Arizona Western College - El Matador Yearbook (Yuma, AZ)

 - Class of 1972

Page 1 of 202

 

Arizona Western College - El Matador Yearbook (Yuma, AZ) online yearbook collection, 1972 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1972 Edition, Arizona Western College - El Matador Yearbook (Yuma, AZ) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1972 Edition, Arizona Western College - El Matador Yearbook (Yuma, AZ) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1972 Edition, Arizona Western College - El Matador Yearbook (Yuma, AZ) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1972 Edition, Arizona Western College - El Matador Yearbook (Yuma, AZ) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1972 Edition, Arizona Western College - El Matador Yearbook (Yuma, AZ) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1972 Edition, Arizona Western College - El Matador Yearbook (Yuma, AZ) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 202 of the 1972 volume:

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' J' i 'nunalhn i1 n .. . , . ,gli - . ,, .iq ' n Qs 'fu jp- xl! 1 'I 'F rl fra :-tx I I .Ai ,p',,0., 1 1. Y J . 35:1 ' A 'if ' '- rw " K42 'f3:'4.. 3 KJ is X41--' '-1 ,-k-,"'--'f-N r, -,.',. '. - 'Skyfgu--f'f'Q,3,'n.c+-iz.. y....??,f..f -J-f.w'+ -mf .Q- , ,-,.7. U V' 1-.1 -T1"l:F'L': lg . . , FZ, -Zn' L' feffffg' 109.1 A be 'f21:.:.'k ,J 1.Q'4fif' ' X n .,,r 3-fri -Jin Z ,inn L' L '..:. A man of man talents makes our eolle e president . .Dr. George L. Hall U Z ,,,, . t t .i at My , 1 5 ,f W i gs ,W Z Q i f f f 1 f Q '14 5 7 4 F N' xy X . NYY . J f , X , x M. Ss 'P Q 5 ' fwftffks W 0- sex - 2251. .UW "sr -.VX W r UPPER LEFT: Dr. Hall at his desk while on campusg QRIGHTJ at his home holding a string of dry peppers that will eventual- ly find their way into one of Pres. Hall's recipes and QFAR RIGHTJ he explains the recipe for pickling olives and cucumbers that were grown by Dr. Hall in his garden at home. Hobbies such as these allow Pres. Hall to don on an apron and a chefs hat and be a gourmet when he entertains guests. ...1 Qi Y ty r 5, in 9 y 'Y 2 4 en, y ' -e ---- f tr.. ' . lf -- 5 . ,, A ' ' 3.53 ' . U E ts ge nt all . . . Western is a beautjul campus. . . I still get a thrill everyday I drive out there. The people are great. I fell in love with the place. ml' w , if 5 -.... V, M. ww-.Wm-um--W A 2 w , V' ..-m.m.-ua . 1' . x Y ., - -1-U-1 XVN 5' If .'ii ,ALM X . hi f F 5 7 Vice President William J. Berg, the NO. 2 1112111 OH campus Dr. Berg directs the academic instruction and is responsible for the caliber of college i faculty. Dr. Berg, vice president foriinstruction, assumes the re- sponsibility of supervising the college anytime the college president is offcampus. Dr. Berg also' is directly responsible for all the faculty on campus among his other duties. f Above, in his office in the Administration Building, he signs last minute travel requests, while tleftj he attempts to offer some advice on some problem in a telephone conversa- tion, one of many calls he will receive in a routine day. 6 3 I 9 s . .. , ll .. J. 4, . 43-Ai' an 5211, Eff"- .31 4. he re- ollegf lty Ofl ng. he pts to VCIS 3' 14 District Governing Board RIGHT TO LEFT: -4 LES BARKLEY DON N. SOLDWEDEL, President AL FACE, Secretary JOHN A. CURRIE AUST EN HAYDIS J Qollege Ex - Administrative Council AAiAL - 'AAG i s Xqsg If i g . ' A A tl ii. .vi t V ' i V11 1' ,, X -f N' f' , . Q, i' , .1 N 1 , s I I gf , iz, Zi If 3 gt X A w , -y ,, , , - , is ' . 4 s- NAM-ks . Q X 1 JAMES CARRUTHERS Director of Housing DR. PAT PATTERSON Acting Dean of Occupational Education 54 -4 1 7 CHARLES H. SOUTHWARD Dean of Student Activities 4 jg A ff, , R 1 ,W f,,...w W,,,,,w-ew K wwstww wffi"Z'S'Wf'i A I 'M ,w ,,,, X ,wsX.s,, U:,-Q-X V , A ,ua T fi , .,,. '- .-j-x J l C . ge Executwes lin 'li Dean of Student Affairs X WILLIAM J. SIMS Director of Development, Planning and Information Services ROBERT STEWART Business Manager DR. RALPH MOOREHEAD JAMES TAYLOR Director of Evening College Our college backbone, the administrative staff J ef E M45 N DONALD BRADSHAW Registrar MYLDRED BEASLEY Bookstore Manager WALLY BRAREN Plant Superintendent i O ...x iff istrar F , 9 - twttmy A JACK HOOKER Security Chief an RONALD DANIELSON Law Enforcement Director ROBERT HARDY Director of KAWC Radio 'Sm CHARLES KENDALL Upward Bound Director Y , 21 K, ,..-W.-....-Q-.. E a REUBEN O. LOPEZ DAN KINNARD Director of Foreign Language Director of Data Processing ABE MARTINEZ Director of Financial Aids E PAUL MILLER Information Services Staff Photographer 1 V 5' VIRC Nursi PEZ 8 UBC LER -vic65 1phCI' . , ur.-" . ALBERT MOTLEY Comptroller JIM MITCHELL Placement and Vocational Counselor A MARY STEWART VIRGINIA SMITH Nurse Nursing Director NATALIE STOWE Women's Counselor X X PAUL WADDELL t - Student Activities f '42 Q! ggi! ' JACK WATSON Athletic Director "Xa He: 3 1 L Q TOM 1 Garces 1 I A Q fl A 5 3 i' ' s as ,J ,ff Z? ' it? ATSON Direcwf i Head residents of campus dormitories MRS. LUCILLE WAGGONER Garces House L., Kino House ARNOLD AND JOY RAMIREZ DeAnza Hall 5 l ,' , N! rw px Division Chairmen discuss changes in student and curricula. . QI. Generally Speaking, de you See any major difference in students today and those of P055 years YOU halfe me' Wh,-le at AWC.? How do these students compare with the students that attended college with you? Q2. What is your division doing to compensate for these djferences among students? PROF. ANDERSON Al. Yes, students are different today from the students of my college days. They would have to be different because of the change in society. I think the main difference in students today is their priorities and needs. What was most impor- tant to the students in my day aren,t nearly as important to the student of today. The students of my day were not nearly as concerned about ecology and pollution as the stu- dents are today. I am not saying that they shouldn't have been but our priorities were different. These differences in priorities can be found in many areas. The other area of change in stu- dents today is this area of "need" What were A merely desires of many students in my day are essen- tial needs of the student today. This area could be explored and books could be written detailing this great change. But let's face it, CHANGE is the very heart of our society, and provides great opportunities for those who are tuned in with change. If you ask me, "would you like to go back to the old days'?", I would say "definitely not." These are the greatest days of our coun- try's history, except for our foreign relations program. A2 The division of Business has a great responsibility to the stu- I8 dents today as it had in my college days. Primarily the division MUST continue and strive more than ever to update the concepts and values of the ever changing business world. It is most important today for the business teacher to have work ex- perience in the business world so that the discipline they are teach- ing can be relevant to today's so- ciety. The work experience for the business teacher is a prerequisite for AWC. The business teacher must be more aware today of the individual student and his needs and objectives and maintain the flexibility to help the student a- chieve his own individual objectives. DR. CARRUTH Al. Very little difference. Ac- ademically, most of them seem weaker than the average in reading ability and in some performance skills in their major fields of in- terest. There is less motivation and self-discipline, on the wholeg but there are notable exceptions to this. The basic aptitudes, however, are generally about the same, cover- ing a wide variety of abilities. AZ. We give considerable em- phasis to the basic courses that help the students acquire a broad foundation of knowledge and de- velop the skills that are essential to their professions, such as speak- mg, Slngmgs playing musical in- struments, painting, drawing, etc. We offer opportunities - for U them to display their works and demon- strate.their abilities in art exhib- its, forensincs festivals, plays and other dramatic productions, and musical recitals and concerts. They are also given opportunities to become familiar with representa- tive works of.-some of the great artists in concerts and exhibits and to associate with professionals to become aware of current activities and trends and to receive inspira- tion and motivation to higher levels of personal development. DR. CAVANAUGH HAI. It is true, of course, that fads, fashions, and certain interests on college campuses change from year to year to one degree or an- other, and it is true that individuals, hopefully, experience significant and lasting changes on OCCHSIOHQ but'the human being, as such, changes imperceptibly, if at -all over' the years. A perusal of the world's literature encompassing several centuries readily indicates that human desires, drives, fears, and frustrations remain essentially unchanged: the accounterments are altered from time to time, but the essence of the human being remains the same. , A2. Students at AWC, being human, have changed little over the and 'ICB 'tel the ESE awing, ere, 1 e for E them and demon- art exhib- plays and ptions, and rcerts. They 'tunities to representa- ' the great :xhibits and :ssionals to it activities ive inspira- igher levels GH Jurse, that in interests ange from gree QI an' ,ndivrduillsr Significant q OCCHSIOHQ if 'at Fil' ,sal Of the I indicates ives, fiars' untefmegs 3 time, . nan being being fpver the l N """"1luQg., - .z. i eight years the school has been in operation-and students have not changed essentially since I was an undergraduate student in the midwest. As is the case everywhere else, AWC students are young, old, bright, dull, tall, short, short, fat, skinny, motivated, and lazy. In spite of the fact that the exter- nals change this year they have long hair and walk around barefootedg where as few years ago their hair was close-cropped and they were exceedingly possessive about tennis shoes in a "magnificent state of disrepair"-oh, excuse me, time for a coffee break. DR. COTHRUN Al. We in technology find that students today are no different than in years past, percentage- wise, we find that 7006 of students enrolled have a purposeg that IGP? have the desire, but are not mental- ly capable of performing satisfact- orily in our areasg the remaining 205 are not motivated, have no purpose or goals at this time, or perhaps, are still undecided on a career. We feel that adequate coun- selling and advising at the elemen- tary or jr. high level would over- come some of this. We feel that high school is too late to prepare some students adequately for col- lege or occupational careersg they need it earlier in life. We have had to lower teaching standardsg methods of instruction have been altered to fill the needs of the studentsg and, have advised many students to work toward entry-level skills rather than techni- cal-level or para-professional occu- pations. Those with the motivation, capabilities and interest have been counselled and advised to continue their training and education after leaving AWCg we have attempted to single out those students who have the abilities required for advance- ment in their fields of choice and have pointed out the advantages of furthering their education, in order to stimulate further the student who has the ability but perhaps doesn't realize it himself. A2. We have been rather success- ful in placing students in jobs after leaving AWC, by placing the stu- dent in a job we feel he can perform at successfullyg and by discussing the student with the employer, so that he is fully aware of the stu- dent's capabilities. PROF. LOPEZ Al. Yes, today's student is more removed from any idea of actual physical hardship and deprivation than in my day--more likely to be open about comments affecting his immediate enviornment, less interested in the world as a whole, more relaxed about sexual matters, much more matter-of-fact, more apathetic towards student affairs and college social life--every bit as good a studentg but less likely to swallow crap from a prof. My generation also knew it to be crap, but anything to get through college and get that degree. Today's stu- dents are perhaps more likeable as humans, on the whole. A2. Primarily the area of self- paced and individualized instruc- tion in areas such as math and geo- logy. Considerable attention is paid to student feedback. More empha- sis upon teaching tools, as A-V equipment and materials. Less emphasis upon compulsory attendence--more toward grading A, B, C, W a growing idea that simply not getting credit for the course is punishment enough with- out an "F" or "D" or a "Q" for quit, which carries "F" gradepoint. An effort by many to de-empha- size grades in favor of learning. 19 Moreof. .. division heads talk out PROF. MOSS Al. In many areas there are no major differences between the stu- dents at Arizona Western College today and the past, however, in some respects there are a few. Per- haps the changes we think we see in the students of today have not been so much a change in the stu- dents themselves but in the leader- ship of these students. They seem to have accepted in an overt way leadership which has tended to speak of the present as if there were no future. This leadership often leads the students into be- lieving that change, any change, is good and worth the price. The students of yesterday, on the other hand, sought practical knowledge of history, wisely understanding that knowledge of the past can often prevent tragic errors in the future development of our democratic ideals. I can be said, then, that DR. DAVID COTHRUN Division of Sciences 20 yesterday's students, or at least their spokesmen, talk of NOW as ifthere were no tomorrow. Compared, to the students who attended college with, the current students seem to have found it easier, and often preferable, to quit whatever they attempt. This too- is undoubtedly because they give little thought to the future. In addi- tion, today's students seem to de- plore competitiong they often choose no to compete and accept all to willingly mediocrity rather than excellence in all aspects of their lives. It is plain then that our pre- sent students are less goal oriented than past students. A2. The Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation is striving through its activities and instruction to provide the leadership that will adequately meet the needs of those students of col- lege age as well as teach those values and skills which will enable them to live "the better life." We wish to teach attitutdes, skills, and know- ledge through physical education that will help establish their direc- tion, a direction that will- lead them to be ideal citizens-men and wom- en of wisdom and action. Socrates, 2500 years ago commented, "If a man does not know what port he is sailing, no wind is favorable." Our division hopes to fan at least a favorable breeze as the students set sail for their individual ports. History will record how effective we have been. PROF. WILLIS Al. It is difficult to make a gen- eral statement covering the dif- ferences in students from year to year. As in the past, we have some good students, some not so good and most of them fall somewhere in between. I feel that too many students are attempting to get an education without any effort on their part other than attending class. The majority of my classmates were world war II veterans and more mature than our students. Many had families and were in school for one purpose, to get as much out of it as possible. They missed much of the social life and other important functions of cam- pus life so it would not be an equit- able comparison. A2..We are offering 2-year occu- pational programs. in all phases of agriculture. These programs ERNEST LOPEZ Division of Technology ,S X. - A S " .., 1-T-11'-'1'11. 1-Y7f'!'l"'7!'!"1Z'.fiTl':lf!?3T?'tM-.iJ.-i.. ' -, L , , t ' -, ' .. , , -LIS i make 3 QUE the WC have Some ll Sumewhere Eg to SCI an y effort on HH attending Y Classmates veterans and sur students. und were in ie, to get as rssible. They rcial life and ons of cam- be an equit- 2-year occu- 1 all phases : programs EZ ology e 3 consist of a carefully planned se- quence of courses of a practical nature. Much of the learning is through doing and competencies are developed to give the students saleable skills for the labor market. I'S SSO profe NEIL R. BEAR Art W'1hu.,,. AW MQ, 3 f i . JOHN AHEARN Philosophy GEORGE BROOKBANK WARR EN BENSON English Agriculture 1 0 l . , 1:37 V xv . .. EN BENSON English RAY BUTCHER Football Coach and PE qygw t,,WW,... Www MOSES CAMARENA Mathematics and Wrestling Coach 7, V k E7 4, E2 DR. DONALD CLAY Aww at as. .i- Geology 'is... ROBERT CURLING Electronics If RONALD COSTIN Business 1 pn- RICHARD DeVERSE Automotive Technology fiffznfzu 15618 l9 2Z2l 232 ,A MARLENE EVANS 425 H l Z5 Z f Q K V 1 iff lv 'W Ei! ,s W Child Care Wf lf l CHARLES DINE Assistant Football Coach, PE JOHN " , . Busine I 4014" I L r GARY FOY , . Hgh Business ... - C C Y , QF, ..mis........... . CHARLES DINE Football Coacl,PE ,gf JOHN FREEMAN Business ROBERT GAMBS Zoology Ns! RONALD FULLER Band ROBERT GARCIA English DAVID GERSHAW Psycology NICK GRAVES Art JON GUTHRIE Speech and Forensics, Director of Human Resources Development GEORGIA HART Mathematics LaRUE HEATH Women's PE i,,i,,i, SUSAN HINES Mathematics Y, 5 N . A ,fr X, k 111 ' ' Y V CHAE' HW Enfor' AH A 1 5 V' GONE Techlll F ,nv 6' l MICHAEL HOEFFLING Law Enforcement ESTHER HOWE 1 Nursing Y 4229 E li ROBERT INGRAM GONZALO HUERTA Chemistry Technology x 1 1 l 4 i RICHARD JENNINGS V F i Chemistry .gif Q 'M' 3 T MW! ' .J l 0 4 PAUL Ml , ,- .,,,, 0, A -1 .fl N A In ani 1 1 l l 1 I i l l l l CLIFFORD JOHNSON Agriculture r 1 9 JUDY JOHNSON Mircro-Biology l 1 l l l JAMES L. LENERTZ l Biology l l, 1: l l i E if i , OA FRANCIS E. LOVE l f f . Social Science 456 LAWR J English I 28 l 1 I E . 7' ' " 21' ,. ' A - ,f V ' A A 19 .ganna-rmy. ,cv N -- ' ' ' V 11. ' PAUL MacCREADY A Speech and Anthropology LAWRENCE MacDONA LD English CHERRIL MADSEN Business JOHN MCLAIN Chemistry and Physical Science GILBERT V. MEZA Journalism X A X Y , AQ 2 ,I , 7 1 VIEZA nalism X A CHESTER PARKS Instrumental Music BRUCE PIEPLOW English Y ANNE PUTNAM QUPPER LEFTJ Home Economics ROLAND QLARRYJREYNOLDS QABOVEJ Business NORMAN W. RIEBE QLEFTJ Mathematics HELEN SCROGGINS English CHARLES SAXE Political Science 4Kl llk ROSE SEARS GLORIA R. Sl-IEA Business Nursing BN MILI Busillf I EJ DAVID Data Pl INS glish 31 , H? 5 H EA ursing MILDRED SHERIFF Business 1, BARBARA SLIVAC in DAVID SNYDER Data Processing .l Foreign Language F s.,4'x4'4 ,... .. A. + MICHAEL SPAIN English 33 MARY JANE STANFORD CRightJ Home Economics RAYMOND TRAYNOR fBelowJ English EDWARD TREADWAY QMiddle rightj Automotive Technology i i l JOHN VALENTINE Electronics RICHARD VALENTINE History X, 2 1--H' A X I 5 X Q l I l, l I f 1 . IN E ELLI Engli 'E X l I ii 'E , 'M -- ""' ai 'Y' . LN ,imgm-.-np. ag- ..., , . X , ELLA MAE YORK English ANNE K. WIGGINS English JOHN WHISENANT Basketball and Golfcoach, PE DR. LENORE ZAPELL Drama 'M H 3 Q x T 2 . Q. O. 1 1 Jr., .L qw . . 14 Ai' v IK -, .- ldl '4 , . 1 . V r 4 Q-'Fw n .if Q ' "v- 'IAQ ' L ,4 I L W L Fred Abbey J ose Acuna Brian Adam William Akin Abdulkarim Ali Abbas Alqallaf Jocelyn Anaya Helen Anders Craig Anderson J oDell Andrews Arthur Angulo Steven Arizaga Linda Arviso Louis Arviso Ronald Arviso Ronnie Arviso Matt Asanovich Joe Ayala Steve Baldwin Linda Bailey Debbie Baker Rick Ballin This unidentified Western student con- templates the course offerings in the Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation as explained to him during registration. Despite his ankle cast and the dependance on crutches, this young man hobbled around until he completed registration for fall semester. lil? .W Wt 9 , ,, .uw X-w I M I t i f , , 1 V , , V V '-vm 45" , "' M ' N A, ... 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' f Hof.. ix 0 .I VCX f I I I Q ', X , f ,M , X V V,-,.... , ' . 4 .w I 1 f Aix fs V,,f 'Wu-ff t""i1.7+y F? M3 W7 Keven Balser Terry Bandy Kenneth Barker Barry Barnes Norma Barnes Mike Barnicle Audrey Barrett Ed Beals Lorraine Beaver Joseph Becker Brian Beebe Cecelia Begay Toni Begay Walter Begay Edward Berge Linda Biltz Richard Binder Darrell Birdno Barbara Blackburn Carolyn Blair Benjie Blake Rosemary Blanchard Frank Blanco Jerry Bland Charles Blumenstock Dennis Boacnard Debbie Boase Vicki Bochentin John Boemer Craig Bowman Theodore Bowman Tom Boman Heinz Brademan Richard Brandes Mark Brennan Andy Britain Joe Brooks Mark Brooks Clarence Brown Samuel Brown Robert Browning David? Buirge I .."' :. '11 it r Kathleen Buirge Shirley Burch Barry Burgan Sharon Burgett Marcos Bustamante Alex Caballero Salvador Cabrales James Callicotte Larry Calzada CliffCameron Bill Canada Juanita Canoy Martha Canoy Michael Cansler Mary Ann Carlson Marie Carr Michael Carr Alfredo Carrera Cliff Carroll Kim Carstensen Tracey Carter Diane Carvaj al Jamie Casey Robert Casey Cheryl Cash Brad Casselman Victoria Castello Tony Castro Henry Chavez Christie Clark Lonnie Clark Stephanie Clark Robert Claypool Jenny Clayton Pamela Clayton Larry Cleland If f? , , ,, A , A J 'Lf 1 W' , 7 M X ff :Q ,W X ,gl Dx f ,X wt ,Alt X N1 f ,f 4 .X . 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T 9-Z 1 f' ff ?, Us f if f at 'F L am WX Mr' MES? X' Q5 X ' L f w as va , YY ,J 9 HY 'I ., fx l ig! , 595 ,fig fi" Z I-ilw' -5' .v 0 , Wm' X Q! 1 l rf' mf!! Y '75 ig? Z , , , w g . if-wx S r X 'Q' I 1 E A WY WVWWYWY W i ' 1 V " ' ' ' ' ' f --- -V V . qw-, .- .. --f--1-fwfr V - ' " V - , - V " -.-.A .g,r.-. . ' it il s . '--s -5 , of it 'L ls J E . ' QW si 3, ill " tl tl . 4. ,gd 1 Q! ,-4 i ,fa XY X KE if " 'X f Q C I Lois Clemons i ' ,f X 4 Q - , t .,- g Charles Coast 2 "C R at C j Alan Cole W . ,f llbb V, ,:,,: Dennis Coleman ' ,,, X I "' James Coleman X I W! Ozell Collier , Eg? H JL. ' Q ff ,M 5 V," g V t .Q Daniel Collins -, .f pfnqu pg ,i,, , , , .' 'W e ig 3 Richard Conklin 'MW N I ,V A, Mitch Conrad f' . l Jeffrey Conte IS X 1 , Ke, Gracelyn Conty 'KX Q tlie 1 Q f,Q ff V Edward Contreras f 1 5 11 .v X ll ll ff-0-anal f ' -f-, 'ea' v v' ff f or LN C 9 W ., ' E mum V if 'ff F' a y Qi K Q ea ,W fe.. at r fl ., ...L 'N' "r"',Wt,,,,, jg Y ft A, L' stag C X. . l W faaww ,ss i R r , in ' y 0 ff 1' f ' I 7' 'if' H, W W Q - Q' ix W' Ze, ,A A ary, f H W ef C , 7 aw ,, sf' y ,... f f 2 ' . ,f X Q, leg, ' X ' . f ii Q, ' NA 5 X I X 2 5 ' f s. H i I x 1 Q ' N li ' ' . , 11 1 U I 5 f,,x 1-.,.f K '32 3 , -2, 1, 2 f 2 11 r Kate MacCready ponders a lab assignment in Chem lab. She along with fellow students go through routine lab experiments to ful- fill credit requirements. Chemistry labs are supervised at all times to assist students working in there. Ignacio Contreras e ,f, ' Daryl Contryman f t K ii i fy' Gregory Cooper -'-'- g Chris Corbet 1 Marie Corona f ,,,er ' ex Manny Cota 'W lsr ? , f Sr 41 Marilyn Cramp Steve Crossland Mary Crouch Michael Crowe Greg Cubric David Curbello Ellen Curlee Claudine Curtis Debra Cyr Christopher Czajkowski Gary Dalegrowski Stanley Dalegowski Arlinda Daniel Durana Daniel Thomas Daniel Craig Daniels Brenda Darby Richard Datchuk Janet David Michael Davidson James Davis Jean Davis Richmond Davis Ronald Davis Donald De Cuir Felix Dees Betty Denton at X f hifi? .A xg.: NN V A5 2: 23 M 3 i - . 1 5 eg, . ffm' t ' wi 2'--Q , ,. ' - ,Z vw'-v V , Y "6 KW Z' W-1 D., .. Q .-7 if ' Vffgf -- P' ff' i X. ,I rf 7 94-ww, A ""' : x . X ,IL t , .X M , 3 i or Q as f- f X K is 5 fx .. . , ri E 4 f " if x f l 55,1 s , X ZX, NY!3'14Qfz,3g +I if ff X X , 4 X f, if , W9 5 , sr ff ft X f, A lf f - ' f x v- .4 1 :mf X -my rf 5 - .wg fv . ,al . ivarylxv if I., '. J 5 i In K' ' , - C ' :. N? X? 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X 1 p tx , My fy .V f fflilfijifwl ff f W ,, f"""MWiN r' f 22 P it ,W .anna J M L xxxx.. :bf lik' 'A ' 7 X I FA J ,Ni , . I I Wx A 24. ff! -f 'rf 5 J? X W X I ,.., -,, T ' s K ' " 1, 4 H XWMW fm' t 5 Q a-Q H 7 X fi s f i , V L R .,,. H: p pm' , 5 X 1 Www fl 01, M ,Q 6 Q J. 2 B ' ,M 2 ' ' - 1 A-rr' "" E. S ig 3: 6" 'Zi , Y" V HY N G ff: me N X Xx-X XQXA 1 4, ii J W ,, ,,s,,,,,,, ,. 71' I, ,X f , ', ww f , A W NmQ:g:::5L2:f""""" . ' W . fi- 1 0 J , r,.T'f'f'T JA L 'Q gqapwn. V, ' , f -if ' Edward Albeeis "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolfe?" was yr W- fy scheduled to start a six-day performance on campus in Oc- ' y U tober, but because of production problems, it was cancelled. 4,453 Lifx W, 4-3 This makeshift coffin was placed near the Little Theatre by a at J ' w V W- ' . . ' '64 J N group of students as a silent protest for the cancellation. In- ! p ' stead f'Alice in Wonderland" was the season's first drama jigg presentation in December. ' , ,f Bob Deskins Nancy Dircks William Dobson Thomas Doler Bill Donnelly Barbara Doten Evelyn Drennan Larry Dresden Valerie Drysdale Mary Duffy Patrick Duffy Laura Dunninc Alice Duran Dennis Duran Frank Duran Patsy Duran Ron Eastman Elizabeth Echandia Juanita Echols Lynn Eddins David Eddy Harold Edgerton John Edwards James Ehrhart Mike Ehrlich Kathleen Eidson Daniel Elkins Dixie Embry l l Mark Ericson Bennie Escalante Frank Espino David Espinoza Mary Estupinan Mike Evans Timothy Ewalt ,. v F' in , ,kwi- V o .ly ' l 1 Mxx ext., . -I -,Aw W! kiwi 4 43' t ...Q er v W, f . ,. , ..., -W, ,S -'-" ., 0' f., , ffl uf! 'a A in Q if X E I 7 , V 5 f . , , ,'. 'f W ,,,,.. 'N 1 'gif ' X ,' W xi f 1 J' ' f 'dw if-nf-n..f ' ' ., "" ' X , S Warren G. Benson, professor of electricity went off for over an hour English, reflected the relaxed atmos- at one time, and some teachers dis- phere that developed on campus missed classes rather than lecture during an October rain storm. The in the dark. 5 1- 5 A , ,MN ,, J, 2' S is F' ,fa is x N T r S X . Y Hy ft. wh qi fn at 5' x Af 'ff fi ,f:' N272 ,gg 1 "sri-f 295 Q 'Q -. 1 23 ,ggi KJ , ., if ,ar I X Lf S' 1' -7 -vi V our 5 dis- ture W i i f 1- xx Q x Q fe S :fi ' ' ,dl K E G kg X 5 ee 1 so i 1 E s x E lg. E B fir X ' We Q y xt , f 'avg XM i i o J ' ' i. 5 ix, an gg A W . N.-Thr ,V 3 Fifi xx, J 1 X 2 'ti XX x K X524 fi l we W, a s A' 'JN E V A I, e , ' "0 'Rl ' ff av vw if ,kv X 5? ,.,,, xi NH' , 1 0' 'V jf Y ,fvl 33 ,ac ' ' I J V 'W 41' J at Q -V I K. ,A , I4 X sm, ,.. ' X - x- r f N I r I 'X 5 xii ,rs K i W., X Ds i . -W 1 3 M, B fZ! f ! J J f i f uf: ,f Fx Z ,Z N fr' 44 1 5, Oy 1 C f QV, J- ,. 4 '4 if . , Q Z v ' ANMM . '. J ff , af cf X ' f L f 4 icq ik -1 '1Z,4fKiQ5! M f 'i,l.g.i. 0 thigh '7 N A .5-X4 w -ae l X, ,. ff f wwf hx , ff s ,.., v f x X I I , XY X? ,, ,,,,, M X , ,fra y Q, 1 Z , 'sr M , 'ug , K . ft W ,ffasfv my is f f 4 at fa ' , ' TW-,. w ui, M ,ft ff ,R J NY .N 4 I sa ,f,,, X 7-R J . 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J , Q J .fi TLLQQQT' J , N! regex, : r 0 ii , v Lynn Farris Polly F assett Carmen Faucon Rolande F aucon RoseAnn Faulkner J ame Fay Rebecca Fernandez Stephanie Ferree Philip Filer Mark Fillinger George Flores Virginia Flores Eugene Flynn Teresa Flynn Richard Foerstner Terese Ford Marla F ortney Deborah Foster Ernest Foster Becky Fowler Mary Fox John Franco Charla Frandsen Dennis Franklin Mark Franklin Becky Franks Glen Frost Mike Frazier Mary Fulton Benjamin Galarza Ana Gallegos John Galloway Kevin Gamard Arthur Garcia Greg Garcia Lydia Garcia Rose Garcia Ruby Garrett Esther Gasca Daisy Gates Barry George Renee Gilchrist Dennis Gilliam Thomas Gillmore Debi Gissendaner Gary Gist Denise Gloria Karn Glover Francisco Godoy Linda Godwin Cathy Gollis Elizabeth Gomez David Gonzalez Joey Good Susan Good Gregory Goodson Maria Goss Anthony Gottsponer Nick Grabowski Don Gray Sandy Gray Stephen Gray Hank Green Mark Greenough Jack Greer Charlotte Griffin Jerry Grigsby Frank Guerrero Melba Guerrero Kim Guthrie Korlis Hackbarth Clyde Hall Gale Hall Gary Halliwell Alvern Hallmark Michael Hammann Douglas Haney Debbie Hankins V -.,1 f.., 1-Q X ik, ' M lixilx' sk' v ri' if 1 ar 1, . i 1 A fe 1, A " ,S any 3 ! l -Q - X if wiv' 4, M x 1 14 , x f ?i ff, ,V N ,ii : ,I A Q S 3 sl 5 l g XT ff! if 42 f., - 32 f x u .VZ ,f fm :fi i , X s W, .ff . 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Linda Vance and Donald de Cuir take a moment out between classes to relax in the old Student Center, which was replaced by the Student Union second semester. Donald Hannaman Mark Hansberger Micheal Hansberger Helen Hansen Roy Harper Peppa Harries Bruce Hart Nathaniel Harvey Daisy Hatten Mark Haut Cindy Ann Hawkins Guy Gayes Ellen Haynes Mark Haynes Leslie Heintz John Hensley Steven Henslin Arnulfo Heredia Rosa Heredia Rose Marie Heredia Andy Hernandez lsela Hernandez Michael Hernandez Patrick Hernando "1 ff V' ,f X ,x A- if 0 lu, A x V ,gal l V , X :Wy ,I T .h I fliivl W in fi.. 5 Kp f5llfTwZf'fawF'7l."efZl'M:1 47 9 I i l i l David Hilden Tim Hilderman Tommie Hill Ronald Hines Kay Hobbs Terrance Hochstatler Mike Hocking Erwin Holt Bob Horan Andre Hornsby Gerrald House Garry Howard Barbara Howe Samuel Hu Donald Hubbard Earlene Hubbard Evelyne Hubbard Terry Hudson Jose Huerta Garry Huffaker Dena Huffman George Ibarra Penny Imhoff John Inman Joseph Inman Clarence Irving Morrow Jackson Cecil Jacobson Johnny Jaramillo Thomas Jazak John Jeter Janeen Johannes Donald Johnson Nancy Johnson Leroy Jones Todd Jones 48 "A Y A 1' 6 ' I ff 9' . . rr oi.. 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K fa ' ' fr Sw A, X V: Km, i5"fT'f Z . iff Qt , ,Q ,T ...Wt Q? A ' W 1' L , ,gg f . sm f K ,, .1 1. my , X 1 a Q ,, X as A . ,W H' i, ,J 46 vjlsf' fr I Xl ,ff W 5 ,. -xy f , 3 ff g ' V ' " uf, 1' 1 f E X C4! , , A... ' Q f 2 if f '-en K., ' " ' - - t My , g,,,......, ,x f' so H J ,5 "M M X wt. 1' f Q ff , , K A 3, X ', s w ft, fx JNEN, ft rf 1,4 X , K av yy 5 a uf - ,1 ' , 5 ,J f wwf' s 41 Q. N 14 , s . f.W -1- f , s X' F2 S Q i -1 5 t 4 X. , - 3 ' " ' ' 4 'W' 'ffi?w,? K fs , X t , 4 T ' " i 4 tw S X 1 ' 3 1 X. f ,fthe-.Z.,f' -X 1 N Q 2 ! S s -. ss W t 'f 1 ,E 1 s if ,, M A J.: A Y Madeline Jordan Marjorie Kameath Roy Keeton William Kelly Donna Kennedy Hubert Kenney Larry Keyes Charles Kidd Danny King Debra King James King Susan Kline Students chat about this and that in front of Garces House before boarding one of two college buses that transported some 64 students to the Mesa College vs Western game. Western upset the No. 2 nationally rated Hokams 18-13 on their home field in Mesa, Ariz. Ronald Kluck John Knecht Glenn Knight William Kreamer Lorna Kreft Norman Landers 49 Darrell Lane Alvin Langston Candy Laprince Mary Lauing Linda Lawrence Jerry Leamons Ken Lebsock -' iw rl! l Alex Lee Alice Lee fr ...df Heddie Lee Xa Jerome Lee 'V' Montie Lee 5 wagon -4 ,, f I ref xr, f ss:5 . y, - K ,f A. T .1 . . i L ff-A M - .1 lr f fm' ! l ., ' A 1 I L , X k ls i l ,Q f l www S L X . s K ii , 5 2 , A Y 'Q ,Zigi K A at Le i was 2 .. 1 , ,. t , ,rr. . 'X ' I i'...1Q" i '-2 ' L N 5, 1 'ns' i ' A 'Q' " ' if V 0 " ir" 1' S' X zz' 1 X KX v I L gl. iv by V I K ' 'f i 4 ff' 2 , lr L' 1 i ll K an HY lx ' ,X , N i 5 'Q M , 1 1 if fi Mary Lehrer W f -Ea, Billy Leverett 'Vw Marvin Lewis 714. 1 f ,,1:: ,M e f.: ' 4 V 33 ,fa l l . ff fl Vickie Lewis gi 5 Mrs. Judy Dyson, wife of Garces' head resident Tom Dyson, enjoys herself at one of the many parties held in the dorms. s x XX Q y KD? 5 X Xxff ii 1 ia- ,P Q lin' X il: b ,,,,a,, . .ff N ws. f , rmzfes l?f'Qk:,g1 XKNN ,LFE is Nasal tw L f N nw few-ui Inf-ern , V- Mfg, 7, I 7 1' H ' A ' N Za- X --NW! X X X A Q 3 , X fxqx my i , 1 w.,,Q,, ly, L , g-,. 4 .....1.. I at ea , :Y ' If 33-. 1' .,.. 'i"'X 'i , ,,f f 3 A A X Q , i ,, Q 9 ogg ? Vg Z .. f, il W fl ii f,- ff: Y' -fb if .23 'f fi? .XX 1 4 f Z!! l 2 9 ., , 3 3 ls 5 Ei ' 'Ji 1 W., ,, I ti J , ,, ww, W , 2 +7 X, at ffl I ff 'We 2 'ii A .tt - fm, hwww 'zfc W7 5 , cf if v ,V ,wh .W ,Os Y A.. i X31 ,-f f,, if F 2' M t GS? X , X Z I 1 ff sl , Q 4 X 'SQ 'M-. Z f , it -wwf' 'K f N meta, W " mn , N-Mfm,,A,,.i.wwfvfs MW' 'DRM .o ww .M A ff- t W1 W3 , W-st. ,, ' WX, 'M ' 'Way ' ,MX A fwhl 1,41 M 'af fa .il Agua 1 7,1 W 1 , f o V Q i? M 2 Z X S' ' , Aff z ' T i f '1" a ll X 'X XX l ' 1 S i f f , .,,vv..,, Q I .t 1 .,,. ,, ' R ,K ,,.. ' f- 1 Xe at , X "Q V. Sylvia Linden Jacque Lindsay Ralph Livingston Gloria Lobato Willie Lockett Frank Lopez Laura Lorona Linda Lott Bobby Luerrero Ronald Lux Kate MacCready Laurie Mackenzie Carmen Magdaleno Stephen Mahoney Steve Mariscal Dennis Marschall Barbara Martinez Carlos Martinez David Martinez Ignacio Martinez Robert Martinez Ralph Matthews Melanie Mattice Glenn Mattox Timothy Maylor Eddie Mazon Michael McArthur Roland McChanahan Paul McCollun Laura McDonald Emma McGhee William McKee Il .......... 4-5, -5-s --I sw-'ur - N U. ., . , ., . , 1, t l i l . Q . V i Q 1 1 i i i l 1 l i l i l l l 1 1 l Rose McSwain Enrique Medina Rod Medlin .lim Meeks Sherri Melton Mary Mendivil Arturo Mendoza i Rosa Miles Agnes Miller Darralyn Miller David Miller 52 l- Charlotte Griffin, Western Press' ad- vertising manager, reported campus news happenings each day at 1:30 pm. The newscast is part of KAWC's expanding program which gives students practical experience in radio broadcasting. .4 f, ,dir X4 I, , ,515 T ggi 4 f ,V 'Q fig 41 ix .I, i 5 ' I l I M ,I if f i , W ,, .. M! , , f ,f -ez Ivy f , fi' w Q ' ,4 ff . 4 vi . g 4 X i..,, . . i ' I W ,::'IeE2- U f,,!f h f f X Na f a Was, ,f gps., 3 1 ' Xl t,w Z 9 V fjflfi 'Z 'Wx fwmgg Mm.. 9 WW, .... , J N 1 v fx D L . 1 X A ' W X. L ,.fE:- - 'A ' 1 , R , K 2 xl ! . , 9 23? K x f, ' Z 'K gyms , ,. f 7 1 lf we 35 ' . , , WX? -W f vw 5 ,SSS s '-5:5 Q X viva ' Q? 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X "f" N f , ,iw wuts" M ,aa- ' L ,,iX-q-- oft- fa J f 1 ' W, "Sf 'ff' f fa :ses 4 , ' Wai L 2 , - ff f - 'A EU? 7 ' ' V7 , 4 j ,wc f wx' if 2 X f f f 1 W! , 4 X , if if X 'I A '-. l L fi L7 ,I Q M, fj ff fy Z in X f nj if ZZ Z at 1 ff Zf I , V Aw- I, Q af, 1 5+ Y fl ,, Lillian Miller Steven Miller Kenneth Mills Debi Mitchell George Mitchell Harley Mitchell J an Mitchell Terry Mitchell Ruben Montoya Carolyn Mooney Barbara Moore Cecile Moore Houston Moore Jack Moore Willie Morales Daniel Moran Lexine Moran Mary Moran Irene Moreno Stanley Morgan Laura Morris Marzette Morris William Mortenson Vicki Muhlenpoh Joanne Munos Janis Musgrave Marilyn Myers Michael Myers William Myers Douglas Myrland Janice Nance Charles Nelson Mark Nelson J im Neveu Nat Nez Patricia Ng Vernon Ng Don Nichols Gus Nichols Karen Nitka Rodney Nix Susan Nordell Vernon Norman Helen North Paul Ochoa Edgardo Olaiz Christy Olesek Michael Opinsky Robert Opitz Loida Orines Daniel Ornelas Joe Ornelas Mike Ornelas Virner Ornelas Will Ortega Michael Osuna Stephanie Oyer Brian Pace Michael Pace Phyllis Pace Luis Padilla David Paintner Greg Pallack Milton Palmer Nancy Pancrazi Tommie Parker Lee Parks Estanislao Dayan Wayne Pease Bill Penny Mario Perez Patricia Perez Dean Perkins Bill Phelps Patricia Phillips John Phillips John Phipps Elizabeth Piceno r rv vs X ' 'Tl ,Q 4 7 Y I -T, , E . . 1 A ' uf 4. i L4 V -ef Z ' x iv 'WB ! 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Wgf, Q . eg Y .,, 7 X1 -1 Q' , if .XXX Z 3 f E .,W Y f at ,f X f .X ,V y Q 4:11, . - 'V f 1 a fm 4 , 1 ff K 1 up - I Xia, . W -X X, I f- 1. I fv f W. S -4, A ,, ,M ff X Xlvf f xx Q X 1 ,SN Nw.. x AX I. A. Vx -n ,n 1 ,qs 'QQ 1 Tx ts YN' x 'C' ' ,yr V Y I I i i ,4 as o ' -,R x . X Q1 - , ji ,z -J file' X r a xx af 'Q' l A l 'es ,4 .- J rf , 2322 f 24 ff ,f V- 4 42 'M ' . 41 "M, ' y A 441,41 Qfigtgz f,--,,, " 455 viii 'IM 5.3 .wsyf 'X' LR S:ii ' il r ' gk t. 'I RQ Q P X f . ' . aw . 1 Mi , K ex , sr . wx Ex K ' n M f wwf' 'W . L. ,af vu ' f , ff I ji I iw, egg i A V ,,. f .7 Q iff :-" 5 .1 . ,ff c ttf , ff K -Y ws fvf , sw - R f ttt 1 : lizz . i ,, X 1 5 h ,, .,.' 3 w Timothy Pieplow Vicki Pinkus Tim Pittman Juleanne Pitts Beth Plowman Bill Poe Bill Pogue Francine Pogue Mona Pool Catherine Prairie Frank Preciado Pat Quandel Ronald Fuller's 20 member "Desert Dolls" added an extra boost to AWC's cheering section this year. The "Dolls" act as a drill team but they formed them- selves into a pep club and aided the cheerleaders. Fuller, band director, hopes to enlarge the group to 32 members. ,, ff 5 - 1 f , Q. , jf Witt , V 1 . , ,ag 3 - M - -fe. - Xl, -' Stephen Quick 5 - ui W Valerie Quintero . w W.. .V f -my t ok Kathi Quost W I Y Alfonso Ramirez V Q! 'K P W Arnold Ramirez , A Herbert Ramirez X fi ul 1 2 , M N I V , gm, :fn HZ ,,.,. c 1 t t . 4' P- -:'12- , P . f r . ., if t ., 'gg 6, ' f' 1 - ,.,, Em 4 "e. Elsa Ramirez t 4? Jr ,sg is , X l ' sf . Q f Mar1aRam1rez my ff " ,p f'-- ,g . - - f 5 p ft' V X JoyRafn1reZ M fm i 3' ' 1 ' , , , , , P, C 5 at c.,,,f ff "' K xx , I' f T If 't Richard Rankin f wis 0' " 'H I 'u W G ' 9' tk . ffiipii 1' .' V Michael Rasberry , P ivt, .gas " 5 at Debra Rathbun , B T A We X W f Wt 1 fit 'X X' " E , -.:, 'E J x Jeffry Rau Leon Raybourne Frank Reed Sidney Reed Angharad Rees Geraldine Reeves David Reynolds Rick Richards Ed Richmond Clifford Rice Andrea Rico Johnny Rico Mike Riggs Augustus Riley Jeanne Riley John Riley Olivia Robinson Concepcion Robles Harry Rockwood Linda Rockwood Maria Rodgriguez Lynn Rogers Terri Rohrer Bob Rojas Fernando Rosas Frederick Ross Jerry Rowlett l an , f ' 'JN ' - V , -, 'S - ,. ,r 'W 4 J . 0 if . . avr. M ,r 0 7' Q . , Z- 5 vb '-v. 1 'z ' K 'V' r X ' A ' 'vu' X ' ' '4 9x4 r ' -.f,. -s Af V J X -X, W, ff , A we 'TU J V1 3, , - If ,, "' jf' R 5 f ' if li, S ,f f V 1 ,Q f J J I 1 A- K Q- 1 ...W hx gf J MM 1 W.: ,, X 'fi ,R , fx A .zz :ss J J M fj if .,- . S 5- . 4s.- 7--X- ' ' .grew ,.,. 7 Q av. , M K- X , r'-.Q in" F H 5 f X , www 4 , 5, .M V . X Z 1 I I , V i fm,-,flf ' 6 ir S ' by! 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And it must have worked because the Matadors defeated San Diego City College 34-9. ffl .a--Ar if 54, 4, 7 ,X A V To Edite Rube Albert Ruiz Eugene Ruiz Gary Rush Juanita Rush Katherine Russell Cary Russell Dorothy Ryan Roselene Salas Abram Sanchez Rafael Sanchez Raymond Sanchez Brian Saunders John Savino Ruth Schmoker David Schnack Kay Schulz Werner Schulz Karen Schwark Donald Scott Ernestina Sedillo John Segret Warren Seiz Sharon Sekula Pam Self Rick Sellers Richard Setterbo Martin Sewell Stanley Shadle Jane Shaver ,-. . 0 on 1 v X at . .1 5. , o x I A f S ., f I I S - ik X W ,. K f' L, c '-' f' ,J-W In ,ff 'af ' i rv ' , ,. . , , ,, f X ly' X f I x X , ,f qi 6 w , X f ,,, xi. 1,7 4, :LN . ,N. I A- fr w- ? 'JW' r :l i e Y f 0 JZ .' y z J ' 9 'lf 'fe Q4 f, gzm C J f 1, 'f z ,, ,f ' 'i ' ,fm , ' W f 6 If , Qs CZL 516261: , I 7 ,XXV V, 1 .- ' ' , . 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X f SNS K an , XS 'Y ' "TWT f ,tz,,,w7m, X il , ,J,,, ' ,954 ' mf" X , ' Geraldine Shaw Daniel Shea Morgan Shelledy Dena Shelton Gordon Shoemake Randy Shouse Philip Sibley Mike Siefarth Pat Siefarth Marcos Silva Ronnie Simms Joe Sizemore Betty Smith Donald Smith Dorothy Smith Douglas Smith Rhoda-Cheral Smith Therese Smith Gregory Soczyk John Soderberg Chuck Spear Glenda Spikes Lydia Starr Diane Steinbeigle Dean Stevens Patti Stewart Mary Stinson Melvin Stokes Bill Stone Larry Stowell John Stricklin Michael Strom Ralph Strom Cecil Swift Dwain Talley Alfred Tatro Brenda Tavares Michael Taylor Robert Taylor Robert Taylor A Vera Telford Wendell Telford ssl? 4 R,:5T,it .ifff?fr?f235agITYQQESYFSSZ'5s1?43:sQi.iii:Ei?i?1+?4:.:: 1: 5551 'exe V473T325-if?,?fY?j:F5j5?. -T-gig A ' on '..::L . -.4 2, ,,, 4. o ! l Q . I l l l l l l il li li ii l i l. 3, i, ll W, al 60 - ...fwfr - , Elizabeth Tello Francisco Tervel Steve Tewahongyoma Gary Thacker Cherri Thieme John Thompson Leonard Thompson Bernard Tipton Terry Tomasch George Towkins David Tomlinson Froylan Torres Theodore Torres Virginia Torres Dwight Tribby Shirley Trounstine Arnold Trujillo William Truman Robert Turk Doyne Turner John Turner Suzy Turner Irene Twa Jeannie Uentillie Rod Underhill Arthur Urtuzuastegui Martha Uruchurtu Jaine Valdez Valentino Valdez Sergio Valencia an P iv 4' 'R K '43 T9 'Q' . ncen:ww.n.w 1 ' ' - Aa X 'za f-" 1, lily, ,,,,ff4z . J 44 X, .g,- 1 S . 1 af. fffff'-ff' Q I if 'P fy " Wm! ' K' 4 s' X, ' f, 5712 'W 4 4 - f ' he , ,. N -,-1 N 4 ' ', mf- , N-J .wwf V xx I X 2 Xt X A M ff 1 ? 4 'Z s f z ,:,. ,, . ,.... ,. . ..,, f ,f 5 , 1 5 f, f an ,, rt V 1 . l xv 'ij' 1 I A vw vow as h9v1 H. UM ' 'K 'N 41 i' t nr, 1 ,-, MA 'tl 65 ,N fx, ' fl 1 r L-' . 5 35 . '. 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'W 'fm' 'f""" fr 'ww' ' 'A , '---' '-'-- -- -A f-f- - -fn - Y -r fs 7 - H 7 1 , , .,, ,, ,,,,, U-H' g Hn ,YV , :.,,,i , . - . . - . , . --. xr., M I - ' A " , ' , - . W 1, '..,,,,, l,.,..--,.t . 'I 'f if 4 Q ft 5 ,.. -. All students attending Western on a trust or scholarship met this lady, Mrs. Phyllis Carter, ac- countant, during registration. Mrs. Carter previews each student's money packet he or she will need in the ensuing semester. Henry Vanenzuela -e ' Linda Vance 1 qs W if X fy X 1 1 f f Q Y ,--f 2 X, :QM J Joe Vasquez l gy v X wwf if ff J Marty Vasquez -V 'J V Craig Vaughan David Vegadavidy sRobert Velasco Daniel Vice Jesse Vindiola Ray Vogel Nancy Voigt Debbie Vos Peter Vos Susan Wagner David Wallace Jane Walters Joseph Warren Marie Lena Wakam John Warrington Lucinda Waseta Kelly Watkins James Watson James Watson Charles Weaver Jeanne Weaver Inez Webster Kathryn Weeks Linda Weeks Butch Weidenbach Margaret Weiler Gail Welsh George White John White John Wick Jon Wicks Larry Wiles Clifford Williams Gordon Williams Greg Williams Randal Williams Sheila Williams Larry Willis Linwood Wilson John Wingate Roger Winn Kathy Wirt Tsuyako Wold Richard Wolf Terri Wolf Corey Wolfe Ella Wong Scott Wong Sue Woon Phil Wright ,- .l Y :L 1..Z"" .0'4 " Q E-Q I ,... . V sr '-vigil . K VN X X1 X , ,,, .,.V , . , ,P Q 1 t , ' .. it i A. X X W X flgxxx I 5 -M V, L XX .... , Z at-I -r A. Q f 4: Q A , 'lr 'K 3 ' . ff. 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' .L g . if f AN f , X, 7 52 ' xiii . fY1W le nr- 7 'WW l J f .W ! , 73" 5 ' ii? Q 5 5 X lt 5 I M gg 1' 'K Q tt ' is g 1 322524. W- K f I f f 'MW V, 7' ww, My i Y 1 Wa ff ..,g.zf,. f X ii? :mr Vi, 1 l w 4 r f A ga M ff QM ' fv - an M, :AP .-1 3,4924 .,, - .4 2: , so at . , 1 W ff M f, A, was IW M 'Wy' ef .. .M 'gf af 4 'M if W 1, nf' Y .a , ,f,e'1'.,g', 441 ., ' -212. W W f ,, ,:,. i Ein." . l 2 f , , , s 4 fy, 4 ,MQ 1 . ..,, . J g , ,J 'S is 3 Q 'N l rf' 9 5, 25? :ii Q X A N X ' r s 4, s f t f i at g , if-5 rf,,e . ,gl E 1, X ,f Mix X I , 'Q' 7 f 'ik Xxiwgfyii i A? QWQQ Y ,, 'f xv Aung ,gym ,MQW .WW f .WM as mgjgm SGS, 'G fi l , 4 , X X ifr fi3i9K'lNiT1.2. if-na f"f Um A Uv ,33N':7.WMMWZi r Mike Wuertem burg Pat Wuertemburg Suzanne Yavorsky Adrian Zavala Mary Zavala Rachael Zavala wa f 1 f 'V f f' 7, f X Wf f"-B 'S , www., i 3 I " Z' 'I 5 "0 ' n , f , fp Carmen Faucon, one of many students enrolled in "Principles and Techniques of Skin Diving" rests before continuing her practice swim in preparation for the real thing. The class, one of the more popular course offerings of fall semester, was held in the campus swimming pool with field trips to Puerto Penaseo and San Diego. Michael Zeller Charles Zigler George Zins J f Q .xi X , ff, , ,I ,X K ,ff ,fl X, X: , , 4, if i f f 1 7 1 'V ' it Y , gn 63 S if, f ew X fix f 41 I' - 5 f if N Am. I i . A 'S 44. . 1+ . ,f V' ! l-K' ,,,, V 6 .C il I V 'u:, 'ig X Q1 5 3 1 1 5 f 1 1 . A ' f I f I 'lv 4 fs.. ' " 321.3 'Q fi?"-I 1 - "LW J f 5-. 9 tb QN: xl'-ntkj If . .4 if D IJ f -v ' .Q 42' r vfh .' ' 5' fl -f' 'A ,V , ,' aff' . 1 91' ' 5 ",- qf ',a'U .'P 81, hi' ,7 fjwff .5 - Jig ", QQSAI-'I flu' - fl ' Ig 2 -1 ' -' ' -' .fi ,,':-R552 , 'AZ-I if 153.1 , , 41-1 E s I - ' " 'J' 'T UIM11 X , .. rl Y, .,-.':g. Q: . if .. 'J .',' .5 ff2aj,v'oi M' 4 If Hi--jilvz ?', ""4 - I? ' , A' , -- 9 rl - , 1 ,X w ' 4,i i 1 4 '1 I Q w ! . . 1'3- I y l' Il '.l ' ,g Qg - N4 Mia 'Q .f fg. A 'Q ,I nr' 5' U 1 .' 1 A. u 4? ,. ' I nf ' E- '11 'ff ' 0 :rg , w --4 55 W J , 5 :O i L 1 w il NN' ,ff f s, 1 ,, 'r 1 , . FS.. 6 1 If 'Q I. l I I . ., 1? if ,'l,. Kd' v I I' , lea i ., QQ! 45" 5 n avi C45 p 7,1 -1. Q 4 will ,.,.., 9.. I 5 ik A .u -q J 1 , 'O . 5 '. ,3- 4. 'L-. .ff f U91 aj , . irx J 1,A N 1 Q1 fl lv? i , ' s riff JJ., Aa - .q'p',' f .xi x : d Q tri . N 'Q' 1- 4' L' N 8 Q wi'- , i ff 1971-72 Homecoming Queen Irene fNippij Taylor Homecoming Queen Nippi Taylor and her escort John Fuller CCenterJ and student body president Tom Gil- more congratulate her during the half-time activities of the San Diego City College vs. AWC game at Kofa Memorial Stadium. Oct.23rd. V ,,, L. . I. . . - L li i " "'? I :en ner ler nt En her :me Lan vs. ofa nm. Members of her court: Rose Marie Heredia Stephanie Oyer Kathi Quost Suzy Turner 67 25 ?. Nw, 1 ,1 , M gg: All-,N n lu - 1 1 wi ,f 1, ww 1 -1, V , ,r 1 4 g . Q G if .,.4 A'l gi :W v, 1 .1 N, ,V r .S n ,xl 7 ,4 Mm E. W I V? V A 31' YM W E HEY N uf whim ' ip 3 Sglk iii Jig? .55 if 1-iSg2" ' 25?,w E ' W 1 V y ,1 I 1 Y,-,u 14 I' yi., , 41,4 IW f u M fig I VN' GJ .3 ,g',,, In-Ulf . QF.: ,nik up' sri Mil a. 413 Mi 35531 M9122 ' Xian 44134 a m i aff ' Si Qi! Wg iw! 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A W2 , 122 Q2dff3422 f f , Q e. . . Wg 'AWQQ N av Eif4HsF?242, Y 13 1: ef 'vu v fi :fi . ww w+ 'f f f ,a f -1f"?'G?'i:wv 1 N WM 1 34' 'f7'3'lgg?Qv'g5qiV MZ mga' MHQ. Y!fUv2, Qfl3 " .f f 9 , fmJ' ', "L'F','-'Til 4" Pill '.:3gM:54g Efgfiiyefini, W 39Qf45E5:zr.'1,!5igZ4,13W -LWFZ ." f!z91 ,. 2:4711 r sZw2'!Y Af1ef M5s1, mm WN EWU' fu 95? M21 JE i",:1"15FF51f1'i,'X?'5?Qj'?3EZ fH1si1215WM giWf3',r', W3f'.1 ' Wgf if gr , -,gl ' , ffEgQp3:f2Z3 m ? N ' wg? 15315, H 15 , 'ig:g ,1 1,i222GfzQE : . ' . - . 3? J w w f Hp Wa g 1 !,e3y 12 v W2 -WZ' M 1 1 f ' , ' ss M Z, 'lil nh W ' ff? H ' . i t " 1' ,MSW 'b , Z' 'L Q 497' 'W113l1'W:".W7'ffl:-Ylf' " ".'+"'f" " 'f fwf .f ' ' ' fy " .lb 'QW - A l l I l l Vl I l 1 l l l l l P l 1971-'72 Queen ofCourts Miss Barbara Jean Howe, a sophomore, was crowned Queen of Courts, March 4, 1972. The ceremonies were held during the break between that night,s two Region I Basket- ball Tournament play- off games. Western hosted the tournament. Miss Howe was escorted by Greg Watson. ,air-41 t Q-w R lf The many faces of Q Sat Tom ' Gilmore, CASXAWCJ Student Body President M h I ,- ' 1- 52, M- .. :fri "W - c M sc as Q g Mrs. Sherry Roedder 1971 Homecoming dedicatee is I 3 i si S 3 it 9 , Saturday, October.23, c i was crowned during halftime i 1 ofthe game re ' against San Diego College. Mrsi ivosecfetary to the associate gg dean of stuffed? affairs, Paul Waddell, was t selected by1memherslgofthesASfAWC execu- , 5 tive ' MacKenzie' presented?- s 7 f 1 3 . Student exchange program provides . ,W V I , I xi' ' , if Ji Y, A Til is 4 ? 443 a I WX' ' Q es, 5 .ff Q '65 Q I Mp-4' 5 , ' t 5. e x 2 , Z. Representing Western at the University of Sonora in March were QLEFT TO RIGHT, FRONT ROW! Rosa Heredia, Irene MQICIIO and Elizabeth Gomez. Standing QLEFT TO RIGHTJ Frank Preciado, Nonie Reynolds, Marielena Wakamatzu and Mark Fillinger. N01 pictured is Robert Davis. I 4 Y f ,.,..Q-V f, Q. , H... .5 ..., . S 4 it z .india as X 5 I Str gf s .s WCIC iado, Not 'J A+ . 4 'Y' , - if " L international dialogue ,Wa ww tawaf will Shirley Burch QTOPJ and Bobbie Padilla sunbathe at Kino Bay during last year's exchange while QABOVEJ Reuben O. Lopez CLEFTB poses with students from the UofS in downtown Hermosillo. Eight Arizona Western students experienced a week-long happen- ing March 18th through the 26th that long will be part of their lives. They traded lifestyles with a group of students from Mexico. The eight, Robert Davis, Mark Fillinger, Elizabeth Gomez, Rosa Heredia, Irene Moreno, Frank Pre- ciado, Nonie Reynolds, and Mari- elena Wakamatzu, represented Western during the fifth annual student exchange program with the University of Sonora at Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. They were selec- ted by representatives of student government, and a student and faculty screening committee. . While in Hermosillo, the group attended regular classes at the University, visited museums, ap- peared on local television, relaxed at nearby Kino Bay, where guests at fiestas, and lived with an adopted Mexican family for one week. The exchange program, the only one of its kind between an Arizona junior college and a Mexican uni- versity, was co-sponsored by the Polyglots Club and the College's Foreign Language Department. Shirley Burch served as the club president and Reuben O. Lopez is the department director. While these eight students rep- resented Western in a foreign land, a like number of students repre- senting the University of Sonora visited campus for one week. They too attended classes and visited local historical landmarks, and lived in campus dormitories. Also, they were hosted by college presi- dent, Dr. George Hall in a dinner banquet. The Mexican students and their North American counterparts ex- perienced a cultural jarring when they viewed, complimented and criticized customs and traditions common and uncommon to their ways of life. The exchange pro- gram, as in past years, exposed these students to a laboratory of human experience that far outweighed the one week of regular schooling they missed while not on campus. 73 f,, Student government As homecoming began to roll around, student government officers got active on construction of a float. Kim Cartensen and Tom Gilmore QRIGHTJ struggled with cutting the chicken wire while Ron Eastman QFAR RIGHTJ sawed on a piece oflum- ber. Every part ofthe float must be covered and Barbara Moore, Benjie Blake QBELOW RIGHTJ, Rose Heredia, and Henry Medina QBELOWJ did their part. Kim is the director of social activitiesg Tom is President of ASXAWCQ Ron is in charge of publicityg Barbara is ASXAWC Secretaryg Rose is ASXAWC Treasurerg and Henry is the President ofASfAWC senate. 1 ' A M113 my 4-1' iv EWR' i Fa , K 2 'ii fi an m....'?:, wi W. M X 3 we-rw . 4 fran-M-4. ...M 'Q' l 4 F 2 fa., we TV. W r i.,.:.g,,-Q wi at we f at 'I l 4 li 'lil' r , J., fl f gif 1 A Q 2 if ., , A , .5 .Qi at haf f f . Ya V, ,, 'stat ,Qt , , A f L., fy.-4' I Y - -- -- J- 4 f - 1. - .5..,"1fk W ' - ejglx "'-nah.. in "t ork on a float 4' 2 'IS f MW as Q di. fs. , ,MA i x, y 'Zi x, z X X . 535, W' x I4 rgggga 1.45 N ,, 1 Ame 1" 1, ' , , S f :Z 5,2 2 ix 4" l 'f Q' A , , X W 9 , " 2 .UB Z ,KL xwzwf ,H x 54 2 A E , 1 . , 3 f 3 Z , Q E xg ki 3. '-S f :I f 51: As f 4 ' v Q 43 il Q f N5 ,, : X L 'M 0 1: li 7 . I 75 E r n X r v l n ARIZONA gPos'r QFFICE aox 929 r ' , 1 ' PHoNE: 'izefiooo y YUMA'ARVlzQNA185364 February 17, I972 Dear d V -. l want to take this opportunity to congratulate you for achieving a grade point averagr of 3.000 for the fall semester, l97l . The college is very proud of the fact that you at have achieved this high academic standing . It is not the grade itself that is so important, ' Bute the effort youput Forth to obtain this goal . ' file hope thatyou will be able to continue your education and that you will achieve your gptersonal goals in life. r ' . 51fRil'phfMoorehead y. g r 'iveieie fStudent'Affairs' r 1 'A VWVA I 'V , b. V I V I A . -...f f" n gx I, ix IH I 1 I, if A I 1 R I I . -Qs IL, " . " -:Q ,I l, , . -' .. L' GJ 1'--f i 'if' 1 7 3 Af . . ,M . -5 A w ' 1 W V qv., I ..-.1 ,W af .' . . . A" -"' Af- ' .ij " " ' -I, , I . f 1 - If 1 -g. A - A 120 . - ,2?' I 'V .In ,H A I af 1: 2, ' ' f I 1-ffgvfy xt' '. ,U 97 1 .li 'I I , . . 'I f ' . 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XJ -.i. 9, I . . lt Irwin Il .. A -2 I Q -'z :bw ' A .x.,!4., imvhb .- bis. :J I -' - ff - -'-19 Hg' 1 ,gk 4 ' ' I . 5 1 4-5 fs ,, - ' .' - :LL-.ffgfh ' ' "NYPL 'W' f ' ' 'K ' 5'-.H '-127146 '-'1 A' J 5 '1- L A ' Fifi . fi ,'f1 S f:f f fs2g -fx ' N wtf - g-5 .ga .v '--iq ,'1,i',m-i .4'Ei-'F x ff:f1n,u - 1' we-fggmg 5: af- -4, . A Q :sg iw- f.Q:,ffs:5 M. .P 4. f,.-via -Q ,, cw v Q ff. f if . .Q we , Q 53+ gf? 1 L 1K..'jf,Q4i??' ,f'4Ij!'::T'.N,, .L 5'-In AL ly. 'A 4.12 ki, xii,-' .. ,s 4. .C-gi. lx if "Ibm-,til W 'Jf,1'4,!Y.' Y. v',' T4 R '.bY.X3:'4 .N 1. xt' 'r 'f-:'S"7' 'fn ' MN- -v5.:"l- .- .X 7. QI .1- Qi Matmen wrestle their way Yuma County wrestlers tlabovej on this year's team included fstanding, left to rightl George Fergusen, Alfred Miller and Mitch Conrad. Holding Ralph Rich- ardson onto the mat is George Mitchell. Assistant Coach Glen Mayle and head coach Moses Camarena offer instructions to the wrestlers. Matmen Ralph Richard- 80 son fcenterj during a wrestling match in December tries to out move his Phoe- nix College opponent. George Mitchell ffar rightj is about to be thrown onto the mat during a home match against Glendale Community College. The PC match was the first day match in the history ofthe college. ' -...N """-. 'Uh to a 5 6 l season record The 1971-72 edition of the college wres- tling team registered a first despite their 5-6-1 season record. This was the first losing season for the matmen in the school's history. They also qualified one member for the nation- al tournament in Worthington, Minn., in early March. Bill Moody, who placed third in the 190 pound division in the regional tour- nament, lost his first match at the nation- al tourney. The matmen also finished in fourth place in the state tournament, and cap- tured two state championships in John Knecht and Keith Rhodes in the 118 and 150 pound weight division, respectively. I This year marked the return of wres- tling to Western after a year's absence, and the debut of its new coach, Moses Camarena, a former AWC wrestler and student. Home grown talent on the team, rem- iniscent of a Yuma and Kofa High alumni club, included five Yuma County wrestlers. They were George Fergusen, Alfred Miller and George Mitchell, all Yuma High graduates, and Mitch Conrad and Ralph Richardson Kofa grads. To complete the alumni association, Coach Camarena and his assistant Glen Mayle are both Kofa and Yuma alumni, respectively. XXX 0? 'L H I vw 1 1 4 1 4 ,JA-'.,, V, . V . Y.-Y..,-.-.... , . -. .. A.,,, X, 1 df ,I EHTP y Bill Keith lssist- dsorl, a i b r i i z I I . i R i f r i r i v i I r r F i r i Squad captures fourth in state conference in Phoenix I 5 5 X? 'N-. f i i ' ff " NWMWHQG' wfwfvm X ,ff, x Q, wwffw N' M :MXN . V 1 1 T i i V I 83 l After a yearis absence. . . Wrestling makes a memorable first daytime match in introduces a new coach , I J 2 'S S . 84. , ye. -4,-.,. le in 'N H .qt A2 Vvx , J: s . . 'T "3 1 1,2 ., ' ,r Lg- 'Q g w- E fm '4 fi' .f f .LQ 5 2 ,M.,fww-Y Z ,N ,x ,r 51. J-whimz t .,..1 Coach Camarenafs scrapbook ,f WW t WWW' debut t we muwgik' V Western hi tory a new team 5 I f 1 A. J, Z- ,, 4 X 1 ff f, 2 X s ,G , . VH-V K ph W, ny.. f , W X 1 X , . x N4 1 , ff Q X In LX ,, ,X 'bex -Q, X me 2 9 ., . , X I, X , V 5, 5 w , 85 I' 'rv 8 Swimming means: l ater, water, and more water. Students had the opportunity during the past year to extend their physical abilities in several self-improve- ment classes offered through the Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. Popular classes included water safety, scuba diving and skin diving. The classes were conducted on campus in the regular Olympic size pool next the gym. Also, the gym was open to all students during the weekend and when not in use for classes. A life guard was on duty at all times at the campus pool. l f 'KH ,ffm ' ...W S ,f I f f Mmm. W, ff .. -- W 'W' W. ff A yy f mme.. W fvffm., ff f , I V .WW , Q f i at t , W . , 5 , t X ...... . I . f www' ' , M W' ii 0 ' .. A X 1 1 'W' My is ' f X ff , X M M 1 ' JW" New i f V t l P l BIB! Q35 ' ' ' ' A v . rf-' --H W--fr-. Q. .-W -. - , .W,,,,.. . . , , , , ---H -, n ' ' ' . Q' '-.-.A L.. 6 ii 3I'. 5Ular Open Luse npus 'a"'1 'hum 8 1 V fw, f. r Q ,1 -4...-q ,V 1 ' A- As- QL l l ummm- i B H sv W. fer, f f . X Q ,ni Western students are offered many forms of water activity. In a Water Safety class CFAR LEFTJ, two stu- dents sink in a mock boat mishap, and then take turns rescuing each other. An advanced skin diving stu- dent QLEFTJ peeks through under- yvater floral during a class field trip to Puerto Penasco, Sonora, Mexico. .Ed Richmond CBELOWJ prepares to surface after a high dive, plunge into the campus olympic-sized swim- ming pool. 87 autographs f 'ei 0 v I9 , autographs 4 G S Q. 4 C OLLE GE 4, , ARIZONA WESTERN i mme.: P051 055105 50x 020 pt-i0N51 120.1000 www, Amz0NA 05504 The question has been raised many times regarding the success of Arizona western CoTTege Footbaii. we have been biessed with many outstanding young men with great piaying abiiity throughout the Tast 8 years, which is certainiy a big factor. Even more important was their desire as a team to be the best. Some are born with this desire, however, most have to Tearn it. we beiieve that through the associa- TQ tion with the facuity, administration and staff this has been instiiied. That Tittie bit of extra time spent with the individuai, both in and out of the classroom, has paid off in great dividends. No one individuai or seTect group on any campus can produce a constant winner, this takes time and effort on the part of many: coaches, facuity, administration, students, townspeopie and on and on. There are, T am sure, many other reasons. However, T beiieve the main reason for success in anything is the wiTTing- ness of peopie to sacrifice time and effort in working together. ' d the heip of God, T can see no faiiures in with this an the future. Head Footbaii Coach DTSTRTCT GOVERNTNG BOARD JOHN R WTLHELMY ' JOHN A Cuamz ' AUSTE 550 5. az smear P. 0, Box 37 N HAYD5 LES P. BARKLEY DONALD N, SOLDWEDEY- YUMA ARIZONA 55364 1-AGNA ARXIONA 85352 T521 CALTFORNTA Avenue Route T BOX '13 P o BOX 271 ' PARKER Amzowp. ' ' ' '97' 1972 is-13 85344 SOMERTON. Amzoru 05550 Yum., Am-Loup. 85354 T974 is-15 D D LDWE EL 11 K 2 85364 NA Reflections on a successful program After a successful winning football season, the 1971 edition of Western's Matadors football players were honored at an awards dinner at the Stardust. The evening was filled with humerous stories of the past sea- son and kidding among the coaches, players and guests. Success, however, does not come by talking a line. A coach and his staff must deliver, they must deliver a product that will be saleable and accepted by the public. Since Ray Butcher has been head football coach here, all his teams have finished the season ranked in the top 10 by the National Junior College Athletic Association in Hutchinson, Kan. On the opposite page, Coach Butcher reflects on the success of his program. Butcher, who was named Coach of the Year in the Arizona Conference wrote his thoughts after the season. The Matador football squad showed their appreciation of Coach Ray Butcher by presenting him with a man's blonde toupee. Joining in the laughter are QLEFT TO RIGHTQ Dr. David Cothrun, Butcher, Dr. Ralph Moorehead, Jack Watson, Jim Carruthers and Sam Salerno. Butcher sported the arti- fical hair on his balding scalp during the banquet. Strong second halfs give Matadors the edge , , . V . - 1 1 , -,- : 1 1 1 'vi . 1,1 wr rr-1 f,uw1".y' .U H 'vw-.1 UL- NW' 1 '5:"G'p"""r,lr 5-Wiz.,-,r-.sf'g-'u. 1,1-mwy, mmw,L.g1'gf-H,-, ,,,Qm4f,e,15j'wwww' 4'L!,LLw,4rw-r w-wwwhaw:-fm wr.-, 1,1 ,Mmmin-w..,,nf,-Lwv.-1,. ,,w,-..i:v.- :,-f,,':-ft'ff.'L- MN 1 'M"'::a'1'-.:'j1 3-fifvlif 321' 1--it .43 If 'i ..M....i..,.s.. -- Q N5 ,fits . , . .- -.fn .,-.M -. WW im.-,--www -r nuffwmw'ftrwfmwfiriwW't-1WWi1'?-Wfviii TWiWWD'g'it1'!1fl W. iw- Y HT, gw,mcMFm ,1,-,QQ-,g.Qw1p5,7L, ,lp wttmq4f,.,,,gf,fJ,M,,g, 11,71 mwgwii-W,1,1-ymgw iq ,g,,'z.,g'.,,,,-.,, -1 ,Q-,,5F,,,.,c,nlf',,,r,,.,, 9 igewrr-..mJ Wg,u5,q4r-afpwrfi?-M,:Z-Z?Q,i-faq-,tiyvllhiwbbldfflihifl4216qi'1Wy1yMh'wwrther1rhiM2lQ4Miyv7ItjlW,?Z+W,Wt'ggmnmri-wtffdvvv-fi-M57-'lw'fffvfff.- 'f 'wygwalwrft it 4yQ11u'w"Wr" rw . 'ij 1 'Q--. , f, -2,497 st. W' The 1971 Matador football sea- son proved to be quite exciting for AWC fans. Starting the season off with a loss to San Diego Mesa College of 7-0 showed the Matadors to be over confident. The Matadors came bouncing back after their defeat to take on the U.S. Air Force Academy beat- ing them 30-10. ' Throughout the season AWC wg.. Q proved to be a somewhat different type of team. They played what could be called second-half ball. To exemplify this the statistics for each half shows that the Mat- adors outscored their opponents by a total of 86-85 for the season in the first half and then outscored them by 186-24 in the second half game. By the end of the season AWC held an 8-1 win-loss record. In a- chieving this record the Maradors defeated their two biggest rivals, Phoenix and Mesa Community College. Mesa Community waS the only team to beat AWC last year. In national rankings the AWC Matadors finished number thfC6 for the season,-one place ahead of the previous years' ranking. mb.q 6 P ifig-5125 in fu., 9 K. if , I-if vt' 1 'f of 'N ' ' Y , U ---v ,,r -3--. L. N v - ,. ' ' - - w x- I "' '.i. 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W V Nita f 6 5 W an W M 2, W vyh, " ww ' ' f V5 wr' iq L , as W L af fr 2 "Q w , ,, A , .W ku X JV' W 4? ga dz f K 1 ff M Wzg'7a g W , f . ' , .-Q ff' kTTff'w yf, , X' gsm WMM yu, W V if ., i f :ff , ,W , Q G f if Q7 lllgagv MW LEFT: Number 83, Melvin Stokes, is as- sisted off the field after being injured in the San Diego City College game. TOP RIGHT:Coach Charles Dine displays one of his unusual expressions during the fourth quarter of the Air Force game. ABOVE: Bill Pouge, as the Matador Mascot, takes a break to rest his tired shoulders at the Glen- dale game. '- 1 Action is only a small part. - - People are what make Matador football AWC VISITORS 0 7 San Diego Mesa Col. 30 10 U.S. Air Force Acad. 45 7 Taft College 16 12 Eastern Arizona Col. 18 15 Mesa Comm. Col. 34 7 Reedley College 34 9 San Diego City Col. 20 l4 Phoenix College 37 30 Glendale Comm. Col. 94 Yuma fans loyally supported Mat- ador football at home as well as log- ging many miles in following the team to the Phoenix area and even as far as Reedley in northern California. These faithful fans sweating through close situations were always rewarded as the team more than equaled their efforts by producing the most exciting season in Arizona Western College football history. .., gn 'V x l il 1 'Wig ' .I 'j1 ...,. l FAR LEFT: The AWC Band, directed by Ron- ald Fuller, adds life to the Matador games with music at half-time. TOP CENTER: Matador, Greg Gibbs, eludes defensive men from Glen- dale Comm. College. ABOVE: Adding their talents to the half-time show this year are the Desert Dolls LEFT: AWC Songleaders bubble with joy at the sound ofthe final gun after the San Diego City College game. s l I The 19 1 1-31T0m Bowl 3 ' 9 r--12, , .t,tK1W"f .E A , gi .4 Jw, Q ' MWF 415 5 K Q ' ff ft 7, 2 , , ,JM F W 5 in Q.. tu. ABOVE Westerns VIC Bomolo Q45 rushes up the mlddle for addltlonal yardage durmg the l97l Sunklst El Toro Bowl Game agamst Ellsworth CIAJ College Greg G1bbs No 34 for AWC MIDDLE RIGHT shakes off an Ellsworth Panther to plck up a first and ten ln the Dec 4th champlonshlp game won by the Matadors QFAR RIGHTJ Chuck Muncxe C425 ns arrborne before bemg drop ped by an opponent Arizf of Iowa T he 1 Sa1urd2 T he ' Valuabl Most V W her ' and the E s tto r ? 3 .z , Y ' B 1 lla QM i Q X y J' l I D t,,-nnlw ' ' - W 1 ' I , 4 '4 me ll l ,, , l 1 V4 I ' 1 l l , . . 1 . - 9 . . , - 1 9 . ' 5 96 iwl W D I '4 T 3,7 lx LAY. l 'Q Q.1-A ffff ' rush6S during 3 ainst 5 No. keg off -51 and 15 WOU Chuck I dfop' Arizona Western made its fifth unprecedented. national bowl game appearance Dec. 4th when it met Ellsworth College of Iowa Falls, la., in the Sunkist El Toro Bowl. It was the third time the Matadors had appeared in the El Toro. The Ray Butcher-coached squad, rated No. 3 nationally at season's end, warmed the capacity crowd that cold and windy Saturday afternoon at Kofa Memorial Stadium with some fancy scoring efforts. The Western offensive attack was centered around the running and receivin of'Ch'uck Muncie who was named the Most 8 , , Valuable Offensive player, and the clutch passing of Dennis Coleman. Don Hubbard led the defense and also garnered the Most Valuable Defensive player award. ' When the four quarters of competition were over, the day had warmed up some with the sun breaking through the clouds, and the final score read Western 28, Ellsworth 12 . 4'5"-wa ff' silk 97 Howsweet it is We are fifth A K v I Y V. fi 4 ? f ,4 I 4 4 , bi 5 Y 3 I 4 1 'I I l in of '- suv ,Q I S Vx Vx 'A 5 I .. las Q.,-H Q QQ.. ' Q .ss- V-'I , 3 ' 5 U I 5 ZZ! E23 ps Q 5 9 23:3 A Y R ll' ll. ll! ll .3 5v:. u l!" iq!! M' ill? so 'll ll' QM 1 ul' pn . s s as an yu The on incl sbc QW Fil' pic pre- Ha ' . H -'W .. ' 5 - D sn inthe Nation! The basketball team posed with their fifth place trophy after arriving on campus from the national basketball tournament. Team members included QLEFT TO RIGHTJ assistant coach Joedy Gardner, Ken Leb- sock, Bill Truman, Candy LaPrince QWITH TROPHYJ, Bruce Battle QWEARING HATJ, Joe Sills, Dennis Marshall, Dwain Talley, Phil Filer, Ed Mazon, head Coach John Whisenant, and Bill Hagins. Not pictured is assistant coach Jim Amick. Coach Whisenant CABOVEJ presents Pres. Hall the victory trophy, and is congratulated by Dr. Hall for the national honor brought to Yuma and AWC. Matadors net 34-3 record, coach accepts new post HUTCHINSON, Kan. 4 Arizona Western College is officially the fifth best junior college basketball team in the nation, and a lot of folks here feel the Matadors might be No. l. And so wrote a sportswriter covering Arizona West- ern at the National Junior College Athletic Associa- tion's national basketball tournament in Hutchinson, Kan., March 14th through 18th. The Matadors, who lost the opening game against Paducah, Ky., won fifth place in the 16-team national basketball tournament after defeating Erie, N.Y., Dal- ton, Ga., and Hutchinson, Kan., colleges. Western came all the way back after their initial loss through the loser's bracket to net their national title. The final win gave AWC a total season record of 34-3. It was a determined squad that recovered after their initial loss to Paducah College, 86-78. Arizona Western bounced back to defeat Erie Community College, 116-76, and Dalton College, 92-79. The sternest challenge came in the final game which saw Western go into overtime against hometown Hutch- inson Junior College before a throng of 7,500 screaming, partisan fans. But the Matadors won, 99-94. Along with the national victory, during the season AWC laid claim to the state title, region one title and first place finishes in both the Matador Classic and El Toro Classic. It was Coach John Whisenant's finest hour. The 34 wins also set a school record. Under Whise- nant, the Matadors have won 24 games in each of the last two years. Whisenant, who had been here four years, announced in late March that he was leaving Western, He was of- fered, and he accepted the No. l assistantship at the Uni- versity of New Mexico at Albuquerque. As of press time, assistant coach Joedy Gardner had been mentioned as a possible successor to Whisenant, So it was not unusual when about 100 students and fans, among them college Pres. Hall and Yuma Mayor Thomas Allt, greeted the team when it arrived on campus March 19th after their return from Hutchinson. It was a tired, but happy team that proudly surround- ed their NJCAA trophy while photos were taken. A- board the Matador bus was Whisenant, his assistants, Joedy Gardner and Jim Amick, the team, the cheer- leaders, and a student broadcasting crew of Cliff Car- roll, Gordon Helm and Peter Vos. All the tournament games were videotaped and telecasted on a delayed basis over Cable Channel 8 and broadcasted over KAWC. It was a balmy Sunday evening in Yuma when the Matador team stepped off the Crown Coach to the cheers of their supporters. It was a balmy evening, but not a typical one. One that will long be remembered. The many moods of Bill Hagins, No. 52, during the season show his complete and total involve- ment with the execution of the sport. Hagins, selected to the first team All-Arizona conference squad, led the Matadors with re- bounding and averaged l9.2 points per game. Hagins CTOP LEFTJ reacts to a referee's call. The 6-8 center QRIGHTQ works for an opening in the opponents defense and CFAR RIGHTJ waits for a rebound while teammate Dwain Talley executes one-foot balance. 100 AWD 52 sq Wa- ,N , Basketball I . X - I P 1 E sm' W, -,lv 5 3 ., Xu . W 4 Q ,Ji ' 5 ""' 4, N I JK , Xi 7xX , 4, ,ww I x .X X9 wx: 223 f 4 ff I 4 F gx 7 ,Q Q 1 , ' J if :if 439 S XX XA fwfr x X 1 XWJ 4 SX Qs ,w ,QQSQ 5 S4 max X X 45 ,AX X 3 W r Q M -ff ,X XX ,f M84 :X 554: ' W Wx I K W a WW 'N-was-a ff ww ,-in 1 ' Q , 4 . 0 Q , .- Z X f , nm, f f W I 1 , , X f Z X ,X X1 Q ' fy f 4 , f ? X W Z0 X, Q ,X 4, , f, - ,X al V., . 7 's- X ' f f, X 4 Y ' f M " 7 .' X XX , X' V I , X X P W .. , , ,I X , Q 7 ...J , , . ,Eff M 4 ' fwff X QM X X? , ff ,,, iw W, ' ff X , ,, ' ww, f X k XXWVD-X .MW ,' X07 WV MX K M K f ,K 4 2 VW 1 f ,fi ,f, f M 0 f X , ., 4- 0 fw af X 2, X7 , f 'X 4,21 X , Q, V f Q "J - dw! X J, 5025 1 f ,' V 4 1, f M, " ff w 3? I f Q W 5 f f X ff f X f , ff 0 , m, f f f fr , W f 3 Z ZX W X0 M W1 gf - yu ,z, ' ,Af XX, 'X 41' g ' 2 . 6, WQ S" , L, 4, f X 1 'I f 7 Ti V ,A Q A f ,, X Q, ,, W XG: f ffff A f A ,, ,CX ww X KWH 'fghm 2 -, E 1 Bill Hagins and Candy LaPrince QABOVE RIGHTJ congratulate Dwain Talley after another suc- cessful performance while team- mate Phil Filer watches the game Sitting along side them are CRIGHT PHOTOD assistant coach Joedy Gardner, head coach John Whisenant and assistant coach Jim Amick. This trio guided the Matadors to the national basket- ball tournament in Hutchinson Kan., in March. Clay Brown C503 leans for a rebound MIDDLE RIGHTJ against Eastern Arizona College while 5-10 guard Dwain Talley CFAR RIGHTD directs the Western attack against the Eastern Gila Monsters. 1 102 7VOI' s'. RWD 54 -g. ...K ?, ast moving action is key to M3 ii! 'II - L """"Www4. G It was head basketball coach John Whisenant's best season won-loss record Q29-25 in the college's history. Whisenant's "Warriors" won the state conference for the third year in a row, captured the Region One tournament for a second consecutive year, and advanced to the national basketball tournament, the first time in the school's history. Indeed the success of the program came from within and from throughout. It can be said of the 1971-72 Matador basketball squad that their success, their individual talents and sacrifices along with student and community support indeed was a team effort. I IO4 l 2 ,fha AQQ .,.. A . W"'t If a successful program is to be really successful, it must have support. Support not just from within but from throughout. This year's No. 3 nationally-rated Matador basketball team drew several standing-room- only crowds at home. Obviously, the community sup- port was evident. Fans came for a game of basketball, and in most cases, they saw just that. They saw the Matadors surpass the century mark in scoring eight times. They thrilled and shared the joy of victory with Western, who tied a state record for the most consecutive games won in regular season play at 28. The Matadors have won 35 consecu- tive games at home. Their last loss was Dec. l5,l969. 3? 9- el' Io atador success ,nun ""vMw'.... ful, il n but .fatCd TOOIH' ' SUP' caseS, ss the 1 and statC :glllaf ISCCU' 1969. K4 I I. When the action is fast paced, like it was against Yavapai QABOVEJ, the crowd finds it hard to keep up. Big Bill Hagins CRIGHTJ attempts to block a shot by an unidentified Yavapai player late in the game. Western defeated the Roughriders 79-65. -+1-14:-, z 1 of a ' f e- A , ,, U ,,nL4-:.- ... 1Jd3liivl" ' hat ex-great American I S l -a 1 E i 'i 'I li Q L l 1 ll El v ,WX ,fm SF X Head baseball Coach Jack A.Watson QA- BOVEJ gives the Matador squad some pointers during the end and beginning of a doubleheader contest at the Desert Com- plex. Coach Watson CABOVE RIGHTJ discusses with catcher Don Kwart what combination of pitches to deliver to the man at the plate while CLOWER RIGHTJ the leather bound spheres, the baseball, is what the game is all about. U ,4 7 5, I X7 Wfapw 'wit if-eff f N41 FC A ws 6 ,, - U " i 'ica Il . sport. basebal "I " vb? . -.-My T'-L' A ,Q.'f,' V . X , - VA, , i fmf if :mi Qfffff, 'fn E iff, l KA' LOIIIC g of Om' HTJ vhal H211 the 'hat f W, r f As the 1972 baseball season started for the Matadors, West- ern was out to repeat as State Division Champion in the Ari- zona Junior College Athletic Association this year, with hopes of doing better in the state conference playoffs. Last season, the first under the split conference setup, the Matadors captured the state division. Mesa CAriz.J Commun- ity College won the Valley Division, with the two clubs meet- ing for the conference championship and a berth in the na- tional tournament at Grand Junction, Colo. As expected, Mesa won the best-of-five playoff, but not before the youthful Matadors put a real scare into the Ho- kams. Off that 1971 club, Western head Coach Jack Watson has seven veterans returning, all of whom are just about guar- anteed of seeing plenty of action. Heading the list are infielders John Jeter and Glenn Mat- tox, along with catcher Willie Morales and outfielder Keith Tallberg. Mattox will be back at his shortstop spot, while Jeter has been converted from the outfield to third. Hampered much of last year with a bad ankle, Jeter appears to have fully re- covered, and along with Mattox, gives Western an extremely strong left side defensively. Morales will no doubt be the starting catcher, however, he is expected to be pushed by freshmen Don Kwart of Tuc- son. Tallberg started much of last season and hit near the .350 mark, mostly on his speed. Another veteran first sacker is Monti Lee. The other sophomores who are pitchers include Don Gray and Don Smith. Speed will be the name of the game for the Western offen- sive attack. fPress deadlines did not permit the round of this year's sea- sonj. ,""' ffflfyf W. S iCfx"a 242 H X K Nj' N. lO7 4 .MJNWM-awww-M-'uf hw 3 0 ,X , h A EICUOH 1 4 E Q 1 4, x 5 Q li i ual! is: 'mv .- Y -is 45409 A i , I , ,,.., 'A' 4 ' V' V 4, , 1 ' Y :INA 'ht ' x H i the name ofthe game 5 1 T'-,f5'f'V5' 5 Y 5 MCL ' :P hx '."51 fx" iv I 452 F4 'SX f H 4, X732 I 95 af? 1 ' Q1 f . Q K , 1 'J 4: My 1 2 V v- f ' , I bf -ff if M .R 1 1,15 Q X i 2 4 0? 'B' Q 1 Q5 , ' mov ff X' 4 . rw, 1 3 2 A 1 f 7 1 2 3 W rf Q 44, X 3 f f plf I ,es Q 3, 7 . W f, J: 1 54 4 444 Qffmf' fv .Y ' fwfr? Q., 3 fgafff. va ZW' Us Q V s X My ,gp f ' , Q f 4 M , ' ,ff ,5 ff if P 1 Q Qflaf I' r ' X 49 "7 '+ T 4 ' 1 39 'fi L 'Za f ,Q , A Wy. ,L 'WNW fl " , ' ,K I 5 , V ' if Q 1 fy X , W Q 1, L L l all I N ,wr ,, t L f Moods, moments and men make up the players on a baseball team while on their stage, and the Matadors are no exception as evidenced by these pages. Third baseman John Jeter CUPPER LEFTJ dons a safety helmet before batting while catcher Willie Morales QLOWER LEFT5 takes a breather before the start ofthe second game of a double header. Keith Tallberg QABOVEJ swings the mighty piece of lumber while a teammate is on deck. Mike Kees CRIGHTJ loosens up muscles and nerves before facing the delivery of an op- posing pitcher. with might l. 5 1 s if l 3 gh. it ' V I 4.-L15 ' ike at the bat. xp . F xQK"'fZ4 wifi 5, Z M. S 1 ,-1:4 ff wx W 5, 2,-N 1 I X f 'Ky ' TW 9" V MWVQP? , Nz, 1 X , f ff jf 115 X 005 ff X !f Wf L V Q31 sv z er f gf, X N ff! 4, 2, .X , X f f f wif S ' x yy! x .Z ,WZ fy E QR f f , Mg M xs K if f P I l , v . ll R . -. , lf . I. 4 L r P P r E + w 1 r r u x r n L 1 1 B x r n . n X - P 5 r n A v n L I n r r 5 5 I n 5 n r L V n n E 1- 1 x . L , , s L L L a L . , p L n r m ,,.. 1 3 ,A ' . Q . - The 1971-72 tennis team, coached by Bill Logan, had a squad of five. Team members included QBACK ROWJ David Espinoza, Bill Poage and Tom Fell. The FRONT ROW players are Randall Hart and Phil Wright. Home matches were played on campus. s s . T e , Q i, ,s e , spse ,r., yii,, , r i is if lkm ,V :mg , I J, , ., fr 7 Z 'MH' ' ,J 1, " I ' ,,4f,V,VM4 W I I g , gtrx, Ie' '31,-'l 112 l l F 1 1971 Tennis team represents Western at home, on the road A. '3 mf ,jgqrsn :img :yuan BILL LOGAN Head Tennis Coach db 5 VP 1 I nd. 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V f,,, wg, fy, 'f , fc, , f QQ I W! ,f, Q,,, f W, , ,, ' W W M, ff rf W 'QW M, X ' 49 , 0 f A ,, ,f, 7 , , W! ,W N A V, , , ,,,! ,, ,W W Q, X x, X fa QQ! ,, Q77 A nf X fy, 'Z ,V Wg ' Z f fw, , W , zf 0 'Y , ' 'V ' ,,, fw ,W f ff ff 3 W, Q ,7 , ,, ,, f , , 4 , ,9, va, ff X , , ,, , 'x We 77, f , Z4 ' M KW 4 15 Of W, , W, ' W f, '4' if Fw W 'fy W f 1 I 2 f ' ' 3 f ' , ,fZ, f Q f , Q ff, f I X0 5 ' I 1 7, ' .. , ff CRIGHTJ These unknown dorm st dents try to secure their Coke and change from an uncooperative vending machine. QBELOWJ Empty bottles of Strawber Hill wine suggests U J 3 Jug ...f lk JAY, 1111? QS' Mimi' Expressmns of ,ZQQ l dorm life show 4 Q0 .M . . . . lg, A Q4 Wir 1nd1v1dual1ty qw ff fl ,tt wa i S ft I ak ""'iy' RWM' ,nirilll ll H I CRIGHTJ One of Willie Lockett's many posters is shown here. Magi M? db u- TY as ,X ,rw was if if 5? A 7 - . 'T 'L JV 19 CLEFTJ Dee Dee Stevens rests against the wall underneath a lion head poster. QBELOWJ Randy Mann contemplates the meaning of the poster in the background while smoking on a tobacco filled cigarette. The beginning of another day I M, N of night classes M' ,J tif ,guna '7 The evening college student transforms the campus parking lot QLEFTJ in front of the Administration Building into a new day for night classes QBELOWJ just before the start of classes. Classes meet four days a week, from seven to ten p.m. presenting: awe's 19 1-72 songleaders. . Songleaders for this year included QKNEELING, LEFT TO RIGHT . Debbie Cyr, head songleader, Arlinda Daniel and Debi Vos. LSTAND- and cheerleaders squad. INGQ: Marla Fortney, Kathi Quost, an alternate, Mary Ann Carlson JZ and Polly Fassett Mrs. Natalie Stowe served as adviser to songleadCrS 126 Y . ,-.. R 2 X I D N 5 f X 'QR Y .rg N il - is vii yr 4 1-4- .ff "iff . V an V as " 2 'ill- , ,QQ X 4 'Vx s A. flu 'hw 41 fi ,f 3 ,- ang- ' iff, - 1 'Z i 'rifzf ' '.,' " ,N Qs .:, eaders 1 nn f iv '."x.i':, in tr' l v s We at .LII f ff f ZWW y f , y,,yWWf,.... " f 43 XM " iff Jwfi' e 4,4 ff W X , K 7, Q ' f Y f' ,jwf y , X f f ' f x fr X . Lx, ,,ff?fx.q an I ' ' . . SCWS Cheerleaders exhibited the best cheerleading techniques CBOTTOM ROW, LEFT TO RIGHTJ: Sue Kline, Sandy Gray, head d Linda Lawrence. QTOP ROWQ: Vicki Muhlenpoh, th N C ational Cheerleading Camp where they were awarded the cheerleader, an et d - . C C0021 Cola Award last summer. The squad members included Denis Gloria and Terri Steen. l27 l ill- QS 'f-Q. ' x This law enforcement QABOVEJ training class allows students to employ deductive reasoning in solving this mock situation. Here CLEFT TO RIGHTQ Lauren Vuillier, Mark Hames, Arnold Trujillo and Reuben Young attempt to determine whether the death of this exhibit fthe dummyj was due to homicide or a suicide. Randy Williams QABOVE RIGHTJ gazes into a seldom seen world through the aid of a microscope in biology lab. Evolution is one of the many changes that Randy Wick and-Toni Goss QRIGHTQ probe while studying a zoology problem. Sam Hu CFAR RIGHTD contem- plates why one part A plus two parts B equals three parts C. RN-.. 1, "Q-sm.-,,,,,, QSM H X 1 l I ,, M. Si. .. Aujri Vx- K V , A n1.L.aAi1..n ,Q . ". Science students probe the techniques of discovery Xifiiwz in 'nm W .4 Q 'C , AMBER Technological studies aid Western Arizona students The Division of Technology, chaired by Ernest Lopez, offers an educational program to prepare semi-professional engineering or industrial technicians who function as production and construction su- pervisors, as aides to professional engineers or architects or as op- erators of their own technical businesses. The programs in this division are more practical and intensive apply his knowledge to practical production and construction prob- lems. Students in this area of discipline are trained to receive a high are trained to receive a high degree of proficiency in their respective chosen field oftechnology. Students enrolled in Western's technology division acquire a vo- cabulary common to the engineer and architect. They understand the basic principles of the funda- mental sciences which are common to both the professional and semi- professional aspects ofengineering. A faculty of six is in charge of this division on campus. than those given in engineering colleges and more advanced in character than those given in trade school. The educational experience of the technology student consists of a balanced arrangement of class- room, laboratory, drafting room and shop work. The student learns "by doing" as well as by studying and listening, so he can readily 130 Af j M 1 ngineer CrSland funda- Jmmon 1 Semi- rering. arge of I ww v""f' 54,5 Y, X 4 2 . RIGHT: Robert Browning prac- tices a welding technique that may later be helpful. BELOW LEFT: Edward Treadway, pro- fessor of Automotive Technology, explains wheel alignment to Dave Nebeker and Phil Sibley during an auto shop lab. BELOW: Ruben Montoya checks over a reel-to- reel tape machine aided by an osciloscope. BELOW RIGHT: Drafting requires skill and pa- tience as well as concentration. Ronnie Beckett exhibits his skill as he finishes a lab assignment. 4 The Division of English and Foreign Lan- guage provides the student with academic work in the basic avenues of English, composition, reading, literature, language, motion pictures, mass media, and broadcasting. The Division, which expaned to include a Department of Journalism and Radio Broad- casting, had as its division chairman, Dr. Jerald D. Cavanaugh. The Division offered course work to permit students to meet general education require- ments and it also provided a multi-level pro- gram in aiding students of varying abilities in the development of their communication skills. Also available was Introduction to the Mo- tion Picture, an evening course that proved popular. Yet, regardless of how one refers to it, Eng- lish is communication and communication is good English. English spells communi- cation. It can be a relaxing atmosphere, yet a lunge into the unknown with printed word. .a esture. . .verbal communication 51 1 is 1 Prof. Warren Benson QABOVE RIGHTJ. It can also be a printed word on the chalkboard, a ges- ture plus verbal communi- cation from Prof. Michael Spain CFAR RIGHTD. It can be an extension of the classroom in a student- professor conference be- tween Pinkie Hernandez and Mrs. Helen Scroggins QRIGHTJ. 132 . E Steal. Q X ix-Q 5 V i 4 44 .X 2 ' x X X X 7 4- ,. ,.'A1" " Y 'ff , 'B Q x X fi? fx ,Q x N .- W xg. 7 mfr. f X xv , ,,. Q f f Q wg '1 RT gf I. I .1 The Division of Agriculture, headed by Jim Willis, supplies interested students with the knowledge needed to be a success at farming. Machinery is an important factor in that success, so CBELOWJ students are taught how to test the power of a tractor. Landscaping classes are also offered and the students can test their skill on the mini- farm surrounding the Division of Agricul- ture CRIGHTJ. CFAR RIGI-ITD Students check over their projects growing in the greenhouse. 'Aw fl W 1, J M a natural thing if, Q s QQ W Z 5 A, ,i 'X ,1 f aff!! . , , 1 W xr 4 3556! X 4? 1 wg 1 .Q F 1, zz 4 24 . 'M y 1ef,f741V,0XiW,v jim" f-WU fwwm , ,fn 4 yy 4, ,f i 4 'Y 'N ' M I up Wffx 4 , f K 1 i I MV. 4 Z 2394 ?,.' K Y f :W fxfwt . 'X ff, , 4 W S., X' 14 V 6 - ' I, 5 f Q? If 4 ff f 1 GZ ,Wa W ,f, .43 ,M 4 R ,ga Q f 4 1 sz' , QA , .sp Creativity. . . . is the product ofthe Fine Arts Department. Within this division, each student is provided with a foundation of knowledge in all branches of study. Its purposeis to help every student in the skills and proficiencies of his art. The Fine Arts Division is responsible for activities and organizations that provide opportunities for expression of individual creativity such as: Mile Post 9, the New Singers, Forensics, Drama, the Desert Dolls, the Yuma Symphony Orchestra, and faculty and student recitals. ,,,ii., ,,,,,, ,Mfg T, g V, V I +....,,7 M' , " f"'tYswf?fpWEWfmzsziffwffb "fissif1Ynd?1fz, ' -v Q -2 if- V, V it ' Q t , ' I n rf Q t fa. r. Y y wmv! , ,V,,f"ff,Zif MANS I ,, V V 4,m,,'P4,fJ'.:ZJ,W,g0i1,,jV 4 , ,A K . z ,.gf'tij,, , My, .f,fM,,,Mm,,,y ,, M 4 W 4, ff f ff U V3,,,,5 "'f'?'ii,,ff3f-Z., ,V x A jp 3 xg-iifmif tx 'fwifa W? Ns ff N,gQ6I:W,Zni ML! 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'--, 'R WWWW, W 'M'-vww., if .u bln, , --will "Exit K -f Fine Arts has many tastes. An individual can sing QABOVE LEFTJ along with AWC's contemporary New Singers, under the di- rection of Dan Burton. Or a student can tune in to music QFAR LEFTJ ofthe masters. But arts typify discovery with the hands. Throw a pot QLEFTJ or turn notes into music. QABOVEJ Fernando Rosas makes the pi- ano's keyboard sing. 4 N35 Mlffgw X .W NN was id .. -, 11 9 Wk,,,.,...g.....S9 , ' M, 'ly WW ,wx oF .ani fl usiness: QLEFTJ Richard J. Ficher, staff member, checks the print out of second semester deficiency slips as the computer continued its job. Ronald Costin, QABOVEJ professor of Business, explains an interest formula to his marketing class. John Konopka reviews the logic used before punching in a program QRIGHTJ. O l from adding machines to computers The Division of Business was one ofthe more popular divisions on campus this past year. With a variety of areas of proficiency open to the student, business courses available included Survey of Business to Principles of Accounting to Quantitative Analysis II to Typing on through Computer Programming. Harold R. Anderson is the chairman of the Division of Business. The division recognizes that as modern business be- comes increasingly complex, it requires entering workers to have an understanding of business and its relationship to society as a whole. Those students with a basic knowledge of the organi- zational structure of business and its functions, and with a mastery of those skills required of the entering business worker, found their places more quickly and easily in the business environment. Programs available include a college transfer program, business administration, general business, office edu,- cation, secretarial, office services, mid-management, data processing and data processing management. l39 WC S youngjournallsts gm" ' Q ' "' 2 .ff N- 1 f' I ,Q x . 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M ,ww rf .4 ' s U QQ my 0' 'W' 1 an . W M f ik -+34 " my 'M 5 "f + 'w.,.r. WQKPQ f 'V wi mfs X , , , K Nm-ft U- V' , QQ. ,,,-W GZ 3 egg 5 ,wg W fr 9 ,M Q, ,,,,, Q 'Nm-Q M ,, '0 ffw' ww 4: Mvivlfvl W 4. f 1 'ef airy H-fa' at f ,gp-vw 'a - 'T + f. A-,, iv, Ulf A 1 , 4 -wg P my W ,, S X t 3,4 x. ,,, .,.. , A 'vw -.1 -EWR Q'Av ar, '-N Q.. Ps' " .-QQ. W Q' -fm ., we ff- M We Q QVW.-,,W, MQ if ft,-6 , rf . - 4 .,,.. MQQAHL. A fs 'QW Publications on a college campus have the responsi- bility of informing the student body through a newspaper, and preserving memories in a yearbook. Memories and events that dominated our time these past nine months that touched the lives of us all, students, faculty, staff, and administration alike. For Western Press, the year was a full one. The first issue headlined the approaching completion deadline of a new College Union Center on campus that wasn't met. Remember remem- ber the contest college district governing board election, Virginia Woolf, superchlorination, field burning, Allen Sherman, a fourth consecutive bowl victory, a new academic calendar, athletics vs. the farm bureau, Dick Gregory, a basketball win streek, HB224l, the national bas- ketball tourney, student body elections, final exams, graduation? El Matador yearbook was caught between a traditional annual or a contemporary yearbook. The result? A compro- mise. Pages 161-l92 of this memory book have at- tempted to give you a pre- view of the trend in year- booking. A trend that must be taken and expanded if a yearbook is to be kept as a functional part of college life. i A note of recognition and thanks goes to Debi Rathbun and Michael Starrett, editors of West- ern Press and El Matador, respectively. Gilbert V. 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QABOVE RIGHTJ Participants in the Matador Forensics Festival periodically checked the posting board to find where to report to next. CRIGHTJ Marrow Jackson stood ready to hand out packets containing radio speaking information continued the Festival was visited by interested young students QFAR RIGHTJ While all the excitmeni wwv"""' l l Matador Forensics bring together speakers from over 60 colleges The Matador Forensics Festival over the years has become a major event for college and university speakers in the southwest. This year's tournament more than met its reputation. Over 600 students from 32 college representing seven states competed for the glory, fun, and trophies on campus. Debate, oratory, impromptu, oral inter- pretation, expository and radio speaking were featured in the fourth annual Festival. Some of the events were broadcast live from Cottage One on KAWC radio. Adding color to the fast-paced competition were the Yuma High School Choralairs and stage band, a tour of San Luis, Mexico, after registration Thursday night, a banquet highlighted by a performance from comedian Allen Sherman Friday night, and a bar- be-cue awards banquet Saturday night that finished off a very active and exciting weekend. 145 s . ral' I I I - I I . I I . ,fy I 'I I 1 I I I , i'fI 'r II , Yy' I 'I Ir' fy f ff' I, I rt" ly f Ir 71, H firy ,gf I' ,Ir ,, 'IVY If I I 7 Yr --w,.,, -... ,, :I Ia 2 I gf I: III' II 1, I I A , a ,,.,. , I V 'fi-xflb li' ""' A V 517 if I Z 7 Iff , 1 , I I f I, , 1 I I' I In ' .-f3 "ss:z'w,ie HQ f ff I I, Ig I I , , I I I N V W v fvw if WN-JG Q , A .. fx 11 2 I ,, 1'-I I , 1 '.N.- I ' 1-A.: E -'TWC l' pw. fy 'v 'U Yr Yr ' r ' v Y 1 ' r ' r ' I W ' I ' 1 Y I r 1-Q... tuna.. ,-. Amar-af.. learning center Library. The mere sound and appearance of the word sounds pretty dull. To many it brings to mind a large building whose insides store a large volume of books for the public to borrow. Where most libraries stop, West- ern's library continues. lt no longer exists under the title of just plain ulibraryf' Its true name is the Library Learning Center. The Center strives to be a stu- dent library as evidenced by the more than 430 different periodicals and micro-film of past publications dating back 10 years on file. More than 31,000 books make up the storehouse of written ma- terial in the Center, even though the averagejunior college libraries carry about 20,000 volumes. Richard Yates serves as director of the Center, which is a classroom in itself that challenges the student to discover himself at his own pace. g 0 , - l v ,,,,,........- f 4 I .W Q E' 5 1 Q 1 as if Q .yi t wt 1 Li Z 9, e .... MQW... T g 1 9 1' ,,,,. , 'Z fu 1- i if 0 33 ,, The modernistic design of AWC's Library Learning Center QABOVE LEFTJ adds beauty to the campus. But beauty is only skin for brick in this casej deepg it's what's inside that counts. Students can study QFAR LEFTJ, listen to music supplied by Mrs. Patsy Lewis QLEFTJ, or listen to a teacher's comments on tape CABOVEJ as Pam Self is doing. i E Viv auf-LLA NWN, gyfl RNS967 wwnw 12 A X f ,.,,-...-n'lflkn... , , , r X f I l f I K ,wif W' ff Q, 1 , 7504? '.fi"u, ff 04,1 gm, 4 ,f ,W .. .Wg im 2- wizgfw agp ff' WA .VZ ,X 2 Q bf Q, f M is Sw I I 4 2 Jo X ,Ln Productions provide participation for drama students. fD March The last production for this year was last Lenore Zapell presented three productions this year month spresentationo Luv ' A lier la Who s Afraid of Virginia Woolfe'?" orc p scheduled For presentation in October, was cancelled Romeo and Juliet n at the last minute because of "production problemgv, CABOVEj Romeo fRandy Nic- holsj duels with Paris fSid Reedj and kills him. QRIGHTJ Romeo then mourns the death of hiS beloved Juliet Uaneen Johannesj. xx. 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SX 'HQ N X 1: 4 gJ MA t 1011 creates a new learning skill , S ss , I fr , NN". -X U W I mr ' ' T f flaw ,gt QLEFTJ Making a movie as a special project for Mrs. Ann Wig- gin's American Literature class are QLEFT TO RIGHTJ Mark Haynes, and Marsha Herbert. QABOVEJ Cliff Carroll and Larry Keyes discuss taping procedure before a basketball game. The Television Production class video taped home games for later broad- cast on cable TV Channel 8. index I Prodi Jaw' 3,-ian I Wiliil Abdul Abbas Joovly Helen Cr2iZ j0DcII Anhui grover Linda Louis Ronai Ronnr Matt I Joe A1 Steve Linda Debbi Rick I Keven Terry Kenna Barry Norm Mike Andre Ed Be Lorrai Josepl Brian Ceocli Toni I Waite Edwai Linda Richa Darrd Barba Carolf Benjie Rosen Frank Jerry I Charie Denni Debbi Vicki I John I Tom I Craig Theod Heinz Richm Mark Addy I Joe Br Mark Ciafqj Samui R0ber David gzrhle ' I Bm? Sharon Maron Alex C Salvaq James Inv' Cllffc Bill Ca Juanita Mnnhl Mmilai Fred Abbei' J ose Acuna Brian Adam William Akin Abdulkarim Ali Abbas Aquallaf Jocelyn Anaya Helen Anders Craig Anderson J oDell Andrews Arthur Angulo Steven Arizaga Linda Arviso Louis Arviso Ronald Arviso Ronnie Arviso Matt Asanovich Joe Ayala Steve Baldwin Linda Bailey DebbieBaker Rick Ballin Keven Balser Terry Bandy Kenneth Barker Barry Barnes Norma Barnes Mike Barnicle Audrey Barrett Ed Beals Lorraine Beaver Joseph Becker Brian Beebe Cecelia Begay Toni Begay Walter Begay Edward Berge Linda Biltz Richard Binder Darrell Birdno Barbara Blackburn Carolyn Blair Benjie Blake Rosemary Blanchard Frank Blanco Jerry Bland Charles Blumenstock Dennis Boacnard Debbie Boase Vicki Bochentin John Boemer Tom Boman Craig Bowman Theodore Bowman Heinz Brademan Richard Brandes Mark Brennan Addy Britain Joe Brooks Mark Brooks Clarence Brown Samuel Brown Robert Browning David Buirge Kathleen Buirge Shirley Burch Barry Burgan Sharon Burgett Marcos Bustamente Alex Caballero Salvador Cabrales James Callicotte Larry Calzada Cliff Cameron Bill Canada Juanita Canoy Martha Canoy Michael Cansler Mary Ann Carlson Marie Carr Michael Carr Alfredo Carrera Cliff Carroll Kim Carstensen Tracey Carter Diane Carvajal Jamie Casey Robert Casey Cheryl Cash Brad Casselman Victoria Castello Tony Castro Henry Chavez Christie Clark Lonnie Clark Stephanie Clark Robert Claypool Jenny Clayton Pamela Clayton Larry Cleland Lois Clemons Charles Coast Alan Cole Dennis Coleman James Coleman Ozell Collier Daniel Collins Richard Conklin Mitch Conrad Jeffrey Conte Gracelyn Conty Edward Contreras Ignacio Contreras Daryl Contryman Gregory Cooper Chris Corbet Marie Corona Manny Cota Marilyn Cramp Steve Crossland Mary Crouch Michael Crowe Greg Curbric David Curbello Ellen Curlee Claudine Curtis Debra Cyr Christopher Czajkowski Gary Dalegrowski Stanley Dalegowski Arlinda Daniel Durana Daniel Thomas Daniel Craig Daniels Brenda Darby Richard Datchuk Janet David Michael Davidson James Davis Jean Davis Richmond Davis Ronald Davis Donald De Cuir Felix Dees Betty Denton Bob Deskins Nancy Dircks William Dobson Thomas Doler Bill Donnelly Barbara Doten Evelyn Drennan Larry Dresden Valerie Drysdale Mary Duffy Patrick Duffy Laura Dunninc Alice Duran Dennis Duran Frank Duran Patsy Duran Ron Eastman Elizabeth Echandia Juanita Echols Lynn Eddins David Eddy Harold Edgerton John Edwards James Ehrhart Mike Ehrlich Kathleen Eidson Daniel Elkins Dixie Embry Mark Ericson Bennie Escalante Frank Espino David Espinoza Mary Estupran Mike Evans Timothy Ewalt Lynn Farris Polly Fassett Carmen F aucon Rolande Faucon RoseAnn Faulkner James Fay Rebecca Fernandez Stephanie Ferree Philip Filer Mark Fillinger George Flores Virginia Flores Eugene Flynn Teresa Flynn Richard F oerstner Terese Ford Marla Fortney Deborah Foster Ernest Foster Becky Fowler Mary Fox John Franco Charla F randsen Dennis Franklin Mark Franklin Becky Franks Glen Frost Mike Frazier Mary Fulton Bejamin Galarza Ana Gallegos John Galloway Kevin Gamard Arthur Garcia Greg Garcia Lydia Garcia Rose Garcia Ruby Garrett Esther Gasca Daisy Gates Barry George Renee Gilchrist Dennis Gilliam Thomas Gillmore Debi Gissendaner Gary Gist Denise Gloria Kam Glover Francisco Godoy Linda Godwin Cathy Gollis Elizabeth Gomez David Gonzalez Joey Good Susan Good Gregory Goodson Maria Goss Anthony Gottsponer Nick Grabowski Don Gray Sandy Gray Stephen Gray Hank Green Mark Greenough Jack Greer Charlotte Griffin Jerry Grigsby Frank Guerrero Melba Guerrero Kim Guthrie Korlis Hackbarth Clyde Hall Gale Hall Gary Halliwell Alvern Hallmark Michael Hammann Douglas Haney Debbie Hankins Donald Hannaman Mark Hansberger Micheal Hansberger Helen Hansen Roy Harper Peppa Harries Bruce Hart Nathaniel Harvey Daisy Hatten Mark Haut Cindy Ann Hawkins Guy Gayes Ellen Haynes Mark Haynes Leslie Heintz John Hensley Steven Henslin Arnulfo Heredia Rosa Heredia Rose Marie Heredia Andy Hernandez Isela Hernandez Michael Hernandez Patrick Hernando David Hilden Tim Hilderman Tommie Hill Ronald Hines Kay Hobbs Terrance Hochstatter Mike Hocking Erwin Holt Bob Horan Andre Hornsby Gerrald House Garry Howard Barbara Howe Samuel Hu Donald Hubbard Earlene Hubbard Evelyne Hubbard Terry Hudson Jose Huerta Garry Huffaker Dena Huffman George Ibarra Penny Imhoff John Inman Joseph Inman Clarence Irving Marrow Jackson Cecil Jacobson Johnny Jaramillo Thomas J azak John Jeter Janeen Johannes Donald Johnson Nancy Johnson Leroy Jones Todd Jones Madeline Jordan Marjorie Kameath Roy Keeton William Kelly Donna Kennedy Hubert Kenney Larry Keyes Charles Kidd Danny King Debra King James King Susan Kline Ronald Kluck John Knecht Glenn Knight William Kreamer Lorna Kreft Norma Landers Darrell Lane Alvin Langston A Candy Laprince Mary Lauing Linda Lawrence Jerry Leamons Ken Lebsock Alex Lee Alice Lee Heddie Lee Jerome Lee Montie Lee Mary Lehrer Billy Leverett Marvin Lewis Vickie Lewis Sylvia Linden Jacque Lindsay Ralph Livingston Gloria Lobato Willie Lockett Frank Lopez Laura Lorona Linda Lott Bobby Luerrero Ronald Lux Kate MacCready Laurie Mackenzie Carmen Magdaleno Stephen Mahoney Steve Mariscal Dennis Marschall Barbara Martinez Carlos Martinez David Martinez Ignacio Martinez Robert Martinez Ralph Matthews Melanie Mattice Glenn Mattox Timothy Maylor Eddie Mazon Michael McArthur Roland McChanahan Paul McCollun Laura McDonald Emma McGhee William McKee II Rose McSwain Enrique Medina Rod Medlin Jim Meeks Sherrie Melton Mary Mendivil Arturo Mendoza Rosa Miles Agnes Miller Darralyn Miller David Miller Lillian Miller Steven Miller Kenneth Mills Debi Mitchell George Mitchell Harley Mitchell Jan Mitchell Terry Mitchell Ruben Montoya Carolyn Mooney Barbara Moore Cecile Moore Houston Moore Jack Moore Willie Morales Daniel Moran Lexine Moran Mary Moran Irene Moreno Stanley Morgan Laura Morris William Mortenson Vicki Muhlenpoh Joanne Munos Janis Musgrave Marilyn Myers Michael Myers William Myers Douglas Myrland Janice Nance Charles Nelson Mark Nelson Jim Neveu Nat Nez Patricia Ng Vernon Ng Don Nichols Gus Nichols Karen Nitka Rodney Nix Susan Nordell Vernon Norman Helen North Paul Ochoa Edgardo Olaiz Christy Olesek Michael Opinsky Robert Opitz Loida Orines Daniel Ornelas Joe Ornelas Mike Ornelas Virner Ornelas Will Ortega Michael Osuna Stephanie Oyer Brian Pace Michael Pace Phyllis Pace Luis Padilla David Paintner Greg Pallack Milton Palmer Nancy Pancrazi Tommie Parker Lee Parks Estanislao Payan Wayne Pease Bill Penny Mario Perez Patricia Perez Dean Perkins Bill Phelps Patricia Phillips John Phillips Jol Eli Til Vif Tir Jul Bill Fra Bet Bill Mc Cal FH Pat SIC Val Kat Alf Arn Her Els: Ma Ricl Mic Deb Jeff Leo Frau Sidi Ang Ger, Dav Ricl Ed l Clitl And Joh: Mik Aug Jean J ohr Oliv COIII Han Lind Mar Lym Ten Bob Ferr Fred Jerrg Edit Albc Eugn Gan Juai Katl Can D011 Ron Abr: Rafi Ray Bria Joh Rutii Dav Kay Wer Kam gon m John War Shar Pant John Phipps Elizabeth Piceno Timothy Pieplow Vicki Pinkus Tim Pittman Juleanne Pitts Beth Plowman Bill Poe Bill Pogue Francine Pogue Mona Pool Catherine Prairie Frank Preciado Pat Quandel Stephen Quick Valerie Quintero Kathi Quost Alfonso Ramirez Arnold Ramirez Herbert Ramirez Elsa Ramirez Maria Ramirez Richard Rankin Michael Rasberry Debra Rathbun Jeffry Rau Leon Raybourne Frank Reed Sidney Reed Angharad Rees Geraldine Reeves David Reynolds Rick Richards Ed Richmond Clifford Rice Andrea Rico Johnny Rico Mike Riggs Augustus Riley Jeanne Riley John Riley Olivia Robinson Concepcion Robles Harry Rockwood Linda Rockwood Maria Rodgriguez Lynn Rogers Terri Rohrer Bob Rojas Fernando Rosas Frederick Ross Jerry Rowlett Edite Rube Albert Ruiz Eugene Ruiz Gary Rush Juanf 4 Rush Kathe 'ne Russell Cary Russell Dorothy Ryan Roselene Salas Abram Sanchez Rafael Sanchez Raymand Sanchez Brian Saunders John Savino Ruth Schmoker David Schnack Kay Schulz Werner Schulz Karen Schwark Donald Scott Ernestina Sedillo John Segret Warren Seiz Sharon Sekula Pam Self Rick Sellers Richard Setterbo Martin Sewell Stanley Shadle Jane Shaver Geraldine Shaw Daniel Shea Morgan Shelledy Dena Shelton Gordon Shoemake Randy Shouse Philip Sibley Mike Siefarth Pat Siefarth Marcos Silva Ronnie Simms Joe Sizemore Betty Smith Donald Smith Dorothy Smith Douglas Smith Rhoda-Cheral Smith Therese Smith Gegory Soczyk John Soderberg Chuck Spear Glenda Spikes Lydia Starr Diane Steinbeigle Dean Stevens Patti Stewart Mary Stinson Melvin Stokes Bill Stone Larry Stowell John Stricklin Michael Strom Ralph Strom Cecil Swift Dwain Talley Alfred Tatro Brenda Tavares Michael Taylor Robert Taylor Robert Taylor A Vera Telford Wendell Telford Elizabeth Tello Francisco Tervel Steve Tewahongyoma Gary Thacker Cherri Thieme John Thompson Leonard Thompson Bernard Tipton Terry Tomasch George Towkins David Tomlinson Froylan Torres Theodore Torres Virginia Torres Dwight Tribby Shirley Troustine Arnold Trujillo William Truman Robert Turk Doyn Turner John Turner Suzy Turner Irene Twa Jeannie Uentillie Rod Underhill Arthur Urtuzuastegui Martha Uruchurtu J aine Valdez Valentine Valdez Sergio Valencia Henry Vanenzuela Linda Vance Joe Vasquez Marty Vasquez Craig Vaughan David Vegadavidy Robert Velasco Daniel Vice Jesse Vindiola Ray Vogel Nancy Voigt Debbie Vos Peter Vos W Susan Wagner Marie Lena Wakamatzu David Wallace Jane Walters Joseph Warren John Warrington Lucinda Waseta Kelly Watkins James Watson James Watson Charles Weaver Jeanne Weaver Inez Webster Kathryn Weeks Linda Weeks Butch Weidenbach Margaret Weiler Gail Welsh George White John White John Wick Jon Wicks Larry Wiles Clifford Williams Gordon Williams Greg Williams Randal Williams Sheila Williams Larry Willis Linwood Wilson John Wingate Roger Winn Kathy Wirt Tsuyako Wold Richard Wolf Terri Wolf Corey Wolfe Ella Wong Scott Wong Sue Woon Phil Wright Mike Wuertemburg Pat Wuertemburg Y Suzanne Yavorsky Z Adrian Zavala Mary Zavala Rachael Zavala Michael Zeller Charles Zigler George Zins index .,1 , 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 A 1 V 1 . 1' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . f1 1 I 1 I 1 1 - 1 1 1 ,1 1 1 f ' 1 1 1 , 1 1 J X , 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 -' 1 1 1 1 ,1 '1 1 1 1 1 X 1 1' 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 . f , X f 1 K . f x 1 1 X 1 I f 1 1 1 1 1 . 11 1 things. b El Matador: Because Leo is more of your aggressive person. He is supposed to be a dominate person while the Pisces is more of your dreamer, your thinker. And I had you as a Pisces. Ahearn: Can a Leo be practical? El Matador: Yes, very much so, to extremes. Ahearn: You see, I have recently started to raise my own cow, grow my own cucumbers and gather eggs from my own chickens. I hope to be self-contained, you know. El Matador: Are you very much into growing you own food or do you want to be self-sufficient? Ahearn: Not 100 per cent. I am going to do this. Not everything. I am too practical to spend all my time grow- ing corn when I can buy 10 ears for a dollar. I am going to grow fun things right now: watermelons, squash, pick- les, tomatoes, and later on I will get a few more things goingg but I have to work. I donit have that much time. I have to work making dollars to pay this thing Chousej off. But I like to do this. I drink fresh milk from the cow's tits. Not our own cow, but there is a lady down the road that has a cow where we can get our two or three gallons a day. Also, we eat our own fresh meat. El Matador: From your own cattle? Ahearn: I raise about 15 a year. So, I eat about three a year, and I sell about three to my brother, and one here and one there. It is not a money-making thing really, it is fung I come out even. I know there is no unnecessary hormones in the meat and the same with the chickens. They just eat regular chicken feed and they give you nice big eggs andI don't worry about cholestrol. But, this is a Mecca out here. El Matador: Thank you, Mr. Ahearn. Ahearn: Thank You. E . I V X X X ' 1 1 f X . V i A V I X X. X N! 4 1 E l i ' I 1 I 1 I I' 31 4 li ,Q 9 5 3 ! 1 ' A 1 , A 1 ' . ' . e fm 1 - f f I , X f I . .ali I X I ' f 1' 1 lv f.,- Q, n - . 1 , , . , F 1 N X' ' r rf f Z i E ! i i I N. ,w ll V 55 ix f X , N fy if X X N f Q: Q Ahearn: No, they have always been there. The New- man Club has been there. The students Desert Rat Club of the LDS Church has been there. There are two new ones, the Christian Science club, which began last year. I think one or two people are involved. The clubs are very small. The Mishpucha club is a very small group. There is another one, Matadors for Christ. -I probably should not say this. If they knew what matadors ment, they might not use it to describe their club. It trans- lates out killers for Christ. , El Matador: Matador means killer? Ahearn: Yes, if they only knew what it meant. It is a fundamentalists group. The groups are all small, though. I don't think any of them exceed ten. They might have 20 on the roster. I might be wrong. I think it is the efforts of one or two adults pushing these groups. This is not significant in my opnion. El Matador: What is your opinion about the swing toward unitarianism in recent years? Ahearn: The Unitarian Universalist is a combination of two groups. They are the most liberal semi-organized group in the country. They have more meetings than church services on Sundays. This is a tendency. The word free thinker was used in the last century but that has bad connotations. El Matador: So does Unitarian Universalist? It used to be the heathens, the pagans, the Quakers, and the Uni- tarians all equated together. Ahearn: Right. And also with a trend towards the Unitarian Universalist. They are growing. They are a tolerant group of people. I have met with them. I have talked with them a few times at their little meeting hall in the old LDS Church. They are most tolerant. You can take any stand you want and no one is going to beat you up for it. What you believe is what you believe. We are not here to make you believe what we believe be- cause everyone of us believes something different or maybe we have no beliefs. El Matador: That's right. They are still searching, arenit they? Ahearn: They are looking. Also they are searching and they are using reason. El Matador: Do they have a Bible as such? Ahearn: No. They do, however, recognize the Bible as being a good book, but they also see as good books the Bhogavad Gita, I Ching, Tao Te China, Rig Vedas, and.the Analects of Confucius. They are looking for truth. And damn it, what is the truth? We are all looking for the truth. Plato says, "I don't know what the truth is, but I know what it is not.-'S He said also "that after 50 years of teaching, I do not know what it is." I do not know what it is either. El Matador: Do you think students today feel that being outside of the church is knowing what the truth is? Ahearn: Yes, but they are honest. They say, "I donit know. I am confused." I was brought up this way. I had to go to this church, this synagogue, or this temple. I want to think for myself. I don't think they did the job and I have to find out for myself. El Matador: What part in this change does the Com- parative Religions class have? Ahearn: We tend to give it a philosophical approach. I mean it is a philosophy course. The most we can do in there is study Hinduism, Buddhism, the religions of China, Judism, Christianity, and Islam. The most we can do is attempt to get a good sniff at the basic philosophies of these religions and behind any of these religions is a basic philosophy. What did the founder intend for those who were going to follow this religion? As with Buddha, just living in peace with each other. The kids today have nothing on Buddha. They are all saying the same thing as Buddha. Don't hurt anybody, donit wound anybody, their feelings, their bodies, just live in peace and love one another. Christ said the same thing. Zoroaster said the same thing. El Matador: There are so many different religions ,in the world. How can we pick the right one? Ahearn: Do you have to pick? El Matador: For salvation-sake, according to the Christian Church, yes. Salvation, preaches the Christ- ian Church, is not going to hell and not being damned. Ahearn: Do you know that the Christian Church is the only church that teaches a hell? The Jews do not have a hell. The Moslems do not have a hell, the Bud- dhas have no hell, the Chinese have no hell, and the Indians, have no hell. Only the Christians teach a hell. They do so because of Plato and Augustine. El Matador: Well, how did the Christians get a hell and the rest none? After all, they all did come from the central religion? Ahearn: Well, there were several concepts that came out of Hinduism. The concept of trinity, the m.other, God, and concept of salvation, but no concept of eternal damnation. There was a temporary delay in getting into nirvana, but not of perpetual, you know, you can't get in. It began with the Manicheans back in the second cent- UTY A.D. They were attempting to explain Christianity and thing Allgl ury. usin .0 tl Arisl Arist good priso was the ' but . totle avail tures beca bacle who Aug hang E have Ai El as w A wou basil in tl chia be tt E. esta valu mar A by l que: him mor talk our keel for be ' 70-3 fter do :hat 'uth onit y. I le. I job OHI- ach. lo in s of I can mhies is a hose dha, have ,hing '0dy, love said ns ,in . the hrist- med. Ch is J 1'l0t Bud- 1 th6 hell. 1 11 the came gtllefi ternal Vg lllto get in- l cent' and they were utilizing Paul, who utilized Plato. You know, Paul had a hell of a lot of problems with his sexual life. For Paul, this was something bad, some- thing bad about things that made you feel good. And Augustine latched on to this notion in the fourth cent- ury. He used Plato to help teach Christianity. He was using the language of Plato to help teach Christianity to the pagans, the non-Christians. Aristotle was lost. Aristotle taught a very wholesome outlook in man. Aristotle said man was good, essentially good, basically good. Plato said, no, man is bad: manis soul was in a prison. This sounds like basic Christianity. Man's soul was stuck in his body and it will go back to the land of the blessed someday. Augustine taught the same thing but Augustine said no, man is basically good, but Aris- totle got lost. His writings got lost and the only .writings available for Augustine to fall back on besides the Scrip- tures, were the writings of Plato. And he utilized Plato becaused he was talking to people with a Hellenistic background, a great background. So, therefore, the whole Western world's attitude towards sex is based on Augustanism and Platinism. This is why we have our hang-ups and if it makes you feel good, it is bad. El Matador: Does that mean that Easterners don't have similar hang-ups? Ahearn: No. They don't have the hang-ups thatwe do. El Matador: They wouldn't see a psychiatrist as much as we do if they could afford it? Ahearn: Ideally speaking, all things being equal, they would not need psychiatrists if they are following 'the basic tendencies of their beliefs in their attitudes and ln their feelings. No, Augustine is responsible for psy- chiatrists and psychologists kneel down and say, 'fthanks be to G0d for Augstine and Plato." El Matador: So you believe that each person should establish their own moral judgment, their own moral valueys and ethics to live by and in so doing he is a better man. Ahearn: He does this not by himself, but by living, by bging With people, by pursuing wisdom, by asking QIICSUOHS and by questioning answers. Sure he does this himself. Even manfs conscience is the ultimate norm of moralilk but we donit get it by ourselves. We get it by talking with people. We read, we think, we scrounge Eur minds, and we scrounge other people's minds. We eep flskmg- We spend our whole lives as we search f0f wisdom. What is a wise man? Can an 18-year-old ge WISC? No. He can be in pursuit of wisdom. Can a 0-year-old man be wise? Not necessarily. He is still inthe pursuit of wisdom. But it is the interaction, talking with people that is important. You can't sitdown and read books, and read books, and read books and be wise: take tests and be wise: go to school and be wise, you have got to live. Of course, we get into the area of social involvement, our responsibility to be involved with other human beings. This is where we get wisdom. If you are talking about goodness, this is where we be- come good, happy. El Matador: According to John Locke in "A Social Contractf' man came together to form a good life. Just to form a good life so that everyone could live and be happy. He expressed the individual. Isnit that really what a lot of people are doing today? We are affected by Locke, such as, ideas, in our Constitution. Isn't this what religion is forcing people to do? Not coming together but retracting so that they can save themselves similar to what you are ,doing .herethomejf You are retreating out here, sort of like commuting with nature instead of staying in the city. In essence, you are getting away from everything. Isn't this why communes are building up, to bring out the individualness in the individual? Ahearn: Okay. Your question is rather involved. But this is a commune. Any group of people living together is a community. My wife is here and six children and there is another on the way. That is pretty good for seven months of marriage. El Matador: That is very good. Ahearn: I am a very powerful man. El Matador: Fast. Ahearn: This was an accident. I did not plan to have this many people living here. It was an accident. When I bought this house, I did' not 'know Martha CAhearn's wifej. El Matador: You bought this home then for yourself? Ahearn: Oh yes, I didn't have any specific plans. I figured it would work into something. No specific plans. It just happened. I like to be with people, and I like to be with myself. I love myself. I am very fond of myself. D El Matador: But not to the extent of pushing your- self on other people? Ahearn: No. If you don't love yourself, you can't love other people. l El Matador: Just out of curiosity, what astrological sign do you belong to? Ahearn: Leo. El Matador: I thought you WCTC 21 Pisces. Ahearn: You see- I don,t go along with any of these El Matador: Mr. Ahearn, do you consider yourself first as an educator or philosopher working here at Western? Ahearn: Neither one. A combination of both or per- haps more of a guide. El Matador: A guide for whom? Ahearn: You see, I don't like the word educator. An educator is one who leads-who leads people. I would rather be one who is considered more of a guide. That word has so many connotations it scares a lot of peo- ple. A philosopher, strictly speaking, is one who is looking for wisdom or more precise, one who wants to be happy. I think that has been my purpose in being here. I feel that it is to try to show people how to be happy. If you are happy, that is it. If you are not happy, you have blown it, you have shot it, hang it up. i El Matador: Do you discuss your moral values during class lectures? Ahearn: I don't think too many of the students know exactly what I stand for. You use the word moral: I really use the word moral for religion and use the word ethics for those in the philosophy classes. We talk about human conduct. We throw out a few cases, a few principles, and we see what type of reactions we get. We utilize essays from contemporary writers, and get the students to react to these and to interact among themselves. El Matador: You really then don't point out your personal moral values in class? Ahearn: No. I will not tell them what is right and what is wrong. This is for them to decide. I get them in- terested in the problem. Everybody has to take a stand on just about everything. I have my own stand. Many of them have no stand, or if they do, they change from one day to the next. I think they have to take a stand on their own principles. They must come up with principles. We can't operate without principles, and they must select their own. El Matador: Much has been written and said about the moral decay of todayis youth and the direction they are traveling. Is it really moral decay or just the trend today? And, what is the direction oftoday's youth? Ahearn: I think that young people today are just more honest. I think that they really want to know what makes me happy, how can I be happy, what things do I do to be happy. Everyone wants to be happy, but they are being honest about it. Maybe they are experimenting a little more. But I think they are more honest than this do-bee generation. They are going to make more mis- takes. In fact, I am leery of the person who doesn't make mistakes because he or she isn't doing anything. They, however, are not morally decadent. It may seem that way because they are far more honest. There is more dishonesty and immorality that goes on behind closed doors in businesses, politics, but there are many good things too that go on in these enterprises. El Matador: Many of today's Roman Catholic priests are labelled as radicals. That is, they are mixing religion with controversial situations, such as, the Vietnam war, celibacy and abortion. What purpose do these so-called radical priests serve? Ahearn: What do you mean by radical? El Matador: Perhaps the word controversial priests is better. As an example, the Berrigan Brothers, do they serve a purpose in the church? Ahearn: In the constitutionalized church, nog but in the church that is the people, yes. El Matador: What purpose do they serve? Ahearn: Well, they are serving as witnesses to the principles that they stand for today. These are the mar- tyrs of today as far as they are concerned. They are Isaiah, Jeremiah, and John the Baptist. El Matador: Controversial questions of this severity are causing a split in the church, are they not? Ahearn: No. I think it is causing people to think a little bit more, and the people who donit like what is going on, then they can leave. They can leave the in- stitutional church and still be members of the church, which incidentally, is just a German word for a gather- ing of people for a common goal. El Matador: Aren't there more and more people leav- ing organized religion and joining a more free-thinking type of religion or more modernistic religion? Ahearn: I am positive. I am convinced this is evident. El Matador: Why is that? Why the switch? Ahearn: Because institutions are failing them. People are looking for freedom but in the past, and this is really Eric Fromls stand in his book, "Escape from Freedom," people have always wanted freedom in the past, but in looking for freedom, they have attached themselves to things that make them secure: unions, big organizations, big institutionalized churches. They find that being in- volved in these institutions, organizations, and churches they have sold themselves. They have given up their free- dom for security. So today, people are leaving these organizations because they want to be free. We can see this in businessmen who leave big jobs. Men, who be- cause of their principles, will come out and make it. Take a stand on something, lose their jobs because they P Y' wa me l are abt fre Gr to v for rel 4 hey, that Vl0l'C osed :God iests gion war, illed iests they it in the mar- aiah, erity nk a at is e in- irch, ther- leav- ,king dent. itch? r:0Dle eally omf, ut in 55 to ionS, in- ches free' these Ill See J be' - tllei' want to be free. We want to be free men, instead of secure men. El Matador: Do you think, however, that the masses are really seeking security and not freedom? Ahearn: The masses. Wow. Gee. You are talking about everybody. I want to be free and you want to be free. David wants to be free and Scott wants to be free. Groups of people don't want to be free, individuals want to be free, 8f0l1ps of people want to be secure. El Matador: Where are today's young people going fOr. this freedom, if they are not going to institutionalized religion? Ahearn: They are going out on their own. They are making decisions for themselves. Some of them are cruel and hard and they are suffering. But I also think they are going to make mistakes. In the long run, how- ever, they are going to be a better human being when they finally find themselves. El Matador: What about those returning to the Old Eastern ways of living and the Hare Krishna movement in order to obtain freedom? Ahearn: It is an attempt to find themselves, but I think they are going to be disillusioned because all of these movements began in the East, in India, in North India, and China. The goal of these philosophies is to flow back into a oneness, into a nirvana thus losing your identity. So they are making a mistake here. Many of them are finding this out. You are going to lose your identity. Thus they are confused with the Western way of living, which is an Aristotelian way of life, so they are going to the East. But, when they find out what is really over there, this is the Eastern philosophy, they are going to come back and say, "thank God I am a Western," be- cause we have a goal and we are going to be individuals, we are going to be a person. Over there, the goal is not to be a person, not to be an individual. El Matador: The Eastern way oflife is so much slower. It is more tranquil than the Western way of life. If you ask an Easterner, "When are you going to get the boat done?" their reply is "It will get done when it gets done, not before and not afterf' The Western way of life re- quires a specific answer. "It will be done by 8 o'clock tomorrow morning? We run on time, and they are just existing. That is one of the reasons why the Westerners can't cope with this or can't relate to it so well. Ahearn: Yes, a simple yes. They are not concerned with it. We live in the tomorrow. This is our big mistake. The Western way of living is not the perfect way of life. We are not living for three o'clock, we are living for six oiclock, or the weekend, or Thanksgiving or Exodus. Some of us are living for the end of the year, for gradu- ation, for marriage, for retirement. Even today, young people think about retirement for security. We don't enjoy this beautiful moment right now. It is a beautiful moment-birds, bees, flowers. This is the moment we enjoyg not next week. Hell, next week will never get here because we will be thinking about the week after that. You know, it is the present moment that we must look for. El Matador: Presently there are five religion clubs on campus this year. Was it always like this or have they just become more active all of a sudden? John himself argue ti hurts h teachers cator b enthusil in life raising before no pers dergart experie How hearn 1 underst to do. life is so El IN membe Scott X view w portant C John James Ahearn, professor of philosophy, sees himself as a guide first and a teacher second. But few will argue that his choice as a guide as his primary vocation hurts his teaching abilities in the least. An enthusiastic teacher, Ahearn feels that the more experience an edu- cator brings to the classroom, the greater his students, enthusiasm will be for the subject. He feels experience in life is paramount, even if that experience includes raising cows, chickens and horses. "We need to know life before we teach it," is Ahearn's philosophy and he feels no person can have lived life by going to school from kin- dergarten through the doctorate level without having experienced anything else. How a person goes about living life to its fullest A- hearn did not say. But he feels living life centers around understanding people and that is what a guide attempts to do. Ahearn is a novelty in today's complex world: his life is simple, yet challenging, basic, but full. El Matador editor-in-chief Michael Starrett and staff member David Schuman along with staff photographer Scott Wong talked with Ahearn last October in an inter- view where he shared what he feels to be the more im- portant sides of a person. Professionally, the native-born Chicagoan has been at Western since 1968. He came to AWC when he re- signed from the priesthood after six years of pastoral service. The 44-year-old Ahearn has taught on the junior high level in parochial schools in Arizona and New Mexico. Ahearn, a licensed pilot and a veteran of the Air Force, teaches philosophy and comparative religions here. Last school year he was honored as the 1970 homecoming dedicatee. He also serves as director of the board for Awareness House, an anti-drug effort in Yuma, is a member of Somerton Rotary and El Toro Foundation. To Ahearn, teaching involves becoming a complete human being before all else. In no way does he feel it must include bearing the label "professor." As he con- siders himself a guide first and a teacher second, he also feels that a teacher should be a human being experiencing as much of life as possible first and a teacher second. This interview was conducted on his ranch-style home near Somerton on the front lawn with birds chirping, cows grazing nearby, an occasional neighing from a horse, and the pitter patter of life-children at play. Novelty: A rt 0fEffective Living An interview with John James Ahearn L0 H1 i HCS 1 f f s ny -5 . Q , .V , . ,, N or , 1' ew , yy X amxgkxk g ,-M-s-.wgffy Q , 'X ' -.wwf JMS 2 - x ' iwfbgij' V Vg, ' f , ' Q Q X V yf -M.: wrsfw NX , , ' 'John Galloway throws a pot 'Concentrated biology study .ljji 1 flI.'.AZC"l'-'Ag Y .f,. .x , A-...,.,. , ,V d Energ , moods, is life on X 2' fa- I' Harold Anderson sharing experience mv' Yi X wffiml "'01l0'1Illlll0ln , sf A .8 x - l ig! L sd' Q 5 aw A Q s A . ' s X 5 N X S-XXX Q ,A , e ua -- . . ...U N. L L are X if 'r 27' , ,f Q iw V, , - ff i in , faces, involvement K Arizona Western's Campus fwja S 75X KW fx W f f L e Q A X .f f ,, e ,M f ff Q ff Yff 1 iw XX X X x 'gf-,H , , ,W ,, Y A YA Y , V - : - , - , - f x L. x , r P f n L f 1 Ill l. 5 av Y 4 L, 1 ff ,MW f ' Wfwv wx X X Nwffmw- 'QQYWQXX ffxdkw wkxxx Nwmxx WN NM KNWMQNN x S ax was A cr fa 1 "Q!ff 1 W f,,4' 9 if ,, 4 ,Q N K .2 , .,u.'zf , x:"I2: :xg 5 . aux' ' gf 1, ,.-'L , bv, 0:91. , f- :1,afAg"4.1 . ' .iw ,,L.V.m .,5, .,,,p,w.L4." 'Hia ??Q' QPF, 'V read!! . wvyv , wf' 5 ? +1-'RSL' 1 fs,-V 5 Rf T354-H1 . -'frfm 'Mu ever wear ou dong suck O lmm W O denc UH I 0 X an ID HCXQ N or .Z ' ,fi El Sh El Sh y El fr? Sh El 51 tialb i 2 A 3 El u ' ' h f 1 tu' N Q1 I m I' th. A 1 n a sunny day.. the birds are chirping and the bees are buzzing. The sun is out and shining, and it feels good to be alive. A sort of laziness surrounds the cam- pus and everyone is affected. Spring fever overcomes the student body and immediately the campus comes to life. All head for the outdoors, where the air isn't stale from ciga- rette smoke, and where the wide open spaces allow free- dom of movement. Through- out the campus, one can find students decked out on the grass, sleeping or talking or maybe even studying. When spring starts raising its flowery head, all react to it, and all love it. Spring has touched ourlife. ,ttt , , ,W w,v,. H I ii, ll 1 Q 1 f , ff? LS Y? l l 3,4 Us 'gf ,x Q jg: fax , S e 5? , ,' -3. f. 'ffl' 'QR' I i ' is ,.,.-v" l ,,,r3 ps E ,M,4 ,yay AMX Mfhn 1 'Qi di f n e556 p,ag Lava ., V ,Ffa .WWW ff. Two unidentified Western students CFAR LEFTJ enjoy the spring weath- er during a break between classes. Several students rest on the grass lawn outside the LA building QFAR LEFTJ while others make use of the bench in the background. QABOVEJ Many students wait under the shade of the trees behind the Administra- tion building until class starts. Toni Goss QRIGHTJ chats with a friend before continuing with her class load for the day CLEFTJ. thoughts 5 2 thoughts mf 8 'N Qi x Q9 .9 6, - Oh say can you 3-Ds? 0 3 UM QUCQ' f C111 yousee. .. or breathe. . . or live? we e f mQ"1'S"' we V, ' ,af N' Q ref X , , N, A ,A . 4 ' y'iM,ixV.,Q'..f,z: f " V 4 ,.,. qw' s ,g,1,ggm....::::.2i:::"'2x 'ft -...U ' ' "'u. '1'!,:p. ........,. ., , yv ,, .. El Matador: Throughout your lecture yOU Spoke In generalities and you were vague at times. Why do yOU use so many generalities? Gregory: Like what? n El Matador: For instance, the numbers you cited. You kept using the statistic 98 per cent this, 98 per cent that quite a bit. Where do you get your figures? Gregory: You mean 98 per cent of everybody Wh0 drinks alcohol in America started out drinking milk? El Matador: Yes. Where do you get the 98 per cent statistic from? Your alcohol-milk parallel is used quite a bit, you know. 166 Gregory: I said 99 per cent. Documented evidence. That was in Newsweek -magazine. Anybody can get that. Let me say that in this interview, I hope the things that you didn't read don't have to make mine vague generalities. El Matador: No, sir, except that your repeated refer- ' ences to these statistics made us wonder where you had obtained your information. " Gregory: It was 78 percent of all the drivers that get killed from drunken driving: if you listened to my speech, it was 98 once, 99 once, 78 once. Third highest cause of death in this country comes from sclerosis of the liver. The first highest cause comes from cancer, second comes from heart trouble. These are facts anybody can get, if you expose yourselfto them. El Matador: Do you think that the black man will ever become socially equal to the white man? Gregory: Definitely. El Matador: Why do you say so? Gregory: It,s heading that way now because we are -not going to permit anything else other than that. He could keep me unsocially equal here as long as I per- mitted it. Once I stop permitting it, it is over. El Matador: The white man has a role to play in this because he is part of the total population. What role -'does the white man exactly have in getting the black man to be equal to the white man? Does he have a role or is .it just the black acting alone? Gregory: He has a role as he wants it, but we've no- 'ticed that he wrote the Constitution, not us. And it seems like we are the ones that have to implement it. Itis just like if you depend on me to feed you to the extent that you get to believing that if I don't feedyou, you can't eat. And then one day when you decide that if I don't feed you, you gonna go on out there and get your own food, then I realize that I ain't got nothing to do with con- trolling if you gonna starve to death or not. The only -way I can control that is when I can make you believe that your livelihood and 'everything depends on me. -'And once you decide that it don't, itis a different ball game. And if for some reason I change my attitude to- ward you, once I realize if you don't have to depend on me for survival. And that's what seems to be happening in this country today. But when we rally behind our blackness, there is more integration in this country in the last six months under Dick Nixon than in any of the Democratic Administrations not because of Dick Nixon, but in spite of Dick Nixon. And what's happening in this country today is because of my attitude. For a hun- dred years we have been depending on white folks to do it. Because when I flex my muscles, it's when his attitude changes. His white police never stopped them from lynching me. And so consequently, the whites can play 5 terrific role in this country. You know, they can get it over night. Not just for us but for everybody in the country who hasn't got this Cequalityj. El Matador: The white man is obviously afraid that if he lets you have the freedom that you're entitled to, he 'will not be in the same position that he was before. I-Iow do you overcome this apparent fear the white man has? Gregory: That's the way Nature works. El Matador: Yes, but how do you overcome it? Gregory: You don't.That's a condition and the price he has to pay for that condition. You see, this is the only white man in the history of man that fell in love with his skin. Every white man in the world will tell you I'm an Irishman, I'm an Englishman, I'm an Italian. But in this country, the cat say he a white man. Look where he came from, he wasn't nothing but a tramp. He wasnit nothing but a jailbird, a criminal when he came here. Kicked him out of all of Europe and he came here to settle. He had nothing going for him so he reached back and got us. And the only reason he had his head together was because he had a nigger. And now when he ain't got no more niggers, man he really in trouble. That's what his thing is. And so consequently what is happening now is we can't worry about his fears anymore. Because I see how he acted with his fears. I see what he did to the lunch counter, I see what he did to the buses, and so what is happening in this country for a hundred years we've been busy worrying about his attitude. Why and how is this going to affect Martha? Instead of wondering about how do it affect me? And that's the way it's going from here on end. How do it affect me? If it had been different when I tried to work with him hand in hand: if he could have dealt with us, come on brother let's talk about it. He don't want to, so now I got to worry about my thing. I got to worry about them black folks in the ghettos, that's dying six years younger than white folks in this country. I got to worry about the infant mortality rate in this country, which is twice as high in the black communities as it is in the white community. For every one white baby that dies in childbirth, therels two black babies that die. I can't even worry about his fwhite manj fears. The highest suicide rate of any race of people in this country is the Indian. The Indians start committing suicide at SIX years old. That's what I'm worried about, not white man's fears. I'm worried about the conditions that create .these monsters. And so. consequently, you know, I think "':":1:.'"f1gf,11arWZ.T"f'g-W:.::,-yr-5'-L-L fp-ya-7'-1-9 , , ,V . . , Q 7 Q :fw-'--'..-.txztzixx23'-'ll-i7l!r:rl7::::!iEif5?2'iell1.2'.ar1:-:ly-like-:La.4z:..tir..--.grew.....f:..: -.:...:'g:- .. .i ., , I . 2,4 .. ' ,val-'-1-rrn.7r --'.,"TiWW . I A 1 , . , ,, mfy in ' of the Nixon, ling in 3 hun- 5 to do lllilllde l from lI'l play fin get lIl the that if IO, he 2. How tn has? : price is the n love :ll you talian. Look Lramp. len he :came so he le had ,d now tlly in uently 5 fears zars. I did to gfy for ut his artha? ? And f do it t work ith us, mt tO, worry ng six gOt to rllfltfyfa ts it 15 ,Y that lt die. s. The Ountry :ide at White create jrhivk 1.1 ., 1 s L v I 0 I J I 5 1. J.- Diek Gregory lecture February 23, 1972 ....:g-g,,g- L :'sQtz'4sLffsQf3S5z5ggb,f' 55.133-F' Ufrv?f'?EfH+Tif? if' ? 555 . -v Q, v . 4 Q. if-4.i'. I' -. ua Lf: .Linn 1 , L P ' ' 'Lil 334' ,L ' 1 .. ' "noun 4 "' 4 Y I 'I?"'f. 0 Jfuia ' " " ' ' ' L' ' It's like black folks in the south. One day we looked around and say man, 10,000 black folks turn the corner and the cats cut two dogs loose on us and we run. Come tomorrow we not going to run. That dog ain't gonna eat but about two folks after 10 people, his jaws get tired. Sheriff cut them two dogs loose, man, when we didn't run, you should have seen them dogs run back and jump on the sheriff's lap. But the fear of getting bitten is in your head. And the fear of jails, there's not each jails to put people in, once we start getting not scared of jail. They show you a jail, they show you jail movies all your life. See cats in dungeons, cats getting beat. You know that's to plant their thing, and once that thing don't work, there is trouble. They don't know how to act. Washington, D.C. white kids really lay something over the police. There ain't never hit nobody with a billy club. And when they get ready to draw the billy club back, there's a white kid stick his head under so he can get his lick. Ain't never had that happen to him. He canlt get that billy club back fast enough before the cat stuck his head under there. Cause when they pull his billy club up and shoot tear gas man, they use to running. The Democratic Convention, they got through shooting this tear gas and when they ran out of tear gas, there was still a wave of kids coming at lem. Tell 'em about the whole world looking. They couldn't comprehend that, at all. And so I would say definitely there is a tremendous change in attitude that you can see. El Matador: All this you talk about is for the better? Gregory: Yes. Definitely. El Matador:You say there will be a problem when all these kids get their heads together. The problem will be. . . Gregory: Throughout the system. El Matador: How do you define the black revolution? Gregory: First let me tell you what revolution is. Revo- lution is controlled by Nature, not by man. Revolution is nothing but an extension of evolution. Evolution which is the gradual naturalistic change after long periods of time, leading to revolution, which is quick change. That's what is happening in the black community today. The evolution leading to revolution. It's like the woman who gets pregnant, the first nine months is evolution, and when the water bag breaks, it's revolution. And when that happens ain't nobody holding it. You find a woman nine months pregnant and get all the National Guards- men on the face of this earth and keep her legs crossed and keep the baby in her. It's the forces of Nature that man can't deal with that at all. El Matador: Is the black revolution going to be a vio- lent one, or is it going to be a vocal one? Gregory:Well, that depends. Like the woman having the baby. If she can have it right, it'll be a peaceful one, but if the National Guard crosses her legs, it'll be a vio- lent one. But Nature don't deal in terms of that. She deals in terms of situations and whichever one you deal with, she comes out. It's quite natural to be violent white lfolks, but put a nigger in the Army and they teach them how to throw hand grenades and go all over the world shooting folks. And then they ask if Ilm gonna misuse you, I ain't gonna teach you to use the bazooka. And if I do, I got to be out of my mind. All them niggers gonna go over there to Vietnam, throwing dynamite that's why they are shooting up all them white lieutenants over there. There ain't a man that stupid, cat go all the way to Vietnam and guaranteed a better form of life than his own mama got in America. You don't think he ainlt gonna come back into the same thing? All black leaders that's been sitting around talking about non-violence, we couldn't tell them black folks not to go to war cause if they didn't go, they we was communists and put them niggers in jail. So they went and learned how to kill good. Now, how can you turn it on and it off? Very Hard, very difficult to do. Very difficult for me to take you hunting and teach you how to shoot a bear and a deer and when I come home and attack you mommie, your wife, your loved ones, tell me you ain't gonna shoot me? I'm the one who taught you how to shoot. And if I'm stupid enough to know I,m gonna misue you, your wife, your family and your momma, and don't have enough wisdom not to teach you how to shoot, then there's something wrong with me. I El Matador: Do you think Shirley Chisholmfwill become the first black President? Gregory: Shirley ain't running for President. Have you heard her before the press? Shels running across the country to take a coalition into the Democratic Con- vention and be able to manipulate them votes. That's what she's running for. She says it 24 hours a day. She wants to get in the position to be able to say we want a black vice president, we want to put an Indian head of the public of interior. You see what happens in this country is black folks vote 98 per cent Democrat. Now we ainlt never voted no other way but that since the Depression. So when the Democrats get their little bag of tricks together they don't even have to come to us. And what she is saying is she wants to go into that con- vention saying you ain't got them Qvotesj this time. Now you gotta pass me to get to them if you want them. What's your defense budget? 55 million dollars. We want 20 per cent of that for the black community. That's what she talking about. Which means more than talking about the Presidency. Cause what she's saying is that shels going to that convention and negotiate for the oppressed people of this country. Which is very very here. Cause she donlt have no influence on the Republi- can Party because she's a Democrat. She not gonna be at the Republican Convention, she gonna be at the Democratic Convention. And she'll walk up and sayl got X amount of delegates that I will deliver to you. Now you tell me what you gonna give me? And with that, that's very important. El Matador: Thank you, Mr. Gregory. Gregory: Thank you. more fears. fears ing ir? see St go to- he ill tator. that. that J El the lJ Gr El your wast Gr that': El of yo Gr want UY Y trial had on ii 'tappl causl you knov the I can'1 ferer not 1 know ftele And El lectt G E. you G E attit pret G E you G It's lool talk ting Whc The hite lem Jrld suse .d if nna why wer way han .in't lers ice, tuse rem kill 'ery ake d a nie, loot d if our .ave hen will you the fon- at's She nt a I of this slow the bag I US- con- Slow lem. We nat's killg that thC ver ubll- a be the I got Now that, Y more and more he,s beginning to rid himself of these fears. I think the only way for him to rid himself ofthese fears now is for me to move into the society like we mov- ing into it now: to where can he turn on the television and see something other than the Amos and Andy show or go to the stores and see Buela and Aunt Jamima. Now he turns on television set and see a black news commen- tator, a black cat doing this, the black woman doing that. It kinda relieves those fears of them, but you know that young kid coming up ain't got those fears anyway. El Matador: What you are saying is once I understand the black man then my fears are automatically gone? Gregory: Automatically gone. El Matador: You have charged the FBI with taping your telephone. How did you know that your telephone was tapped? Gregory: How do I know? I bought the tapes back, thatis how I knew. El Matador: You mean the FBI actually sold the tapes of your telephone recording back to you? Gregory: You can buy anything in this country you want to buy. You can get any information in this coun- try you want to buy. Didn't you see in the Chicago Seven trial they came in court and proved that they CFBIJ had tapped their phone? Did you see in the trial going on in Harrisburg, Pa., they got proof that they CFBIH tapped the phone? You can get anything you want be- cause we keep all our records. If you got enough money, you can buy it back. That ainlt no problem, but you know when your phonels tapped, if you have been using the phones. I can pick up this phone and talk on it. You can't tell when your phonels tapped. There is no dif- ference between a phone that's tapped and when itls not tapped. And when itls your phone, you be sure you know. There are a million ways. I know. I owed them ftelephone companyj 536,000 and didnlt pay the bill. And they wouldn't cut my phone off. El Matador: How long have you been on the concert- lecture series circuit? Gregory: Five years. El Matador: When you started out five years ago were you more militant then than you are now? Gregory: About the same. El Matador: Then you really haven't changed your attitude to much over the past five years? You have kept pretty much the same? Gregory: No. I was honest then and I'm honest now. El Matador: Have you seen any changes in attitudes of your audiences over the past five years? Gregory: Every six months you see a drastic change. It's unbelievable. Unbelievable. Every six months. I look at a kid this year that's getting it to himself. You talk about how quiet it is on the coast, every kid is get- ting it to himself to try andfind out who he is. Baby, when he finds that out, boy, this country is in trouble. That is where he is going within himself. There is more people talking about eating better today. The one thing you can go to the bank and get is a million dollar loan to open a chain of health food stores cause they know that's gonna make it when everything else has failed. And the awareness, you look at the books that young people are reading today. They're very interesting. If you go to a library and check the books that young kids reading on college campuses 20 years ago, compared to the books that were read 15 years ago: compared to the books that they are reading now. You see where the changes are coming. The literature thing is altogether different. There's more social books now. At one time, man, the hottest books kids read on college campuses was the Three Musketeers and all that kinda stuff. These days are over. All of it is social stuff: look at all the so- cial books that comes off the press everyday in this coun- try. They're selling. It's totally unbelievable. I would see a tremendous difference but you can see that difference every six months. It shifted after what happened at Kent University. Tremendous shift. After Kent University, it became very interesting. Before Kent there was about twenty-nine 525,000 or better acts for college campuses, and after Kent, there's only three 525,000 acts. I mean the social thing shifted that bad that that trick just don't gomno more, So I defenitely see a tremendous change. ROTC enrollment is down across this country 53 per cent. There comes a time when a young kid wouldn't dare come to college without joining ROTC. That was his guarantee to get through four years. He don't care now. What do I need to join ROTC for, he asks. I ainlt going anyway. So what you gonna do? Put me in jail? You know what is happening in this country? So many people went to jail they stopped drafting folks. You now they haven't been drafting nobody, don't you know? You know why? Five out of every six people in the last 12 years has gone to the federal penitentiary because of draft resistance. Five out of every six. So they stopped drafting. That's what the games all about. When that thing gets to shifting, man, it gets to shifting where it can't be dealt with, they jump up and wanta make you believe that, ah, we not gonna draft nobody for six months. That ain't what it is man. They know that half the people they run through ain't going. It wasnlt bad when a lot of them was splitting to Canada, but you got a lot of them that ain't even splitting to Canada no more. They say, man,I'm not going. Period. You know, here's wherellive and anytime you want me, I know a lot of cats, man, go down to the draft they no sooner get their induction notice. Cat says, go down to the draft board man, they number so high, they wouldnlt get drafted anyway. They go down say, man, look Ijust want you to know I ain't going. They going out of their way to go on record, man. Say I'm not going. We've never been able to deal with this cause we've always had a penal sys- tem stood up where yould be scared ofjail. You stop getting scared of jail, then they can't use it no more. l L, 'VF x 1 i E , . ii ,i Q 5 'w ick Gregory who bills himself as a soldier in a war against hate and bigotry appeared on the Arizona Western cam pus Feb 23rd as the headllner for this year s Concert 8: Lecture Series The Civil Rights and black power advocate and some times comedian spoke to a standing room only crowd in the Little Theatre for more than two hours With an almost evangelical delivery reminiscent of the late Dr Martin Luther King Gregory decrled the fear that he feels is destroymg America. His unspoken message that night was that people are afraid of what they don't understand, and not understanding is a sickness that is weakening America Brmg moral honesty back to the system, he asked of his young audience who interrupted him more than a dozen times with applause. "You must make sacrifices for America to bring moral honesty," he said "Any country that says 'Let the buyer beware' instead of 'Let the seller be honest,' there's gotta be something wrong." ' Throughout his lecture, the 39-year-old Gregory, who has been on a much publicized fast since April 24, 1971, voiced his opposition to violence, alcohol, drugs, underpaying law enforcement officers, hatred and corruption. Hatred is a sickness and understanding yourself and others is a medicine, he said. . Gregory showed forth with bursts of energy uncommon of a person who has lost more than 189 pounds in a fast that will continue until the Vietnam war is ended. Fruit juices have been his only nutrition. A daily jog of 20 miles is his only formal exercise and' weekly medical checkups have allowed him to continue his speaking engagements at colleges and universities. Gregory, physically and mentally exhausted at the end of his speech, met with El Matador editor4in-chief Michael Star- rett, associate editor David Schuman, staff member Audrey Barrett and college staff photographer Paul Miller in an exclusive interview. During t-he interview, the tired Gregory drank three glasses of orange juice filled with crushed ice. The underlying tone of his speech and interview emerged as a message of freedom and equality-for the entire human race, and that today's youth must be the ones to bring America back to morally stable and sound ground because - - A ' f' A Y 'ss ' - V ' -' A' ' . ,, . 1 9 , , 9 ' . ' , , ' - . - ' . . ' - - - E . . ' 3 . n U 9 I . 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