade lasts. 12-"He talked to me for nearly an hour tlast night! and didn't know it." 13-"Bob and I aren't going to stay late tonight." 13-"There is the cutest dress down there but it is a regular party affair." -1-1 CLASS ROOM 1. Come late if possible then you will be seen to a better advantage. 2. Never bring a note book. You can borrow paper from your friends and the noise created is but a slight distraction. 3. If you haven't a fountain pen some one will loan you a pencil which you can sharpen during class. This enable those nearby to cough without being hard. 4. Sleep if possible because the in- structor prefers an interested class. ETIQUETTE 5. If sleep is not agreeable, talk to the girl next to you. Her giggles at your wit- ticisms "enthus" the teacher. 6. Throw ink on the floor for thc school has a janitor for the express pur- pose of keeping them clean. 7. Lastly, don't take notes, because if you follow these rules you will remember everything that has been said. 74 ." 'Q ..,..4, x, l 1 4 . 'lvhx if 'vu MLM 5 S r' 9' . ,lr 1 FL -1 mx x s +1ff'b" ' N .,p,.,.,..4,, v HY Hakim Jim -f ' Y if V4 1 -mf-, ,y,1q,1 M V ' ' -I 1 mm V f7'?T5f ,: ' H W , U l 'Q . . ,' V x Q y A x, 2 fl ' if , vt. . ,-5 45 '-:Af ' :S 'N ., x' ? it i 1 3 4 I -, vi A -nl !"7X . Qi '. ' .LQ f V 5,24-kiYw?':'.f X 2-ijt M' r " Q5 . I .H fi' ,far me :wen-is. j Q, unaware 'IN , Q ma own ' I W gsimivd. I v!rffAf'lll0N 'WIP , '2- or ' WZ,-, L ' .- ,34- I V v- -L74 , , 'z 4152 A " , .V sf '- vi J v uf?-5 James tin Latinj-"I don't like the Way the Romans made their chairs." Miss F-"Why don't you like them, .l:1n1es?" J-"They were only large enough for one." Sim-"Mary, what do you think of my new shoes ?" Mary-"Why Sim, they're just im- mensef' Prof. Gilliland-"What does the word vacuum mean, Hugh ?" Hugh S.-"I've got it in my head but I can't get it out." Miss Haskett-"Dan, have you read your 'Romeo and Juliet'?" Dan Bloomheart-"No, ma'am." Miss H.-"Well, what have you read ?" Dan-"Hair and socks." Harry Woody Cin English Class study- ing Spenserj-"Somebody's taken my book." Miss Haskett-"Has anybody Harry's Fairy Queen ?" Miss Frazier-"W hat part of speech is Apriles ?" James Cummins-"Nominative plural." Miss Anderson--"Fools can ask ques- tions that Wise men can't answer. Wise Freshie-"That must be the rea- son we all flunk in our tests." -Rf fffmf-'w F It I f . In It A J I -N ' X . K Qs, ' . j ,ff Miss Lupton fSpeaking of Scouring Fu-ahesj-"Rachel, what's the lesson to- day ?" ' Rachel-"Why, them there things call- ed scrubbing brushes." Mr. Gilliland-"You started out well this year but I'm afraid you're coming out the little end of the horn." Garnett Clary-"Well, that's the end you toot." Miss Hume-"What tense do I use when I say 'I am beautiful?' " Harry Howard--"Remote past." Freshman-"Why did they call a foul on him ? I dicln't see any feathers." Captain-"Of course you didn't, you muttg this is a picked team." Teacher fin Freshman Englishj-"He drank the toast in silence' Is this sen- tence correct ?" Freshman-"Noi He ate his toast in silence." Guide-"That is a negro cemetery." Visitor-"Ah, I seeg a kind of blackber- ry patchf' Grovie-"Ye Bo Ijust saved a guy's life." Senior-"How's that '?" Grovie-"Well, you know I shot at him and missed him." ' 1 SNAP SHOTS fd 'X V iw af S A .9 if "' M! sau u-:fix I .. hi 'Asif ' ' , S 'T ""' wifi' , 12 .. 2115. mfg 3,153 V r ., .. f V , gf gf ' u S , , I ,f,,1:,' - , P BQ . 352' Eg, fin M THE WORLD'S ALMANAC BE SURE 1. To talk, laugh, study, chew gum and write notes in Chapel because Miss Has- kett would feel lost if there wasn't some one to call down. 2. To go to Gillie as much as possible for permits so he can keep up his record for asking questions. 3. To go to spelling without studying the lesson, it makes a nice big guest list for the evening reception. 4. To yawn all day at school so the teachers will know you were out late. 5. Girls, to bring your own mirrorsg some one needs the big one worse than you. 6. Freshmen, to bring library books or something of that sort to employ your time in study hall lest you get your name down for idleness. 7. To gather your books up and be ready to leave as soon as the first bell rings, if taking any subject in room 3, Miss Kisling does dislike to have any one in the room at second bell. 8. To clear your throat if you want to attract some one's attentiong it is a new signal, teachers will never guess. RECEIPT-TRY THIS The following receipt for loneliness has been handed to us: One-half cup of "Ser- enaders" songg two cups of Katheryne Henneberry's gigglesg a pint of Esther Endicott's quietnessg three grams of Gil- lie's Chapel solosg one quart of Una Nich- olas' love lettersg one-half dozen Peek's winksg one skein Alpha's yarnsg one-half dozen Tal's napsg ten minutes of Clara Rothfus' hunt for books. Dissolve well in Franklin's milk bottle and let stand for two of Tommy's minutes, then pour five drops into one of Morgan's spoons and take every time we have a speaker in Chapel. HELPFUL HINTS 1-A stand in with the faculty will smooth a good deal of rough roads. 2-Don't tell a girl you feel it your duty to take her to a class party. 3-Dance while you like itg you'1l soon be too old to enjoy hopping around. 4-A stitch in your side loses your ap- pendix. 5-The dew Cduej point is the point where compensation begins. Only study in Chapel laboratory days-too much mirth excites Gillie. 6--Arrange your hat and coat neatly in the hall, straighten your hair, gather up your books and ask the girls with you if the powder is on straight. All this has a pleasing effect on Miss Haskett and Miss Kisling and if they haven't time to show their appreciation in words they will at least close the door in your face. 7-It is no longer good form to snor aloud although quiet sleep is still very popular. 8-Having entered a class room, spot a friend across the room and cough, whis- tle or throw some "shot" at him. If this fails to attract his attention maneuver around behind him and slap him on the back while you ask him if he was study- ing something-He will without a doubt take a little time to TALK to you. ....l..i- OH HAPPY DAY When we can talk in the halls. When Physics lessons are over. When the "Mirror" comes out. When we are graduated. .l-1 A new excuse might prove fatal to Gillieg don't spring it. LOST-One box of candy somewhere in 200 block on North B street.-Boardman. 78 SNAP SHOTS Er..,,,,,,,,-.,,i,M,.,,,,,...-.. . W-, - .-,..,, .. . , , sf' 1 r f W Q P 7 1 'ff 'SR , 9 ,7 Q, 'Y w ' A G. i E Y 'gr Q . xl W I A x ' r ' 35. I U' 4 r. - :L 4 A, A Su. V 'fx-.I L WE ' L', . 3 W ra .7 if gn N Lx ,Q5 ' in SENIORS CHARACTERISTICS THE WORLD'S ALMANAC Gnats are small, Most Polite-Paul Parman. Most Serious-Banner Titus. Most Jealous-Louis Morgan. Cutest-Corinne Lesh. Most Modest-Esther Endicott. Busiest-Leroy Peek. Most Southern-Una Nicholas. Most Ambitious-Joy Cozine. Best Fake Sport-Elmer Fagan. Best Politician--Yens Yensen. Most Popular-Lena Pittenger. Wittiest-Katheryne Henneberry. Prettiest-Hazel Clubb. Most Irish-Joe Fenton. Luckiest-Alpha Blevens. Slowest-Sylvia Hadley. Most Childish-Mary Vawter. Shortest-Lucile Johnson. Hardest Workers-Annual Staff. Spending Sunday evenings at 820 South Summit.-Antonio. To "report at the office"-Hazel. To change classes Without hearing Gillie gently murmur, "Let's have no talk- ing now, this isn't the place for talking." -Clara and Ruth. To "just loaf" and have a good time- Alpha. To play basket ball.-Una. To learn "poetry,"-Lena. Letting some one else work the Physics experiments.-Leroy. BY AXIOM I. Gas pipes are long, Ornie Payden is long, Therefore Ornie is a gas pipe. Most Precise--Marguerite Gregory. Best Scholar-Ormond Warner. Most Romantic-Antonio McAdams. Youngest--Tate Cary. 'W'1ie'rr-at--Carroll McDowell. Jolliest-Ruth Wilson. Best All Around-Harry Thompson. Laziest-Brainard Taylor. Newsiest-Winnie Gibson. Funniest-Hugh Scott. Daintiest-Louise Hodge. Most Interesting-Ora Straughan. A SENIORS IDEAS OF HAPPINESS Happiness--is that sensation which makes the sun shine brighter, the world move faster and every one to be in good humor 2 To get a correct result for an experiment in Physics the first time we try.-Ora and Louise. To ride around all day with a car full of Teachers.-Elmer. To be with Mildred--Louis. To have a fire drill during Physics hour -Corinne. Louise Hodge is small, Therefore Louise is a gnat. Fazors are sharp, Elme Fragan is sharp, Therfore Elmer is a razor. Peaches have rosy cheeks, Grace Davis has rosy cheeks, Therefore Grace is a peach. Turkey eggs are freckled, Arthur Williams is freckled, Therefore Arthur is a turkey egg. Potatoes are Irish, Katheryne Henneberrv is Irish. Therefore Katheryne is a sweet potato Ghosts are white, Helen is White, Therefore Helen is a ghost. Freshies are green, Sylvia is Green, Therefore Sylvia is a freshie. Johnson is a prize-fighter, Lucile is a Johnson, Therefore Lucile is a prize-fighter SNAP SHOTS I Q ,S 'f ' 'HA ae' rv Q THE WORLD'S ALMANAC COURT PROCEEDINGS . Police Court. Professor Bender found guilty of chew- ing Spearmint and sentenced to a lecture from Professor Gilliland. Elmo Berroth arrested for vagrancy in Wichita. Sent home for punishment. Fenton and Cary charged with arson. Sparks set fire to buildings on corner of Fifth avenue and Second street. Found guilty but appealed to the probate judge. Titus charged with drunkenness and contempt of court, and sentenced to thirty-one days in jail. Sam Payden charged with disturbing a soprano in the choir by escorting a voung lady to church. Sentenced to cease from all social frivolities for six months. Marriage Licenses Corinne Lesh ........... Hugh Scott Lena Pittenger ......... Leroy Peek Beulah Drew ...... Laurence Chaplin Verna Downing. . .Germany Williams Charlotte Scruton ..... Tal Ammons Ruth Burkey ......... Harry Howard Irene Bloomheart ..... Frank Denton Ethel Carlton ........ Luther Harris Helen Blevens .......... Algie Fitch Augustine Moncravie. . .Lovell Gragg Mildred Grove ........ Walter Fesler Cora McClaskey .... Ormond Warner Mildred Boylan ....... Louis Morgan Louise McPherson ..... Harry Woody Ethel Ruf ........... Arthur Cooper Alice Hestwood ........ Sam Payden Dena Day ......... Antonio McAdam Flossie Chaplin ...... William Hardy Edith Vaughn .......... Albert Rau Helen White ..... .... B ryan Grove . . .Oran Powers Ruth Wilson ..... Sylvia Hadley ............ Roy Lolhs Pauline Green ...... Herman Magnus U JUST IMAGINE Chapel period without talking. Carrol McDowell flunking. p Ruth Wilson not laughing. Elmer Fagan doing the high jump. Mr. Gilliland without something to do. Louise Hodge not "pretty peeved." Harry H. and Ruth B. not together. Alpha Blevens without something to say. Marguerite Gregory fat. Art Cooper bald-headed. Miss Haskett Physical Training Teacher. Ruth Burnett flirting. Mary Vawter, yell leader. Eunice Goodwin bashful. Leroy Peek not winking. Irma Sims Without Lena. Grace Davis Without rosy cheeks. Carl Ammons studious. H. S. students noisy in library. Joe Fenton missing a nap. Seniors quiet in spelling. Georgia Booton a brunette. H. S. without Gillie. Lucile Johnson seven feet tall. Esther Endicott cutting class. Mr. Bender "really" bald. Katheryne Henneberry sad. Tracy Cary not having the last word. Hazel Clubb not hungry. Ora Straughan not blushing. Gillie singing a solo in Chapel. Class picnic over before morning. Elmo and Tate on time for Senior Eng- lish. Clara Rothfus breaking a date to "Cram." The J. O.B.'s not causing a disturb- ance. Visitors in Chapel without a speech from Gillie. There's a meter in accent, There's a meter in tone, But the best of all meters, Is to "meet her" alone. There's a letter in accent, There's a letter in tone, But the best of all letters Is to "let her" alone. 32 THE WORLD'S ALMANAC WE WANT TO KNOW- When Gillie's going to stop askin' ques- ions. Why some kids like the back row in hysics. When Alpha will be on time. Why the Senior boys like the Junior irls. Why Chapel is a "Prayer Meeting." Who ever saw Marguerite or Esther ilking to a boy. Why Taller doesn't sleep more. Why Miss Haskett likes the Seniors so 'ell. When the cheese became of age. How long a short rope is. Xlfhy cold can't get in but heat can get u . Who's the "Mirror's" Business Manager. When Harry and Marry will work to- ether again. Who works Corinne's and Ruth W.'s hysics problems. When Gillie can work an experiment ithout "I don't know whether this will ork or not but -" "What're you goin' to do in 'Literary' " PHILOSOPHY A flunk is a bit of unappreciated effort. A band is a bunch of horns blown for le purpose of producing discord. A I. is a recognition of your ability as a uffer. A tablet is something you buy for your iends. K i . A school seat is something for you to eep in. A James, vulgarly called a "gym" is a ace where the boys amuse themselves hile their clothes are airing. A study period is a place to :get a grade deportment. I ' A Domestic Science kitchen is a place here nice little girls are taught to make ud pies. A permit is the same as a hunting li- cense. A victrola is a miniature Ford which produces music. A bluffer is one who recites without reciting. I A date is something Seniors never have on school nights???? FAVORITE SONGS All for the Girlies-Joe McCarty. il Along Came Ruth-Harry Howard. I want to Go Back to the Farm-Tom- mie Thompson. Do the Funny Fox Trot-Paul Parman. Silver Threads Among the Gold-Miss Haskett. Let By-gones be By-gones-Louis Mor- gan. I Want a Little Bungalow-Fib Hadley. Land of My Best Girl-Ormond Warner. Baby Love-Mary Vawter. Can't You Hear Me Callin-Sim Har- rington. He'd Have to Get Under-Phillip Doane. In the Palace of Dreams-Tal Ammons. I Want to be Somebody's Baby Girl- Louise Hodge. I Miss You Most of All-Una Nicholas. I'm Crying Just for You-Harry Woody. My Love Would Fill a Thousand Hearts -Tony McAdam. Would You Take Me Back Again.- Rachel Horton. Don't make eyes ata bashful fellow- he may take you up. Don't do all the reciting in agriculture -the class might think you a farmer. Don't wait 'till the last minute to make a date for Annual Board Meeting, you might get stung. . Don't get sore at a joke on yourself, people 'might think you a grouch. 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Nasa I Ezhw . . .m swam I I .3 MSDN U' :Em HEOSU6 .D has USSDWSS u u i 02-AOA . - NPSA . l EQOA i WGS gigs! h . gh OUR ADVERTISERS The Senior Class and Annual Board of Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Wish to express their deep appreciation and gratitude to the firms Whose advertisements appear on the fol- lowing pages. These advertisements repre- sent the "Up-to-the-Minute" business men of our community and we join with them in solicit- ing your patronage. They are reliable. You have not given your due co-operation to the Annual Board until you have read the adver- tisements of the men who are one of the great- est factors in making this book a reality. TERR Y'S DAIN TY SHOP Quality and Cleanliness First. Ice Cream Sodas, Lunches, Candy and Cigars r ?llBUlii1T'5 I Child S H i y ,H , , X r N k gahxes Qllcahg-in-illlrav Gimfxncnts S it Arkaxrsas Glitg, Ziiansas l Sk t A TTEND TH ARKANSAS CITY BUSINESS COLLEGE Tulle S?ioo2w W ith a Complete Course of Study and Trained Teacher rite or ata og E0 Go Pfes Curtis fa- Ames 5fNWThe Home National Bankwm j ARKA SAS CITY, KANSAS 1' Established 1888, ' 'A .' S3?P'fal a"dE9!IlE5 S51 553102 Dspssitazfy tar tha Uaitacdl Statss In In 15 Depositary tar ttns Stats at Kansas 5: Dsgnssitsry tar Cswllsy Csannty EE Dsgussitsry tar Otstatncmirmla Stats a tlas Afvvxnfvvvvvvvs tlmmlnvites YourBusiness was CLAY an an stasis Pianos, Victrolas, 1 P0l.llf!'y, Eggs, Buffet' Sewing Machines And Hides ana' Repairs 411 south Snmmarw BQFPHONE 45 Pl 96 325 soup 5 5 NEWMANQS Everything in Dry Goods. 7 vsfsAJvvxfvx,g W ll ui1Q sriNltHAnrjWEnEllbE l L Wm smnn l .W I :,fi,,Z Q rl' H cl . . 1 Ti :EM uuly ar ware M L BW MF t Automobiles "WE" " G l L rnnLs cuum fGOLLINSUN Hlnnwlnf cu, numfsnc uumnnv Q We want Your Business K. Satisfaction Guaranteed Expert Tuner and Dealer in HIGH GRADE PIANOS Geo. M. Getter, Prop. 222 N. 8th Sf. Phone 451 Phone 530 210 W. Central Jesse MQRGAN MUSIC Co. 6 y High Grade Pianos 6 RJ . ' ' Player Pianos and Victrolas i ' Arkansas City. ---- Kansas Sporiti g Goods Evezfyftllnirm Electrical nAAAAAAA ------ -v-vx. -------- ------ -sf --vvvs. ----- -vvx, -+--------- - SOLLITT 85 SWARTS Corner Drug Store SCHOOL SUPPLIES Ive Cream gltlas tljeuwaywthe Girls Like Them H. H. ALLEN, the GROCER ...We Hove What You Want... Phones. . ...127 and 128 PACKING HUUSE CASH MARKET BERROTH E? CO. Goods Delivered to all Parts of City by .MFTL'h0WlS, Delivery T B. oLD1eoYD so Sozvsi House Furnishings and Undertaking. E gifs' Rl 09' 'JU fn "' C511 U3 rw U gli: su 2 g .22 -Q2 2 F- O SE? 'PU ....':." "1 D:- mg, ff' " "1 :a 5 3 SS ""' 6 H2 -'H EH M1 '- T5 52--fin -Q35 gm ir-.. 243 ral-Hz 3 Q53 SEQ --,,,-' -fH-- rw- - .. c'1"4 - o. " 2' 5.2 .QS WHW Sew ,SUI SJ A. e. MQTQR CAR CQMPANY AGENTS FOR Hupmobile, Detroiter, Saxon: Accessories, Supplies and Repairs bon't OtoMSee the blobe ana' Direct Actioii Ranges Before Buying CQAL AND GAS RANGES ana' Everything in Hardware ana' Implements Call ana' See Us Plione 39 102 S. Summit A.. JDDQJUJFQN RARDWARE CQMRARRF-up . RURHTY C. E. MASTERS CANDY RIITCHEIRT A ,, . 1 CREAM AND ICES . A non ADE CANDY, ICE W Y. V ,VA H 224 South Slllllllllf Street FRANK M. PEEK The Horseshoer 208 E. Fifth Ave. Phone 245 A C C GUYQTO'-M Real Estate, Renata! and lnsaraizce. Tax Collector And Notary Public REAR HOME NATIONAL BANK BUILDING -PHONE 205 90 THE SECURHTY STATE ANR DEPOSITS GUARANTEED vxAA.Afvvxn.Azw We Invite Your Business. QPJEN A SAVINGS ACCOUNT 'WITH US, SMJELJFJEE nssnsaosn FINE 'f0GGERYf0"MENa1'dBQY5 E- C- PYE Sailtllr urh Drugglet s7lze .Place to gat we o::pSg::2i2-:Fit GEO. CHANEY, Prop. YOIII' BllSlIl6SS V A l2 u2NF soqj Aw -h STURTZ CANDY KITCHEN The Popular Ice Cream and Chili Parlor for Ladies and Gentlemen. Everything in the Confectionery line Phone 800 324 South Summit street swmvr CLOVER BRAND 3011110 e9 Jarvis C A Qealers in llilllllvtl Goods and Pure I-'ood l'l'0tlllC'tS Are C BFQT-Tr 0 I , A .72ui0m0bz'les n n 1 1' THE ARKANSAS cm tes co. 1 1: 1' 1 ff Pure I ce 5 , Full Weight Satisfactory Phone ...Service... If 4: ll lr in ..,.,,,,vvvvvvxAA. , AVWNW XN-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-AA,.-.-1.-v-.-.-.-.-v-v.-.-vv,-.-v-AAAAAf.-.AA,vV- .-.A.-.-.-.-V., LESH OIL COMPANY Oils of Quality. 1 LUTHER PARMAN ...rURN1rURr:... FORD'Sl5XRERY 4 Ask Your Grocer for Red Seal and Butler Nut Bread. Everything in Fancy Pastry. 143 S. Summlt. A Phone 63 92 The Arkansas City High School boasts of one of the largest, finest and best cquipped gymnasiums in the state. A required course in physical culture, ex- tending into the Ward schools and direct- ed by the most efficient teachers procur- able is but one of the many noteworthy phases of the Arkansas City School Sys- tem. -.-.-v-v-.-xfs-v--.-.-.-.-v-.-vxnzr.-.-:.-.-.-v-v-.fxfv-.-.-J w-v-.-vvs,-.-.-.-.-.-x1y-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-v- OF INTEREST T0 EVERY ...STUDENT... We have served your senior class in the way of Jew- elry and Stationery and are prepared to fill your every individual need in Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry and Stationery of the finest quality at lowest possible prices. JACCARD'S BOOK OF GIFTS Makes it possible for you to buy your gifts direct from the manufacturer and thereby secure beautiful distinctive wares at especially low prices. Write for our "Book of Gift"-Mailed Free. JACCARD'S:::S'I'. LOUIS Broadway and Locust fMermod, Jaccard 8 King Jewelry Co.j The World's Grandest Jewelry Establishment. Ar'-v-v-vs-v-v-'A-v vsfefsfvvx THE GLOBE umlacciliesg Teg erfym Lesernw. MQTCEEHHEEHQ Cen U Jnitensrnezdennis E E E BETTER SHOES T T T W TTHBFHEMAFTT T Mwmmwmwmseuue Tneemwwwmw 51 0 1 WNMwBssses,E3e5eMesfsi1Qsees My ---vu-.- Crescent Flour I l fa I 'r NOTHING E BETTER The Arkansas City Milling Co. .-v-.zvv-.-v-v-r-v-.-.--.-.-.-.A.-.-.-v-.-.-.Av-v+.A.-v-.-v-.-.Av-.-.-v-.-.1-.-4mn.-v-.-.-Jvxafvv fAQvv A ' - - A A -fsA.r-v-.-rv-.-Av-1-v-.-.-v-.-.--.-.-.-,A-v-v-rv-.-JvfAf.-v- ,AD H, MQQRE TUILQC-fico.,JDa1fice Grocer Phone 05 E. KIRKPA TRI CK Furniture, Carpets, Qeensware, Stoves and Undertaking Arkansas City, Kansas N gzaiural as ,fife H Garnish 53110103 0. IC. UNSICLL The Centra! Exclusive Agent Haydzvaye Co. FOR Benjamin Clothes Try Us Next Time AND , Knox Hats Phone 9 o.M.P1TTENGEH ---Dm-ulvr in-- Ll'NlIHill, LA'I'll, SlllNtRl,l'IS, SASII, INNDRS, Sl0l'lilllNt-ZS, LIME, Illlll'K HEU HAH IHANSFEH Ell. n Office Phone 122 3 Res. Phone 481 Under Home National Bank lW. H. Parman 3 Second Hand A. M. F A R L ECY Man l 1E'i'f5E'Elfffii'5 PHONE - - - 121 Phone 446 USE ELECTRICITY31ER3i33 LIGHT AND PUWER I F lor tge Best oELEverytg1ing in t e ewe ry ine, ee us oo J. T. ' n 3 Jeweler and Optician PALACE GJEQQQCJEZRY MThce Mega of one Bosal FV for Mme leans?" . 1 . 4 , , , 313 S. 3uJ.1 f1ft . Plhomce 3 3 97,3 BAJDDGJEJR JLIUTMJBSJEJRZ CQ., D WD Irecopendlmfnenng Agent All Kinds Of BUILDING MATERIAL W. W. SMITH H. R. BRANSTETTER If You Try 3 King You Wm BUY K 3 'A A l 'ki , ?' m'fi,f3'g+' 15" , , ag A Q 2 BUILDING voN'I'1zIICT011s ax sum' 506 SOUTHSUIIIIIT ST. "The Ca' of '10 fegfefsu HILL-HOWARD MOTOR CAR C0. II E ROSEBERR Y eo SON Rea! Estate, Loans, Insurance when Yon Ask for HENNEBERR Y'S BA CON INSIST ON GETTING UNE GF OUR 3 BRANDS ARK, SWEET CLGVER or FAVGRITE HENNEBERRY fl CUMPANY All Meats Inspected by Uncle Sam THE TRADERS STATE BANK ARKANSAS CITY. KANSAS CAPITAL 8 SURPLUS ---- 840,000.00 Y A I 't dt B P l fTh' B k llusiraflons uallfy Aff Q In evA:ept'on'fl Karim f -cl'e':iAQ'1xbi iheu lx PQLAR. BEAR ELQUR HS KING . , 4, '- 51 I ,vjryrf ,, 1- , 'fx 1 X fl L41 5 'nu . . 2,5 , 1 1 1: 2- -X I V y 1 4 .. V 'I A I .F I I Ni Q I I .Q..l.. ' I- V a. N1 I ,fi -1 n 1 Vw 2521 ,f 1, TEQEQEQQ r U i L i E r r l V i 1 I I f I i ! E e E L ! E J'-. ' fg'1n:,'i,' ' V 4. ,, L "' " "' i5...f.5rfQl V dw: 1-V.:-5 .V.:x .,, A A "' 'K' 'ff Ni-.:...1' f V' 'f" , ' K 5 - ' 'Tflff' f'j,Z 'If' V ""' ' ' V "'4"WY",-'Y il! gf-gg-'-'., if , 4.. A ... . f --4..- 3 . : f nw... ff .- - - ff--4 - " V . . .V . . -... A 4 . V .mg . ., ,f -V, -A .,--.Vg -. ,, . V u- ' -:V-K-1-nw ,-.v-- .V.- Vf 'e-1 11.- N,-.,fgm3gg---q-r Sv. 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Suggestions in the Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) collection:

Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection, 1911 Edition, Page 1

1911

Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection, 1913 Edition, Page 1

1913

Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection, 1914 Edition, Page 1

1914

Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection, 1916 Edition, Page 1

1916

Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

1917

Arkansas City High School - Mirror Yearbook (Arkansas City, KS) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

1918

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