Archbishop Mitty High School - Excalibur Yearbook (San Jose, CA)

 - Class of 1971

Page 1 of 142

 

Archbishop Mitty High School - Excalibur Yearbook (San Jose, CA) online yearbook collection, 1971 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 142 of the 1971 volume:

4 s .1 EXCalilm This is the 1971 Excalibur of Archbishop Mitty High School. This book was put together with the efforts of photographers Russ Hughes, Tom Chargin, Paul Landry, and editor Dale Gregersen. This book is not an all out attempt to glorify Mitty in every respect. Mitty has made mistakes, and the editors have also featured some of the school's problems on these pages in an attempt to produce a balanced yearbook. There is the traditional coverage of sports, which the teams deserve: a foot- ball squad coming from a dismal 1-9 record last year to a 7-3 record this year g undefeated winners of the Buchser basketball tournamentg one of the finest soccer teams in Northern Californiag a fine baseball teamg plus the hardy cross-country club--all are included. However, there is much more to Mitty than sports. Mitty has moved ahead in areas totally ignored by other high schools. Mitty is not merely four walls and a roof designed to imprison students for a few edu- cational hours each day, it allows its students a much freer and more realis- tic atmosphere on campus than do most high schools. School seems more like an extension of everyday living with the adoption of the open campus policy and the creation of co-ed classes. Students also make up their own class schedules, 2 and by exercising this right are assuming the responsibility expected of them. The new school standards have produced a spirit of change and progress about campus. Students and teachers alike are putting their own ideas into practice-- such as the S. S.P. workersg the off-beat, song filled Sunday massg the expand- ed Guidance and Counseling programg plus the ever-present spontaneous frisbee matches, poker games, and snowball fights that crop up. It is mostly in these zany and spontaneous escapades which occur on and off campus that students witness the feeling that life is worth living and that there is something worth living for. Most yearbooks, especially high school yearbooks, are given to high-blown sentiment, purple prose filled with exultant corn whose ooze drowns the truth and obscures the vision. Annual publications at best attempt the impossible-- to capture life AND to preserve it. This book, like Mitty l-ligh School, is a little bit of every person who put it together, both may be summed up in this line by e. e. cummings: "Life, for eternal us is now, and now is much too busy being a little more than everything. " John Waters Jr. N 'I f 4 3 S . Q, we -4 -sa Ame.. Sf 1 ,,w.. ww- . f 1-Q A , -11.1, 'Y' .- --J8' 5' f vi 'Y -Q - M -.mf .W ,,, -JKNJC, ' x J Q.. . 'Q . 3- as, L... ,N ., "' QQ .4 Qyffy "' 'Q 3 . M. ,+V ,M s Nr . , """19 .3 . k Q. Q N ,4 ,SJ-L,.f' A A ff v5.5 xi AW ' .sesgyff P ' :K if-99?-. 1 ' 1 if g.A,fs.?,-k 4 .. l. A 7... Q p ,5 vu.- NSVQS rf 1 S ,Q 1"'u9k 'iff' Y w.f'!' is Nm., uu- - vu Xs' "EN--5-7' J. ,S ' .. v. '- -1, V H. .X,...,1x ,Erik Y0 . M5 uf. -N-5 . Q X 1 "' -"'r"' 0-.,:c ' .,, 4 .V , , 4, ,, Ag, 'W 'Q.1.vx,9Q', "1 K -Am J"1 1? N Wifi n, ' n ,qw W , 3- Qs I fe Y K f " w Q . -I Q- ' V . a M... yn ..rX -Z, .- , V., P YF 1-', 1 'jx ., A ' ' f., , .3 ' :lain :L - . 4 V X A x ' -"L IVY j C 1 Xi F-1 tai! V rf A ' -wg ' . w. ,gf X x , A Z1 " '. 4'-'.vf. X -til? as 1 .v wv si". f'E"1F4f" 4 yr x 1 o sa, X lkiv-Nr nw "'f S. G f,w"l'4,x..-r L nw 'RWE Q 4r.:,i5m-,f' JW' f s v divx. .x gt me ,nxnxict A ' s."""':' '-'15M?"f'Q' . Q, . fm, Nc., "QA, 'Q'-QB. x s 'ix 1 Chf'?f..ffi' 'V afY'Nm",a'X kJ"s,,gxv.l.Q ,Y 1 THE MAGIC BUS You come and go from school in a variety of ways, ways which will probably persevere in how you go and come from work later in life. The following excerpt from the writing of john Fowles raises one of those vital questions we all are being bombarded with: How about You and the World you move through? Almost all nature education based on the know-what approach is bad, for what goes with it is the notion that everyone ought to get an identification interest in natural history. Of course, if we did all become keen naturalists that would solve all our - problems. But if anything is certain about the real situation, it is that many people are never going to be very interested in nature either as science or as a hobby for showing off a cleverness with names. In- deed, as they have less and less contact with nature in our overpopulated world, they are very probably going to be less and less interested in it. What has to be done is to get this vast and growing army of the indifferent to see nature as a daily pleasure of the civilized life. It doesn't have to be named, or studied, or hunted, it just has to ,W fn fn ,Q SCHOOL Bus Q, i T 'l". Q' E .t.-,- f r 3. i r l k lrif f t,,,,2,g.T..3,,:',,i e l ' l E hpwr p i... .pun . ,gp pg, M - ,, ef" j In Xnganwk: . L - - 11 i :ff si .fa A-5 ,,,- ,. ,.,s,,.....,...-..........i., i...,....,. . ,.......,.,..,....,-..,............ KE ' a is 'TL jim Joe Bob Tim Kevin Tracy Blarney Borges Bower Brashe ar Bridgeman BFOWH evi K , ,,. if , - B 3 In f , a l a B fi 1 . Brad Burnett X X if s R N' ,lf x! . E. L! sh .uf ,..,-.vs ,. . ,.,,. ...,.......,.... ....... W...,..w. .-, .. WW... ,e.....,.,. ..n...,,...N 3 ,.. V...-N' 4, 041 ,,, Lam es 2 -mwpww 1 L... S - i ' 4 .P- HIGH H I guuuuiuln Z gaussian!! limi IREISIKY im' D an Butler s AQ as Tony Dennis Calleja Calmes 5 ev ,g e ae e ? ., Q l, e Lee Campbell 1' X i F Steve C ardona .P ff? jim Enrique Casebolt Castaneda x ' . A e e Q if , . ai. 'V e I BY TRUCK OR AUTO r-ann, Q is via 'L l ...- 1 ,Q W s be there. And they have to be taught to miss it if it isn't there, the Way they would miss electricity or the water supply if that were cut off. The kind of seeing that this requiresis much more esthetic and imaginative than scien- tific. So for a start I should like to see the scientific element in our school-teaching about nature severe ly reduced and its place taken by study of the attitudes and vision of the many great painters, poets and writers who have treated the subject. They are who we need most to copy and to learn from, not the scientists. You can always tell the man who wants to experience na- ture from the one playing at scientist. The former will have granted equality to the whole scene, both in terms of the various families of natural life and in terms of the statistical commonness and rarity of what he is seeing. He won't, in short, be blind to all but his own field. He will know that he has to observe with both the eye of the flea and the eye of the elephant, as the Indian proverb goes. We all see too much with a human eye and to a human scale. He will see the moth's uncurled proboscis and the ancient glacier bed, the smallest and the largest, and all in one glance. He will see forms, colors, structures, see personal, artistic and literary allusions, see whole poetries where the, pseudo-scientist sees only names and matter for notes. One of the curses of our times is that this poetic approach has come to be ridiculed as something rather romantic. It is true that without any scientific check, such an atdtude can lead into the turgid bayous of nature-corner sentiment or to the equally nauseating anthropomorphic scripts of the Disney nature films and the kind of com- mentary one hears at Marineland. If such cheap sentimentality were the only alter- native to the scientific approach to nature, jim . Joe Tom Bart Bill C2S1igDaI11 Cesario Ciolino Clanton Clarke . . . .st , xp i -it ' l 'ff V " . ' f 3 ' A ff ' -' - 'Y J. - .' 3 L Lmqb X f' f'.hisf!4' Steve Connelly s t 1 Mike Corica. at Y as Jon Costella :ik is .-ag J .sa ' . 75 ....--.-.. .. , t . , a r 'Q ' gsgvgr ,Q rising: ? 4 - , i-ar. K., Q lp.: L' ft .Lf d A ,. , .Q t ,,,- Ka . .. , . 5 K iv l . "' f f:'rt'f3gsff W .,., "N S'-St. l7'I-- " A - 5 . X X m f - Hog, :ASQ A .,. ...L . t X.-L ., s, K ' ' '. A -Qi, 2:1 X . 1 Q A .,.,....5., yt Y -- . a x 5 ,... gi . X . hs Q.. fbi V " A"T',f' xt: 3 R ' rift? F W 'Q i' fi. ' " .. fr"-'-' is M -M ' 'X' fmt A - 'T Q i "S :.'2'f,,?" s ' 'U ' 4' V i' ,-J' ' 39. t ' ' ..- X ' . .. .. .. ,k,. I K 'x ' - " w . -' f .I.:.a,'uu rvf '-'1 " ' . '1 ..f" s'-" V Bill Cotton N' J' . 1-yn-vs" I should be all for science. But there is no more need to see nature either sentimen- tally or scientifically than there is to see paintings, or listen to music, or enjoy a game or a sport in one of those two fixed manners. And here, perhaps, there is a stumbling block particular to the American mind, with its inbom pragmatism , its demand for some immediate utility in both the object and its pursuit, and its corollary as- sumption that the more facts you know about a thing the more there is likely to be in it for you. Europeans enjoy appearances. Americans enjoy things better if they know how they "work"--and of course knowing that involves knowing names. This obses- sion with labeling and functioning, and the corresponding impatience with the quieter pleasure of mere experiencing, is an aspect of what an American friend of mine once described to me as the single deepest fault of the national culture. He called it a lack of poetry, and then amplified the phrase by saying. "We try and turn everything into machinery." Over the years I have come to see this criticism as a clue to a great deal of what is unhappy in American socie- ty. This is not the place to discuss whether my friend is right in general. But I would choose "unpoet:ic" as probably the best word to des- cribe the prevailing attitude to natural life in the United States just as "poetic" best describes the great exceptions to that gen- eralization, the Audubons and the Thoreaus. Poetry, alas, is something you can't sell. All you can do is suggest thatit'is out there, if people will only ind the time and the right frame of mind and discover for them- selves that enjoyment does not require sci- entific knowledge. Myself, I regard nature very largely as Mark jeff Dave Tony Doug Coupens Cronin Crooks Crusco Denham t 1 x at ff- OR BY CYCLE therapy. It is where I go to get away from words, from people, from artificial things. It is affection and friendship, too, the re- currence, the return in the cycle of the year of certain flowers, beasts, birds and insects I am fond of. It is sounds. It is cur- lew on a winter's evening, as I lie in bed. It is the sparrows that chirp on my roof each morning. Above all it is the familiar nat- ural life that lives and breeds round my house--the kind of life any rarity-hunting naturalist would not even notice, it is so ordinary. But I have trained myself, partly through reading about Zen, partly through thinking on the texts ofsuch men as Thoreau, not to take anything in my thousand-times- walked-around garden as familiar. l'm not in the least a religious person, butl suppose the process is something like prayer. You have to work at it. I once told a Bene- dictine monk that prayer was incomprehen- sible to me. "Yes, "he said, "it was to me once. It becomes comprehensible only through endless repetition. " This, I am convinced, is what practical conservation needs behind it, or beneath it, if it is to work: a constantly repeated awareness of the mysterious other universe of nature in every civilized community. A love, or at least a toleration, of this other universe must reenter the urban ex- perience, must be accepted as the key gauge of a society's humanity, and we must be sure that the re-entry and the acceptance is a matter of personal, not public, respon- sibility. So much of our communal guilty conscience is taken up by the cruelty of man to man that the crime we are inflict- ing on nature is forgotten. Fortunately there seem to be many signs in the United States that this "lesser" crime against natural life at last is being recognized for what it is-- not the lesser crime at all, but the real source of many things we cite as the major mistakes of recent history. You may think there is very little connection between spraying insecticide over your flower-beds because everyone else in your street does over a Viet- the same and spraying napalm namese village because that's the way war is. But many more things than we know start in our own backyards. Social aggression starts there, and so does social tolerance. !""'A 'V V .W ' B 14 rw. y 1' Bob Mike Eric Vince john Di.Marco DiPietro Dippel Doherty Doirou D r:.:k i f K y ., .. K it 9 K , 4 .Qs K . Q A. ,Ng g V, gjfpfx f Qui pl, if Mike Dougherty 1 M v 5222 ...-fl ,ff Mark Drohman D ave Nature is an inalienable part of human na- ture. We can never blaspheme against it alone. Exterminate, and you shall be ex- terminated. Don't care, and one day, per- haps too late, you or your children will be made to care bitterly. Evolution holds no special brief, no elect place for man. It's only favorite is the species that keeps the options open. The nightmare of our cen- tury is that so many of man's options are closing on him. A main reason for this is that the individual increasingly lets society and its label-words usurp his own role and responsibility. We all know that we have to get things right between ourselves and the other forms of life on this crowded planet. What we don't or won't, know is that the getting right cannot be left to govemment, to the people who are paid to care. I make no apology for saying it again. Conserva- tion can never be someone else caring. It is you caring. Now. ,wx - .- - " s- , :N , 5qw1g,, pn, n M Q U I f-X 'Tr .V-. N is aff. a... l. .9 'aiufx-Q .xsgfifr Q 2.1, " , of ...J 75- nip :ti . fy, ,f l -f e r l -s is iq. Z., V' . . ' , !, ,,T'l: , nf' if fi ref' 4. " ifiz'-gif-n Sh f 7 . -Eg jfzagwfx- ,X , 3. Q ,gig f pg r if 156 p X Ci'4"s. 51.1. 1- , , X - X s 7 .lx Q x v' XX sh A 5 .f,f.f,i'v'f '- W' ggi,-,v.a Q, ,nykt N 'T . kr .-me fw ng -' . .ff 1.51 2 ' f-'1'.i'2?'f.. . 1' " fs' '-:W'f'i"P 'fri-'- ' l if f 1 - ' . "ig I g 0 ,. ,J A K .. E ,.1:..'.,. -at M Q-yy t xg 1 p X , sa r .A :yu its,-J',..,Ti 'YR i - Q Q. AFIA-.'k'd:,41:1j X " 7 Q75 Q' '5g?vi-.Ll5" -f..,,f,.,.- W """3 'Mt ,' fa if was , s rssasas A nuff! . QQVL L t A tax ,' h h 2 ,bqwixxgl if' Av . xi: t Q, 'Wk N , 1 p R- I X N. If'-5' st 'W W 'WSIS-I-' vifg flfrfw as we , 't N X x f ' 3 g ' .. f - it -1f 'm',' f- sg ,Q N , g a .a 2 Q, 5. J. , -A .,. 4, N Y 1. sk K , k 5 3 E K mc' Y , -,. l L-, J N3 by bi www- ., Q 2 xx V if f H 'vas ' :'ff'A i' : W , ti X 3. J,-4 92. a l . ff t, if -A . 'i' fl.i5"".'?1 ' s . n 'X ' ' Y ' vw " V K' tff lff lf' J Q-1 933' rr wr 1 I ,,m:Qf"i g f-f -ws ' . 'Yan D r straw Kata -:ff my s..-35" ff Rick Bd Dru ley Dutra Eag le W .Q- ix . K- . 1' - E11 its 'f r r Bob Terry Bri an Phi lip Edmounds Egan Elgin Emerson - .1-s x wr' X ,, t' d s s a . fx ' 1 CROSS COUNTRY Alfred Marty L31-ry Enright Espino Euley ' 'f'g.dx , - vw ' :KM P A 3 'Q' P1 ' . , - . if 1 W David Evans L ., 2 F fwfjf W5 Q 4 2' .. jeff Evans f fi if ,i s Sak - 2,6 R x, Marty F anciullo 'iv '55 QL .3 V .Ji Robert Farrell 'E . f .QAALQ .f,. ,S Hg. PN ,ll , It 1 , . "We went once around the field and then along a half-mile drive of elms, being cheered all the way, and I seemed to feel I was in the lead as we went out by the gate and into the lane, though I wasn't interested enough to find out. The course was marked by splashes of whitewash gleaming on gateposts and trunks and stiles and stones, and a boy with a waterbottle and bandage-box stood every half-mile waiting for those that dropped out or fainted. Over the first stile, without trying, I was still nearly in the lead but oneg and if any of you want tips about running, never be in a hurry, and never let any of the other runners know you are in a hurry, and never let any of the other runners lmow you are in a hurry even if you are. You can always overtake on long-distance running without letting the others smell the hurry in you, and when you've used your craft like this to reach the two or three up front then you can do a big dash later that puts everybody else's hurry in the shade because you've not had to make haste up until then. I ran to a steady jog-trot rhythm, and soon it was so smooth that I forgot I was running, and I was hardly able to know that my legs were lifting and falling and my arms going in and out, and my lungs didn't seem to be working at all, and my heart stopped that wicked thumping I always get at the beginning of a run. Because you see I never race at all, I just run, and somehow I know that ifl forget I'm racing and only jog-trot along until I don't know I'm running I always win the race. . . and I wonder if I'm the only one in the running business with this system of forgetting that I'm running because I'm too busy thinking. . . I trotted on along the edge of a field bordered by the sunken lane, smelling green grass and honeysuckle, and I felt as though I came from a long line of whippets trained to run on two legs. . . and I could just see the corner of the fenced-up copse in front where the only manl had to pass to win the race was going all out to gain the half-way mark. Then he turned into a tongue of trees and bushes where I couldn't see him anyinore, and I couldn't see anybody, and I knew what the loneliness of the long-distance runner running across country felt like, realizing that as far as I was concerned this feeling was the only honesty and re alness there was in the world and I knowing it would be no different ever, no matter what I feld at odd times, and no matter what anybody else tried to tell me. It was hard to understand, and all I knew was that you had to run, run, run, without knowing why you were running, but on you went through fields you didn't understand and into woods that made you afraid, over hills without knowing you'd been up and down, and shooting across streams that would have cut the heart out of you had you fallen into them. And the winning post was no end to it, even though crowds might be cheering you in, because Steve David Doug Dan Dave Mike Barry Feeley Ferrari Ferrari Ferree Ferriera Feulner Ferro Q I A ., ae: . g l at as jp X Q i f-1? ,I , I 14 s 5 I. afff 'I 1 i I . I L., 2 f I 4,a-- "' 5 A , , e V . 1 si ki 55 : I, on you had to go before you got your breath back, and the only time you stopped really was when you tripped r over a tree trunk and broke your neck or fell into a VV ' disused well and stayed dead in the darkness forever. . " rs--'W - r g. 2 2 ,, 4.2z-,,15'if , 1 , dd" ' g , "q5? ' I've just come up out of the sunken lane, kneed and V if f' . QV, Q ' eV 1 - '1 " f l ddlfie Vp elbowed, thumped and bramble-scratched, and the ra 'N' 1 W f id ' 4" if Q-' I Vt is two-thirds over, and a voice is going like a wireless . A .F M' ' in my mind saying that when you've had enough of fe V V ra V V5 V,,L A ':,i W ,V H good like the first man on earth of a frosty morning, : , Q -VA h,rr fy ' i F you've known how it is to be taken bad like the last n Q r , . on earth on a summer's after- noon, then you get at last to being like the only man on e and don't give a bogger about either good or bad, but just gg Q 11-ot on with your slippers slap V '- - E W 'K good dry soil that at least wo1 :Q I V 'Q never do you a bad tLu'n. Now 5 1 f the words are like coming from iii' , Q ix a crystal-set that's broken dow ag and something's happening in: the shell-case of my guts that bothers me and I don't know w though or what to blame it on, a grinding near my ticker as as X ,if 1 f N David Ed James Terry jay Tim Martin Filice Finkas Fisher Fitzpatrick Fucci Gairaud Garcia I P FE . Vi . i g I V 'V A i W V, ., V.: V VVV, i f Q5 - .VVV. 5- V N ' 'Q Lr,, 1 ii ',- . ' f W 1 W i ' .E V I 3 E i in X Q es, -"ft W LM,,mf-ff? .Ms fQ we r I A . rs -sy .W . . I 'yr A X wanna 4, - . - ,ag ,An K s , .. .4 , fu, - Apgrii QR K , I he W A or ii . , s ' hh ' Y -. , Q, .I I , ,sy 1, f Sfffig I A rg- I I fg,.M,gs- I . I- . ' ' 11: -K.. i sw we ' .1 I www .- :- I I I I L . ,Q A - .V ' ,E Y., I gp .?.w,31'f'f4f- I 'X I 4 I I I -me I. stays was wk.-4i'f"5' si .f , ' WX, .M A' nw .!. ' and v I .aa-Alu! ESKKM 34 :Q ,. sw- ' ' ag! N gjfss gyifk A-is Y I Q V uf M-Q it 'N J ' . ' Q 1 A .. A sy , 4' as lf 'E l .Q , vw , JW - sr Q. i .. ,aw I - ,-,i ,L ,,-,--nw if H - I X 1- a A 1 'L Q f "" O -X 5 t EN mx.: I 5, A . ,V V 1,gU Q - J 1 2 E. xr., I - -r - - of v' f ' .Ja -. -'fiifa - , ' .. , X -- we X . ss --a n dp ,. e X, M- A Q - M .X 3, Q ..- vw 7 0 i , nf., i,.:..- V K 3 4 W ' 'J' 1- A, .. M , +4x"4.k-'V' for worry. " 'Y 1 Ja.. 4 of rusty screws is loose inside me and I shake up every time I trot forward. Now and again my rhythm to feel my left shoulder-blade by a right hand across my chest as if to rub the away that has somehow got stuck there. But I it's nothing to bother about, that more likely it's by too much thinking that now and again I "The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runne1"'-- Alan Sillitoe - . I, 4. 'f' Is, ,JY- . ,gt Brent Steve Larry Cassian Gattuccio Gerst Ginestra Goodpasture Q :M'5""I,. .V we 5 R. ll'- ,Y , new-r I Jim Goosen N -nr' Q Brian Gregory 'ww Paul Gre nier ' 48' xi so , - rr tt ' Cross- Country running isn't all loneliness however. Some- times there's a crowd. And there's the bus ride to the meet. And the occasional blonde walking her dog. Scream- ing parents. Screaming coaches. Screaming muscles. You don't have the student body there to cheer you - and you tell yourself it doesn't matter. It doesn't. qQ Chris Griggs . 1 K uv-' fl A Q. I' ' 4 H.-xt-"v"N' .. , Scott Kelley Allen Pat Guadan Guasticci Gurrols Haniger ' v. f ,, ,.-5' ,,,. ,. -.. wp,4 , . , al f A . ,N f a .f,.3 . . ..,.1z y ,--L Q. , .P, .W . , v ,klfil 1 ak, r-f - +-, 45- Y '-.M ' 'wer'-' "J V .-t' ? ,, ,- v.,m s m .v'f -- :.-1 , . " ' . 4 .' . . -..--- '. va' ' '- .J , 5 .' -of-2' fc .. V ,. fr 'ay ' ff.-aff .QV ar -' ', , .,.3,',' -.1 VA.. Q. --'W mfg mfr.-. 'L -"' i ,.,..,- 4 J, --. - . .X 1. K ni , 1 -..gg r, Ne' Qs' S- A .... , Q R.. -S A wN.s, , ...wb M . A , M- - f sgryvgy -" -3 4 Andrew Hansen . iq' g ! If K It ' A ." 5 9 ,,, I iv 1 wi n k k -Ag.-,gg V -' ,FW Li . F -, in ...lt-Mfr' . s ...:." . Q t ,.' .-fvoj,X' f.. ,ea , -as Ib Dave Harlow 5 'iff ' r .av 1 WA J..- - Q pf' 'A if F ,,,.s.0Aln-rw -"K" Ate is g 'Y r xY1..g'x'f .1 .4 Ss Q 5' 'xx A .Rl 9 xi'-la, JI' -,352 xl' KL I ' x ' 9 .l k 4 Q xl , ' 1 , U , . 1 ,, A . g ,.- . , l. 4, e ea e N1 ,Ak A 4 4 Q : :I K: f , A 4: 'E' 6,60 I 2- " 4" L "5-...Q But you wish the rallies would do more than mention you as an afterthought. 1 Practice makes perfect, they say, but mostly it .41 l , 9 'l just makes you sick to your stomach. Sanchez falls ' X off Lead1ey'5 van and all you can do is laugh and 1:16 puke. A11 he een do is bleed. Up hill, up up hill. ., Down. Turn. And the knife in the lungs. Maybe I 'P Sillitoe was right. The Pain. Navarra, what ARE X , 155 you trying to prove? I guess we all, sometime or ,M X' another, go it alone. Maybe Sillitoe was right. -' 1. Alone. The pain. The knife in the lungs. I Guy Bill Mark Dan James Greg Lou Harris I-Iaunfelder Havstad Hernandez Hershman Higgins Howe 'P , V q V -A W ' ' ig lf r it y .1 - 4 1 G' 1 V'-ff KY'A:. 1 M ? g gg 1 vs ,1 1 'X 1 1'ii 1 . - 9 VARSITY FOOTBA L L .""sv The Monarch offense rushed for 243 yards with Mike Gill gain- ing 88, as the defense held MSI to a mere six yards. The Monarchs won. 25-0. Both Randy Strawn and Mike Gill scored a touchdown as Mitty crushed Mt. Pleasant 17-6. Mitty outran and outpassed their opponents, 239-72. The Monarchs' Randy Bartkowski isolated a Sheleman gained 23 halfback on our line- and 33 yards on two backer and the Buchser pass receptions, and Bruin beat a too confi- Mike I-Ong blocked a dent Mitty, 12-7, PAT, but Riordan dropped Mitty, 33- 7. Ed Struss capped a fantastic 76 yard drive with a 3 yard touchdown run, giving Mitty a 7-6 victory over St. Francis. 1 . -if Mike Steve Ed Joe Bill Dave Tom C111 Welch Struss Cimino Patterson Brown Fleischli 71, Q53 4,-.IQ 1' , 1 . .31 fill: A 'X is . Jil.-5 " , ...Y gfxgif - -ev - . -V A ' i 5 ui, 45 M51 ' ff, le -, 550, , - .qv W . . sgi lglrrt P .7 . v . , fn- A of. 2- N' 'l fi-Q Pi "k9wv', 'e'5'J.'-: 'g 'J' Y -in l Kr ' , A. 5 A, x N. ,,,. .Ju 5 V Av? Yifmvfxv liwtayg, Ylf,,gqQ": ski, fxgcfi. X' LiV!l.'A' Tj' if Sii.i.iw?ifCi'f'fT5W 1i.ss?rm,.,, :Q-as . YK-if S K t -J its +4 And then came the Bells: 14-14 at the half, but 46-20 at the gun A bad end to a good season. i'N5N:x'Q' X : Kohlman, Mitty's scorer and pass , made 1 touch- and Ed Struss ran 2 in a 28-15 win Mitty did it again-- this time a 28-12 win vs. Sacred Heart. Struss, Strawn, Smith and Patterson all scored, A I itat Randy Strawn blocked a Gill ran 134 yards, would-be-tying PAT Fleischli booted a 43 attempt and nailed their yard field goal, and QB to stifle a late S11-I Struss hit Konlman twice. drive, saving a 7-6 win Mitty won it in the over Serra, our fourth. while Fleischli made over San jose High. trenches, 16-14 over fotu' PATS. 5-1- - Glen Jack Randy Will Marc Rich Martin Smith Coupens Rajkovich Battaglia Picolini Rizio Sweeney f 'Q Ii - - 1 I Y.-Lrf: I ,-- -,fy ,Q YQ- ,L V W I Y h , :mb-f 3 i- 1 .5 A 1 'LVD 5-hi K3 -3'A,f"' l' Q5 ll V' 'Nb 3 i?l'IiJ?'75fv 'K in . Q---fm 7 -:ani , 4,11 v 'ff R 1 1.-151452, . 4+ ww V f 'l fa fe f- - f 1' -:fe ' .,. . , jrnx- rf R". 1, mf' , .f 3 L I 1 ,MZ in . gi' I Vmuin ' yx'Y Y 1. A xx! X ,ijt 5 ' 5 " .fav we. 1 ...Q ,J ws 1- . F -k""rvf --M"-"e . -fll:1.1.a-.l1,.. Q Y' ' 'J -'x-fiillvfi if .ltiilllkwkx LINEMEN . A r 1-am wa... , I ffihim -, fi ,fs,i:x'b,!"h"' 4.xm..+, , X, I M., Featured here are six of the Demonarch's people- crunching linemen. The not so little "Little Rhino" Mark Picolini, gained two berths on the all-le ague 2nd team. Rich Rizio, another hulk, was hurt in the Sacred Heart game, which curtailed his people-cm ing for the season. Mitty's league- leading scorer and a fantastice receiver - Pat Kohlman. Another a league member is Tom Nickel, the team captain during Smith's abscence. Randy Strawn, a good tackler, should be back for another "smashing" season. Colorful joe Conte, center, rounds out the team and keeps up their morale with his loony antics. Gary Mark Pat Randy Tom Arnold Fine Kohlm an Strawn Nickel ' f Ex .l-,.e Q' H , X 'wld .9 H2 i L t 5 fi fl O a iff- ',fii"" lfifxji Qi Q g A if ' .wg , N ' ,Ik vi 4 Mr. DeMonner K ,ff J 1 , g :Wipe P R' ' im f A' Hgh! 3563 QL, , Big, Dale Gregersen .,.-. l . LT 1' '1 - WI Q gh? fs? T .bb."'NNx. Q M ' 3:11 XT ,,-,- 1, t A l ' I, ., X' ' I I 7 e 1 x Bruce Mike Steve Mike Matt Paul Pat Trapani Dullea Masen Pena Campi Hathaway Scudero f 4 X e Q e 1 P A ,f eeee L Li!! 'e , .X ,e AL X ,H e X eh 1 ' U ,X X 1 w fm ' ef e 'K fin - f QMUQN 539 E ua A A R1 ff 15 55" rs ,W M iff' QW ' ex . -. .V X2-ve - e AM .K ' '1 75 fqg :Sw YY i' QQ, e,a11.g,fi-552, ww " fe ' K xJE1Ywq K X'Tf"'7bW , - , X e X W 'L -, J-- fm.. XL - Igyjim ,M 4.41 BACKS The mighty Mitty backfield turned the team on to seven victories. Here are some regulars: QB Ed Struss threw and ran for over 1500 yards. Tony Lupina did a fine job as punt returner. Punter Steve Welch averaged 29 yards per boot, while Tom Fleischli kicked for 24 points. Joe Cimino played sparingly but well. Averaging 3.8 yards per carry was Dave Brown. Mike Don jim Bill John Randy Tony Long Landry Tavtavo Gard Baggot Sheleman Bozzini 1 ll ' B y -1 dab' B' 2 12 vigrr Aix .4 1 , 1, A, 0,vL, ',+l55yaX iw: G95 I, V T '59 ' fp i 1 ifr ffl 1 Q. l' iw?-.JF JR TNF? 1 1 .6 .L - , H rf. ,.fRXsil Q33-f-N HQ A f Syl X Jw. -,ilrfxgmgb V - 5-4. t E ,.v THX: Writ y SC? ., 'I'-H " at .f.:s'ifA2v7N ,.fi,l'fX'era"gin ,u.M'Fve 1 -. -W T Only Bill Patterson could run for a TD with four "tacklers" on his back, as he did in the Sacred Heart game. Speedy Mike Gill ran for over 900 yards. of K: V' klv ' nfl X wfsrweg ' 'L 2155 X Mr- 4 .M Mr. Williams, Joe Art Tony Conte Ferraro Lupina d 3-Q. ll lf if Y . , 'LX I fi J K W Q f "' l iw- 35: Q'33f1955" . 3 11 A2-?y.' ll, 'lg ll ,-X3 Q' J K Pillar Z-is 'Q' xxx' li' 1 K fm J' X -2 with-Ei ml ,VA mf .fc 'WJ ,w-JZ gif ,JL H :'1M,,: IUEQR ln R IV- FROSI-I FOOTBA L L The freshman football te am skidded to a 1-5 record this year. Their lone victory was a 25-O rout of Sacred He art. Several factors determined the dis- ap ointing outcome of the season p . Though the team was spirited, it was Q a small squad and it lacked depth. The fierce competition in a strong league overwhelmed them. Pat Haniger, Pat Owens, Steve Blair, Lou Howe, Mike Taylor, and Don Schwartz are promising players coach Petronovich believes will be part of a fine varsity squad. ChriS Dan Bryan Stuart Robert Ray Carlo x Q.-,Q is KOh1m21'1 Krassowski Kudela Jaquez jindrich Jones Ittare z 3 i X 1 K' L, fx i A he 'N -ss? 'M' 'Y A 1 . 4 is U 5'5- f X f 8. X Q 4 A Q1 Q 1 we ,N ik .fit - 1 1 The jV's, with coaches Barry and Sinnot, wound up with a 1-9 record. The shortage of players hurtg some were on both offense and defense, eliminating the chance at in-depth training for specific positions. Players V. Brandalise, R. Kolegraff, A. Sturla, M. Garcia, C. Vellis, and G. VonRaesfe1d may be future varsity material. 1 james L Chris Stan Mike Doug Mike Bill Kissinger Kendall Luna Lopes Long Lombardi Lesar KN K km ,A , ,Q cu -Q Q N Q t , ss. p .tw X X I- x Lp A R X X 'A is f 'f ' Q :,. ' f '- rw ,L . ' 1 . 1 KX! ' es ,X ' th AND THEN THERE IS THE FOOD Sz CARDS 1 Randy Jeff John Mark Steve Gre gg Lafrom Landry Myers Lascola Lateur Lefferts . .i 3 M D . Sb- QTT see s TL. Mike Myslkinski r... i W , .gsx Q' Q I J l 4 'si N.-I Xsssmm- David Mike John George Mike Mark Terry Morin Morin Morley Mulcaive Muniz Munley Murry Q -Q rrMr M A "W M 499 656' SOME MINOR DETAILS Q ' ' . 'W H , ,Q .Q . .A rr N- 5 'S ff" , f ,ff fag, ,,. if QV 5 3 Y W - V 3 ,uf X i ' A- , if M54 , "J T ., . K 4+ 2 W -:M ' - - AS' 'y . Q a n y-. 5 1 ' . .e we ,,., .. . e K ., I 3 w k -- "N 6 ' .- A ' K A: bg, 5552 Nt . 5 K.. Q .lx + le wiG'r5P+5Sf'f fa-1 as 31 an ii: Larry Mikolich .LQ g we-. QWUL. f-4:-.-W-inQ-fi-gmgw V -Q wegwxmwm .Egg-Qi' 154.45-A Q f+. , S-SF' "" 'W ,,f : W ' ee 4 i ,:,,, 'e... -2-1 ..,, at 5 ' X e A 'ef' " en e Q 'n'i M ne Pz., n m , +i - ' in en Q 3 f X ee ennn A f "'E " '.,. A Qfai k ,. M hV A eee L ee -ige LQ? ,,,,,A n e - e ' e e n n e nnen l n nn e X' "'z? ' 0 e Dan MimMack Kelly Monahan Eddie Mnotie 1 fe Marty Mario Moreali Moreno gg f :,. I k -5 5:5 sg-. . 3 I wg., ' Q ,A ,N Qtw , A , . Q, p PM ei - ,, fb - Li 7 Q f" g. " Q ,1 if. 1 if J K M 51 . b V 3- L ,' g s gn -r -"X ' Q 5 S: t. jugs I , - K , - 1 . e fx? 5 A eene f- f . .,' 1 1' ' ,LIE 1 .. Q 1, , 5 ' eneen gn 2 Q.: T' -'51 ' :if?Q+2lvfga.3?Si5f,1Zi?5??if - ' 5 Kevin Morgan 'Q , eg 3 - 4 5 , -v' f Tw ,N wk. if ik 1+ ag I QL xmxbi .X 'Y 6' X' l'Ul'l' n . 5 N 1'x,L 'X -gow--'Q , , .m,,.,, IM. ...N . , ,I 36 EIIQI I Q4 S :'lil,llllf i I uw 1 ul I ,Q Q - gf: 2.-. - i ' 'K't ,,:' f .1 III .fa I L. I I I I lxl I I 1 flltilllllll 2 E Q I I I I I I Q , ai .M k fjgp ii V, ,s -V , hp- . Nqr: 5 1 11' Q fi,-TQ-fs Q Ka .--N x fqtf-'-.,Xk as Q Q5 .fwxykw xr nk: s I I Q Q I I O ' . I Brian Mike jim Garry Kevin Mike Mark McDonald McDoue11 McKenzie McLeod McWeeney Meek Messier V L l . 1- '..L 5 4 W . Q an ' We x v 9 e M ff , E' -2 X dx A if as kit! Q 9 o 4' 1- K. i SOUND MIND. . . Anth0I16y Jim Bob Mark Philip Mike Steve M9.1'!i11O Mantino Mathews McAdams MCC arthy MCC loskey Mcdermott if X "N e , 8 'F I if " 1 j- lf., E A D ,P S e x e f,,yv v ao OI' , 1 i ",,aoo ' 'o0oa Jim Nicholson . Sn ,gg Y jeff Nicoletta 62' .. I ,1 fa 1 Frank Martinez 4'- Q17 L A , X A 5 .. 5 fr . K "' Q 4 L' . . ,fl - b sl f g - f .. T- - 1 iiifiiixf i -f I . , -in if 9 A SOUND BODY :K , Mark POui0 Jeff NGISOI1 Danny Nelson Bob Naughten Gay N augle Miguel Ortega Sean Okane 11 ,B 5 e ee 94 .Q Lb' I X zj 2, "ij -L7L.,z 517 l. ' . ra -fa: . , ' i, A li' vi x r m.., . ' Rx f if 7 , S , 4 .1 4 4 ' My A ' , Y i . ' ' .Q - in , , A Q. an X ., 1- Jag? L X m ,NM Q m L 5: fig... .5 Q, - '-P ,- -- ' - L. :-' 1 , r--4.2 - 9, -- 'D 'fm f , . - , L .ii arf ,C -ii, nf db 7 I - sw ,sb W 1 ,a:,,,,,!,., K1 L -,Q-3' - Dx- -K-.-.....,... r , . ,L D j-.H 5 Q" Q ,,,.,-- ,,Q. . P , A V XL XA. , ,W 'Q i ' i gy f i ,L'L ' . 11 , Z- - " Iigf .,Q ' S, A 'Si L'9"x - - X I 1 x ' is:-. , - 5 'A n 'is x rv" Lf K X- 'mf k I 'K -,k'k V 'fi 'i ' EA' i k ' s f 4 - . ,-F - L. I M U Q img A I .k-i 1 - L F A - K . if 'P , 1' i K ' :f ly - - ' x' K u , g Gp, In A . +L in s Q x N A , Q ,L A xx 1, ' -. k f ,f -V.. ,147 A K A Q .sw In ww N MCA . K -E Q ' ., . .. 1 Xfgglz.-figqi M ,E ., YK ,,g.k,,, -5 ,,. S at 'S' "' N' - , W . - """"'!""' W ' X. , N5 af- - 1 1 Q -52: f:1 ,4,, W Mf' fmw- -- -1-. -- . -, . ' - Q Q. X 'WN' 4. 1 ' M f 'X Q -- .f , -'jf M' Y W .K - i -Q vi L:3.i,.,.'11.i. V, A - M-Z V4 ff V , - N' -- .MTA M " A I M'-1 1 , W A - - - 1 thoney Pattucci Mark Pizarek Martin Piper Manuel Pindrock Pat Perry jim Pavley Dave Rugani 'Rfb ir" we Q, . ,., N ,. , A . L- "LI - Q , Q A L -Q.. N gf- - 5-1- - -, 2' f-V? ' "Thu, MITTY PEOPLE 1 ecology nah! 1 ,Y f ,l , ' ff , Dave John Mark Ken Don Regalado Reges Riofrio Rivera Rice 3 m L X m f f - ' K A 2 ,J , f Wk 4 fi Q Bill Romasko f ig Nm 1' f . r 4 Tony Romo aw, "gag f. Pat Ransil 1 .Y fv- 'n.Y,'f"' --Ny' ,-fv. .Agn-fi-1 r 'ua -.' - ' ,A -, V. ,s,,, if ."5I..,1 h.1.f-I .ff-,',.'f ' -c , A ' 'tal K 'HQ' AJ. ...'-,."'f'1 -..r...'-f"'n. ' is JN- , . ,V M1 ,X X -, . K . at -,i X' - Y ,REF l......a'?W Steve Dave Carl Donald Scott Mike Rakich Rajkofvich Rabe Schwartz Schneider Schibler .- ' :ie 5, 4 e ' ,gf- 'gic ,,.,, e ' EI , ' 15 ' ' k l " ' DRAMA There have been athletic successes and failures, but Mitty theatre and music has always been of the finest quality. The Fall Season saw repertory perfor- mances of Arsenic and Old Lace and Tartuffe. The several bands somehow get better every year fthe '69-70 group finished third in five western states at Renojg music and Mitty have be- come synonymous. The following ar- ticle looks not at the well-known, but turns attention to a solid group of musicians working relatively indepen- dent of the Academically Established units. There are some things this country doesn't need any more of, comedians, construction engineers, and people who want to give their opinions about music. The shame of it all is that some people who really KNOW some- thing about music are never heard above the din of ill-informed disc- jockeys and newsmen who have be- come instant music critics by virtue of a local festivity. Of course if you sell a million records or catch the fancy of the right promoter, your opinions on music, revolution, philos- ophy, etc. will splash across the pages of ROLLING STONE, DOWN BEAT, or even TIME. or NEWSWEEK. Mitty's community of musicians who have worked independently to put their ideas into sound, have a wide spectrum of thoughts concerning music , what is its purpose, and where it's going. Most of the community's artisans are striving to attain an original sound, and some of them, when asked who influenced them took it as an insult, as though they were being asked who they were trying to copy. The "teen Bands" of the early 60s who tried to look and act as much like the Beatles or the Rolling Stones as possible just aren't around anymore. This is good, but a musician should know where his roots are, and be able to recog- nize his influences. John Coltrane al- ways credited Lester Young and Charlie Parker as being greatinfluences on his style. Leon Thomas, avante garde jazz sing er and drummer, goes even deeper into his roots and speaks of African music as being a very integralpart of his music. For "acid-rock" fanatics, there is not a whole lot to look for- ward tog it looks more and more as though jimi Hendrix took his music with him to the grave. But then no form of music ever really dies, its reign as a predominant music may pass, but it continues to influence other people as music itself continues to evolve. It may be as guitarist Dave Anderson put it, "Yeah, I still like that kind of stuff, but every- body's doing it and there's not much chance for a new band breaking into it," or it may be that music is a form of communication and there are other things to communicate -- like per- sonal thoughts, and new musical idea Steve Fanelli, Dan Dahlhauser, Paul Hathaway, and Brian Sheredy are David Joe Gregg Dan Michael 'Vice Shawn Sanford Salerno Sabatell Scudero Scutero Siquenla james 5 -rw 5: Q, ,' 4 , 5 ' W r ' .M 25 f ' ' wk I ,M . f N e t 1 -L. 1 . , -ya: V '. .J - Q 'X 1 Q r .air YW x Ny r Q ww Q W 9 kk J les iw ,J It A ,4 - as J 5,5 Q awk i l ii? it Q four Mitty muniors who have recently formed a band along with pianist Phyllis Pearson from Mother Butler. Steve, who has played for seven years Qmostly 12-string guitarj, sat on one of those plasticized benches in the Mitty foyer as he tried to explain in his low, soft-spoken voice where mu- sic is going and what its function is. "Music that was drug oriented, basi- cally started by the Beatles, is start- ing towards Christianity. Music is a form of communication, you can use music as a sort of tool to touch upon shadows of thought. " Leonard Cohen e Tom je ff Sipiora Smithers 31 .in and Mason Williams have been in- fluences on him. Later I found another member of their band, Dan Dalhauser. "l've had guitars around me since I was about eight. But I took my first lesson eight months ago, and I had my last lesson seven months ago. " He paused for a moment and pushed his shoulder-length, stringy black hair back over his ears, and continued, "l didn't improve at all during that time. I play for my own pleasure, which is why I can't play anything anybody else likes. " l asked him what else he played be- sides guitar. He said "I can play any- thing, butjustnotvery well, sometimes not at all. " Like Fanelli he couldn't say what his music would really sound like, but offered some ideas, "We play our own music the way it comes out, we let it flow together. Wc've decided not to decide what it will sound like . . . because we know our range of music is greater than we think . . . " Dave Anderson was probably best des- cribed by one Mitty student: "the Monster that never was. " He is tall, .p , . c,s'l5.,tli K Q- xr' " f, x T , Q4 'E X H 5 X S , . I I . . :QQ ' K A -av is A I I g Q . 0 S a.. 1 0 Q I Q 0 v- 4 , - M V Paul Tim Edward Bill Dominick Smith Smith Spence Sprugasci Stea gig 54 p .31 . uv' ,el ' 5 .,.- ' .. - un s . - + . 1 I .y b , o K -x.,,f-A' ...T Q SE! Dennis Brian Jim Kevin Mike Paul Mike Struth Sullivan Sullivan Sweeney Taylor Telles Tieman ea., lk ... ff ,Q 5 rat X thin, and has long brown hair that covers all but one thin strip of face. That which isn't covered by hair stares through steel-rimmed blue glasses, and smiles a lot when he's in a good mood. "Where is Rock going? ! where IS it going? . . . We're trying to McLaughlin and Harvey Mandel." porary jazz" explained the drummer with long hair as he sat across the play progressive rock, " he said of his group, Sweet Rush. "We're TRYING. I think that's the real direction, that's real muscianship . . . stuff like john I'm playing abstractjazz and contem- X X, QE llxgfkxxz .X 4 n s.g Michael Tierney Qc I Xu 3 W QRYUU1 table from me. "What I mean by that is total improvisation at a give pro- gression. " Mark Stanford started playing drums at eleven because he was "intrigued by African rhythmatics. " He has played with a ntunber of local rock groups and is now working with me in a band that as he puts it "has a variety of styles. Bob fGarcia, Mitt-y '70, now at SJSl is working with his stuff , I'm working with avante-garde, and I don't know what you're doing. " "What I want to do is play Black jazz, the term Black jan means the original foundation which so many people took and screwed . . . It would take a whole page to list all the people who have influenced meg I would say Philly jo jones and Cootie Williams." Of the state of music today, "I want the sound to mellow, the sound is mellowing from acid rock. "I like music because it me ans audio-emotion, it's the only art that can tamper with the inside and fluctuate the nervous system. " Bill Patterson is not you're typical idea of a musician. A solo folk gui- tarist-singer who "jams a lot with friends", he is NOT generally seen sitting in the hallways, guitar in hand, harp in mouth, holding im- promptu folk-blues sessions. Clean cut, broad shouldered, Bill is the varsity fullback-defensive end who helped lead Mitty's football team into the first division and al.most to a WCAL championship. He does look a lot like a cowboy though when he talks out of the side of his mouth, or when he grins and says, "really whaddya want to interview Con't. p. 45 4 L. 7' A' Wy' 'W M Ray Brien Andy Brady Tom Terry Townsend Torres Trevino Turner Vanderbosch Vane Nh- B :L 4' -74' T f'n I 'f 3 MR. ODDO .rib .W ,Q , da? F Fir: Q- , ' Q y " 'if f JSF, f ., 'gif 5, ' fl' gr ,LM 5 f gfnjfg xl? 4 .,u mf, gdgf ffjffii J .i c 36 'sf sk X N X 5 1 W L .w w X. ,, . ,. QW 'G ,M Q V' Bruce Wynn ,SN Lou Art joe Tim Andy Mark Valletta Van Overin White Wilkinson Williams Windeler qw by X ,Q -1, , 'Q 'W' 5 'W :" , ,n:' K , W4-ik LA D , W I Lk :kk if ...- Q ,ar 1 I In I Ken W all We AND TI-IE MUSICIANS iz rg x E L ,, ,J 3 Q-MQ' I , . Brian Bill Watt Weiner M 'Nw Q 4 . Q w . L L- : , : 3 , .rr . .sr 'N Q , Rf! 585 ., 1 L13 W' J ' ,"!7',:'l 1 - ver S- ,f S 'H - 1 x K Vl""N .1 'S W if Y' , .4-""x Doug Wells jim Whalen Mark Yandow if Chris Zanette A ,.: g K tiub ,Q K X A v PRACTICE Fred Tim Tim Ackerman Adams Allen e "Y W. . A f ,Q ei, e A ' x Eric Donald Anderson Arnold if-A 15' fi Q : :N:: , " in f.'57,f'jf1SAf K-:' - '. Q e,--,--. 2 A .6 jim Atwell g ww 'X Mike Azevedo , . R-' "1 3 if 3. M' ig I ee z t. ,ff I , wi .' '4,x L s ,f ' ' ' 45 ' 5 . Z' ' 9' A R ee ,yew ff ,ff ef 1 ' .. '- Deran Dennis Bacon Baldwin ' 7 if? K -.K .. if Robert Steve Osc ar Ban Baratta m Barragan K ik tx ,X f - .WI X P Q John Mike Bartz Bauer S' ee r L X. . ' 1K PERFORMANCE 'K 4-Q 5. -vJl"" Chris Mike john Be audoin Benton Birge o , H5 , - X. 2 " J K ' -W A ' K, o n Michael Bradford .Q Q-- 35" . f-sm, A... 'Q' f' .Yr - S ,. '4 2 133. 'E' Dave Vic Anthony Brady Brandaleis Brindis o Q Q an ,KS M x if fl. Sb g Rf f me for? . . . Folk music, Iplay it because I like it. I don't know, just enjoy playing it." He is not trying to copy a style either. He does not talk a lot about communi- cation, or self expression, he just plays it because it makes him feel good. Rick Costa is a musician whom I have a very strong respect for. I got to know him about one year ago, back in the days of closed campus when you had to sneak over to Queen of Apostles to have a smoke. Rick is the lead guitarist with a group called Stone Free. I-Ie first started playing music in the first grade with the accordian, and continued that instrument through the third grade. I-Ie took up guitar five years ago, and now writes instru- mentation and sings in addition to his guitar Work. "Our music does bear resemblance to other types of music, but it is not like any other music you've heard. We've asked people to classify it, but no- body can put a specific label on it. We use hidden meanings and Wmbolic lyrics, but that's as much as you can come to classifying it, other than saying it's a type of rock. I can't think of anybody who has really in- fluenced meg Eric Clapton is' the only guitarist I can really listen to and get into. "I can't speak for all music, a lot of people are doing things I don't agree with 10096, but I can tell you where MY head's at. I don't believe in staying in one place too long, be- cause the world is constantly chang- ing and the message has to change. The message helps people see things as they re ally are, and that's what Stone Free is all about. "I play music because you do what- ever turns you on and this is what happens to turn me on . . . when I first started playing, I realized I could communicate with my instru- ment. After I got more involved and I started to play professionally, I realized I could transmit vibrations to other people, to people in the audi- ence. . . . that's what music is all about, that's why jam sessions are so fascinating. You can take control of a jam for a while, you don't have to be playing lead, you can get the whole group working on your ideas. But, you can only keep control for so long, and then you need someone else 's ideas. That's what makes mus- ic exciting, everybody's ideas. " Music is an art, and like any other art is many-faceted. The attempt to capture the ideas of some of these musicians can only be a glimpse of what there is going on in the commun- ity. Innumerable guitarists, driunmexs, horn players and composers are work- ing with their ideas in this school, and only a few have been mentioned. Come tomorrow many of these ideas may have died or been forgotten, others may have, will have, possibly evolved into something valuable. The artist continues to try to work it out because, in the words of gui- tarist Steve Strunk, "You just do what you have to do. " --john Mix pm, B.-.u wan. rumrs QHEIRMACY ml he K V " I 'x PIWFI , ,1 ,y .... '. ,, . -1 4 ,r vs. "..a Q , o .nw ., A . 1 . '-. .-, " 'Wig .. . .qv i-- ' waist!! 5 ' , ..,. Charles Tim james Larry Pete Neil Kip Brown Buchanan Butera Byers Caputo Carroll Ceccarelli i. if ' 'W ki r .V if M . ' A as N yi W- - .-'J' x l 1 F - ..,. it X ' is NM 4 " Q' 5 I A lxs... , s fe - s x CI-IAMINADE DAY . X ..-. X Q- x' ' F5 L -11 - Bernie Greg joe D ave Ron Carl Steve F e H Cesario Changras Chargin Chiappe Cieslak Cimino Clarke H VZVK K .f , I EV , 4 A x . 'N 5 if .: K .. . K 1 . my 1 , x K Q ' -- , wi 1 fe W X ,, ex EW, X j i 5 we is I X Brian Tony Conry Corica 7 W' . I . - - 1, ljiqwwvlf 7 so -3 f kk -1 n Y A A - f - ff' Q-gi-1 I Wm "'2 - fi 1 'V 3i??i.RQ3H 2 - . ' Y Q . wx - is w, K 1W-L Q y -- X X I t ,. , ' J .gf ' gg . -' . 3 3- Q - ', A ' ' ' ' ' .1 L F f Q A 3 x ,,. 14 , o, Y- - xy Q F Q f Nil' ' L." iq."-' ' 1 ',w K K , 5 ' N' 59' . I A o if v-J bo v hx X 'T 1' K fx . .A NI. P I V gm Q ' f- of K 5' s K: -W s ,A . 0 " . nf-fl , gx ? ' ' Q 5 V - - -4. kk 4' Bob jim Mike Jerry Steve Costa Costere Crawfoxd Creegan Dale li? Q L L, ,I -cf E 'S 3' - X 5 K o W X t , 'sf' M Us - W. . , kj? - ,K I, 4 XA! w5,n"',.Q . 'K I f Like, EK 4 gl . 4 S43 N 4 Wm. . 'F' my-an-r-N .-pu y.-STV' 1? Paul D1xon James Edmonds M1chae1 Enfantmo Carl Estrella Peter Fasano Gerry Fremtas Kevm Furey BUCI-ISER TOURNAMENT V1 -Qi" M ,- if 6: ,J f Q.- : w, "-dv-...mwM"""Nvug,.-,,, ,wad , , -2 i TF W Riff I E f 5- ii Mike Dennis Mike joe Matt Keith Gary Garcia b Gavin Gill Gillick Green Greene Griggs e Q. G eiie if i 'S ,W M M , E' G A i , :K1 Amie! Q-5, Q W 5 XX-ff WM M " After 45 summer league V1CtOl1ES, the Mon arch varsity basketball conmngent took a 6 O preseason record 1nto the Buchser Tournament, non lt handrly , placlng I-hle and Pluto on the all tourney team Three games later the Monarchs xxexe 12 O as the WCAL, Northern Cal.1forn1a's toughest league, began At the end of the f11St xound the record was 15-3 and the Monarchs were under the gun. Only time would tell if the team xx ho blew Riordan out of the gym 94-54 could successfully pull themselves together for the run for the title. Bob TOD1 Tom Kirk Anthony Paul lx 1 arn- Cuerrero Guinane Gullett Heinrichs Hernandez Hernandez Hogan X , wx . X g Y 1 '- a V 4 " s A QU , V. H ' X if-A P, . 'l M , l 5 X ' 'Sine Q ' fi A at k g x . , - i 'C 4 T fy 20 L ' -.4-we---Q.1. Ql 4 : Xxx Le- z wa Scott Dan Dana Mike Sean Chris Don Jimenez Johnson Kammersgard Kelleher Kendall King Klunder J! A 5 e e' 4 5 Y . .. . V 'DL , Y f V K? ' T 5 5 Q f K gi 'week f 0 A15 ee ,A 1 f fir, M k L, 5 . X- 'E in M g. A k 4 vi Q svn' Asst' w X' . A mx: r - g -H ?' - iff-3 ' QM. A ' 'S s 1 TW,-f? ' , ,Q Q ' .- .AL ,sf 'Q xl A-,Y is dk Q Xk3Fk'w5Om Q X 60 .9 as A 5 . Q Y ' r , , W .I 4' I D . T' P K' 5 mm 1 .WM Q .4535 ., "wwf Q, .U . 1' A 1 n .n --.......,....., Kiel" '-f: . .L ig" wi PM 'E ,MM , A M f .J V 6,91 4, K KVVML N M f ........ x T 5 Rf" i V S rw 5 all Q ' -L Haag, Y va ii Q 1 -alffnx pi .n fs' X 5435 . s i I --3 'Q ,Q , Qs-Q X N 'F - Fx F1 in . ' ' ' 5 . - , Patric Anthony Don jack Mansfield Macaluso Lynch Lutes 3 I 445' fl aa. J N: f,11'v-ff' X igmf -'M ' A 2 I I F f If 411K P Q " -if X ff x . . W " fl f J' X4 - in lx, 4,9- D ennis Tim Bri an Lyden Long Lorenz 5 6, xc' , t X H P 'W f ' 4 Q .----' Jff 0-"X W r wiv 3 b'r :r K 'Y B ' -11Lr f1w f '-L4 ' f . -'v fx.. aff 1- g - 1 K 4 F ' Kwffigf 1 fx I 'D , , E " .1 '.xl IL Richard Marovich X U Tony Martin in VX -S, 4-. ...Bi Q. .. an- as ts? ff FJ -- 1 3.-"r 'lu If-' X 9 l wi its, .,. 31 A NIJ acilfxl IL!-., , ng Q-3 3? HW ' A Zlflz 1' .-'I l ' 171 I f Jim jim Dave Tom john Massung Mazzeo McAdams McCulloch Mc Intosh , .' . 31 P S5 - , f ' f Fitzgerald E! -'fi .,- ' 'V :Sr .fg sf ff, SW' , 1:5160 ? ,-vii it-R jim Richard Robert Charles Rod Mike McKillip McKezie Mezzetti Milani Miller Mim Mack ' Q J I .EW ,1 7 'ww q Y" Q . X Q X ,Y M M537 -QQ IQ., Bruce john Greg Dan Terry Fred Minnery Miotke Mushiae Nagengastk Navarra Nieri Wy! H. g Q, , S .Q A 3 K . , Y W 1 i f 'S -W in - , Granades , 'S h ag 1-'X - WN .Q ff' 3 .. I 1 'T 2? 4 ii iff 5 .X . X ,s Q ' S .vi Miuy 67 s.F. 65 Mmy 56 1 V' 'Qi M , , Q -. -wg 65145, ,," 'im Iv. ff 1 ,, W M6455 2-, 1 M 4 V' K , '15 -ff 1, W -M 6 Q ACT a-PQQ., Iviitty 68 .,pf"'Vw X, Mmy 75 ,. rv' .f 5 g id! Mitty 60 SCITH 55 Riodan 59 Bells 63 S. I. 40 Ray Rick Tom Dave Rick Tim Dan Townsend Hile Gray Pluto Roberison Walsh Sullivan K .U ,Q vm' wi ' M, 'L ' ' Q. 3. XL. . Q H -1 K, gp X um l,-.l 64.-2 'Y' 2' V? 45 - . 'rwgiw ww , a'g,,, . +G'iJ41'f Maw, ! lf? .01 Q quills D ,gn FFx: 'W ",, Gt' f .ag . gf -.S 3 .mt f Mitty had to come a to win the league, but the brought the Monarchs to from the Lancers grasp great offensive play of the Playoffs. Mitty nabbed the in the WCAL Shaughnessy. Rick Hile played at top form, Dan Sullivan and Tim Walsh played better than ever, and Rick "Robbie" Robertson dominated whomever he was called upon to defense. "To be the best you've got to beat the best, " Coach Fitzgerald said, and his Monarchs did just that. Lancer Tom Ganley QWCAL MVP, was snuffed and fouled out of both title tilts while superb Lancer junior Steve Plut never did get it together as Tom Gray played feverishly and Hile and Pluto put on a show to bring the gold to Mitty 5000. Mark Paul Steve r Nolan Nolan Occhipinti an rifle? L -wir. 5 iagssfvv K. .-iw . 111-gil.- - e , . .. - :-.r.m'- sssf . V Dammit : 5 it ,. Elllllflllil A Q H lllgugmz , f . 1 WNW -. - if fe iff: 5 0 ' . U E I A Jil irii I --K , fi .QL .-is 4 -' gxii Both Westmoor and Hillsdale looked to waylay the enroute to the Region 1 Championship. Playing erratically the Monarchs still won handily as neither Westmoor nor as Dave Pluto took it to St. Francis' heralded Paul Boscovich Hillsdale were as tough as the leading WCAL teams, were good words for Hillsdale's Schram Q". . . best player we've seen. "J as the victorious Monarchs headed up the road to St1a.nford's expensive Qrent: 53, 250 per night! Ma Pavilion and the CIF Finals Central Coast Section. Kelly Z. Tom Robert O 'Connell Pardini Parlato - al 8 l' 1 representatives had never made the Finals and the Indians Q26-lj figured to beat Mitty Q25-41 in the final. Rated first in the Central Coast Section all Fremont never knew what hit them as Mitty raced first quarter lead. After that it was stumble and with Mitty's superb defense compensating for a night of sloppy basketball. Bright light of the night Robbie Robertson's destruction of the vaunted Fremont Gary Hoffman fseven pointsj and the fortunate fact Indians folded before an honest WCAL defense. Mitty played poorly and still won. Joe Dave Marc Pattin Petrucci Petta 1 L Q H f 'N' 4., Rs The next night tall Alisal f6'5", 6'8", 6'10"j took it to the Monarchs. Rick Hile, whose superb senirr season had been the key to Mitty success, turned cold. Dvve Pluto couldn't operate inside. Robbie and Sully kept the Monarchs close at the half. Big Dave went to the board in the second half but Alisal's Robert Higgins hit six clutch free throws Qthank you referee Dick Fergusonj and the Monarchs' greatest season ended unhappily, 59-57. Mitty had five more field goals than Alisal, but 23 charity tosses to 11 Monarch attempts proved the decider. Pon's Raiders. Rookie Ray. Karl, Tim, Sully, Robbie, Dave, Tom, and Rick. Thanks for the memories. performance that counts s Q .J . 'FV . N ,TM Ve.- Gary Steve Jerome P. Pie ch Pirotta Pluto ARTHUR gl gumq , CHlLDHOOD'S EN! X Q :su A 94:2 '- il. if ri A 1 . s. 5' . f . vr- - --- fi. 1---'fa . fly 0 iM..::ra'w .. ,1 .qgil ,Y .3 W. I Al' if my 7 AN DROMEDA STRAIN f 'il-U Paul Pooley if 'i xg 'ww 'iw www M1ke 1m Amos I-Iouland Marc Mlke Raney Regalado R endler Reynolds R11ey I gf v 'Z an ?' s wi L A L ' Nw, H M L L' 4- - .N M - A . f - " f N- ' . ,. ' L .. ,, 4 K wk WWA, Mikal-mmm, Wm . J. l, , v,... .Im n K mul: :xs1,Q'Etj,xLIvX i KI' x q if ms vt' . 'qt -N,- ' 4 H 1,'.A, if A ' : . L L43-l" "" fE""if' 1' ' Y'ALL Q JL ' K A ' 'X ' 'm'A 2- Z2 W 'A" L 1 'I 1 - iii J 2 A -.4 2? Mike Gr eg joe Richter Roberts on Roy A af Q L'gg .N 917- ' L: - Es john Q. Ryan 5 KY. 1 1 ....-1 5 get 4 .4 E E f 1. 1 Andy Mark Santiago Sanders is L , PM . X ' Q x 4 -:fs M ' " 'fl' ' QQ, I W x X I .,. E ,Si ' X Q N x . 4 ' Hd' x ai 1 S' wssfggl .1'ikk'i-Zviikiiik Mg, W MITTYS MUST CLASSIC MOMENT R x... Q fi 'iv f Q E W yV L A A M 'Em 1 . Q' , ,Z . UI 7.3 1 f bf Us . , ,. I ' 2 .. in I 5 f. 'f S gl 'xxw Q - 3 S A 0 , .. Q M04 D X' I P au- v,,n if 'VV' N .. F 5 4 ik S, v-f'lQ N X, . I ' Q 'P .V 5 . I E Q. , a, I ,M Q ""' up -NW' 'K 'SX 1 'YU 'Q :sul V ww k - . A favs. 3 A . .U K is Nav-9-A.x.,....-Q ,.,M,xZ.,. K, W., ' f - A-it if Q. yawn Q ,. swf' Q M ,ge 5 - X ' S ' , . 4 -- .M .Z Q W ., , K 9 -M,ff..'va 1 .X .M If HO . R . 5 . , f. M , L W, .- fl V , A . A N , , A I, .... jerry Sabatino Charles Sabatino Mark Scheideler Michael Sipiora Robert Smith Steve Soar e'eSee S S ..ee ' 'eee A V , W - b S S 1 S . we , fri - .f Q ex 2 X , gg , ' ' S K M Petr K Q L4 5 ..:k XX ' Q in it ii? . mSt A V 2 ML: 45" h' A N, mm 4. ,..,,9g 4 ' eq-L , - ' Wfw, 4V A xp ww 'qi fa b a 1- Y , I X L. A e 1 'sy-4 2 ,, Y Q e IW..- . If ,QW Q' ,., e 5 f 's kin gl X 3,-v Q i 1 K Qs, XLVX , - J' Q , x Q? Q K gy apleto A1 Sturla Steve Sulgit Bruce Sullivan James Sutherli Steve Taormino :qi ttf e if R' Ps .V 1 ww Nw L ks-an Q, , of' A Q wav I-+ ,Lmll gi I A ii gigs N, f . ,sm fggewx 1,3 wx ! 52gl1Lf.4'f,W?l.1fxil 5 L 4 1 fw 5 fbinzzm E jr QI,-' , ffaanewfaf-Tam, if i.!i"AI-5115-ff4"'f5-Sf . ..L.r..v-.. ,Jah ,:.R'ie' 31.4-W FP' Thomas Taylor Clark Vellis Jerome Venneman Bernard Vogel Gary Von Raesfeld- Michael Q sazlrsgaxs QKV, Q e oo oe , - o Q E7"?'- 1- 1' ' H ,':2 f ,f ,K Qizm jj l R 'feri A f Q q 1' KL! 8' . k K A, ,k.- t ..5 1' - 11 W l ns, xxx QI C N k fif' is N Q i- s ' Q .. H .F-Q.. b Q 1 .-,....o-H" qnnlll"' ' 9 . m, ' 'WL' 4 ' M 'Q 'Ax Q , ,.... 3 ' .115 !"gif1- --ln, ' U l I ' . u , 1 , . ' . x . xi Q s 'FM 0. . I , M ' A X p ' " . ffl 2 X, .A " ' 54- """' l . Vu,1jX "A X , L F 4 X I, . Hr' X ,4 ..J k '1 2,55 - 1 , -. K1 j.'f'.4 Ag 8 A ix 1 ww.. - ,A 31, if an Nw wlxmixk x X xxx' U' f M ,ix 'Q 5 S' ig ww Ma .r 2 9 marshall -'hr'-'nnfwvvmv 'W WN X Mus Wmxml ,QW WM x Sqn.-,A.., w-was N X 9 Mr JM ' 4. ,J - , A . 1 .-amy. . a A l--.VJ E fr Q 1' N is . X . W ' X5 fx" ' 5 x ' ' K - .N ' ft- :.. N, 'QT K - 5, -Ng-W-f4gf"": .f-sr, f Q33-'rffzwi' V - x W s, Qi, .- vff' .' Q 1 Q- X ' Q . ' N g., will -' -:xfiki5g :f?'flgg-I '- YA AX ' ' A Ii, ' , -Q vw, Q - - Q ' Y- "L, , ,., 4 ' "' ww:-" . gm: ' 5-592 - A - - L M - -vii f. 'fa RSMQS ,R ' . ' J- -f i-:,:f,f1::f K Wfpgvli .. ' g gggm ,gyms ww, su ,583 X PM A335337 K .. Ls3ffsiQ'gg: f'?5'kf'qQf:lff'ff5!? ., Hwy 'TSA' his ,V V 'i"XG'3wff.mi1fsa X 34' a by f1,L..i.:. 4 vfizfz' :. I. ,, ,, , a , . '. ! ' S ii- ' .am A , 1 JILL -,rl IHZQHKK aff' :lr """eX!ff, HJ' 'U Yr. fn .Ll A gg H gi, . . I' . . un 7 A : . . Qi unuufr 'Q . ' i jim Ales Mark Grenier Bill Bartling TOT11 F1eiSCh1i Gene Mim Mack Pat Higgins jim Brown ff xi? v -4 A fr' "", 13 fr? 521' -gif A ' . '1 4 -- ' Q 3 Vi Us inxf, . 'HV' 1 '4'-J, , fir... I '7 32 , 'A 'N In A Ti :I L X ' 'F 1.1 L! ,qv 'A' EN- .fih Wm Amin dmlitca This season's Monarch Varsity Booters didn't have the record of the previous Central Coast Sectional Finalists, but broken bones, pulled muscles, and sprains took more of a toll than opponents' skill. The Monarchs tied the S. I. Wildcats before a record crowd at Kezar Stadium in the finest match of the year. But the cost was great as super Pat Higgins played the re- mainder of the season with a broken foot, gamely, but not well enough for the Monarchs to return the title to Mit-ty for a second season. Tom Fleischli Q Varsity Football, Soccer, and Golf, led the WCA1. in goals Q17j and was joined on the All-League first team by Gene Mim Mack and Pat Higgins. Second team all-league were inspirational Jeff Schwertly, Dan Stringari, and Mike Salerno. V Buchanas Benton Buck Vernacchiu Stringari ga , n 1 A I ,fri 1-- , . ' Y A- fl 'S " M arm, at at ati-.N 1 k"Q-1fl'l:t'? -J: vc li u f :V fl inf? 's:i,,.........,. 2x -1- gg-sf M- D-. .-.Q-f.,,......-...,-3-5-..,,un. ,,, . Na... ,M .'- ,' -.""' Q - -- ......... .7.. .,-..,..,f K:aQQl',g-1-zggsrigtg :N ..,.:, WJ.. f.,M-XV? ',, .saggy-0-3-'N 'M 4- -jfwisxj , ...Sw 'ff'-Q .":f'f- f 1-Q f1-':'5f-..,r3g:...- 'A - -,'j""-if '5..a.:"'."' "' L?"ii?i:f"iE"l'.-.-:'k' -wir?" -' ' .,f ' .-3-f if L 'L':"d"-r",-1'4,1.-n..,' ' , . ,t ' -5 Q.. --, -., I .,.f,' '.,'J""' D. ..,.. AJ,- e'i""' - . -.,f, "y'1f 1 . ., , ,, 21. . ,M -. ., -1-.1 Sl 'Q . r W . ,mi -. wk 1+ n.-,k ' W ' X " Q A 'K I K if-'Q' - X , X f-A , f K .gwz f Q , min' .., K -K 1' Q f xl -- Y' - - fx' i ',. '- . .j X mf ffl " K' 5- x .R --fiisw-Q, , fxsw,,gh3k M , A E Q 2 it K m 4 K ffggx. -4-Q - ,V Em 'Wil -isis-.nga K Q Q Yi N 'iv K A X Q- Q, f gm., Nfl X Thibault Wittsten Chaplik . Y R , UW ' J '22, W QQ X7 3591 gr' QW .,f gf125.i ,Yi , 39' , V, Y --v ...S .Q .wx i N, -vs. if 'v A .. .J ,x mx, , sf. , .. A Wzxvx Q.: F x Q . '-ulwnm" A- .A Figel x xrz' Mx - 'fX f ,4,..,?' Q t Q, . KF? .lg 3-.fn-.,. . gg... K Q a x Uk f A . ,A Q N if 1 . . ' , 5' Q Q , x .,. Baggott 'Cf. W 'Om QQ' 54: f fr WY 46555 'Ex -rm 1 5 we FROSH AND JV SGCCER A 1 ' i A -ggf....., I-,, ,. A ,-fag' 4 s -4... . '- ' A 'A , qml ...N , 4. -I H..,., M " sl- , .ffm Muzi vv at ul ,fikrwa-D-, . W. ' fel if-4.f.".' rf. . Tony Bob Pat Mike Mike Chris Vukelich Wadsworth Wallace Wallace Walters Waters 'MR , , -A - , r 3 'Q ,.l' . t 2 Q KY ia K Q., mg a fifw a a a a - , , 3 if L-:""" ' ' kf 1 - 1 W M ll U A K al l ly Sis. xl il K Ln -x .W Dustin Kevin Weiland Welch Q- 4 1' I ibmaq, , gyfz ' -. , xt V , wi. , , ,I M 3 ' A J " v R594 4- if :F wa., 4 , ., ' -y -ip N.: We-N ' Q - 2. ,,.- - - ml: , h I sg , -- ' - . . . if -, ' - f ' -,,.' 'L , ,fk f. Q tl" M K -T 1 N, I A. bi ,, ..:Ak.Q'f -5,--,., Q. mf' f .P-111 FA' 1 ,- il 4 , -,.' ,Y V '. '4:.2.,.-mv . 2--fd A -, -' ...,.,1- 'F 1 ' -' V- gs - . -K .pw . 'E A K 4 'J :,,,.,..-'5' -V ,. i V f' - - n .. k - I D: 4!as,.,., .., , b v, A, 'B . , mmf? ., 0 V 15 .A .. , K ,F ' ' 2' i' .fgm .-.fx If-7 .AN ., ,,: , ' ... ' 1 H' - - -Q W Rf '--, J. ff- 4 Q M Q f ,' ' -- . x..-gh ,,g.3'f:j,,.,"" -1-'ikbgff-3' fy-' fw1:1v-L . ff ,i 1, - . -' i - i--Kvnugkwi-.'3?'fgg'x7i'v.--'x -. Q.gi'e',., ',,g,: -N M 4, . V.. X -.- .c tw. Hs,-a --ww,-...,, f-,'h f' ' '-' ,--fm ...V--'J 'QNX -. ,vp .-.l- -1-,-' '5 "kg,-L., ,Q- .,4..cp,.L.w-Q,---fffifwgg.,-'i', '-w,r.:Y"f"" ini-ff Xf - J X ,L ,- ..-f 3. 4- . J , X Jfizyx -1:55 vt, A U. 4 y-. K 5 K.-1 MW A VK ' My K! -J ,..,.1lL3gg 5314, ' t, n1g:F,l,,4Lwf -,.'6.ai..,-satin fu I., .- Fi, r f. V rL..,l1.,. gf.. ,Q A' -.5-f M -3,55-.A if rl' 4, .,g::A.k:w.a,--3. ,.. ,-1-.1 .,p -,- ., ww-f-H, .gf--w L, .wffp .N-, -- ' f - , -- 1 ,Q -1+ v5,,.'.-.-95 .V . V '--mf -My .- , -fr . mvirvmg,-wf'-1 Rh -f ',K,,:' -yr' .-.-ff-3, ,bw '-,.--iq.-..---'bv 5. -g 1 -1. " N- .V 5, - -,253 Xglg wrv-V'j,n2'f..N '. 341, - .A .1 " 'x 1,1-f"T 164 Q52-,vw-"U'-1, ',L 4,-'af .r -'W "QF .- ..:'.""4gqQ' 3' 'ffH:2"'."f. '.r.w" ' s 12?3:"",F? Aff:: M..-w-3-fQ2,i,2:fff"iw'-:ffffw.E4'Q-: 612- 4 x+.,'m.nSw.-'faN-'S-'lf- G 5' Q, - - :,.., 1 V , 5-wr-.4 M ,gl .15 -9.3 . - - UQ-ifn8Kfx,f..sEi:-Q 555531-xi-.M-wl-,..f,LfW.'-"9,"'f .r,ffi"x.-5 .,v-vim" .f3w"PVs. W' :tf."?'i3?5-c'1'a"m . f. '.4.- Alan Wvosnick Mark Chris Wolnv Wvnn james Ales 'Lg -1-A , b ' sw Am 4 ei , fa. 5 , S--qw I .m 1 X " mm Q W ' bg K , j i E X ' . 'X If ' W 'F 4 J . 'ly . "W " ' ' 'W Q rm A nun mzvtl If Vg: 7 o A A 5 Q S 9 xg h - V -fm f fr , a . 4? . 3 '5 Z it f 4-..........,,......Mn. , ,, . f , wg?-H A mf. , , H .- INS' fkwfyx-'ff1ff'f'1-HW 'V--wwsswwnm .unmmnw-15, W ,,:W-..,......,,.,,,,,1,,,,,.,Q -X f 5 U yy, :Q 1, i, , Today more than 10,000 high schools have student governments, but the vast majority are "governments" in name only. Many are instituted to allow students to play games, many represent only elite groups with- in the school, many have only the power to advise, and hopefully to be listened to, many are "bucking" Administrations lacking the foresight to see we are entering an era that requires direct student participation in educational matters which directly affect them. And finally, many must contend with faculties who desire to maintain the "status quo." As the school year comes to a close we see the legacy of past Mitty Student Governments, a government not instituted to play games, that represents the entire Student Body, has the power to advise AND to act, willing to change to meet the needs of the students and the Mitty Community . -- Phil Sumner, Director ot Student Activi cs T -- C hris john Pete Pete Tom john Baggot Baggot Balbiani Barnes Barnes Bar tletl 3 x .ti 6 ,, ,ge in up sq: . . X P f - Q J 4... A W ' ' . 1 ' ,,, , A. .., J PRO AND CON STUDENT GOVERNMENT There is always the danger, when the head of a government turns introspective that he will gloss over the weaknesses of his administration. I will try to be as objective as possible in my appraisal of Student Government this year. The Cabinet, which I set up after my election, proved to be the backbone of Student Government. It was here that the actual work was done in serving the needs of the students All the planning, co ordinatmg, 1n short, the Executive side of Student Government was done here Everything from the daily announcements to the planning of rallies was accompl1shed 1n the Cabinet, by myself and the Chairmen I appointed When school began this year, Student Government was over S700 1n debt By the middle of the second quarter, this debt was erased and the Student Body Treasury was placed at plus S300 Th1s was due largely to the first three dances of the year which were successfully organized by the Dance Com mittee With the combined effort of a hard working staff and Activities Director Mr Sumner, the newly formed Student Services Committee was very successful It effectively took over responsibilities which the school had previously handled Sopho more Jackets, Junior rings, book sales and many other services were supervized by this committee Through the year, the Student Services Com- mittee handled many thousands of dollars for the students. The Spirit and Special Events Committee worked closely together in planning events at Mitty. The rally hosted by Crazy George, Careers Day, the Christmas Assembly and Chaminade Day are but a few examples of the events which these two com- mittees coordinated and executed The Student Senate this year was for the most part composed of Homeroom Presidents who were keenly interested in Student Government Followmg the original 1n1tat1ve of the Faculty concerning a new form of government at Mitty, the Student Senate quickly acted to review and ratify the proposal It then proceeded to redefine 1B6lf in relatlon to this new system of government even before the other sectors of the school had accepted the proposal For the first time, members of the Student Senate th1S year were afforded the opportunity to act side by side Wlfh. Faculty members 1n important policy making committees ln one case, the Supervision Committee, a Homeroom President was elected as Chairman Student Government did not function w1thout pro blems this year The worst of these was in the area of communicating internal events within the government to students This was partly due to the shortness and mfrequency of homeroom meetings . -li B1 Mike eff Brad Craig Steve Bartnng Bergkamp Bergmann Bonnett Boston BraShe21' IKLLKTIONSHIP 74- 5 5 if 4 Q 1 . , . . . . . - . J . 1 . -- ses. P' 'r'-'- rL-, - A ' A' t r'ii -i'1s - X' 2 . ' 1 , ' if' ,. X 53151 Q V ',-- I . .5 ' i - ' rf: L ., . A , rm 9. 3 J . - y Vt fs, S., ,fn e -as fe: a -. wif -avr ' 5 ' Lk . Q 4' 'aff 1 1 - A ,X " N V - . ' ' nf, 5 i if ,. ,,., -jg , fi, ' I - 5 4 if , f. I " - "Q - ana Q ' .L Y 2 , T ' 1, . Q 3 - sz R sr- 05.5 N om Chargin aw 5 v qi i i f W .' . 1 wff Q W M.',f , if A: ' ff: f. .:.rf Q 5 : 3 V :H ,. u s Mike Christie Mike Connelly P N ..... , v 4 5 f 'sm 5 5 "ii .L - ' ' 5 r, f Q Tim Conway Photo by Russ Hughes Norman Costella. Chris COSCGUS Qu W I, ,, N ml fl 51. Q QQ.: ,- .Q K 'f se X -L' :J .-5 Q .K , ,,.-, 1 o ff ,i.,.. 4 il ,H x - N A I A 1 f 6 R MODEL UN -' Mr. P Killian wi - M 'K Kevin Cougill M, if PKK? 'SY James Cronin J, M Hg , Ni Dan Dalhauser Ruby 'ha .. A Q- ff v n ,n Q , .J 1,-:E :H V Q in v . . ' 'YQ " v H . ,Q r 4 ,531 M 5 737 ,.w,,vm ,ffl fp? T'..L.TIfl1.Z Stuart Mike Dan Daley Denham Dias , I L. ,fl K ,, W - ,, my f If I -' x 'E JRR? Mike Di Marco if X . r ,XJ-X., iivi Alfred Di Pietro , QX,,. Robert Henley Dixon Douglas of ki' . 'F J ff? ig 1? .,, 7 we +- A X.. K - v Wayne Chris Dubois Ecu-nst . fn Q , -' we 1 Q i Mr. Leadley ral' 144' Lf' M L4 , X am X I 1 l W A OPEN CAMPUS Craig Steve Mike Esposito Fanelli Federico o'i- 'f L"L 5 Q ' .KL L-A -5 -5137: , ' ' '22 HF.: 1' f' V , 5 5 j i, ffl . V 4- ' I 5:1 ' .., Q .fi .. ., 'i w r S V .5 f'ff1Q5 M f' . xf 7' - ,f 5 My , , :.gfQA' ' 5 fx:-, Keith Feifarek ,:f-- nf . .f ,-xx N F i.,. 35:5 sv Wx :fn -A A-vga Mark Art Ferrari Ferraro A V 'i" f X. -1 if iiie f Q fy. ,ff .,, : v .. Xe .V D in ,CJ . N155 , 5953-.KY W" ?Q ,9L"Yff f J W. is! A f ' gk In 1 I-,R ' ,, X, , , ' - , 4 F" ,, . 'IH 1, 3' -V ' . 'if 5 N3 ' if , , -4- -A .. 1 x ,W 4. .f 'W4' Q , ,. 4 , . x ... 'X- P rf!! 'I 1, . -S ,, " A-Q 59,-. - " . X5 'FF 1 1.51. Lf' . ' - Q fig ,f3,.'gu- ' ,. "'vf'f'. if-W' , L my hQ'A"h I WT ' ' f .-H '-V t '- " ' 2 , 'L 5 ' " f ' JM ,- . I . - .-.:'33,:.:':'? ' - . A ' "" " ' wf . iff' a.i'S,w wa. K-wwf -x - ' ' .. . in-.. k , - , A , Vkhkr ., . ' ,,,wxQ15f?i WYE , 4-,- g ---L 1 " , N L N M' -' W7 ' J a . , .:. "- A ga, -vff' .-:yg,x:--wax, fe-iw -.u - v vw- " - ' 1,5 .. f.. UVybafggq-fsflblikg'-e5..1fiixrfffx Sir-a.:X:4l:Qf:s5f .hm ,, V- ff' 1 John Fisher 19 Y- SE 1 ,. , . wf. qu . :- Bill Gard .rr -x jim john Dan Gilmore Gilmore G1111n X .Q Q . , ix Lx., KLV, I .E A 'EEZ K V. ffgjg' kk'g - e K QQ' .... s-A . - ' A ' ex " 'V 1 2 2 Rf K5 SL A . xwg, , Sv i W X 5,5 S Q 1:2 5 MORE OPEN CAMPUS if if MT- Robert John Pat Glen Danial R. Steve McC arthy Godar Gonsalves Goodpasture Gorden Green Grant . G - L -:ff , ' ,:. ,. ' . ' , Z X H V :1-' M - 2 Ief if :Q- ,:.,. " G G qw tt- .', , G GG GG eee 1 MORE MITTY PEOPLE A 52? R iff. .,,, 1 wif? ""l l eg A ' ' V - "' X A57 X ., y 1 . I I-E357 P-iq, . A k,.,,.. .... . M1ke Cralg Paul Tom Steve Bobby Hlelman I-Ialler Hole Hathaway Hennmgsen Herrera Hershberger M .MA f lv Keg 3 . Russ Tony Hughes Iorns - f -.'- + ELK Ak ,,T1,A Mr . Eaton lu . 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N wwf ' R -, X si -5 me . ..., 'SWE-f3!+ ' i . ,, af.- - 21 ,g:.ps'ev'-ni Ai'jIg,fT A kk I .b,4.,, , W' WAX 3, 2' F-"'Jv'n.f', 'M "gf L 1.5 ' A and ,-., I . Q .WML .3 .. 'f 1' ' .. , ,iw SL.. I. . MJ, 2 .,.,.,M W- v 'r-as V-1 623- .gf :f'afsN-KX Y X x ' " ,d f- R .ara . - ., 2 .L., .x,:.,,', ,, M Q -.fg,fQ3.',', ,'1,P..- H - 1 ,,W,.e.- .xM.g,,ggga , W, ,. ' 93 fy- .W 'fp - b ig 4 gg!5w4JQ,.ig5 ,,Q,f-bw rig: X' " M. 5 ulgzimh- gg?-,g Lf gd ux.ri.v-Ty,-iiidzr-ffie-B38 - .M 359 ,lE,i,L5Q3fw31z5gfZi-535 52.-fig iiY:,.ij,',Q1,, - H--: - Xe, A .,-,L K4 5fff,:,KA:..A , Lai' .,,f,q,, f. Q Y -if X v ' ' N, f-envy N y y uf My 'H --Pqgfg, f 2 , Q M 5 f' 'W 'K Ken M1ke Brldger Paramo Pena f he' Bill Pie ch gg 3 '--- . X Q35 52 , I - ' D Si' 5 N A ,Ki hy 42 fm fi .-1 L pf , 4 F if 1 if f : 5: M w :Si rl 1 andy Dave joe adjkovich Ramere z Rossi mn -A 5. .- 4, 'Q' joe Ricci ERN, i ,4".., s x Greg Bro. Sanford Fien wk Q .X - f ., .f . , . wig-- ff .1 Q- , - if. . A j .. ...4. 1 -mf. HJ, 1 - ,. .W Q 1, L 4 .2 'M' .--A' . MA . B' f if ' ' f , 4 W - ' 1 . ff, . xt: i 4' pu L x f s g s ,' 4 A ' ' w f 14 X Q A 3 4 D . :M 'D 'v 1 i '24 95 - hti 4 -.7 A TRACK PRACTICE I 1 '2 ' '- LAf.J,. A... 5 ink. S 5 Y ,. ,A Hmiwu iw . . ,.f 'gg -.:. ,. V' W . ., iw: 1 ., X. M . " Q , ,.41..f,' ..s.,:Q::.:,.,v.V," .. . x. , ,.v vw, . X -- ,V -.ff ,-.fg r.. .. .. qt., ,, . Rv, if 4. ef, -v .yy , . , - '. :J . v . , W w X Mr. john joe Richard Pat Pe arsall Sanche z Sanchez Schwartz Scudero ff, Y' fy ' ' f 96 C Q Brian F. John jack Sheredv Sobieralski Squires kk , 4,13 ik. K . e S 1 F' QT? gi , ' ' n . , . .17 .,-.. 1 , .. - , ,. Q ' ff M " . ' , ff--vi A 2 A -4. ' D s -0- . X I Xl ...Q .. V ' 9 A, 'F ? 1. rt igifs li . gf f Q! X at . S! -. S 'f 5 1 "2 +5 3 Q- 1 A 2 -- we - . e e. A ,I Q. M P. ,e,, 3'.Uq , X- 1 , - g XY, -351' .-x.5J4:a.g :lx SN xxx wkxb K L' 15 Zlfliys' K 5 2X,'.,r1g R If e , ' ,Qi-iiii:f,'fifgg1e15y+ e . wwe-Ni.lxf -,ge 1-ff"-,w'xwN,.H Xi :X M3 - 'JANE- - ff-fX'?i . L ,aw X gym: fg,3..',g.--.7 'N 45' 'L kg. 6:5 535 fi L E "fi ?fLiXQ3ii'Qin9W' z 7553-f.'5f'if:'ff-'TH' X e "T 4' : 1 .wfi-gk W.--zfmvv-, 1' ' Keith Stephenson , fx fm? is f WF' 5 few... - - 2. L ffgf- -1 ,. 1-ge esv-We w Nz ,Rs a , - - Q K .K K. .ML tx Tim Stewart 'fp Mr. Dalton ,Ax ww' wg' ,X 97 THE MEETS E T A- inf. ,f' -i -J fins X' R i RQ 98 Mr. Ross E 1 Randy Pat James Zak-E 'L Strawn Tanner T31-1531-d ., ,E lg E,5: 2 Q-.,i E 'EEIE K . fe. K 5, an W' in f .gg X . Neg! x ,E xl J , Dave ,..........................-W-..-v . Q-vm A ,Q 'A' Mike Toomey 3 Q 1 new - 1 ... Q '.....,.......... ....,.. .- x. -f ' f "+"+l!1mlai.,m-sm - -, lfis Brad Towers 5 1 Q Xi I 1 Q ,gi QOH f X E is W -" A' 'L .Sg- W, -av-15 -H .mu Y Mr. joe I R if 1' sv " ji 99 ., u- 'U-bnsqns HV T T ,iid Mr. Stanton R f. , x, -- :A A Ml fm' fswfif Bruce Ken Fred Steve Joe Trapani Vares Vernacchia Welch Wettstein zzn e V- V23 Q, 15 V 4 U 5 e 1 e A '- , ZLZ :lg 1 Z Q.: N5 qi- i ics: L f K ,S 5 it e l Q VCT' 9 3 VKE ' Q Q! I ' L K 3 K K , . '-,f-. W, K Q. j Y, 4 W J t K 1.1 1 n A Mlke Wmdeler 'RPF' -,Qmgs 41. S vsssrons mousg Nun 1' jim E oe Wught Zappala Gary Qu1be lan Dempsey L,: 3 wzzgf so Christopher Allen Robert Andrews Gary Arnold Edward Atlas giwwlw 1 ,Ui 'CN F"'N Steven Baggese Michael Balanesi Michael Balbiani john Barros .,-'aw 511 SENICRS l -ar .,. gd- 'U' '!'T"""'rX Christopher Basanese William Battaglia Michael Belair john Biqsotti 'X "' Ted Biskupski David Blackford David Blaum Anthony Bozzini ,, .1...-J-'M' 'ai Richard Brackett Gregory C atania '55-in David Brown james Cambra Rocci Caringello .uns in joseph Cimino Richard Clarke Charles Clupney ,PQ 'Oi FW NUS 1...-. dv' Thomas Connelly Thomas Connors Joseph Conte Michael Cullen 'Ox ? 95? Jghn Coupeng Mark Daley William Deckman Richard Defrancisci Y MXN fu-""f""' Dana Delmas Thomas Dippel Philip Dixon john Duggan Michael Dullea William Dullea. Robert Echeverria i 5 all-1 41? qpy 1 Carl Epolite Kevin Field Mark Fine Dale Finochio we sw WWW ly 475 .95 ' x f Alfred Firato Thomas Fleischli Steven Fonatana Mark French au.. Qu. wu- H Hi Gs- "'- 'Q M. M., " Q "' N. yn.. N.. A "0 .. N 'W A-Q. james Gallegos Paul Gorden Patrick Grant Thomas Gray -:wr '91 dl" ' 'lr Edward Halteman Michael Haniger William Harn Timothy Hart Gi. "' Y' 45:7 Q Paul Harvey George I-Iaskin Lawrence I-Ievia Patrick Higgins QT' 'U' Richard Hile Barry Hitchock Michael Horton Robert Howseman is gs iifi3".J 1 A .1 QQ "6 K , '5 X Sv ,f b-.f John I-Iumes Michael Hassinger john Janus Dennis Jamison but-. iw: Eric johnson Harvey jordan Paul Klunder Lawrence La Mantia S as-W 4.5 in as v""'i fv- .Q 10' in Robert Lawrence David Lazzarini john Littman Michael Long Anthony Lupina Michael Mackey David Malloy William Massung :inn ' 'QP' na ik.. -we f 1 Gnd' Massuco, joseph McGuire , Kevin McKenzie, Allan McKenaie, Timothy W"""' McManus, Scott Mendoza, Mitchell Metsera, Ronald Meyer, William 3 Ma Q Ie 5 71 3- .M -WJ zi"""" 'W Q N Ivy i Donald Miller N .1 X X . joseph Montemagno Mark Miller Eugene Mimmack Donald Miner .f?""x George Mosher Richard Marks Dennis Navarra if Eric Nelson john Newman John Nickel David Occhipitni 'gf-1 t -r"M " jeffrey Organ Patrick Owen Anthony Palome William Patterson f'-JI' k,, up "VN .l"' Stephen Pfeifer Marc Picolini David Pluto john Pon ,-gg . . Q 'X William Pooley Michael Putz Allan Redmond Henry Rendlcr Qt Ni 1' Richard Rizio john Rodriques Randall Rose lack Sanguinetti is Michael Salerno jeffrey Schwertley Randy Sheleman Mark Sheredy -.LN 1 S. ,ar K' N it 2 .fx any gd?" ,- Francis Simon Glen Smith Theodore Sobieralski Edward Struss 1' 1' anr""' 47 ,gy 'R' Daniel Sullivan William Susha Martin Sweeney john Taormino 36 ldyj HUNYYR rid! X .IL ,--1 QQ his 5 - Jn' 1 Terry Temes Mark Thoman i NN- john Unland ., Vallope Veeravuthipol QNQ Todd Tomlitz Clifford Thompson fir- 'mx -1 .an-W' Vernon Von Raesfeld Timothy Walsh Y Q , an A X Q: K .fws 97. ' ' 7 VH., ' -' 'L ' "'-' my if arg- . .. ,- . V- - ., iaaaai w i .,, AA 'lr , - XX jeffrey Wehner Michael Welch William Wells I f N uf . -sv- -Q. Bill Williams Charters Wynn Roland Yarbrough Donald Zoccoli TELEDHONE K J ORGANIZATIONS One of the most pleasant new traditions at Mitty are the always laughing song girls lead by Patrice O'Connell. Staring during Football season they per- formed throughout basketball season. Spirit Chair- man Tony Bozini coordinated the election and de- velopment of the group which included Karen O'Connell, Linda Soto, Carol lngebratsen, Theresa Struss, Debbie Burns, and Diane Smith. if r 5 K 5 Here, imaginatively lined up before the illustrious front entrance of Mitty High School, protecting any further possibility of theft, the noble senators of our illustrious republic. These are the students whose responsibility was the representation and legislation of student body needs. They ate lunch together several drnes a week and gave student body Presi- dent Dennis Navarra something to think about. You've heard of Duffy Daugherty, Ara and Pete Petrinovich? That's right, old under-the-jersey, reverse reverse, statue -- who needs to worry about won-loss record-- to Mitty with a pretty mediocre bunch of freshmen footballers , brought them from grammar school flag flingers to a fairly game, hard-hitting crew. "Willing to play" they were kind of frosh who "1 er quit" and, according to their young, well-liked coach, had their greatest game against Sacred Heart, 25-O. Coach Pete labelled Pat Haniger his most consistent performer, also citing Ferrara, Castagani, Owens, Laine, Malinski, and Blair. High scorer was Swartz with six touchdowns. The freshmen B basketball team, led by methoc Brother Mike Chu, S.M. , played excellent deff developed extraordinary patience for freshmen 1 ers. Their leading scorer was big Lou Howe, most consistent were Terry Murray and Mark Havstad, WCAL Champs. The Concert Band is one of these large aggregations of sixty people where the director probably has to spend half his time standing like a traffic cop. But they ut it together well enough to get to a tour P of Southern California. Practicing three days a week, Mr. Oddo's beautiful people were certainly the best Concert Band Mitty has had to date. Great at the Football Games, the Portugues arade they even P marched for George Murphy. The muscianship of this group is a good indicator of great things in the future. Y' KVI, Mgr: QA --L The quiet, unsung heroes of the Mitty operation have got to be the Library TAS. Under the direction of Mrs. Clorinda Lennon, the patient methodical people make an excellent school library possible. Sometimes they got a little wild with the school stamp on the covers of the latest magazinesg but mostly, good people in an unknown job. tx . 5 ,c f w Q The Frosh A basketball team started well under Coach Peterson as they picked up ten wins against one defeat in pre-league, but then came acropper as they fell before other WCAL frosh Luiits. Coach Peterson identified his number two scorer, jim Blamey as his most consistent performer5 took spec ial note of the play of number one scorer, Terry Vane, reed-thin Sean O'Kane and quick, young Mark Messier. Basketball at Mitty is definitely looking up because of the excellent coaching and continued commitment seen at the Frosh level. If 1 had The cross cotuitry program has come many miles under Coach Bob Buoncristiani. Many many many miles. Hills. Creeks. Miles. Most surprising new- comer was Chris Griggs. Mike Haniger, essentially a middle distance runner, was superb again as a senior. 'Xi The Monarch Varsity Soccer Team had a difficult task defending the WCAL title won the previous year. Starting slow, then dogged by injuries in the first round of play, the Monarchs were anchored by one of the finest players in the state, Pat Higgins. Higgins set a league record of four goals one match, only to have it broken the next match by a fellow senior, Tom Fleischli, five against Sacred Heart. For awhile a freshman was starting, but to every- one's surprise, sophomore Mike Benton came on rapidly to complement the forward play of Gene Mim Mack. In '71-'72 Dave Chapli.k's booters are in for a rough go as fine defensive players like Dan Stringari, Chris Baggott, and jeff Schwertly are lost to graduation. The Pep Band, lead by Russ Hughes and Art Greco, consisted of ten to fifteen people Qdepending on the weatherj most of whom were also in the stage band. They played at all basketball games and some rallies. When the song girls needed late practices, they were always ready to oblige fwho could refusej racticin before ames whenever whatever Dave if S I P 8 S , 1 - Azevedo played drums some. Kolegraff pumped the Sousaphone. Mr. Oddo helped keep it all together. The band leans to brass though occassionally one could lean down close and hear a tootle from Brad Chames, piccolo and flute. English TA's were student teachers. This kind of things has never been done before, especially with such success. Working under the direction of Mr. Michael Slack, a graduate Ph.D. candidate at Stanford, these seniors Qand some outstanding jun- iorsj worked with the new freshmen program, study- ing film, media types, grammar, short stories, and composition. A - sr!! "WA - .,...-- fx' -.,.., M .f'Ax"'r'M""' ., . W 1 K K K 4 I, ,r ,. D1 The Senate does the talking, but the Executive Board provides the leadership to get the job done. Outstanding certainly was Tony Bozini, Spirit Chair man. Led by S. B. President Navarra, this crew did the things some schools put faculty in charge of. B ia,,xr We cares about baseball? Mitty cares. Passionately. From the gophers to the seagulls to Peter dodging foulballs Mitty baseball has a ready audience. The Monarchs have always had good pitching. This year's mound corps was led by Gene Litle who gave up no earned runs in his first five starts. Catcher Tony Lupina was certainly Mitty's finest receiver ever. And not bad with a bat either. Coach Bill Sinnott relied on the power hitting of Fred DiPietro and the speed of Ed Struss and Rick Hile. Bob Eccheveria had timely clouts and the smooth swing of Tom Henningsen suggests the Monarchs may enjoy good hitting to complement their pitching for some seasons to come. e and nine the previous year, The Monarchs der Head Coach Ron Demonner and assistants Williams and jerry Regan fashioned a 7-3 ger. Finest performance of the season was bably the victory over St. Ignatius to spoil Wilcats' Homecoming and put the Monarchs the championship battle. Junior Pat Kohlman the Mitty All-League contingent garnering eman of the Year Honors. Leaders from 'tty's finest senior class to date were Ed ss, joe Conte, Wild Bill Battaglia, Tom ischli, Tom Nickel, Bangin Bill Patterson, d Cimino the Splendid Splinter. Losing Gary old, Mark Fine, Ton Vozini, and Rhino cholini makes the '71 season look like a uilding year. Tell that one to Randy Strawn. en duck. Some people play basketball in the Win- ter, and only the Winter. They don't play for Mitty. The Monarch varsity gets a furlough at the end of every WCAL season, two weeks so the coach can catch his breath. Then they're off and running, working hard, learning. Mitty basketball was superb again this year because of 45 summer league games and all those hours of practice. It took Riordan 19 years in the league before they took the title. Bellarmine never has won it all in basketball. The Monarchs took the title because they earned it. They lost in the CIF Finals because they didn't play well enough that night to win. Returning from a solid 26-5 season, Karl Morin, Matt Green, Ray Townsend, Chris Loafman, and Rick and Chris Costella will have their work cut out for them. as ,W ,. s . . is , t ra, , . a ,a , , Q I pq ,AI X I is .f -, Xb. ae.. - ,,,., - ip - ,V 'tsp in y 1 x , fr i' ' 9 . l T gp- W. : X nit' 2 3 .F X " ,r ' irar - E Q' Q 1. I . af.-j r 51 .-, sns ' s pk 'L , A . ,r oi o r ,. JM a. rt.: , - ,- - -'-.' : 1,37 ' X -' s 5 -."'w'f 'K-. X ' I pf 'dei " ".- 4 ' if ' For some people, the JV team is where it all stops. Little League sensation, SeniorLeague teammate, IV . . . you got your growth early, developed the skills, had some great moments and enjoyed playing for Mitty, being a part of something special. For others, IV is where everything starts to jell: your sense of timing, yotu' strength, yourrecognitionof the importance of an all-out effort, your appreciation of your role as a player. You have a future. There were some fine teams at the junior Varsity level this year, and some fine players: Brandeleis, Kolegraff Riley, Martignetti, Brady, Pena, and Long to name but a few. Mitty's JV basketball teams had never won a league game in the history of the school, till 1971 when they won a bundle. On the other hand, the JV foot- ball team only got one win all season. Things were so bad at one point the quarterback decided to go duck- hunting instead. Win a bundle, lose a bundle. VVhat's it like to be a IV? If you played for Coaches Granados or Townsend this year you won more than you lost. Decidedly more, and learning to win is a lot nicer than learning to lose. 1 mn ,, r 4n.., .. . A A PARTISAN REPORT FROM SOMEONE WHO HAD MATH OR RATHER WAS HAD BY MATH WHEN HE WAS IN HIGH SCHOOL AND THEREFORE OUGHT TO KNOW BETTER There are those who would say Mitty's Math Program has everything as backwards as the photograph of the Math teachers and their teaching assistants pictured above. Controversy surrounded the program from the first, some vocal, some as silent and disconnected as some of the less successful students. Major modifica- tions in the program came soon in the year. Too soon for some and not soon enough for others. I-low much credit will I get? My TA doesn't understand me! People questioned, exclaimed . . . just how much algebra does a musician need anyway? How much math is really needed for the man who clearly has no career ahead in math or science? How clear is clear? Is algebra the necessary first step in mathe- matiCS education? Many times the presuppositions about what is college prep work and what is not fail to take into account the vast varieties of higher education. Could Algebra I and II, Geometry, and Trig be salac ious old whores every young man gets sent to as part of some bizarre Twentieth Century American puberty rite for the middle class? What jesuitical device lurks in the crannies of that old lockstep? Was this a needless experiment for seventy percent of the students? What is Qwas?j the Math Program? Let me continue by saying something simple we can all agree upon: two plus two equals four. Right? Sometimes. As I understand it, the Math Program realized the old educational saw "Each student will proceed according to his own pace" which is exactly what happened -- some guys did well, moving swiftly, others did a little, slowly. You don't move on to the next level until you succeed at the current one which is a very sound approach to mathema- tics pedagogy. Having spent my high school career befogged by Algebra instructors telling me I wasn't working hard enough and then sprinting on to the next chapter while I foundered in the vacuum of their lesson plan propwash, I am convinced the Math Program has the right approach. I see some students way into a second year's work and the second semester is barely under way -- that I sub- mit is super. Super. But what about us DUMBKOFERS who don't get cranapples from cranberries and apples? Well, you let me flounder around long enough till your sure I'm not just lazy. Then you help me by doing a variety of things and one of them is getting the bright guys to lend a hand. Students do learn from one another in every king of thing from basketball to chess, from music to mathematics. There is no question the Math Program flike most Mitty programsj calls for a mature, determined effort from every student, TA, and teacher. As the year went on the Math Program matured greatly -- some students matured and found out clearly they were or were not mathematicians, they learned from one another, and they didn't get swallowed up in some surrealistic mathematical gyre. Hooray for Dan Eaton, Ralph Pardo, and Bros. Rolly Bunda and jerry Gor! Hooray for you Math TAS! Chalk one up for Goodness, Beauty, and Truth. -- Kevin McCarthy Excalibur Faculty Advisor Ex Math Midget MITTY PEOPLE " 'L 1 m L' ' , v , if ' K Sf ms 15:2 T-FL A K ' K V AQ. 1, A-,i ...Q .ax ,X Vg .x +315 .. ,vw X 'iv' -A 5 R V5 . 1 A a Q ve ' W 1 1 I 4 is 1 ' 1 '3 M9131 S A ,wfgi . . 3, ,- Q - E -,,,.-f' X A , 3 1 3 i I RT! . , E H' iE4',i 23 W e! 'L 4 5 13 S, 3 ,Q , iii 'W R 1 5. 2 till .X ' I E pw I f 1 x ,1 f S gl 4 1 1 Y me T Q if I Y fi! i l if g. i, q T, .flif 'fl gl gl f T 1 N vs. i sg? Q-' "5 asm E E J, ,- f'fii'1 W . 7- "'A,-5" 'f ' a"X, K-1 f N P ' v 4 , f fs...- 4, , M 1' ' L1 M511 iwbi 32 1 1 fi N NN yi gm ' E w X Ei w I Q. X X Sv is K 'S' W X .0 A ws, 'fits A . .,.. QE SSN .132 Q-:W ,, . .. ,lf , - X -N I' W I 3 I . . ig J' -gi , W ffm , .Ai 'A1' f In . , ..,, A- - gf.: ' ' .QQ it xx ii? , - . . w-QQ, .Q -fra.-. -Q L. ks Sf I 2: U' E .E ED CU ..C'. LJ E O I- 3-4 cu an P' cv .-C1 4-I Sl-4 O 5-4 GJ .-C ograp Phot I u I 'Q I iw-, - I I 4 I 1 I I I I 4 ' 4-as-101 L 4 qw, -esLj,, ,fig I r ff I 'T Ig 3 , I . I I g 1 r aj I I 1 o 5 7? I i ,IQ . QI ' 5 Editor-in-chief: Dale Gregersen Copy Editor: John Waters Photography editors: Tom Chargin Russ Hughes Paul Landry Faculty advisor: Kevin McCarthy Special thanks to Mr. Kolegraff, Mr. Pluto, and Mr. Sanford for their photographs. JL Lls,UD1 25 52f,f'yjxl im'-f3X xlg yqixg K gl M5451 mall. ms JK A x x x . ,-e -,, 'vw , play, A -:. NVQ W,' lx xg ,-N 1--. X1 j um L-X .714 1. '- Lv-1 ,N -. Ajgpf JAM-2.1 1. ,1 f .,. 110.13 1-tJX.,1:U U Wqx-. -yr x 'x .. -1 4,, L,-pm uw-w,',.W ri 1-xx ' U A 1, -,fg x'-f'-sl E fy, H5 A ,Y . L. .MUS f..?f,jVQf ,.J',,g,J.ftd .- xl'.!,X x x fvlllxj J Vx 5x'a:1,i K QJBW "Q Lxf in yi Km' Paeveqli Wk 9 G Ca ve if Cvlvpfw Cm :palm F3 Ti WMCJUF5 Q7 0 x-7 !x,GCCi2fNXNi QL' Hgh M91 Qddg- 1 RMS X 453155 Sumncw Davis Rei E wh fi Mo


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