Arcadia High School - Olympian Yearbook (Phoenix, AZ)

 - Class of 1960

Page 1 of 160

 

Arcadia High School - Olympian Yearbook (Phoenix, AZ) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 160 of the 1960 volume:

 W x N . «£ (y % 3. j 0A %mu ,'a 7 f o (V o1 ik IdAiby , ■ rfcr S xrSw jJtX lfM.(JT) , Co c L eo j4rcadia kligli §cWl Hie. ux, Irizmi 7) • - 5 -— 7 - ------- TT, iyy?- - })'Lt' XZ t y .C Lj j A JLt-zAl 2iy vr v-y AJzls JL U Faculty Advisor MR. A. J. CARPENTER HELEN BLANDI Table, (9mtmts THEME AND DEDICATION .... 2 BUILDINGS.......................4 FACULTY AND CLASSROOMS, . . 8 CLASSES. . . . .............20 ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES . 60 SCHOOL LIFE....................82 SPORTS.........................90 FINE ARTS.....................108 HONORS........................118 ADVERTISING AND PATRONS . . .132  Cbiu- SlX y JbO u yikxb HA ! u b 0 , 0 v £jte jQ SU X x yC w cAJrv X, O yrJk jy oJ- i sirUL Z J i l „ 2 ✓ LaAQ A 5 . Ml ti  UP liMior tl i "Past, yd driMlMar(l tli "Fixture IN EVERY POSSIBLE WAY, Arcadia High School represents the look of tomorrow, the trend toward progress. First, in her styling, Arcadia has taken a dramatic step forward. The round li- brary and other unique buildings were a source of awe to nearly everyone. Be- ing one of the first of this type in the nation, our school is truly a monument to architectural progress. Under the able direction of Dr. R. E. Bullington, our capable faculty sought practical applications of modern teach- ing methods. General emphasis was placed on class participation and the in- dividual development of each student. Finally, the attitude of everyone con- nected with Arcadia High has been one of progress, of always striving forward toward new frontiers. Because in these and so many other ways, our school is an example of things to come, we dedicate our 1960 Olym- pian progress.H c ijuxg Yoa The main attraction on campus was the round library, which was raised several feet above the ground on stilts. It earned for Arcadia High such nicknames as "Spaceland" and "Disneyland." WITH THE OPENING of the 1959-60 school year, students were surprised and fascinated by the many distinctive features of the new Arcadia High School, which was designed by Phoenix Architect Mel Ensign. The unique round library, main attraction for many students, was a popular place not only because of the study facilities of- fered there, but also because of the recreation area beneath it. This area was put to good use by the students during both lunch hours, before, and after school. Surrounding the library was a semi-circle of classrooms, which, when completed in I960, made an entire circle. This new addition nearly doubled the number of classrooms on campus. For a few short weeks, empty bookshelves lined the walls of the circular library. Arcadia's unique design was especially oyt anding in this building. semi-circle of classroorhs, more than f Arcadia's classes were held. On the up- floor were the departments of mathematics and English, and on the lower floor, those of science, business, and social studies.yw § aw . . Toadied was When completed, the auditorium was used for assemblies, plays and musical productions. Music and drama classes were transferred from their temporary classrooms to this building. "STUDENT SERVICE CENTER" was the official title given to the administration building. This clover-shaped building on the northwest corner of campus just off the "Walk of Olives" housed four main centers of activity, the principal's office, guidance center, nurse's office, and bookstore. Early in 1960, the auditorium and the classrooms surround- ing it were completed. At this time fine arts classes, which had previously been meeting in the art building and the cafeteria, were moved to their permanent places. The auditorium itself, with a seating capacity of 1330, was the site of many assemblies and productions, both musical and dramatic. Three circles joined to make the administration building. All school business was transacted in this pleasantly lighted and decorated building.New UW j4ttradu k . . The cafeteria and the snack bar were kept busy during lunch hours, and were frequently the site of fun during dances and other evening activities. DIRECTLY ACROSS FROM the Student Service Center was the art building. This structure, which had once served as As the picture below shows, space in the art building was very limited, but art students spent many creative hours there. a home, was converted to the art center. Until the audi- torium and the surrounding classrooms were completed, drama classes were held here. During Arcadia's first, and perhaps most challenging year, the cafeteria served varied purposes. When lunch hours were not in session, chorus and band classes were held there. It also served as a meeting place for several organizations and a site for many dances. The art building, formerly a house, became the headquarters of the art department. Other classes, includ- ing drama and languages, were held there.Tujictuwtal Uieii The perking lot, in keeping with the rest of Arcadia High, was very attractive. It was used con- stantly during school hours and in the evenings during games, dances and other functions. The stadium on the north side of the football field took on a new life during games as 1800 Titans and visitors cheered their teams. THOUGH NOT COMPLETED in time for the first basketball game, the gymnasium served as the site of many exciting games which followed. In addition to games, girls and boys P.E. classes, pom pon and cheerleading practices were conducted there. The parking area was nearly finished with the open- ing of school. It was in constant use during school and during after-school activities. Arcadia High School is definitely a new idea in school planning. Just how successful this new type of school styling will be can only be told by time, but if '59-'60 has been any indication of the future, Arcadia and other schools like it are setting the pace for tomorrow's education. The gymnasium on the far south side of campus was used by physi- cal education classes, pom pon and cheerleading squads. During bas- ketball games nearly 800 enthus- iastic students cheered and yelled. —M®$t Uww l of all places lem lelk ijiis LslJie Qassiwm . . A SIMILAR DEFINITION may be applied to the teacher. In keeping with Greek tradition, Arcadia High School was com- pletely dedicated to education. Not only must a school itself be dedi- cated to this cause, but each and every member of the faculty must possess this devotion also. The students of Arcadia were fortunate to have just such a fac- ulty. The school's many involved functions were kept running smoothly by the ad- ministrators, while the guidance depart- ment and faculty worked closely with the students themselves. Members of the faculty not only spent many hours in the classroom, but also sponsored many student activities.j4 r ressu e, ARCADIA HIGH'S administrative staff was headed by Principal Dr. Richard E. Bull- ington, who worked through the year to keep Arcadia at its academic best. Dr. Bullington is a graduate of Rutgers State University, New Jersey, where he ob- tained his BS degree in education. He earned his Master's degree at University of Alabama and his PhD at University of Arizona. MRS. HENRY STIEG PRESIDENT DR. RICHARD E. BULLINGTON MR. HIL BRADY PRINCIPAL ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL THE NUMEROUS PURPOSES and duties which kept the school board busy this year were keeping educational standards high, employing teachers and admin- istrative officers, and providing adequate materials and means for the school system. The board was made up of five outstanding citizens — Mrs. Sally Stieg, Mr. Paul Feltman, Mr. Lester Mowry, Mr. Reese Verner, and Mr. Lloyd Bimson — who dedicated several hours each week for Arcadia and the other schools in the system. MR. REESE VERNER MEMBER MR. LLOYD BIMSON MEMBER MR. WILLIAM HENDRY ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL ARCADIA HAD NOT ONE, but two assistant principals. Mr. Hil Brady, who has a BA and MA degree from Arizona State University, had the job of disciplining and regulating activities of the student body. Regis- tration and guidance were in the able hands of Mr. Hendry, who obtained his BA degree at Alma College, Michigan. 10 -"F w a "Progressive. ‘SckW- FOR THE PAST SEVEN YEARS Mr. Ashe has served as Scottsdale Public School System Superintendent. He is a grad- uate of Arizona State University where he obtained his BA, MA, and EDO in education. Assisting Mr. Ashe was Mr. Davis, who is a graduate of Arizona State College at Flagstaff and has been in the Scottsdale School System since 1954. MR. JOHN ASHE MR. RAY DAVIS SUPERINTENDENT ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT KEEPING A WATCHFUL EYE on accounts, and purchasing school pro- visions again this past year was the Business Manager George Merrill. Personnel manager this year was Mr. John Connors, whose job was to interview and recommend people for employment in the school system. This included teachers and noncertified personnel such as clerks, maintenance people, and the like. MR. GEORGE MERRILL BUSINESS MANAGER MRS. JEAN McMINN, director of the Guidance Office, was ably assisted by Mrs. Ruth Downey and Mr. Olan Moore in helping students this past year with problems pertaining to school subjects, school activi- ties and outside work. They also helped each student plan a logical curriculum appropriate for his needs and abilities. This department worked very hard to help students during the year. MR. JOHN CONNORS MRS. JEAN McMINN PERSONNEL MANAGER GUIDANCE CHAIRMAN MR. OLAN MOORE GUIDANCE MRS. RUTH DOWNEY GUIDANCE 11§ciW and M.(itke rtLas . . MATHEMATICS, sometimes called the language of science, is used not only in technological oc- cupations, but in daily applications of all kinds. The interest of many students today lies in en- gineering or related scientific fields, and the upswing of technical programs in most high schools has emphasized the need for math. Headed by Mr. Jeff Larson, the Math Depart- ment offered courses ranging from general math to solid geometry and trigonometry. More ad- vanced students were offered an accelerated program, covering four years of math in three years. In addition to the regular curriculum, a course in mathematical applications was taught after school by Dr. Bullington. MR. FORREST JOHNSON . . . general math, algebra ... 1 1 years teach- ing .. . sponsored Sophomore Class . . . photography, tropical fish . . . "Can the chatter, it's my turn." MISS PENNY ROBERTS . . . algebra, geometry ... 1 year teaching . . . sponsored Freshman Class . . . spec- tator sports, reading. MR. FRANK WILCOX . . . geometry, algebra ... 10 years teaching . . . sponsored Freshman Class . . . music. Dwarfed by Mr. Jeff Larson, Ann Schneider, Mary Thomas, and Ann Cornwell do their difficult algebra problems, while Bill Welch seems to be laughing at the teacher's joke. Mr. Frank Wilcox supervises while Harriet Zenobi and Locke Kelly attempt to prove that CE is parallel to AB in triangle ABC. Good luck! 12 -. .TU Lcut aage of Tedui l SCIENCE goes hand in hand with mathematics in today's world. Job opportunities range from elec- tronics, as in radar and tracking devices, to all sorts of engineering. The preparation of students for these jobs and the general instruction of all students was the job of the Science Department, headed by Mr. John Henderson. Among the six courses taught were lab science, biology, chemistry, physics, and two special courses. Advanced Physics and Advanced Biology. All laboratory equipment, from scales, Bunson and Fisher burn- ers to distilling apparatus was brand new at Arcadia this year. MR. JOHN HENDERSON . . . Head of Science Department . . . biology, advanced biology ... 3 years teach- ing .. . sponsored Sophomore Class . . . photography, wafer skiing, hi fi. MR. RICHARD L. DAWSON . . . biol- ogy ... 11 years teaching . . . sponsored Freshman Class . . . sports. MRS. EDITH GEARY . . . science laboratory, biology,.homemaking . . . 2 years teaching . . . sponsored Y-Teens . . . sewing, flowers, music. MR. BAXTER HURN . . . chemistry, biology ... 8 years teaching . . . sponsored Senior Class, Chemistry Club . . . skin diving, tennis, phil- osophy . . . "Now get this." MR. DAVID NEAL . . . general and accelerated physics, science labora- tory ... 1 year teaching . . . spon- sored Senior Class . . . hunting, auto mechanics . . . "Knot-head." Glenda leistiko, JoAnne Thornton, Vicky Zoeller and Mr. Hurn look on approvingly as Jim Anderson observes the effect of oxidation on steel wool. This experiment was one of many carried on by chemistry students, and it involved the study of oxygen. The intricate human organs are closely scrutinized by Mr. David Neal and Fred Daniels. Giving advice and instructions are sci- epce laboratory students Scottie Colson. Veronica Bann, Judy Sheer, Sharon Stoefzer, and Lynda Wynn. 13 -9«-1 MR. ROBERT FINKBINE . Social Studies Department . . ican History ... 4 years . . . sponsored Teens Against cer. Flag Football Club graphy, athletics, swimming three children, reading history . . . "It's a hard life." MR. GORDON CASWELL . . . Ameri- can Problems, World Geography, ... 17 years teaching . . . Senior Class . . . golf, reading. MR. ANTHONY SCHIFINO . . . Amer- ican History, social studies ... 5 years teaching . . . sponsored Junior Class . . . golf. GwerH nent . . Hie living THE SOCIAL STUDIES Department, headed by Mr. Robert Finkbine, taught courses in social studies, world geo- graphy and history, American History and government. Mr. Howard Amerson headed the Safety Education Department, which taught the basic skills of driving. MR. JACK WEBB . . . World History, social studies ... 8 years teaching . . . sponsored Freshman Class bridge. r. Gordon Caswell explains a chart showing the life of a new w to Teddy Neuberf and Suzanne Brown during American Problems, a course taken by all seniors and mandatory for graduation. MR. HOWARD AMERSON . . . Head of Safety Education Department . . —P safety education ... 12 years teach- ing .. . sponsored Student Council . . . sports . . . "Okay, you guys, knock it offI" Roger Bigelow and Mr. Howard Amerson test Judy Jackson's peripheral, or "field," vision while Mary Thomas records the score. The apparatus shown in this picture was one of the many devices used for testing in safety education.MRS. CLAUDETTE BERACH . . . home- making, human relations ... 1 year teaching . . . leathercraft, swimming, sewing, jewelry making, flower ar- rangements. MRS. MARY LOU MYERS . . . typing, shorthand ... 1 year teaching . . . sponsored Junior Class. lousiness . . 1it 15asis of Oar Emamc SyStfcw. THE BUSINESS EDUCATION Department, headed by Mrs. Doris Howard, prepared students for jobs in industry and business. Typing, general business, shorthand, busi- ness math and English, commercial law and bookkeep- ing were taught. The Homemaking Department, consisting of Mrs. Claudette Berach and Mrs. Edith Geary, gave the girls insight into keeping up a home. Making "T" accounts is one of the basic skills taught in Book- keeping I. Here Kris DiTullio tries her luck as Connie Stephenson, Diane Alford, Chuck DuFrain and Mike Weller check for mis- takes. Here Sue Bartaluzzi, Sharon Farmer, Donna Myers, Parma Hoiles and Edith Davis cook up a delectable dish in homemaking. Kit- chen facilities were complete, modern, and colorful. MRS. DORIS JO HOWARD . . Head of Business Education Department . . . business law, typing, office training ... 10 years teaching . . . sponsored Sophomore Class, Fenc- ing Club . . . golf, fencing, archery, design, writing. MR. ARTHUR PETERSON . . . book- keeping, general business, business English, business math ... 1 year teaching . . . sponsored Junior Class . . . sports, travel, photography, agri- culture, construction. MR. WALLACE BUMP . . . librarian . . . 10 years teaching . . . "The only man who ever got all his work done by Friday was Robinson Crusoe."English . . of Gomunicdtim. THE NECESSITY of Eng- lish for every student cannot be overempha- sized. In all occupations, proficiency in English is a requirement. No per- son can make the im- pression he wants to make if his grammar is bad, or if he hasn't the slightest idea of how to write a good letter. Janice Ourcn, Ann Rosenstein, Bill Helbing, Chris Bohling, and Sharon Benson listen entranced while Mr. Collignon lectures on the virtues of Hemingway. Discussion was the daily activity of English VI. MR. JOSEPH COLLIGNON . . . Head of English Department . . . English . . . 5 years teaching . . . sponsored Junior Class, N.H.S. . . . swimming, tennis. MR. AFTON J. CARPENTER . . . Eng- lish, journalism, yearbook ... 9 years teaching . . . hiking . . . "We're on a hot deadline." MRS. VERNA FEBUS . . . English . . . 14 years teaching . . . sponsored Senior Class . . . music, outdoor life . . . "dbme students have feeling for their teacher." MRS. HELEN FISHER . . . English . . . 1 year teaching . . . sponsored Soph- omore Class . . . children . . . "What's for dessert today?" MRS. LOUISE MILLER . . . English Cindy Johnson and Roberta Love hesitantly speak into a tape . . . 32 years teaching . . . spon- recorder. This machine was used often in English III to help sored Junior Class. students improve their speaking ability. Mr. Joseph Collignon, head of the department, and other English teach- ers worked toward their goal of making every student well-spoken, well-read and well-writ- ten through the essen- tials of good grammar and fine literature. An extracurricular course in speed reading was also taught. 16 -LO uages . . Oar Uittittke World ONE OF THE essentials of good foreign relations is an understanding of the people and customs of the country with whom we are trying to negotiate. This under- standing could not be at- tained or developed without the study of for- eign language. MRS. MARGUERITE NEID . . . Eng- Mr. Doran wraps Tom Henze in a makeshift Roman toga while lish . . . by2 years teaching . . . Latin I students howl with glee. Tom doesn't look too happy sponsored Sophomore Class . . . with his lot. Hail, Caesar) sports. MRS. CECELIA WITTY . . . English, speech training ... 4 years teaching . . . sponsored Sophomore Class . . . swimming, interior decorating . . . "Let's be quiet." MR. THOMAS DORAN . . . Head of Foreign Language Department . . . Latin ... 13 years teaching . . . sponsored Freshman Class, Junior Classical League . . . "Sapristi!" MR. ALFRED HEYWOOD . . . Spanish . . . 5 years teaching . . . sponsored Sophomore Class, Rifle Club . . . hunting, fishing . . . "Bueno!" The Language Depart- ment, headed by Mr. Thomas Doran, worked many long hours to give each student a basic un- derstanding of a country and its people through the language being studied. In addition to French, Spanish and Latin, courses in Italian and Japanese were taught by Mr. Doran and Mr. Caswell, respect- ively. Johnny MacArfhur and Mr. Heywood give struggling Linda Beal assistance with the troublesome task of conjugating verbs. This was one of the skills that was fully developed in Spanish II. MRS. EMILY STAFFORD . . . French, Spanish ... 10 years teaching . . . sponsored Freshman Class, French Club . . . travel . . . "Silendo!" 17 -MR. ROBERT HENDRICKS . . . Ath- letic director . . . boys' physical edu- cation ... 5 years teaching . . . sponsored Letterman's Club . . . skin diving, hunting . . . "Let's get the job done." MR. BENNY ANDERSON . . . boys' physical education, safety education . . . 1 year teaching . . . music, golf . . . "Some days you eat the bear, some days the bear eats you." MISS SALLY HARDEN . . . girls' physical education ... 4 years teaching . . . sponsored girls' tennis, pom pon girls. Senior Class . . . leather carving, golf . . . "Poor baby." MR. PATRICK CARLIN . . . boys' physical education ... I year teach- ing .. . sponsored Junior Class . . . fishing, softball ... "A winner never quits and a quitter never wins." •ftbi ss . . . "tke Key -fo T lujsicaL Weil-i5ewy PHYSICAL FITNESS has become increasingly important in our daily lives, and its necessity becomes more and more apparent every day. Physical Education, which teaches fitness, has become mandatory in most high schools. Mr. Hendricks, Arcadia's athletic director, had to organize, not only the Physical Educa- tion Department, but all athletic teams repre- senting the school. Many sports were covered in a year of P. E., among them, not only major sports, but also little-known ones, such as vol- leyball and speedball. MRS. NANCY TIMBROOK . . . girls' physical education, English . . . 5 2 years teaching . . . sponsored cheer- leaders, Pep Club, girls' intramurals . . . music, sports . . . "Time out." Connie Clark demonstrates a speedball "lift" to attentive ath- letes Barbara Haupt, Jan Sisson, and Connie Mcudell. Speedball was one of the many minor sports covered in physical edu- cation. Frank Riley aims for a free throw while Walter Lahti, Stephen Everson, Rick Larson and Don Bisbee anxiously await the flight of the ball. This is one of the seasonal sports played by boys in physical education.Jht . . TU Expressisti sj1 M.oks Inner §el THE ALLIED ARTS Department was led by Mr. John Hall. This department taught a wide vari- ety of subjects including band, chorus, drama, art and speech training. The Industrial Arts Department, headed by Mr Joe Nix, taught widely diversified skills such as woodworking, drafting, leatherwork and other manual crafts. MR. JOHN R. HAIL . . . Head of Allied Arts Department . . . drama, speech training ... 9 years teach- ing . . . sponsored Senior Class . . . "Figures." MRS. MARGARET BURRELL . . . arts and crafts ... 5 years teaching . . . sponsored Senior Class, Art Club. MR. JOE NIX . . . woodworking, drafting ... 3 years teaching . . . sponsored Sophomore Class . . . building, fishing, sports. MR. REGINALD BROOKS . . . band, chorus ... 3 years teaching . . . sponsored Band Lettermens Club . . . hunting. MR. JAMES MULLER . . . drafting, crafts ... 2 years teaching . . . electronics. Mr. Nix demonstrates a power saw to Woodworking I stu- dents Doug McCollam, Jim Evans, Roger Wollheim, Murphy Medecke, Eldred Stamm, Gene Reid and Lester Butler. The new power tools were used by advanced woodworking students. Sharin Smith, Steve Sutter, Ross Ficcara, Don Aden, Leroy Gaintner and Bill Hart work industriously over their drawing boards in mechanical drawing. This subject required great precision and exactness. juuyu kj?fclU U ij- Ci o Scy C SUfrdL (La- j I %J 'M ssui, yy fc i %AJ. v» -v spst ctspi Put. r4L P ryrt yijL, XPU- $ CYI TtSUsisyyjts ud -o .Ssrs%L »£a.1 - X vL 1- A soy+ ?z li dtsK ntO' chr Pi., O Uru, Ti.mJA, '" p . s' If C V 6 ' Co; ■ns , Jusm l-' ft'TTl s '►-i c zA s t rwiesiAtc -nJ • J O-O-c s tJa, fyjL£ a-£. W, % uK zzr 't -' f a (a Ls a. K i 6 kiigk §clu5®t provides youth. wttJi experiences ut skaruuj, , leanung THE OPPORTUNITY to develop both aca- demically and socially is offered to high school students in many different forms, some of them being school work, class activ- ities, and club activities. Enthusiastic to get into the swing of high school life, the freshmen had a very out- standing year, exemplifying terrific school spirit and class spirit as well. The freshmen also participated actively in sports, their football team having a season record of 8-1-1. The sophomore class, with a full year of experience behind them, were active in many ways. One of their main projects of the year was having a party for the fresh- men. They were also involved in several clubs, in sports, and in scholastic attainment. The main interest of the junior class was preparing for the Junior-Senior Prom. Al- though this big event was their major proj- ect, the juniors also participated in clubs and student government. The culmination of all high school activ- ities came with the senior year. Although the class of '60 participated in many ways, their main concern was graduation. Several months were spent in preparation for this all-important day. After four priceless years of studying, participating, sharing, and learning the seniors were finally presented with their diplomas. Those in the graduating class of 1960 left Arcadia High prepared to enter their chosen fields or to continue their growth educationally.- 22 - jb rx 'Ksl cl uyvuA n jdl vJL iU' (XlftAS J t jLo XL jUttk Xk xfat c u l, juMi L'WLlfrv o ' l$Xst 4l sLkA 4 jUz-O O-f-LsrJ ■ (XXX ] acIcLt A (Lcb L J yy biw vyV 37nJlw X gx vsl'JX •Aac bfi bJb X jJoaj '7V it yuvu Ioaj-c, nxA.'VL Uastj tyLlas (yr« - Qy O i. xj jLs 'TLuXy Kj CSO L X ns X J-jL y A Ky riAs A oA rfr y .1 ! Af Pre eiitiiig FREDRIC B. BURNS PRESIDENT "Fred" . . . DeMolay, Key. Wrestling, Tennis, Student Council . . . Frosh Class Rep., Jr. Red Cross Delegate . . . Busi- ness Finance . . . Dating, boating, skiing . . . (Suppressed desire:) To go to class on time and make good grades ... "I will my white bermudas and red coat to the next fool brave enough to wear them to school" ... "I didn't do it!" . . . He Graiutftiiy (Plass ©f IP60 CONNIE STEPHENSON SECRETARY MARILYN BENNET VICE PRESIDENT F. H. A., Rifle Club, Red Cross, French Club . . . Homecoming Queen, Pres. Chemistry Club . . . College . . . Swim- ming, dancing ... To take auto shop in school ... "I will all my books to my brother" ... "I guess so." Pep Club, Girl's league. Student Council . . . Senior Day Queen, Homecoming Attendant . . . University of Colorado . . . Swimming, writing, playing the organ ... To join the Coast Guard . . . "I will my pony tail to Fred Ross" . . . "I'm Embarrassed!" Senior sponsors, who worked many hours helping class members plan assemblies, activities, and graduation. Mrs. Margaret Burrell, Miss Sally Harden, Mr. John R. Hall, Mr. Gordon Caswell, Mr. David Neal, Mr. Baxter Hurn, and Mr. James Muller. MEMORIES of fun filled times will be many for Arcadia's first graduating class, for collectively they participated in every organized activity on campus. Several seniors were instrumental in formulating new traditions and policies to be carried on long after they are gone, through tak- ing an active part in student government, class projects and club activities. Inasmuch as Arcadia was brand new this year, the total student body came as representatives from separate schools, many feeling a sense of split loyalty. These feelings, however, were quickly resolved in the flurry of new friendships and shared activities. Perhaps the seniors, more than any other class, felt this new unity. Because they had a personal choice about changing schools in their final year, those who came to Arcadia did so imbued with a definite eagerness for sharing the excitement and inevitable challenge of being a part of a new and pioneering school, hoping to fully participate and enter in to the fullest. - 24 -GLORIA THOMPSON TREASURER Senior Qoss j4ctu e. "Under Prextj Trecl Bum LEE ALLISTON BOY REPRESENTATIVE "Gloria" . . . Phy Tyo Club . . . Typing certificates, 3 Bookkeeping awards . . . Painting, writing poetry ... To be able to make up my mind without a lot of confusion ... "I will Mr. Hall to all fu- ture Drama students” "To each his own." THE FIRST SENIOR CLASS became closely knit in a short time, and by May nearly every one of the 115-member class had taken part in planning assemblies, dances, graduation, and other senior activities. Elected to lead class activities were Fred Burns, President; Marilyn Bennett, Vice President; Connie Stephenson, Secre- tary; Gloria Thompson, Treasurer, and Helen Blanding and Lee Alliston, Class Representatives to Student Council. Graduation was an ecstatic culmination of 4 years of academic and social achieve- ment which was preceeded by a whirl- wind of last minute cramming sessions, exciting parties, and happy celebrations as graduates received announcements of college acceptances and scholarship awards. In this section appear pictures of every graduating senior who had one taken, and a summary of their clubs, honors received, future plans, favorite pastime, suppressed desire, will, and familiar quote. The seniors also honored 10 class members by electing them Most Intelli- gent, Most Friendly, Most Attractive, Most Talented, or Most Likely to Succeed. HELEN KAY BLANDING CLASS REPRESENTATIVE "Helen" . . . Student Council, Tri-Hi-Y, Pom-Pon Alt., Nat'l Honor Society, Phx. Musical Theatre Guild, "Oklahoma," "Finians Rainbow," Scottsdale Singers . . . Yearbook Editor, Red Cross Con- vention Delegate, Worthy Advisor of Rainbow Girls, Delegate to State Student Council Convention, Pep Club Veep, Pres. St. Joseph Jr. Auxiliary, Queen Finalist "Miss Olympian," Hall of Fame . . . College . . . Sewing, dancing, swim- ming ... To do away with deadlines . . . "I will Mr. C. a little free time" . . . "Hi Ho!" Jim Solem" . . . "Would you like to have an acceleration contest?" Glenda Lestiko and Bill Helbing, "MOST INTELLIGENT" - 25 -TUCSON, TEMPE VISITED ON SENIOR DAYS ROBERT E. ALLEN, "Bob" . . . Amateur Radio Club . . . Col- lege at Flagstaff; Forestry . . . Amateur radio ... Be a Com- munist ... "I will an under- classman the iob of starting an Amateur Radio club . . . "Shoot firef" JOHN ADAMS . . . Latin Club . . . College . . . Sleeping, dat- ing .. . To graduate ... "I will my Harem to Mr. Schifino" . . . "Helpl" DIANE ALFORD, "Di" ... Pep Club, Yearbook . . . V.P. of GAA, Y-Teen Cabinet . . . Kent University, Ohio; Business Ad- ministration . . . Swimming, ice skating, and ice cream ... To be in the F.B.I. ... "I will a very good senior year to my sister, Sheri" . . . "Why-not?" VELMA ANDERS, "Big Feet" . . . GAA, Pep Club, Girls League . . . Flagstaff College . . . Ski- ing, parties ... To meet a "rich" doll in a fine little sports car . . . "I will my '49 Pontiac to next year's Car Corner" . . . "Oh, laugh it off!" JOYCE AMMERMAN, "Joy" . . . Girls League . . . Secretary Wig 'n' Mask Dramatic Club . . . Swimming, dancing, and "Pat" . . . To be Valedictorian . . . "I will my noisiness to every future pupil of Mrs. Burrell" . . . "Toughr CAROL LINDA ARP, "Wyatt" . . . Girls League, Camera Club . . . Housewife . . . Day dream- ing ... "I will my seat in American Problems to some unfortunate junior" . . . "Oh- uh-why?" JUDITH LYNN BALLARD . . . Girls League, FHA, FTA, . . . ASU; Business . . . Water ski ing . . . "You bean head I" BARBARA ARNSBERG, "Bobbie" . . . Da-Kon-Ya, Girls League, Bowling League . . . Dance Band, Choral accompanist. Mu- sical productions . . . College (U of A); Harmony and Arrang- ing teacher . . . Piano, water skiing, swimming, tennis . . . To live at La Jolla, California and see more of M.G.M. Stu- dios . . . "Hallelulahl" - 26 -CONNIE, ANN . . SHINE AS ARCADIA PRINCESSES SUE BARTALUZZI, "Susie" . . . Biology Club, Spanish Club, Beaver Builders Club, GAA . Y-Teens Representative, Tennis Club Historian, National Honor Society . . . College (A S U); Teaching . . . Dancing, tennis, reading ... To join a fraternity at ASU ... "I will my driver's license to my brother so I don't have to cart him around" . . . "Oh, really?" SHARON BENSEN . . . Swim- ming, dating . . . "Well, honest to Peter WILLIAM M. BERG, "Bill" . . . Lettermens Club, Key Club, SRVP VPA . . . Homecoming King, Student Body P exy, Hall of Fame, Co-Capt. of Fencing Team . . . Texas Lutheran Col- lege,- Electronics . . . Stereo Hi Fi, girls ... To have 5th per- iod Student Council ... "I will next year's S.C. President 15 new members with 15 new ideas" . . . Merry Christmas!" BRUCE D. BUCKLEY, "Bruce" . . . College . . . Basketball, Red Cross Convention Delegate . . . To strangle Karen's little brother ... "I hereby will one Jim Cameron an extra large handkerchief" . . . "Knock it offr THOMAS BAUM, "Tom" . . . Band Lettermens Club . . . Swimming ... Be a doctor. GARY BEIL . . . Bowling Club . . . College (ASU); Insurance . . . Bowling, stamp collecting, photography ... I will my American Government book to Scott Vaughn" . . . "Quit it, Seoul" A ALEASE ANNE BENYI, "Anne" . . . Lae-Tae Y-Teens ... To live in a penthouse with maids . . . "I will my government tests and an empty grey box to Diane Bowkley" ... I'd much rather go bowling!" STEPHEN BLECHNER, "Stever- eeno" . . . School play . . . College (ASU) . . . Guns, target shooting ... To be a teacher with Mr. Hall as my student . . . "I will all my brownie points and brownie pins to any of Mr. Hum's chemistry stu- dents next year" . . . 'Let's neck!" ¥ - 27 -MARCO PAPALEONI BROUGHT FRIENDSHIP FROM ITALY CHRIS BOHLING ... Art Club. Biology Club, Pep Club, GAA, Girls League . . . Frosh and Soph Sec. . . . College, Adver- tising, Public Relations . . . Parties . . . Attend a Roman Orgy . . . "You rock, you scoty beast!" JILL OIANE BOTTRELL . . . First Class Honor Roll . . . Univer- sity of California; Psychoana- lyst . . . Reading, bad chess, tennis games ... (I don't sup- press my desires) . . . "Most seniors will, I will not . . . "Did you ever think?" BARBARA BUTLER, "Bebe" . . . Pep Club, National Honor So- ciety, Mu Alpha Theta . . . Col- lege (Redlands); Mathematics . . . Sewing, playing piano, asking questions . . . Flunk one of Mr. Caswell's tests . . . "To Mr. Larson, I will my sister, so he will always have someone to ask questions" . . . "But Mr. Larson . . . Why?" Diane Greer, and Fred Burns "Most likely to succeed" SUZANN KAY BROWN, "Suzie" . . . Pep Club . . . "Miss Olym- pian" finalist . . . College (ASU); Homemaking teacher Swimming . . . Get enough courage to cut my hair ... "I will my clarinet reeds to Jim Swanson" . . . "All right, you guys!" GERALD BUELL, "Jerry" . . . Chess Club, Camera Club . . . Golfing and Bowling ... To receive my graduation diploma . . . "I will my flat tire to Mr. Caswell" . . . "Tally Ho, and all that sort of rott!" TRUDY BOHM . . . College (ASU); study law . . . Tennis, driving the car ... To own Arcadia High and manage it after my taste . . . "Oh, I'm sorry!'' CAROL BOWER . . Graduate, work in a bank . . . Listening to the stereo ... To get rich quick ... "I will my talkive- ness to Carl Parker" . . . "Wish I had a car." RICHARD CORLISS, "Dick" . . . College (ASU) ... Hi Fi. Pho- tography, Music . . . Drive a Rolls Royce to school ... "I will my negatives to Mr. Car- penter . . . "Hmmmmmmm?" - 28 -GREER, BLANDING HEAD EDITORIAL STAFFS FRIEDA DANIELS . . . Pom-Pon, Pep Club, Girls League GAA, College; Airline Stewardess . . . Parties, Drags . . . Belong to the Maffia . . . "Happy Valen- tines Day!" AL EDMONSON "Alphons" . . . Tile Setter . . . Thinking about how to build an extrava- gant airplane . . . Have a won- derful and full life with Judy . . . "Let's get going!" JOHN GRAVES . . . Lettermens Club, Track . . . Frosh Boy Rep- resentative . . . College (Flag- staff) . . . Cars ... To elimin- ate women drivers . . . "What is there to do tonight, Anne?" LARRY GENE GOFF . . . Pilot in the Air Force . . . Hunting, staying away from girls . . . To hunt Elk . . . Why not?" BARBARA GRAHAM . . Olym- pian Staff, Astronomy Club . . . College . . . Reading ... To be able to sing ... "I will Mr. Caswell to Muriel Hockstetlcr." . . . "Bizarre!" HANNAH EASTBURN, "Lee" . . . Pep Club, Girls League Art Club Sec. . . . Beautician School Swimming, driving and "Abe" ... To travel around the world without money worries ... "I will a room full of scrap paper to Mr. Caswell" . . . "Really?" KAREN GENTRY, "Kate" . . . Pep Club ... To be invisible for 24 hours ... I will my old Government tests and cheat lists to Sandy Benson . . . "I'm tired." LYNNE GREEN, "Dimples" . . . GAA, Pep Club, Mixed Chorus, Girls League . . . IBM School . . . Bowling, skating, riding . . . To play the piano ... "I leave my naturally curly hair to Mr. Caswell." . . . "Ain't that the berries!" - 29 -BERG, BENNETT PRESIDE OVER HOMECOMING LEAH DIANE GREER, "Cookie" . . . Fencing Club, Japanese X-class, GAA, Girls League . . . Editor of the Arcadian . . . Colorado State University . . . Art, reading, flirting ... To be Mr. Caswell's warden . . . "I will my newspaper to next year's journalism class" . . . "Now is the time for all good newspapermen to come to the aid of the editor." BILL HELBING ... Key Club, Astronomy Club, German Club, Rocket Club . . . College . . . Reading, parties, sleeping . . . To be able to sleep 24 hours a day ... "I will my brain to the Science Department . . . "(censored)." PAUL GRIMMETT, "Scooter" . . . 14 trophies in drag race com- petition ... To become a mil- lionaire . . . Building my Model A . . . "To be stranded on a deserted island with 10,000 women ... "I will my '50 Buick to Bob Dean" . . . "Why?" JIM HALLEY . . . Hi-R-40 Club . . . College (ASU); Insurance, Trust Company ... "I will my ability to avoid truancies to Elaine Tempelton" . . . 'Well, you know me John, . . ." DOUGLAS DETMAR . . . Lettermens Club, Key Club . . . College, University of Nebraska . . . Working on cars and racing . . . To be a bad man ... "I will my salt shaker to Mr. Nix" . . . "Rinky-DinkT ROSS J. FICARRA . . . Loafing . . . Marry a rich widow with a bad cough ... "I will my woodshop projects to Mr. Nix." BARBARA BARNETT, "BB" ... St. Joseph's School of Nursing . . . Drawing, swimming, painting . . . "Too bad!" JOHN BOCCACCIO . . . Political Club, Key Club, Lettermens Association . . . Veep Student Council . . . College, (ASU) . . . Women and trouble . . . "I'm hip!" JOHN HILSDORF . . . Newcom- ers Club . . . Honor Roll, Col- lege, Banking . . . Traveling, antiques, lazy fishing ... To buy a new car of any kind . . . "I will Mr. Anderson a quiet study hall" . . . "Let's have a party I" EDITH HILTON, "Edie" . . . GAA. 4-H Club . . . Nursing, Airline Hostessing . . . Sports, sewing, riding . . . "To marry a millionaire for his money." THEODORA HERSKOVITS, "Teddy" . . . Orchestra, "Okla- homa," "Finian's Rainbow," "Kiss Me Kate," "Pal Joey," Pep Club, Y-Teens . . . Mar- riage . . . Reading ... "I will my infuriating qualities to my brother so that he may con- tinue to bother Mr. Collignon" . . . "Good night!" - 30 -MANY SENIORS ACTIVE IN FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT TED JIPSON, "Tick" . . . Col- lege in California ... I will my chair in the office to . . ." "i'll meet you at Granite Reef." CHERRY HOBSON ... Pep Club . . . College (ASU); Sec- retary . . . dancing, parties . . . To have a car . . . "I will my American Government book to Mr. Caswell'' . . . "That's cool!" WAYNE HUGHES, "Wanie" . . . College, meet girls . . . Getting girls . . . Graduate, then live . . . "I'm tired of school." ROSE MARIE KUPNIEWSKI ... Pep Club, GAA, Girls League . . . Secretary or Airline Stewardess . . . Bowling, dancing, eating ... To be a pilot of my own plane ... "I will to Diane Bowkley my big monster to injure Harry with" . . . "Drop dead!" BARBARA BERLIN . . . Legal secretary ... To beat Robin at tennis . . . "Dealieabob" STAN JONES . . . Sceptre Hi-Y, Golf Team, Swimming Team . . . Frosh Prexy, Model Legis- lature . . . College (ASU) . . . Hunting, desert parties ... To design the next white house . . . "I will my slide rule to Mr. Larson" ... "I didn't do itl" JACQUELINE CAROL KANE, "Jackie" . . . College; Nurse . . . To own a pink Thunder- bird ... "I will my good luck to Barbara Berlin" . . . "Sick, sick, sick . . ." BILL HART, "Just plain Bill" . . . Geology Club ... To get a good job and make a million . . . Working on the Olds; Geolo- gy and Chemistry ... To outrun Lee Alliston's car . . . "Who cares if we get caught, they can't hang you but once I" RICHARD KESSLER . . . Chess Club, Rifle Club, Demons Car Club . . . Girls, Motorcycles, Cars ... To join the WAVES . . . "I will some of my hair to Mr. Caswell" . . ."That's earth- shaking!" CARL KELLER, "Bud" . . . Let- termens Club Wrestling . . . TV and girls ... To be 100 years old ... "I will my books to my brother Bobby" . . . "Help!" KAY KNIGHT . . . Frosh Prexy, Kamsa Beta Y-Teens Treas. . . . College . . . Music ... To mar- ry a millionaire and be the first woman President. ■ SUZANNE KAST . . . Work . . . Swimming, photography . . . to coach a football team . . . "I will my English book to my sister" . . . "Everybody's always waltzing." - 31DESERVING STUDENTS AWARDED COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS ■I BARBARA LAMBERT ... Pep Club, Girls League . . . Office work . . . Sewing, cooking . . . To have a neat car. JOANNE LICHNER, “Jo" . . . Jr. Honor Society, Red Cross . . . Work . . . Cooking, bak- ing ... "I will my American Government book to Rose" . .. “Ye Gads!" ROBERT H. KRUSE, “Bob" . . . Latin Club, R.O.T.C., National Honor Society . . . College (ASU); Metalurgist . . . Going out with girls ... To see every state in the United States and every country in the world . . . "No liel" I LYLIA LAMANTIA, "Blondie" . . . Pep Club, Tri Hi Y, Cheer- leading, Paper Staff, Girls League . . . IBM School . . . Skating, boys, collecting rec- ords ... To take a trip to Pennsylvania ... "I will my blonde hair and blue eyes to Judy Murphy" . . . "Tough enough!" GLENDA L. LESTIKO . . . Band, National Honor Society, FNA, BB Club ... Jr. Class Treas., Larson Award, Band Lettermen Sec., NCCJ Representative . . . Business School; Accounting Writing letters to someone spe- cial, swimming, music, good clean fun ... Be the first woman to reach the moon . . . “I will my shorthand speed to Barbara Hubbard" ... "I just flunked a Chemistry test!" SHARON LEWIS . . . Band . . . Secretary . . . Swimming . . . To go to Law School. SHIRLEY ANN McCUTCHEN, "Peanut" . . . Mercedes Ath letic Girls, Y-Teens, FHA . . 4-H Veep . . . Marriage, Tern pie College . . . Horseback rid ing, swimming . . . Rodeo per former, to be a good one . . "I will to my sister Carol — my place working in the book store" . . . "Shucks!" ROBERT CHARLES LUTES, "Bob" . . . Key Club, Band Let termens Club . . . College (ASU); Spanish teacher ... To see the Titans clobber Scotts- dale . . . 'You know what I mean?" — 32 —TWENTY SENIORS IN NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY CARLA PADOVANI . . . Olym- pian Staff, Pep Club, Girls League . . . College (ASU); Medical Technology . . . Sketch- ing, reading ... "I will my brains to my sister Linda" . . . "Barbara, may I please see your Trig?" JANICE HELEN OUREN . . . Thespians, National Honor So- ciety . . .. Jr. Class Veep . . . College (ASU); English major . . . Painting ... "I will my experience to Marti Walker." MARTHA ANN PALMER, "Mag- gie" . . . Bowling Club . . . College (ASU); Psychologist . . . John, mosaic work, water skiing ... To cook ... "I will Arcadia High School to re- open the drugstore" ... "I can't believe itl" SHERYL PAYNE, "Pain" . . . Thespians, Scottsdale Singers, "Claudia," "Matchmakers," "Twelve Angry Women," "Ear- ly Frost" . . . Pep Club Prexy, Art Club Treas., Fencing Team Treas.-Sec. . . . College; Speech and Fine Arts . . . Fencing, art, acting ... To belong to a Head Shrinkcr's Quorum . . . "Good grief I" BONNIE PETERSON, "Pete" . . . Latin Club, GAA, Girls Glee Club . . . Nurse . . . Fishing, baking, sewing ... To some- day go around the world . . . "I will my brains to my broth- er Lester" . . . "I'm really a farmer at heartl" MARCO PAPOLEONI, "Lover Boy" . . . Key Club, Rifle Club . . . Foreign Exchange Student from Italy, Homecoming At- tendant, Wrestling . . . Col- lege,- Psychology . . . Reading, riding, dancing, girls, moun- tain climbing, fencing ... "I will some pure, strong, true Italian 'Vino' to you all" . . . "Oh, really?" DEANNA JOAN PHILLIPS, "Joan" . . Pep Club, GAA, Cheerleading . . . Soph. Class Treas. . . . Secretary . . . Eat- ing ... To be at class on time . . . "I will my diet book to any girl who wants it" . . . "What?" i CALDWELL ELISE READ, "Pen- ny" . . . Horse Lover's Club . . . Dream Girl of Delta Sig- ma Phi . . . College (UofA) . . . Chip, riding, dancing, sewing ... To get my pony tail snatched off . . "I will all my past fun to Niecie" . . . 'What's happening?"SENIOR TITANS FETED BY JUNIOR CLASS ANN REID, "Shorty" . . . Tri- Hi-Y, Y-Tccns, Pep Club, GAA . . . Vice-President of Student Body, Homecoming Attendant, Senior Day Princess (ASU) . . . College (ASU) . . . Water ski- ing, swimming, dancing, eat- ing .. . To become President of United States ... "I will my brother all my muscles" "Hi Handsome! Hi Gorgeous!" ROBERT ROWE, "Digger" . . . Band Lettermen, Key Club . . . Key Club Prexy . . . College, Texas or Colorado; Physician . . . Golf, music ... To own a hospital for Arcadia Alumni who get ulcers ... "I will my public debt to Student Council" . . . "Key Club will now come to order!" JEFF SINGER . . . Spanish Club, trip to Mexico . . . College (ASU) . . . Working on other peoples cars, also girls . . . "I will my black Cadillac to my Ruth." Caldwell Read and Robin Robbs, "MOST ATTRACTIVE" SUE SHEPHERD . . . Model . . . DIANA SEDOR, "Dee" Swimmina ... To get married ... "I will to Mr. Caswell Fred Ross." ALFRED BERT ROBBS III, "Rob- in" . . . Ag. Club . . . College (UofA) . . . Sailing, water ski- ing, tennis. ROBERT ROWELL, "Bob" . . . Drafting Club, Archery Club, Junior Engineers Club . . . College, Mississippi Southern College; Teaching . . . Sleeping . . . Build a dragster . . . 'To Mr. Ammerson — All my old tardy slips" . . . "What that is?" JOHN G. SMITH, "John" . . . Baseball . . . College (Flagstaff) . . . Inherit $10,000,000 . . . "I will my grade average to Bob Bean" . . . "Hi!" - 34 -SPRING JUNIOR-SENIOR PROM A BIG SUCCESS CAROLINE LEE TEMPLETON . . . Pep Club, Y-Teens . . . College, University of Colorado,- Educa- tion . . . Tennis, skiing, model- ing ... To travel around the world ... "I will my sister to Mr. Caswell" ... It isn't FAIR, Mr. Caswell!" SIGVARD SMITT, "$ig" . . . Key Club . . . College (UofA); Engineering . . . Girls ... "I will English VI to whoever wants it" . . . "Why worry about it?" JAMES SOLEM, "Racer" . . . College (ASU); Engineering . . . Cars . . . Honor Roll, 3rd Place Award in Nat'l Ford Ind. Arts Drafting Contest ... To gradu- ate and start to live . . . "Oh, Hi!" Sheryl Payne and Marco Papaleoni, "MOST TALENTED" VIRGINIA L SWIGARD, "Gin- ny" . . . Biology Club, French Club, GAA . . . College, Uni- DAVID SURGENER . . . Models, versify of Illinois; Business Ad- music. ministration ... To go to El Paso, Texas, on business . . . "To Dede Singer and Lynda Kyff I will one '49 Plymouth" . . . "Oh, sad!" MICHAEL A. TURNER, "Mike" . . . Water skiing, riding horses. PAT STANLEY . . . College . . . Skiing, Bowling. LINDA LEE STOUT, "Lins" . . . Biology Club . . . Beauty Oper- ator . . . Horseback riding . . . "I will Karen Maby a needle to sew with" . . . "Oh, ya know!" - 35 -CLASS OF '60 BECOMES ARCADIA ALUMNAE DON VINCENT, "Peanuts" . . . Young Life Club, Track . . . Homecoming Attendant . . . Air Force . . . Cars, girls, girls . . . To have a goatee like Paul Grimmett ... "I will my good looks to Bob Kruse" . . . "Why not?" SHARON JO WARDELL, "War- dy" . . . U.S. Waves . . . Swim- ming, boating, chasing boys . . . Ride in a jet . . . "I will all my book reports to Mr. Car- penter" . . . "OK, In a minuter ELEANOR WESOLOWSKI, "Cookie" . . . Join WAVES, get married . . . Stamp collecting . . . To become a professional grave-robber for Mr. Franken- stein . . . "I, the undersigned, leave to posterity all my dis- carded gym towels and dirty sneakers" . . . "You cotton picker!" SUSAN SNOW, "Sue" . . . Girls League, GAA . . . Work in an office, get married . . . Volleyball, basketball, swimming . . . "I will my artist's hands to my art teacher." STEPHEN SUTTER, "Steve" . . . Lettermens Club . . . College or Trade School . . . Cars ... To own a '57 Chev. with a big Impala engine "355" ... "I will my Trig, book to Harry Wif- liams" . . . "Later." KEITH THOMAS . . . Work, night school . . . Cruising Central . . . "I will my belt to Mr. Brady" ... "I don't know." CARL VANDERBOSCH . . . Rifle Club, Key Club, Baseball. Soccer . . . Class Treas., Band Council, Band Pres. . . . College (ASU); Foreign Service . . . Music, football ... To crash Hollywood . . . "I will my car to Nancy Tenney" . . . "I'm hungry!" BARBARA WIERSCHEM, "Bobbie" . . . Hanson's Business Col- lege marriage . . . Swimming, sewing, teasing Bill . . . "I will the lunch that's been in my locker all year to Karen Maby" . . . "Why don't ya?" LARRY LOVE . . . College . . . Loafing ... "I will my Trig, book to Gus Ouiedo" . . . "Sec what I mean, chili bean?" DOUGLAS McCOLLAM . . . College (UofA) . . . Sports. ANN ROSENSTEIN, "Sam" . . . Band Lettermens Club . . . High School Instrumental Teacher, marriage . . . Reading, listen- ing to music ... To make a good Shinto out of Bill Helbing . . . "I will to Dave Sargent all the grief that leading a drum section has to offer" . . . "He's so 'Gung Ho'!" WILLIAM SAUNA, "Bill" . . . Science Club, Wrestling, Track . . . College, Carnegie Institute of Technology; Research Chemist . . . Rock'n Roll records, lifting weights ... "I will all of my 5's to Cheryl Salina" . . . "Hey you, come here!" CAROLYN BAINBRIDGE WOOL- DRIDGE . . . Beta Club, Span- ish Club, Math-Science Club . . . Plane Geometry Award . . . Painting, sketching, horse- back riding ... To unsuppress my suppressed desires ... "I will to Jil my will — literally" . . . "So what?" CATHIE WINKELMAN .. Sec- retarial work . . . Having fun ... To throw a rock through a big glass window . . . "Hush!" SHARON YARBROUGH . . . Get married in October, 1960 . . . Bowling, swimming, golf ... To go deep sea fishing. - 36 -THE CLASS OF '61 contributed greatly to the success of Arcadia's first year. The majority of varsity athletic squads, including Cheerleading and Pom Pon were composed mainly of juniors. Twirp Week, the Sweetheart Prom, as well as a candy sale were sources for obtaining money to put on the annual Junior-Senior Prom. The juniors also placed second in the magazine sale. Pat Sterba led the class as President, Susie Wood as Vice President, Secretary was Carol McCufchen, and Treasurer was Harriet Zenobi. Representing the class in student council were Lynn Milof and Ricky Turner. Beverly Sue Christensen and Judy Elliott were the only junior student body officers. Beverly Sue was also chosen sole delegate for Arizona to attend the International Student Burgesses in Virginia. This enthusiastic class impatiently awaits their senior year which will bring forth caps, gowns and diplomas. CLASS SPONSORS — Mr. Larson, Mr. Carlin, Mrs. Miller, Mrs. Myers, Mr. Schifino, Mr. Collignon. - 37 -QtrSte se»i Sole j4riz ia . MOST TALENTED: Neicie Gardener and Bob Ware MOST FRIENDLY: Beverly Sue Christianson and Ricky Turner MOST ATTRACTIVE: Julie Langston and Toni Fisher. To- Lite iu ial Student Burg esses. Susan Adler Judy Aubel Cindy Bauer Shireen Alford Sandra Austin Stan Bayer Donna Allen Fred Balash Bob Bean Linda Allums Judy Balser Joanne Beauchamp Heyward Anderson Norma Bancroft Bill Bedard Jim Anderson Sandy Barnes Roger Bigelow Barbara Atkinson Ricky Barr Linda Bogdan Pat Childers Beverly Sue Carol Cole Christensen © i- q A m I f { } A f a ;v ■ 6A Ml jsm © a a Darla Bollman Diane Bowkley Art Broeder Sharon Bromberg Karen Brooks Barbara Burt Lester Butler Larry Byrd Jim Caldwell Pat Callaway Bob Capito Karen Carlisle Raymond John Chattin Chapman - 39 -POM PON, CHEERING AND ATHLETIC SQUADS Doug Cole Carolyn Collins Marie Colson Sam Culley Carl Carlock Ann Cornwell Nancy Davidson Gary Deak Robert Dean Sam Dysart Loren Eakes Diane Eggert Don Evans Jim Evans Alice Fattaleh Eddie Ford Neicie Gardner Gene GeBauer - 40 - Trudic Cook Jacque Crampton Nancy Dahill Gary Daudet Clarence Deike Sandra Deike Richard Dick John Dingman Chuck DuFrain Jerry Dujanovie Peggy Eklund Judy Elliott Lynn Finell Tony Fisher Ronald Jack Gilbin Gerstensch lagerWERE LED BY JUNIOR STUDENTS Jim Giblin Nancy Gibson Douglas Griffith Jane Hakes o. .1 f i Jim Hays Douglas Hilker Bill Holston Shirlyn Hoyt Judy Jackson Rod Jacobson Annette Katarski Bob Keller Margaret Kimball Roy Kingsley Karen Kotlarczyk James Krantz Larry Glose Susan Gray Quentin Gregory C rk Sue Hanneman Jan Hardin Bill Hargrave Stuart Hilton Muriel Hochstetler Richard Hogue Barbara Hubbard Judy Hubbard Selene Hurford Bruce Johannes Joyce Justin Jan Justin Locke Kelly Pete Kersten les Kilpatrick . .4 Phillip Kinsey Kay Kline George Knirsch Pete Kruse Priscilla lagrotta Walter LahtiJUNIOR CLASS SPONSORED 'TWIRP WEEK Julie Langston Bill Lawren Murray lichty Karen lindstrom Floyd Meyer Carol McMasters Lynn Mi lot Bob Moe Joanna Nesmith Kathy O'Gara Sharon Owens Susan Quail - 42 - Mike Lee Larry Leonardo Rose Lichner Lois Liska Bob Looman Lida Macri Joan Manning Bruce Mazur Judy McAllister A -T Q A )" Sharon McIntosh Gordon Medill Asa Meudell Lynda Meyers Bonnie Miller Jerry Lee Mills Linda Moore Craig Mueller Judy Murphy Sandra Osman Bill Ostermeyer Gus Oviedo a A A — ) 1 , j 7 Jack Queck Roger Quick Susan QuickTOPPED IT OFF WITH SWEETHEART PROM Elizabeth Quinn Fraiah Payne Karla Payne Vicki Paul Bob Parker Bill Pearson Lester Peter Suzie Peterson Sue Pflumm Judith Post Margaret Pratt Edward Raduenzel Ed Richardson Joe Richter Wanda Roehrer Ann Schneider Jolenc Scott Mark Seargent A Q A J Linda Simmons Jtrr, Skinner Ray Skinner - 43 - Richard Parker Carol Parker Arleene Peer Bill Peterson Kay Pleasant Bill Potthoff Terry Repp Leslie Rhuert Burton Rogers Fred Ross Pam Schafbcrger Linda Schnaufer Jack Smith Sylvia SpanglerJUNIORS AWAIT FOURTH LAP OF THE COURSE Gary Shaffer peakmarT Nancy Staats Jackie Stahl Pat Sterba Larry Stiffler Dick Strader Streyckmans Betty Storrs Mike Smiley John Szychowski Nancy Tenney Dennis Thomas Mary Thomas John C. Thorp Jo Ann Thorton John Tokar Jan Topping Kenny Tonis Mary Turnbow Ricky Turner Richard Tuttle Scott Vaughan Martha Walker Meredith Walker Bob Ware Don Weeks Bill Weidemaicr Diane Weidenfeld Bill Mike Weller Karen Wendell Don Werner Diana Williams Evelyn Williams Susie Wood Bonnie Yarbrough Stella Ysasi Kathy Zamie Harriet Zenobi Mike Zimmerman Vicky Zoeller - 44 -BOY REP. Sam Bartaluzzi THE FIRST FRESHMAN class to attend Arcadia High School made their debut on September 8, when they were welcomed by the faculty and Dr. Bullington. These freshmen, the largest class on campus, adjusted quickly to their new life and soon became one of the most outstanding groups. The class of '63 showed their ability to lead by winning first place in the magazine sale and a freshman also won top honors for the school in this drive. They contributed to many clubs and organiza- tions, such as the Pep Club, Y-Teens, Girls League, Tri-Hi-Y, the Titan Band, and the Arcadian Staff. Scholastically, 5 made the first six-weeks First- VlCfc PRESIDENT Ricky Wood GIRL REP. Nancy Kelly Class Honor Roll, while 39 made the Second-Class Honor Roll. While only one freshman made varsity squads they had their own football team which ended up the season with a 6-1-1 record. They also had their own basketball squad. Class officers were: John Propstra, President; Ricky Wood, Vice-President; Gail Gallagher, Secretary; and Dave Herskovits, Teasurer. Representing the class in Student Council were Nancy Kelly and Sam Barta- luzzi. Enthusiasm and interest were the key words for this class, and made them a welcome asset to the student body. CLASS SPONSORS — Mrs. Timbrook, Miss Roberts, Mrs. Stafford, Mr. Wilcox, Mr. Doran, Mr. Webb, Mr. Johnson, and Mr. Dawson. - 45 -KELLY, KOPPEN FROSH HOMECOMING ROYALTY Carol Adams Donald Aden Billie Jean Akers Harold Allen Linda Ambrose James Anderson Sherrill Ashton Bob Ayers Bruce Bagshaw Jim Bailey Sandy Baldridge Loretta Baldwin Ronnie Balliett Dallas Banks Shirley Beauchamp Barbara Belan Don Beil Janis Bennett Bill Beran George Bernai Beth Weber Stan Bieleski Ed Biszantz John Blackmore Gloria Bones Jerry Boudreau Cynthia Boyer Rick Briggs - 46 -FROSH PLACE FIRST IN MAGAZINE SALES Stephen Bromberg Judy Browne Diane Bruchis Patricia Bruining Pamela Burke Charleen Burns Jerry Busey MOST TALENTED: Carol Adams and Mike Ellis Tom Church Connie Clark Larry Clarke Susan Clarke Karen Clever Scotti Colson Donald Conroy Donna Cronn Fred Daniels nm ■ ■ i Edith Davis John Ziegler George Headley Lynne Dobben Jerri Lynn Draney Nancy Drechsler Lorraine Dunbar - 47 -CLASS OF '63 SHINES SCHOLASTICALLY MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED: David Herskovits and Gail Gallagher Dwight Eckhardt Terry Edmundson Ronnie Eggemeyer Gloria Eklund n Lois Elliott Mike Ellis David Elson Charles Emery Andrea Emmons Bob Fairfield es ; Bill Farmer Sharon farmer Michael Ferguson Joan Fish Rick Ford Patty Gardner Vicki Goddard Carolyn Goff Paul Graves Carolyn Gray Cathi Greenwald WPk ' r I ■ 1 I Gene Griffith Richard Guthrie Peggy Tyra Marcia Harrington Chris Haugcland Barbara Haupt - 48 -FORTY-FOUR ON FIRST HONOR ROLL Don Hauser Linda Hauser Phil Hawkins Terry Hawks Richard Henderson MOST INTELLIGENT: Tom Parker and Kay Smith Stuart Herman David Herskovits Dean Hill Corky Hilsabeck Betsy Hodges Cathy Hoeksema Peggy Hoffman Parma Hoiles Skip Hotmberg Nancy Hoyer Pamela Hurley Don Jacobson Wary Jane Janecek Cindy Johnson Dorsee Johnson Ray Johnston Sandra Johnston Donna Gaye Jones Mike Julian Esther Juni Bill Kamstra Nick Karales - v i I Mary Kafarski Q Tim Keen Gerald Keith Glenn Kelty Rose Marie Kennedy Mary Kent I Chuck Kessler Linda Kilpatrick Ralph Kimball Carole Kinzle - 49 -FROSH ATHLETES EARN SEASON HONORS Jack Koppen Theresa Kowell Gary Krug Joan Kruse Ellen Lacy Bill lamuth Joanna Lefan Candy Lane Adeline Lichner Breck Lillyblad Clifford Lindblom Al Lindstrom John MacDonald Jane McMaster Joe Manzo John Manning n o j Gary Maschner Paula Jo Mattingly Murphy Medecke Pat Medecke Warren Miller Eileen Moneel Carol Moore Gary Moore Tom News Peter Von Nikiforuk Corky Northrop Bob Ofstie Linda Padovani Ronnie Pagleardini Bill Papp Tom Parker Toni Kupniewski Regina Levenda Paul Lewis Prissie Rogan Tom Lynch Linda Martin Hank Martinson Rocky Mell Connie Meudell Bob Nairn Mike New Susan Peacock Bill PeblerPIGSKIN TANGLES NET 6-1-1 Linda Ploegsma Sharon Polen Mike Quinn Sharon Reardon Gibson Pratt Ralph Prettyman Dulcie Pridgeon John Propstra John Rebeske Laurie Retter Ann Richmond Lee Richter Julie Ricklick Eddie Rolwetz Bob Robyn Lowell Rogers Cheryl Salena Sue Savittieri John Scofield Mary Scott Peggy Sheffield Sandra Sheldon A ) ft t, y Scott Silver Donna Simser Susan Scott Patty Seargeant Jack Sederstrom Judy Sheer Lance Sherwood Becky Shettler Richard Shields Brad Shoemaker Denise Singer Jen Sisson Andrew Smith Dick SmithAnn Gregory Kathleen Smith Ilf Eldred Stamm FROSH FETED AT SOPHOMORE PARTY Mike Smith Tanya Smitt Mike Solvesky Janice Speer Rod Temple Sharon Stoetzer Dwioht Stuart Karen Swanson Gary Swift Sandy Sylvester Denise Taylor Bill Waterman Gail Weiner Edgar Welsh Joseph Wesolowski Steve Wilson Pat Winegart Iona Winkleman Prairie Witkamp Roaer Wollheim Ricky Wood Craig Woodnaid Lynda Wynn Martaine Wynn Doris Zesiger Lucy Zingale Jk Reardon Dight Scott Zimmerman - 52 -PRESIDENT Bob Fukuchi VICE-PRESIDENT Corki Norde BOY REP. Tom Elliott SECRETARY Gail Chasey TREASURER Donna Cravener GIRL REP. Darlene Holman SOPHOMORES THE OUTSTANDING class of '62 , with their freshman year behind them, con- tributed largely to the success of many activities and organizations. The Sophomore Class was represented in the Student Council by Darlene Holman and Tom Elliott. Other class officers were: Bob Fukuchi, President; Corki Norde, Vice President; Gail Chasey, Secretary; Donna Cravener, Treasurer Many sophomores were on varsity squads while several others were mem- bers of the Junior Varsity teams. Honor Roll-wise, 4 sophomores were on the First-Class Honor Roll while 37 were on the Second-Class honor roll. The class of '62 has kept a fine record throughout their first year at Arcadia and will make outstanding leaders for future years. CLASS SPONSORS: Mr. Finkbine, Mrs. Witty, Mr. Heywood, Mr. Henderson, Mrs. Fisher, Mrs. Neid, and Mrs. Howard. - 53 -SOPHOMORES PLAN FROSH-SOPH PICNIC Larry Ayers Sharon Ballard Bruce Barnett Bob Beal Linda Beal Jannie Beardsley Sharen Beckman Jean Bellenger Pat Benjamin Ken Bertotin Paul Blauman Don Bisbee MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED: Tom Henze and Donna Cravener Priscella Biscotti Jean Birch Julie Biro Tom Canter Mike Case Bob Butler Ed Caliendo Sandy Carlisle Charles Catkins Bruce ChadderdonCLASS OF 1962 LOADED WITH TALENT Gail Chasey Judy Clatterbuck Diana Cleveland Bill Close Cheryl Colopy Leslie Compton Terri Conner Ricky Cook Donna Cravener Oliver Crawley Terry Cusack Bill Daley Harry Davis Stanley Davis Karen Dodge Philip Doornbos Douglas Gordon Henry Dunbar Pam Edgin Clifford Edmundson Tom Elliott Sharon Eltz Sandra Emerson Kenny Efchells - 55 -CLASS MEMBERS CONTRIBUTE TO . . . Steve Frick Bob Fukuchi Peter Geiger MOST TALENTED: Gail Chasey and Mike Case Jerry Gilbreath Jackie Glover Carl Granzow Jim Greenback Carrol Greenwald Ronald Gregory Willie Sue Grifford Kitty Halsell John Hamilton Tom Haney Joanne Heeftle Luke Helms Roy Henderson Tom Henze John Herrick Don Hodges John Hickman John Hiegel Kathie Hinds Carol Hinton Wayne Hiser rj n, a ts V M ■ Darlene Holman Cheryl Holtson Eddie House Mike Hughes Craig Hunter Mary Janet James - 56 -TITAN BAND AND VARSITY SQUADS Malinda Kerr Alan Kershaw David King Clark Knight Sue Knight Linda Kyff Sandra Lafon Benny Landis Richard Larson o Ch f V - ■ f t Sandi Learn Diana Leist Susie Lewis Don Lewis Pam Lind Larry lof i J K, v 'r Roberta Love Bob Mahler William Malinski Barbara Martin Una Maschner Walter Mazur John McArthur Shiela McCarthy Sharon McFord Carol Mecey Jeanne McLander Chip Miller - 57 -MANY SOPHS INVOLVED IN STUDENT ACTIVITIES Linda Millar Sharon Mill» Margie Moaller Nancy Morris Patricia Maser Will Muller Calvin Munnell a rv , 4 wm, 11" ■ X ' ' w Donna Myers Dick Faux Shirley Neeriemer Judy Nicholas Tim Niesz Corki Norde Cheryl Nye A Sally Pettit MOST ATTRACTIVE: Barbara Jones and Gary Wasson. Bob Porstman Suzy Quick Mike Reese Linda Reinhardt Lyn Rhuart Fred Rhoades Frank Riley Helen Robb Robin Robb William Roberts Toby Rowell Kenny Russel Dave Sargent Zoltan Sari Robbie Schafranka - 58 -BIRO, JONES ONLY VARSITY CHEERLEADERS Mary Schammel Gary Schneider John Schlink Dennis Schlink Eric Schumacher Dick Sederstorm Jim Swanson Lee Roy Shaw Kathie Skinner Bob Smith Karin Smitt Dave Snyder Nancy Sorenson Gary Spinzl Bill Stanford Michele Stephenson Patti Stevens Michele Stewart Suzy Stump Stephen Surgener Paul Sylvander Sharon Thompson Lynn Thomas Gerald Tinney Cheryl Tinney Mike Townsend Lynna Kay Trabert Kathy Tritten Anita Ulibarri Georgia Vollkmar Karen Volmer Richard Wall Carol Wash Monte Washburn John Wassel Gary Wasson Richard Weiner Don White Bob Williams Dan Williams Harold Williams Harry Williams Riley Wilson David Wiseman Sharon Wright Sandy Zingale - 59 -.AtiUo jli studio are importaitt. e a-curricalar acfcMftes dm m, deL el p a welL- rounded pess kdtlhj VARIOUS EXTRA-CURRICULAR activities gave Arcadia's students a chance to dis- play their talents and develop their in- terests. With clever yells and snappy routines, the cheerleaders and pom-pon girls pro- vided an extra boost for school spirit. Budding journalists were given a chance to express their ideas in the school newspaper. The Arcadian, and the yearbook. The Olympian. Student Council was composed of student body officers, class presidents, and class representatives. As the gov- erning body of student activity on cam- pus, it sponsored several events and represented Arcadia High School at inter- school functions. While those having musical talent participated in choral, band, and orches- tral programs, those scholastically in- clined found their interests challenged by academic and honor clubs. Through the myriad organizations at Arcadia, each student found something especially suited to his interests. Al- though education was of prime impor- tance, outside activities added much to the all around personality development of the students.j4rcadias Tirst GauiiciL {jji . . . Mr Howard Amtrton SENIORS: Fred Burns, President; Helen Blanding, Girl Representative; Lee Alliston, Student Council Sponsor Boy Representative. Bill Berg Student Body President The entire Student Council during an active meeting in the library. AS THE FIRST governing body at Arcadia, Student Council's func- tions were numerous. Their aims and objectives were to promote a better relationship among the students, faculty and community. Record hops, assemblies. Homecoming activities, decora- tions at Thanksgiving and Christ- mas, student council conventions, the exchange student, and pep SOPHOMORES: Bob Fukuchi, President; Darlene Holman, Girl Representative; Tom Elliott, Boy Representative. - 62 -. . . bij 1?erc), Reid, Hlitftt, ©irishmen. Student Council Sponsor JUNIORS: Pat Sterba, President; Rick Turner, Boy Representative; Lynn Milof, Girl Representative. Student Body Vice-President Student Body Secretary Beverly Sue Christensen Student Body Treasurer posters were some of the activ- ities sponsored by Student Coun- cil. Money raising projects in- cluded the apple machines, foot- batl program sales, and conces- sion stands at sports events. President Bill Berg and Spon- sors Mrs. Ruth Downey and Mr. Howard Amerson kept the coun- cil running smoothly. FRESHMEN: John Propstra, President; Nancy Kelley, Girl Representative; Sam Bartaluzzi, Boy Representative. - 63 -Girls, GWleaJer s . . . Nancy Gibson Co-captain Tillie Diorio Carol McCutchan Darlene Holman Peggy Eklund THESE EIGHT Varsity Pom-pon girls represented the Titans this past year at all sports events, pep assemblies and parades. Money earned from the "squeezie" sales helped offset the cost of their uniforms. Five peppy cheerleaders cheered the Arcadia teams at all sports eveqts. Linda Bogdan VARSITY POMPON GIRLS: Nancy Gibson, Darlene Holman, Karla Payne, Linda Bogdan, Gail Chasey, Kay Kline, Beverly Sue Christensen, Corki Norde. - 64 -. TWfrt l §cWl spirit j®r p©rts Julie Biro Gail Chasey VARSITY CHEERLEADERS: Tillie Di- orio, Carol McCutchen, Julie Biro, Barbara Jones, Peggy Eklund. The five cheerleaders took turns being captain this past year. Beverly Sue Christensen Captain Miss Sally Hardin and Mrs. Nancy Timbrook, Pom-pon and Cheerleading Sponsors Kay Kline Judy Hubbard Majorette Barbara Jones - 65 -Marilyn Bennett and Bill Berg are crowned Homecoming Royalty by Dr. Richard Bullington. Each class was represented by two attendants in the court. They are: Seniors, Connie Stephenson and Don Vincent; Sophomores, Barbara Jones and Tom Elliott; Freshmen, Nancy Kelly and Jack Koppen; Juniors, Judy Elliott and Rick Turner; Seniors, Ann Reid and Marco Papaleoni. In the center are the king and queen. Bill Berg and Marilyn Bennett. A wonderful evening of dancing topped off the extra-special festivities. Shown are Ronny Gregory, Rick Turner, Judy Elliott, Jack Koppen, Marilyn Bennett and Bill Berg. §p$n.$(we )l by GwnciL MARILYN BENNETT AND BILL BERG, Homecoming King and Queen, reigned at the dance following the football game with Winslow. Stu- dent Council provided for refresh- ments and arranged all activities for Homecoming, with the "pomp and circumstance" of the impressive half- time coronation ceremony being well taken care of by the band and chorus. A rainy weekend necessi- tated a week's postponement of the original Homecoming plans and stu- dent anticipation had mounted to a high peak by the time the much talked-about events took place. Lou Hallman's Band provided music for the Homecoming Dance celebra- tion. The refreshment tables seem to be an excellent van- tage point to see what's going onl The amazed trio of merrymakers are Ed Caliendo, Suzi Wood, and Stan Bayer. - 66 -"Snowflakes in Fantasy" was the theme for the first Christmas Prom. Huge paper snowflakes were hung at various places on the ceiling, while the rest of the theme was carried out by the use of a beautifully decorated Christmas tree and crepe paper streamers. Mr. Hil Brady presented Jolene Scott with the prize awarded for the selection of her theme for the prom. Qolw, Sastt Ui (Ml “first 'Prize, Jw 'Prtm lUefixi THIS YEAR the first annual Christmas Prom, sponsored by Girls' League, was held at Paradise Inn. The dance, held on December 19, was a huge success ending with the normal con- fusion of tearing down decorations for souvenirs. Amid gaily-bedecked young ladies and sharp beaus, Andrea Emmons, Carol Adams aqd Roger Bigelow dance the hours a way. punch and cookies. - 67 -Twirp Week royalty were announced at the dance. They are Carol McCutchen and Loren Eakes, Mr. and Miss Twirp; and Pat Sferba, Mike Weller, Suzi Wood and Locke Kelley, attendants. Music for the very successful Twirp Dance was fur- nished by the Clarissa Hall Trio. Near the end of the dance balloons were released from the ceiling and many were kept busy trving to rescue one for a souvenir. where the girls washed cars for the boys. The purpose of the carwash was to clean the cars for the dance on the following night? Girls l®oki9®tjS Places for aUieek THE ENTIRE TWIRP WEEK activities were sponsored by the junior class, and special activities were set aside for each day. On Monday the girls did the boys' homework. On Tuesday the girls opened doors and carried books. The girls brought or bought lunches for the boys on Wednesday. On Thursday the girls complimented each boy three times during the course of the conversation. After school on Friday a car wash was held at which the girls did all of the work. THE TWIRP DANCE, "Hernando's Hideaway" was held in the cafeteria. It was a semi-formal sponsored by the junior class on February 27. Fol- lowing the tradition of Twirp Week the girls invited the boys to the dance. Music was furnished by the Clarissa Hall Trio to add enjoyment to the evening. The decorations used were elaborate and appropriate, il- lustrating well the theme that was chosen. - 68 -The newly-elected student council painted the waste paper cans in school colors as its first service project. Shown here are: Bill Berg, Judy Elliot, and Ann Reid. Arcadia's male faculty members met in victorious competition with those of Scottsdale. Part of Arcadia team is shown here: Mr. Lou Hallman, Mr. Ben Anderson, Mr. Richard Dawson, Mr. Joseph Collignon, Mr. Howard Ammerson, Mr. Robert Finkbine. j4ctu fe Imported THE GENERAL ACTIVITIES around campus were just as important as those which were scheduled and publicized. It is these minor activities which make each school day differ- ent from all the rest and this variety sparks the interest and enthusiasm of school spirit. The women faculty members acted as pom-pon girls at the basketball game be- tween Arcadia and Scottsdale, dressed as pom-pon girls of ancient Rome might have. They are: Mrs. Marguerite Neid, Mrs. Doris Jo Howard, Mrs. Jane Plecas, Mrs. Mary Lou Myers, Mrs. Wynn Eichenberger, Mrs. Larson, Miss Sally Hardin. ASSEMBLIES, special speakers, and various other happenings brighten the daily school schedule. Also the nighttime activities and sports events provide circumstances where the stu- dent body and faculty can become better acquainted and where school spirit grows through the support of the activities. In the middle of April construction was oegun on the other half of the section of classrooms. An attempt was made to complete this construction soon after the start of the 1960-61 school year. - 69 -15W, LifennEii kj(Wi©rari) 2Lab NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY MEMBERS: Marilyn Bennett, Diane Greer, Karla Payne, Preiident; Lynn Finell. Vice President; Pat Childers, Scc.-Trcas.; Barb Butler, Barbara Burns, Carla Padovani, Bonnie Peterson, Helen Blending; second row: Annette Katarski, Sue Bartaluzzi, Peggy Eklund, Bill Helbing, Linda Leach, Pat Tomkins, Linda Allums, Pat Sterbo,- top row: Margaret Kimball, Bev Sue Christensen, Doug Griffith, Bob Jensen, Mary Ellen Speakman, Barb Denzer, Mr. Joseph Collignon, sponsor. NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY, sponsored by Mr. Joseph Collignon, was a nationally recognized honorary club. Stu- dents were judged mainly on scholastic standing but also on citizenship and leadership in the school and community. The club inducted new members at the semester. 31 BAND LETTERMEN: Anne Rosenstein, Mike Case, Vice President; Pat Childers, President; Tom Baum, Barbara Burt; second row: Mr. Reginald Brooks, sponsor; Bob Lutes, David Surgener, Steve Briggs, Bob Rowe. BAND LETTERMEN was also an honorary club and was sponsored by Mr. Reginald Brooks. The group was made up of outstanding band mem- bers who were awarded let- ters. - 70 -■key Gub, Gen ed GcUoL, Gmm)uh| KEY CLUB MEMBERS: Bill Lawren, Roger Bigelow, Dave Snyder, Roger Olmsted, Sergeant at Arms; Qoug Griffith, Treasurer; Doug Hilker, Secretary; Fred Burns, Leslie Rhuart, Vice President; Bob Rowe, President; second row: Dan Williams, Asa Meudell, Scott Vaughan, Carl Vanderbosch, Luke Helms, Gary Schneider, Mike Zimmerman, Marco Papalconi, Bill Berg, Tom Henze,- third row: Mr. Hil Brady, Sponsor; Gary Wasson, Bob Lutes, Roy Henderson, Mike Case, Sigvard Smitt, Chaplain; Jim Caldwell, Chuck DuFrain, Les Kilpatrick, Dr. Richard Bullington, Sponsor. KEY CLUB MEMBERS worked to better the school and community through service. They assisted at open house at the school and they also passed out "vote yes" stickers prior to the bond election that decided the school's future. Club members, along with Key Club members from all over the Valley, assisted with Kid's Day at Luke Air Force Base, annually sponsored by Kiwanis. In April, Lily Tags were sold in Phoenix to help raise money for the Samuel Gompers Memorial Clinic. Key Club held a car wash in March. They made $120 which went toward the red and white Key Club jackets. RIFLE CLUB MEMBERS spent this past year studying the rifle and they also had target practice every week or two. The purpose of this club, sponsored by Mr. Heywood is to promote safety with firearms. RIFLE CLUB MEMBERS: Mr. Alfred Heywood, Sponsor; Paul Sylvander, President; Rocky Mell, Vice President; Norma Bancroft, Billie Jean Akers, Priscilla LaGrotta; second row: Don Bisbee, Peter Nikiforuk, Marco Papaleoni, Charles Emery, Skip Mills.Uttem i, Girls Uague Spa fe LETTERMEN: Bill Weidemaier, President; Mike Lee, Vice President; Pete Kersten, Secretary-Treasurer; George Knirsch, Chaplain; Bob Bean, Sergeant at Arms; second row: Mike Weller, Bill Close, Richard Wall, Bob Ware, Gary Deak, Bob Keller, Bob Butler, Bob Beal, Don Bisbee, Don Lewis. Third row: Coach Bob Hendricks, Sponsor; Dick Faux, Danny Deschler, Bob Moe, Ray Dendy, Quentin Gregory, John Tharp, Craig Hunter, Bruce Chadderdon, Gordon Medill, Charles Calkins, Ed Caliendo. Top row: Bill Welch, Jack Smith, John Herrick, Don Evans, Tony Fisher, Sam Culley, Stan Bayer, Larry Glose, Carl Gran ow, Loren Eakes, Jack Queck, Tom Elliott, Don Weeks. ARCADIA'S LETTERMEN'S CLUB was comprised of the outstanding athletes in all sports. The purposes of the club were to promote and improve athletics, sports- manship, and character. Lettermen sold programs at football games and they sponsored a basketball game played by the Harlem Clowns. The Lettermen also assisted with the Open House at Arcadia. GIRL'S LEAGUE was organ- ized as a service club for the school through the promotion of school activities and school spirit. Girl's League, sponsored by Mrs. McMinn, held a style show at the school. Club members also sponsored the first annual Christmas Prom at Paradise Inn. GIRL'S LEAGUE MEMBERS: Ann Reid, Linda Simmons, Barbara Butler, Parliamentarian; Karen Dodge, Treasurer; Joanne Thornton, President; Kris Di Tullio, Vice President; Margaret Kimball, Historian; Margaret Pratt, Annette Katarski. Second row: Patti Stevens, Sandy Osman, Linda Allums, Barbara Denzer, Nancy Staats, Shirlyn Hoyt, Sylvia Spangler, Barbara HubDard, Sharon Mills, Lorraine Adams, Susie Lewis. Top row: Charlene Burns, Kathy CXGare, Melinda Moore, Cynthia Boyer, Julie Langston, Patti Davis, Kathy Hinds, Judy Clatterbuck, Leslie Compton, Linda Arp.utt-y. y-tw j4fjiotK »f ywe . ywe.4 TRI-HI-Y MEMBERS: Susan Adler, President; Wanda Roehrer, Secretary; Harriet Zenobi, Treasurer; Jan Hardin, Chaplain; Lynne Milot, Historian; Patti Stevens, Sergeant at Arms. Second row: Mrs. Plecas, Sponsor; Corki Norde, Darlene Holman, Carol Hinton, Kitty Halsell, Michele Stephenson, Kris Di Tullio, Pam Schafberger. Third row: Pat Sterba, Margaret Kimball, Sylvia Spangler, Ann Reid, Mary Thomas, Shirlyn Hoyt, Linda Simmons, Karen Dodge, Julie Langston, Carole Kinzle. Fourth row: Linda Allums, Helen Robb, Jacque Crampton, Karen Lindstrom, Barbara Jones, Gail Chasey, Kay Kline, Melinda Moore, Donna Allen, Carol McCutchen. DELTA OMEGA Tri-Hi-Y members strove to maintain the ideals of the national YMCA: "To create, maintain, and extend through the home, school and community, high standards of Christian character." Collecting donations for Cystic Fibrosis was the first main service project and Arcadia's Tri-Hi-Y collected more money for this cause than any other club in Scottsdale, Phoenix, or Tempe. A formal induction of the members followed. Catalogues were distributed at Christmastime to raise money to fight polio. The club also gave two needy families a nice Christmas with toys, clothing, dishes and food. Window washing projects twice during the year helped support the club's activities. THE STATED Y-Teen purposes are: "To grow as individuals, to grow in friendship with people of all races and na- tionalities, and to grow in the knowledge and love of God." Y-Teen club members held a bake sale and a carwash and later in March they spon- sored a dance. Y-TEEN MEMBERS: Sherry Kay Sheldon, Sharon Mills, Chaplain; Vicki Paul, Vice President; Nancy Dahill, President; Leslie Compton, Nancy Staats. Second row: Annette Katarski, Betty Storrs, Susie Lewis, Cheryl Nye, Roberta Love, Kathi Hinds, Lorraine Adams, Sharen Beckman, Charlene Burns, Ann Reid. Third row: Sandra Schooley, Mrs. Edith Geary, Sponsor; Pat Childers, Judy Jackson, Donna Cronn, Jean Birch, Robbie Schafranka, Linda Reinhardt, Nancy Davidson, Shireen Alford, Barbara Burt, Diane Alford, Diane Eggert, Lynn Thomas, Sandy Carlisle.""Pep Qui) ‘Sodee l tip -fcstbalL Teum. FRONT ROW: Lynne Milot, Sergeant-at-Arms; Mary Janet James, Treasurer; Linda Beal, Chaplain; Sue Knight, Secretary; Varsity Cheer- leaders: Barbara Jones, Carol McCutchen, Tillie Diorio, Julie Biro, Peggy Eklund; Sheryl Payne, President; Darla Bollman, JV Cheer- leader; Susie Wood, JV Cheerleader; Shireen Alford, Vice President. Second row: Carol Schlossnagle, Nancy Davidson, Stella Ysasi, Lee Dunning, Susan Gray, Karen Lindstrom, Judy Post, Cheryl Holston, Sharon Wright, Jerry Lee Mills, Terry Edmundson, Toni Kupniewski. Third row: Norma Bancroft, Billy Jean Akers, Sharon Beckman, Donna Simser, Veronica Bann, Kathy Tritten, Donna Cravener, Michele Stephenson, Patti Stevens, Robbie Schafranka, Linda Reinhardt, Mrs. Timbrook, sponsor, Shirley Beauchamp, Donna Myers, Judy Ross. PEP CLUB, led this year by Sheryl Payne and spon- sored by Mrs. Timbrook, promoted general school spirit in the high school and community. Members of the club were seated together at each home football game, wearing dark skirts and white blouses. Using blue and white mittens, representing Arcadia's school colors, club members followed the pom-pon girls in snappy hand routines. During warm weather. Pep Club sponsored "squeezie" sales after school to help pay for the mit- tens. FRONT ROW: JV Pom-pon girls: Helen Blanding, Susan Adler, Lois Liska, Cheryl Tinney; Varsity Pom-pon girls: Nancy Gibson, Darlene Holman, Karla Payne, Linda Bogdan, Gail Chasey, Kay Kline, Beverly Sue Christensen, Corki Norde,- JV Pom-pon girls: Shirlyn Hoyt, Daye Dayton, Linda Miller, Jackie Stahl. Second row: Sandy Osman, Priscilla LaGrotta, Harriet Zenobi, Wanda Roehrer, Connie Meudell, Lylia LaMantia, Cheryl Nye, Jan Justin, Mary Ann Allen, Judy Balser, Janis Bennett, Denise Taylor. Third row: Cheryl Colopy, Margie Fink, Edith Davis, Linda Padovani, Jan Sisson, Jerry Lynn Draney, Una Maschner, Susan Peacock, Ann Gregory, Carolyn Goff, Carol Nash, Joan Kruse, Mary Kent.Qr. 'Red. Guss, Tj4 2 kJelpeol 'Ffcjkt ©imes TAC MEMBERS: Susan Gray, Joan Manning, Barbara Graham, Karen Carlisle, Mary Ellen Speakman, Vice President; Patti Davis, Linda Ploegsma. Socond row: Kathi Hinds, Mary Schammel, Mary Thomas, Wanda Roehrer, Shirlyn Hoyt, Carol McCutchen, Karen lindstrom, Kay Knight, Sue Knight, Annette Katarski, Peggy Eklund, Julie Biro. Third row: Muriel Hochstetler, Bunky Hilliker, Fred Burns, Marco Papaleoni, Larry Leonardo, Jim Caldwell, George Knirsch, Freddie Fisher, Nancy Tenney, Ann Gregory, Carol Cole, Mr. Robt. Finkbine, Sponsor. Top row: Margaret Shoemaker, Linda Stout, Diane Alford, Vicky Zoeller, Sherry Kay Sheldon, Lee Dunning, Betty Storrs, Linda Simmons, Nancy Staats, Paula Mattingly, Kathy Tritten, Mary Ann Allen, Earlene Peer. TEENS AGAINST CANCER, sponsored by Mr. Robert Finkbine, was a club devoted to helping fight cancer. The main way in which the club did this was by collecting money which they donated to other organizations which fight cancer. April was set aside as a special month for working for the cause. JUNIOR RED CROSS members and sponsor, Mrs. Jane Plecas, kept ac- tive this past year carrying out the club's many aims. The club special- ized in promoting the humanitarian ideals of the Red Cross. Their pro- grams and projects were carried on at local, national, and international levels. Boxes of cookies were baked by Junior Red Cross members to bright- en the Christmas season for hospi- tal-confined people. Club members also visited bed-ridden children in their homes, and at the Crippled Children's Home. Later in the year a chest was filled with articles to be sent to an emergency area overseas. JUNIOR RED CROSS MEMBERS: Roxie Musbach, Chapter Representative; Bonnie Peterson, President; Diana Williams, Chapter Representative. Second row: Sandi Deike, Karen Pefov- sek, Annette Katarski, Mrs. Jane Plecas, sponsor.Italian,, Qapanese,, ReseartJi, KatWatfes ITALIAN CLASS MEMBERS: Mrs. Graff, Bonnie Peterson, Barbara Butler, Barbara Burt, Mr. Thomas Doran, teacher and sponsor; Judy Kennedy, Mrs. Kennedy, Mrs. Marcone, Ricky Dee Marcone, Beth Miller. ITALIAN was offered as an extra curricular course to stu- dents in a class after school. Mr. Thomas Doran taught the class on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The Italian students, ranging from grade school to high school age, studied and learned the Italian language. Two of the mothers of the students also took part. JAPANESE, also offered as an extra curricular course after school, was taught by Mr. Gordon Caswell. The class, composed entirely of juniors and seniors, met every Tues- day and Friday. Although the class was small, those who participated in it benefited greatly in their knowledge of Japanese. JAPANEbt CLAbb MEMBERS: Mr. Gordon Caswell, teacher and sponsor; Barbara Denzer, Helen Blanding, Leah Greer, Mary Speakman, Judy McAllister, Asa Meudell. - 76 -©wrses Offeredlfr Qapobk tjjd nts MATHEMATICAL APPLICATION CLASS MEMBERS: Jerry Repp, Pat Childers, Marilyn Ross, Doug Griffith; Second row: Scott Vaughan, Dr. Richard Bullington, sponsor and teacher, Lester Peterson. MATHEMATICAL Applications was a course taught by Dr. Richard Bullington for those students who were espe- cially interested in mathematics and the more difficult phases of it. The class met every Tuesday and Thursday to discuss and learn about the applications of mathe- matics RESEARCH Philosophy was an extra curricular course taught after school on Tuesdays and Thursdays by Mr. William Hendry. This course was offered to all students interested in the study of philosophy. RESEARCH PHILOSOPHY CLASS MEMBERS: Bev Sue Christensen, Lois Liska, Carol Cole. Mr. William Hendry, sponsor and teacher. Nancy Tenney, Rick Barr. - 77 -QJ Pep 1?acW Up Ik QJ. TrWi Jacki Stahl Varsity Alternate Helen Blanding Varsity Alternate JUNIOR VARSITY POM PON GIRLS: Helen Blanding, Susan Adler, Lois liska, Cheryl Tinney, Shirlyn Hoyt, Daye Dayton, Linda Miller, Jacki Stahl. JUNIOR VARSITY Pom-pon girls performed during the half-time Homecoming festivities and at the last basket- ball game of the '60 season. Skits put on by the JV's con- tributed much to the many pep assemblies throughout the year. J V CHEERLEADERS were present at all JV sports activities, and they assisted the Varsity Cheerleaders at the pep assemblies. The JV Cheerleaders also cheered for the freshmen athletes at some of their sports events.Marco studies in his home in Trento, Jtaly. MARCO PAPALEONI, foreign exchange stu- dent from Italy, arrived in Phoenix on August 21, 1959. While in Phoenix Marco stayed with Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Rhuart, their son, Leslie, and daughter, Carolyn. Marco was amazed at the number of cars in the United States, but after getting used to them he was just like every normal Ameri- can teenager and wanted a car of his own. As a rcprcsenfafivc of the American Field Service program, Marco took monthly field trips to various places of interest in Arizona with the other foreign exchange students living in Phoenix. Each of these students was allowed a budget of a certain amount of money from the American Field Service each month. Marco enjoyed his year at Arcadia very |n Italy cars are rare but Marco's motor scooter does the job. much and has even considered returning to America in future years. txciiaKge, 3tu£(£Kfc l i tefll jrm Italy Marco enjoys listening to music in his spare time. Marco's family shown in front of their Trento home: Lorenzo, Mrs. Papaleoni, Marco, and Mr. Papaleoni. Marco and his American family at Christmastime: Mr. Rhuart, Marco, Carolyn, Leslie, and Mrs. Rhuart. - 79 - wiu ukcei Olympian Going over artist's sketches for the yearbook are: Mr. A. J. Carpenter, advisor; Helen Blanding, editor; Liz Quinn, artist. MANY CHALLENGES faced the six-member yearbook staff at the beginning of school. Each member of the staff, which eventually increased to twelve, did several jobs at the same time in order to get things done. Each member was a typist, a section editor, a year- book salesman, a patron salesman, a copywriter, a proofreader; and a number were transformed to be- come artists and photographers. The "Olympian" editor, Helen Blanding, Mr. A. J. Carpenter, faculty advisor, and staff members all worked on an overtime basis to meet deadlines. Going over copy for the yearbook are: Nancy Davidson, Michele Stephenson, Barbara Graham, Sue Hanneman. Straightening out the budget for the yearbook are: Carla Padovani, Pam Schafberger, Karen Car- lisle. Yearbook photographers are: Bill Lawren, Linda Arp, Una Maschner, Dick Corless. - 80 -§ix j4rwlms in 'ftkt' ear Working on final dummies are: Velma Anders, Lynn Thomas, Nancy Tenney, Kathy CyGara, Pat Callaway, Mary Turnbow, Diane Greer, Editor; Stella Ysasi, Ann Reid. Looking over paper fresh from the printer are: Marti Walker, Nancy Staats, Kay Kline, Ed Radu- enzel, Una Maschner. Checking over the "Arcadian" budget are: Hannah Eastburn, Frieda Daniels. Writing copy for the paper are: Judy Elliot, Kay Coe, Mike Roselle, Pam Lind, Margaret Kimball, Susie Wood, Barbara Starr. JOURNALISM WORKSHOPS were held in Flagstaff be- fore school opened in order to assist the schools in learning more about newspaper production. Editor Leah Diane Greer and Faculty Advisor A. J. Carpenter, led a staff of twenty-six in producing six issues of the paper this first year, seven if we count "The R-Kdia Door," the April Fool mimeographed edi- tion. A special spring dance was sponsored to earn money for newspaper facilities and also to help pay the cost of printing. Future plans of the "Arcadian" staff will be to do more of the actual newspaper production itself, and in the future Mr. Carpenter will have more time to devote to newspaper and yearbook work. - 81 - Mem's •ffcmilfst Mew®ri ort 'Recollectum sfkfis %utk SCHOOL LIFE is best defined as the every- day routine of a typical high school stu- dent. At Arcadia High it consisted of many things. If was often the unsched- uled, impromptu, the sometimes humor- ous events at games, dances, and dinners. It was also cafeteria rushes, after-dance- clean-ups, and bus rides to out-of-town games. The people who served the students in various capacities also comprised a vital part of school life. Cafeteria work- ers, bus drivers, janitors, and office work- ers helped to make each student's school day more pleasant and enjoyable. School life, then, is made up of the simple things — the things which take place every day and receive little recog- nition or notice now, but will someday bring to mind happy recollections and fond memories.Hectons Erst Uieek Lockers were a month overdue in arrival, so stu- dents were obliged to keep all books in cardboard boxes, or carry them around all day. For days on end, the students watched with eager interest the progress being made by the workmen unloading and assembling the lockers under the library. Even with the ample sidewalks and corridors, the situation between classes usually left something to be desired. Students inevitably congregated at the railings upstairs to throw books down on to a locker partner, or in the middle of the corridor to chat with friends, or at the inner walls to attempt entrance to locker or classroom. IT IS THE COMMON unscheduled occurrences of the average school year which come to possess an undefinable and wonderful meaning for the high school student. Perhaps a part of school life which is comparable In to the scheduled academic and extracurricular activities is that which occur around campus,- fellowships and re- sponsibilities are gained and shared in this out- «of-class atmosphere which could not possibly develop elsewhere. Not long after school had gotten under way, student body elections were conducted and student government was initiated at Arcadia High. During the windswept and poster-filled campaign week, students enthusiastically circu- lated petitions and candidate slogan tags. During TWIRP week there were many fun-filled activities which culminated the day the girls had to wash the boys' cars in "30 seconds." Performing this enjoyable chore are Tillie Diorio, Suzi Wood, Lynn Milot. The scene of students studying diligently on Arcadia's green velvet lawn became familiar to students at Arcadia High. In many cases it was more pleasant to study there than to fight for a seat elsewhere. - 84 ctu iSes j4ccmtei by spirit The many pep assemblies promoted by various groups around school were a traditional start in promoting school spirit. Daye Dayton, Lois Liska and Linda Miller, Junior Varsity Pom-pon girls, perform a skit at a pre game assembly. Days were often hot in September and October, and students were alwflys eager to purchase squeezes after school. The pom pon girls and pep club used the profits from the sale of the multi-colored fruit ices to help purchase their costumes. THROUGHOUT ARCADIA'S first year, an integral part of the school life of each student was sharing in the creation and formation of lasting traditions, standards and ideals. Participation in the groups active on cam- pus, sports activities, dances, club projects, and various conventions were numerous reasons that the close spirit of unity and school spirit developed. Frontier Motel at Flagstaff became the residence of many happy convention-going journalists attending the annual Arizona Interscholasfic Press Association con- vention. Pictured here are Helen Blanding, "Olympian" editor, and Diane Greer, "Arcadia" editor. This was but one of the numerous journalism, student govern- ment, girl's league, and interschool club conventions in which Arcadia students participated. After-game dances were always well attended, and provided a full eve- ning for crowds of students who were usually hoarse from cheering the Titan athletic squads. Barb Graham and Mrs. Eichenberger give morning announcements, sub- stituting temporarily for the familiar morning "Now hear this" of Principal Dr. Bullington. - 85 -Here Roger Bigelow, Mike Case and Lois liska are rehearsing a scene from the production "Teahouse of the August Moon." Rehearsals for all dramatic productions usually ran three times a week, plus one night rehearsal of three hours. Arcadia's campus seemed to take on an entirely different personality after sundown, relating the impersonal security of well built structures but completely lacking the warmth it seemed to possess when enliv- ened by its own teen-age community. These students are finally head- ing home after a long day of studies and extra-curricular activities. Trying in vain to look inconspicuous in her dance leotard, Mary Turnbough was caught between the camera and the rehearsal she was hurrying to. Needless to i'y, this shot was taken after school . . . ONE OF THE MOST COMMON after-school sights around the Arcadia campus was an ever-active group of students who participated in clubs or put in extra time in order to meet deadlines, rehearse for productions and concerts, perfect pom pon dances and cheering routines, paint scenery or seek additional help aca- demically from a congenial faculty memb»f Art students frequently chose their subjects out-of-doors, and moved to the grass for sketching sessions rather than doing all of their work in the classroom. Top row: Ed Bizants, Vicki Goddard, Judy Kennedy, Gloria Thompson, Charleen Burns, Leroy Gaintner, Mrs. Burrell, art instructor, Theresa Kowell, Hank Martinson, Kay Coe, Sue Sheppard. - 86 -Here is a calm scene of an everyday occurrence — lunch hour in the cafeteria. The lunch hour was split up into two sessions, one starting at 11:00 - 11:40 and one from 12:00 - 12:40. Eating a well cooked meal are Johnny MacArthur, Don Lewis, and Leroy Ferguson. ALTHOUGH THE ENROLLMENT at Arcadia did not in- crease as much as was expected, a large increase in enrollment for 1960-61 was predicted due to the ever- increasing number of residents in the Valley of the Sun. Construction of the second half of the present semi-circle of classrooms was started in expectation of the greater enrollment. The detours taken by the stu- dents, however, were only temporary. The inconven- iences were borne with resignation and smiles by the students in their knowledge that there would be more classrooms for the coming year. jftt Mcuta QuickijLj At school's opening the parking lot was always in mass confusion. The administration solved the problem by arrang- ing for traffic direction signs. The day's end shows Sandra Carlisle. Pam Schafberger, and Don Evans preparing for de- parture. Many trips were made to the fruit machine throughout the year by hungry students. The" selections available ranged from oranges and pears to red or green apples. LATE STUDENTS: Juniors Bill Troutman, Kaye Coe, Roxena Musbech, Jerry Lee Mills, Gayle Smith. Seniors John Baccaccio, Sue Snow, Barbara Burns, Mary Lou Jenkins, Jim Hendricks. Juniors Louise Kerstiens, Jill Kocour, Margaret Shoemaker, Howard Hall. Second row: Junior Anne Coe and Sophomores Linda Burns:, Gay Naumetz, Mike Whelan, Clark Livermore, Brian Reis, Sandra Harper, Cherie Gribble, Dottce Froelich, Trudy Farrell, Elizabeth Coppins. Top row: Freshmen Andrew Owen, Bob Cady, Jim Gillard, Carole Robinson, Linda Hall, Pat McGinty, Larry Dool. - 87 -Many t ktelj ui in. j£knt §e vic THE NUMEROUS DUTIES of Arcadia's Student Services Center personne. were handled smoothly by the specially trained school secretaries, the bookstore manager, and nurse. Aside from keeping all necessary school attendance, health, and bookstore records, the people working in each of these departments were always of service to the faculty and student body in other ways. The yearbook and newspaper staffs were especially thankful for the frequent help and assistance received in checking the correct spelling of names. Mrs. Wynn Secretary to Eichenberger the Principal f I ! Mrs. Frances Walker Secretary to Mr. Henry Mrs. Iris Widmark Records Clerk Mrs. Mary Lee Larson Attendance Clerk Mrs. Regina Messec Receptionist Mrs. Robbie Hand Secretary to the Librarian Mrs. Jane Plecas Nurse The nurse's office was a busy place with many students going in and out throughout the year. Here Mrs. Jane Plecas is giving Shirley Beauchamp the eye test that was given every student in school. Mrs. Carol Haugeland Guidance Secretary All student business transactions were made in the bookstore. All supplies and books needed for class were purchased here. Mr. George Rocker Bookstore Mgr. - 88 -ARCADIA STUDENTS were always presented with an appealing variety of lunches in the cafeteria, thanks to the outstanding cooks. Two or more main dishes were always offered, and usually three selections were available for both salad and dessert. Favorite dishes among the student body were fried chicken, home-baked hot rolls, and fruit pies. The maintenance men could always be found after school and weekends on the job cleaning, sweeping or mowing the lawn. Their friendly faces were well known around campus, and the men know many of the students by name. The students had good reason to be proud of their clean school grounds, thanks to these men. WORKERS: Mrs. Clara Johns, Head Cook; Mrs. Edna Christen, Dishroom Assistant; Mrs. Hildred Dcrcver, Cafeteria Manager; Mrs. Mildred Hildebrandt, Snack Bar Supervisor; Mrs. Marie Kennedy, Salad Maker; Mrs. Emily Hochstetler, Head Baker. Top row: Mrs. Billie Karales, Assistant; Mrs. Lorraine Russell, Assistant Cook; Mrs. Mariam Plotner, Cashier; Mrs. Grace Schulz, Assistant Baker; Mrs. Bernice Hedla, Snack Bar Attendant. (2ojferia, HamfoiOKJ I©p JANITORS: George Robyn, Cafeteria; Francis Farring- ton, Custodian; Pete Previtf, Gym,- Warren Coonfield. Grounds; Walter Reynolds, Custodian. Not pictured were Mr. Pitt, Mr. Denotta, Mr. Trapani, and Mr. Smith. - 89 -■fitke K, iu5t ©iJij pliysical but wentaL, is a product of cmnpgtSlue (dWto SPORTS were an important part of the scheduled activities of Arcadia High School. Everyone was in some way connected with this phase of high school life. When- ever there was a game or meet, those not actually participating on the field were usually found in the stands provid- ing pep for the players. While teamwork was vital in the major sports of football, basketball, and base- ball, the minor sports — track, wrestling, fencing, and golf — were often individual contests. Most of the sports were avail- able at varsity, junior-varsity and fresh- man levels. Through participation in athletics, the Titans developed not only the invaluable quality of good sportsmanship, but also personality, skill, and co-ordination.Gordon Modill HB Co-Cjp Rick Tornor — HB - 92 -Id Ca liando n Mika la RO - 93 -■first Season "RecoroL 4 Uiins, 4 Usses . . Tony Fithor IF Roy Dondy OB Gerald Nikolaus of Snowflake is brought down by Rick Turner, Arcadia half-back. After intercepting 3 pass on the Buckeye 40-yard line, Bobby Keller (51) runs all the way for the final touchdown of the season. - 94 - Bru o Ctxddordon MtnjgorCtorg Knuuh Midigtr "W d-Stafe Movable Mewtewi Quentin Gregory gains 10 yards as he races around left end and loses would-be Superior tackles. FIRST SEASON'S RECORD WE THEY 26 38 0 .... Phoenix Christian .... 35 20... Superior 19 28 0 32 19 14 Chandler 18 21 Winslow 33 35 Buckeye 6 Voted on the All-State Honorable Mention Team was Rick Turner, who played great foot- ball at the left-half position and who also was elected by his teammates as one of the co-captains on the Varsity Titan Squad. Also voted on the All- State Honorable Mention Team was Quentin Greg- ory who played in the right-half position. Dick Wall I Sob War Trainer - 95 -Qtnsvn.. klitjk. 'Pisiat M.OK-. Captam, ej1 "first ( W)er "five VARSITY TITANS: Jim Greenbach, Bruce Mazur, Bob Jensen, Larry Glose, Sam Culley, and Don Weeks. Top row: Don Lewis, Gary Deak, Coach Lou Hallman, Locke Kelly and Rick Turner. A Coolidge man plays "jumping jack" as Bob Ofstie tries a push shot. We They 40 ............. Sunnyslope 58 30................ Coolidge 38 36........... Phoenix Christian 49 41 ..............Snowflake..............44 46................. Peoria 38 34................. Peoria 60 48................. Brophy 57 43................. Tempe 54 51............. Phoenix Indian ..........77 39 ............. Scottsdale 60 42 ............Buckeye...................47 51............. Agua Fria ...............59 50................ Coolidge 73 40 ............. Washington 64 40................ Winslow 49 40 .............. Kingman 38 27................Tolleson...............29 41 .............. Chandler 50 22............... Scottsdale 57 42 ............. Sunnyslope 60 ALTHOUGH THE FIRST SEASON showed only a 2-18 record, the Titan basketball games provided excitement, action and thrills for the student body. Many games were lost by a close margin but the team and the students showed good school spirit and sportsmanship despite final scores. Much recognition and support was shown the basketball team and their coach, Lou Hallman, for their fighting spirit in Arcadia's first basketball season. All official games were played "away," since the school gym was in a state of semi-comple- tion throughout the season. - 96 -Qcy ees Sltswecl GmL '"RecW. JAYVEES We They 38 30 51 45 34 ... Phoenix Christian ... 33 29 41 34 Peoria 35 34 26 38 43 50 39 53. .... Phoenix Indian 57 36 39 68 Buckeye 28 47 57 46 50 33 69 36 Winslow 40 41 28 39 36 35 33 45 43 48 ... 59 Anyone for bowling? Larry Glose looks like a frog as he makes one of the few baskets for Arcadia in the first varsity game against Scottsdale High. CAGERS Bill Troutman, David Zesiger, Ricky Barr, John MacArthur and Walt Mazur. Second row: Dan Wil- liams, Jerry Dujanovic, Bob Butler, Wayne Hiser, Larry Lof and Coach Richard Dawson. Top row: Mgr. John Dingman, George Knirsch, Bob Ofstie, Royal Dodds, Bob Portsman. - 97 -Ttedt ©ivifW kfo- W Teems ■1 AMERSON'S CAGERS: Mike Ellis, Cyril Barton, Ricky Christmas, Tom Church, Brad Shoemaker, Corky Northrop. Top row: Corky Hilsabeck, John Propstra, Jerry Boudreau, Rod Temple, Dwight Eckhardt, Sam Bartaluzzi. Because of the large freshman class two basketball teams were organized so that the boys would have a fair chance of playing. Amerson's Frosh Peterson's Frosh Wo They We They We They We They 30 North High 24 67 Tolleson 18 42 Sunnyslope 26 53 Washington 45 38 Glendale 27 73 Washington 32 24 Phoenix Christian 31 22 Paradise Valley 46 61 Tempe 35 38 Mesa 42 39 Peoria 32 45 Chandler 26 43 Camelback 35 55 Brophy 20 28 Camelback 29 60 Mesa West 42 45 Scottsdale 38 53 Phoenix Indian 58 24 Scottsdale 40 45 Glendale 40 41 Chandler 27 54 Phoenix Christian 35 46 Agua Fria 39 73 Phoenix Indian 47 Peterson, Donald Conroy, Andy Smith. - 98 -Nwice, Net 'Fowl him. Opp wt£nk Y £ 1 GIRL'S TENNIS TEAM:- Carol Moore, Sharon Wright, Karen Vollmer, Trudy Bohm, Connie Meudill, Gloria Eklund, and Doris Zesiger. Top row: Julie Biro, Connie Clark, Sue Gray, Mary Schammel. Peggy Eklund, Cheryl Holtson, Billie Jean Akers. BOY'S TENNIS TEAM: Fred Rhoades, Bill Farmer, Bob looman. Bob Nairn, John Scofield. Top row: Jerry Skinner, Riley Wilson, Bill Lawren, Joe Richter, Coach Bob Finkbine. - 99 -Granzow kteadci "First Arcadia Track Team row: Steve Surgener, Wayne Hiscr, Clark Livermore, Tom Parker, Jack Queck, Jack Smith, Craig Hunter. Third row: Joe Caudle, John Seesholfz, Mike Rosselle, John Thomas, Gary Wasson, George Knirsch. Fourth row: Dennis Thomas, Don Evans, Sam Bartaluzzi, Bill Troutman, Gordon Medill, Gary Schneider. Back row: Bob Fukuchi, Gerald Keith, Breck lillyblad, Gary Daudet, Larry Leonardo, Paul Sylvander. Under the direction of Coaches Dick Dawson and Howard Amerson, the track team enjoyed a successful season. Heading up the relay team are Sam Bartaluzzi and Don Evans, starting men; Don Vincent, second man; Dennis Thomas, third man, and Carl Granzow, anchor man.Ttons fast and 'Farms Dennis Thomas jumped high and far competing against Brophy Prep. Hurling the discus a distance of 127 feet to win a first for Arcadia in the Brophy meet was Carl Granzow. Taking a practice run over the high hurdles was Sophomore Gary Schneider. About to put the shot in the Tolleson-Arcadia meet was Junior Jack Smith. Three fop boys in the track events were Jim Greenback, Jack Queck, Mike Rosselle Making a backward swan dive over the pole vault bar was Larry Leonardo. 101 - loitifaj, 'ftosk kferfo- §ucces$|uL VARSITY: Ray Dendy, Ken Russell, Ricky Turner, Bill Weidemaier, Mike Reese, Jerry Dujanovic, Lester Peterson, Bobby Keller, Tom Lynch. Mgr. Top row: Coach Skip Schifino, Don Weeks, Bob Moe, Gary Deak, Tom Haney, Bob Jensen, John Smith, Rickv P ,r, Tom Henze, Dan Williams, Mgr. John Dingman, Tom Elliott. FROSH: Nelson Burns, Corky Northrop, Dick Parrent, Lance Sherwood, Bill Lamuth. Second row: Mike Ellis, Ricky Christmas, Brad Shoe- maker, Dean Hill, Richard Shields. Top row: Pete Nikiforuk, Bob Robyn, Nick Karales, Captain John Propstra, Rod Temple, Coach Pat Carlin, Ricky Wood. - 102 -Making up the infield were: Bill Weidemaier, Mike Reese, Ricky Barr, Tom Henze, Ken Russell, Rick Turner. Composing the outfield were: Don Weeks, Bobby Kel- ler, Jerry Dujanovic. Top row: Bob Moe, Dan Williams, Lester Peterson, Bobby Keller Coach "Skip" Schifino Ken Russell Lester Peterson Mike Reese 1 Surrounding Coach Schifino are Catcher Ray Dendy and pitchers Tom Haney, Bob Jensen, Gary Deak, John Smith. Coming through with a successful bunt, during practice, was Bill Weidemaier.MATMEN Gene Reid, Mike Solvesky, Bill Close, Gordon Medill, Tom Haney, Stuart Hilton, Sandy Calkins. Second row: Marco Papaleoni, Carl Keller, Bobby Keller, Loren Eakes, Bob Bean, Joe Caudle. Third row: Murphy Medecke, Jim Hays, Vince Carter, Bob Fukuchi, Fred Ross, Bob Beal. Fourth row: Tom Niesz, Stan Davis, John Scofield, Don Bisbee, Mike Rosselle, Eddie House. Top row: Coach Oei $“McCollam. Mgr., Mike Lee, Burton Rogers, John Tharp, Mgr. THROUGH PEP ASSEMBLIES and effective instruction, wrestling at Arcadia progressed from a sport of little notice to one of increasing student interest. Perhaps by the score sheets, the '59-60 season would not appear to have been particularly successful; but the experience gained by the Titan squad members was invaluable in developing a great potential for future years. For the first time, many students actively supported this athletic event with as much enthusiasm as other, more widely publicized team sports. Each man, regardless of size, was of equal importance to the team, providing a place for every boy to participate. Those who showed e greatest potential this year and who may well grapple their way becoming state champions are Bob Keller, Joe Caudle, Tom Ha v, Stuart Hilton and Bob Bean, high-point men for the team. Heavyweight on the wrestling team was Stanley "Moose" Bayer. Bobby Keller tries to get a good hold on his adversary from Central High in order to pin him and gain five points for the Arcadia team. Coach of the first squad of Arcadia wrestlers was Mr. Joe Nix. 104 -Keller, GaudLe, Uientrfe- (3bfe l®untawfiiit Senior Bud Keller, who also won all of his matches during the regular season and then won the district meet which qualified him for State. In the tournament he placed fourth in the 154-pound weight division. Stuart Hilton gets his opponent in a fixed position so that he can turn him over for- a pin. Qualifying at the district meet for State, and then placing seventh in the 175-pound weight division was Freshman Joe Caudle. Tiring his opponent out for a quick decision is Bud Keller. Also qualifying for State was Bobby Keller, who placed seventh in the 165- pound weight division. Gene Reid. - 105 -G©lje s, 'facers §Uwecl Spint nBLaHMnmnaHHBHMBHm: rak JMHMMMHHaraaHMnuwwMkMU ntiwh THE GOLF TEAM: Pat O'Connor, Bob Rowe, Mike Hughes, Bill Welch, Gary Swift, Terry Repp, Larry Lof, Bill Stanford, md Gibson Pratt. GIRL'S FENCING TEAM: Karen Smitt, Martha Walker, Sheryl Payne, BOY'S FENCING TEAM: Stuart Pettycrew, John Chase, Gerald Norma Bancroft, Georgia Volkmar, Janice Ouren. Tinney, Roy Henderson, Chuck DuFrain, Bill Berg. - 106 -Seoswi FOOTBALL THE FIRST SEASON of football at Arcadia was tough but the record showed that AHS gridders gave opponents rough going. Opponents were larger, more experienced, but they did not surpass the Titans in spirit and desire. The team maintained high morale in each quarter of the game. The season's record was 4 - 4, but all who participated felt that they had won moral victories as well as a victory for Arcadia. Elected honorary captains of the first football squad were Bobby "Killer" Keller and Ricky "Twinkletoes" Turner. Bobby was center of offense and right linebacker on defense. Ricky was the leading scorer and also led in yardage gained. At all games there was good support from the student body and when the team played away, there were frequently more students from Arcadia than from the host school. The Titans' first game was against Snowflake at Snowflake. Though the scoreboard showed 36 - 26 in favor of Snowflake, the Arcadia team displayed strong defensive and offensive action as well as good sportsmanship and know-how. In the next game against Phoenix Christian, Class B Cham- pions of 1959, the Titans were defenseless against the powerful Christian line. When the final buzzer of the last quarter sounded the score stood 35 - 0 in favor of Phoenix Christian. The first home game was played on Friday, Oct. 9, against Superior, and the visiting team was no match for the overpower- ing Titan lines. The next two games against Coolidge and Phoenix Indian School proved to be the same tight defense and offense as was shown in the game against Superior. The rest of the season was equally exciting and the last game of the season showed a fighting and determined squad trouncing on Buckeye 35-6. BASKETBALL HEADING THE BASKETBALL team this past season was Coach Lou Hallman. Because of the inexperience of the boys they were victorious in only two major games. Probably the most exciting game was the one held at Kingman. The Kingman team was completely undefeated until they met the Titans. It was quite a victory for Arcadia because Kingman held the top position of champions of the A-North League. Because Arcadia's Varsity team was composed of juniors and sophomores, these boys will be available and experienced for the 1961 squad. Bob Jensen, high point man and honorary captain, proved to be one of the Titans' most valuable men. The J.V. squad for '59-'60 proved to be a credit to Arcadia by displaying only the soundest sportsmanship and team play. In compiling a 10-9 record, the boys demonstrated a high potential in all phases of basketball. TRACK LEADING THE HIGH FLYING TITANS to an impressive track season was Carl Granzow, captain of the squad. Capturing all scoring honors in the 100-220, the broad jump, the shot put, the discus, and running as anchor on the relay team, Carl be- came one of the most noticed track stars from Arcadia. Another individual star in A-North competition from Arcadia was Sophomore John Schlink. In the Buckeye Invitationals John tied for first place and won a first in the Chandler Invitational. In the first track meet of the season Arcadia traveled to Agua Fria. Because of the tenseness and foreign track the Titans were deflated 63Vi to 49' a. The next meet was at home against Brophy Prep, and the Titans excelled to a smashing score of 98 against the prepsters' 15. In the freshman meet held at home the Titan yearlings defeated Buckeye by a score of 75Vi to 371 2. According to Coaches Amerson and Dawson state hopefuls are: John Schlink, high jump; Carl Granzow, broad jump; Mike Rosselle and Jack Queck, mile,- and Don Vincent, 440. SCHOOL RECORDS 100 Yd. Dash — 10.6 —Carl Granzow and Dennis Thomas 220 Yd. Dash — 23.3 — Dennis Thomas 440 Yd. Dash — 54 — Don Vincent 880 Yd. Dash — 2:18.7 — Jim Greenback Mile - 4:54.3 - Jack Queck Shot Put — 43'10"—Carl Granzow Discus — 127'5 2"— Carl Granzow Pole Vault — 10'—Breck Lillyblad, Larry Leonardo, and Gordon Medill High Jump — 5'10"— John Schlink Broad Jump — 19'9' 2"—Carl Granzow 120 High Hurdles—18 sec. — Clark Livermore 180 Low Hurdles —23 sec. — Clark Livermore 880 Yd. Relays — 1 min. 37 sec. — Sam Bartaluzzi, Dennis Thomas, Don Vincent, Carl Granzow. BASEBALL AT PRESS TIME the baseball team led the Class-A-North Confer- ence 5-0. Winning all of their games after being trounced by Tempe 10-5 in the first game of the season, the Titans became the Cinderella team of conference baseball. Composing the first year's baseball team was 1 senior, 10 juniors, and 7 sophomores. In the first game of the season against Tempe, the Titans were tense and nervous but after the first three innings the boys settled down to play good baseball. The next games were played with determination and the will to win, and with that behind them the boys hit and fielded to win their conference and non-conference games. Even though there were many boys who had not played rough competition before, they soon found that they could handle it and give their opponents good competition. The last game up to press time was the deciding game for the number one position in the A-Conference. Just one game behind was Sunnyslope, who had lost to the Titans a couple of weeks before, but were determined to win. Theirs was a lost cause. After the Titans got twelve runs in the first two innings, Sunnyslope just couldn't fight back. The final score called at six innings was 18-1 in favor of the Titans. GOLF THE FIRST YEAR GOLF TEAM consisted of boys who had never played together before the past season. Because of this it was hard for the first few matches but the boys came through with several victories. The golfers traveled on through the rest of the season unreported here due to the Olympian's deadline. According to Coach Ben Anderson the season showed great potentiality for the Titans on the fairway and the golf team proved that another sports team is a credit to Arcadia. TENNIS IN SPITE OF the excellent direction of Coaches Bob Finkbinc and Miss Sally Harden the boys and girls tennis teams were the victims of much hard luck. Many players were playing com- petitive tennis for the first time and by the end of the season a marked improvement had been noted. The boys varsity lad- der: Bill Lawren, Jerry Skinner, Marco Papaleoni, Riley Wilson, Fred Rhoades, Joe Richter. Bob Looman, and Bill Farmer. The girls varsity ladder: Karen Vollmar, Gloria Eklund, Cheryl Holt- son, Charleen Burns, Connie Clark. FENCING SOMETHING NEW WAS ADDED to this year's sports program and that was the swashbuckling sport of fencing. Under the direction of Mrs. Doris Howard the fencers be- came one of the most successful fencing teams in the valley. Arcadia's prep high school fencing team faced opponents from Judson and had tough competition at Arizona State University. Scoring the most points of the season up to press time were Bill Berg and Sheryl Payne, who were also the captains. Coach Bob Hendricks, Director of Athleticsbutita ( )niOJn£ut ft . . . NEARLY EVERY AGE has been an age of industrial development, yet while the roar of progress has moved onward, men have found comfort, relaxation, and cul- ture in the beauties of art. Since the ap- preciation of art is such an important part of our lives, schools have come to offer extensive programs in this field. The Fine Arts Department at Arcadia was designed to serve two types of stu- dents. First, it offered the serious student of art, the person who was interested in further study, an invaluable preparatory program. Second, the department offered a source of extra-curricular activity and cultural training to those who participated in the arts simply for the enjoyment they received. The three divisions of the department — art, music, and drama — were chiefly concerned with the training of basic techniques and the furthering of art ap- preciation. Although the three divisions functioned as separate units, they did work together on several fine arts pro- ductions throughout the year. Richfield unbGIRLS CHORUS: Sharon Mills, Patti Stevens, Linda Miller, Marjorie Moel- ler, Kathy Evans, Judy Post, Carole Robinson, Oiane Cleveland, Lona Winkleman. Top row: Gloria Bones, Barbara Weirscham, Karen Clever, Sandy Deike, Joyce Elkie, Paula Mat- tingly. Erlene Mosier, Pamela Hurley, Selene Herford, Sue Lewis, Jan Jus- tin, Sheryl Nye, Doris Zesiger. Bobbie Arnsbcrg and Nancy Tenney, talented pianists accompany soloists Karen Lindstrom, Vicki Zoeller, and Sherry Sheldon in the Easter Cantata. QuWUS tack kW . . . ARCADIA'S MIXED CHORUS, comprised of forty-three talented members, reflected the expert guidance of Mr. Reginald Brooks in their presentations. Performing for the Sky Harbor Kiwanis Club and presenting a Christmas Concert, the chorus showed their talent in the deliverance of two top- notch performances. The Easter Cantata, presented in col- laboration with the Girls Chorus, was a first class effort on the part of both groups. Bobbie Arnsberg and Nancy Tenney, two hard working pianists, accompanied both the Mixed and Girls Chorus through- out the year. Mr. Reginald Brooks MIXED CHORUS: Barbara Burns, Carol Parker, Lida Macri, Vicki Zoeller, Sheila McCarty, Margaret Pratt, Judy Clatterbuck, Cindy Johnson. Second row: Sandra Fagg, Barbara Denzer, Peggy Eklund, Karen Volmar, Diane Bowkley, Joanne Heeftle, Donna Allen, Carol Wash, Nora Rogan, Sheryl Payne, Sue Knight. Third row: Beth Weber, Sandra Learn, Annette Kafarski, Charles Schdlet, Pat Stanley, Bob Parker, Don Vincent, Charles Emery. Sue Gray, Robbie Shafranka. Top row: Wanda Roehrer, Sandra Schooly, Judy Jackson, Eddie Ford, Vance Day, Gary Sprinzl, Larry Dool, Richard Barr, Zoltan Sari, Karen Lindstrom, Sherry Sheldon, Carolyn Gray. no --Full -first Year UNDER THE DIRECTION of Mr. Reginald Brooks, the Titan Band was well re- ceived throughout its first year. Early in the fall the band proved their out- standing abilities by providing top-notch entertainment at Arcadia's football games and winning the immediate sup- port of the student body. The Titan Band made its first march- ing appearance in the Lion's Club Hal- loween Parade on October 29. After seeing the band perform in Scottsdale's Parada Del Sol and in the Phoenix J. C. Rodeo Parade, their snappy blue and red uniforms became a familiar sight to Scottsdale and Phoenix residents. Mr. Brooks and his Titan Band also had the honor of being the first to ap- pear in Arcadia's newly completed au- ditorium. JUNIOR VARSITY BAND: Lois Elliot, Clarence Deike, Edward Trapp, Joe Manzo, Carol Moore, Connie Muddell. 2nd row: Terry Hawkes, Gerald Schu- macher, Richard Ford, James McCullam, Toby Rowell, Kip Lindblom. Top row: Steve Jones, Eric Shoemacher, Stan Bie- leski. Hector Streyckmans, Jeffory White, Mr. Brooks. Absent when picture was taken were Mike Quinn, Mike Julian. Mike Case, talented trombonist, was the featured soloist in Arcadia's first con- cert, presented in the auditorium. TITAN BAND: CORNET: Jim Caldwell, Burton Rogers, John Call, Bob Lutes, Mike Zimmerman, Gary Wasson, Steve Briggs, Jack Smith, Bill Cetti, Bill Kamstra, Dave Snyder, Robin Robb; TRUMPETS: Steve Surgener, Les Kilpatrick; CLARINET: Suzann Brown, Ken Ealy, John Scofield, Carl Vanderbosch, Jackie Crampton, Patricia Tomkins, Lowell Rogers, Gary Maschner, Gloria Eklund, Karen Brooks, LeRoy Shaw, Tanya Smitt; BASS CLARINET: Diane Eggert; BARITONE SAXOPHONE: Jim Swanson, Don White, Jane Hakes, Sherry Sheldon, Bill Close; TENOR SAXOPHONE: Bob Rowe, Roy Henderson; FLUTE: Patricia Childers, Dulcie Pridgeon, Mary Katarski, Marilyn Ross, Barbara Burt, Judy Clatterbuck, Sharon Farmer, Steve Everson; OBOE: Tom Baum, Willie SueGrifford; BASSOON: Ellen Lacy; FRENCH HORN: Dave Surgener, John Herrick, LeRoy Gaintner; BARITONE: Tom Canter, Dallas Banks; TROMBONE: Mike Case, Keith Vanderbosch, Rick Briggs, Carl Granzow; BASS: Tom Elliott, George Knirsch; PERCUSSION: Ann Rosenstein, Dave Sargeant, Jean Birch, Roger Olmsted, Judy Hubbard. - Ill -Lois Liska, petite ballerina, presented a challenge to the artistic talents of Mrs. Burrell's students as she posed in costume for them. At, ©ra»ux (3W£nfc . . . THIS YEAR'S STUDENTS had a chance to ex- press their talent under the excellent instruc- tion of Mrs. Margaret Burrell, head of the Art Department. Attractive still life displays as well as live models were a challenge to the abilities of her students. Mrs. Burrell's students aided the Drama Department by painting the entire backdrops and scenery for "Teahouse" and "Anything Goes." Mrs. Margaret Burrell Art I students find still fife more interesting when they have displays to duplicate. Here they try their skill at drawing a fresh fruit arrangement. Perched on ladders high above the drama floor, two of ;« $. Burrell's art students work industriously to finish scenery for "Teahouse." 112 -GwnbiRei Mony Haleitls MR. JOHN HALL, head of the Speech and Drama Department, provided first-rate direction and supervision for Arcadia's productions, "Anything Goes" and "Teahouse of the August Moon." Members of the Home Economics Depart- ment, headed by Mrs. Claudette Berach, proved themselves invaluable members of the theatri- cal crew by sewing numerous attractive cos- tumes for productions. Murial Hochstetler hems the attractive kimona worn by Caldwell Reed, while Earlene Peer, Cherry Hobson qpd Karen Maby, other Home Ec. stu- dents, put the finishing touches on three other costumes. Mr. John Hall eefiveness of beautiful scenery and backdrop is apparent in one of the scenes from "Teahouse of the August Moon." Roger Bigelow and Mike Case in foreground. Ronald Gregory, in complete facial make-up of the Ancient Man, posed on stage so the make-up crew could see the complete effect of their efforts under lights. Cast learned the technique of applying make-up for Arcadia's production of "Teahouse of the August Moon." - 113 -Roger Bigelow, as Sekini, interprets words of democracy from Captain Fisby to the villagers. "Ikkuse Ik August Psychiatrist Stan Bayer lectures Captain Fisby, Mike Case, in a scene "TEAHOUSE of the August Moon," under the direction of Mr. John Hall, was the first play presented in Arcadia's new auditorium. Starring in this comedy production were Roger Bigelow, Lois Liska, Mike Case and Michael Evans. Mr. Bob Lingren, of the Lingren - Tyven School of Ballet, was choreographer for the fun-filled production. "Teahouse" was presented on April 7 and 8 after being postponed because of a delay in auditorium completion, namely lack of seats. from "Teahouse". In a humorous rehearsal scene from "Teahouse", Captain Fisby (Mike Case) makes a frantic plea for help over the telephone as Lotus Blossom (Lois Liska) attempts to remove his coat. 114 -The girls of the chorus concentrate on one of their dance routines during a rehearsal for "Anything Goes". Uias jAcadias Major 'VMu m. SELECTIONS FROM "Anything Goes", a lively musical comedy, were presented by the Dra- ma Department under the direction of Mr. John Hall. Twenty chorus girls, under the di- rection of Choreographer Bobby Lindgren, contributed in a big way to the success of the production. Making use of the arena style stage, the Drama Department also produced "The Match- maker". This playful, 4-act comedy was well received by school and community theater goers. Helen Standing asks Carol McMaster rather sarcastically, "Dahling, would you care for some tea?" in one of the Theater Arts class plays. The rest of the class makes an attentive audience. "Matchmaker" leads: Barnaby (Ronald Gregory), Mr. Vandergelder (Michael E. Evans), Cornelius Hackl (Michael Case), Malachi Stack (Roger Bigelow), The Matchmaker, Mrs. Levi (Helen Blending), Miss Van Huysen (Sheryl Payne), Irene Molloy (Mary Turnbow), Ermangarde (Carol Adams), and Minnie (Jo Anne Beauchamp). 115 -©evei ped . . . ARCADIA'S AUDITORIUM at the first of the school year was a mass of steel girders with only the stage part very far advanced. The student body watched anxiously from day to day as the auditorium gradually took shape and devel- oped into the beautiful building which so artistically exem- plifies the modern Arcadia look. The interior of the audi- torium, as well as the exterior, carries the modernistic theme. It was completed upon the arrival of attractive tur- quoise seats. The public had a chance to see the completed audi- torium at the presentation of "Teahouse of the August Moon" April 7 and 8. Construction is apparent as one looks at the bare scaffolds and steel sup- ports in the foreground, with build- ing materials scattered around. A dramatic angle of the auditorium captures the modem lines of the incomplete building. Projecting front piece added, the auditorium is closer to completion but still has a great deal of work left to be done. 116 -■fim St lrfo- c3tage ARCADIA'S BEAUTIFUL auditorium, upon its completion, housed several activities of the Fine Arts Students. The band and chorus un- der the direction of Mr. Reginald Brooks, and two plays, directed by Mr. John Hall were presented on its spacious stage. The auditor- ium is a center of extra curriculum activities and plays an important part in school life. Workmen hurriedly install seats in time for an 8 P. M. perform- ance, while "Teahouse" cast does a last minute rehearsal on stage. The Art Building, surrounded by trees, is almost rustic looking amid the dramatic, modern buildings that meet the eye in every other direc- tion. Arcadia's auditorium is a beautiful, modern building as well as a very useful addition to the campus. 117 -but magiu tes “tie roJlmt se -ligkbdlM!ktt of Giaracter, kt©H©r cmcL clu£vew£iit THROUGHOUT HIS LIFE every man strives for the attainment of higher goals and personal satisfaction in some field of en- deavor. Perhaps the most innate and dynamic trait in human nature is the desire to earn and possess respect and fellowship. In the high school community is an opportunity for every individual to make himself outstanding in some area of per- sonal interest. Merit and recognition are proudly awarded those making note- worthy progress and contributions in academic subjects, athletic activities, jour- nalism, student government, service or- ganizations, dramatic productions, and the industrial, domestic, and fine arts. Public recognition, however, is not the only measurement of success. Each student who participated at Arcadia with the criteria of bettering himself and his surroundings gained a sense of personal satisfaction and achievement.SUZANN KAY BROWN "Always smile, it's the key to reel success" ONE OF THE BUSIEST GIRLS on campus was Helen Blanding. Her quick smile and sparkling personality gained for her many honors, among them that of being a yearbook princess. Helen served in Student Council and held offices in Pep Club, Rainbow Girls, TAC, St. Joseph's Jr. Auxiliary, Jr. Red Cross, and Senior Class. She belonged to several clubs including Tri-Hi-Y, Jr. Symphony and Jr. Musical Theatre Guilds, and National Honor Society. Her versa- tility in journalism was shown by her positions as section editor of the "1959 Camelback," editor-in-chief of "The 1960 Olympian," and campus correspondent for "The Arizonian." Helen received many honors, among them, being Arcadia's sole delegate to the State Stu- dent Council Convention, being a finalist for DeMolay Sweetheart, and being recognized in the Teen-Age Hall of Fame. Other activities were participation in the mus- icals "Oklahoma." "Finian's Rainbow," and "Any- thing Goes." Marco- Kwg; Caldwell, Sue, kleW "Reign . . . BY A LANDSLIDE VOTE of the entire student body foreign exchange student Marco Papaleoni was chosen to reign as Mr. Olympian for the school year 1959-60. In the same election Helen Blanding, Suzann Brown, and Caldwell Read were chosen as fin- alists for the title of Miss Olympian. SUZANN KAY BROWN, better known to her many campus friends as "Suzie" was elected one of the three Olympian princesses for the year 1959-60. Suzann's many activities included Pep Club, Teens Against Cancer, Scottsdale Junior Varsity Beaver Band, and Arcadia Titan Band. She also served as Secretary- Treasurer of the Band Lettermen Organization in its first year at Arcadia. Being a queen is nothing new to Suzann, who reigned as District Softball Queen for the Latter Day Saints Church during 1959. Her future plans include attendance at Arizona State University with a major in home-making which she hopes to teach after graduation. 120 - HELEN KAY BLANDING "Know the truth, and the truth shall make you free". . . In 3-Uicy lie Mis Olympian BUT, DUE TO THE FACT that you the student body felt each of these girls equally qualified for this position and because you showed this by making the run-off election end in a tie, all three of them have been chosen as Olympian Princesses. MARCO PAPALEONI MARCO PAPALEONI, Arcadia's first foreign exchange stu- dent, was chosen by a very large majority of the student body to reign as Mr. Olympian for 1960. Marco, who hails from Trento, Italy, attended school at Gimasio Liceo "G. Prati." At Arcadia he was a member of Key Club, Lettermen's Club, Teens Against Cancer, and Stu- dent Council. He was also elected Homecoming Attendant for the Senior Class, and received letters in wrestling and tennis. Marco, whose Italian parents are Mr. and Mrs. Ezio Papaleoni, lived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Rhuart during his stay in the United States. His hobbies include horse-back riding, collecting jazz records and playing tennis. CALDWELL READ "Carry Love in your heart always." CALDWELL READ, a girl known for her charm and grace, was a close candidate in the election of Miss Olympian. "Penny," as she was known to her friends, was an avid horse lover. Her activities in that field included membership in the Western Saddle Club, and Horse Lover's Club. She also participated in many horse shows throughout Arizona. Caldwell has won several other queenships. She was crowned queen of Delta Sigma Phi at their Sweet- heart Ball as well as Paradise Valley Trail Queen. Sho was also a debutante at St. Luke's Charity Ball. Caldwell's future plans include going to college. - 121LeiStlW, Ouren Top-kW r (3tjuol£nk Glenda leistiko. Valedictorian of the 1960 graduating class. GLENDA LOU LEISTIKO was ap- pointed Valedictorian of the 1960 graduating class. Glenda won this award with a 1.17 grade average throughout high school. Along with making top grades, Glenda was a member of the |National Honor Society and Band Lettermen's Club, and active in her church activities. Her future plans include further study in accounting. The top 5% of the Senior Class, Glenda Leistiko, Trudy Bohm, Jan Ouren, and Barbara Burns. Not pictured is Carolyn Wooldridge. 122 -UWdn in T p 57o JANICE HELEN OUREN was chosen Salutatorian for the Senior Class with a 1.2 grade average. Jan moved here from Abraham Lincoln High School where she was Junior Class Vice President, in September of 1959. She was a member of the National Honor Society and National Thespians. In 1958 she was an American Field Service Exchange Student to Berlin, Germany. She plans to go to college and major in Eng- lish. Students making the Principal's List the first four times were: Lynn Finell, Doug Griffith, Willie Sue Grifford, Candy Lane, Kathleen Smith, and Peggy Sheffield. - 123 -15eg, i3enndt NaW o kWec mwgs . Queen Marilyn and King Bill MARILYN BENNETT, born in Hull, Quebec, Can- ada, was elected by the Student Body to repre- sent Arcadia as queen of the first Homecoming festivities. In addition to her many duties as Vice Presi- dent of the Senior Class, Marilyn enjoyed par- ticipating in Junior Red Cross, Teens Against Cancer, National Honor Society, French, Chem- istry, and Rifle Clubs, Episcopal Young Church- men, and the Junior Achievement Club. Marilyn has been awarded a scholarship to the UofA where she will major in Chemistry and minor in Education. BILL BERG, Student Body President, was elected to reign as Homecoming King for 1959-60. De- spite his busy schedule Bill was an active mem- ber of the Salt River Valley Presidents and Vice- Presidents Association, a member of the Key Club, Fencing Club, and a three year sports letterman. He was also selected by the admin- istration to be recognized in the "Teenage Hall of Fame." - 124 -I95P- 60 B©M£CGHnmg {syafcj V A SENIOR ATTENDANTS Connie Stephenson and Don Vincent SOPHOMORE ATTENDANTS Barbara Jones and Tom Elliott JUNIOR ATTENDANTS Judy Elliott and Rick Turner SENIOR ATTENDANTS Ann Reid and Marco Papaleoni FRESHMAN ATTENDANTS Nancy Kelly and Jack Koppen 125 -McGiteW, Eoks Reigw. wer Iwifp UJeek n i ATTENDANTS Pat Sterba and Mike Weller ATTENDANTS Suzi Wood and Locke Kelly Carol McCutchen and Loren Eakes reigned over TWIRP Week and the TWIRP Dance February 27. Carol was Junior Class Secretary and a Varsity Cheerleader. She was also a member of Y-Teens, Delta Omega Tri-Hi-Y, and Teens Against Cancer. Her future plans include going to college and majoring in psychology. Loren was a member of the football and wrestling teams and the Lettermen's Club. - 126 -n aWi "First foreign HxdiGnge 3tLui£Kt MARCO PAPALEONI, Arcadia's first foreign exchange student, was from Trento, Italy, where he studied at Gimasio Liceso "G. Prati." Marco was a member of the Key Club, Lettermcn's Club, Teens Against Cancer, and a member of the Student Council. He was also Homecoming attendant for the Senior class. While in America, Marco lived with the Leslie H. Rhuart family, but his real parents are Mr. and Mrs. Ezio Papaleoni. His hobbies include skiing, horseback riding, tennis, swimming, sports, and dancing. The four finalists in the American Field Service Foreign Exchange Student Pro- gram were Carol Cole, Annette Katarski, Marilyn Ross, and Joanne Thornton. BEVERLY SUE CHRISTENSEN, Student Body Treasurer, was chosen to represent Arizona at the Williamsburg Student Burgesses in Williamsburg, Virginia. She was also elected DcMolay Sweetheart for Scottsdale Chapter of DeMolay. Along with maintaining a 1.9 grade average, Bev has been a member of Student Council for three years, a three-year pom-pon member and captain for one year, and a member of Stellae Tri-Hi-Y, Future Nurses of America, and the National Honor Society. Marco Papaleoni Beverly Sue Christensen 127 -8 Musicians, l ocalists, j kkM» 4li- 3tnfe ALL-STATE CHORUS MEMBERS: Sheryl Payne, Margaret Pratt, Gary Sprinzl and Charles Emery ALL-STATE CHORUS, Band, and Orchestra, which was held on March 11-12 on the campus of the University of Arizona in Tucson, presented an opportunity for select persons from every high school in Arizona to study under noted musicians for two days. Students sent to All-State learned new techniques and carried them back to members of their respective organizations. The members of the Band and Orches- tra were chosen by private audition at ASU in Tempe. Chorus members were selected by the choral director at each high school, the number depending on the size of the school. GUEST CONDUCTOR of the 1960 All-State Orchestra was Guy Taylor, director of the Phoenix Symphony. John Bloom, Director of Music at ASU, directed the Chorus, and Dr. Manly E. Whitcomb, Director of the Bands and Professor of Music Education at Florida State University, conducted the Band. Representing Arcadia in the chorus were: Soprano, Margaret Pratt; Alto, Sheryl Payne,- Tenor, Gary Sprinzl; Bass, Charles Emery. The Orchestra and Titan Band were represented by Joanne Thornton, Selene Hurford, Keith Vanderbosch, Tom Baum. ALL-STATE BAND AND ORCHESTRA MEMBERS: Selene Hurford, Tom Baum, Keith Vanderbosch, and Joanne Thornton. 128 -15Wwq, Grw titers-in.- Ouef I WOULD LIKE to express my deepest ap- preciation to the many people who have had a part in producing this yearbook. To Mr. Carpenter, the staff, our advertisers, the administration — you all have been invaluable in making my opportunity of editing "The Olympian" a memorable and rewarding experience. Because there were so few of us on the staff with any actual yearbook exper- ience, this endeavor represents a great deal more personal effort and individual "learn-as-you-go" spirit than many would imagine. We are proud of our part in pro- ducing this, the first annual of Arca'dia High, and hope you will share in the joy of watching the book grow bigger and better each year. Helen Blanding, Editor-in-Chief, ‘The Olympian" Helen Blanding, shown here making out a dummy page, was Editor of the "Olympian". Leah Diane Greer, Editor of the "Arcadian", is pictured typing one of the many stories that went info the "Arcadian". THE POSITION of high school Editor-in- Chief is one requiring responsibility and a willingness to give time and energy to the ever glorious school newspaper. It is a job mingling work, fun, and some confusion into a meaning that comes out periodically. The thrill and sense of achievement that springs into being when you see the life blood of the school cap- tured on six pages is rewarding, but the most important thing in the life of every editor is not the finished black and white but the long suffering staff that made it all possible. Leah Diane Greer Editor-In-Chief, "Arcadian" 129 -HELEN BLANDING, Editor of the '60 Olympian, was chosen by the admin- istration for recognition in the "Teenage Hall of Fame." Helen was also a two year National Honor Society member, four years a Junior Symphony Guild member, a two year math honorary member. Senior Class Girl Representa- tive, a member of the Junior Varsity Pom-pon Squad, a Miss Olympia Prin- cess, and a finalist for DeMolay Sweet- heart. kiaroL UJ wfeng . . . i BILL BERG, Student Body President, was also a member of the "Teenage Hall of Fame." He was an active member of the Salt River Presidents and Vice Presi- dents Association, Homecoming King, a member of the Key Club and Fencing Club, and a three year Sports Letterman. ANNE BENYI was awarded the Best Business Student award for 1960. Last year Anne was a member of Lae Tae Y-Teens and was in the Production of Kiss Me Kate. SUE BARTALUZZI, Arizona State Tennis Champion, was awarded the Daughter's of America Revolution Award. Sue was a member of the National Honor So- ciety, the Spanish Club, Girls League, Historian of the Tennis Team, and Rep- resentative to Student Council for Y- Teens. 130 -lAm Mcuuj bf®n®rs ANN REID, Student Body Vice-President, was elected Senior Day Princess to Ari- zona State University. Ann was also elected Homecoming Attendant for the Senior Class, and was a member of Girls League, Girls Athletic Association, Delta Omega Tri-Hi-Y, and Y-Teens. MICHAEL EVANS, a sophomore, won first place in the Junior Men's Division of Interpretive Reading at Arizona State University. He was also chosen by the Optimists Club as a Youth of the Month. I CONNIE STEPHENSON, Senior Class Secretary, was elected Senior Day Prin- cess to the University of Arizona in Tucson. She was a member of the Pep Club and was Homecoming Attendant for the Senior Class. Connie plans to go to college for two years and then become an airline hostess. SELENE HURFORD was awarded a schol- arship to the Music Camp at Arizona State University for three weeks this summer. Along with playing the cello, Selene was a member of the Girls Chorus and the Phoenix Junior Sym- phony Guild. She hopes to become a Concert Cellist. - 131 4cL effeing Is lie kleraU MODERN SOCIETY is the product of an age of speed and power. A strong and sometimes fierce spirit of competition has arisen among the numerous businesses which have come into being during the past few decades. One of the most pow- erful and effective allies of the modern merchant in competitive business is ad- vertising. Advertising benefits the businessman and the general public. The advertisers and patrons of this yearbook have con- tributed sizeable amounts toward its pro- duction costs, and they have displayed an active interest in the school.When It's Shoes Remember . . The SHOE BOX At the Wagon Wheel Shopping Center 4242 East Thomas Road Phone WH 5-1507 ARIZONA SAND ROCK COMPANY "FIRST FIRST SERVICE” "LOOK FOR THE MIXER TRUCKS WITH THE RED CREAM STRIPES" PRE-MIX CONCRETE SAND ' ROCK PAVING • CONSTRUCTION 2400 SOUTH 7th ST. • PHOENIX, ARIZONA • ALpine 4-8465 134 - MARSTON SUPPLY COMPANY Complete Line of School Supplies and Equipment • Athletic Equipment • Stage Equipment • Duplicating Supplies, Equipment and Maintenance • Office Supplies and Equipment 3209 N. Central Avenue — Phone CR 7-5477 PHOENIX, ARIZONA BEAUTY SALON TELEPHONE: CRestwood 7-5771 3947 EAST CAMELBACK ROAD PHOENIX-ARIZONA L. J. lieffort. Prop. LI EFFORT'S MOBIL SERVICE We give S H Green Stamps 4200 E. Indian School Road — Phone CR 4-9832 PHOENIX, ARIZONA 54 East Main Phone WH 5-8391 39 Pima Plaza Phone WH 5-5118 SABA'S Western and Sports Wear FOR LAND'S SAKE - SEE US We're specialists in undeveloped land and Paradise Valley — Cavecreek area prop- erties generally. Also exclusive agents for- that "miracle on the desert," CAREFREE, ARIZ., the new townsite near the inter- section of Scottsdale Road and Cavecreek Hwy. DARLING PALMER, Inc., Real Estate 30 Pima Plaza Scottsdale WH 5-4252 6 Sunshine Circle Carefree Dial 112 - HU 8-3281 For Young People Who Are Going Places - 135 - L . . . We hope you will find a way to college, for your life will be fuller and richer if you do. For those of you who must enter the business world now, let us recommend that you open a savings account immediately — however small — at the Valtey Bank. As you progress in your business life, you’ll need bank credit. And when a banker makes his first loan to young people, he is guided mainly by the banking record they have established in the past. Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Junior and Misses Dresses and Sportswear Town Country Casuals Camelback Town Country Village 2045 East Camelback - Phone CR 7-2733 DIAMOND’S - 136 -Sflffffil HOTEL Address: 4611 N. Scottsdale Rd. For reservations: Call WH 5-6482In the Heart of Pima Plaza Paradise Pharmacy 24-hour Prescription Service Brown and First Avenue Scottsdale, Arizona Shirley E. Brown, Owner House of Fabrics NELSON-HOLLAND BUILDERS HARDWARE PHONE AM 6 8411 - 1205-1207 E. CAMELBACK PHOENIX, ARIZONA The Shootin's Good in Arizona For Fine Fabrics . . . REMEMBER 5 Park Central Mall Phone CR 7-3521 Make every shot a perfect one with a camera from 40th Street Foto Shop Complete instruction and guidance are included with all of our photographic supplies. We specialize in information to beginners. Easy Terms — One Day Service — Guaranteed Results 3931 E. Indian School — Phone AM 5-6500 Aa, “PtaycL ecMtcf, Sato i 533 North Brown Phone WH 5-2353 - 138 -■ 3020 S. 19th Avenue Phone AL 8-7517 Open 9 AM to 10 PM ■ PARKER’S ARCADIA 214 Hamburgers 3712 East Indian School y PHARMACY i y ■ iinitivinvi j Records — Phonographs — Accessories Stereophonic — High Fidelity It's MUSIC CITY 4750 E. Indian School WH 5-5132 5532 East Thomas Rd. - Phone WH 5-5532 SERVING ARCADIA SINCE THE BEGINNING G. F. Strickland Son LATHING PLASTERING 2315 East Pinchot Phone AM 6-2706 139 -Autry Brothers Jostens Caps and Gowns Announcements Jewelry Class Rings Sam De Witt — Representative Compliments of E.L. FARMER Construction Company 2801 North 32nd Street CR 9-4191 y rtm CHURCHILL-BAILEY PLASTIC CORK«TILE« RUBBER» ASPHALT PHOENIX, ARIZONA 3902 E. INDIAN SCHOOL RD. MASONRY CONTRACTOR 1330 South 26th Place PHOENIX, ARIZONA - 140 - Faftour HxA. Ray Lumber Co. PHOENIX, ARIZONA A complete line of Lumber, Hardwoods, Plywood • Lime • Doors • Nails • Plaster • Hardware • Roofing Material • Wallboard • Shingles • Cement • Paints • Tools • Sash 3 Locations to Serve You Phoenix — AL 8-5355 19th Avenue at West Culver Maryvale - YE 7-2718 4450 West Camelback Scottsdale — WH 5-9566 388 South Scottsdale Rd. Uv bo Ln s “tb MiA C-Lt ( • ! rvta OOva CLl. ROAD OFFICE MEMO TO: ARCADIA HIGH STUDENTS . . SCOTTSDALE SAVINGS is your kind of hometown institution. Beautiful surroundings to make business transactions happy times . . . well-trained staff members to serve your best interest , . . and savings account variations to help you plan for every joyful thing in life. We invite you to visit our office and learn how easily you can start saving: safely, conveniently and with a good return on your money! Best personal regards. B. H. CARLSON Vice President and Manager L fllff Scottsdale Savings SCOTT SOAK and Loan Association 10 NORTH SCOTTSDALE ROAD • SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA 141. . . one of the most com- plete school and church supply houses in the Southwest. 530 W. Washington — Phoenix — AL 8-6661 PRESCOTT • FLAGSTAFF • MESA SAFFORD • TUCSON • YUMA taxES... TAXes... taxes?... TAXES! Rehearse it well! It's a word you'll be questioning often, praising sometimes, complaining about regularly ... for the rest of your life. And yet, the freedom to pay for the education, recreation, and protection we want through taxes is a privilege reserved only for a free people. We at Arizona Public Service, are happy to accept our responsibility as a good neighbor, along with nearly all busi- nesses and individuals, by paying our fair share of taxes. Providing low-cost utility service is our main job. Being a good taxpaying citi- zen is important, too ! ARIZONA j Public Service C--1 »AmTi e cunt «Httcvi t » vt GRADUATING? Finish your education Hero arc 4 things you should do to Succeed! Learn leadership Save part of your Earnings western SWINGS rr SUCCESS COMES FROM HARD WORK AND SAV- ING PART OF EVERY- THING YOU EARN Plan to start right now to save part of every pay- check ... no matter how small the amount may seem to be. Little dollars soon grow to large sums. Your future is assured with a Western Savings account. 8 friendly offices to serve you. - 142 -WATER DAMAGE SERVICE INSTALLATION Qardner Carpet Service 4433 North 16th CR 7-2606 CLEANING WILLIflfll VOLKER CO. • Wholesale Furniture • Carpeting • Floor Covering 1026 North 21st Ave. Phone AL 8-3458 DYEING - 143• Wet Dry Suits • Spear Guns • Diving Masks • Hunting Fishing Supplies Archery Equipment Supplies Phone CR 4-3863 Steue’s Union Service 4402 E. Indian School Rd. WH 5-4641 FOUNTAIN PHARMACY 4832 North 40th Street - AM 6-3838 PATRONS CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF '60 I. L. Stephenson Harold Arp C F. Blanding Dr. C. E. Blaldey 3027 N. 44th Street Dr. R. F. Bobo 3819 East Indian School Dr. F. B. Gillard 5051 East Thomas RoadCflfUfO Studios PHOENIX - TEAAPE "Pictures in Uving Color” Arizona's Exclusive Color Specialists 718 North Central - AL 4-5757 For the best in real estate Charleen and Fred say, "See Harry Burns at Wall Street Realty!" THE WALL STREET REALTY. INC. 131 W CAMK1J1ACK ROAD • l-IIOKNIX. ARIZONA • CR T 34B» . CR l«N BETTER HOMES FOR BETTER LIVING ■ — • - ■ d uAndmen QuiQdeit ornei 306 e. CAMELOACK CR 7-1122 I - 145 -er V of '0J' Advertising Index PAGE Arcadia Pharmacy............................139 Arizona Public Service......................142 Arizona Sand Rock.........................134 Autry Brothers and Jostens..................140 Bruce Floors................................140 Churchill-Bailey Contractors................140 Cell's Beauty Salon.........................135 Clemens Insulation Incorporated.............139 Darlington Palmer.........................135 Diamond's Department Store..................135 E. L. Farmer Construction Co................140 40th Street Foto Shop.......................138 First National Bank.........................136 Fountain Pharmacy...........................144 Gardner Carpet Service......................143 G. F. Strickland and Son....................139 House of Fabrics............................138 Jenni's Juniors ............................141 La Plaza Beauty Salon.......................138 Lieffort's Mobil Station....................135 Marston Supply Company......................135 Music City..................................139 Nelson-Holland Builders.....................138 Paradise Pharmacy...........................138 Parker's Hamburgers.........................139 PBSW Supply Company.........................138 Ray Lumber Company..........................141 Saba's Department Store.....................135 Safari Hotel Incorporated...................137 Scottsdale Savings and Loan.................141 Shoebox.....................................134 Sports Spot.................................144 Steve's Union Service Station...............144 Town Country Casuals......................136 Valley National Bank........................136 Western Savings.............................142 William Volker Co.........................143 146 -A Adams, Carol .......... Adams, John ........... Adams, Lorraine ....... Aden, Don ............. Adler, Susan .......... Akers, Billie Jean .... Alford, Diane ......... Alford, Shireen ....... Allen, Donna .......... Allen, Harold ......... Allen, Mary Ann ....... Allen, Robert ......... Alliston, Lee ......... Alliston, Sue ......... Allums, Linda ......... Ambrose, Linda ........ Amerson, Mr. Howard Ammerman, Joyce ....... Anders, Velma.......... Anderson, Adriene ..... Anderson, Mr. Ben ... Anderson, Jim ......... Anderson, James ....... Anderson, Sally ....... Arnsberg, Barbara ..... Arp, Linda ............ Ashe, Mr. John ........ Ashpaugh, Betty ....... Ashton, Sherrill ...... Atkinson, Diane ....... Aubel, Judy ........... Austin, Sandra......... Ayers, Bob ............ Ayers, Larry .......... Bagshaw, Bruce ........ Bailey, Jim ........... Balash, Judy .......... Baldridge, Sandy ...... Baldwin, Loretta ...... Baliett, Ronnie ....... Ballard, Sharon ....... Balser, Judy .......... Bancroft, Norma ....... Banks, Dallas ......... Bann, Veronica ........ Barnes, Sandy ......... Barnett, Bruce ........ Barnett, Rick ......... Barr, Ricky ........... Bartaluzzi, Sam ....... Bartaluzzi, Sue ....... Barton, Cyril ......... Bataran, Mike ......... Bauer, Cindy .......... Baum, Thomas .......... Bayer, Stan ........... Beal, Bob ............. Beal, Linda ........... Beamer, Dick .......... Bean, Bob ............. Beardsley, Jonnie ..... Beauchamp, Joanne .... Beckman, Sharen ....... Behan, Barbara ........ Beil, Don ............. Beil, Gary ............ Bellenger, Jean ....... Benjamin, Pat ......... Bennett, Janis ........ Bennet, Marilyn ....... Benson, Sharon ........ Benyi, Alease Anne .... Berach, Mrs. Claudette Bcran, Bill ........... Berg, Bill ............ Bernal, George ........ Bertolin, Ken ......... Bieleski, Stan ........ Bigelow, Roger ........ Bimson, Mr. Lloyd ..... Birch, Jean ........... .....................46, 47, 67 .............................26 ..........................54, 73 ..........................19, 46 .................39, 73, 74, 78 .................46. 71, 74, 99 .................15, 26, 73, 75 .....................39, 73, 74 ..........................39, 110 ...............................46 .....................54, 74, 75 .............................26 ..........................25, 62 ...............................54 .................39, 70, 72, 73 ...............................46 ..........14, 62, 69, 102. 103 .............................26 ........................26, 81 ...............................54 .....................18, 69, 92 ..........................13. 39 ...............................46 ...............................54 ........................26, 110 ..........................73. 80 .............................11 ...............................54 ...............................46 ...............................54 ...............................39 ...............................39 ...............................46 ...............................54 B ...............................46 ...............................46 ...............................39 ...............................46 ...............................46 .............................. 46 ...............................54 ...............................74 .................39. 71. 74. 106 ...............................46 .....................13. 46, 74 ...............................39 ...............................54 ...............................46 ..........39, 97, 102, 104, 110 .................45, 46. 63, 98 .................15, 27. 76, 130 ..........................46, 98 ...............................46 ...............................39 .....................27. 70, 128 ......39. 66, 72, 92, 104, 114 .................54, 72, 95, 104 .................17, 54, 67. 78 ...............................46 .................39, 72. 92, 104 ...............................54 .................39. 46, 74, 88 .....................54, 73. 74 ...............................46 ...............................46 ...............................27 ...............................54 ...............................54 ..........................46. 74 .................24, 66. 70, 124 .....................16, 27. 88 ..........................27, 130 ...............................15 ...............................46 ...27, 29, 62, 66, 69, 106, 124 ...............................46 ...............................54 .............................. 46 .14, 39. 67. 71. 86. 113, 114 .............................10 ...............................54 Biro, Julie ................ Biro, Mr. Paul ............. Bisbee, Don ............... Biscotti, Priscilla ....... Biszantz, Ed .............. Blackmore, John ........... Blanding, Helen Kay Blauman, Paul ............. Blechner, Steve ........... Bogdan, Linda ............. Bohm, Trudy ............... Bohling, Chris ............ Bollman, Darla ............ Bones, Gloria ............. Borsch, Mimsi ............. Bottrell, Jill ............ Boudreau, Jerry ........... Bower, Carol .............. Bowkley, Diane ............ Boyer, Cynthia ............ Boyes, Nancy .............. Brady, Mr. Hil ............ Brandow, Glen ............. Briggs, Rick .............. Briggs, Steve ............. Britton, Jim .............. Bromberg, Sharon .......... Bromberg, Stephen ......... Brooks, Karen ............. Brooks, Mr. Reginald ...... Brown, Don ................ Brown, Suzann ............. Browne, Judy .............. Bruchis, Diane ............ Bruhn, Sheryl ............. Bruining, Patricia ........ Buckley, Bruce ............ Buell. Gerald.............. Bullington, Dr. Richard E. Bump, Mr. Wallace ......... Burke, Pamela ............. Burns, Barbara ............ Burns, Charlcen ........... Burns, Fred ............... Burrell, Mrs. Margaret .... Burt, Barbara ............. Busey, Jerry .............. Butler, Barbara ........... Butler, Bob .............. Butler, Lester ........... Byrd, Larry ............... Cain, Pat ................ Caldwell, Jim ............ Caliendo, Ed .............. Calkins, Charles ......... Call, John R.............. Call, Rita ............... Callaway, Pat ............ Canter, Tom .............. Capito, Bob .............. Carlin, Mr. Patrick ...... Carlisle, Karen .......... Carlisle. Sandy .......... Carlock, Carl ............ Carpenter, Mr. Afton J. .. Carter, George ........... Carter, Vincent .......... Casbcre, Pattie .......... Case, Mike................ Caswell, Mr. Gordon ...... Catkins. Charles ......... Caudle, Joseph ........... Cetti, Bill .............. Chadderdon, Bruce ........ Chapman, Raymond ......... Chase, John .............. Chasey, Gail ............. Chattin, John ............ Childers, Pat ............ Christen, Mrs. Edna ...... Christensen, Beverly Sue .....54. 65, 74, 75, 99 .......................89 18, 54. 71, 72, 95, 104 .......................54 ..................46. 86 .......................46 25. 29, 62. 70. 74, 76, 78. 80. 85. 120, 129, 130 ................................54 ................................27 ......................39, 64. 74 ...............26, 99, 122 ...........................16, 28 ...........................39, 73 ...........................46, 110 ................................54 ...............................28 ...........................46, 98 ...............................28 ...........................39, 110 ...........................46, 73 ................................54 ...........................10, 67 ................................54 ................................46 ...........................54, 70 ................................54 ................................39 ................................47 ................................39 ..................... 19, 70. 1 10 ................................54 ......................14. 28. 120 ................................47 ................................47 ................................54 ................................47 ......................27 ......................28 ......................10 ......................15 ......................47 .......... 70. 110, 122 .............47. 73. 86 24, 28, 62. 69, 71. 75 .............19, 24. 86 .........39, 70, 73, 76 ...................... 47 ........ 28. 73. 76. 78 .........54, 72. 95, 97 ..................19, 39 .......................39 C ..................................47 ............................. 39, 75 ......................54. 66, 72, 93 ..........................72, 93, 104 .................................. 47 ....................................7 ..............................39. 81 ..................................54 ..................................39 .............................18. 100 ..........................39. 75. 80 ............................. 54, 73 ..................................40 .............................16. 80 ..................................47 ..............................47. 104 ..................................47 54. 56. 70. 71. 86, 111, 113, 114 ..........................14, 24. 76 ................................. 54 ................47. 104. 105 ..........................47 ................54, 72. 94 ......................... 39 ..........................47 .53, 55. 56. 65. 72. 73, 74 ..........................39 ................39. 70, 73 ..........................89 ........63. 65, 70, 74. 124 147 -Christensen, Bob ....... Christmas, Ricky ....... Church, Tom ............ Clark, Connie .......... Clarke, Larry .......... Clarke, Susan .......... Clatterbuck, Judy ...... Cleveland, Diana ....... Clever, Karen .......... Close, Bill ............ Coe, Kay ............... Cole, Carol ............ Cole, Doug ............. Collignon, Mr. Joseph .. Collins, Carolyn ....... Colopy, Cheryl ......... Colson, Marie .......... Colson, Scotli ......... Compton, Leslie ........ Conner, Terry .......... Connors, Mr. John ...... Conroy, Donald ......... Cook, Ricky ............ Cook, Trudie ........... Coonfield, Warren ...... Corless, Dick .......... Cornwell, Ann .......... Crampton, Jacque ....... Cravener, Donna ........ Crawley, Oliver ........ Cronn, Donna ........... Culley, Sam ............ Cusack, Terry .......... Dahill, Nancy .......... Daley, Bill ............ Daniels, Fred .......... Daniels, Frieda ........ Daudet, Gary ........... Davidson, Nancy ........ Davis, Edith ........... Davis, Harry ........... Davis, Patti ........... Davis, Mr. Ray ......... Davis, Stan ............ Davis, Stanley ......... Dawson, Mr. Richard L. Day, Vance .............. Dayton, Daye............ Deak, Gary............... Dean, Robert ........... Deberge, Bob ........... Defever, Mrs. Hildred ... Deike, Clarence ........ Deike, Sandi ............ Deloian, Robert ........ Dendy, Ray ............. Denzer, Barbara ........ Deschler, Danny ........ Dick, Richard ........... Dight, Reardon ......... Dingman, John............ Diorio, Tillie .......... Ditullio, Kris ......... Dixon, Sandra .......... Dodds, Royal ........... Dodge, Karen ........... Dool, Larry ............ Doornbos, Phillip ...... Doran, Mr. Thomas ...... Downey, Mrs. Ruth ....... Draney, Jerri Lynn...... Drechsler, Nancy ....... Dufrain, Chuck ......... Dujanovic, Jerry ....... Dunbar, Henry .......... Dunbar, Lorraine ....... Dunfee, Janet .......... Dunning, Lee ........... Durrell, Julie ......... Dysart, Sam ............ Eakes, Loren ........... Eakes, Rita ............ Ealy, Kenny ............ Eastburn, Hannah ....... ................... 47 .............. 47, 98 ...............47, 98 ...........18, 47, 99 ....................47 ....................47 .........55. 73, 110 ..............55, 110 ..............47, no 55. 72, 73. 95, 104 ...............81, 86 .........39, 75, 127 ....................40 69. 70 .....40 .....55 .....40 .13, 47 .55. 73 .....55 .....11 .....47 .....55 ....40 ....89 ....80 ..........12, 40 .....40, 72, 73 .53, 54, 55, 74 ................55 ..........47, 73 40, 72, 95, 96 ..............55 40, 73 .....55 .....47 .29. 81 .40 40, 73, 74, 80 ..............47 ..............55 ...............55, 73, 75 .......................11 .......................104 ........................55 ...........13, 45, 69, 97 ..................47, 110 ...........55, 74, 78, 83 40, 72, 73, 94, 96, 100 ........................40 ........................55 ....................... 89 ..................40, 111 ..................75, 110 ........................55 ....40, 72, 94, 100. 101 .....40. 70. 73, 76. 110 ...............40, 72, 92 ........................40 ........................47 ...................40. 97 ...................40, 64 ...............15, 72. 73 ........................55 ...................40, 97 ...............55, 72. 73 ......................110 ........................55 ...............17, 45, 76 ...................11. 63 ........................47 ........................47 .........15, 40, 71. 106 .............40. 97. 100 ........................55 ........................47 ........................48 ...................74, 75 ........................48 ........................40 40, 69, 72, 92, 104, 126 .........................48 ...................48. Ill .....................29, 81 Ebert, John .....................................................48 Eckhardt, Dwight ...........................................48, 98 Edgin, Pam ......................................................55 Edmonson, Clifford ....................................55, 67, 73 Edmunson, Al .................................................. 29 Edmundson, Terry ...........................................48, 74 Eggemeyer, Ronnie ...............................................48 Eggert, Diane ..............................................40, 111 Eichenberger, Mrs. Wynn ....................................69, 88 Eklund, Gloria ........................................48, 99, 1 1 1 Eklund, Peggy .......................40, 64. 70. 75, 99, 110 Elkie, Joyce .................................................110 Elliott, Judy ............................63, 66, 69, 81, 125 Elliott, Tom ..............53. 55, 57, 72, 92. 100. Ill, 125 Elliott, Lois ..................................................48, 111 Ellis, Mike ................................................47, 48, 98 Elson, David ....................................................48 Eltz, Sharon ....................................................55 Emerson, Sandra .................................................55 Emery, Charles ................................48, 71, 110, 128 Emmons, Andrea .............................................48, 67 Efchells, Kenny ..............................................[..55 Evans, Don .....................................38, 40, 72, 94 Evans, Jim .................................................19, 46 Evans, Kathy ................................................110 Evans, Michael .............................................55, 131 Everson, Stephen ...........................................18, 55, 111 F Fagg, Sandi ................................................55, 110 Fairfield, Bob ..................................................48 Falk, Carolyn ...................................................48 Farmer, Bill ...............................................48, 106 Farmer, Sharon.................................15, 48, 111, 108 Farrington, Frank ...............................................89 Fattelah, Alice..................................................40 Faux, Dick .................................................58, 72, 95 Febus, Mrs. Verna ...............................................16 Feltman, Mr. Paul ...............................................10 Ferguson, Lee....................................................55 Ferguson, Michael .............................................. 48 Ficarra, Phyllis .............................................. 55 Ficarra, Ross ...................................................19 Finell, Lynn ...............................................40, 70, 123 Fink, Margie ....................................................55 Finkbine, Mr. Robert ..........................14, 53. 69, 75, 99 Fish, Joan ......................................................48 Fisher, Eddie ...................................................56 Fisher, Freddie ............................................55, 75 Fisher, Mrs. Helen .........................................16, 53 Fisher, Tony ..................................38, 40, 72, 94 Ford, Eddie ................................................40, 110 Ford, Rick ......................................................48 Frazier, Larry ..................................................56 Frazier, Judy ...................................................48 Frick, Steve ....................................................56 Fry, Susan ......................................................48 Fukuchi, Bob ........................53, 55, 56, 62, 100, 104 Fulbrecht, Lynn .................................................48 G Gage, Bill ......................................................48 Gaintner, Leroy ...............................19, 48, 86, 111 Gallagher, Gail ............................................45, 48 Gardner, Patty ..................................................48 Geary, Mrs. Edith ..........................................13, 73 Gebauer, Gene ...................................................48 Geiger, Peter ...................................................56 Gentry, Karen ...................................................29 Gerstenschlager, Ronald .........................................40 Giblin, Jack ....................................................40 Giblin, Jim .....................................................41 Gibson, Nancy ........................................ 41, 64, 74 Gilbreath, Jerry ................................................56 Glose, Larry ..................................41, 72, 92, 96, 97 Glover, Jackie ..................................................56 Goddard, Vicki .............................................48, 86 Goff, Carolyn ...................................................48 Goff, Larry Gene ................................................29 Gordon, Douglas .................................................55 Graff, Mrs.......................................................76 Graham, Barbara .......................................29, 75, 80 Granzow, Carl .......................56, 72, 93, 102, 103, 111 Graves. John ....................................................29 Graves, Paul ....................................................48 Gray, Carolyn ...................................................48 Gray, Karen ....................................................110 Gray, Susan ..............................41, 74, 75, 99, 110 - 148 -Greenback, Jim ...... Greene, Lynne ....... Greenwald, Cathi ... Greenwald, Carrol . Greer, Diane ........ Gregory, Ann ........ Gregory, Quentin ... Gregory, Ronald ... Griffith, Douglas .... Griffith, Gene ...... Grifford, Willie Sue Grimmett, Paul ...... Guthrie, Richard .... .......................56. 96 ...........................29 ........................... 48 ...........................56 28, 30. 70, 76. 81. 85, 129 .......................52. 75 ..........41, 72. 92, 93, 95 .................56. 66. 113 .............41. 70. 71, 123 ........................... 48 ................56. Ill, 123 ............................30 ............................48 Hakes, Jane .............. Hall, Mr. John R.......... Halley, Bill ............. Hallman, Mr. Lou ......... Halscll, Kitty ........... Hamilton, John ........... Hand, Mrs. Robbie ........ Haney, Tom ............... Hanneman, Sue ............ Harden, Miss Sally ....... Hardin, Jan .............. Hargrave, Bill ........... Harrington, Marcia ....... Hart, Bill ............... Hartin, John ............. Haugeland, Mrs. Carol .... Haugeiand, Chris ......... Haupt, Barbara ........... Hauser, Don .............. Hauser, Linda ............ Hawkins, Phil ............ Hawks, Terry ............. Hays, Jim ................ Heeftle, Joanne .......... Helbing, Bill ............ Hedla, Mrs. Bernice ...... Helms, Luke .............. Henderson, Mr. John ...... Henderson, Richard ....... Henderson, Roy ........... Hendricks, Mr. Robert .... Hendry, Mr. William ...... Henze, Tom ............... Herman, Stuart ........... Herrick, John ............ Hcrskovits, David ........ Herskovits, Theodora ..... Heywood, Mr. Alfred ...... Hickman, John ............ Hiegel, John ............. Hildebrandf, Mrs. Mildred Hilkcr, Douglas .......... Hill, Dean ............... Hilliker, Bunky .......... Hilsabeck, Corky ......... Hilton, Edith ............ Hilton, Stuart ........... Hinds, Kathie ............ Hinton, Carol ............ Hiser, Wayne ............. Hobson, Cherry ........... Hochsfetler, Mrs. Emily ... Hochsteflcr, Muriel ...... Hodges, Betsy ............ Hodges, Don .............. Hocksema, Cathy .......... Hoffman, Peggy ........... Hogue, Richard ........... Hoiles, Parma ............ Holman, Darlene .......... Holmberg, Skip ........... Holtson, Bill ............ Holtson, Cheryl .......... House, Eddie ............. Howard, Mrs. Doris Jo ... Hoyer, Nancy ............. Hoyt, Shirlyn ............ Hubbard, Barbara ......... Hubbard, Judy ............ Hughes, Mike ............. Hughes, Wayne ............ H .............41, 111 .........19, 24, 113 ...................30 ..........12, 92. 96 ..............56, 72 ...................56 88 Z!JZ!i 66. ‘ i o i’ 104 ..............41, 80 .18, 24. 65. 69, 99 ..............41, 73 ...................41 ...................48 ...................19 ..................81 ..................88 ...................48 ..............18. 48 ...................49 ...................49 ...................49 ...................49 .............41, 104 .............56. 110 ..........16. 25, 70 ...................89 ..............56, 71 ..............13. 53 ...................49 .........56. 71, 106 ....18, 72. 92, 106 ...... ...........10 17, 54. 56. 71, 100 ..........................49 ............56, 72. 94, 111 .............45, 48, 49, 98 ..........................30 .................17, 53. 71 ..........................56 ..........................56 ..........................89 ......................41. 71 ..........................49 ..........................75 ......................49. 98 ..........................30 ...............41, 104. 105 ..................56, 73, 75 ..................55, 56, 73 .....................56, 97 .....................31. 113 ..........................89 ................41, 75. 113 ..........................49 ..........................56 ..........................49 ..........................49 .........................-41 .................... 15, 49 53, 56, 62, 64, 72, 73, 74 ..........................49 ..........................41 .................56. 74, 99 ....................56, 104 .................15, 53, 69 ..........................49 ....41. 72. 73. 74, 75, 78 .....................41, 73 ................41. 65. Ill ....................56, 106 ..........................31 Hunter, Craig .......................................56, 72, 92, 102 Hurford, Selene ..................................41, 110,128, 131 Hurley, Pamela ............................................'...49, 110 Hurn, Mr. Baxter ........................................ ” ’ 13 24 J Jackson, Judy .......................................14, 41, 73, 110 Jacobson, Don ..................................................41 49 James, Mary Janet .......................................".56! 78 Janca, Rosemary .......................................".........'...57 Janecek, Mary Jane ..................................................49 Jensen, Bob ................................................7( 96 7 102 Jipson, Ted ........................................................... Johannes, Bruce ................................................!.!!.41 Johnson, Bill .................................!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!57 Johnson, Cindy .........................................”.16! 49! 110 Johnson, Dorsee ................................................!....49 Johnson, Mr. Forrest .................................!!!!!!!!!!!!!V2! 45 Johnston, Ray ....................................................!..49 Johnston, Sandra ................................................... 49 Jones, Barbara .........................57, 58, 65, 66, 73, 74, 125 Jones, Donna Gaye ...................................................49 Jones, Stan ..................................................!!!!!!!!! 31 Jones, Steve .................................................."" j 1 j Juni, Esther.................................................!!!!!!! 49 Justin, jan...............................!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!'4i no Justin, Joyce ..................................................!....41 Julian, Mike ..................................................49, 1 j j Kamstra, Bill ........................ Kane, Jackie ......................... Karales, Mrs. Billie ................. Karales, Nick ........................ Karpinski, Dick ...................... Katarski, Annette .................... Katarski, Mary ....................... Keen, Jim ............................ Keith, Gerald ........................ Keller, Bobby 41, 72, 73. 92, 94. Keller, Carl ......................... Keller, Robin ........................ Kelly, Locke ......................... Kelly, Nancy ............................ Kelty, Glenn ......................... Kennedy, Judy ........................ Kennedy, Mrs. Marie .................. Kennedy, Rose Marie .................. Kent, Mary ........................... Kerr, Malinda ........................ Kershaw, Alan ........................ Kersten, Pete ........................ Kessler, Chuck ....................... Kilpatrick, Les ...................... Kilpatrick, Linda .................... Kimball, Margaret .................... Kimball, Ralph ....................... King, David .......................... Kingsley, Roy ........................ Kingsley, Phillip .................... Kinzle, Carol ........................ Kline, Kay ........................... Knight, Clark ........................ Knight, Sue .......................... Knirsch, George ...................... Koppen, Jack ......................... Kotlarczyk, Karen .................... Kowell, Theresa ...................... Krug, Gary............................ Kruse, Joan .......................... Kruse, Pete .......................... Kruse, Robert ........................ Kupniewski, Toni ..................... Kyff, Linda .......................... ..........49 .........31 ..........89 49, 98 27. 41, 70. 73, 75, 110 ........................49 ...................49, 98 ........................49 10a, 102, 103. 104, 105 .............31. 104, 105 ........................57 .....12, 41, 69, 96. 126 .........45, 49, 66. 125 .................49, 76, 86 ......................76, 89 ...........................49 ...........................49 ...........................57 ...........................57 ............41, 43, 72, 93 ...........................49 .................41. 71. 88 ...........................49 .......41, 70. 72, 73, 81 ...........................49 ...........................57 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!4i ......................49. 73 ......41, 65, 73, 74, 81 .................31, 57, 75 ...........57, 74, 75, 110 .....41, 72, 75. 95. 100 ...........30, 66. 98. 125 ...........................41 ......................50, 86 ...........................50 ...........................50 ...........................41 ...........................32 ......................30. 74 ...........................57 Lacy, Ellen .....................................................50 Lafon, Sandra ...................................................57 Lagrotta, Priscilla ........................................41, 71, 74 Lahti, Walter ...................................................18 Lamantia, Lylia ...........................................32, 74 Lambert, Barbara ................................................32 Lamuth, Bill ....................................................50 Landis, Benny ...................................................57 Lane, Candy ...............................................50, 123 Langston, Julie ............................................42, 72, 73 Larson, Mr. Jeff ................................................12 Larson, Mrs. Mary .........................................69, 88 Larson, Rick ..............................................18, 57 - 149 - 42, 71, 80, 99 50. 99, 1 1 1 70 57, 110 42, 72, 93, 104 50 1 1 57 Leistiko. Glenda 13, 25. 32. 122 Mosier, Arlene 42, 45 Mueller, Craig 57, 72, 92, 96 Muller. Mr. James Muller, Will 32 57, 73. 110 Murphy, Judy 50 32 42 Myers, Mrs. Mary Lou 15, 37, 69 Lichty, Murray 42 N . 50 50, 99 57. 81 Neal, Mr. David 13. 24 Lindblom, Clifford Necriemer, Shirley 58 1 11 Neid, Mrs. Marguerite 17. 53. 69 ...50 42 42, 73, 74. 75. 110 Neubert, Teddy 14 42. 74. 78. 85. 86. 114 New. Mike 50 57, 97. 106 News, Tom 50 42, 99 58 16. 57, 73 Nicsz, Tim 58. 104 32. 70. 71 Nikiforuk, Peter 50, 71 50, 100 19. 104 M Norde, Corki 53. 57, 58. 65, 73, 74 42, 113 50, 98 MacDonald. John Nye, Cheryl 58. 73, 74. 1 10 42. 1 10 O 57 42 57 5 96 Manning. Joan 42. 50. 75 O'Gara, Kathy 76 O’Gara, Peggy 76 Olmsted, Roger .57 42, 73, 74 50 42 50. 86 Ouren, Jan 16. 33. 106, 122, 123 58 Maschncr, Gary 50 Owens, Sharon 42 54. 74. 80. 81 P 50 75 110 Padovani, Linda 50 57, 97 42, 76 Palmer, Martha Ann 17. 57. 97 Papaleoni, Marco 33. 35. 66, 71, 75, 79, McCarthy, Shield 104, 121, 125, 127 19 104 42 McCutchen, Carol 37. 42. 64. 69, 73. 74. 75.126 Parker, Carol McCutchen, Shirley 32 Parker, Richard 57 42 Paul, Vicki 57 58 42 50 43, 64. 70, 74 1 1 Payne, Sheryl 33. 35, 74. 106, 110. 128 57 42 72 92 104 43 19 50. 104 Pebler, Bill 50 Peer, Earlene 43. 75, 113 Mcll, Rocky 71 Peterson, Mr. Art 1 1 88 33. 70. 75. 76 3fi 42 71 76 18. 50. 74. 99, 11 1 Peterson, Lester 43. 100, 101 42 42 76 Miller. Bonnie 42 Pettit, Sally 58 57 SR 74 78 85 110 Miller, Mrs. Dan-Louise 16. 37 Phillips, Deanna Joan 50 Pike, Harl Mills. Jerry Lee 42, 74 Pipes, Pamela 51 58. 73. 110 Pleasant, Kay 71 Plecas, Mrs. Jane 69, 72. 73. 75, 88 Milot, Lynne 37. 42. 63. 73. 74. 78 Ploegsma, Linda 42. 72, 94, 100. 101 Plotner, Mrs. Mariam 58, 110 50 58. 97 150 - Post, Judy ........... Pratt, Gibson ........ Pratt, Margaret ...... Prettyman, Ralph ..... Pridgeon, Dulcie ..... Propstra, John........ Pruitt, Pete ......... Quail, Susan .......... Queck, Jack ........... Quick, Roger .......... Quick, Susan .......... Quick, Suzy ........... Quinn, Elizabeth ...... Quinn, Mike ........... Raduenzel, Edward ... Read, Caldwell ....... Reardon, Sharon ...... Rebcske, John......... Reese, Mike .......... Reid, Ann ............ Reid, Gene ............ Reinhardt, Linda ...... Repp, Terry ........... Retter, Laurie ........ Reynolds, Walt ....... Rhoades, Fred ......... Rhodes, Fred ......... Rhuart, Mr. L.......... Rhuart, Leslie ........ Rhuart, Carolyn ...... Rhuart, Mrs. I......... Richardson, Ed ....... Richmond, Ann ........ Richter, Joe ......... Richter, Lee........... Ricklick, Julie ....... Riley, Frank .......... Robb, Helen .......... Robb, Robin ........... Roberts, William ...... Roberts, Miss Penny Robinson, Carole ..... Robyn, Bob ............ Robyn, George ........ Rocker, Mr. George .. Roehrer, Wanda ........ Rogan, Dora ........... Rogan, Prissie ........ Rogers, Burton ........ Rogers, Lowell ........ Rolwetz, Eddie ........ Rosenstein, Ann ....... Ross, Fred ............ Ross, Marilyn ......... Ross, Judy ............ Rosselle, Mike ........ Rout, Dave ............ Rowe, Robert .......... Rowell, Toby .......... Russell, Kenny ........ Russell, Mrs. Lorraine Salina, Cheryl ........ Sargent, Dave ......... Sari, Zoltan .......... Savittierri, Sue....... Schafberger, Pam ...... Schafranka, Robbie .... Schammel, Mary ........ Schdlet, Charles ...... Scheitlin, Donna ...... Schicker, Bob ......... Schifino, Mr. Anthony Schlink, Dennis ....... Schlink, John ......... Schlossnagel, Carol .... Schlossnagel, Linda Schmidt, Mary Ann .... Schnaufer, Ann ........ Schneider, Ann ........ Schneider, Gary ....... Schooley, Sandra ..... Schuly, Mrs. Grace .... Schumacher, Eric ...... ........................43, 74, 110 .............................51. 106 ..................43, 72, 110, 128 ...................................51 ...................................51 .................45, 46, 51, 63. 98 ...................................89 Q ...................................42 .........................42, 72, 94 ...................................42 ...................................42 ...................................58 ..............................43, 80 ............................... ...51 R ..............................43, 81 ..................33, 34, 113, 121 ...................................51 ...................................51 ...................................58 34, 62, 66, 69, 73. 81, 125, 131 .......................19, 104. 105 ..........................58, 73, 74 .............................43. 106 .................................,-51 .................................. 89 ...................................58 .................................106 ...................................79 .....................43, 58, 71, 79 ...................................79 ...................................79 ...................................43 ...................................51 ...............................43, 99 ...................................51 ...................................51 ..............................18, 58 ..............................58, 73 ..............................34, 58 ...................................58 ..............................12. 45 .................................110 ..............................51, 98 ....................................89 go ::::::::::::::::"::::::43; 73; 74 75 v 1 o ...................................no ....................................50 .............................43, 104 ...................................51 ...................................51 ..............................16, 70 ........................... .43. 104 .............................43. 127 ...................................74 .............................43, 104 ...................................43 ....................34, 70, 71, 106 ..............................34, 58 .............................58. 100 ...................................89 S ................51 ................58 ..........58, 110 ................51 .......43, 73, 80 .......58, 73. 74 ...59, 75, 99, 110 ..............110 ................51 ................51 14, 37, 100, 101 ................59 ...59. 73 ................74 ................51 ................51 ................43 ................12 .......59, 71, 88 ......73. 89, 110 ................89 ................59 Schumacher, Gerald .......................................51, 111 Schuring, Mike .................................................51 Scofield, John ............................................51, 99, 104 Scott, Jolene ............................................43, 67 Scott, Mary ....................................................51 Scott, Susan .............................................46, 51 Seargeant, Patty ...............................................51 Seargent, Mark .................................................43 Sederstrom, Dick ...............................................59 Sedcrstrom, Jack .............................................51 Sedor, Diana ...................................................34 Seescholtz, John ...............................................43 Sergent, Nikki .................................................59 Shaffer, Gary ..................................................44 Shaw, Jim ........................-.............................59 Shaw, Lee Roy ..................................................59 Sheer, Judy ..............................................13, 51 Sheffield, Peggy..........................................51, 123 Sheldon, Sandra ................................................51 Sheldon, Sherry Kay ............................43, 73, 75, 110 Shepherd, Sue ............................................34, 86 Sherwood, lance ..............................................51 Shettler, Becky ..............................................51 Shields, Richard .............................................r51 Shoemaker, Brad ..........................................51, 98 Shoemaker, Eric ..............................................Ill Shoemaker, Margaret ............................................75 Siffler, Larry ................................................44 Silver, Scott .................................................51 Simmons, Linda ......................................43, 73, 75 Simser, Donna ............................................51, 74 Singer, Denise..................................................51 Sisson, Jan ..................................................51 Skinner, Jerry ...........................................43, 99 Skinner, Kathie ................................................59 Skinner, Ray ...................................................43 Smiley, Mike....................................................44 Smith, Andy ..............................................51, 98 Smith, Bob ...................................................59 Smith, Dick ..................................................51 Smith, Jack ....................................43. 72. 93. 100 Smith, John ..............................................34, 100 Smith, Kathleen ...........................................49, 52, 123 Smith, Mike ..................................................52 Smith, Sharjn ................................................19 Smitt, Jane ...................................................106 Smitt, Karin ...................................................59 Smitt, Sigvard ...........................................35, 71 Smitt, Tayna ...................................................52 Snyder, Dave .............................................59, 71 Solem, Jim .....................................................35 Solvesky, Mike ...........................................52, 104 Sorenson, Nancy ................................................59 Spangler, Sylvia ...................................43-, 72, 73 Speakman, Mary Ellen ................................44, 70, 75,76 Speer, Janis....................................................52 Sprinzl, Gary........................................59, 110, 128 Staats, Nancy ................................... 44, 73, 75, 81 Stafford, Mrs. Emily .....................................17, 45 Stahl, Jackie .......................................44, 74, 78 Stam, Eldree .............................................19, 52 Stanford. Bill ...........................................59, 106 Stanley, Pat .............................................35, 110 Starr, Barbara .................................................81 Steig, Mrs. Henry ..............................................10 Stephenson, Connie ........................15, 24, 66, 125, 131 Stephenson, Michele ............................59, 73, 74, 80 Sterba, Pat ..................37. 38, 44, 63. 69, 70. 73. 126 Stevens. Pat ..............................59. 72, 73, 74. 110 Stewart, Michele ...............................................59 Stoetzer, Sharon .........................................13, 52 Storrs, Betty .......................................44, 73, 75 Stout, Linda Lee .........................................35, 75 Streyckmans, Hector ......................................44, 1 11 Stuart, Dwight .................................................52 Stump. Suzy ....................................................59 Surgener, David ..........................................35, 70 Surgener, Steve ..........................................59, 100 Sutter, Steve ..................................................19 Swanson, Jim ...................................................59 Swanson, Karen .................................................52 Swift, Gary...............................................52, 106 Swigard. Virginia ..............................................35 Sylvander, Paul .....................................59, 71, 100 Sylvester, Sandy ...............................................52 Szychowski, John ...............................................44 151Taylor, Denise ..............................................52, 74 Temple, Rod .................................................52, 98 Templeton, Caroline ..........................................35 Tenney, Nancy .......................................44, 75, 81, 110 Tharp, John .........................................44, 72, 94, 104 Thomas, Dennis .....................................44, 100, 101 Thomas, John ............................................52, 100 Thomas, Lynn ............................................59, 81 Thomas, Mary ...............................12, 14, 44, 73, 75 Thompson, Gloria ........................................24, 84 Thompson, Sharon .............................................59 Thornton, Jo Ann .......................13, 38, 44, 127, 128 Timbrook, Mrs. Nancy ...............................18, 45, 65 Tinney, Cheryl .....................................59, 74, 78 Tinney, Gerald ..........................................59, 106 Tinwald, Nancy ...............................................59 Tokar, John ..................................................44 Tomkins, Pat .................................................70 Tonis, Kenny .................................................44 Topping, Jan .................................................44 Townsend, Mike ...............................................59 Trabert, Lynna Kay ...........................................59 Trapp, Edward ...........................................52, 111 Tritten, Kathy .....................................59, 74, 75 Troutman, Bill ...............................................97 Turnbow, Mary ......................................44, 81, 86 Turner, Dave..................................................52 Turner, Mike..................................................35 Turner, Ricky ...37, 38, 44, 92, 94, 95, 96, 100, 101, 125 Tuttle, Richard...............................................44 Tyra, Peggy ..................................................48 U Ulibarri, Anita ..............................................59 V Vanderbosch, Keith ......................................52, 128 Vaughan, Scott ..........................................44, 71 Verner, Mr. Reese ............................................10 Vincent, Don .................36, 66, 67, 100, 101, 110, 125 Volkmar, Chalice .............................................52 Volkmar, George ....................................59, 106, 110 Vollmer, Karen ..........................................59, 99, 110 W Walker, Mrs. Frances .........................................88 Walker, Marti ...........................................44, 81, 106 Walker, Meredith .............................................44 Wall, Dick ...................................59, 72, 73, 95 Wardell, Sharon ..............................................36 Ware, Bob ........................38, 44, 72, 95, 100, 101 Wash, Carol .............................................59, 110 Wash, Marlyn .................................................52 Washburn, Monte ..............................................59 Wassel, John .................................................59 Wasson, Gary .................................58, 59, 71, 100 Waterman, Bill ...............................................52 Weber, Beth Weeks. Don Weidemaier, Bill .. Weidenfeld, Dianne Weirscham, Barbara Weiner, Gail ........ Weiner, Richard .... Welch, Bill ......... Weller, Mike ........ Welsh, Edgar ........ Wendell, Karen ...... Werner, Don ......... Wesolowski, Eleanor Wesolowski, Joseph White, Don .......... White, Jeffery ..... Widmark, Mrs. Iris .. Wilcox, Mr. Frank ... Williams, Bob ...... Williams, Dan ...... Williams, Diana .... Williams, Don ...... Williams, Evelyn ... Williams, Harold ... Williams, Harry .... Williams, Kenneth .... Wilson, Riley ...... Wilson, Steve ...... Winegart, Pat ...... Winkelman, Cathie .. Winkleman, Lona .... Wiseman, David ..... Witkamp, Prairie ... Witty, Mrs. Cecelia ... Wolheim, Roger ..... Wood, Ricky ....... Wood, Suzi ........ Woodward, Craig .... Wooldridge, Carolyn Wright, Sharon ..... Wynn, Linda ........ Wynn, Martaine ..... 46. 110 ........ 44. 72, 93, 96. 100 .... 44. 72. 73. 93. 100, 101 44 .........110 .......................... 52 ........................... 59 .........12, 44, 73. 93. 106 .15, 44, 69, 72, 73, 93, 126 ........................... 52 ............................44 .......................... 44 .......................... 36 ............................52 ........................... 59 ...........................Ill ...........................88 12, 45 .....59 . 59, 71 .....75 .97, 100 ......44 ......59 .....59 .....89 .59, 99 .....52 ......52 ......36 52, 110 ......59 ............................52 ........................17, 53 ........................19. 52 ........................45, 52 .37, 44, 69. 74, 78, 81, 126 ............................52 ....36 .....74 .13, 52 .....52 Yarbrough, Bonnie Yarbrough, Sharon Ysasi, Stella .... Webb, Mr. Jack .14, 45 Zamie, Kathy ..... Zenobi, Harriet .. Zesiger, David ... Zcsiger, Doris.... Ziegler, Johnny ... Zimmerman, Mike’ Zimmerman, Scott Zingale, Sandy .... Zocller, Vicky .........44 .........36 .44, 74, 81 ........ 44 5rr ; 4 Si ‘V 12. 37, 44. 73. 74 .................97 .......52, 99, 110 .................52 .......44, 71, 100 .................52 .................59 ...13, 44» 75, 110 - 152 -I (W k O’Vo , V xk 1u um. VV« w )fk wyy m -i i - vHn 'M= i ft O' ft “S l y y u., k - y (• ' , uj o y


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