Arapahoe High School - Calumet Yearbook (Littleton, CO)

 - Class of 1973

Page 1 of 234

 

Arapahoe High School - Calumet Yearbook (Littleton, CO) online yearbook collection, 1973 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1973 Edition, Arapahoe High School - Calumet Yearbook (Littleton, CO) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1973 Edition, Arapahoe High School - Calumet Yearbook (Littleton, CO) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1973 Edition, Arapahoe High School - Calumet Yearbook (Littleton, CO) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1973 Edition, Arapahoe High School - Calumet Yearbook (Littleton, CO) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1973 Edition, Arapahoe High School - Calumet Yearbook (Littleton, CO) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1973 Edition, Arapahoe High School - Calumet Yearbook (Littleton, CO) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1973 Edition, Arapahoe High School - Calumet Yearbook (Littleton, CO) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1973 Edition, Arapahoe High School - Calumet Yearbook (Littleton, CO) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 234 of the 1973 volume:

? 5 1 '+L -- 'T' 54 ffuff filiiiag !Cf4?L"M'4L'Qf-L' 64,1 ' - ,f" f' ' f. ,V fx 7 ', xD ' , L Af Axyf -t v 6-. Zfv Cf?-f'LfuC .,,,'f'ZlQ..f6L,,vf'g,cV X 1.- Liz? 'Puff I GH, f XJ f Of! 21 1 5:5 AWDFJLJJ b FV 7 5, Q, , LMC' if QL, 4, , , ' K CK'-4411 1 Sung ' Q wwe f7"N"C.g., 1,44 , ,,,.4 ,lf C 75 T 1' oo X ? 44: W 1973 Calumet :Ei 'fArapahoe High School Littleton, Qolorado I Mjlolugpe 10 N . .1 aw 1 ,nz .1. -nw.. ., W ?iTff'-wiqzf - 'tag V QC " ix, ., wg' .3 L , wa ir I in .'i.V's:Efk x vs VFP" QI., ' . i yd. if 'iw I, f - in 4 A '42 - -, C . .5 ' .,. I. AM 2 , 'Kg fs. I N gn-ff ' 'J 3 ,Q , .- f .-5.1. H ' - - -Ar .if . vi , 11 " Jflff. " V ,, '-'-fl? y I' -Q 'Q'--s7"5' 511- 'J' ' ff , 15? ff?-f f lisp'- ,4 X1 .gun Y 'V 'JJ' t cb aid ' lx 'VCX' I K U L . - V Jxgi L' " " Q' .fy N 'ei '- .WA V , I 5, fix .Nl 'Q 11 , -V W , g ag, Q- , '?'x7'f5":'. .' V- ' I ,N 3, ' " 1' f,-gf: Qi , 1 bf' fi? .93 vw' PFW , 'T'-1, 1 " ' " ' ' 'W "Q ' - W " 1 , I I 15" 2 W 'B ' av 5821 i I kiwi ii , X . W is .J ,J A. ,ef QQ' 1' :i 'I A 17. .L 1 ' '- -' ' . i d - ' ,f?4'Lf,, . -. x uf-' +5 ' ' ' 5 41 ' ,, - T53-'Jai X F. f' 2. Z-.r -, 1 1 L. . Q .7-QM . '..l5 If - 1 1 7 s' 11 1 1. " " ' ' -. I xl x 4 'JW j r. , QM, xx K 1 W gl. E.,-,V N K' 'rv' ' El- in .',:1,,,a . P- wx. ' xx 4 . W I 1 . V T' fl..- ' '-1, 1.2-.2 A , -Q. nw. E+., I . ' Yuki: -.. H of I . I lu " ,-.fe f-:Lf ' 'Q - My mind explodes in a state of puzzlement and I wander through a maze of questions. Only I search for the hidden answers that relate to my being. Gazing about, I become aware of those around me, wondering, what is a smile? And then I find ity behind the smile is a feeling of warmth and comfort which is so often needed in times of uncertainty. lt catches on and spreads itself around. Then I notice, my own face has learned to smile. Still filled with unanswered questions, a pair of hands with fingers woven together appears in my mind. Friendship seems to surround me, but do I really know what it means? Not having to search far, I find the meaning. It sits beside me laughing causing me to laugh and making me feel good and complete inside. Even alone I know solitude not loneliness, for I am also a friend. 'task isu.c6ess:.. If is C1 ncziurcvl Efee IQi5ng n1nd? ii- co'mpe'lIlLs me lip gugdggeedi mord. l'l1ec1'I'i:ge. fhic1fuQh,, ffh'G,T fl ldlso must gxpenience fqilure fgr siuceess is nut always -.ecfsfily 'qitQgin'e1'bil'e. Th.lTOUfQ'hETh1iQSl l?eqI iZCi1fipn, l ,am eager. fa fake ,err dlistcaiclliesz jknowignggf fh'G1'r-i'ff I7 fail., l will lgok Tgrl n new 1direc'tif6ni cmd' be SQm'enAf-. 7,- F' .I 1' QFF' 1 1 ,1 fl , .A,A g'g'42Q1+vi??5PltE 11. 1 , Pl. Ji , 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 11 , 1 1 0 1 . 1 ' 1 W . , ., I :L 1 :I ' I 'W 11- A1 .1 ,V '1!1 1 4 ' '1 1 , ,. 1011 ,"f '111ff" , , ' Y 1 " .1 11 V '1' 51 1' 'UL 4. 'f X ,71 '1 111 1, - ,f'1!"1j.a,,:.?"f1'w,' , r ,, !,,y , Iv Nw. f 1 1 ,Q,1, 1-11' 11 ,---Y" ' 1i H- 1 '-'KJ' fl 'P' 'f 21 -fl-ff Y' Q Y 'uf-1.11 11 - 111 111.'v,J11f1-' 1. 111111111 .' Z 1 '31-Y ff--1-Q"V'1-V1 xx ,1- A,JI'.35.11y-':fV'I' 5.3 01 ' '1fg3'i-'-igifjgiif.-'15'-?1Iy1yg.gQ !f,-'11EA.f-'3?'A21ffn'kfJffL f1 1 1 1 '1 Q17 1' 1. ' 1,1 , J. , I1 1 , 11-11,1-' 11 ' , 41'- ,1f ,1 '1 . A 1 1 ,,1--1'-71 , fl ,. 11 , -1.1, . 13 - .11 ,,l1,11 ,1 ,.1,'.7 ,'1,,1L--31 A' f',115,1',f,1'1 .1 ,J-' 1 5'-11--yy' ,gf 1321471 Q 15.1 L31f1gJfQ:-' ,j5g,'1!f'xL LQ5f:'15b+Ef1"A 1-,X ,1g17lf1'm21f:f1g-'51 J ' I 1 ' 1 ' '1 .f1."" , If ,Y if ff 'YZ '12 V111 ,A .' 1'. , . 1, ,-1. .-, r' -' , -"':,1.1.". ,11 ""' X 1' 1 ." 'V' ff 12.31 Q' 'ff' f'fl"1. 1' 'f '1 f1'11f.'- 1,71 ' fl11g1",-1. 1. 1 .fp 111, 1 .1 1 1,- 1 111 ...L ,. , 1..y,4,,1f.y,-f, -f,.1,'1111,,.4 1 1 M:,l.3.L,U, 1 g,-1 ,AT J! QV, 77, . .N . R. - 1. .Aw - , ' A , 1, 1,1 ff .2 1' , H fx -- ,,,1L':.Y. 1. . ,f Jw, .1 '1 111 , 1 f fr i7'7 '1 f ,f 'vw' ,".1l'1q1:QL1I:Q ,,.,'Lf.U z ffiif. ,'5z'1f5x-Eff XL 1: ff" WF1451-. uf d52'ig.'fQ25J 11 "'A "' 'fi' "1 'T M V - "1 V -V U 1'.-'I A ""' ' f""' 1, 13' 11 1, V. 1, ' 1 1 111, 11 .U W ,V J' 1'Jf' 11 14 1' 1 . , .H I frf' 'if '1f1'f'1m'Q1 f"I W ff V -'ff' ,ff lfQJ'f11g-f7f1Li111'11 11 ,f'4Qi'g1. 13S'ff1Q1f1 U Qffxmgf 14Qff3G:W, cf ' I ., , .- H 17 . 1 XM, 1 ' 1 v 1 , '31 " f 1-JM 1 1"-'1 ' 'Y 1 lk -'W 11111 1 411' 1" .1 1- 171421 1.F,f1f71,f.1-1,1 3 1. 1 qj1g,14.i 1, 1,121 3,54 W1 11511211 Q- .yy--A-2-15,2-'14 rg-'Aft f Y, 1 1, if 1, V 3' 11' 1 Ur 1 11.1 -,I 1 , 1,211 fx-f' ff ' ' Af' ,nf 1 lin. 4 ,145 11'yf'f11 117'-1' Y ,gf ,+. 125,-Lo 1 .:y:.1'f'--'-' 1' ' "f1,"H ff 1 t. 1 A 1 ELA,-1"" 1 W1-1 1 aff? ' 1 2511 1 -1Q 21 ' 152f1g111, , 1 A 1gaiE??g1agf '+Q1i,Q fm-gf' ,M -Q., ., 1 ' 1 793 K-P159 2 151 A f-'f5TVi9"' 9' 1 :E , ', .jg-'K Y -1 X' 'Q Q ,1-:mfr ly' ' 1 Nw: .L1.g, 513 ...Arif - 11 ,Pm ,,-in-1, .1-- 1 ,. , 1 111 ' 1 1, 3 , 3 1 I 1l.i1?.i'1'?iV3H'if5f'5'1-ii'n1i23?A: 1 K 5 '- 1, ' 1gQg4,1,11-1,1 , ll T Emotions run wild through my head. It is time to break away, discover excitement. And so I become involved in things that satisfy my own needs and cure my curiosity. They become my tool for letting myself find enioyment and my laughter dominates my melancholy spirit. 1 Y 9 But there are times when I must seclude myself. Times when my mind yearns for comprehension. It is my hope to understand people, their situations but most of all myself. And when this understanding is more consistent than confusion, I will have peace of mind. t .1 m f in And so I begin. I perceive the challenges before me knowing I can conquer them. Applying all that I have learned, no goal is set too high to reach. In my searching, my final goal shall reveal itself to me and my reward will be happiness: the key to a life of fulfillment. I take my first step hoping that it is in the right direction and search for-the secret to life. 3122?-I' -'E if, 1 f ne Sense of Learning p. 15 Your Own Time p. 63 ae inner Triumph P- H1 aces p. A159 ...latin if 'hi' The Sense of Learning The mind begins searching, acquiring knowledge to fill I spaces of unanswered questions. There is presem only a ling oi reaching -om and finding thai which before seem totally unsolvable. Withoul awareness or warning, the le ing process overpowers the dormam mind. Another chance 1.0 discover, make new relationships and progress in ,menraliry and personal insigln is offered. A .dream lol gaining rhe knowledge that fills the pages .oi fb the rhoughi ol understanding the intricate and complica qpanennsiol speech that rum oui classics filled with philo ophies. This is progress loui rnosl 01 all n is a chance 10 lc pile knowledge, using i1 mo truly ,undersiarid People. - Qt .i 4 1 ' -3 '- - V AJ -Iv "-"2-E , ,,f' 1-Ig - P, , -vw if -1 ..: z W .,,' 95-ff --'Q -,PPE ,calf ' . ,,, 'iw-va x:E:3iE2,g"!rit ,.-1-,iv WW- 1 .Q fre wfwf-"W, Mfxwci-IW :FEM -' fm 'gh' . TW. JNL " - '-251'-fl'f4'3 f,g'i"41E' 7'-nf: :fy f , U , w- V. 5 ,: 3:93. LL,-z2"'114 . 'mg X .wi . 1 -- f , , , H- am- 1- ' - V'-" aw- " ' ' ' 1f..'.l v ,H':. u f',F1.- nz' A fh'5"f2'. .,ff.'f- . r'1i,QV-j,,.:L'. :xi-I , , .f9"f.'-'afihi g- W .mf 143--A? , my!-,.ga ifwii-A 446:-"fee- .: r ' ' + 333 W' 'f+if.fvs4f.fAwffix? A Ny: ,111 Hu: V.,--, V, u - ,,.. ,X , - 1 ,M nu ,Mg ,, , U- . -1 ' 'l M1451 'M-I-17 byllf,-v',l ,nj . IV f' 1 '1 ffl: ha: 1 N jlf,4p,3,W'Q , Av."-, f ,Q W5 . gt1ag,e.f-,zgx - L ,gf ,gf , , ' '-'M' 1 5, .wx - 1- 'W , It nv :gf 5 - ':,.! ln. ,- V . ,' -tg f - - r- fw, ' f . - Q- f I -0: 75 . ull ' Q' ' ' ' "E-1 - 1 - 'N T.-EFI 5' W5 , KT- .Z V F- Xa. A4 U Q - lsr. is 1 :X IP,- ' T K I W n Q X if lu Q- 'T' JI fi'-' ".' '1 . ,N Q 45,11 LM- ' A A A ...Qi ' v ,ff v- ,ff . .1 . v 'V U K-x ,. J E , vw r , 'Y-,..-W, 3 A A 7? 'Eft ,, ff mn g g f gf' wilfgggylw r 951: ,, . Q 1-' QA' j l- h 1 C ' . , , ' B . e' 1 - X 7 f 5 1 I I 5' . I . ,- "' - A -V . ' V, ' 3.9: W-.ia ' ' , 4 6 . H 1 'Q-Xe SX l ...W Sfpn . . 't ' 1' 1 ?,1A.. J.. ,, ,l. ,Y ! " . ', .- , Lx. - ' H . - 'fiisu-1. 5 Q Y, fi? .--., ff? ,44 Z ii Tri The care of human life and hap- piness, and not their destruction, is the first and only legitimate object of good government. -Thomas Jefferson ..- 1 5 i 1 R i i I i i Challenges Evoke Student Interest lil P' 1 1 TV xii ' - I n I 1 Y i ji 1 - ' W , in . J S I1 " 1 f T I v-' .- ".' N . ,, .. i V 'l Q 'I A' ' -:'l,- ' l I," :F i I - - AY . A 'V - .V 4 H J. 58 1' ' ' fr r f i'i"f"'3.,-!,n7 C "Q ' " ' 'W " ls.. 5- at In Singing carols with the elderly brings en joyment to all ltop Ieftl. Entertainment in the cafeteria is available through the speak- er series lbottom leftl. Information is sup- plied to students by the Student Council bulletin board ltop centerl. Juniors raise money by selling polliwogs lbottom centerl Executive council meetings require serious thinking lbottom rightl. Any organization that hopes to be a constructive body of power depends primarily on action. Action of mind and body can accomplish even the supposed impossible. Fruitful ideas are presented and often argued over. Interest in a project grows and the results are sometimes surpris- ing. While not every project under- taken is a success, it at least indicates some involvement. Student Council is an organization that definitely requires members with a desire to become involved and active. While the traditional actions expected of a council are still done, such as can- teens, more contemporary activities have arisen. 'N fy- 1 Of primary interest this year was the AHS beautification project worked on by students. The relocation of the smoking area and rejuvination of the student parking lot indicated that Arapahoe's students are indeed willing to work. Several other council accomplishments include the Christmas party held for the elderly, the publishing of the "Dry Creek Clarion," and the many bake sales and food drives aimed to raise money for AFS and IFTF. With the aid of the three class coun- cils, the Student Council officers suc- ceeded in leading and expressing stu- dent opinion. The executive officers for the year were Bob Lembke, Presi- dent, Neal Rubin, Vice-president, Lau- ra Sasaki, Secretaryp Bess Bronstein, Treasurer: Marian Baker, Parliamen- tariang Laurie McDonald, Historian, and Gretchen Adams, Public Relations. A ,Gi S ll I! il I 1 KBS -:eJ.5:L"-If ...Q General meetings enable many students to voice opinions ltop leftl. Fats Johnson en- tertains AHS people at the Homecoming variety show lcenter leftl. Christmas pres- ents from young to old reveal true holiday spirit ltop centerl. A sophomore sponsored canteen is exciting after a winning basket- ball game itop rightl . The seniors' drive to have graduation at Red Rocks ended in satisfying victory ibottom rightl. Optimists ond Students of the Month Change. Slowly it comes about, yet ever so constant, revolving around every individual. Change may take two directions: for better or worse, and al- ways having an affect on life or the living. People direct the change in hopes that the end results will be prosperous and beneficial. Students who make the effort of getting involved, are recog- nized by their dedication and hours of work to acheive what may seem a tiny goal. And for their ambition, a special honor is bestowed. Each month Student Council elects one person for the optimist award who is outstanding in one or more areas. Concern for others, participation in school and community activities, and volunteering their time toward a par- ticular event, were all factors in de- termining the honored students. Key Club also selects a dedicated student each month. Academic acheivements, consideration for fellow students and neighbors and outstand- ing personalities and talents were all basis for their selection. ?f""1 Key Club Students of The Month are: S Eckert, Chris Schanker, John Vogl, Tim Kirchner, Frank Oden, Johanna Keller, Gretchen Adams, Laura Sasaki, Carol Gear Steve Shugart. Optimists of The Month are: Steve Shu- gart, Marian Baker, Betsy Stephens, Carol Gear, Katy lVliIler, Carol Wilkins, Laura Sa saki, Gretchen Adams, Eve Huggins. ' 'J .543 wi . ,-ji-4353 ,J Qrxal ,. 1 ,sv Yi--, Q,- N Y' 'n J - A it .....,.,,, Q! ,V rs. Lal Dara Kungkaya finds Arapahoe offers a di- verse art program as she mixes dye in class, top left. Like all other students, Pascal Zuf- ferey knows that intense concentration is necessary in the classroom, lmiddle topl. Linda Martin demonstrates the finer points of Australian cricket, ltop rightl. In prepara tion for her summer scholarship with AFS, Marain Baker studies one of the many bulletins she received, lbottom rightl. Al- though much of the American experience is a learning process, Marisa du Costa Pereira teaches the game of buraco to onlookers in the cafeteria, ibottom middlel. Kim Hou- gaard takes a moment out of a busy schedule to relax and play the piano, lbot- tom leftl. l LQ Tis- ,ge-11-uf ff 4 -' Reflections of a year's time, a life's time, spin throughout the mind like a cartoon-fantastic, memorable, and yet somehow true-in which the main character is . . . yourself. Adopting a foreign culture for a year or a few months is an adventure in liv- ing. lt is a chance to experiment with- in yourself-to dig beneath the layers of custom and society to find the you that is real, unhampered by the im- pressions of family and friends. But this far from home escapade is much more than an invitation to discovery, it is a life which works its way into the total puzzle that is . . .experience. Joining Arapahoe students in Ameri- can living this year were Kim Hou- gaard from Denmark lRotary Ex- changel Marisa du Costa Pereira of Brazil lYouth for Understandingl and Pascal Zufferey of Switzerland lAmer- ican Field Servicel. Linda Martin from Australia and Dara Kungkaya from Thailand merged into the AHS popu- lation as new Americans. Nlarian Baker was selected an AFS finalist for sum- mer session of 1973. ra 559 Ing S ai i .. 4 fr' , I By experiencing we learn, through learning vve come to an understanding. Many students came to understand what government is all about by ex- periencing it at the YMCA's 19th An- nual Youth in Government Confer- ence. Arapahoe had the largest school dele- gation at the three day conference, which was held at Colorado School of Mines during December. AHS students elected to offices were Bob Lembke, governor, Katy Miller, Lt. Governor, and Marian Baker, Speaker of the House. Those appointed to offices were Neal Rubin, the Sen- ate's Sergeant at Armsg Bess Bronstein, House Majority Leader, and Marta Janssen, house chaplain. ill' ig, V1 ii? If he is indeed wise he does not bid you enter the house of his wisdomr but rather leads you to the thresho of your own mind. -Kahil Gibran Awareness of Knowledge TUFT- i ng? f:f'5f'f'l.' X, ,I rx Nikki' I A,.: .-,ggi , , .f If Students develop further insight into drama through the independent study program, ltop Ieftl. The Fine Arts Resource Center is a place for gaining knowledge of the theatre, lbottom leftl. Acting in class is preparation for the real stage, ltop center and centerl. Mr. Scrimpsher gives constructive criticism toward acting techniques, ltop rightl. Be- hind the scenes, the stage craft class makes props and scenery, lbottom rightl. --IEQ ll yt M5415 1-Jtgbts 41: ii Dramatic talent, the never ending re- hearsals, line after line of reading un- til perfection is reached-developes self confidence. The mounting ten- sion until the final night when the curtain parts, the actors now become living characters. Beginning with only basic knowledge, the player developes into an actor. Only a handful of students will ever reach the stage and discover the true meaning of a theatre performance, however, every student has a chance to experience the theatre in a drama class. To round off the theatre spectrum, stagecraft classes create the settings for the complete illusion ofthe pro- duction. x ' ' ' M., . -. Av v' inhilr E' J afffj Y A r Twig, wx-...lsr ' 4595- f f ' - L M ff . L- , ' 4 i f f ' . Y., ' 2 -. Y 1 I ' .' ig, Y - f.. - ' H fl 2' V I J Luz I 715- I ll, L U H E J, ,Q , G 4 ' in. W A, ,. . 5? Jw , Q" 1-- f- FFP1 ,' 'Q , ' ,f qi! ff? 4 Y mix 3 g -- 2 ' 1 f -KT? ., , A '42-4' ' "V - " AA , 11-5: EQ u., YF wx N ! ' ' 1 Y L -il " , 'sf 7 ,. 1' ,, U . fx 4 , 4 . E5 4 ,-1' , . '1sgl,5'Q',L2 ' . -nv-, - wk.: 3. ., v fu gl ' . 1... 'fl in 1 f-5 - . z .lgpandmfg I , Sufi-if-7 51.- ,2-M-M W .3 .., , ' -'1 V 9, . 2455. -114' it-l W 4 . ' 'f 0 1 V H+. . V' , A -4 , V .LQ 'fax ' I ly? ' . , 4 '+V - ' U! 'f X' 2, mer 1 ' Q 1 '14 V ,'A ' Q' Q ' ' L mfg' , 91 5 -5E..1v?,'v 5 -4 Nw, A. Q' , , Q .2 .Q i Y- !?'g'Vf"" ' Y. ' -- c F' . A ,, N 3 1, .- A, ff F f' iF'i'. ' .I ' ' Q , ., ,A 1 ,eff ' 'Q 45.2 . ff' i 5- 11 I " ' 5,624 ' 1 4 Q' ., . :X it f 3 V 1 an. I if - '. y Y A6 F r E, f, il "'. ' 1.- ..1,,1,, V In f N? ff. ' 1 .Y .QV . f' P f"!ff ' rw "5,,.- ' . V"- . 4"r:pTIP X, nilx 1 Q f Y . A .,1 1 , , 4' 'A w 2 y ,, 1 ' rw I R 1 x ,- ul r 1 X1 4 1 , 'w ',., J- ., f A '- .Ak VI. if ny. ii! E 2 ,- 3 , ..,, .Q x . fi: KT? . g . .1 x, y-5 YMQU ':L 'nv 5- x 5 .JPY ,mv As the saying goes, "practice makes per- fect," and the AHS instrumental depart- ment proves this. Although all instruments vary in size and sound, they develop togeth- er to make delightful music for both the musicians and audience to enjoy. just. . n , x ,R -i' P52 ' .11- '1' '71 wk L Q l. It takes time. Time to practice at home, to build a float after school, to last through the seemingly endless hours of marching practice. But there are 190 dedicated band students who love it. Music requires a special group coop- eration along with individual responsi- bility. IVlr. Don Smith acts as coordina- tor and each day he helps the students prepare music for upcoming concerts and during football season, the march- ing program. The high point comes with a concert and the realization that all the hard work was worth it. The frustrations finally end with joy. It takes time. Time and determination to be dedicated to music. ' 'Ri",' .TC J . ,A-' :QA f'32I3?if - 9 5 .v X, 4 - , ,e 1 .X ! X - 9 diff! ," xt- x I . ,f I Y . " X, -- it 2 A E ff. - -,, L , kg AJ, , . ft-,-,X f' ,f -1 01 yu w ,AFV cf.-5 .1233-' 3" ' rwwl-f X , y, , . -. 'wil' '. 1g'!f'Q3 T . lr ' v I-QQ. , .4 "gf'2f'w. .M I af, nv 41 -.s 2 An expression from inside oneself . . . the artist must begin and end with this idea in mind. Skillful hands plus some essential materials like canvas and paints contain the possibilities for an effective expression of the mind and heart. The differing forms of art create varied preferences. One possibility is the typical display of a feeling through a painting or a sketch with a symbolic figure or realistic re-creations taking the role as subject. And art can have a purpose aside from just expression, like creating some- thing with beauty and usefullness. The term artist used loosely can cover a realm of meanings from poet to musician. But the true meaning of the term artist exists in skilled hands that can turn a piece of canvas or a slab of clay into something meaningful. 'fi , Av if My tigfvi ifiifrlf . T: .: w... . 'V J A Yi . .- N... rf :f -g-3-qv ,,.,:,.'-.z i -- ...,.,4..: 1,111,- '11-5,-.".3-r Y , ..-,..,,.. Q 1 ' 5 1 'KJ 1, . Y 'V H ?4,Q, YW Q A ' 'ffl Sgggvilz- Tb S -- - A L . 1.3. 4, 1 1 lk L 4 --1: ' Wil MJ 1- .' ' f. . -' 1 xiii: uw 1. .: Kin. . 5'1q'3?xv,fi 1 A . -, gi, QQ .. ,. L, ,N .. , 1 H--'wer S- K X4-Isl" 43:41 ' K- 'Q H 1 "1 K , 'iii , N' 5 Q.- : 4- ff' M .T V V ,H . , :4 4 sg' F '62 J. .- -S A b, A 5 .M , L? , . . , 11 fast vii' 1. - A ': , - 'wp . V :MQ ' A .. , - ya, - - A- Q ,W Q - I ,ie s f un'- I , .., - ' . ,Ea ""w-fl , ,Y am ,IQ A1 4 'wx IR lr ? -jA,,,,,,1-ff 'Z X Q33 -X w ' X XX, :RR fka Z 2 'Qfgx :I I . Xl! s 1 Wah Slab, Clattering sewing machines, straying aromas from hot ovens, and the pounding sound of hammers, are all results from skilled hands busy at work. The Home Economics and Shop Department is an area in which stu- dents can apply their energy to tools and machines to turn out a final product. Future bachelors now have a course providing them with basic techniques needed to face the world alone. At the same time, drafting is opened to all girls finding an interest in it. Together they use the acquired knowledge knowing they will have practical uses for it throughout their lives. Speed and accuracy counts: scribbles become meaningful wordsg and learning to sell is an asset. These traits are all common to the Business Educa- tion Department. Rows of typewriters await eager fingers, and shorthand pads are filled with pages of notes. Don't overlook the profits of Deca-Diamond Store. This department offers many lessons to the future secretary and business-minded people. The Business Education Department does not consist of only typing and shorthand, but also offers book- keeping and business law. It is a special department that provides many stu- dents the training for the business world. 1"" in Classroom work drills practical skills into the minds of business students ltop left and top centerl. Individual assistance improves typing ability lbottom left and centerl. Stu- dent assistants use their required knowledge when working on the switchboard ltop rightl, or selling from the Deca store lbot- tom rightl. Students become teachers as youngsters learn by example in both STEP and Child Management Classes ltop left and bottom leftl. Data processing is a class now open to persons who show an interest in it ioenter leftl. Those in Cosmotology become guinea pigs as various techniques are introduced ibottom centerl. Actual experience with livestock enhances those students interested in farming or ranching itop centerl. Nurses' aides get the feel of how a large hospital runs ibottom rightl. Basic skills are learned when working with furniture ltop rightl. No longer must learning be confined to the classroom as experience be- comes the teacher. Through the voca- tional and STEP courses, students are placed in the shoes of an occupational position and learn through training how to fill them. An actual job situation becomes a responsibility as well as a teacher, and learning by doing is the key. Whether it be hairstyling, working in a hospital, doing farm work or becoming a teach- er for tiny students who will someday grow up, all the vocational and STEP members acquire knowledge and skills that may be put to future use or packed away with experience. It is one way for a student to be a student in a new situation. . rf- . ' 1' AHA 3, K' .2 sl 4- . P ' , Ifr 'L ,HN 71. Y, K4 L asf W 1 ' Y.'.jff'f'-'ff rl J 5 , ,inn "'v4:LS,' -Vi 1- 2, il f '1 ily at in-L: . . :LL V. :W ,if ,gm W I x iii QE-A51 .. Q H , .U-,. ,. H . .f 4, L .1 - i Q if I' 5 "T A 911' ,cs 1 I - 'rf v ,.L fn mg . .... 1 lf . W f -N ,miie J -.5 .,-A at 't N , k N 3m fi I W ' " wsisxssassifef mf 5,1iQiw'S22?Q:F5sA: A- gwfxggiggggs 19- mg ' 1- gpg. IQJ. ii' 51 .4-A X - , -v .. ,L f 35.44-' ,I 1 u :pf , . I Q "J' .M , 1 'x . ,5- -FL II. . 'Q 2 " 2 11 MQMSQQ Q WM . : L S E155 .L , J ,., Mf- -.xv 74 J, ' cif, , 1 1 ., , ., 1.1.4 , J 1 xi - -V f ,w..,, ,,-.A. w v 1 mmm fm 'WIN 'E you boys Hurricane Strong and Tough? . . . Rip those weights, illets . . .Shut up and sit in your iiad lines so I can take role, girls X. Let's go to work, men. You, too, tter . . . Who told you to pick that ? . . . Did you take a showerl? Imbination locks, towel lines, show- s, roll calls, gym suits, soap. The ysical Education Department is mposed of many inanimate and cold rts. But it is the individual partici- nt who pumps life and feeling into I . . A. .K ' ,i 4" V, in . w i the P.E. Classes. The responsibility of building physically as well as leaving memories rests with the singular stu- dent. He alone must accept the duty to improve and refine his physical state. Arapahoe's Physical Education Department provides more than ample opportunity for the system of body building. Variable Scheduling allows for a wider choice of interests. The pool provides for the more wet- minded. Weight training facilities en- able the individual to choose his own limit. Badminton, swimming, and gymnastics are only a few examples of the many P.E. classes offered. Towels and sweaty gymsuits signify hard work yet fun achieved in class. Fiehearsing specific interpretations enables the coach, Nlr. Jim Westbrook, to criticize the speaker so that improvements can be made itop left and top centerl. Scripts and organized debate file boxes lbottom left and bottom centerl , prepare the speakers for the all important trip to a speech meet ltop rightl. . , -4. Q., 15171 "l am alone. . . I do many things alone. Thinking is best." "Can you imagine anything as funny as trying to teach your wife to drive." "Let us again turn to our third contention. If the negative team will remember . . . " Those are some of the sounds of the Forensic Squad. Forensics can boast something for everyone. The Interpretation events are, Dramatic, Humorous, and Poetry. Duet and Solo acting make up the Acting division. The Public Speaking division includes, Debate, Original Ora- tory, Analysis and lnterpretation of Oratory, and Extemporaneous Speaking. They all sound different, but are still tied together by one word: COIVIIVIU- NICATION. The desire and ability to communicate are both necessary traits of a Speech Team member. Two other vvords also apply: competition, and a very important one, confidence. Belief in yourself is absolutely necessary for a good performance. The pencil writes down thoughts of an individual that are to be read, trans- lated and criticized by many others. The question: is it good enough for publication? A publication that will be read, or a yearbook that will be popu- lar with the students-these are the goals that the yearbook and news- reporting staffs strive to reach. Each staff member admits something about himself when his name is included in the staff list of a publication, and both staffs are continually engaged in re- flecting the best part of themselves. The image of the writer formed by the reaction to and acceptance of a publi- cation is important to both a general staff and an individual staff member. Because of this, the newsreporting staff works hard at the publications they put out, including the Swashta and news stories sent out through Arapahoe Student News Service. The annual staff has a year's job of cap- turing pictures and words that will tell the story about the happenings of the year and to put it all in a hard back book. The best work of the staffs must compose these publications, and the best work requires many precious hours to accomplish, hours where the best journalistic style of the writer or photographer must be in use. But regardless of the work necessary to bring a magazine or yearbook to press, both staffs find distribution days re- warding and well worth the hours, or year, of work that went into them. up YLNSFR I if-i 3' si- Newsreporting editors meet to discuss the upcoming Swashta issue, itop Iefti, and bring the class into the discussion, ibottom Ieftl. As a deadline approaches, staff mem- bers prepare the Swashta to go to press, ibottom centeri. Calumet sales evoke stu- dent interest in the yearbook, itop centeri. Photographers go to extremes to achieve quality pictures, ibottom righti. Final touches are given to Calumet pages, itop righti. i :am .,m,.,Yv , ,J 1 :gi5':'EQ7f,i ' X D g To study English is to explore the fas- cinating and endless amounts and if kinds of literature. It is learning to 0 truly comprehend what is read: to question new ideas: to look for differ ent meanings in familiar stories, to even read between the lines of the great works of literature. The beauty and grace of the English language appears in many great liter- ary forms. The power and influence of English, both spoken and written, is great in all societies today. Most important of all, students in ,imkwl English classes learn that there is more f 1 A X to their language than the ordinary E "Vi colloquial use that it commonly re- 1 ceives. English is the language of the - i scholar: ofthe genius: and of the l greatest masterpieces of the world. .i i - o.irsii,":-f.: fe '45 S! 1. V i F F 5 iii if rj i . W, i --4A -.. Piles of books await distribution to eager students, itop lefti. Pantomime expresses thoughts without words, itop centeri. Group discussions provide different class- room situations, ibottom Iefti. Film-makers tell stories with movies rather than books, itop rightl. A raised hand is the signal that questions have arisen, ibottom centerl. Learning to speak comfortably in front of others is a necessity, ibottom righti. Q 5 , ,1 ' 5 , . . I1 Q Ax 1 l l'i l Nlisunderstandings and lack of com- munication destroy relationships be- tween people, All over the world the greatest barricades against unity and l peace are the barriers of different lan- guages and customs. Sometimes to comprehend others seems an impos- sible task. 12 i Yet daily, people manage to do the impossible, to overcome the barrier. At first they struggle to simply com- pose a sentence, but one day they can read a phrase in German-or Spanish- U or French-and understand. The mira- cle of communication takes place all the time, but this is special, a com- p munication of thought between people of different lands, customs, and ideas. .ia fi French, German, and Spanish are learned to gain insight into the minds -Q and lives of people who live today in other countries. Latin brings insight into the peoples of the past. When a person can understand a language, a whole new world is opened to him. Mr. Smeltzer shows that another language can be both a learning experience and fun at the same time, ltop lefti. A point is em- phasized by Mr. Romero as he exposes the class to Spanish, itop centeri. Individual help is readily given by the French teachers, ltop center and top rightl. Further insight into a foreign language is found when doing lab-work, lbottom leftl or reading a non- X English magazine, lbottom rightl. in dl il"""', " Y.:-sr0""' 53 The Social Sciences create an atmo- sphere that deals with people and time and covers the diversity of the world simultaneously. History, the most common term asso- ciated with the Social Sciences, is only one facet of this large learning experi- ence. lt involves a study of the world in times past with the purpose in mind to find the mistakes made and try to prevent them in the future-or some- times recognize them after they are made. History can also be just an apprecia- tion of accomplishments of people's ancestors. lt not only is a study of the bumbling mistakes past peoples have made but also of their brilliance. Besides history, the Social Sciences also involve study of the lands of the world and of human behavior. The Social Sciences are an involve- ment with the world and its people, a probing into life. E runa- 1 .TW if . ' 2 -.1-.111 , gp tg-eg-3, 4, ll'- R xt -P 9.05. 3. Unorthodox learning practices, such as mirror tracing experiments, are always present in psychology, ltop leftl. Enthu- siastic instructors help make history more enjoyable, ltop centerl. Engaging games further the understanding of the mind, psychology students subject mice to mazes, lrightl. Studying maps and graphs increases knowledge, ltop rightl as does informal dis- cussions where ideas are gathered together, lbottom rightl. ,fem A ,fer X ,4 A di I-HB .ff ,' ,4- Q' 56 Data is typed out to be fed through the computer, ltop Ieftl. Ratios of plants to areas are determined when Biology students do field study, lcenter leftl. Some math problems need additional explanation, ltop centerl. Botany students discover the in- finitely complicated make-up of a plant lrightl. Theorems are presented daily in math classes, ltop rightl. Inherited physical traits are sought by genetics students, lbottom leftl. ,W I Nil X t :legal ,I l wbiyx. . ' fx XZ R X .. 'SX L1 :XE X K J, . b 9.930392 , , L, , 1 F5 t N.. 5 L i s., 9,..- iw' . -e ,,,..-' ' I V ev.-lf. a . l"'.z?3i. Science is the art of fascination, ex- perimentation, frustration, and finally, with a new discovery or the correct answer, exhultation. Probing the mysteries of the physics that make the world go 'round, sam- pling the order of Nature's garden- your own backyard or a nearby field- and separating the pigments of a plant into colorful liquids are all usual oc- currences in the science department. But even the most common are some- how, to an entranced student, magic. Typing out data on a computer tele- type machine is simple enough, but an unexpected answer deserves much punishment. Watching an enthusiastic teacher unravel a complicated math equation, coupled with the next evenings' last minute homework are memories all math students will . . . cherish? . . . or at least never forget. Countless adventures happen in the locale of the science and math de- partments, but many more are waiting in the pages of the next chapter. 57 "'l"'1 ', . ' ef -. 55 M' Yip.. A Vg ,X 1, 4 . rf Af -fi . - V.. . '. 5" -. 1A Q g " f. ,ff , "M gfv V' - pai 'gli " l ,f :fx-. T5-V 5' Af. 551-.1 ? .7 F 114 fair: "Mm V 'J -Y , M? , -Kg: -5 gg: Vwgr. . "'-2-i,f', fr l ':'.-j.L.'Xp- 3, wif' .. fl., H :Miz in-.1 L -Il, , ,Q ',. In ,gt H .gf Q I. -.L 'F' --'--b-4,SiA'lf. Tv 3 .4-' .M gifs! ,A , I Q i i 5,1 if -WR 1- ..4'.'.'lx1f I 3 91-' F iff ff M7 ' " 1: :pg . 123- '- " 14-:I K V A -' 1 Mx' '4' ' -1. 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'J Q- "b "5" 1 --, "' fi 'EW Van, liver, an 1- .Q Q X' YV -9 ,Max qi he mos? disicmi goal is Moinobie To him who hopes wisely. - lope De Vega 'ei In Your Own Time Tlme seems 1.0 go 'by so qulckly when moods are .good splms mgn. Hours alms: school seem 10132155 by an hugh Each smdem ldlsmlss-ed wave-ls his own -way, 10 a dem ol mose places each enjoys. The lndlvldual makes pam ll mhose acllvmes he can do be-sl. When school llf. oul -mlnuu-s are spam lmprovlrlg each 1 lown lalems Nm only llear-nmg and progre-s.singld.u11ng hours ol lreedom, tml jusl erljoymg llle. Happln:-ss an are lloumd mrlough our own amllons when glove-n me mr Vllhelher ,ll be, skllrlg over me clean Tresh snow, lalklrl people in lrlorll ol a lfre or sleeplng-m ull hall pan Tw-e me mdlvldual ls ldolmg owner 'he llke-s lbs-sl. The hours ,aher me books are hldde-n-away are spem b the drudgery ol sluclymg, bm ilearmrlg goes on and LZ-ill -sell pam .asslgnmems The Individual hBS1lTTlE'l,O5lE5TlFl. hnmsellf 'x jg-. 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' "FM I- 2-H, f- ' ,L . .N ' gn-.H 4, A ,. ,,- -1 ' ,V . , ' ' X A-K J' j r L VER! :if 14 11 . y iN-ax A! " 4 A, 4. 13:1 i. ' it ,- X,',lZ mfvfs' LA- K t 79, , JE E.. .31 ' Q - 4, - . 55 M v-x ,N ,Qc ,Q-gig 'fftli T ML-',..:'. xiii- '- ff :mf fi A-. A . Sunny Doys of Freedom As warm glittering rays fall down upon each day, summer be gins to show. Bright sunny days, barefeet running across hot cement, bright new flowers and freedom in the air, all seem to say summer. As summer begins to show through, the cold, long days of winter still linger in memory. A feeling of free- dom is in each one's reach, while still remembering those long hours of studying and learning. Each hour of the day seems to slow down, just a little, giving each individual time to reach out and find himself. Summer is a time of learning about those people around you and how to communicate with each other. Clear sunny days spent at the pool, skimming over ice blue water, riding with speed, not caring, just going, pass a summer afternoon away. Each one does that thing which seems fun to him. Camping, tubing or fishing, are special throughout the summer, letting everyone do something he likes to do and wishing the sum- mer would never end. V J . v J V -J fl 514 -wifi 'Q -hung-.f1., :Ai Ev QQ Q fm' f"i'fI"'?.Vff'rf . J- ' ,QWv.Q'QL,j,a'l gg Q1 7:5523 ly my Vp Y is -M z 554 -f W ff , .pd ., ,1i'f-' i 'V jg - xxiqf, 4 -Q, 5.4, ? L' Q Nr. 0 x 5 Q e '1 ,, -. . " -' .:- A ' FF., A , 4 .. if ' " ,lf -: 'f' ':'7g42y4f--' a.,a , N , N ,, F. '-1 - -lap it- ' :fTf"f A 5, , 4- L - if , . J-1b 'j'1155.- IS T! Q. " , ff -f" "V, , Q, , 4 - ' ..,:Aq.,..Q ' r-2953 . ." finx V v-wa.-....-,gg . ,.4. . . 1 . . Er.: cv- K 1 '3 3, 1 53 ::Af5xxx': , , IL L2 "f dggrf' ,put-ww... iii-ff' ,K ,B -Egfr f' ,E L .a. 261 V -,w iw N axfg-'Q 1, "TX 3- 1- .-1 er -'M r 1 1 ji 5 fl'-M 'Toy 950, Clint The loud shrill of a bell and the sound of shuffling feet seem to signify the ending of a hot summer and the beginning of a new experience. When the new year began, each one was found beginning in his own way. Each one comes as a strang- er, seeking friendships, happiness, and achievements through- out the year. The student begins the new year-a new Sep- tember with different attitudes about what's ahead. As the weeks slip by, initiation invades the sophomore's se- curity. Sophomores begin to become a part of things as the weeks stomp on and the blacklist grows longer and longer. Senior Pride soon takes hold, forcing the Sophomores to fol- low the rules or face Beany Court. Enforcing initiation, helped the new school year to really get rolling. Through a few laughs, and a smile or two, the year was off to a great start, letting the students become involved within the school. Faculty After Three Slowly, tiredly, anxiously, the school year marches on, leav- ing the excitement and first impressions behind. Teachers soon begin to blend into the atmosphere of school, students forget that they too are individuals. Somehow, in accepting their daily offerings of knowledge, we forget that teachers do other things but teach. It seems strange to see Miss Johnson in Levi's with patches on the knees, Miss lVlcQueen racing around an ice rink, and other teachers just doing what they like best. Overlooking their individuality, we find ourselves forcing teachers into a common mold. But each one is dif- ferent, taking part in his separate life. v",. far' . A fi- ' Q A' ii ev X 1 ,g A. JJ xi "Q -M, N., s L n Q.- bf f 5 4 K J-4 'f X ' f Ia I .44 F ' U I 1 K WGA V' W r ig?-pf The Fall of Troy An annual fall gathering of spirit and friends . . . this is Homecoming. It culminates the feelings of returning to school, the excitement, the slight nervousness, the eagerness, and most of all, the fun. The students join together to face the new year's events. Class competition is always strong during Homecoming week. Working with the theme "The Fall of Troy," each strives to outdo the other in float-building, an activity that starts even before the beginning of school. The day finally arrives when these masterpieces of fine planning, great art, and plain hard work, are paraded before their cheering fans. Float-building might be led by partisan groups, but the snake dance is for all, as they wind around trees and posts in high spirits and with a sense of great fun. The variety show allows students to present their various ta. ents while the others are provided with some great entertai ment. And, of course, there is that breathtaking moment when the Homecoming royalty is announced. This all leads up to the event of the week that everyone an ipates. Football is an integral part of fall. So is Homecomir week. Together, the Homecoming football game means fall nothing else does. In this year's game, Arapahoe scored a resounding victory over Aurora Central, with a final score of 44 to 7. As the spirits of the Arapahoe Warriors rose, the Trojans did indea fall. e 'wg A ,-QV. , , 4 k ,E HQ w , M kW mm H W H S ' .1 5, .f 8 . 1 - 4, .. Jil, v' f 4, '1 X., . w Homecoming Royalty is announced! Preliminary and final voting has produced results. Finally it is known, the honored places of royalty are filled. This year seated in the wicker throne was Laura Sasaki, Queen, with Rick Carbone, King. Senior princesses were Sue Eckert and Karen Jones, senior princes were Mark Frohardt and Dan Jewell. Wendy Mead and Carrie Nafus were the junior princesses, while Robin Carlson and Chuck Richardson were the junior princes. Soph omore princesses were Cathy Gear and Jeri Gee, sophomore princes were Dirk Durdy and Bob Jones. The Homecoming Dance winds up the week of fun. The ea- gerness and excitement of the past week is indicative of the year's events to come. :A f , v M r , -, N .vw,,',7!t5g I I T ' 9' f 44,4 T ELL, 'VLLV fifwiiar , --0.5-, ,. .Mg ,V-f, - - ,ns , A , -A , gm " H., - .. , ,. ,erik ' . " A " " , M W X' W' :J MN H --I' ":':n.Q.d0Sk'- QQ, A" K iglffiifl ' ,' if 4. X - JI W' 'Vw-H Q km ,"5': iw Weil: fv, ,. w G. qi. . , A Zig' :.4::wi,9iY gp , gifbfibzs-. J' Q ' A' wif! E Y W H . . + 'l.-ig-Mfg f f . -- 1 'fi'5f,l., f , A- 'A f, f - , f X 1' Y :I ' Q 1 4 l sf N, ' as X ,, , , A H n ,, 'S . 2 A a ' , D ., A . I h , V. lid!! :L Ari, .R . 5 1, 1 , ,. . -nw - W "lr: .lip I , ' KV V , " 'FS . XL ' X - J1'Nf5g f "- ' " "'. w 5 " king up 1 ian-:-4+ M, ' ' jf Q, 1 A55 w I , EW ' J ' h Q V 1' u . X , I X ' ' : 1 . TQ 6 faz1!?ii?z . M 4 - J MBMSQ , "'F"',.d'wf7gVg555 'QMQ1 il rg---. vita, 35511: Q 5 vQn2, wg? .,' hw. N f .'Fi55Ali'1' - . , 'lrif 1 'si'Mp,:t'Ha--,L " I ll'?r,iif, L -f 'lr l. W ,. Al. in"'--' 1' ,-. WR. .M , Wil. . , l -. L -x. 1 .A . E- r. s, v . . J. ,. y ., are lasrl be . nl. N' M - uw ,V , Y 4 IAS? ,Zee 4 4, . f,, l . 7 'af' J ' , A-5 l . . l... 2 . , -,Q , l . ,V r...- ,.,, V -.l W Y -.2-'rrp V- :-- UNM -- V 1 5.5, ya.. 13,' -.5 'Z ,I -if -v , -, A . -.. , ,ar ,Mr - " ,Z . 1. . ' ' L, , 2, ' . fs. ' ', F421-Pu. 5 , l if." it '1 " 1 I- ,tg .5 X N 'ir -- lr' , ." 351 if " A . i J, rye. 1.. , fps- 'J an l Div. , '-. f, uf: ...,, Ugg, 4 . , ' X A Time for Change . . . to Discover . . . Question . . . Relate Fall is the time for change . . . we witness a slow, gradual movement of the world. The days begin to get cooler: the first frosts come and the land explodes with colors. It be- comes colder and fall is lost into winter. Nature folds into it- self and becomes dormant. It is a time to be alone, a time for thought. lt is yours . . . quiet, peaceful, relaxing. Wander and feel the calm. Fall is the time when you learn to know yourself better. lt is a new kind of freedom, freedom to think. The mind is released and able to explore. With this new environment comes a need to question. Fall is not only a change of seasons, but a change of being. Discover . . . question . . . relate. f W' x kit I 4 , 'fill 1 : W V 31,2 I ' -'.' . V : MKEM 1511 .si Ll 5 fiv- W-as Puppets come in all sizes, as was seen when the first drama production of the year, PUNCH AND JUDY, was performed. While the masked characters pranced onstage, both youngsters and grownups were entranced by this children's play. The play is based on the "Punch and Judy" puppet plays, which have been performed for hundreds of years. Punch has met many characters in his travels, all of whom are involved in this play. Punch iBill Craigl and Judy Nicki Stevvartl are puppets who come to life, and with the help of other friend- ly puppets, they entertain children all over the world. Their accomplices in merriment are Toby iCharles'Pettigrewl, Pro- fessor iLarry Whitel, Hector the Horse lNancy lVlead, Lynette Oxfordl, Doctor lLee Rogersl, Policeman lSteve Hansenl, Guards illllorgen Dickinson, Dan Nlartinl, Hangman iFrank Odenl, Ghosts lTeena Tiedeman, Karen Mallinl, and the Devil lPaul Attardil. Punch's tricks and pranks added up to an enjoyable day for all of the lucky persons attending, and the smiles and laughs confirmed the play's success. fmt ,-fra S K K r i " if-W lk ' , W QQ, 'A ,AF M .,, ,Q f' ff .F ' arf" r 1 A- A 5, , V - l. . Y- . X 'H f 5 V 1 WM W 1 . e Story of Joan of Arc an ' , ,. ,r-Wfifih : QQ Q- ,552 M 1 ., s.. Jw l A ' ww- 1 Jw w' 'wig M 2. ffm -N 81 'H XIS ,LL-Av' .-f pf - ,-A. .,,,n- Guys ond Dolls A people paradox between a group of crap shooters and the Save-a-Soul Mission Band plus a little crazy love, this was the musical comedy "Guys and Dolls". Nathan Detroit, a gambler, and Miss Adalaide, a singer at the Hot Box Night Club, or Sky Masterson, another gambler, and Sarah Brown, the leader of the Mission, create the crazy love. Sarah reluc- tantly finds herself in love with Sky after he talks her into going with him for an evening in Havana. When she returns she finds the Mission sadly lacking support. Sky promises to helpg he creates the crap game of all time. In this, if he wins, all the crap shooters are obligated to go to the Mission. He does win, so the Mission is saved, and to add to the perfect ending, Nathan decides to marry Adalaide and Sky decides to marry Sarah. The story was only part of the production, as the entire cast this year was brilliant. Frank Oden was very effective as Nathan Detroit, as was Jennifer Cox who played Miss Ada- laide. Jo Keller was excellent as Sarah Brown, and Forrest Mays equally so as Sky Masterson. Magi McKinnies was Gen. Matilda Cartwright, Steve Burkholder was Nicely-Nicely, and Pat Brunk was Benny Southstreet. The cast, story and music were brought together into a polished whole by three people. Mr. Gene Scrimpsher was Stage Manager, Miss Marcelene Dillon was Vocal Director, and Mr. Don Smith was Instrumental Director. llllllllIHS!!!!!BE!E!EMlH::llmaaastau- " PERFE, ENDANQE 'kc QLQA9 cz' Today Is but ca Memory in Tomorrow s H '--' LE:'.i:3 -1-qui-I nilsmi- Q B I V 1 J , fi! 5 Q IH .V 2 gi I I I N e Sounds of Silence W 715 wr-1 , -9-X iff? A-' Q Out of the colored darkness, shines a painted white face, bios soming with expression . . .a mime. Silently he speaks con- veying a message with actions instead of words. His feelings become movements without spoken symbols to back them up. Fear of the unknown, the happiness of life, and the under- standing of people, are all emotions portrayed by the mimes. These feelings seep from the mimes' portraits to create a mood among the audience with a touch of humanity in every story. Mime . . .a word of silent communication, communication in its purest form . . .the only true universal language. Wonderful Winter Magic A white blanket of snow calmly covers the lifeless ground. Its sparkling shine brings beauty to the brown scene fall left be- hind. The time has come for briskly walking in long wool coats through mounds of snow and gutters of ice. The warmth of summer slips away. ln everyone's mind the thought of Christmas and Santa Claus coincides with the drop of the temperature. Christmas goes by all too soon, but wintery days still lie ahead. The feeling of skiing and freedom wait to be explored. Blowly cold days of winter continue on, not allowing enough time for every- thing. Winter feelings are wrapped into a bundle of snowball fights, sledding and warm, burning fireplaces. Everywhere people pass the stingy-cold days away with care- free thoughts and moods in the cold wintery season, making the best of each and every day. 'ff' ,L , J. 1 .ii ,VIT- F mx H4 Au 151' if ww, .J- . ' P -z N , , , , A , Mm .1 , 2 I , -P L' A 1 -1 qi . ,f V 'uf f - sa-4 Q an 4 1 ' 'I V11 W L 4: C 'v Q' R 4 :Eg fum, R v D, X 1 , at Ir' ,f 1 f ::f gif, - .4 EJ' --, .fe '21 W7 ,fail FN, N Mg- N , ' i , :L kg- ' M .1 V ?t : X S Q, , , Hg, Wm 2 ' 4 , jg EN l' gg,-.fu ' , N. X . , Or 6 ' . ,z-fg. 5 'f ' " ' QIYYZA- E W .V wr 4 , Wh '57 ' gwr:.11", ' , k . W -WpsggB-A2,,H,-nj?-'1"' N 11-ww hwwEwW ww1 Ngigq -N 52 -yan, 1- 'W gif"-:K V, -aj, 'Agil- Q Q gm-L','1:..wq1 W ,- .w .. - -, ... 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"f'E5-N .5 '-' if-jg ' ' f---,,-Q- .- .":g.5'ffzfw "E--Wi -v - - ' 31'-',--:E -ff -:fr '-nf -' H 1 N2 42--Qf-A 'w""-1?5"!f-9,614 . N "', -Q.:-fu, X A "Q-Pu. .Q 1 'M' ,Q '-' fr-ff-iS..m.,, - W aim , . mi,-im my 5 M 525321 2.,S1s..,m S vqsml iiggggggim - , ,4 , 4 ,x I, , f ' .. .-211-ef gg' 2? .Nfl A '- , 'nv ,,. ,mi- . :yer Y fr, f Aw..-N , i 5 , ' 4 . 4 W , 1, r 5 , G f "4. X 'fa in ' I , .e I fl f In ,Q , h 1 ' V. --1 . v H, 'il X ,ffwji G X A , ' ii- , I . ML 1 ..., ,Ja 1' .: fwbwlzpiq .' , Y. ,br ' 1? ig.. 57171, -. , . .7 -. 4- '1 1 V .'::' f ul . 1.7. A f H . ' f- lg r -M . A, f. 4, al. X- "SP fig- Q , A ,.f' ' ' '- ,Sf-fl' ...S 0 I "QF N, 'dam r E' 'A,A , 'U-1 f'1'l , ' A - N I I 4 I .F -l W 1. L - K r Eg! W 2 .xl g nw. rd 1 fifjzgi , Q., L 71 J , U V 'ew I . fi gl 4 13 " V ML, A . E? XE! f. x 4 r. 12 ' v mf , x.. Q 'fif' XJS. ,fwlr-1 tJuJ rWf1 NJLJ rwfw ,. un. , J fig X 1 I h t I 1 TW ' X i 8 'i f:??L ri 22,4-QAL' Key Club Hos Perenniol Power Arapahoe's finest! Such a congregation of upstanding young men have no choice but to succeed, From the choosing of monthly sweethearts and students, to the performing of com- munity service, the Key Club by its very nature excels in its activities. Even the Hoopsters, Key Club's Intramural basket- ball team, and the Key Club Glee Club singing ensemble, managed to be outstanding this year. With the sponsorship of lVlr. Holmes and lVlr. DelVlarco, the club accomplished many things. Between Tuesday night meetings, members were involved in a Hemophilia and Can- cer Drive. With a room full of balloons the annual St. Valen- tines Day Massacre Dance was traditionally carried out for another year. Key Club also participated in helping with the Parking lot clean-up, and the Glee Club sang at the Cherrelyn Manor Nursing Home Christmas Party. Arapahoe is fortunate to have such a group of young men willing to devote time and effort to school and community projects. We I fy 5-.. The beginning takes place in a room half full of strangers. Lasting only minutes, the strangers become aware of the friendliness hidden under nervous smiles. lt happens, two groups-the actives and the newcomers-become a stronger One. This union is known as Kappa Phi Omega sorority. The members of the sorority, through its ups and downs, grow to know each other and feel a closeness they can share l Kappa Phi Omeg in and out of school. Rolled-up pant legs, goodie-bags, ba bibs, and cardboard signs are a part of the trials they put each other through to test the devotion to the sorority. Throughout the year, the group plans charity projects, fu raisers, and their main event of the year, Winter Formal. ' gether the girls work for club achievement, thirty giggling girls who provide their own entertainment. 1 -Q R555 . n K Fai-E-,F H. We ss 'Sf E gi, w e -al -4 1 X 53 , .. , fii u 'IZ' IW' W. is E 195 ngQ,. EQ. , . : ',.2 I 9 IG .F 5.-Y ::: f Z .5-1 I -, V it -331 w id! F3 'S '.f?:::1L'..11 Ii , .. .. , .FW Y A QW H as fil ms ---- A-M N1 ww-2'--f was - - - Wi- ,W.mNw!..tg,T,Nw,f gi :aa-1.5 1. M mu- :-:-s-- ' r ' .- mga www ,, Ag - ' vffgi fl ' ' ' f L -, ' ,MW .E f ' 59? sd i' Sf Y mm ' x, Q2 "EL sf L X fa .I-, 'S .' . Y ' U'-uk, f- -gi: X I rr l W Q Uv r sb. I l3Jv if , W' M .-.. , .a ., 4 ,.'.. 4 V, J , X ,-V, 4,-, A, ', I An Open Door to Action Communities provide a door to participation. Right there in an emergency, Arapahoe Rescue Patrol provides helping hands to neighbors vvith a smile-in spite of long, often gru- eling vvork. Helping not only the body but the soul, Big Brothers and Big Sisters work through Inter Faith Task Force with underpriviliged children-being to them a friend. Students of all ages show concern in a different way by walking or biking long hours to raise money for IFTF and Nlarch of Dimes. Blistered feet and aching muscles are honors when that effort means food to a hungry family or medical care to disabled children. Littleton Youth Advisory Council and other civic organiza- tions provide an outlet for constructive criticism, active par- ticipation in community affairs and a chance to meet the adult leaders of our community. Girl Scouts are also important helpers. Long past the brownie stage, it's time to start volunteering to help out local business- men vvith clerical skill in free time after school. No matter what method is used, satisfaction is in supply for all who actively display their caring. And that special thank- you smile from an open heart is worth every minute of de- voted time. The Weekend . Time to Live The weekend . . . ah, those glorious two days at the end of the week. The daily grind, the rat race, and the blahs in gen- eral, all seem to fade away. 48 hours to ski, or shop, or just do whatever it takes to be happy. Unfortunately, school sometimes carries over to the weekend hours. Hopefully teachers realize that weekends are usually meant for other things . . . f' 421 0 u But, More Than That . . . toRelc1x. . .LelGo. . . J Weekends are . . . Friday nights with the gang whooping it up, knowing there is a chance ahead to sleep-in and forgetting that there is any such thing as a lVlonday morning. Saturday comes and is the day to get done something that's been waiting around so longg twelve noon the alarm rings and the day is then too short to finish the job. Sunday brings the last day of relaxation reminding, at least, that there are only five more days until another welcomed Friday. z-ss-1:15-H SIVACKSHDP F wk J , Free Time to Spend The cafeteria is empty. Chairs are all pushed in neatly under the rows of tables and suddenly it starts, the bell rings, send- ing dashing students to fill the large room. Books and trays of food cover the table leaving only inches of Counter-t0p showing. Noisy voices of last hour's gossip fill the air. The cafeteria serves its purpose not only at lunch time but for free hours too. Conversation begins: "Hey Phil, did you see my fantastic play in the game Friday night?" lf it wasn't for my blocking you would have never made lt." "Oh, give me a break! Go get your hair cut." "Yeah . . . it's touching my ears." "Hi Sue, have you seen the new foreign exchange student?" "Yea, is he ever good-looking." "Good-looking's not the word, he's gorgeous, and his accent is greatl" "You going to the woodsie Saturday night?" "ls it at Daniels?" "Yeah, I heard there would be 10 kegsl" "l think that's right." "There better be, I paid a dollar for my share." .Xi 'X x it For some, the cafeteria is just a place to eat, but for others it is a bridge club or a place for socializing and studying for the test next hour. It is a place to communicate, study and learn. Every type of student can be found in the cafeteria-learning not only math and science but about people and life. 64. " ...fa- 1.5 s Tvbsnf 1--. ., in x X XN.. . Q., . ' L W., 'L ss 1 1' 1 'JL 9" The lnlner 'Why ldoes man lfeefl 'he ls res1.rJc1:ed TO me-mal and phy 'bound5? lls li because Ihe lbe.l.lev,es mam he ls incapable, mm she 'has reached his 'human llfimlzamlons? 'Nl an 'mum 'break a amcideclane no rhe heavens, "N 0, fl shall nm remain caged lprl:-oner -within these-vvall-slol llmnazlons. I defry Them , . .amd ll wilel le-xceed mem." Thus, .a lchalle-nge ,IS made .and - Lboumds larefbroklen crea1,lmg,new and ihlgher llllmm, agaim lclmlllemglgmg me 'vvlillls 'ol mem. The mape is stremched across me track only a shom .ms away. lAlUhal1lenger anempts 1.0 delem 'hrs Qpponem, the ol ,als1lopwawh. A pole as suspended parallel 10 the -earmh Again, an mdwldual declares a challenge, a dare to smpl from .exceedlngahils lbound . .1he:Qpens up a new lmmme ARSITY FOOTBALL STATS. rapahoe Irvada West -rapahoe ittleton rapahoe -ovela nd rapahoe urora Central rapahoe nairview rapahoe herry Creek ,rapahoe ,eritage rapahoe urora Hinkley rapahoe -oulder rapahoe nglewood .RAPAHOE TENNIS STATS. .rapahoe legis .rapahoe Ieritaga .rapahoe .oveland .rapahoe littleto n lrapahoe lurora Central Irapahoe ,nglewood lrapahoe iurora Hinkley lrapahoe pulder irapahoe Iherry Creek ,lrapahoe Broomfield Arapahoe iairview Arapahoe kravade West SOCCE R STATISTICS Arapahoe Littleton Arapahoe Hinkley Arapahoe Heritage Arapahoe Englewood Arapahoe Cherry Creek Arapahoe Aurora Central Arapahoe Denver County Arapahoe Littleton Arapahoe Colo. Academy Arapahoe Aurora Hinkley Arapahoe Heritage Arapahoe Denver X-Team Arapahoe Cherry Creek Arapahoe Aurora Central CROSS COUNTRY STATS. Arvada lnv. Lake County Inv. Denver lnv. Arapahoe lnv. Aurora Inv. Boulder Valley lnv. Pikes Peak lnv. Jeff. Co. lnv. League District State A7116 B3116 C2116 A 9129 B 6129 C 5129 A 8123 B 5123 C 7123 A 12136 B21136 C 4136 A8133 B 14133 C9133 A 4134 B12134 C 5134 A 7125 B 6125 C 14121 D 8121 A 419 B 219 C 119 A4119 B4119 C4119 A11116 J.V. FOOTBALL STATS. Arapahoe Arvada West Arapahoe E ng lewood Arapahoe Littleton Arapahoe Aurora Central Arapahoe Fairview Arapahoe Cherry Creek Arapahoe Heritage SOPHOMO RE FOOTBA LL STATS. Arapahoe Wasson Arapahoe Mitchell Arapahoe Aurora Central Arapahoe Fairview Arapahoe Cherry Creek Arapahoe J.F.K. Arapahoe Aurora Hinkley Arapahoe. Littleton 0 6 32 0 48 O 38 14 28 8 42 14 22 8 26 0 Spirited Teom Pulls Through League Title The spirit and excitement of the 1972 Arapahoe Football Team spread throughout the student body as they competed through their fall season. To the player, his excitement is overcome by the tension and anxiety he has before the game but as the game begins he no longer has time to show fearg he must play to his fullest ability and not surrender. The play begins and the quarterback fades back looking for an ap- propriate receiver. Scanning the field he spots a receiver and hurls the ball with a marksman's aim. Breaths are held and heartbeats falter as the ball is suspended in mid-air on its predetermined course. The receiver extends his arms towards the ball and with his fingertips, makes contact with the pro- jectile. With the ball in his possession he sprints toward the goal line as if possessed by animal instincts and crosses the goal line. J 1 U' " W :VA A f-1.'wf1i1iixzl't 'A - Q .. , . Qs" ' x 'T' w - ' K , Af, 1 '-5' " L I C 92 . L-ek, N 8 , '52, ' Twvfn 2, 1 4 WP .JV ,' I, i 4 .1 - 415- gl., QP 1 , -, .. -A , 1 - :Ji x V , . -.,. k A 1 1-5- ,,: , .H-fy, E , ' -Q! Lv.: ijfd qv ig-. -Z yi- -31. --3... gs: . w V K' 1.12: , 5' 3515- J' H N mf- A '-' Y A, , A '- ' " P, - :ffl L L K I i i , Q A4 H Y v f ff' Q . i x -' .L ' I 1 .C my Q K, . ' M ' , ,. W f 2- ' , 4, A ' :M .'if'1f'jn -311-5 1 .-.fnvsJ? -, , f 1 ,' l 1 i ,' '34 ' o 0 ,I J --W I-A 1 . '4 M is V 5 ' I 1 ff .7 X F' - Cfighf ' 4, :,': in V if . -I A, , -, 1, 'N f .ag 1 A, -'E ' 1 L I ,gg N -if , ' -.-. . -Q . , ig wfl. X L' Qtr, ,fwj ,w w f . km fy' ' 'A - K1 -225225 'Q 4. ' -n fi K , V Q x f I: I - .,,.J- , " P H 7 ' V5 Q ,AI IW? 1 Aa : . .. ""5T,,'h ,' , f A f- rv .sa ,U A I -A .MQ 4 - RFK. ' 97' 9' . .. w-Sf 7" 9 "1 g' G' fi " " - . , .1 1 lf 1 . ' x r " ., 4 , 'HJ Ty Q ' , N .4 5 . Q' , -9 ,-.Y , - -. , X, - ' A-' ' ' - ' 'L' ' "-w.- 1. 1 UH-., 4 4: ' V l 5 .-L , F N n y It, I -xx '.,.- Y W , f- V - A . - . "-- A 'V - w L- ' ' - I Q f J in ' . , -, if l Q' x , ,Q .,.L 1' ycggfifi,-'L-.,f-af, --- --- " ""' - ' V ., ------ ' - - Q4 , A f- , ' V . View "fu"'ii5, Q 'Q 1 , IX, ' Lf'f"'SP "'A7Q"l'?l? " . ' , , , f V1 4 V1 X , 'L 'Q - 4' . - ,. , . -' ""i- .af '-"fu ' ' ' , 4 'fm N' Q - -H. ,- in - fzfiieff' H Q? ' -ff ' .-:QF -1:1 5. ' J ag 1 'iii .. ' aff:-"ffl .-f , ffm: W T--"" - f -A 1 - -,, xy -1 , V, , Y iziiiiivgfliii f - ,- -V " "fx -Q' z. ' .3 1 b : ' - M-lag,--N - ,wr VM.:-.12 .M '- 1- -- ,- T" A , , ., - 4-' V X 1,1-, ' ,. f 3' I . 5 .:ZA.:- n.7F-1:15 -J ,:.,.. I. Y Y- , ' , ,H , ,V X r- t - V , ,. :i,3..f.:, A L1-R - W: .. ' "fha,-V -55,5 - -'fgf V ' px :Y '-'-'af I ' ani- . ., " gy 1" ' "1 " ' An-3-,L M 'Y x , i , 5' ww- -rffp-Y -'A 5-1 5.1. U Ay., f. 1 - v 1+-h . -- -. ,Q , iii Af. t'.11V4'Tf" ,f '5."'fT"f-g'v.,,'1f'- L- ' . ' A ' ' 1. ' NT . f",.. .f3ff,, 4' 2354-,' -fgiilffffff ' ' 'K ' j "M Q" " ' ful.-Qxgly. E' 2 4 ,g..'gg'j -"',. i' . ' -A 4. ' Nfl , ' ' ' ..,, 41 - . f.e,,,..wf . ---jg 7 A- .-gC,,v2"-Q fu . -f, . ,':i'1f.g,, 9. qui,-g 4,-,-, , , Yi , .... W- V: . H--5-A15 - .- . ,, ,, ,-:, -- ,,,?.,:t.,g,,-M,u .Q-A---'- , gg 141. ,Y Q , - iq., -- --'Af-L "" --' f ' ,.-' i' I , VH, .At - , .. K AV J ' 30 -. '- -x 'fs B w .. Ng. N - f if .J ' I , A' 4- . V .1 L- A: 7 . , .,,. . , 2 ,r ,Egg Y ,f J jr' ff 4 1 . if , V15 Er . E .- . . 2-,Q .. 'PM ' A n.. -Y5,.,11'.',: Q , I X . - . Ls A ,, 7-5 f. .r - .N Q ff , .a "W K, ,g ,fy - K.w:1q1 Qui- Q .. X U. A Winsl- r .It I c Q 1 e " E . , ' M, ,,. . fa- X z.,,'N K1-Qt-Q,"f 'f--n,nwP"' " . I Q, 45, li lt- 5 ,LF .V I. Y b - Seen? ,F H '. I 4 . A ' :f 4-w ' ...f ff- X ll p X - i H 5.1 v' ,ifgrii 4 ,. 78. 75' K, I N h 'lf r ' 4' ' ' Nfl ' f ii 0 .Q 1 Y x .S A .. . x 'W 1 as if ?xg,,. V I " I .H 3 Q 1-4218 1 5 u' ,T . l 'Y ' i 'J ' . , M. w , - L, 1 ' , l ,z5.M' ,J ' P.-,f-' ' f,-34 Jbl fwif X ' "Nw . . I lx mbazik X," Q' ifjgig IJ: sg' 4 Kr pm lk 'J' U . ' -IQ ' 30 5 ., l . I . A I Q X xl . '51 'X m E -N f-v 151 Q 4 - ' A . - xl H v 4' X if W i , I . V V in ' Ld ' ,A Q Q V .N If 4' I .e ws A ,, - 31 Q ,4 1145. 4 ' '... ,, e Q ,U H ii L Q K H 1' ' . -. , I M, f S , Y 1 ur e' 3 Q ' 'f' , f K- pi 3 T99 V1 V. 5 -A . P 3 a 4--A3 A . l 5 - .. Q ' ,f ,- gf .., , 1 si ,ff as . 4 'AQ s 1 J , ., 1 '13 ff - .,x.,.?.-Ease: .34 .0 --L Q .:. W, s. 1 v' -' F1 ls' ' 1? A small handwritten sign on a bulletin board in room 51 reads as follows: "The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." This wise saying forms a picture of a room where the distance between the walls are infinite and its undefined dimensions are equally far-reaching. It suggests a strong idea that no matter where you stand on the heights of success, there are always challenging goals at greater alti- tudes to be climbed and conquered. It well describes the positive attitude that the 1972-73 Arapahoe Soccer Team took with them from the beginning to the end of the Fall season that marked the best year in Arapahoe history for soccer. Under the leadership of Coach Omar Swarzendru ber the Warriors won in eleven games, lost in one, and tied in three others. This was an even better ratio of wins, losses, and ties than their already proud record of 9-6-0 set in the previous year. This year, their only loss was to Hinkley whom they eventually shared the Centennial League Championship with at the end of the season. Bob Boss broke an individual school record for the number of goals scored by a single player by scoring a total of eighteen in all of the games com- bined. Mike Holland, one of the team's goalies, was elected "Most Valuable PIayer". Jim Rippey, Greg Kempf, and Brian Roberts also did much to contribute to the team's success for this year. 21 :V-fi' . f, A- 2 , 1 1 .4 p-. r . rg l l l l l aff? 3 asv ,- , . . . f- 9 Q' .r , ' . 1 . V , 1 , M fig- . " .igh-'Of uw. vi-T ' ' 1 .44 Jr. -4' - 6: ' 1 . '- '.:vi I QA-, . Ji ,vw N -fr K il' occer Power Is Here To Stay . -,.1 H2 I H V, ,z ug.- Y . I 4' I. X his n -7 . 'L A-1 if-f' -' I- 1- V-5 i- ,M - -Q, 'S L5 F - .im ' - F 1 R A ' , A. Q, 1., il f The Lonely Breed It takes a special type of athlete to en dure the hard work and mental attitude that it takes to be a part of cross country. In no other sport do you feel so alone. Just you and the en- vironment. Why go through so much pain and agony when you know there won't be crowds of people to cheer you on when you run through the finish Chute? You endure all the fac- tors that are fighting against you be- cause when you're through running that two mile course, you have the sat- isfaction of knowing you have con- quered the weather, the course and your own fears. When you are finished, you know you are one. Not one of eleven or one of five. You are an in- dividual. .,.,ll.i,i,:Z.,:NrEv.:. . if.,.'t.:.-qf,v 2? " ' , J. - : -5-fig?-.liL"4f: . il -Q 4. "-' ll' a A-.- all -e f Tvvq -,,, gilt -a,U.,,,A g .- WJ .-4,5 ...M 1.- ,v,-. 'v-4f,v4 zijf .yj li. . 1' fy ii 'J .ll Tennis Spirit ond Pride: Second to None The Arapahoe tennis team has again revealed to all oppossers their high spirit and pride. With a team of great potential and ability they completed their season with an honorable 8-2-2 record. The feeling a player has before a match is unique. He has no one to rely on but himself, he must play to his maximum ability and then excede it. He must not let up and secede to his opponent. When asked what he felt about the team this year Coach Blanco had this to state, "This year's team was better than I had expected, and we will improve on our record next year.' Yes, records can always be improved, but their spirit and pride is second to none. 1.3 gxlilhi r se 5, TWG 1 f gif'-t t,.,.z'4 -s r 11: A N' W. fu w mr ., A .7 ?. . L W'-' - '4 h w f f"'1.. 1. --af 5 W ' 9, r K sz' an-ax.-i..,...,, v I 41.5 ifsi-i Qu v q-f-gif' .Q , f . 4 v t. ,, fxxxh .AF -in-1 .... .-- . H- .-.p..k..,, ,YW ., .,C?.,.M Q -41:1 rl .1 A..ri. ' x . F All-f , ia, , af' v Winfer The Earth 'shakes beneath theme and 'the heavens roar above: But nothing scares them from the course they love. A yi em we Q M ii , A no iffy" 'wififf 126 ' h ij. W 5 ge :FA LJ M . ay if gf WRESTLING Delta Arapahoe Wray Arapahoe Grand Junction Arapahoe Arvada Arapahoe Poudre Arapahoe Arvada West Arapahoe Littleton Arapahoe Aurora Hinkley Arapahoe Heritage Arapahoe Fairview Arapahoe Englewood Arapahoe Cherry Creek Arapahoe Aurora Central Arapahoe Boulder Arapahoe VARSITY BASKETBALL Greeley West Arapahoe Wheatridge Arapahoe Englewood Arapahoe Cherry Creek Arapahoe Aurora Central Arapahoe Boulder Arapahoe Littleton Arapahoe Aurora Hinkley Arapahoe Heritage Arapahoe Fairview Arapahoe Englewood Arapahoe Cherry Creek Arapahoe Aurora Central Arapahoe Boulder Arapahoe Littleton Arapahoe Aurora Hinkley Arapahoe Heritage Arapahoe Fairview Arapahoe HOCKEY Palmer Arapahoe St. Mary s Arapahoe Colo. Academy Arapahoe Littleton Arapahoe Heritage Arapahoe Cherry Creek Arapahoe Regis Arapahoe Littleton Arapahoe Regis Arapahoe Coronado Colo. Academy J.V. BASKETBALL Greeley West Arapahoe Wheatridge Arapahoe Englewood Arapahoe Cherry Creek Arapahoe Aurora Central Arapahoe Boulder Arapahoe Littleton Arapahoe Aurora Hinkley Arapahoe Heritage Arapahoe Fairview Arapahoe Englewood Arapahoe Cherry Creek Arapahoe Aurora Central Arapahoe Boulder Arapahoe Littleton Arapahoe Aurora Hinkley Arapahoe Heritage Arapahoe Fairview Arapahoe SOPHOMORE BASKETBALL Littleton Arapahoe Wheatridge Arapahoe Alameda Arapahoe Boulder Arapahoe Littleton Arapahoe Englewood Arapahoe Heritage Arapahoe Fairview Arapahoe Cherry Creek Arapahoe Heritage Arapahoe Aurora Hinkley Arapahoe 57 53 59 50 38 28 49 52 29 33 42 47 37 43 46 57 77 53 39 44 37 55 SWIMMING Broomfield Arapahoe Northglenn Arapahoe Harrison Arapahoe Aurora Central Arapahoe Eaton Arapahoe Poudre Arapahoe Cherry Creek IAI Arapahoe IAI Cherry Creek IBI Arapahoe IBI Englewood Arapahoe Arvada Arapahoe Boulder Arapahoe Littleton IAI Arapahoe IAI Littleton IBI Arapahoe IBI Fairview Arapahoe Arapahoe Invitational 4th Arvada West Arapahoe Heritage Arapahoe DPS Invitational 3rd Aurora Hinkley Arapahoe Mullen Arapahoe Palmer Arapahoe Air Academy Arapahoe Wasson Arapahoe Cheyenne Mnt. Arapahoe 45 50 40 59 37 58 20 74 39 56 37 58 55M 39M 23 72 31 64 25 68 37 58 44M 50M 14 80 42 53 33 62 32 63 48 47 36 59 30 65 44 51 45 50 42 53 l- JY!- A gh . NJ" x N VSJX ' x x., K, N5 v' .Q 5 . I .-5 f,'!5 m fr-a 'Q ,Q- O '- S arf! .,,,.5 . .ffl .xx -11. 1 W, , I I 1 1 fv i 's 1 ang' sl A 4 I ,, -.F 5 .N .3 - - 5 f f-Q A :.' :N V 'Aff'-o V . p 'L .1-x A X ff' fp ' , I - I. -Q '11 .V 4, ' . A A ', ' . , Q 74' , 4' M I 4 'D' I '-X ' x LX - 1 if, . ' mr' -Q ' - w1 -In xp 405 -It X W, 'V -r W A l 1 N-, Q X ,I 'ik gil , 1 'W' ,nf .mt 'T 51, rp' P' ar. ,554 64? I 1. .A 1 r-"' f ,,, ,,, - f' 1 -. A we 'F -I ' .ff Xi' 'L ,, 1 HNF 'gt Vx T- 5' 33' ,H '---:yifzIq ,i5' . bv' X , wg , 1 ' bfi., . 1 ,' - E. Lf W Lf .sf'f"N"f 9-'F 7 iff Xe " Q Ng ' F .f K s X. A ,, we Q i f "P A ' 4 ,, ' 6 'V i 'AU A .Q -Jw , A - ' 33 is .V mv I' W T Q ' fl f f gi 'liggfxsa ' " 9 ,ig X 'V I Q V I . X -L N- ff ef 4 ' f g Q .5 g Jr ei .s. r x I rw 9951? X ff.. ,- Sl 1 X' '1 v -?f "P . QSM- 1 x 'sax 'Z i.YNxf9:fAt .ar 9 .zgf M 'A wif" 4 '. A 1 EY? Q f If gf? nz, NYQQ M .,.. f x'Hffgi5 iL HJ? I 'fi E xif 'N -M I -559333 ,f f ,, f gh -, ' 1 V 3 - 1 ,V mg .yt xmi ,, 5 .4 5fN5:E fx ' Q ,ff-,V af ,-sf-fyw , E f 13, A . 4 ,, 152 "T N 72 1 --5 1, ,, Y, N 'im Tig' , ,. . ,W ,.,k .K .. . .....,l,. M, W 'W 4- . Wg E 5 29 , A . ,N ,K X, - 1 1 Xfzuxxxxx 3 ,af W X MQQ Mx X, fwwfaa . f 'Wi ,mm f . i a 0- 'n. aa .f"E"w" 5, R xo ' L 1 if 1'3" Q-"f"w"fH 1 I 6' oi' .fy 551 -:I KH 'fi U i'. wi ., A W Q-A44-1' ' , 1? k , , V E 1 v , . gf' 0 If al -' A ' , 7 O - 1, Out! ta it T3 V M u T.. .Q 'nv ' 'UIQ 'EK -A. ' llilf A jf 'LJ I. x .S -Q fr ll v -3, x :J I 5 an tx if rf ff I nf! L I' .J 1 F515 Qgtslvoqg 'Y f 3 fling, sizing each other up, the .stlers begin. One fakes, the other -ves, suddenly one is on top. He s to control and manipulate his op- -ient, he slips a little, his balance is ken, the man on the bottom pulls rversal and takes command. Using 'vis skill and strength the top man -ies his opponent flat on the mat tries to pin. No good. The bottom 1 is up on his knees and trying to 1d up. He is tripped and down on back, the top man goes for the pin and the reff's hand slaps the mat, he has the match. Arapahoe's wrestling team, with the leadership of Mr. Vern Skari, lVlr. Ray Greb and Mr. Pat Defoe had one of Arapahoe's finest seasons. The War- riors took first place in the League with 98 pts. and sent six men to state. Danny lVIallon, with a 14-0-3 record, took second place in the 132 lbs. class at the state meet. Ric Brill, with a 15-1-2 record captured fourth place in the 155 lbs. class. Warriors Grab First Place at League Championships A 135 4'-L w sw? gnaxnwvl .90 , C-ARE, N ' Inv if 54' fl-1' E x Iv ni I K 4 Q' 1 1' , 1 l o ,c ' - - 4 . K .. 1 . J 4.2 'ff 'i Y., , sh" I I s .I Arcipcihoe lcers Slice Through Compefifion The hockey player eagerly approaches the puck ready to slap it across the rink. The opposition stands in cautious anticipation of the first movement. ln an instant the quiet breaks and the action starts. Whether a participant or a spectator, hockey is one of the fastest growing sports. The cold climate and close facilities provoke a mood conducive to the sport itself. Skates and hockey sticks are mere im- plements as compared to the coaching and teamwork necessary to organizing an efficient team. With this year's 12-5 record, it is only evident that this sport will continue to grow. i -ez? few 555 5 ,, . 15 5' H QM' ' ff235i'f"j id- 'M Y I ms,- ilyi-i""' ,A ' 54, L I 5 5 5-. , ,E E3 3.5 .JJ,,, 4- ...Eg wt. 5+ - 5 5 Q ,K -1, , .WS 'Q 'J -1 lv f I, 1 f ,i ,S gif-ei r. 5 fi . K' Mrw' M H 555 555 325- Ng-'51 I M .311 5 m 5 :E 1 5 Y EW. 5 E V , 'E 55 5 '- 32 :.. 5 Y 4 j, - 5 5 , T ' 'V' gg 25 V ,455 S, ax - Z - , 555555555 hm 5 5: . My 'ft Q-5 V Q V A Y 51. ,,, ,ig -2 5? ' -Q, . lv I N 5, -QE? , , - ,E 5 A , .,,, :V : 5 51 J 5 . 5 nt- E 5 - Q ! 5 1 5 . 5 5 5 5 V : 55 5.'--A..-, 5 I 51 5+ 54, H 5 ' ' - 55,5 f' I 5 i 5 I5 IA ., 3 ' VHA 5 5- 51 , 15", - -v'.".45?.-if ! '- 51--a ,L-. " 5. "5 S412 5'55:5.' T. - 5 1:55551 -...if 5 5 ' - -.mia-4 Y gl-V ,- VW fig 5 :- 5 , i.:.vEl: 2 I f .1 Q- 5 1 iq. filffiri-3:2ff3,Xf..: H X 3 LQ X ' a X X X X..XX,EMgn55z:, UXWXXXXXXW XHXWXXWXX XX X " XX! X . XXXX X XXXX H XXHXX X qwafs ..-V , , I X X .K N X if ' Xweaieaiasziassiassiasi E55Hfifgfifififgfgigmm WWW, X , NJ".,I.I.:IN X XX X X ' X XXXXXX ' NN+"-'w'H-g- XX ' 'XX 1- ff 4:-. X: .X Lyixwmw-QM "'fl1'Wi2g I f' E XXXX ss 15 H XX Xgg . W. M ,E -1,353 pig S Eiwfflb X XX XX H H H m.,,.m,. h.,A W AAmW,,m ,A.,,A.. XX X XX X X zfwufx .fwm ff? XX XXXXXXXXXXXX5X2gEEEX53XXaw XX -.X X... X M .L gall? Q . T - .3-U? X ,XWXWX XX'XX -XJ .Eff X!'X' X X,XX,XXXXXXQ51 X X :-. WXX' AXX"XXX"X:?'XX"XX"WX" XX "XM 'HKXXXX X X X is-?S,? XX . wi X Minmifwxvfmmdf Wm . W X XFX H X" X XX1 !ffsXfXsX1X V X X X U iw, ' Em Siege? XXX X -Q .WEEE ' 25 53 Y , . X. XXXXXXXX -M ....m..s-.eazv-Q-2 XXX"XufXJ X XXX mg lel Us I fT f :?ihg.4 : X -1 5 .V .iQ3.: .. ?X,Xg 1X . QW XX -- mmm, .X f'.1.+:'..f-2:-gif'2 ...JL W-vXsXfXsXfXsXf 'XM ,T Jawa? M zsQ.:1:.,N..f.f-Lv: XXXQXQXM XX! A I XX XX I XXI X .. X 1f21ffw"'XX:f: XXX "XX"X"XX"XX" "XX" X AzzX2Es1X522XSsQfeszzsswfgfsizssgfff XX X 11 ?2i.J'q'g M1 HXX'.1XXHXX" X1lXXwXXHXXH if' XX "X XM? haf!! 'XX "X X" XX , A .... X.X.X.X,X.XX X Spirited Girls Show Their Pride Throughout the great span of history, athletic competition has been an exclusive activity performed only by the male. As early as the Greek civilization, an elite group of men participated in forms of athletic competition. These men were possessors of high esteem for their great aescetic devo- tion to their chosen activity. This attitude continued for many ages but eventually this exclusive club became en- dangered by a small group of women who also held a desire to compete in athletics. The world laughed and looked on in disbelief but nevertheless, these women continued to pursue their ambition. Q-., afm -1 . 'f?"'1"1 4. .J pa"-,. :r"43"'f4,"' ' 1- v v V J, I I, 7.771-Q 5. r"f 1 A-59, N! I . , W - ,X 1 , EA ' - 'hs , '- E' Y 1 .. 7 Q-L V- iff- ' fe ' p uns. "' ii 1 -.A - L14 -.f 5 - Y Pm lw2f""'f': '71 'L' ' I I 4 . I- l H., , . gag.- 9 H , -a14.:3.L 1 - My "" -1- Q-nf- L- ' Q T' bi, -nf-If , 1, I W as . . 1 -xisiih-inf' ia' 15, ' 1 , " --X " D - "Sal, 55. : - I - U 5, -, , - Lili' " if J A n V 'A ,WN wr X 1 ,-fT.- l g 1-7, A--M - '-- - --f-'SQ2' its ,f-L. -rx , "3 Aw if he Q.: ,W . DT. , J!!! za.: I -it , --w- 3'm?k'f: ' 'Y 2 lv D 'ag f Lu W 1 ffvwffz .wr wr.-144 , -- mf .fs -:uf 'V . 'if A , un- ' 1 grief -g,w ,fq "! .FA .fi' 14-5.-. xv-fy . 9 3? , Uxrli. . "2M J'Q5 .0 if? +- . -Z -,Q is' ea R ..f,., +006 ..... . .1g,..1 N., , Q ' f ':Kfzft a'm f '1n 2'-v1 .4 ,. 1 Q :-V S' ' 'mf same if 3 fl , Q Lew' . 5 ,Qian-.2 ,af'PXZf e1'o:o5 a5'Q?.gZg.Qe 'EEST-if'fK31sft:A1,gh:IQI3!4 Af' . v ' fy .:, V ' , ' 5-, wr .I':, 1 Aix.. f , 1 ' - ' :f'ESQ1f'-v6+,?Q31,a'vffz,f 'OF omni' 'F'3' --'igiyv A3'o'6fw1,.?5xc:-4:11.-., N, Q- M, Q g.f.w:v.+ig3.2:+:6, 1, rw-.ner Effaari?-F52 - ' .J +1304 ., ' ow- Pv+wQ'.,.-.A---'iq "wtf 'T fw9'?'-5g'z144.p 1--fr f -Z, 9-f9YQ Db, 6 afeeqv ,5 1.-fgtg " 2.Q+g+f53Ef0v34'..1 U !'- G7 'E' is 9513,.",.55:4lE.'3"J4if:?ll!.94"fL,"xfogfzieeiczga-30355 '52-1,---fe, 1,-J iff ' a -3 J -s ? ' - ' ' '.9Q1,Q1qie,g?'fi'fa'Jfe5'x?ll f,.-Q, ' 1 M.,t,,9N- W, 42-+r-sf-ow, 'f if fa: . sv .Fsayfsis ' "-'lfviffa' ?a7'fQ'E5'7J - f L V xx X " A 'x . N ' 1 H ' T y '. 1 wk' 54- is, W -Q r - ' - Q w V 'f H 1 ff 9 1,1 1 es ..- -J I . ' .. 1 V! YA I sim ' ,4 J ' L ' :nf I 1 Lvl . gf- . , ,v.J5... 1 , M, -5 -FL " :ix :i'vi?25' 1 L, 'I ,gnil w gi. ,I-42+-', 1 in ' fi rv 'e 1 1 - -4 1 ui-A 4, , ,V-.L-.eh Q4 ., :gw.,.bf' g S rf "zu T .., -M f f Nm fs", I x fb f ,, M I ,.' . --,,,. ., fj X, V, B 1,1 qnvhrm- e4"" V' ff X f. 3. gba 1 1 . ,Af SA! R D f 'U ., W A HL 4 1 f QQ, gf fl 6 ,cl . gy. . Ly.- L, i.. QA .a 1-3 ,. -.-x kt? 3 Tr X N z 3 n s , 2 .fx , 352 ef .fa , 'ii '-Qin, I ...H -1 E -H x F- N. 6 'M -in Cheers Encourage Worrior Victory Attempting to capture school spirit and confidence into a winning school is their exclusive purpose. Undying spirit and determination characterize the warrior cheerleaders. This year, sponsored by lVlrs. Donna Peck, the 1972-73 cheerleaders have fulfilled their purpose in attaining the highest level of spirit and success possible at Arapahoe. Cheering isn't all they did. These girls spent countless hours practicing. They planned pep assemblies and took an active part in homecoming activities. Needless to mention the way they spoiled the athletes. Putting candy in their lockers which they colorfully decorated with spirit boosters. And in some instances they smothered the athletes with love and devotion. A group bursting with spirit. reef 2 my l l . . . l l F M 1 5, , ,K 'ff' fggigi "7 5 1 3712 - .A Student Body Lifted By Half-time Entertainers The abllity to make a good perfor- mance demands full concentration of each step in coordination with the music and cooperation of each girl to perform the step in unison with those of her team. Three hours of daily practice prepares the girls for per- formances at games and pep rallys. each week. Sponsor for the flag twirlers is Mrs, Kathy Benoit and the Tom-Tom 's sponsor is Miss Julie Brown. Team members who served as heads and directed the flag twirlers and Tom-Toms were Tinny Durdy and Danae Brownell respectfully. '51,-,:f is 5, mm. Mi' -' ,.i,....--.-ew ' N -fd . ',, it .wwf ' ' - L 11"s.vH' ' , , H1 W 1 51311111-11s11W, 1 1 51 -.Q ,.. Q , gijwur N 11 ii: H V Y 'Y 11"' W 11N W "21eef'V' ' ww Z -mis , E.. ,ufffk -7' -L 55355111 . 1'-2-1 .. 1 5fQ21'K2?2f'l'qq?i5f E 1'Ei1i2S1 1 '1 " '11i131g1i11m:?11f'1' " 1 1.152121 ' '1'!!3w51"55?E5QE?SfE ' h 43 W M?Q'!,?H5'5f"1?lL5T?iiLq ' 127- 2 -K: 1 531255 L: img gem Fi! , . jiZ552SIGzii15i?? !"':?5i?W?3E 1,ii3iSiZ?1 -1 1 1 1' EAL 11 L32 35 'V' 'El9Q?1fffff'! 11 M ' 5? - H' Vsfiwr 1 grae? nafsslfss: Us 3 ' 1 A '1 - ,11'211f11,,,'1111g,,1 1W H yyfl fk S We H T ,Q , ,QM4 1 '!ffl'l155l33?1 1 1 1' 1 1 M1 if 252' gk W M ,Sa is a Aja' E1 3 11" J 1 N TQ N X1 1- N 1 1" 1 1- 1f1aqQ11F JR X' fl 11x1a1fE 21551221 1: 11 111 1 X Wm 11 1 " 1 5 , K ,L "Either Qttempt It not ,g9r succeed."- x ,,.. ' w 1 MS, igz 1 1 112551 1 tif' as W: - ww 1 Q 33 ' 555121. l'1 wa. E 55 'EM ' .:: za: M ' M 1 11,11 ,222 ., MYW1 - 1 1 11111 h 1 m5S3?n1M f E ' gags: 1 if E Q W ' 11 1 33 . 11 :a3:w111111111.g 1 1 ,11 B iiffi5l:""'A"'l ' EfaaiQi22fa2121Q1i2w1i1 1 H1 5 '11 " H6213 423 W 'f ' "'1' - ' J 1 U' E '1 fir? ' 11 1 . H 1" 11s1A111 11 eff " '1 1:1 P- 1 ah. S-ww-32:2 1 ' EQ? 5 V. '15 122: W J A . ,,. ?,i,,, N si? N55:g1,g wiv-5:5123-..1 ya Q., "53555Ef"' 4 , 'A , 1 1' Av 155 'W ' , b5',Z1m 5555" am. , ,gig 11 x If 3:11 izlv -111-11 1 1 - 5 ' t 1 Avy: " L11 11 ifl, f fzvlv 1, H11 W 1 11 1111-1221, 1131313515151 1 ,E 1111 . mi , '4 'i?iZfjii553l?' ' W iSrfffl5'Hf5iLW'1 ll MV W ' ifivmvirrff H .iifliiflii Fi X :::Q55fQ:- :S mx mmffsz . ,V .. J g xhg M 1 57 .,.... u fu , 951.1 ' I"'HIQ1?Qf4Z3?1,2I III' I' 1I,?'5, .M ,I I I VARSITY GOLF STATISTICS Arapahoe 206 l'1l':gL'i1Voe TRACK STATISTICS A RSITY BASEBALL STATISTICS Arapahoe 56 Lincoln 392 apahoe 4 Chemgcreek 225 Lakewood 74 irview 5 Qrfap? oe 2 6 Arapahoe 69 apahoe 3 Ea'r:"eW d Longmont 682 glewood 4 Ang emma 221 Englewood 332 apahoe 3 Rrapa oe 194 Arapahoe tleton 9 Aanufm' E 209 A Wesson CANCELLED apahoe lDouble Headerl 1 11 E'a'i'a 0 d 239 I Widefield rora Central 2 1 Czgriwgieek 219 Pikes Peak Relays 4th apahoe 4 Ara aloe 229 Arapahoe 109 irview 3 Arapahoe 218 Mullen 67 apahoe lDouble Headerl 12 9 H,nEIe 235 ll Fairview 66 erry Creek 8 0 Lan mint 212 I If Arapahoe 832 apahoe 4 Ara gahoe 217 I " Aurora Hinkley 522 Tglewood 10 Hinge 198 Arapahoe 96 apahoe lDouble Headerl 3 7 Ara ahyoe 202 Aurora Central 40 ulder 0 2 Aurzra Central 219 Aurora Relays 14th apahoe 5 Chen Creek 404 League Relays 2nd ttleton 2 Fairvizw 405 Arapahoe 452 apahoe lDouble Headerl 2 9 Boulder 434 I Arvada West 592 rora Hinkley 4 6 Arapahoe 439 Lakewood 65 Littleton 205 CSU Invitational 2nd Chen, Creek 211 F Centenial League 3rd Arapaioe 236 Sophomore League 1st State 10th 4th place finish in District 5th place finish in League SOPHOMORE BASEBALL JUNIOR VARSITY STATISTICS , BASEBALL STATS. It 5 2:IfI.2iIa2S rapahoe lDouble HeaderI 6 2 ' lgncor 25 , ra a oe e.er anum t 0 4 Chegry Creek 3 ' Arapahoe 104 ' rapahoe Double Headerl 8 8 Littleton 93 reeley Central 14 1 grapzhoek CANCELLED I rapahoe 9 Aigaggj 5 2 j Arapahoe 86 awww 8 I Littleton 9 I Bomder 111 1 rapahoe 11 Arapahoe 1 ' 5355 nglewood 3 Englewood 4 if l": Arapahoe 90 A rapahoe 10 Arapahoe 13 Faifview 100 mleton 20 Aurora Hinkley 9 I . rapahoe lDouble Headerl 7 3 Arapahoe 0 Arapahoe 91 ' urora Central 4 3 ":l' QQ Cherry Creek 6 Palmer 77 I rfap?hoe 7 Arapahoe 14 I 3Il'Vl9W 5 Englewood 3 M Arapahoe 98 I rapahoe lDouble Headerl 5 16 'Arapahoe CANCELLED 5, Hinkley 124 heffv creek 4 2 Bear Creek 2, I rapahoe 6 Arapahoe CANCELLED "iI Arapahoe 107 nalevvovd 4 Littleton .1 57? Central 165 rapahoe 7 Arapahoe 1 Powder 5 Aurora Hinkley 6 Arapahoe 119 5If3D3h09 5 Arapahoe 5 Cherry Creek 151 -lt1ZIet0f1 O I-if Littleton 2 f 4552, Arapahoe CANCELLED 'ii"i 5 "Il:' Ara ahoe 6 League 7th Aurora Hinkley Litgeton 5 Soph. Tourn. CANCELLED 4 I m::w,,..' -- ,., ff , ,,,'::tI5I3I3Iieei7iqr III' , at X 1, 5 fl A,-LI :JA A I I l ev,,z I ,MLW emit Q X . . 'Le HI-Zigi in 3- V, I, I' . , 4 flags. Y ,fd ,.. 1 V V-4 -JE-f 'gg 'Y 4 A ' - ,CWM 'i ,Q , , "'??5'J 23534 ,wi mv' 1. go-1 ,, . , 1- A .- 's Q I. . :ML .si ,,. an I mi? f ,v 25-,,,yg..:" ' 4 M- - 4 1 , D Q 3 - ,A -. .1 a ,.,, .- -f, V . .15-.. J, ,A . iQ-gl., - 1 , .f .f .... N - .9- -'ilu ,, - !-'H' '-tr -, . Q- A .Q , f, f ,- W- + .Q --" 4 ,..,. . .A . ,, - . " gp 5,,..,- -1- "' . 1 P - x , 'Arg -vp I qi- N- '- x, 4 '. - ' 3- -, , . A A - "' V 1 ,o-. - ' ' ,, -' . 1' f' . f T '- ,va ' . b 1 f u'vp 5 ,Ya-V . N mi V y:-,J ' in ,. . 4, I . 'G Q i Q V .. - Y ,. 'Bran--a,g-.U-1w-.,.., , , .-. .. 9, .. , f , '---5 ,, fy 2, - , . ' V ,A --, 150 Bosebcillers Score Batter up! That is the cry that typified the Warrior's baseball season. Records in Batting l.458l, Most Hits i22l, Nlost RBI i28l, Home Runs i3l, doubles i5l, and Extra Base Hits l10l were set by MVP Ron Selbo, with sophomore Rob- in Carlson setting the school record for most walks i15l. The power of the bat propelled the varsity to a 6-4 record and a fourth spot in the Centennial League. Fifteen players lettered and only seven lettermen graduated, leav- ing some hope for the future. Arapa- hoe's pitching, though not as strong as the offensive batting attack, was respectable and was a key in some wins, improving as the season went along. Generally, good defense was also a factor working in the Warrior's favor. ."k ...,..- ..p......... .. . .. - if ,,..H--, -Q,-..E,,, K., . . E1 -- Y i - 4, . 7:1 1: ' .' . , - Q ,, " 'Mimi'-'-' "Ia-11-if . -- ' "4l2"'D,-fgTa,.1Q"- "1 , v.. , M l F . "Q xii R Q.. ff N' 3 H W' ' Q " F Q ' Q L' T' ,-.1:w------ u 3 ,,.r ....--.-l..-.......-... -.M . , ,, --.-. -fm., V, ,T1...1 , f,---- --. -- -V 1 X a E 1 i J C Q 1 - a xx lJjpV."'i.I? P' if i 'v ,L i X f sv. .5-D. J 'Q-T. .-,,. A gp. damn:-eleugle -Q-. 321, ,, 1 55,13 gpm , , 1 . o . , . "' s una was Ili! 'lf n nous on ,,. 4 unison: Ula ...wwe ununstoc non .ggpgsvu nuovuloiu nvsounosus n o -qwiaeyfew :no s 0 myffrggmw sssauoosaassn .,.,gg,9gAiQnsis D III' 1 IO ill ltllill O unesnlscooonn DIDIIIIOIOOIO IOICQQDOIIOOU OCIOIOOCUOIOO lvIlIIlll'lQllI nausumonsanun hlolaliboioli pocclotdnbyi hiss into coli lass!! dooiq ll lineto ironed 1100016 iosoeuocoail uclunouli-lil lilitilllflill IU fiinlnrnthoanlttp lgpuu :M Q Q 'fa G 1 I-I SIIG!! 1 0 iibitilll un "m"'u!2n'O llii .0 H H H H, T ..ll T I g::: 19 1 A '.. 5 0141 to i! ifclo .iQ.lQlQ if ' gum 1 . -- 5- im,.pg,. H H N v A X . re so than other sports, Gymnastics es a responsibility and importance he individual. The gymnast strug- to conquor himself. Through rip- hands, pulled muscles, and unde- d courage the routine is composed. routine demands the gymnast con- tly overcome fears, try new tricks, find the moves no one else has and ect those moves. A man trying to noshcs . . . Individual Competition make something of Gymnastics finds there is no point at which he is com- pletely satisfied. He knows falling off the rings on his head only means he must fall off again. Each individual knows he will never finally defeat him- self. But it is this element of trying to reach a point one knows is beyond his grasp that makes gymnastics fantastic. ..f1f,Q,. L l , . . . A. ti Sill' . f .l hidM..f 'JL4E-m V -U Lg Men like Buddy Cook, Steve Frohart, Greg Berdette, Jim Truitt, Bob Casper, and many others surprised and pleased many spectators. These Gymnasts per- fected double back dismounts from the still rings and back and front toss flips in their routines this season. This quality is rare but fortunate to be found at Arapahoe. 153 Golf Teom Putfs It All Together The golfer approaches the tee. He adjusts his grip and studies the fareway in preparing for his swing. He cocks his arm and takes his swing . . .and MISSES! Now with his practice swing out of the way, he's ready for the real shot. Last year's fourth place finish was only enough to provide incentive for their season this year. The 1973 season will greet returning juniors Kent Moore, Mike Ballantine and Joe Bunton and seniors Paul Danni, Jim Allen and Rob Thomas. Others included on the 1973 Floster are Tucker IVluhrer and Steve Benshoof. The varsity team finished the season with a six and twelve record placing fourth in the District tournament. 2 Lx. 1 lg.,--. " , ' 4, f 1-fix. . ,Y ' NE.I"' .f ' :Q ' 1. . ...u,.W, , ,ga '. my M1 wwf. fn Yiliifiiiiiefgfi' 'Y-51' X ul. X Q ,N'ff"' i X 0 1 + Z'-Y-" A ' 1 ACUUQ 1 gfcs w 1 v . Q V i yi w " - 1 fcf- may .- S Ja 1, , K 'I -- 1" 1 'S' F' . 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V rig: vu. qu, . :fi ' ' Z . 1: ,L Af my. 2 2 'J V 3 I -K.-1'-4-4 ' 'A ., .Q.,...c-.f Q .-,.. - '- ..--.- Track Teom Proves Worthy The 1972 Arapahoe Track Team proved once again to be top quality among the Arapahoe competitors. Through hours of repetitious training the Tracksters gain the endurance and skill needed for competition, During the 1972 spring season, the Arapahoe Track Team experienced 11 eventful weeks of success and frustra- tion. The warriors finished first in the Centennial league meet with 40M points. The sophomores went on to sweep the league sophomore champi- onship meet. During the season, three state records were set: Art Burns in the Discus with a throw of a 183 feet 8M inchesp Bob Simpson with a throw 59 feet 12 inches in the Shot Put: and Eric Thomas with a jump of 6 feet 11 inches in the High Jump. Faces Unfamiliar faces, crowded halls filled with laughter, and of lockers containing books that soon will be put to use tap on the shoulder and a warm smile saying friendship the ball rolling. It takes off bumping into many obstacle causing a chain reaction. Suddenly, what was once a roc full of strangers transforms itself into a room full of frie As time passes, friendship extends itself outside the clas: room. Meeting in the lunch line or at football games, pei get used to people. Relations grow and get strong. Some close and others are just a friendly hello at a quick glanc Suddenly the end is near. Graduation claims the seniors. years have quickly passed leaving good memories and sh ded tears for their ending. Some friends will endure and in touch for many years to come, although new acquain ances will cross future paths. n I + 4 l E s ' Pla 'Nall I ll Qi I Q O 'l!l I l . ll I . p, X 1 ll, la V N3 ltr Seniors Top men on the totem-pole down on the innocent bennie-covered sopho- mores remembering their own initia- tion. As clear as yesterday, it remains in their minds although it is a trial of memories behind them. Playing the role and filling the shoes of last year's seniors left behind. The last year envelopes the senior, slowly it passes until his school years are only memories. Time is moving quickly. You look back and ramen ber. You see yourself in the past, ahead there is a new life. Now as you finish school an un- familiar, unplanned world awaits y lt is unique, exciting and full. The world you find is overwhelming an strange. All you need now is a dire tion, a beginning. Focus on an int and succeed, be all you possibly c prepare now. l l Seniors or Class Officers: I - r, Chellie Campbell, rep-at-large: Dave Houck, rep-at-large: Chris Schanker, rep-at-large, Dan Jewell, Vice-President, Janet in, Secretary: Kitty Dreher, Treasurer, not pictured: Tom Jackson, President: Dave Bauer, rep-at-large. SENIORS-Adams To Boll Yfb -7-1513, -f " f KAREN ANDERSON-Calumet 21SWaSh- ta 3. REBECCA ANDERSON PAT ANGELL-GAA 15 Pre-Med Club 1,2, Pres 35 Forensics Sec 3. MARY ANN ANTHONY-Campus Life 1,2, 35 Homecoming Comm 25 "God believes in you, therefore you can believe in yourself. We loved because He first loved us." MARC ARMENT PHYLLIS ASDELL JACK BACKMAN BILL BAILEY-Football 1, Letter 2,3. CAMILLE BAKER-Campus Life 1. MARIAN BAKER BARBARA BALL BEVERLY BALL-Transferred from Swa- nee Mission West H. S., Kansas 15 Girls Swim Team 15Spanish Club 25 FBLA 35 DECA 3. GRETCHEN ADAMS-Transfer from Princeton, N. J.5 Hockey 15 Choralettes SAC Chrm 35 Student Council 1, Public Chrm 35 Dry Creek Clarion 35 Western come Pageant 25 Citizens for Colo. Futu 35 THE LOTTERY, OUR TOWN, THE BAT, DARK OF THE MOON, GYPSY,- and crew 1,2,3. MARK ADAMS TOM ALBE STEVE ALBERG-Tennis1,2,35Baseba 25 Key Club 1,2, Dance Comm. 2,35 Disk trict Key Club Delegate 25 Graduation P 25 Prom Comm. 25 Homecoming Comm, Concert Choir 2,35 Madrigals 3. GEOFFREY ALBRECHT MARY ALLDREDGE JAMES ALLEN SHERYL ALMER CAROL ALTES-"Just outside my wisoJI are words that would answer everything CHERYL AMIDON-"Thoughts by you others may be thoughts of you by them. DAVID ANDERSON JAMES ANDERSON l 1 l RRY BALLANTYNE iGELA BARKER BBIE BARTON-lnter Faith Task Force ',3. IZABETH BARTON IANE BAUCOM VE BAUER-Stayed out after football et kicked in the head by Paul Duke 13 rmural Basketball 3. uFlRY BAUNIAN-Swimming 1,25 Base- l 1,2. CHARD BEETS VID BELL SAN BENDER-Pep Club 1,2,3g Mat id 25 Spanish Club 27 Tom-Tom alt. 3. BENNETT-Pep Club 1,2,3g Student ncil 1,2,3p Flagtwirler 2,31 Marching d 17 Concert Band 1.2: Symphonic 3' Prom Chrm 23 Prom Attendant 23 League Honor Band 33 GYPSY, AND DOLLS, pit orchestra 2,3. BENSON If SENIORS-Bollcmtyne lo Brounworlh 'gif PATTY BENSON-Earth Club 1,2, Sec- Treas 35 Human Relations Club 15 Student Council 21 Campus Life 35 Concert Choir 3. JAY BERESFORD THOMAS BERG KAREN BESON CORY BEST JOHN BESTA KIP BISHOP SHAROLYN BLOSS CONNIE BOUCHARD KEVIN BRACKNEY DONNA BRASSFIELD DONALD BRAUNWARTH 164 SENIORS-Brozeol Io Carroll ANN BRAZEAL ERIK BREKKE-Concert Choir 1,2,35 Swim Team 1,2,35 Water Polo 1,2,35 Madri- gals 3. PATRICIA BREWER JAY BREYER RICHARD BRILL DEBBIE BRINKMAN-Transferred from Dallas, Texas 15 Choir 15 Pep Club 15 Stu- dent Council 1,2,35 FBLA 3. "Love is flow- er-like5 Friendship is a sheltering tree." BESS BRONSTEIN-Student Council 1, Class Treas 2, Treas 35 Calumet 2,35 Youth Advisory Council 35 "l admit that being hu- man I often fail to live u to m own hilos- D Y D ophy, but I keep trying nevertheless." DIANE BROWN JIM BRYAN-Basketball 1,2,35 Baseball 1,2,3. PETER BUFFINGTON MARY BUMGARNER STE VE BUR KHO LDE R-Transferred from Texas 15 Concert Choir 1,2,35 Track 1,2,35 Football 1,25 Madrigals 35 Key Club 35 FCA 35 THE LARK, GUYS AND DOLLS cast 3. A V If 5, 1. , V J .ff i P 'iw' L 1' Y ' K . W . L. . DENISE BURTON-Choralettes 1,2,35 Pe Club 1, Tom-Toms 2,3. WILLIAM BUSH VINCE BUSMIRE CAROLYN CALDWELL SUSAN CALHOUN-Pep Club 1,2,3: Ea Club 25 Student Council 2,35 Human Rel tions Club 15 Human Relations Comm 25 Youth in Govt. 35 Cheerleader 3. MICHELLE CAMPBELL-Pep Club 1,2, Matmaid 3: TOAD OF TOAD HALL cre 15Student Council 2, Rep-at-large 35 Prog Co-chrm 25 Homecoming Co-chrm 2. JEFFREY CAPEN RICHARD CARBONE-Swimming1,lettl 2,35 Water Polo 1,2,35 Concert Band 15 Marching Band 1,2,35 Symphonic Band 2, Student Council 1,2,35 Homecoming Roy gy 1,2, King 35 Key Club 2,35 Prom Royal VANCE CARLSON ALAN CARROLL DONALD CARROLL MICHAEL CARROLL-Student Council Art Club 25 Spanish Club 251st place in AHS Art Show 25 Homecoming Talent Show 35 GUYS AND DOLLS crew 3. 1. lk if lf F , 5, . '3 -xTHY CLARKE INGSTON CLARK L CLARK-Track letter 1,2,35 Basket- I 15 lntramural Basketball 2,35 Football ter 2,3. DA CLAUSEN-Choralettes 2,35 GUYS D DOLLS crew 3. UREL CLOUSE SAN COLE L COLLEARY-It seems like a long e now since I walked through the front rs of Arapahoe, and thank God now I'm king out. Aufwiderse'n! ISTI CONE-Junior Acheivement 15 Cal- et 25 Deca 3. "And when it all comes n, I hope it doesn't land on you." AN A. COOLEY-Pep Club 1,25 Hi ns 1,25 Forensics 1,25 Concert Band 1,25 rching Band Twirler 1, Majorette 25 l's State 25 Transferred to Arapahoe 3. AN COOIVIBS E COON-Cadet Band 1,25 Marching d 1,2,35 Pep Band 1,2,35 Symphonic d 3. In the words of Julius Caesar, ni, Vidi, Vicil" ll came, l saw, I con- redl AR LES COOPE R :. QKJEL -A 5 5 SENIORS-Carter lo Cooper CHERIE CARTER GREGORY CARUTHERS BOB CASPER-Football 1,2, Letter 35 Wrestling 1,25 Gymnastics Letter 1,2,35 Or- chestra 1,2,3. MELINDA CHANIBERLIN MIKE CHANIBERS-Radio Club 35 "Can education be taught at school?" CORINNA CHAPIVIAN-Swimming1,2,35 Timer 1, Co-head 2,35 Spanish Club Pres 25 FBLA 3. JILL CHILDRESS MARY CHRISTAKE STAN CHRISTOPHERSON-Swimming 15 Water Polo 15 Co-capt of Nlarc Arment Hall Hockey Team 1,2,3. BRAD CIELINSKI-Cadet Band 15 Concert Band 25 Karate 2,35 Intramural Basketball 3. 'BRENT CIELINSKI BARBARA CLARE-Pre-Med Club 3. SENIORS-Cooper lo Dempster RONDI COOPER-Student Council 1, Re at-large 2,35 Homecoming Comm 15 Pep Club 15 Cheerleader 25 Dance Chrm 25 Po derpuff Basketball 2,35 Swim Team 35 Ka pa Phi Omega Sorority 3. DONA LD COPE SHEILA COPE-Tom-Toms 2,35 Choral- ettes 2,3. RICK CORBIN-Football15"l have noth to say that's in good taste, or that tastes good." DAN CORBITT-Basketball 1,25 lntramu Basketball 3. DONALD COX JENNIFER COX TENA CRABBE-Student Council Rep-at- large 15 Cheerleader 2. DEXTER CRAIG LAURIE CRAIG PAIGE CRANDALL CHARLENE CROLEY KAREN CROWE CHRISTOPHER CURRIE ROBERT CYPERS ROSENIARY CYPE RS TE RESA DACIEK-Concert Band 15 March- ing Band 1,25 Symphonic Band 2,35 Swim- ming 1,2,35 Junior Achievement 15 Honor- able mention in MIYWW 25 Centennial Honor League Band 2,35 Cheerleader 3. MARK DAIVION PAUL DANNI WADE DAR ROW CELIA DAVIES GLEN DAVIS GREGORY DEANE DEBORAH DEMPSTER ! SENIORS-Deulh to Elleston RA DEUTH-Swashta 25 Editor of Misc LIRENCE DEVRIES HAEL DlNlCOLA IISE DOCKAL RON DONALD G LAS DONATO DOTY DOWE LL . DREHER Y DREHER-Pep Club 1,35 Student cil 1,25 Treas 35 Co-chrm. x-mas party torer 25 Tom-Tom 3. ACL DUFFALA -l DUNN ii ii il l I lU , ,.nggg..gg I, V . 1 l Ie if 4 f w JUDITH DUNN TINNY DURDY-Pep Club 15 Flagtwirler 2, Head-Flag 35 Feb. Key Club Sweetheart 35 Homecoming Chrm. 3. RANDALL DZAMAN TIMOTHY ECCLES V SUE ECKE RT-Pep Club 1, Cheerleader 2, Co-head5 Student council 1,2,35 Home- coming Co-Chrm 35 Homecoming attendant 1,2, princess 35 Timer 15 Pacemaker 25 Chrm Homecoming 8: Prom 25 Key Club Sweet- heart 8: Student of the month 3. STEPHEN EDMISTEN MARCINE EDWARDS CONNIE EGGERT E W JAMES EIDE DARRYL EINSPAHR BRUCE ELKINS KRISTINE ELLESTON SENIORS-England To Folker I fl., Y 1 . " 9335,-il l. 5 S. " 5 :" fi""' I 'lu' ,Y , I. ' gift' ' l J-'22 I I I 35 ,1 , ' ' rfb 3 I ll Y- air DARLENE ENG LAND-Pep Club 15 Deca LINDI EVE RSON WILLIAM EXNER-Football 15 Intramural basketball 1,2,3g Baseball 1,2,3. PHILIP FALLT NANCY FEASTER LAFIISSA FEDEC POLLY FENNER NIARK FERGUSON CYNTHIA FERRELL LINDA FITZPATRICK-"He taught me not to be concerned with destinations, with get- ting there, but to stop and look at the treasures along the road. FIOLINA FLATER RICKY FOLKER HRYN FOOTE LENE FOSTER IS FOX-VISIT TO A SMALL PLAN- crew 15 RUMPELSTILTSKIN crew 25 WAS ON LY A FARNlER'S DAUGH- crew 25 THE BAT cast 25 GYPSY e mang 25 DARK OF THE MOON crew HE LARK Cast 35 GUYS AND DOLLS 35 Concert Choir 3. CY FRASZ-Transferred 25 Mimes 35 Iections on waking for school: "l rise bed the first thing in the morning not use I am dissatisfied with it, but be- e I can not carry it with me during the NNE FRAZER 'IA FRENCH RINE FRISBY FRITSCHE FROHARDT-Football 1,2,3, 1,2, Capt 35 Track 2,35 Student 2,35 Student of the Month 25 Attendant 2, Prince 35 Out- of the Year Prom Royalty 2, Key Club 2,3, FCA 3. FROHARDT FULKERSON-Pep Coub 1 J GYP- 25 Student Council 35 Youth in :PUNCH AND JUDY usher 3. FULLENWIDER Bi SENIORS-Foote to Gillis ,,v ll KAREN FUGUA-Library Ass't Award 25 Art Club 35 THE LARK crew 3. GORDON GARB-Bridge Club Pres 35 French Club 35 Forensics Team 35 National Merit Semifinalist 35 Who's Who in Ameri- can High Schools 35 Youth in Gov't 3. SUSAN GARVER CAROL GEAR-Student Council 1,2,35 Pep Club Historian 1, V-Pres 2, Matmaid 25 Cheerleader 35 Kappa Phi Omega Sorority 1, 2,35 Prom Chrm 25 Prom Attendant 2, Dec. Optomist 35 Christmas Party Chrm 35 IFTF Board of Directors 3. ni HOLLY GEE CHRIS GEIVETT DEBRA GEORGE MARIAN GERLICH GLENN GIBBONS BRUCE GILLESPIE SCOTT GILLIOM . STEVEN GILLIS 5 5.51, f 5 SENIORS-Glenn 'ro Hardin JIM GLENN-"Looking for bigger and bet- ter things." BEVERLY GLIDEWE LL AMY G LOVER-Pep Club 15 Cheerleader 2,35 Historian 3 COLLEEN GOGARTY-"To be someone to be yourself." JAMES GOGG IN FLORENCE GOOD-"Let me live in a house by the side of the road and be a friend to man." CELIA GOODSON REBECCA GRABLE MARK GRANGER-Bought a 1968 red Camaro with white top 25 Cheese Club 25 Amalgamated meat cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America 25 Hot Dogger and ski bum of Vail 2. DOUGLAS GRAY ROBERT GREEN CHARLENE GREER JOHN GRIFFENDORF BARBARA GUNTHER-Pep Club Major ette 1,2,35 Marching Band 1,2,35 Cadet Band 1,25 Pep Band 1,25 Tennis Team 3. MARK GUZ CHRISTINE HAGEN-Kappa Phi Omega sorority 1,2,3. SCOTT HAJICEK SUZANNE HALE-Pep Club 15 OKLAHI MA crew 15 GYPSY crew 25 Choralettes ' 35 Prom Committee 2. STEPHANIE HALEY-l'm an avid believ that school is fine for obtaining basic kng ledge, but the experience in dealing in re live situations that a iob offers is equally important. LEE ANN HALLOWELL MARGARET HAMLIN-Pep Club 15 Stu dent Council Rep 25 FBLA 3. 5 BETTY HANSON I DEBRA HANSON-FBLA sales manager JULIE HARDIN-Earth Club 1, Sec-Trea l Pres 35 Student Council 25 Chess Club 2,3 "Don't take life seriously-it'II laugh at yn anyway." LD HE R RING -Transferred from a 35 Pre-Med Club 35 Football Letter Ckey 3. E HEWETT IVIAS HEYWOOD-Drama 1: Choir 1,25 hastics 1,2,35 Diving 1,2,35 Annual 25 Sferred from Westminster 2, Grew my ong, met alot of people 25 Calumet 35 B jock haircut 3. MOND HILD HERINE HILL ,NIE HILTON HODGKIN JEN HOFFBAUER HIE HOLLAND-Calumet 2,35 Little- outh Advisory Council 2,35 Kappa Phi a sorority 2,35 "Every individual has a to fill in the world, and is important e respect, whether he choses to be so t." ESAEL HOLLAND-Soccer 1,2,35 Gym- 1 RY HOLLENBECK I HOLIVIAN-GAA 15Swimming1,2,35 lClub15Pre-lVled Club 25 Earth Club 35 r 3 SENIORS-Harp fo Holmcm LINDA HA RP-Pep Club 15 Cheerleader 25 Student Council Rep 1. JERI HARRIS KYRAN HARRIS DEBBY HARRISON-Pep Club 15 Pre-Med Club 25 Annual 2,35 "May good fortune look upon us all." JAMES HATFIELD-Zhsi granga besnukle dujnda et cerufa pango perusch kal Kroika- szhift hugar frugishtati. TERRY HAUSCHULZ-Swimming 1, Let- ter 2, Capt 35 Gymnastics 1, Letter 2,35 Cadet Band 15 Marching Band 1,25 Concert Band 25 Symphonic Band 3, JAY HAWKINS WALTER HAYS-Football 1, Letter 2,35 Wrestling 1, Letter 25 Track 1, Letter 2. JEANNE HEDRICK-FBLA 3. MARY HEISER SHARON HENDERSON-Calumet 2,35 Mat Maid 3. Finally graduated at Red Rocks af- ter 12 years of failure and success! RICHARD HERCHER-Football 1,2,3: Track 1,2. SENICRS-Holmes To Joeckel SARAH HRIVNAK-Pep Club 1,25 Librari an 15 Audio Visual 1,25 IFTF Walk 1,35 Student Council 25 GUYS AND DOLLS crew 3. MARIE HUGGINS SHERRY HULL JO HURST JOANNE HUSTON-Pep Club 1, Flagtwirl- er 35 Kappa Phi Omega sorority 2, Treas 3. SYLVIA HUTCHINSON STEPHANIE IGNASZAK-STEP 2,35 DARK OF THE MOON crew 2. TOM JACKSON-Football 1 5 Stagecrew 1, 25 Key Club 35 Concert Choir 35 Student Council Class Pres 35 "l shall especially re- member two things from Arapahoe: My music and all of the people l've known and loved. My thoughts and prayers to "Mom" and "Rahn." BRIAN JAMES MARK JESKE-Basketball 1,2,35 Baseball 52,35 Fellowship of Christian Athletes 1,2 DAN JEWELL-Soccer 1,25 Calumet 1,25 Drama Club 1,25 Mimes 2,35 Forensics 1,2, 35 Concert Choir 35 Class Vice-pres 35 Homecoming Attendant 35 VISIT TO A SMALL PLANET, RUMPLESTILTSKIN, GYPSY, DARK OF THE MOON, THE LARK, GUYS AND DOLLS, cast 1,2,3. "The people I have met and come to know during these years shall live in my heart forever." STEPHANIE JOECKEL GARY HOLMES LESLIE HOLMES SHELLEY HOOVER MELANIE HOPPER MARC HORNER ALFRED HOTCHKISS-Marching Ban 2,35 GYPSY crew 2, GUYS AND DOL cfew 35 Centennial League Honor Band Western and Adams State Honor Band DAVE HOUCK-Student Council 2, R at-large 35 Prom Comm 25 Homecomin Comm 35 Mimes 3. 'While rolling ston you gather many friends." LINDA HOUSTON-Pep Club 1, Cheer leader 25 French Club 15 DECA 3. LINDA HOWARD DEE HOWELL-ARE TEACHERS HUA MAN, ARSENIC AND OLD LACE 1 T PIANS-vadeville 25 Class Sec 25 Transfeu from Ft. Collins High 3. KIM HOUGAARD CATHERINE HOY JOHN-Marching Band 1,2, Drum 35 Pep Band 1,2,35 Concert Band 1 honic Band 2,35 Stage Band 2,35 All Honor Band 35 Adams State Honor 35 Centennial League Honor Band 35 us Life 3' Ke Club 2 3' GUYS AND , Y , . S, Pit Orchestra 2,3. LD JOHNSON JOHNSON-Pep Club 1,35 Pre-Med 5Orchestra 35 Mat Maid 35 FBLA Sec ARD JOHNSON N JONES N JONES ERLY JONES AEL JONES JONES-French Club 15 Choralettes a Phi Ome a sorority 35 OKLA D93 9 ' , GYPSY, GUYS AND DOLLS, cast SA JONES JORGENSEN E-i , I . i X i U T, Q , is , , "zu Ill, U " I JUNTA-Pep Club 5 Kappa Phi Ome- SENIORS-John To Kerrigon IL. Nt VICKIE KAISER-GYPSY, st 2. JEAN KAMUCK-Nlime 2, Head mime 35 Forensics 35 "When you do a mime of eat ing an apple, you eat the apple with your entire body." SHARI KANENGIETEFK-Pep Club 1,32 Cheerleader 15 Flagtwirler 3. KAREN KAUFIVIAN MICHEAL KEEGAN TERI KEENAN DENISE KELLER-Pep Club 1,2,3: Tom- Toms 35 Student Council 2,35 Co-Chrm Homecoming Decorations 2. JOHANNA KELLER KEVIN KELLY GREG KEMPF WAYNE KENNEDY MIKE KERRIGAN-Football 15 Basketball 1,2, Letter 35 Baseball 1, Letter 2,35 Fel- iowship of Christian Athletes 1. SENIORS-Kellelhul 'ro Lomb KIRK KETTE LHUT-Football 15 Baseball 1,2,3g Intramural Basketball 2,3. i MIKE KING-Bowling1,2,3. TIM KIRCHNER-Grew my hair, tried it on my own 1:Took a new look, cut my hair, did some Gymnastics 15 Let my hair grow 27 Took a few pictures and wrote some H words in here, got a haircut, did some diving, some more Gymnastics, collected some awards 3. DEBRA KIRKEGAARD , I l ADRIANA KITHCART KAY KNOLL VICTORINE KNUTSON CAROL KOCINSKI I KIM Koi-ii.ENBE RG-concen Choir1,2,35 i Human Relations Club 13Tutor 1. DEBORAH KONDEL LYNNETTE KORINEK LYNETTE KRANTZ ' KATHARINE KREBS DALE KROL JULIA KRZESINSKI GEORGE KRZYMOWSKI I r' xl i .H LINDA KRUSE MADELEINE KUKURA-Pep Club 1,2 Flagtwirler 3. DARA KUNGKAYA MARY KWIATKOWSKI-Pep Club 1,2 Mat Maid 2: Cheerleader 2,35 FBLA 3. MICHELLE LAFORGE-l was a figure Aristotlean tragedy-my one flaw was ri thy. I I I Y TIMOTHY LA GRONE MICHAEL LAMB TIMOTHY LAMB SENIORS-Lambert Io Lockarl LEISGE-Swimming 15 Water Polo 25 Ee club 35 chess club 3. LEIVIBKE-Student Council 1,2, Pres nrth Club 15 Key Club 25 Student Ad- y Council 35 Forensics 1,2, Degree of nction 3: Centennial League Student cil 2,35 Boy's State 25 Youth Advisory cil 25 Youth in Gov't, Governor 35 Corps School Partnership Program, , 25 Who's Who Among American High lol Students 3. HLEEN LENT RY LEUCHARS RLES LEUTHAUSER NA LEWIS LIAM LIEB IE LILJA-Pep Club 15 Girls Swimming N LIPSKI BARA LITTLE ERT LIVESAY ERT LOCKART-"Arapahoe is a good ol with a lot of teachers who want to and I'm glad it's my last year." BONNIE LAMBERT CLAUDIA LANIIVIERT ROGER LAMNIERT BARBARA LANIOUREUX WILLIAM LANCASTER LESLIE LANDERS DIANE LARSON-Pep Club 1,21 Band 1. DIANA LAWRENCE ANN LAYIVIAN KENT LEBSOCK MICHAEL LEE DOUGLAS LEHMAN SENIORS-Lombardi To McDonald 5 -. 1 RANDALL MARTIN DUANE MASTELLER CAROLYN MASTERS JOHN MATTHEWS LAURIE MATTSON MARTY MCANDREWS VICKIE MCCALISTER ROD MCCALL-Intramural Basketball 1,2. DANN MCCANN DOUG LAS MCCORMICK LAURIE MCDONALD-Transferred from Robert E. Lee H. S., Midland, Texas5 FTA Sec 15 Pep Club 1,25100 Club 15 Student Council 1,2, Historian 35 Girls Volleyball Team 15 Youth in Gov't 25 Prom Comm 25 Homecoming Variety Show Chrm 35 Calu- met 2,3. NANCY MCDONALD-Transferred 35 GAA 1,25 Tennis 15 Pep Club 1,25 Gymnastics 25 Track Troopers 25 Swim Team Timer 3. 1. DANIEL LOMBARDI-Football 15Stud Council 2,35 Prom Co-Chrm 25 Homecorr ing Co-Chrm 35 Mimes 35 "Even though i did not graduate at D.U., we did graduat We're out!" CATHERINE LONG ROBIN LUTZ-Marching Band 1,2,35 Svl Timer 35 GirI's Swim Team 1,2,35 GUYS AND DOLLS, Pit Orchestra 3. JUDY MACDONNELL KATHLEEN MACKENZIE ROBERT MADSEN JEFFREY MALLIN DANIEL MALLON ELIZABETH MARKS l TERESA MAROLD PATSY MARONEY-Junior Achievemex 15 Inter-Faith Walk 1,2,35 Cystic Fibrosis Youth Board 1,25 IFTF Big Sister 25 DEl 35 Youth in Gov't 3. ANN MARRIOTT-Transferred from St, Francis H.S. 35 Kappa Phi Omega sororiu 1,2. I IS MCDONNELL-Cheerleader 2,3. X MCEWAN fIAEL MCGEE THER MCG REGOR-Swashta 2, art r 37 "Truth lies waiting in all things un- Lig like a rose from living buds. But it first be in yourself. It shall come from 'wise SENIORS-McDonnell 'ro Milliken I I ., , 41,Qg',c,5, , X 3 A soul. It shall be Iove." gg. OL MCILVAIN .E MCKINNEY 'IGARET MCKINNIES-"I always ght my color was blue until you show- me green." TCHEN MEIBOS IOLEEN MERRITT RA MESSELT 'CI METCALF MEYER-STEP 2,32 FBLA 3. 3.77-, , L I A I RICK MEYER KAREN MILES-Pep Club 15 Kappa Phi Omega sorority 2, pres 35 FBLA 3. "Let to day embrace the past with remembrance and the future with longing." TERRY MILLBURN BETTY MILLER BRUCE MILLER DIANNE MILLER FREDERICK MILLER JULIA MILLER KATY MILLER LINDA MILLER SHELLEY MILLER KAREN MILLIKEN-Spanish Club 25 Pre- med Club 2,3. SENIORS-Mills To ocmdy 1 ILL - vi 1 . i . 4 ir- I ' I .V I I : II- i Y V , I I BRUCE MILLS MARGARET MITCHELL SUSAN MOBLEY LYNETTE MOORE LYNN MOORE MAUREEN MOORE JON MORGENTHALER KALVIN MORIN DEBBIE MORRIS-Syncronized Swim Team 1,2. PHIL MORRIS DOUGLAS MOST THOMAS MULLONEY TOM MULVEY MARY MURPHY KAREN MYERS EDWARD NAGLE JEFFREY NEWELL DIANE NIELSEN-Pep Club 1,2: Flagtwirl- er 35 Student Council 2. JEFFREY NIMON-Swimming1,2,3. BETH NOREEN JERRY NOVOTNY KATHERINE O'BRIEN ALAN OLDLAND GERALD O'GRADY SENIORS Olson lo Pollerson JANET OLSON-Pep Club 1gGirls Swim Team 15Student Council 1,2, Class Sec 37 Prom Patio Decorations Chrm 23 Home- coming Float Chrm 3. JOANN OLSON ROBERT O'NElLL TIM O'NEIL MARY O'ROURKE MICHAEL OTTATI-Swimming 1,2,3g Water Polo 1,2,3g "As you travel through life remember your last twelve years of con- ditioning and blindly folIow." DANIEL OWENS LYNETTE OXFORD-Concert Choir 2,31 Madrigals 35 PUNCH AND JUDYj THE LARK cast 3. "God's gift to us is life: our gift to God is what we do with it." MARLENE PABERS STEVE PARK JOE PATE JANICE PATTERSON SENIORS-Pciul CATHY PAUL-Transferred from Littleton High School 15 various plays, crew 2. STEPHEN PAUL-Swimming 3. KEITH PEARCE STEVEN PERKINS ROBIN PERRY-SMITH-Pep Club 15 Stu- dent Council 2,35 Prom Committee 25 Gym- nastics Team 35 Tennis Team 35 "Very little is needed to make a happy life. It's all with- in yourself in your way of thinking." DANN PETTIT-Football 1,2,35 Hockey 3. LINDA PHILLIPS WENDY PHILO-Pep Club 2,35 Tom-Toms Treas 2, Co-head 35 "I hope that next years seniors have as much fun with A-rap Syndrome as I did." JEANNE PIERCE TERRILL PIERCE SUSAN PILLS JULIE PINNEY-Cheerleader 15 Pep Club 1. to Rotliff I ' BARBARA PLATT CAROL PORTER REX POWELL DIANE PRENTICE JOYCE PROCH-Transferred to Arapahoe 35 Y-Teens 1, Sec 25 Scholarship Team 1,2 Marching Band 1,2,35 Concert Band 1,25 Symphonic Band 35 National Honor Soci- . ety 25 Class Play 2. KRISTY PROCTOR-Campus Life 1,2,35 Concert Choir 2,35 Student Council 15 ' Prom Publicity 2. PEGGY PUCKETT-Pep Club 15Student Council 2,35 Prom Comm 25 Key Club , Sweetheart 35 "Three major impressions that Arapahoe has left on me are a Qolf clt indented in my cheek, a hockey puck in my mouth, and a ski imprinted on my nose." ANNE PUGH-Tom-Toms 2,3. JOHN QUINN-Football 1: Swimming 15 Student Council 15 Key Club 1,2,35 Karat Club 2,35 JEAN RADER-Campus Life 15 FBLA 2,! Pres 3. JOEL RAHN I SUE RATLIFF-Pep Club 15Student Cou cil 2,35 Prom Comm 2, Homecoming Para Chrm 35 Swim Team Timer 3. I It I SENIORS-Rechnitzer to Romons KRISTINE RECHNITZER DAVID REEDER CINDY REILLY SHEREE REINERS-Pep Club 15SEMBCS 2,3. THOMAS REYES CHARLES REYNOLDS-Cross Country 1, 2,35 Track 1,2,3. KATHERINE REYNOLDS JOANNE RICH-Pep Club 1,25 Dance Committee 25 Junior Achievement 15 "Smile and keep 'em guessing." PATTY RICHARD-Girls Swim Team 1,2, 35 Swim Team Timer 35 Pep Club 15 Gym- nastics 3. RANDALL RICHARDS-Transferred from Baker HS, lVlontana5 Science Club 15GoIf 15 French Club 15 Pre-med Club 35 "Happi- ness is getting straight A's, that's why l'm always sad." DENISE RICHEY RICK RICHEY I RICKMAN RIDDELL-Marching Band 1,2, Band 1,2,35 Stage Band 35 AND DOLLS, Pit Orchestra 3. RIPPEY RITCHIE E RITCHIE EVEN RITTER OMAS RITTER IAN ROBERTS-Soccer 1,2,35 Key Club Sec. 35 Fellowship of Christian Athletes ARLES ROBERTS i T' BRA ROCK-Junior Achievement 1,2,35 im Team 1,2,35 Swim Team Timer 2,35 ,V ,I -,, emember this-that very little is needed , ' ff if make a happy Iife." Ei . tg, , ' , BRA RODDEN I ,, ' ,l'f' LLY ROMANS 162 4 I, SENIORS-Rossi io Sharp JOHN SCHMIDT-Football 1,2,35 Track 1,2 PATRICIA SCHROER CATHERINE SCOTT LIZ SCOTT LYNN SCOTT-Marching Band 1,2,35 Cadet Band 15Symphonic Band 2,35 Centennial League Honor Band 35 Student Council5 Mat Maid 2,35 Pep Club Pres 3. NANCY SCOVILLE TRACY SCRIVNER-Pep Club 1,2,3. GLENN SEEMAN RON SE LBO-Soccer Letter 15 Football Letter 2,3, Nat'l WHO'S-WHO in Football, Honorable Mention All-League Football 35 Basketball Letter 1,2,3, Capt 3, All-League Basketball 2, Letterman Magazine All-Amer- ican Basketball 35 Baseball Letter 1,2, Hon- orable Mention All-League Baseball 1, All- League Baseball 2, MVP Baseball 25 Fellow- ship of Christian Athletes 1, Treas 2. ADAM SELF DEBRA SELL-Pep Club 15 Girl Scouts 1,2,35 Gymnastics 35 "Arapahoe is a nice place to visit but I sure wouldn't want to live here!" JAN ET SHARP CRAIG ROSSI DAVE ROTH-Swashta 2,35 Calumet 2,3. WILLIAM ROYCE-Tennis 1, Letter 2,35 Chess club 35 Bridge Club 2,3. NEAL RUBIN-Transferred from Anahei California 25 Swashta 2,35 ASNS 2,35 Stu- dent Council 2, V-Pres 35 Sophomore Ini- tian Chrm 35 Intramural Basketball 35 Ho ard Cosell Announcements 35 Youth in Gov't Sgt-at-Arms 35 Centennial League Student Council 35 Homecoming Royalty Finalist 35 WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN HIGH SCHOOLS 35 NATL. MERIT SEMI FINALIST. MICHAEL RYAN JEANNE SAMPLE-Marching Band 1,25 Cadet Band 15 Concert Band 25 Symphoni Band 35 Stage Crew 1,25 Pep Club 35 Flag- twirlers 3. MARIE SANDOVAL KAR LA SAULTE R JANET SAWYER'Kappa Phi Omega sororl ty 2. CHRIS SCHANKER-Prom Comm Chrm I Student Council 3, Class Rep-at-large 35 ' Youth in Gov't 35 No, NO A MILLIONS ' TIMES NO, TOAD OF TOAD HALL, ON DINE, OKLAHOMA, VISIT TO A SMAL PLANET, SHE WAS ONLY A FARMER' DAUGHTER, THE BAT, GYPSY, THE LARK, Cast and Crew 1,2,3. JEFFREY SCHANSNY CAROL SCHMIDT-Pep Club 15 SEMBCS 2,3. IRICIA SHEAFFER DHEN SHUGART-Soccer 15 Denver munity Study Hall 1,2,35 Arapahoe ity Cup-Ski Team 1,2,35 Arapahoe ing Team 1,2,35 Student Council 2,35 bus Plays5 South Suburban Soccer gh 35 Colorado Cheese Club 2, Co-Wiz- 5 Littleton Youth Advisory Council 35 Hot Dog and Cliff Jumping Squad 3. N SH USTEFI K SIMMONS-Stagecrew 1,2,35 Rug- 35 GYPSY, RUMPLESTILTSKIN, LARK, cast 2,3. THIA SIMPSON RLES SMEDLY-Marching Band 1,25 and 1,25 "Veni, vidi, relinquo." REY SMITH GARET SMITH-Flagtwirler 25 Pep 2. K SMITH-Marching Band 1,2,35 Con- Band 15Symphonic Band 2,3. ERT SMITH N SMYTHE SOMERS SENIORS-Sheoffer lo Stoner CYNTHIA SPAUR RANDY SPAUR JULIA SPOSATO MARK STAKE STEVE STEE LE CORINNE STE FANO BETSY STEPHENS-Arapahoe Story 1,25 IFTF15Human Relations 2,35Swashta 2, Ed itor 35 ASNS 2,35 STEP 25 Optimist Award 35 Littleton Youth Advisory Council, Sec 3. "To be or not to be that was the question." JOHN STEPHENS-Arapahoe County Cup Ski Team 1,2,35 Dubonnet Award and Schlitz All American Award 25 Calumet 25 Swashta 35 Campus Life 35 National Merit Commended Scholar 35 Friends of the Li- brary Exhibitor "Through the Eye of a Camera" honorable mention 3. DENISE STEVENSON-Pep Club 15Junior Achievement 15 Pre-med Club 35 "Happi- ness is graduating." JACOUELINE STEWART-French Club 2, co-chrm 35 Human Relations Club 15THE LARK crew 35 Concert Choir 3. "Good Luck to aIl." JONATHAN STOLL DAVID STONER SENIORS-Stott lo Tonge LOIS STOTT TANYA STROUF JILL STRUBLE-Swim Team 2,37 Swim Team Timer 3. MARK STRUNK-French Club 2,35 Bridge Club 2,3p Chess Club 2,33 Bowling Team 3. JERRY sTuRivi-Football 1,2,s. STEPHAN SWANSON CHERYL swEoEi.i.-Pep club 1,23 THE BAT, GYPSY, DARK OF THE Moom, publicity 2. LINDA SWITZER JACK TALIAFERRO BEKI TEDROW DEBBIE TEWKSBURY SANDRA THIEMAN DEBRA THOMAS lvioi.i.Y THOMAS-Pep club 1,25 Mar n 2. ROBERT THOMAS THE RESA THOMAS GENELLE THOMPSON-Student Counu 2, Calumet 25 DECA, 3. JEFFREY THOMPSON MARK THOMPSON-Football 1, Letter 35 Basketball 1gTrack 1,25 Intramural Ba ketball 3, Nat'I. Merit Letter of Comme tion 3. DIANE THURSTON MARY TIERNEY TERI TIGHE-Student Council 'I,2,3p Pi- Club 1,2, Spirit Chrmn. 3, Cheerleader 1 PHIL TILTON-Football 1, Letter 2,3, 1- League Football 37 Wrestling 1,2, Letter Track 23 Swashta 3. MARK TONGE SENIORS Trilch To Wcilkley DISEY TRITCH-Cheerleader 1,25 Pace- maker 1. WILLIAM TROLLINGER-Golf 2,35 Swatawa Poetry 25 Nat'l Merit Letter of Commendation 35 Intramural Basketball 1, 2,3. VIRGINIA ULRICH MICHAEL UNGER FRANK URMAN LEON VAITAITIS-Swimming 1, Letter 2,35 Water Polo 2,35 Soccer 15 Calumet 2,3. "By nothing do men show their character more than by the things they laugh at." ALENE VAGGE-GirI's Diving Team 1,25 Swim Team Timer 25 TACT Singers 2,3. GLENN VANDENBERG-Swimming Stu. Asst. 3. PEGGY VANDENBERG-Majorette1,25 Pep Club 15 Swim Team 1,35 Gymnastics mgr. 15 Choralettes 3. DENNIS VRANICH BRAD WALKER-Track 1,2,35 Fellowship of Christian Athletes 3. ROBERTA WALK LEY 'E 'S' ew I 5 .sf-f Y 5. . , ff vias Q ' ' if SENIORS-Wollen 'ro Young TANYA WALLEN CHERYL WARREN-Transferred from Douglas HS, S. Dakota 35 Pep Club 1,25 Pom-Poms 15Cheerleader 1,25 Concert Choir 15 Gymnastics 25 DECA 2,3. JILL WATSON DEBORAH WAY LAND LAYNE WEBER-Football 1, Letter 2,3, All-League Football 35 Basketball 15 Intra- mural Basketball 2,35 Track 15 Key Club 2,3 MARY WE LCH-Transferred to Arapahoe 25 DECA 3. JANELLE WELLER KATHRYN WELLS-"I found school ac- tivities disinteresting." CYNTHIA WHITE PAMELA WHITMAN CAROL WI LKENS-"Arapahoe Story" 1,25 IFTF 15Swashta 2,35Swatawa 25 Human Re- lations Committee 2,35 Littleton Youth Ad- visory Council 35 STEP 25 "The heart has reasons the reason knows not of"-Pascal. CRAIG WI LLIAMS-Transferred from Cape Elizabeth HS, Maine 3. FRANCES WILLIAMS SCOTT WILLIAMS KERRY WILLIS CHRISTI WILSON JANET WITTE DEBBY WOLFF KENNETH WOODARD STEPHANIE WOODS ANTHONY WOODWARD LOUISE WRIGHT MARK WYCHE DEBORAH YOUNG SENIORS-Younger to Zufferey nas Anderson Anderson dia Azzari eth Bailey -yas Baker E Ballinger Barker ft Barnard ine Bartlett Barton 'n Batcheller ate ayci ll Begger Benedict hy Benson Beyale y Bock .s Bodine Boggus Boggs Bomberger Borden t Boss ,rady Brethauer 't Brittain 't Brodkorb Broome Broome Brown e Brownell Bullock Burdette Burke 1 Butler ion Cajthaml i Caldwell Cardwell rter Castro as Champlin try Coleman Conway e Cooley el Courtney n Coxey ye Cronin Davis ry Dickinson tlornin hy Dudley k Dunahay p Dunahay lDunham Dunham l 141' Diana Duty Dusty Ellis William Ellis Angela Engle John Erck Jeffry Fankhauser Steven Fiddmont James Flaherty Susan Fleming Dean Foreman Donald Foubare Daniel Fox Rodney Franklin Mary Frontczak Carin Fuiino Pilar Gomez Karen Goodwin Alan Gould Gwen Gray Robert Greene Joanne Greuter Karin Greuter Nancie Grove Brent Hannen Hns Hansen Mark Hansin Toni Hart George Haskins Chester Haworth James Heitzer Mark Herin Mark Hermanspan Craig Hinrichs Jocelyn Hoag Daniel Hommel Grace Hores Randall Horton Terry Hughes Jeff loerger Daniel Irvin Mike Janson William Jenks Scott Johnson Steven Johnson Dean Kaylor Keith Kimball Gregory Knever Susan Knowles Leon Koenck Wendy Laas Kevin Lacey Barbara Lamb Kevin Lea Jack Lewis Judith Lindrogg Kathleen Littlefield RICHARD ZOOK PASCAL ZUFFEREY LARRY YOUNGER-"l Larry Younger, being of sound mind and body, lha, hal, do hereby in good taste, discute my life from sophomore to senior year: I am here in this class for the hours that's aIl." DEBORAH ZIMMERMAN SENIORS-Not Pictured Michael Longtain Kristi Loos Vicki Loucks Randi Macluso Catherine Mahnken Dennis Majors Everett Major Guy Markus Karen Martin Michael Martin Rick Marten Jeff Massell Mark McCabe Brent McCain Martin McCoy Timothy McGee Daniel McGuire Michael McC1uade Charles Mear Michelle Mickelson David Mills Jay Mills Corol Moore James Moore Terre Moore Robert Moriarty Mike Morris Randall Murphy Pat Murray Charles Myers Larry Noble Karen O'Brien Michael Olsen George Otten James Parrish Terry Potts Mark Poulos James Powell Steven Primm Michael Pruim Thomas Quigley Grant Rader Jaculin Rapp Debbie Rastberger Jerry Rogers Cary Roth Deborah Rowley' Angela Russell Thomas Rutherford Richard Ryman William Sanders Robert Sandrin Laura Sasaki Judith Saurber Michael Schaffnit John Shealy Richard Schmied Jeffrey Schneider David Scott Corinne Shideler Cheryl Six Margaret Smeal Ann Smith Deborah Smith Richard Speck Janet Spivey Mark Stanislawski Linda Stansbery Ralph Stern Dennis Stevenson Ann Stouick Tom Stover Susanne Stuart Kimgerley Stubbs Michael Sullivan Connie Talcott Karen Tan ke Thomas Taylor Pamela Teflian Margaret Tezak Sidney Theard Eric Thomas Jennifer Thomas Ronald Thornton Rick Thorp Van Uhlmann Brian Ulmer Linda Waalen Mike Walker Margaret Wall Cynthia Ward Kathy Warfield Cheryl Warner Pamela Waters Ronald Watson Elizabeth Webb Karla Weiss Bruce Wharry Kurt Wilhelm Bruce Williams Janet Williams Linda Williams Maureen Williams Deborah Wilson Charles Wood Mark Woods Susan Woods Steven Wren Cathy Yaeger Christina Yee Susan Young Juniors 1. One complete school year passed by leaving two full yearn look forward to-the juniors go forth. The excitement of future, the unknown, still remains with memories of the p still lingering. A year of learning, going and coming, has left the juniors more a part of Arapahoe: those small worries of school ha been overcome, and all surroundings have now begun to f in: the bits and pieces of huge puzzles of school have formed into a picture. Those goals that once seemed so fa away have become one step closer: the finish of somethin started can now be seen, and graduation does not seem to such an endless goal. Each one's own self works to achieve separate goals. Diff ent ideas, different talents, different futures lie ahead to junior as he works his way through another school year. I, rg . , ' ' N .4 1' , 5 u CLASS OFFICERS: I-r, Pam Goodloe, rep-at-large: Mar- field. PfBSid8f1Ti J0hf1 VOQI. l'9P'3f'l3f992 PSQQY Walter. Secretarv, Parks, Treasurerg Andrea Greenberg, rep-at-large: Diane Hat- Frank 01120. FSP-Sf-lfIl'991 Walt Jost. I'9D-Hf-l2l'99- Juniors .Qu JUNIORS-Aldlnger To Carlsen Vickie Aldinger Paul Amundson Linda Anson Judi Ashby Janet Babbs Rodney Bagby Vicki Bangert Miles Barrett Leslie Bell William Benker Richard Bertha Robin Berthold Jeffrey Bobinsky 'Cheryl Borchers Linda Borden Greg Bowers Clnthia Brandhorst Robert Bruck Pat Brunk Jodi Buckwalter Morris Bum arner 9 Kristina Burns Ricky Callahan John Canuel Robin Carlsen Cathy Carothers Gail Castro Mary Cathanese Chris Cieminski Darla Click Deborah Coash Bryan Coffman Bill Craig Sherri Crane Karen Daciek lVlette Dahlberg Tamara Damon Debra Danback Jeffrey Dark Paula Davis Kimberly Deane Robert Dettmer Morgan Dickinson Patricia Donald Barbara Done Olivia Donnell Juldine Dracon Joni Duvall Deborah Ellefson John Erickson Constance Exner Patty Farnell Nlolly Fischer Nancy French Ann Gaddis Georgia Galyean Kim Gerwin Cynthia Getz Laura Gleason Sheryl Gooden Pamela Goodloe Lori Goodwin Judy Goston Connie Gray Donna Gray JUNIORS-Corothers to Gray e - T, , 'V ,. .0 . 'lin A 4'-v 6- . C , i Ili KZL5 ra at 2 fi TL C3249 5 lriljl J f .fig , CJ 2' fn ffl gj-1! i .1 fl vi! 8 Q ri 3 dk' 'rgugp 2 5 if Pi J f 3 CWM 191 Nlargaret Green Susan Griffendorf Robyn Griffith Linda Grossman Amy Grubb Michelle Guimarin Gina Gulbrandsen Sharon Hagen Tina Hajicek Sidney Hansen Jan Harrington Patrick Hart Stephen Hart Diane Hatfield June Hays Greg Hemmer Betsy Hensel Karine Herbst Jill Heyer Celeste Hicks Andrea Hollatz Barbara Hrivnak Colleen Hughes Randy Hughes Catherine Hulings Kimberly Hunter Elizabeth lgnaszak James Jackman Cindy Jacobson Lurlene Jamison Lisa John Jean Joransen James Joseph Walter Jost Jeffrey Kappes Colette Kimball Diane Kirkegaard Carolyn Klie Beverly Kreimier Kathleen Lamb '10 V39 JUNIORS-Lcimploh lo Mills " an-I Wl"'7" 42: 71 Susan Lampton Richard Lawrence Linda Leavitt Mark Lehnertz Cindy Leisge Linda Lenard Linda Lewis Glenn Little David Lohman Pamela Love Jean Lucas Michaella MacKay Stanton Manzanares Lee Mardesen Gerald Marizza Kevin Mayer Eric McGlone Mike McMahon Kent McSparran Wendy Mead Bruce Meibos Brenda Miller Douglas Milliken Daniel Mills Donna Mills JUNIOR-Murosko lo Stinson Alexander Murashko Karen Mussey Karla Myles Carrie Nafus Debra Nash Judith Nelson Neva Kay Nickels Susan Olsen Dave Olson Linda Olson Marzette Parks Eric Pefley Ann Perkins Jill Peterka Cheryl Peterson Leslie Peterson Charles Pettigrew Denise Powell Sally Priebe Michael Pugh Susan Rahn Philip Readio Linda Reese Deborah Rich Charles Richardson Todd Romsdahl Susan Rush Bradley Schaefer David Schrader David Scott Edward Sedivy Monica Sena Jane Shepard Debra Slagle Suzanne Smischny Nanci Snowden Gregory Sprang Kim Steele Karen Steinhauser Donald Stinson JUNIORS-Stott to Zepp John Stott Kelly Stroud Steve Suder Charlene Tawara Jule Temple Cheryl Thomas Sharon Thompson Randy Thornton Teena Tiedemann James Truitt Cynthia Turek Paula Turk Kathy Vandenberg Allen Van Nest Janie Veal Kathryn Villeneuve John Vogl Barbara Wehrly Beverly Whitaker Lisa White Gale Wilson Mark Wissinger Kathy Wood Diane Woodhall Cynthia Worth Jennifer Young Gary Younger Richard Zepp Aix Sophomores ill i 1131 Ei IIICD 'll Eight foot seniors, mile-long lunch lines, a floor plan wit rhyme or reason . . .this is the sophomore's first week ot school. As the days, weeks, then finally months progress, much + the novelty wears off, but the fun has just begun. Pride i new-born thing-as soon as initiation is over. And perspe means the beautiful realization that in two more years tl' glorious status of senior will be yours. Sophomores are special people, and tenth grade is a onc lifetime experience. And more than one senior has look the face ofa "wise fool" with more than a tiny flicker o envy. What does it all mean? Simply that to 571 people in this world, a black and gold "75" button will always be a sacred memento. iophomores Lliii ,533-..'lLx'3. W1 'W " .W -7,9-iv .iw " Y l' , ,Fh,mC5..?ggi1we11i1'+"',iv'l '-u vr Y ,, ..,i-ii :H Q .:z'-""4P'1'fF?-f. - rr el' 'NV' lm' Eegwxnlrffbirrv',1Gfr??W:"f''Thi ML Z . " Eg' fe ' 1 '- " 3 ----W 1? 17' J :V - YW-'Q Q fr ff ' "' , .,F,r.T., ZIl'5H"'gE'p'?"U we W, i " ' 7'- " - - " ' - HY. 't A' ti.-Qgpawki " v V Q' V ' iwn above are the Sqphomgfe Clagg Qfficersg Kitty Da,-nail, Kristi surerg Robin Micheli, secretary: Tom Fisher, representative-at-largeg son, Nancy Alberg, representatives-at-lai-ge, Diang Sglgrnonl mga. and Jeri Gee, President. iNot pictured, Debbi Schenker, vice-president! ff Q!" V' 2? ,. , 5 f I Q, .M ." A-1, 3 ul 2 .1 R 1vgg'???:Ejuf'2T:, I. if-if , .NYJ 5 h 5 er- 4 W 1 1 4 1 ' 3? I-1 "- .H ns! ww . 1 , .byy-'JS J- 1 ,A N U ,L . iv -I' L H . I E ' Qi ' aim! 3. fir 'lf Q -w M 'Ib 155 J.. 1-1. Q' 31? , fi It . l L ?w wi S933 ' AE P-3 : t 4 1, fe. , 1 4x 2 -W Q, jf W - U 4 1-J Ad ' mir ' I 3: Craig Dockal Kathleen Doherty Diana Lee Doubek Cheryl Eggleston Patricia Feaster Peggy Fischer Sarra Ann Fritts Bonnie Galyean Catherine Gear Jeraldine Mary Gee Michael Patrick Gee Victoria Gentry Dana Kay Griffin Anne Gilmore Mary Anne Goad David Godwin De Anne Graham Chuck Green Susan Joyce Green Anne Lynn Gregarek Christine Griffith Leeann Grothe John Grubb Suzan Haggerty 9' Norman Brown Tracey Lynn Brown James Brownlie Mark Bulgarelli Lorene Burley Gary Callahan Robert Callahan Daniel Cammack Lorraine Sue Canez Debra Carpenter Thomas Carter Janet Chaney Susan Christie William Christie Todd Clayton David Coash Kim Allen Coats Dave Coddington Shanee Conditt Teresa Conway Angela Courtney Marc Cousins Barbara Jean Cox Sharon Cox Richard Lee Cramer Kitty Darnall Barbara Davis Diane Deden Gerald Denison Richard Dillon .-W , ,Li Fi , 5 l- it ivy L5 ' er' I' If llw 'hi W , l' V? SOPHOMORES-Hdire to Masters I ji Kathleen Jones Robert Jones Mark Benjamin Joss James Keith Mark Keller Kathryn Kendall Kathy Kerrigan Donald Kincaid Sandra Kinchen Nancy Lynn Kinnaird Gale Kirkegaard Kary Jan Knipping Linda Koenig Ellen Kremers Joni Lawson Renee Lea William Leeper Pamela Leskela Martin Leuthauser Scott Lewis Jennifer Lillie Deborah Lombardi Karen Sue Mallin Michele Manning Sherrie Mardeseln Kenneth Marsh James Martin Connie Sue Marx Pamela Massey Deborah Masters P Pamela Haire Linda Ann Hale William Hardin Mary Harmon Carole Hastings Brita Lynn Haugen Carla Hayes Sally Hearne William Hertel Kim Hlewko Lori Holman Randall Horstmann Marcella Hottle Tania'Hubert Kenneth Huff Michael Hunt Sue James Mary Kay Jarvis Cindy Jeppson Deborah Johnson Lori Kay Johnson Paul Jonas Christina Jones Craig Jones K Marianne Matsoukas Melinda Louise McBee Teresa McBride Robert McClure Nancy McCorkle Michael McDonald Nancy Ellen Mead Nancy Meader Karen Meibos Barbara Meyers Robin Gail Micheli Lou Ann Middleton Mary Sue Miers Brian Miller James Miller Michael Miller Frances Miran Cardance Montgomery Tehmi Monzon Kenneth Moore Randall Moore Tucker Muhrer Kimberly Muller Karen Lee Murlin SCPHOMORES-Molsoukos lo Murlin SOPHOMORES - Nelson to Sumner John Rubbo Katherine Rusin David Alan Sample Roberta Sander Cathie Sarber Lorretta Sarris David Sawyer Debra Kay Schanker Sheryl Schmitt Sharon Shneebeck Donald Schneider Katte Schrader Diane Scott Darlene Seese Mary Alice Seydler Jane Sheehan Elizabeth Shugart Dianne Smedly Julie Ann Smith Dana Lee Solomon Diana Lynn Solomon Jay Stafford Lisa Ann Starr Jay Stewart Jody Lee Stewart Vickie Lynn Stewart Debra Joanne Stout Alice Stramler Kira Jay Strouf Frankie Sumner F il! .. 'fl' J , . I if , i p ' .5 , P-l V2 , cv 1 5. ' H . a 00 J l Q. liitfii Joseph Nelson Mary Pat Nelson Kenneth Neukirch Grace Nill Anita Kay Nyberg James Olsen Karen Leslie Orr Priscilla Parrish Dianne Parsley Sherri Alene Patton Lori Sue Peterson Steven Pettit Pam Plank Brian Plomondon Mary Porter Erin Prenger Theresa Price Ann Chris Rallis Peggy Ann Reeh Mary Ellen Rich Royce Richards Diana Riddle Gail Lee Ritter Douglas Roe 1 SOPHOMORES OH, Q' -Swa to Tina Irene Swa Cathryn Ann Swart Brenda Kay Swiers Ann Louise Taylor Teresa Taylor Patricia Temmer Julie Thomas Lynn Ann Tierney Janis Kay Tunnell Janice Turk Julie Lynn Turner Jane Udevitz Richard Veghte Jayne Lynne Walker Brenda White Patricia White Michael Willard Dana Williams Douglas Williams Shelly Williams Kristie Ann Wilson Helen Wright Christine Young Cynthia Ann Zahora Zahora "WST-h"m Aropohoe Sloff F --A l Standing left is Mr Joe Haggerty assistant principal atv clpllne seated IS Dr Norbert Schuerman principal Mr gram assistant principal student activities Mr Armon assistant principal curriculum and instruction COUNSELORS Mr Dale L Bress Mr FredC Foster -'-1' , Mr. John S. French Mrs. Patricia Gressett Mrs. Janice Karras Miss Jan Mitchell ENGLISH Mr. Ron Anderson Mr. Bill Atchison Miss Gloria Dissler Mr. Roger Graham Mrs. Sandra Heartman Mrs. Marylin Houlton Miss Kathy Hoy Mrs. JoAnne Jillson Miss Susan Johson Mr. Fred Koteskey Miss Carolyn McQueen Miss Katherine M. Murphy Mrs. Connie Rudd Mrs. Doris Stremel Miss Carroll Swift Mrs. Joan Walter Arapahoe Staff 1 f is-si. R s Wm f 11351 . ' 1 U ll 'T' -J - .- Nl . ,. " i 1. l lx V .Jr A W' ii. .. '. iii ' VW' .X ! Jia, X di 'g--J we wif A sg! '-9' in Mr. Jim Westbrook Mr. Dwight Zediker ART Mrs. Loretta Allaire Mrs. Barbara Black Miss Phyllis Vandehaar SOCIAL STUDIES Mr. Peter Blanco Mrs. Martha Burton Mr. David Coles Mrs. Penny Crouse Mr. Larry Emsing Mr. A. L. Grant, Jr. Mr. Ray Hawthorne Aropohoe Staff SOCIAL STUDIES lCON'Tl Mr. Reginald Holmes Mr. Dalton Holsteen Mr. Charles P. Holton Mr. Stuart Johnson Mr. Robert Latronica Mrs. Joy E. Leif Mr. Leigh McCurry Mr. Allah Samuel Mr. Vernon Skari Miss Verna Wilborn MUSIC Miss Marcellene Dillon Mr. Donald Smith , we , , . A ,r I i .Ing- gvl-. V -I 'Q3' X C I A 3? I Q W l, X Z:"'f I , ,,, I a .-,.- .3 is .V J, Q- SCIENCE Mr. Richard Backes Mrs. Elizabeth Craver Mr. Lee Daniel Mrs. Ellen Heeren Mrs. Donna Peck Mr. Kenneth Pitman Mr. Jay Robertson Mr. Gordon Scheele Mr. James Thompson BUSINESS EDUCATION Mrs. Alice Braly Miss Julianne Brown Mr. James Horsford Mr. James R. Kelley Mrs. Blanche Martin DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION Mr. Morris F. Vogel INDUSTRIAL ARTS Mr. Sam Appell ,. 7 I x W 5 X41 I HOOL BOARD AND CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION: Top row: Arnold Loken, Mr. Kenneth Schoonover. Inot pictured: Mr. Michael . Frank Lee Mr. Robert Stansbury, Dr. William Altimari, Mr. Ken- VHQQHHS. NIV- R0b9I't Whitman, Dr. Paul Staiert.I h Baker Mr. Wilbur Stutheit. Seated: Mr. Charles McClure, Dr. . T., 'eb I M y I 'T A-F1 I . Iii? I ' 'C-I , . H I ' Y I I , ifwtiiffi 1 dh 3 ' It . . li ' X LM 9. . .. .-...sf H '1 .JI ' I H ,A . hm Rl -1. " r I ' I- " .. H '53, ii -7 " ,Fa . 3, I qi I . . It ' 'Y y I I . JI I 1 ggi I IIII J eq: ' .asia-,'. LA -- .. war'-A "TK-Q Arapahoe Sioff Mr. Ray Greb Mr. Dayne Smith PHYSICAL EDUCATION Mr. Larry Becker Mr. Harry Buckner Mr. John Cline Mrs. Joann Hirsig Miss Sharon Kissell Miss Barbara Luce Mr. Larry Nelson Mr. Omar Swartzendruber FOREIGN LANGUAGE Mrs. Katherine Benoit Mr. Ronald DeMarco Mr. George Neuvirth Mrs. Roxanne Meier Mr. Richard Romero Mr. Joe Smeltzer 207 Aropcihoe Stuff Q. .If- W, . A . M., I .,.-, ii - 1 M. ii I 3 A X Mrs. Parricia Budd SECRETARIES Mrs. Darlene Artim Mrs. Harriet Cronlund Mrs. Joyce Erickson Mrs. Dorothy Kimsey Mrs. Geraldine MacDonnell Mrs. Shirley Peterson Mrs. Marty Whitman PARA-PROFESSIONALS Mrs. Joan Alberg Mrs. Betty Carr Mrs. Beverly Denning Mrs. Ann Doty SPECIAL EDUCATION Mr. Gene Merrill HOME ECONOMICS Miss Patricia Brackeen Miss Judy Farnham Mrs. Hope Jensen MATHEMATICS Mr. Tom Barbour Mr. Patrick DeFoe Mr. Robert L. Hanson Mr. James Heinlein Mr. Vrej Keotunian Mr. Glen Selbo Mr. William Sigler Mr. Thomas Taylor Les Welker AMA Gene Scrnmpsher AUDIO VISUAL Mr Ray H Vanderbeest LIBRARIANS Mrs Betty Hines Photo Index SOPHOMORE FOOTBALL: Top row, Mark Keller, Troy Cummins, Tom Lee, Ken Lafonte, Mike Hunt, Scott Lewis, Bob Jones, Mike Webb, Greg Frankhauser, Jim Howard, Dirk Durdy, Gary Young, Jim Brownlie, Glenn Schmidt, Mike Gee, John Cline, Bob Hanson. Middle row, Brian Plomondon, Gray Warner, Jim Martin, Mark Cousins, Eron Prenger, Ken Britenback, Randy Hughes, Dave Haley, Jim Baker, Chris Mullen, Pete Bauer, Tracy Shmidt, Jeff Willineue Mark Stake, Pat Feline. Bottom row, Don Morris, Rocky Young, l Bicket, Mark Robertson, Kim Coats, Dan Tilton, Dave Codington, Steve Petit, Ed Torrez, Tucker Muhrer, Larry Kocinski, Nathan Smith, Erick Froistad, Paul Gaunella. 2? 5' .QQQJ GZ 5553 e, li voa-lu-l157l!F 'I' Ui g.2'-, B A654 91 Q " -if 95 55.11-H' we FOOTBALL: Top row, Coach Smith, Rat Stevenson, Coach Buckner, Kim Bishop, Alex Murashko, Phil Tilton, Jay Breyer, Kip Bishop, Randy Spaver, Layne Weber, Ron Selbo, Bill Benker, Rich Lawrence, Bill Clark, Mark Thompson, Terry Leuchers, Coach Nelson. Second row, Bill Bailey, Tom Gray, Bill Leahy, Mark Teflian, Don Brownell, Steve Suder, Robin Carlson, Jim Jackman, Mike Duffala, Mike Ballan- tine, Steve Gillis, Curt Stubbs. Third row, Coach Becker, Gordon, if ll W l Walter Hays, Kevin Jones, Mark Stake, Todd Lohmsdahl, Chuck F ardson, Bill Castro, Vance Carlson, Dick Herscher, Jerry Herring, Mark Frohardt, John Canvel, Dean Saver, Coach Latronica. Bottom row, Pat Brunk, John Sshmidt, Stan Manzares, Wayne Kennedy, E Baver, Chris Holland, Dan Petit, Bob Casper, Greg Hemmer, Steve Hart, Dirk Doty, Jeff Kappes. LE 'fE"'.i FW. M K Aropohoe Sloff Mrs. Audrey Eggert Mrs. Joan Euhus Mrs. Carol Hair f Mrs. Jeannette Huff Mrs Linda Koch Mrs Marie Long Mrs. Ann Miers .- ' Mrs Kay Nelson 4' l Mrs. Dorothy Oden Mrs. Eunice Ogier Mrs. Bernita Payne Mrs. Pat A. Thompson Mrs. Betty Vickery SUPERVISORS Mr. Loren Hill Mrs. Pat Thompson FOOD SERVICES Mrs. Rose Ella Flerucha The ladies of the food service are pictured above in the Ara- pahoe kitchen. Far left is Mr. Roy Schwairt, head custodian: left is Mr. Ralph Harmon, building engineer. M TEAM: Top row, Rusty Roberts, Mark Adams, Terry Hau- lz, Erik Brekke, Rick Carbone, Mike Courtney, Cary Roth, Smith, Tom Heywood, Tim Kirchner, Terry Leuchars. Second , Pat Hart, Eric McGlone, Kevin Mayer, Gary Nielsen, Greg mer, Randall Morrow, John Crowley, Pete Berglund, Michael ti, Jeff Nimon. Third row, Craig Jones, Mike McDonald, Steve Sutton, Kent Brekke, Pat McGraw, Bob Neal, Jim Collins, Mark Bay Stephen Paul, Coach Swartzendruber, Coach Becker. Bottom row, Jim Snelgrove, Lyle Munsch, Herbie Williams, Bruce Busmire, Jim Keith, Jim Sharpe, Chuck Greene, Bill Christie, Gary Flater, Dirk Doty. BQ Top row, John Keller, Don Stinson, Jim Crouse, Jim Dexter Craig, Tim Eccles, Steve Frohardt, John Rubbe, Mike Walker, Bob Neal, Paul Amundon, Mike Holland, Steve Saurber, Tim Garrelts. Bottom row, Lonnie Moshner, Jerry Marizza, Brian l Domin, Stan Ruchas, Bob McClure, Coach Swartzendruber. Roberts, Eric McGlone, Greg Kempf,.Jim Rippey, Jerry O'Grady, ond row, Phil Readio, Pete Berglund, Mark Bulgarelli, Roy Rahn, Bob Boss, Greg Burdette, Dan Cammack. l l TENNIS TEAM: Top row, Jeff Turpin, Ken Nekerich, Rick Dillin, Blanco, Chuck Greene, Craig Gershon, Mike McGee, Doug Arnell, Steve Benshoof, Tony Woodward, Steve Alberg, Rick Hess, Chuck Steve Bennek, Jim Collins, Kevin Brookfield. King, Bill Royce, Mike Bergin, Scott Johnson. Bottom row, Mr. CROSS COUNTRY: Top row, Coach Vogel, Don Mullen, Mark Mardeson, lan Gertzen, Bill Hertel, Paul Jonas, Jay Stafford. Botti Miller, Jeff Smith, Pat McGraw, Joel Jensen, Gary Lanskey, Gerry row, Paul Hoff, Scott Gilliom, Ron Rickman, Mark Guz, Scott Higgins. Middle row, Kirk Weimer, Gordon Muir, Steve Lohman, Lee Hajicek, Dave Stoner, Charles Mear, John Boswick. FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATH- LETES: Top row, Bill Bailey, Gray I Warner, Mark Jeske, Bill Benker. Bottom row, Tad Malloy, Pat Brunk, Brad Walker, Jim Truitt, John Canuel, Steve Burkholder. i lSophsl: Top row, Don Mullen, Jeff Turpin, Dennis Rocky Young, Dave Haley, Dave Wolfe. Second row, Bob Brownlie, Ken Neukirch, Rick Dillon, Paul Jonas, Ken Mike Hunt, Bill Hardin, Tom Leigh, Coach Joe Smeltzer. Uunsl, Alex Murashko, Gordon Muir, lSophsl, Steve Chris Mullen, Larry Kocinski, Art Fox, Phil Hunter, Coaches Chris Babbit and Kim Hunt. Fourth row, lJrsl, Jim Jackman, Tod Molloy, Rob Carlsen, Mark Teflian, Kent Moore, Chuck Richardson, Tim Garrelts, Paul Amundson, Rick Hess, Coaches John French and Jim Horsford. Front row, lSrsl, Greg Kempf, Brian Ulmer, Jim Bryan, Tim Eccles, Eric Thomas, Steve Swanson, Mark Jeske, Alex McEwan, Mike Kerrigan, Bob Boss, Jack Backman, Ron Selbo. 'I' WRESTLING: Top row, Robert Meyers, Jim Coats, Todd Romsdahl, Steve Hart, Dana Williams. Second row, Mr. Patrick DeFoe, Randy Carlson, Mark Robertson, Nathan Smith, Steve Tapp, Perry Becky, Mr. Ray Greb, Mr. Vern Skari. Third row, Phil Tilton, Mark Frohardt, Keith May, Ric Brill, Scott Gilliom, Steve Suder. Fourth row, Kenny Marsh, Dan Carlson, Tom Dinicola, Brian Pasque, Danny Mallon, Don Brownell. HOCKEY: Top row, Dave Bell, Dennis Stevenson, Doug Christman, Dan Hommel, Kevin Wallace, Jim Brassfield, Jim Eide, Mike Ballantine, Bob Jones, Mark Cope- land, Bob Moriarty, Jeff Villnow, Randy Dzaman, Gary Singer, Mike Jones, Coach Buckner. Bottom row, Eric Froistad, David Tom Carter, Dan Cammack, Ken Breiten- bach, Dan Petit. 1 Kauffman, Barry Eckert, Dave Coddington, GIRLS GYMNASTICS: Top row, Mrs. V ., I Garner, Olivia Donnell, Bonnie Galyean, Kathy Jones, Tina Kouris, Georgia Gal- yean, Robin-Perry-Smith, Nancy Glass, Karen Mussey, Kathy Frisby, Kim Talcott, Miss Kissell. Bottom row, Debbie Dutton, Lori Peterson, Patti Richards, Connie King, Jo Cassin, Mary Murry, Cindi Straw, Gwen Grey. GIRLS SWIM TEAM TIMERS: Top Cindy Jeppson, Jan Harrington, Lisa Brita Haugen, Lynn Kelley, Bonnie I E , , ' I c I ' Judie Craig. Second row, Nancy Mc J Teri Holman Robin Lutz Angie Co Charlene Green, Sara Fritts, Julie M Third row, Sharon Donald, Patti Do Amy Stearns, Mette Dahlberg, Joyce ner, Kathy Kerrigan. Bottom row, Ci Chapman, Jill Struble, Lori Johnson Richard. 4, E QI PEP CLUB: Top row, Cindy Leisge, Kathy Lamb, Bonnie Kieser, Diane Deden, Jody Stewart, Julie Turner, Cindy bhora, Mary Joyce Kellmen, Mette Dahlberg, Amy Stearns, Moniw Sena, Patti Porter, Cindy Jacobson, Mary Pat Nelson, Sue Bradley, Debbie Donald, Karen Daciek, Nancy Forsythe, Connie Marx, Mary Breyer. Idler, Judie Craig. Fourth row, Jeri Gee, Kimberly Muller, Pam Second l'0W, Karen Nlallin. Kari Johnson. K8Il'lV Kendall, LOFFBUB Leskela, Franki Sumner, Brenda Swiers, Barb Ball, Pat Schroer, Sarris, Marv Anne Goad, Julie Thomas, Anne Gregarek. Pam Plank, Lynn Scott, Chellie Campbell, Teri Tighe, Marzene Parks, Tracey Jan l'l8fflnQf0n. PSQQV Walfeff Cafhleen l'lU9l195f Nllkl Nagel, SUZY Brown, Diana Doubek. Bottom row, Laurie Heyer, Eunice Bensor HHQQSVYV. Ellen Kl'emel'S. Cafhle Safbef. Debbi AVlSWOfIl1. Kim Sheila Harvey, Brita Haugen, Jan Udevitz, Kathy Kerrigan, Lee Hlewko, Stacey VanWart, Betsy Hensal. Third row, Kitty Darnall, Green, Katie Hansen, Lori Peterson, Sara Frittg, Sue Christie, Pam Haire, Nancy Alberg, Lisa Starr, Sandi Kinchen, CHEERLEADERS: Top row, Srs, Melanie Hopper, Sue Eckert, Mary Murphy, Teresa Daciek, Chris McDonnell, Barb Ball. Second row, Srs., Barb Platt, Karen Jones, Teri Tighe, Amy Glover, Carol Gear, Mindi Chamberlin, Mary Kwiatkowski, Sue Cal- houn. Third row, Jrs., Nancy Glass, Barb Done, Wendy Mead, Darla Click, Grace Bailey, Pam Caruthers. Bottom row, Sophs., Lisa Book, Tehmi Monzon, Teresa Taylor, Prish Parrish, Julie Smith, Gail Ritter. RLE RS: Top row, Jeanie Sample, Shari Kanengieter, Terry inny Durdy, Debbi Rich, Joy Bennett. Bottom row, Colleen Houston. deleine Kukura, Diane Nielsen, Mary Heiser, Laurie Mattson, TOM-TOMS: Top row, Jule Temple, Pam Whitman, Katy Hulings, Denise Keller, Jan Doty, Sue Griffindorf, Wendy Philo, Meri- deth Locke. Bottom row, Danae Brownell, Pat Schroer, Karen Brenneman, Leslie Peterson, Kitty Dreher, Ann Pugh, Shelia JIAIDS: Top row, Sharon Henderson, Chellie Campbell, Lynn GAA: Top row, Dana Solomon, Brenda White, Michele Guimarin, Debi Ellefson, June Hays. Bottom row, Karla Saulter, Kari John- Molly Fischer, Brenda Miller, Diana Solomon, Miss Luce. Bottom Rane Kirkegaard, Pam Goodloe, Tammie Damon. row, Pam Caruthers, Karin Greuter, Joanne Greuter, Debbie Wilson. 215 CHORALETTES: Top row, Laurie Craig, Ann Layman, Gretchen Adams, Joyce Winans, Wendy Mead, Tina Swa, Linda Clausen, Teresa Conway. Second row, Debbie Euhus, Linda Fitzpatrick, Peggy Van- denberg, Peggy Walter, Linda Olson, Pam Jones, Vicki Bangert. Third row, Ann Brazeal, Susie Hale, Tina Burns, Denise Burton, Sheila Cope. Bottom row, Diane Kirkegaard, Tina Kouris, Mary Jarvis, Darla Click. MADRIGALS: Top row, Nancy Oxford, Erik Brekke, Frank Oden, Jennifer Cox, Steve Alberg, Michael Hunter, Johanna Keller. Bottom row, Paul Danni, Diane Prentice, Jodi Buckwalter, Magi McKinnies, Steve Burkholder. WS ORCHESTRA: Top row, Linda Leavitt, Steve Horacek. Middle row, Beth Shugart, Sue Lampton, Celeste Hicks, Laura Obeiter, LeeAnn Grothe, Mary Anne Goad, Lori Goodwin. Bottom row, Bob Hanson, Kari Johnson, Tom Taylor, Linda Waalen, Christi Dyer, Kathy Van- denberg, Cathy Gibson. CONCERT CHOIR: Top row, Jeff Dark, Steve Burkholder, Bill Craig, Frank Oden, Paul Danni, Mike Hunter, Steve Alberg, Chris Fox, Forrest Mays, Dave Bate, Dave Larson, Don Seese. Row two Doug Most, John Erickson, Tim O'Neil, Jim Martin, Chuck Richa son, Tony Woodward, Kent Moore, Greg Coleman, Erik Brekke, Sinclair, Jeff McCool, Dan Miller. Row three, Diane Prentice, Kim Kohlenberg, Jean Joransen, Jacque Stewart, Karine Herbst, Jennit' ' VBS: in if Z ' -3 MARCHING BAND: Top row, Andy Betsch, Norman Brown, Richard Cramer, Steve Alpiner, Doug Williams, Mike Ericson, Dan Prickett, Doug Roe, Steve Hansen, Mark Bay, Arthur Fox, Jim Miller, Gary Rosholi, Pat Kellner, Dave Sawyer, Mark McMullen, Tracy Six, Stephen Haskins. Second row, Craig Jones, Chris Tom Glenn Tomasko, Dan Bronstein, Bill Fitzpatrick, Miles Barrett, David Dutton, Forrest Mays, Tony Novitsky, Eric Thomas, John Seydler, Rod Bagby, Bruce Osborne, Dave Olson, Mark Lehnertz. Third row, Barbara Gunther, Robin Lutz, Kathy Rusin, Carla Ha Cathy Swart, Lynn Scott, Vicki Riddell, Kristie Wilson, Karen Be f . : i L . 1 -: A la 'il' , -me 5, jj" ' ',-'flxxi'-J". , lf' . , . l tx . , . . . ..,,, .,,.. 1 - l . , A 1 ,- .- mas, Patty Benson, Diane Thurston, Katy Hulings, Diane Brown, zette Parks, Pam Love, Leslie Peterson. Bottom row, Miss rcelene Dillon, Debbie Shanker, Linda Williams, Jennifer Cox, i McKinnies, Vicki Borden, Debbie Danback, Kris Proctor, Debi alsky, Beth Schlosser, Connie Bouchard, Nancy Oxford, Sharolyn ss, Mary Catanese, Johanna Keller, Jodi Buckwalter, Katy Miller. .W S of lren Daciek, Sally Priebe, Becky Harris, Diana Peister, Carolyn ie, Lynn Kelley, Sharon Beenck, Brita Haugen, Bonnie Kieser, my Young. Fourth row, Karen Murlin, Kim Landin, Teresa :Bride, Barbara Hockman, Caryn Yaeger, Joyce Proch, Cheryl Six, uren O'Brien, Dianne Smedl, Sharon Schneebeck, Collette Kimball, ula Hannen, Pam Haire, Sue Christie, Laurie Craig, Kira Strouf, lrci Hdttle, Gail MacElwee. Bottom row, Van Uhlmann, Mark with, Tim Benson, Alfred Hotchkiss, Phil Morris, Mike John, Bob eene, Jeff Schushy, Bob Barnard, Jim DeVries, Rick Carbone, ke Coon. MIMES: Top row, Tom Jackson, Neva Kay Nickels, Dave Houck, Dan Lombardi, Mr. Ron Anderson. Row two, Carol Burnside, Nancy Frasz, Ann Brazeal, Scott Eldredge, Bottom row, Dan Jewell, Jean Kamuck, Barb Hrivnak. SPEECH TEAM: Top row, Kim Bishop, Mr. Jim Westbrook, Scott Eldredge, Gordon Garb. Middle row, Jean Kamuck, Kip Bishop, Marlene Pabers, Ron Lembke, Pat Angell, Brenda Miller, Karen Jones, Dan Jewell. Bottom row, Paul Wharry, Patti Donald, Bob Lembke, Karen Steinhauser, Dave Wacker. - ' 4 - - ' STAGE BAND: Top row, Dan Prickett, Mark Bay, Steve Hansen, Dan Bronstein, John Seydler, Don Dunham. Middle row, Bill Fitz- patrick, Alfred Hotchkiss, Jeff Schashny, Doug Row, Colette Kim- ball, Linda Leavitt. Bottom row, Miles Barrett, Vicki Riddell, Felix Mays, Mike John, Arthur Fox, Bob Greene. STUDENT COUNCIL: Top row, Bob Lembke, Laurie McDonald, Laura Sasaki, Karen Jones, Christy Wilson, Eve Huggins, Robin Micheli, Jeri Gee, Kitty Darnell, Nancy Alberg, Cindy Leisge, Kathy Lamb, Marzette Parks. Middle row, Marian Baker, Peggy Walters, Karen Steinhouser, Neal Rubin, Tom Jackson, Debbie Schanker, Kirk Monzon, Cindy Jacobsen, Pati Schaefer, Kevin Thomas, Terry Cheek, Sherry Thompson, Brenda Miller. Bottom row, Mark Frohardt, Gretchen Adams, Sue Eckert, Diane Hatfield, Bess Bronstein, Brad Schafer, Carol Burnside, Tom Malloney, Bob Greene, Pascal Zuffery, Steve Sh ugart, Jan Harrington, Carol Gear. A Q - . SWASHTA: Top row, David Lohman, Linda Reese, Neva Kay Nickels, Jean Joransen, Debbie Deuth, Charlene Croley, Karen Anderson, Linda Switzer, Dave Roth, Adam Self, Ron Selbo, John Stephens. Bottom row, Betsy Stephens, Neal Rubin, Heather McGregor, Kathleen MacKenzie. F ...-1 ? 4 - Q-qw. CHESS CLUB: Top row, Bob Paul, Mark Miller, Stephen Haskinl Mike Miller, Brian Plomondon, Mike Sheppard, Jim McKee. Mid row, Phill Krug, Joel Jensen, Mark Strunk, George Krzymowski, X Chuck Pettigrew, Gordon Garb, Jim Burnside. Bottom row, Mike McGee, Phil Morris, Steve Krug, Bruce Miller, Brad Schaefer, Keri Davis, Tim Benson, Allen Van Nest. 5 FRENCH CLUB: Top row, Rich Garb, Cindy Zahora, Christie Griffith, Gordon Garb, Colleen Webber, Kathy Bruck, Mark Strun Bottom row, Connie Talcott, Katy Miller, George Krysmowski, John Vogl, Miss Flogge, Cathleen Hughes. IDGE CLUB: Top row, Phil Morris, Steve Primm, George mowski, John Mathews, Gordon Garb. Bottom row, Bruce Ier, Mike McGee, Mark Strunk, Brad Schaefer, Mrs. Leif. nag s S az R W .: fm: L. Y CLUB: Top row, Dave Baur, Bob Jones, John Vogel, Tom :kson, Layne Weber, Steve Alberg, Tony Woodward, Walt Jost. ddle row, Mark Frohardt, Mark Miesner, Brian Roberts, Magi Kinnies, Steve Perkins, Steve Horacek. Bottom row, Kim Coats, ke John, Chuck Green, Steve Burkholder. PRE MED CLUB: Top row, Cindy Zahora, Pattie Sheaffer, Randall Richards, Jim Steyaert, Rich Garb, John Vogl, Paul Godin, Mark Norris, Kent Roberts, Susan Rush. Bottom row, Mrs. Craver, Marzette Parks, Linda Lewis, Wendy Mead, Michaella MacKay, Karen Jones, Pat Angell, Cathleen Hughes, Deborah Johnson, Boyd Fenton. L- LDIO AND ELECTRON- SCLUB: Mike Willard, ke Chambers, Marlene Jers, Mr. Gene Merrill. FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS OF AMERICA: Top row, Bev Ball, Kathy O'Brien, Barb Ball, Mary Kwiatkowski, Debbie Hanson, Kim Meyer. Bottom row, Margaret Hamlin, Joyce Kellner, Debbie Brinkman, Jeannie Hedrick. EARTH CLUB: Top row, Teri Holman, Julie Hardin, Judy Lindross Lori Holman. Bottom row, Rick Callahan, Pattie Sheaffer, Parry Benson. CO-EDITORS Kathie Holland Eric Pefley ASSISTANT Bess Bronstein THE SENSE OF LEARNING Laurie McDonald IN YOUR OWN TIME Coleen Gogarty THE INNER TRIUMPH Leon Vaitaitis FACES Debby Harrison Wanda Cooley Scott Eldredge Diane Hatfield Tom Heywood Neva Nickels STAFF Tom Curtis Kim Gerwin Sharon Henderson Tim Kirchner Linda Olson Rod Skotty David Roth Carrie Willis PHOTOGRAPHERS Eric Pefley Wanda Cooley Tim Kirchner David Roth BUSINESS Kim Gerwin ART AND COVER DESIGN Tim Kirchner Linda Olsen STUDENT PORTRAITS Darnell Grissinger Markay Maxwell Smythe Rolf Workman ADVISOR Mr. Fred Koteskey NEWSFOTO R EPR ESENTATI VE Mr. Wayne Ackermann 1:1 ' B ,.......-. 1-4 --1 1 1 Y ' A 1 '- ' .41 ,Zi ' f , x W L. ,167 Always there will be more questions than answers. But through the seeking, my spirit grows, subtracting conflicts which I care not to have affect me and adding things that may lend themselves to my final goal. And what is that final goal? I strive to spread ioy around me by understanding my fellow man. And with that joy, cheerfulness becomes a common trait for me knowing my life is what I make it. My eyes are opened seeing myself in a world that has a place for me and all I must do is accept it. 'IT 55: ,., . .1,., x , y Y A '.,f . 1 ..., H , N i . u I 1 .1 fs, u'm'.7:, I ' W , ,.., ',. mf -if 'bs ." 1. X . I-5 jf. :' 1. N f , . . .- , , " mi '?2:"' L 4 ' A 5.2517 , 4- K ,h I f V A Y, ,511 5 1: Yi ffxmi gm X ' -' I -R. "..x,1'1:3'3:?:?, "V 'i".X '-' ' Qi ' ' Q ,f,"fLi,w-2'?H1 fhikgflfi fx FE ff. 'X fe 11 " ffif-'LJETiiz21f1. e' 4 . L -A. ,wx .. f- -1,.' 4'-'+ 7 ' Kgs . T ' -, A L V- ' ,I L'.:,v5,1." u V , f -qu: .Q.- -,. . if 1 :,y,f:,.V g',.Fl,r as f, ' if J- Fw" -':liF'?5LgfE, Q a " wx- , ' - -I-" 14? R ' 1. ' 'I -' " 'W ', J' -:fy VH? if -V" . . 9 125? 'v'..l',r- " 6 exif ? f7?fs-f Hgwlqf. e 1 AW . Q' j "V QV, V ,, ,aux f .R N-,N v 3 ' 4. ,, v 1 xl :Mu : 1' .1 114, kt - J ' I ' I 4' V' 1- .g::'?5dj. . . s., L--av - .- , 1, .pw- Y 1 .1 1 A A , .E J iv . , . . if A f ' . , A i ,. gf ,I ' A 1. 'F ' f ' ' ,P f 'M I 1, ' . . f . I 4 f I , " , . ' I f I , fu' 1 , f fasp1rat1ons, 1 DESIDERA TA U PLACIDLY AMID THE NOISE REMEMBER WHAT PEACE THERE IN SILENCE. AS FAR AS POSSIBLE surrender be on gofd terms with all persons, Speak quietly Sr clearlygf and listen to others, even the dull they too have the'. story. Q Avoid loud 81 aggressive they are vexations o the spirit. lf you compare others, you may be me vain 81 bitter, for always there greater Sz lesser pe sons than yourself. Enjoy your acme me as well as your pla , Q Keep interested in your own cagt however humble, it I a real of time. Exercise ca lion in is full of trickery. B let this not is, many persons striv for high ideals, of heroism. Q Be yo self. Especially, either be cynlcal abou senchantment it is pe co sel the years, Nu ure st n But not born fatigu gentle ith yr than the rees Sz whether o not it is folding as 't should of w1th shield are a for the face as the doubt be at and in the changing affairs, for the to what v everywhere feign aridity God till the whatever yo h soul. Q Wit 1, 4 still a world FQUND IN OLD keep with 1692


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