Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA)

 - Class of 1930

Page 1 of 112

 

Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1930 Edition, Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1930 Edition, Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1930 Edition, Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1930 Edition, Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1930 Edition, Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1930 Edition, Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 112 of the 1930 volume:

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A L QV: -M -V +L- V1-,LV fw:...a..f.-ma VV . . ' .--' V. ,. 'YV '11?-V.ir":2f.',2gfa:h'51Z',4i'wi.1:2na:'f1efikL:Vff15::?5 , . . . ,. . , .. 1 ...V .- , .,M...,,,..VVl ,V -, M.,,,, ..E.V,.....Qk- Vg, ...W - gMv,,, :,Q- 73- , V vi, , L SMA, W! U MISS MARY E. WILSON Om' Prizzcijml ' and to IVIISS ORAL 1. SHUNK Om' Vice-Pmzcillml, this Twenty-.fecmzd Volume of Nous AND BECKS is fondly and gmiefzzlly clkcfimten' Tl-lE STAFF Editor-iii-Cfoief . . Art Editor . . Literary Editor . Bizriizeis Mtziztzger . .Alitirmtze Editor . Social Editor . Calendar Editor . joke Editor . Drtziztittic Editor . Athletic Editor . . Siztzprlaot Editor . Typiit .... Port Grtzdiitzte Editor Senior Editor . . fitrtior Editor . . Sophomore Editor . Freyhimzn Editor . Lower Srhool Editor Efzciiltyfldifirer' . . . . Margaret Gilmour . . MarieiEvans . . . . Anne Hus Elizabeth van Loben Sels . Elizabeth Goodfellow . Alice jean Floyd . . Elinore Riley . . Elinor Hunt . Barbara jones . Josephine Little . . Elizabeth Fogg . Aleida Le Nobel . Martha Lowsley . . Betty Holley . . Alice Lumgair . Beth Thomas . Frances Ebey . . . Karin Lund . . Suzanne E. Throop JEAN JACOBS MARY CLEAVELAND YADNA RICH VIRGINIA MCENEANY MARTHA LONVSLEY VIRGINIA WARDEN ELZABETH KANT MADALENE MCCRACKEN I VIRGINIA LUM 6 Allow me, . . . Lord! and Laafief ummniiiniin1inviniinIvuiuumumimummmimuuunmummmmmmimmnmmimm' X N this year, 1930, those of us who make our final bow from the stage of Anna Head, offer this small vol- ume with its bits of rhyme, sheaf of prose, and fragments of song, for the diversion of our fellows, who tread the same boards as we. To some who read, it will seem but an idle playlet, while to those who have passed throughgthe halls of wisdom as actors in the serious drama of learning, we hope, in future years, it will read as beautiful romance and enlightening history. Be assured that we, the staff, have acted our part as best we might, for the sole purpose of serving the school, and fostering the ties of mutual reciprocity and esteem. THE EDITOR Q? 7 I I pray you bear, why I alone appefzr. THE STAFF OF Nous AND BECKS itfzlfb I0 expreff their fzpprecifzfiofz I0 ZVU55 Tbroop for the kim! aiu' Jbe bm gilzfezz in rzmkizzg lfJi5 hook 41 mcfesx. 8 -1'-' ' ' 44 I.: v , . x ' 1,5 'S , . , , 'Ze il 'Z2'i'- 'jg gh A f 2 4 if 9: 1 ' 4.-w g f - 5La1L-Orfefwa. 5 x . ' ' , A 5' ?ii'?i4': ' -W .- ii X ' I 'gm , 7' . x 1 N " v . , i . ii- f N MC LITERATURE I am the Prologue. me Atom From north to south, and east to west, Witli vim and never ceasing zest, The scientists work with a will To try to break or smash or drill The Afom! But always with perverse intent, And always so impenitent, It capers, and with sprightly dash Evades the knife that seeks to slash The Atom! But when they get the atom broke It won't be such a dog-gone joke, For they'll be able to efface This world, so one can't find a trace, By just applying the same force That broke and smashed and did divorce The Afom! So now I pray with all my might The Atom will keep up the hght, And dodge and party, shun and Hee The knife, and always, L1l'Ll"djl.f be The Atom! MARX' EMMA JEFFRES, '32 Iiirirf prize. Poefry. Nndf nm! Betula' Literary Collier! IO Our Author tonight tt clmpter will borrow innnivnnnivninvinuinunnnuIIinI1unInnnnunnunun1vuIinIinnmmnmnuumuu1IinIuiInumIinnnIn11IIinInmmmnummim A Teacherls -l-ri let O It's a beautiful day But I must correct Ex's! That is always the way. It's a beautiful day But at home I must stay, And my spirit it vexes . . . It's a beautiful day But I must correct Ex's! S.E.T. 1 1 The Aviator He Hies. The fleecy clouds drift by As he speeds on his unrried way, He hears the voiceless spaces cry, Tho' caution bid him stay. But he is pledged to a shooting star, Where mountains dream in haze, And his eager spirit journeys far Through space's mystic ways. He is lulled by the crooning of his ship O'er the rim of a fog Washed sea, To the mustard terrace hills helll dip l Like an eagle from bonds let free. MARGARET GILMOUR, '30 ll From Life with its Laughter mm' its Sorrow. l'lat:Racks K WAS in a hotel dining-room one evening waiting for my dinner to be served, and having nothing better to do, I watched a hat rack, standing near the door. As I ob- " , served the stream of people entering, I was surprised to see how many really had need of it. When I first saw , the mahogany hat-rack I was reminded of a house where gp llt I spent a week-end. In this house, in the small and r A tastefully furnished vestibule, I remembered having seen a small glass hat-rack in the shape of a monkey tree. How nice my companions tall silk hat looked on it! Now I observed several black derbies reposing in state. In a few minutes they were completely covered with a miscellaneous assortment of head cover- ings. My attention was drawn to a dapper little gentleman wearing a very natty gray hat, gray spats, and carrying a malacca cane. He carefully removed his hat, and placed it on the rack. Then, having looked over the assortment of hats with the air of a Connoisseur, he placed his cane there also. Gracefully and stylishly he walked away, having first picked out his table by the aid of a little monocle. Next, I observed a very fat man. He looked like a politician, and he was smoking a long, black cigar. He smacked his hat on top of the one belonging to our friend in gray with much force and gusto. The latter had tasted his food, and not finding it to his liking, rose, and walked over to the hat-rack. He recovered his hat, and with an injured expression pushed it into shape and brushed it carefully. Then he departed, still wearing an air of injury. A very small man with an extremely timid demeanor had been eyeing the hat-rack longingly for some time. His dinner had been eaten, but he still sat on, gazing pensively at the hat-rack. He had been one of the first to use the rack. I wondered if he was waiting for someone, or what his purpose was. I was interested, so I watched closely to see what his next move would be. Mean- while, the pile of hats on the rack was slowly diminishing, and my dinner was still untouched. I hastily made a beginning, and soon an end of it. Then, observing the hat-rack out of the corner of my eye, I quite easily connected the various hats with their owners. I prophesied that a fat man with many gravy spots on his vest would come blustering up to claim a large, stained, sloppy looking hat, and that a tiny rnan with an over-abundance of self-confidence, would look for a large, heavy hat just exuding security. I knew that a young men with a violent tie and wild 12 IJ not the Actor KZ Mem with el heart like you? socks would leap gracefully along, recover a bright green hat with a rakish turn to it, and then saunter nonchalantly onward. By now most of the hats were gone, and a very few people were left in the dining-room. I had almost forgotten the timid little soul sitting nearby, when my wandering gaze discovered him. He was folding his napkin carefully and conscientiously, and adjusting the chair just so. Then, he smiled deprecatingly at the waitress, gave her an overly large tip, and walked to the hat-rack. He apologized to a stout old gentleman for no reason at all, and removed his hat from the rack. I imagine that he had been afraid of disturbing the other hats and thought it safer to wait until his was easily accessible. He walked quietly out and I was the only occupant of the room. On my way out I cast a glance of farewell at the hat-rack standing guard. There were still two or three hats reposing in state. How anyone can forget a hat on a hat-rack is incomprehensible to me, for, to me a hat-rack is truly educational, and through it one is introduced to many types of people. JUNE STEVENSON, '31 Firrl Prize Nod! and Beekr Lilemry Context 2, I px , r. f. t. - V f-:V-te.. -M- , . , -A.. .. . . X tm- 4 .5 .,.,, qv., 1 l t- . I . s f ,, V? 51 if: l- Q rf ,. 2, I , , it l' 'i.. Wi' ,' "yt 2' fi 5 H 51 "" I , 1, - , i l - -" ., .- . if . I .f ' i -. w at v :V V I - 4 - 'r 1 -: 5 1, l . 15' iam 'V . 'S' 2: 15, 3 ig .5 ' .6 ' 1 1,1 I -- 5 2453 2. , ': ,lf , yin? V 1 . . HL" " :' 1. ' ,f V . 'l it WZQ 3, .-"ggi ,Hu ' fw- Vf-W - w t -, f , if , , aa.. . v ,, . if Jmx...1:..-.w-: ' 1- , .4 aw,--tar.. e v , f- , - V I . ,, f' A' fl1f:5"?i1?ffTf5filf3lf?2'li F151-,.5j2:':,'iL':i':f'ii'f , sara " g a r w Iliff- 15 S 0 'tif for you that our Author has written E Pluribus num Ag N OLLECTING things . . . any things . . . seems to be a great t sport lately. The magazines publish long accounts of the perils and hardships endured by an intrepid collector of variously sized and shaped safety pins, or of the extreme measures adopted by a heroic collector of old flasks, vvhen he saw in a bank vault a magnificent green bottle, which he knew must be his. fThe poor man went to prison for bank robbing, after discovering that his prize had at one time held ginger ale.j Boys, at one time or another, collect milk bottle tops. I tried that once, but my collection never flourished. -'wt-c, gag. ,f-"Wai " Y. , .. 4 ffm ig Z it .. L l ' 'ri 9.9: I "ff A few years later I noticed the great variety of designs on the backs of playing cards. One day, Mother brought home cards having a large, sleepy, black cat on the backs. I liked the cat, whose name was Topsy, and annexed the joker. In the course of time I collected about ten cards having different pictures and designs on them. I remember that one was a tall camel standing in a very yellow desert, with an even yellower sky above him. Also, there were red-and-white, and blue-and-white designs, with cupids riding bicycles on them . . . the then ever present "Bicycle Playing Cards." - However, I had no place to keep my cards, so imagine my horror when one day, I discovered that Topsy, my beloved cat, my charter member, had become restless, and had changed her address without notifying me! The errant one's place in the diminutive collection Qbut not in my hearty was filled by a smiling, tousled airedale, but I never ceased searching for my darling. Not until about two years ago, when I had quite a respectable number of cards, did I see another "Topsy." A grown-up friend had been an ardent collector when she was a girl. Wlien she found some of her old cards, she sent them to me, and among them was the lost Topsy's counterpart, accom- panied by an aristocratic white friend called Tabby. These two seem perfectly satisfied to remain with me, and I hope that the airedale doesn't chase them away. Witli the cats came a sweet, simple country girl of the "gay nineties" who simpers in an horrible fashion, and leans on a rustic, although somewhat artificial gate, with a large boquet of huge daisies clasped firmly in her hands. There is a companion to this dear girl, a bathing girl, conspicuously labeled 'iNeptuna," who is as beauteous as her friend, but of a somewhat later period. She is attired in a very pretty, though somewhat cumbersome, bathing costume, a bandana covering most of her Howing locks, and a pair of long black stockings. 1-f Ami the story he tells is true. ImmiImIInIInIInIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIImnnuIInIIInIInIInIInInunuIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII During vacation a few summers ago, I saw beside a fire hydrant a card with painted flowers industriously climbing over its brilliant orange back- ground. Snatching it quickly, I bore it triumphantly home. You see, I am not at all particular where I get my cards, although I usually wash the cards with- out pedigrees in antiseptic soap. The collecting of cards is a great occupation, and one's friends are very thoughtful in sending cards from foreign lands and strange places. When one has a collection of anything there is the fascinating task of sorting and keeping it properly housed, and habits of neatness and routine are established. One can- not collect without gaining much entertainment and incidental information. Therefore, say I, collect something! ELIZABETH RICHARDSON, '31, Birch -l-ree A sparkling silver outline Against a golden sky, A slim and quivering sentry To watch while night goes by, A dark, tall, ghost-like shadow In black and deepest grey, A lithe, flame-tinted dancer As comes the dawn and day. CHARLOTTE FRIEND, '3 1. 15 A Jong of memory deep in fait heart Cn Going to Bed OW jane, don't be the next half hour getting to bed!" The mere sentence, old and often repeated, several times in one evening in fact, sends an apprehensive chill up and down my back. "just a minute!" is a vague but excellent reply, because it shows that I am busy, wastes a little time, and does not sound unmannerly. After several more remonstrances you really must get up from your chair. This is merely to avoid causing irritationj Then, several more minutes can easily be wasted between standing in front of the heater to warm your feet, Qwhich are not really coldj getting a glass of water, and arranging your books for the next day. Things begin to get a little tense after that, you can't fool around much longer. After long experience you can arrange the intervals quite successfully. So now it is necessary to walk laggingly over to the door and open it a little. "Mother, did I tell you about that dress at the last formal? It was longer in the back than mine is." Mother perks up her ears and remarks knowingly, "but Chanel's latest model is very much like yoursf' There is no stumping mother! A short, fthey are always shortj rather strained argument follows. Mother is rather on edge, torn between desire to get me to bed and to satisfy her interest in the latest fashions. A subject like this one can't last forever, it is bound to "go to an endf' Mother grits her teeth. !'Will you go to bed." "I'm going!" is the reply, . . . another safe one. After applying the much hated tooth-brush, and trimming of fingernails to suit father's particular idea of lovely nails, Qyou can easily imagine what that isj you return to the warm sitting room. "You certainly were in there long enough." "I wasn't at all, I certainly wouldn't stay any longer than I had to, I guess!" After a little more foot-warming and another glass of water, and several prolonged good-nights, you mosey over to the other door, and lay your hand on the knob. Sometimes you can get away with another short argument, again you can t. It seems as though the steepest steps to climb are those on the way to bed. I usually take them at a running leap because I am very imaginative and often fool myself into believing that there is something behind me. Once safely in my room, my one desire is to get to bed and read before Mother arrives Qas she inevitably does just as I begin to be interested in a storyj to snap off my light. 16 One day ruins ringing. Wfilb truth A sense of duty to your youthful beauty makes you cold-cream your hands until they are uncomfortably greasy, and makes you dab a little on your nose, with an ever-faithful hope that it will banish a pimple, some freckles, or the like. fYou always awaken, of course, with that identical blemish, if not another one besidesj. , Once comfortably settled on your pillows, your aspect towards going to bed is very different, for you immediately get drowsy and begin to dream of the pleasant things in the past or future. CONSTANCE WOOLSEY, '3 1. 1 Y oria Pincknzy: avigator That our class records may properly chronicle the unique accomplishments of one of our co-sufferers in the process of education, we sought the classic atmosphere of Toria Pinckney's study. Strange to relate, however, it being the holiday season, we found her in the late afternoon hours surrounded by books, maps, charts . . . working not with the compass, but with Christmas evidences of truly girlish character. This temporary diversion, however, did not interfere with her usual cheery responses, but it was soon made apparent that no satisfactory comments concerning her nautical achievements would be forth- coming. Other sources than our heroine herself had to be consulted to obtain the needed material with which to record her experiences. "Tory" has logged about thirty-five thousand miles of ocean traveling in the summers of nineteen twenty-eight and nine, and has retained her own log books. She has done her trick at the helm down among the beautiful islands of the South Sea, and has tried her hand at seamanship in the ports of North Greenland and New Guinea. V In the Samoan Islands she stopped at Pago Pago, an island among this rou that is onl twent -four miles around, with its reat mountain called Rainmaker, looming over the isle and villages, so picturesque, set in great masses of tropical growth that is picturesque until the dust is seen, and with its one cook-house and community bath. Apia, where Robert Louis Stevenson is buried, is on the summit of Yaca Mountain, beautiful harbors, long stretches of white beaches, livid with tropical 17 He wrote it. S 0 you ffm!! 566 ur here growth, great waves breaking up on the sands from which much too often huge sharks' fins cut the white foam. On the island of Suva, among the Fijis is a large field across from the only hotel in Suva, on which landed the remarkable plane . . . Southern Cross. Here also are magnificent orchids that grow wild and profusely. Tulage is the government seat of the Solomon Isles. It is only seven miles around but a very beautiful seven miles! Here Toria played tennis with the governor. 'l'oria's navigator's rating was awarded her at the conclusion of a four months' cruise in the South Seas, last October. She left on this trip last June rated only as supercargo. On the ship's return on her record appeared the entry, "Toria Pinkney-Fourth Officer!" And so we salute you, Fourth Officer Pinckney, one of the world's youngest girl navigators! BETTY HOLLEY. '5O. To A Collection Poems that lie here before me, Among which I pick and choose, Do you hope you'll come up to the standard? Or do you pray that youlll lose? Do you wish me to quickly reject you, And pass you by with a look? Do you think youzll be free forever If you're not enclosed in a book? Or do you hope that Illl keep you, Until during some dreary night I pick up my book and run through it And come upon you in delight? And find in you all that I hoped for, And learn what I knew from the start, That some clay your beauty must move you From your place in the book to my heart. V VADNA RICH, '30. 18 Where you look on zu clad in motley and timel, aczrtes: outh and Man .' Arr HE Huctuatin intensi of Laertes' character is one of the - v ... . 8. . . ' ,f if ' most fascinating things in Hamlet. Of the same general x., 'Q . . . class, although a little different in rank, Hamlet and - 1 Laertes can be compared throughout the play, Hamlet, E bitter, subtly and cynically humorous, not quite willing , 1- to act drasticall until he is sure of his round, Laertes, , .s i Y 1 . - gay, courtly, not too serious,.but 'capable of good reason- ' f" ing, and wild and heedless in his fury. In my mind, Laertes is a character which can never grow out of date. Shakespeares fame has grown on painting such people. Laertes is hardly dif- ferent from a young man of the twentieth century. Well-bred, gay, a sports- man . . . if he were to be transplanted to this day, even with its different customs, he would soon be able to fit in. He is dutiful to his country, king, and father, but once his duty is done it does not hamper him, and he is off to gayer life than the court of Denmark can give. Like many a youth of today, any objections his father may have are tactfully overruled, and the asking of permission is little more than formality. The paternal attitude with which he gives his sister advice is decidedly typical of an older brother, but he shows quick perception and foresight when he warns her not to lose her heart to Hamlet: "his greatness weighed, his will is not his own." W'hen Ophelia shows her spirit and questions his own behavior . . . well, his boat is waiting, and he must hurry! And yet, peculiar to that time, he respects and listens to his father's long and preaching sermon on manners, morals, and philosophy. Beside that courtly youth, whom we know as Laertes, stands the man Laertes. The man who sways the people, that "Antiquity forgot, custom not known", they call him lord. He is not reasonable, he does not weigh his actions and their consequences as would Hamlet. "I dare damnation!" cried Laertes, which is what Hamlet is trying to avoid. Laertes knows that his father was murdered. Without reasoning he turns on the one in whose care his father rested, as the murderer. But his actions here show the impulsive youth even in the man. A little persuasive argument from the king, the realization that Ophelia's madness is due in Part to her love for the prince, and he is ready to believe the king holy, and Hamlet fit to have "his throat cut i' the church." He forgets that he and Hamlet were once almost brothers, and Polonius and Ophelia were the last persons Hamlet 19 Think, then, our! are hzmmn laearts had cause to turn against, So violent is his desire for vengeance that he sinks to the lowest depths and slays Hamlet through deceitg a poisoned rapier in an apparently harmless bout. Not until he is dying through his own machinations, does he realize what he has done to avenge his father and sisterg how insane he has been, and how villainous has been the king's management. Witli his dying breath he begs Hamlets forgiveness. A truly noble youth! SALLY T.AXY'RENCIZ JAGGER, '3O. f f Twilight Qrchestra Twilight is an orchestra Her symphony is clear But only they who listen close Her fairy minstrels hear. The ear attuned to music And the music of the spheres And something that's immortal Is gained by him who hears. So silently and softly Tread on the grass at eve, And hark to slender melodies The twilight shadows weave. BETTY GERWICIK, '30, 20 Beating with passion of glaafqnerr or of woe. The Lurczo an rancisco ng AN FRANCISCO, with its melodious name, its glamorous 5 '-1. 'ig histor its wharves and shi s its man -colored o ula- . Y' . . . ' Y . P P . , "' -.s- tion, and its hill. streets, is as colorful as m sterrous and ,tl v. , 5 I 7 7 Ag as beautiful as it was when Spanish dons paced its few "'t V 1-ff and dirt streets, when uitars were heard at ni ht in its ' -' .Q presidio, where Conchita, the daughter of the command- . r , ig . . .via "L i ante, danced with gallant Resanov, or when white- winged clipper ships made their stately way into its harbor, and hoarse bits of old miners' songs floated from the saloons which lined its plaza. Now the streets of San Francisco are many and lined with tall buildings which cut white wedges in the blue sky, Conchita Arguello sleeps in a little cemetery, Resanov in a frozen grave, the guitars are silent, the boats which come into the harbor are huge liners and above them fly with keen cool speed steel-Winged, man-made birds, and now the plaza is a quiet peaceful square. All seems changed, and yet, hovering over all is a glamour as haunting as that of old. One may still smell the salt, bilgy smells of the wharves, watch stevedores unloading ships, and hear the swish of the water against the piles. sails of gray hue no longer deck Fishermans XWharf but the boats are still deep blue, the smell of fish remains, and the soft voices of the fishermen are un- changed. In Chinatown men with quiet, aloof, impassive faces, and women with embroidered coats, and jade-ornamented hair still walk to and fro, the shops still display their stock of deer-horn, sandal-wood, jelly-fish and evil smelling herbs. In Little Italy topaz-eyed, slovenly women still sit in the sun on their doorsteps calling soft-vowelled gossip to their neighbors across the narrow, cobble-stoned street, in the tiny stores, which are decorated with sausages, cheese, tubs of fish and olives, and huge crudely-colored pictures of the Bay of Naples or Garibaldi, shopkeepers greet one with the same smile and bow. Telegraph Hill is as 'trowdyu and "bowdy" as ever, and the little Mission Dolores is still a quiet haven from the tumult of a hot and busy world. The old charm is gone, but it has been replaced by a new, no less fascin- ating or compelling, and like a rich warm color, which in spite of its deep impression evades description in mere stiff words, San Francisco still retains the friendly, hospitable cosmopolitanism which is its heritage from the Span- iards. ANNE Hus, '5O. 21 In flair wide lonely world AVC OU GZVQI' QQI1 lt? KNOXV you're seen it, when I look at it I wonder how Nye it feels, what it has seen, and if its faithful mechanical brain could think, what it would know, and if its wise old methodical face could speak, what it would relate. I'm sure if it were capable of either of the latter that I should hear something like this: 1 4 "I have stood here for a great many years, but no one thinks of offering me a seat. Still I do not care, for I am never allowed to run down. This has been my only world ex- cept for the busy factory where I was made, but I was so young then that I do not remember much of that. I know you think I must get stale, but I keep up with the times of the world. .y V -'ve --wt 5 4 "I am really a very important factor in the household, everything revolves around me and about me. I mark the time for every meal and for every class during the day. I serve as judge in many cases when anxious young girls cast hopeful glances in my direction, and either smile or frown at my undisputed decision. Those same charming young girls who are hopeless if my fatal word is not to their advantage, have at various times, tried to beguile their dignified school-marms by turning my hands back to indicate a time that can never be recalled. "You know, I am quite different from common day folks, my age does not affect my importance at all. I am looked up to and respected by both old and young. I will admit, however, that my face has not the lustre of youth, and that some of the paint has come off the letters on my face, and my hands are not as lovely as they were when I was new. But you must understand that that's not my fault, for I am just an old grandfather clock, which stands, and has stood, and will stand for many years more in the hall of Anna Head School." ELIZABETH MILLER, '31 22 Like you we breaztlae the air of H eawen. Nl a s q u ez r a cl sz LTHOUGH I was only eighteen, it was not uncommon for me to be left alone for long periods of time to take care ' of the ranch and help with the round-up. On this occa- g: sion I had been alone two weeks, while my father went Q1 V to attend the funeral of his brother and the settling of V 'Y' tl vp his estate. The pifion fire in the grate and my shaggy shepherd dog were my only companions and comforts " " on this surprisingly cool August evening. to bed when my dog sniffing the air and growling as if I was about to go he saw a bear or a mountain lion, brought my attention to a low and almost inaudible knocking at the kitchen door. Beams of cool moonlight revealed a pitiful looking old woman in disreputable shawl and bonnet from which un- kempt shocks of grey hair started at unpleasing intervals. Her left foot, in a shoe so worn as to resemble a spat, was swollen to an unbelievable size. A homemade crutch under her right arm was bearing the weight of her bulky frame. 1 asked if I could help her. "Shor,,' she gimme." I seated her her. She moved I brought from pie. "Here you the are, I was interested but I was too well to refuse a stranger replied, "by golly, I'm dog tired and I can eat anything ye'll at the kitchen table, and lighted the lamp that stood before a bit, protesting that the light hurt her eyes. In a few minutes cupboard a plate well loaded with beans and biscuit and the coffee will be ready in a few minutes." s in the old woman, and wanted to know more about her, acquainted wth the unwritten code of the country, never food, and never to question the unknown guest. She finished her meal with amazing speed, and leaned back comfortably in her chair. "You know," said she, "live a sick lad in Tucson, who's goin' to school there, and havin' no money this is the best way I know to git to him. I'll be seein, my boy in a few days now, I guess." Her eyes brightened for a moment, then grew dull again. "Ye know, I was refused anythin' to eat down the road. That road gang had mor'n six men cud use too, by gollyf' She paused a moment, then turned to me. l'My lame foot don't stand much travel, and it's gettin' late. Cud I put up here tonight?" My unfortunate guest had aroused in me all the sympathy that one person can feel for another, and I readily gave my consent. "I'l1 be on my way early in the mornin', so don't worry if l've gone afore ye're up. It's easier travelin'- in the early mornin'." "You may take anything I have here for your breakfast," I told her, and 25 Lirten to the play handed her a ten dollar bill to keep her going until she reach her destination. The poor creature almost wept with gratitude. Spreading a couple of sheep skins and a blanket near the fire for her, I retired to my own bed in the opposite corner of the room. Assured of my friend's comfort, I was soon asleep. The stranger was gone when I awoke at five the next morning, and the skins and blanket were neatly laid across the chest. My poor friend . . . I could hardly wait to ride down to the road camp to scold jim Nourse and his gang for turning the poor woman away. I had always had a good opinion of jim, and had believed that he would have shared his last wth a needy stranger. "Jim," I cried, riding up to him, "you,re a fine man, to refuse an old crippled woman foodf' "Oh yea?" said jim. "NVell, we-'ve met up with that pore old woman be- fore, and it happens, Miss Morley, that she's a MAN!" JEAN JACOBS, '3O. 1 Y When Spring Comes Back Wfhen spring comes back to the naked thorn, And the moon swings over the first spring morn, I'd rather go alone in the sweet green meads Than march with the herd and do proud deeds. I'd rather be alone and listen to the birds Than go with the crowd and say proud words, And oh! a rover I'd like to be Wlmen spring comes back to the hawthorn tree. I'll take my moments and my days And let them sing in ceaseless praise, Wlmen spring comes back to the naked thorn, And the moon swings over the first spring morn. MARGARET GILMOUR, '30, 24 1 6 1 X-- . . 1, ,az-ffg L is ' -.Qs--Q1 ,!'-, ' P ' Q - - , vm- M-5.3 4 if' 1 - A 21 VT' ,f 5 QW : Y' 41- I ff 'L ' ,F pf 1-1' -. - ' 2 Biff? P 5 . - 5 --in .av I A 345 - Q-fv, , mf., Y-ASLI 5 Q " . -5 1: mf Q- ff- - . , - . wif- Z- u- . Q24 ' 'Qffil-' '. 31 il' '- - - -iii? 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Haste thee, N ym ph and hring with thee, EUGENIA CROSS CORNELIA ABBOTT MARGARET ABBEY JEAN ANDERSON GERALDINE BINGAMAN MARY BRIED LISBETH CHENOWETH 26 fest, ami youthful follily, MARIAN CORY JANE DAY MARIE EVANS ALICE JEAN FLOYD KATHERINE FOULKE BETTY GERWICK MARGARET GILMOUR 27 Qzzipf, and cranks, mm' wanton wilef, I u A 1nunnnummmumnununuInlImIneInuIInIonInuunInuInIInInnumunnuummm:unuuunmunnmn nl n 1 LLow GERTRUDE GLAssoN ELIZSSETSEZ?-SEAN CORNELIA GREGR ELIZABETH HARDING J BETTY HOLLEY MARTHA 1-1owE 2-8 N odx, and Berks, and wreatlaed mziley, ANNE Hus AGNES IRWIN JEAN JACOBS SALLY JAGGAR BARBARA JONES ELIZABETH KANT MARY LANGDON 29 Such af bang on Hebe'5 cheek, ELIZABETH LAWRENCE ALEID4 LE NOBEL VIRGINIA LUM MADELAINE MCCRACKEN VIRGINIA MCENEANY NANCY EDNA MACKLE KATHERINE MARR 50 And love to dwell in dimples sleek, LUCILE MAST MARJORIE MATHEWS SALLY MYERS VIRGINIA NALL BETTY NORVEU' CONSTANCE OLNEY LEONA PALMER 51 1'-.v S port, that wrinkled care deridef, u :nun u I I I IInnmlmlnunuInlInlInlIIuIrullulIullInlunnnnuIunnnnnnnn1uIInunInIInIluIluIunmnnumumnnm I :lu llvlnnlulllnn ALLA PATERSON HARRIET PEEL ESTELLE PERRY TORIA PINCKNEY KATHRINE NUS ELIZABETH REGAN VADNA RICH 32 'Eu' Am! Lvauglfler, laolafing boil? his Jiaiey, ELINOR RILEY JANE RODMAN BETTY ROSS FRANCES ROYCE BARBARA SAUNDERS HELEN SEGELHURST BARBARA SHERBURNE 33 Come, and trip it ax you go NAOMI SMITH DOROTHY STANLEY FRANCES SWEDBURG JULIE SWOBE JANE UMPHRED ELIZABETH VAN LOBEN sELs VIRGINIA WARDEN 34 On the light, fanmstik toe BEVERLY WEBSTER ELIZABETH WEBB MARGARET WENTWORTH CHARLOTTE WILLOUGHEY DORIS WURKHEIM ELEANOR YONGE MARIAN YOUNG 35 I And in thy right hand bring with thee Senior Song Oh Anna Head, dear Anna Head Oar years with thee have reached an end The careless days that we have spent With days of earnest work will hlend. You hold the secrets of oar hearts, The hopes and fears we eherishg In all we do oar love for yoa We know will never perish. Oar dearest friends have all heen here, Oar hest ideals we've found in thee,' U7e've learned within yoar spaeiotis walls To reach oat towards the goals we see. We hnow that in the years to corne, Oar thoaghts to thee will fondly tarn, And to oar Alina Mater pled ge That everlasting love will hiirn. VADNA RICH, '50. 36 . ,Mm "R X A fy ' 4 ' , , . , . J . 1 1 . .1-f T 'iff' "- X x' WS " Q "F -fi EJ. 1,17 Y A wi 4 V- ,, ,J f 'x ., 1. , 4 ,,, 'f ' A' ' Q.QV 1 1f,Q, eff! Q7 if ,ff vi -H + N , 5 1 , 1 , , A V 5. in ...,.. .,,,. .,.. ,...W,.. . .... . 4,,,.3,,hhm-'NYJ WVIK U J ' f 6' A ,Xi ,'., ,ff ! ' ff 2'f ' ' A . . X 1 ' ' f ' ' ..ff W , .fA4 i . - ' IQ A ' -A ',.4 ,, ."A Af' , , A , , I ,, .fo , .,.. V . . V .5 H 'V ,HIV 1 . - A -. , A -2- 1 ve ,Z ' v - 5- - , VW: ' "" 15- .gf ," 'V .-fm'K9l?gg'1'1.:11,,z. JLINIQRS The nzozzntain nymjvh, Jweet Liberty, Betty Baker Virg'inia Phelps Marjorie Cgmpbeu ' Ann? Bar? Emd Burgess Elizabeth Dolman .Caro Cra t Ann Craycroft Elxzaberh Farmer Margaret Jane Foulke 58 Ami if I give thee laonozzr due nimnannnunuvninIunumnumnnnmnanninnnnInuInuunmnmuuunnmnnmmmummn Gloria Gillingham Charlotte Friend Eleanor Hum Elaine Hadsell Annette Hanan Georgia Kohnke -Ionatha Jones julia Keenan Flora Lamson Eleanor Lathrop 59 Mirtb, admit me of tlay crew, Ernestine Loring Josephine Little Helen Mauett Alice Lumgair Alice Lyon Elizabeth Miller Jeanne Meredith Elizabeth Midgley Harriet Reeder Josephine Pfrang 40 To live with her and live with thee Q D Jacqueline Rourke I Elizabeth Richardson Lucile some Sevilla Shuey Elizabeth Smith Frances Umphred june Stevenson Oraville Tuttle Constance Woolsey Mabel White 41 x5,p7"W 'f J Q x 1 x g Lid? M Uiix , . . ,Marin e,,,,:,Ji,5,E:.5.3.,,l,,......,-f.wwsV:--.m.m---.-,.,,.,-,....,.,,.,. 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Mufiei Phillips June Norvell Frances Reid Mary Alice Rader Caroline Rowell Janet Rmmcbefg Phillis Tesio Beth Thomas Nancy Shefwm- May Belle Spivey Jane Ward Jane Wiedman Annette Tyler 46 g-gggqqcjefiie-'S' Qrb'iWouR F R E S H M E N They have their exits, and their entmneesg unnnunnunuIunnnununnnnnnunnnnIuIInIIuIInnnunnnnnnunnannnnnnuvnmvmInnInInnunnnmummnmnnnn Marilyn Blagen Miriam Boynton Lavinia Cressup Frances Ebey Barbara Ivie L K l Patricia Appleton Edna May Lyon Betty Clark Dorothea Minor Marguerite Nelson Margaret Davis Dorothy Pollard Idah Rose jane Graham Mary Ruth Swift Virginia Webb Mary Eleanor Loubet Lauraine Wigmore Edith Bither 48 K?-:.'! ' 'F , ,,. .1 .W -1. ,f-, Q.,-v .Vv .. . af f 2 .1. fV'.-Zig? V :Ek-fi .- - .V ' Q " H"-""7""f if. "' " - l'V 'Y Z".' ". 'JV' V' """' 'E : 'i ? if '- ' .W '5?'V -:V""rf "' . Q' I -'V V :SIE , 1--3-.V V ff" QM.-M .gV,.5 .1.4..-, QV,.-. .. LJ 5 .QV Q- , Q-:QV if IVKQSEY 7 5: Y. ...gg V 3, Q A: .4 I Q ,gf ig:-...fx '-.KV 5,-ef 5-V' VW. 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" -- DLURW' ' PO T GRADUATE And one man in laif time play! many party, I ' I EMILY ADAMS BARBARA BARKER DOROTHY DILLABOUGH ELLENA JOHNSON MARTHA LOWSLEY BARBARA McCAFFREY MARGARET WOODBURN 50 Hit nel: being seven nge!! nl jiri! the infant Dream Coast My thoughts stray off to a tropic coast, Wliile I dwell near the cold, gray sea, But the laughing lilt of the dancing waves Knows the dreams that come to me. And the magic winds that whisper Are the tunes that I try to sing, Wlmen my heart yearns for green hill-tops, In the midst of a dusty spring That brings no rain to the birds' calls, Though they reverently rise and sing. Palm trees grow on my dream coast, And Hame flowers, vivid to see, Dusk and fire are all about, And around and over me Is thetsoft, fairy touch of the Trade Winds That drift from a tropic sea. MARGAMQT Gitivioun, '50 51 Mewling and puking in the nzzr5e'5 arm: 52 3 A in f ffhfff Q- Lf 9' f ' ,- a n 9- -I ugh! I1 -:fx-i,:k fr Q -, 1, :I . 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A'-'Q5-W' --A, .' , ' - -- ' , I 1, 1, - ., ji, 'j,IQl,Sz1EfQ4 .ff,.,:,Q::g .'j-1g5f,k9,:1-if,j35g,-WgQ ,jA,'-,,-X'-5,3,4,g5Qlgf,:H,j -,.-1 -- 1-'gi--.1,', 1- ,,-.x:,gW-"'- ,, ., , , ,- , -,.g,g,,.-.: 5-gggf' ,Lf-y,-.-f, ,.g,1-,5,1, H fu: ' f ,if-rw?.'f:E':flf-.324g-125-'-:E. 1 '-Z -5' - - -. pi:-H' - . . .. - IL 7 4 " ff- '51 i ' ' "6 ' ' ' fs'-2'-F33 '-1"'1"" ' -- ------Q. . ., ...,.-..-.A1-.am.1....'- ':-l-l-w21u1f:-- . .-4132-..:E.'4.L-L LOWER SCHCDCDL Then the whining .vchool-hay, with his ,fntchel u nm ne in In in un mm 1nuummmnmumnunurunninnnunumnnnmnmnmmnununmmmnmmnuummmmnmmmmum:nnnnmmuu n in ih fg Q, 1 f Kkyk, 'z,?:s5ft h"' M Z " A kL"f SWEYRW f A 1 ' I" ' ' ' ' " . V ' g f! iv I A i 7h'fi i ' 1 x a Y , f ' f i iiii f . gf 1 f ir Kathryn Bcnnctt Mzirtha Barnett Barbara Bullis Virginia Fuulds Batty Friend Mzirjoric Graham Barbara Linforth Maybcllc Mflls Kathlccn Moorlxczld Patty Murray Kathryn Picrcc Gcorginc Porter Hclcn Rader Bcth Rcgli Dorothy Sanders Gvraldinc Seaman Karin Lund Kathcrinc Thornton Paula Wood 54 Ann' shining morning face, creeping like n Jnnil mmmummnumumnmmimmmmmninmmmmnmrmummiiumm'mimimiimmnmmunmiimimmninnunuim Pct She had a nest so cosy, With twelve eggs in it too, I helped her keep her secret, And not a body knew. Sometimes, when she was thirsty I filled her water cup, And when I took her corn to eat She swallowed it all up. She knew just how to thank me, By a croaking in her throat, And if I touched her eggs a bit She had a crosser note. At last I heard a chirping, I looked, and oh, oh, oh! I saw twelve tiny baby heads Cuddled up just so. MARY KiNNoc:H, Sixth Grade A Kitty Verse Dear little Fluffy So soft and gray Comes to the barn Every day, Catches some mice And runs away, Dear little Fluffy So soft and gray! A. v. s. J. 55 Ufzwillingly to school, and then the lover even Little Tumblers U-OO-OO!!" That was the elephants. "R-rou-un!!" This time it was the lions, but it was no great thing. The animals always grew noisy when they were hungry P fwhich they usually were before four dclockj, The up- -' 35 '-:fi "-l ,ju roar was terrible, but it did not disturb the little tumb- lers. They were used to it. I il There were seven little tumblers, joe, John, jack, George, Sam, Tim, and Tom. George thought himself too good for the others, so he was an indifferent companion. Perhaps he was just unfortunate, for seven is an odd number, you know, so if the boys wanted to pair off, somebody had to be without a chum. However, if George had been like Tim, he could not have been alone if he had tried. for Tim's was a different story. Tim appeared to be a quiet little fellow, but the circus people knew he was the ringleader among his troupe-friends. Tim and jack were allies and always up to mischef, and constantly making trouble for someone. If they did not let the elephants loose, or tease the lions, they would chase the zebras and scare them into a stampede. But it was usually thoughtless mischief. They were just healthy boys, and nothing to do between tumbles but think up ways to relieve the monotony while wating for their next act. One day the seven little tumblers were riding around one of the fields on the backs of their favorite elephants. George, the odd boy, ran his elephant up behind Tim's and prodded it with a sharp stick. Tim's beast let out a wild trumpeting and waved his trunk about angrily. All this puzzled Tim. George had dropped back towards the rear of the procession and was innocently engaged in sharpening a pencil, though why he might be needing a pencil at such a time never occurred to Tim. All the other boys were practicing hair- raising stunts on the backs of their animals. Tim was still trying to calm his excited elephant when Jack, his team-mate, joined him. jack had seen the sly George and reported the whole affair to his chum. Tim was very angry. He felt that George had done this spitefully, in an attempt to hurt him. If his elephant had thrown him, the little tumblers would have been six instead of seven, and the odd boy would have had a mate. The next morning, Tim was awake very early. Calling Jack, he said, "I have planned my revenge. It is this, you must pretend to be awfully mad at me. Say, so that everyone on the lot can hear you, that you never want to see me again. Don't chum around with me, except in private. Then, you go to the manager and beg him to let you and George have the zebras. Don't stop 56 Si lain like 'iiwzace with iz woe ill ballad 8 8 . 1 . teasing for them until he says 'yes,' and then come away. I'll meet you in the aquarium . . . the store house end, you know. Then I'll go and ask for a zebra too. Wluen you and George get up on your zebras, ride over to the road where the calliope is. Illl be hiding with my zebra, on the other side of the calliope. When you get close to the spot, point over to the fuel boxes and say, 'Oh George, see that blackbird perched on that lump of coall' He will probably say 'no, where is it?, Then you can say lwait here! l'll get some spy glasses' Wliile he is watching the spot I can creep up and bump his zebra so hard with mine that I'll push him off and give him a good shake-up." "Agreed! Good for you!" cried Jack. "He can't get hurt very much, falling from a zebra, but we can make him mighty uncomfortablef' Tim's plan worked well up to a certain point. Over went George into the dust. XVhat a cloud he made! The dust got into everybody's nose until they all sneezed and sneezed. Oh, how their eyes hurt, and how nasty their mouths felt with the grit. The bump and the sneezing and shouting annoyed the nervous zebras and they broke away, galloping madly around the field, snort- ing and kicking as they went. The other little tumblers, who had been dressing in their tent, saw the runaway zebras ,with Tim and jack clinging desperately to their necks. Witli a loud shout, the tumblers set out after their friends, with some idea of trying to stop the zebras. A crowd soon gathered, and in it was the manager, Mr. Founder. He and M. Lorenze, the zebra keeper, caught the frightened animals, and the boys, when they came to themselves, found that something had hold of their ears. Wlien they looked up, they met the angry eyes of the manager and the zebra trainer. Behind the men, George stood scowling and pointing. Tim and Jack knew at once that George had been tale- bearing. He was just the kind to betray them. ' "XVhat do you mean by creating this disturbance in the middle of a per- formance?" demanded Mr. Founder. The trouble-makers were dragged back to their tent and made to tell their foolish story. It all seemed so silly when told to these grown-ups, and the boys saw their beloved leader in disgrace. Sam and joe muttered a good deal about how they would put the manager out of his job. Where they got the idea, I do not know, but they were very serious about it. John and Tom were planning something too, as could be seen from their thoughtful faces. All the circus people watched them uneasily. Thought- ful tumblers meant future trouble. , That night six heads rested peacefully on three pillows, but George, the odd one, sat up in his lonely bed too worried for sleep. He would have given a great deal to know what was passing through their minds, but he had no clue. Only chums can read each others' minds. RUTHALMA JOHNSON, Gmile Fam' Lower School, Firrt Prize N oilf and Beekf Literary Collier! 57 .fllfiie to hir 77Zf.ff1'65J' eyehrowg then the roldier 41uiin1ru1mi1inimuuuuuuuummmiummmimiimimuniummmumimi1in1in1in1inimimiininumimimuuuuum. Flowers Dainty little flowers, Blooming on the hills, Show your pretty faces, Show your pretty frills. Blue-bells and poppies, Dancing in the sun, Buttercups and murigolds joining in the fun. Wluen the winter comes, And everything is still, Then the dainty flowers t Close each little frill. EILA KOHNKIQ, Fifth Grade -Home I love zt place where the pine tree grows, I love u place that nobody knows, I love a house that is near the sea, I I love a home for you and me, Patsy Smith, grade three. PATsY SMITH, Grade Three 58 Full 0 uiiimimnnnnmi Jtmnge oallos and bemwfed like the pezwi, Aunt Sunny I love you because you are you, Because you see me Not as I am now, But as you wish me to be When I am grown. I love you because you are part of ev Good and beautifulg The ocean when it is calm And sunlit, The bluest blue of the sky, The stars when they tell me good-ni From my window. I love you because you are you! erything ght PATsY SMITH, Grade Three Gfafldpa I love to sit on Grandpa's knee And hear the tales he tells to me About when he was little, He was nobodyls pride and joy, He was a very naughty boy, Thatls Why I love him. Nobody can be always good, And always do just what they should, It isn't human nature. So when I'm naughty and I cry "Gramp" has a twinkle in his eye, He winks at me . . . Patsy Smith, Grade Three! PATSY SMIT 59 H, Grade Three fefzlom in honour, maiden, and qgzick in qzmrrel, 60 an f Ak 'g"!'7'V75Q35 '-29f!34Wa'PfQ:-,p.Q,fg' T ' f-'Milf f31'lE:F73' 1if4f.gf:7" 2+-trffac ,. Q.'.Vl.:ni1n- ' " 'W " - . A -,gg "1 '11 423' ' wi.-,QQ--', "f 'H 1 g., 91" 12' 5 V f':1giq5.i"7 ,, -' ' DF? 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A gf. ,f - iap r- ,V-V-1 ,,:V-A:v-'- -wx g Ae , V, K V' -fi "w K . , 4 sv va :VV 2 'F ,gr A, V- 5' Q : ,. . ', ' 1V- ' Vw, ff' '?e 'Tu -' ""'.-5 wQ,'V- :Ii 1' - V. " ff Vw-'x 'Y-V F ' "'A "f'EL 4,51 . . if Qi V. 5 ' V VV "1 - - -' . ,, , ,-,Ji 'V ila V . ,S ...,f.-:V U. .:,V-Vw V' -,MM --'j.g4y- 1-v jr-nl ffg, g ' - Q V ' '- 1-H V " 'E - V13 :if akf nig Qwn aqgi' . N i -Vefghf T55 2 ,M V. 'V .VVp,1'ff.Jf-vw.ff-.V., ---.fxfw ' Vw! Kb 0V 'z. in , lff'?Zi?r'sQ whiz A - , ' -4V11-1-:qwm!1v9iffGV-Y-14-fffwlw:-flffev'lfaw ,.--V Q 'fu A,-- Vu L - ,V-:2'3'5T I "VF":i:ff'335I5si?-f?xL31'1!?'fE'11V U -111 'f'f"?f11'J' B2?giW":-f." I-1TJ'be'i':i'7"" "PHE" 'T ' -. '12 - V V -14 , ,.,9V,ff.,,5VI: .V,V,4,gfgV1,,,gfftr3.,,5V, V- ,V-,fl V54-.rf-V,...hL, VL,-33.4 J V -. -'f,:2g,,,.-ifV,v.,.,y,,2Q T gV,.1.f.,L- -53,4 V + ' V A' .V VV v- ' , . , " - ""'ggg-:VJ V w ' . .V -H V - ,uh ,. ALUM AE Seeking the bubble 1"617Zll6Zfj07l Alumnae News ENGAGEMENTS Corynne Catherine Chittenden-James Lloyd Coates. Ethel Valentine Saunders--Kenneth McQueen Graham. Miriam Morgan Dangan-Francis Lutts Cross. Marjorie Danborn-Howard Gardiner McClure. M ARRIAGES Claire Elforest Graves-Avis Wfinslow Peckham, june 5, 1929. jane Elizabeth Howe-Stanley Edward Willey, September 4, 1929. Helen Elizabeth Munger-james Rosetrough Saughn, September 19, 1929. Eugenia Coolidge-Larry Grant Aven, june 22, 1929. Eva Alta Miller-Ralph Edward Vaneur Maillen, April 27, 1929. Marian Lathrop Thomas--Kendric Burpee Morrish, August 24, 1929. Erna Louise Basch-Graydon Alexander Milton, May 26, 1929. Corynne Catherine Chittenden-james Lloyd Coates, September 14, 1929. Jean Elizabeth Angus-Ferre Charles Watkins, june 27, 1929. Jane Elizabeth Elengwood-Theodore Marshall Hambrook, june 7, 1929. Ellen Canza-Danzie Cassiusglines, February 9, 1929. Azalea Adelaide Kieruff-Percival Eaton McDowell, April 13, 1929. Harriet Virginia Good-john Duane Thompson, August 19, 1929. Jessie Morrison Marshall-Assadour Bodigian, September 21, 1929. Barbara jean Platt-Stetson McSallen, November 13, 1929. Genevieve Norvell-Charles Allen Stuart, March 12, 1930. Mary Elizabeth Smith-Edwin Russell Chandler, October 8, 1929. Katherine Louise Boole-Robert Farpeon Legge, March 31, 1929. Yvonne de Tolia-Herbert james Cornish, Jr., june 15, 1929. Ruth Younger'-Frederic Cambell Bemer, june 15, 1929. A BIRTHS Lieutenant and Mrs. Hugh Weber Turney, QMarjorie Hillsj a daughter, March 22, 1929. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson A. Jones fConstance Shallockj a daughter, March 27, 1929. Mr. and Mrs. Enerell Le Baron fLois Appletonj a son, April 25, 1929. Mr. and Mrs. Wellington Dallas Dillenger, a daughter, june 2, 1929. 62 Even in the elmn0n'J moutbg and then lloe justice, Class ol 1929 Ufzizfersily of Cezliforzziez: Mary Atkins, Elizabeth Beedy, Narendra Blair, Marian Clark, Lady jane Hatfield, Jacqueline jacobus. Pomona College: Barbara Clark, Alice Butler, Ruth Bartlett. Univerfily ofS0zzllJe1'n Cezllforniuz Ruth Gavin. Ufzitfewify of Culiforniez Agriczllmml College: Florence Hotchkiss. Ufzifferfizy of Culifowzifz, L05 Angeles: jane Crutcher. Milly College: Fannie Heck. Arty and Crafts: Edith Barton. Com Williafzzy Imfitzzzfez Evelyn Hodghead. V .-43: . ff ' 1 - , ,.-, '5-wa'-.2 il,-,-1 - . ,.',, jsf 1 2, 2 5 1 7' rf . f 53' v 'SSM , , 4 1 I Q i . Y' 5. ? 4 1 l 4' I. -- -. 1 . i.,g'.'-' J, 51, 1-A 35,222 - wi-2' '- -. J 1. .- . ' . -H" ,, . il'-. fn,-w . .' -f , ,V ' 1 " 5"2?"' ' - . 1:23 t g. 55 1 ,Mg 52e3.',Lw?I'f1.::1a.f.mx.' ., -' ' ,. ' ' ... .- s fi"'?:'f'-5 ,'1h'u4w'-' H"- -, - 9' I, - a ,y-'4,.j,-',.,,,,.,gf,gzg-'-5, QQ, H-2,-f . 'fl' .7 L :f2E'-g?5ii'lEt?-Tivfffif-,.' - .f'-7:"1'.5':'l'5'55133: .'- i+'5'af29ii7' f53ffZfl5Zf5'fl' ' 5' . - 'ff-f'f.', r -ggi,-gr..-if.,.-2, 'sc ,-,,, 1 ':,.1-a-.af ,. J' .ipi.f,.'Fg?-Vi. af'-:1?'3.,, - - - , Willigfr-542 X' Zi". f 'ns' f' --Lffc'lL12'.'2F. 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' 12' , -Q3 t " 5' 6, 1 V .R . 3' MV! 4 -v-- .,1'Xfgg.,,V.:,Q,"' ' .1 5. wr 35 g.f,hjgh:- 'fhxiif ., NJV 1 515395 2 ff Ii - ' ,iff . " 'S -'Y . ,A Qi . ,, 41? ."'-n, YI 5X.'j4 . q A, S B M 5 Gi., .V , -. A .W - -1 .A . ,. ' I " " 245- 1 is 3 ': .. . '. U eu x,,,,.-f ..,, ,-- ..-, 'TI r "'-Zgw' " , ' ' 'S ,., Eg! . ,r R 2,35 1"'V ' X5 w:. ' Q.: ' 1. ., 1 A , lA,5B ".,.. -V M ., .Q ,A 3' .14 ,V w . . - V, ,X , QL. fm , . is . Q. .1 I :RRR . - . A . .. - . y- 1 'Y -fs 5, ' .1 . '-:- , .?,." -1 ,N: '?. - :Jus Il Y' 'I Y - ugfvf ' ,fpk N. '35 ? - ' "z , , :.:.:. . V, ,. ,- --...pr 1 ,, . .L :- ,ffliio "V -W - I,-F? ' N 'w'52:ff"'iy 5 . L "AW, - ' .- 1.5, 4 J .gg j',-ji, ' 4' H3 ' km.. , , ! ..-5-1'-' il-ITA ,. wk . , , , 1 - avr, f. .r -1 v f fri, 1'-,S ' "U 1, ' 5 A, 1' -: ii ' ,. . , 1 S ' ' .. ' 3 1 V ' . A ' , E ' -V A ,1f7,fg?f:?f'fEf23'1-vw - " . 3 X , , , 4 -. 3,355 5""c' Qge,5iTx?m,-gals. ' ' ' -' 32" 1-1--" A '3 15 V1 'nf 'F "Milf-Z' by 4' K ,, l - A ' I K I ., 1 25.1 Y, N f . ,W 5 , -,g,Mg55,:.1.--L.-, , la, My-t. .I jg Hi"-1-Y"1vjfgr":-W-. +120 ' 'Sn' f- f-- ' " .-',-mm . A K fflflzif,-Q' '11f3??Q,AQM E."f . "QQ , -. , . '. 1 ' - U ' ' W Elf. ' "-'- . ' Kff . .kffiiizi T-vxnfir. .3 , 7,1-. '-I . ' H 'iwfviifh-" x . , ., .. a ,ex - W .M m,f,.J . Q iw, -77 3, ., . .. W A.,,-f,,1q4,,,L,, in aw, lr SPCDRT Full of wife wwf and modern immnceig Sports Success has crowned the efforts of the Anna Head School in athletics this year. Under Miss Reynolds' leadership our teams have nobly upheld the honor of our school. llockcy This year our hockey showed a great deal of new and promising material. The girls worked with enthusiasm. Rigorous training rules were set forth, followed by an early selection of teams, which were coached ably by Miss Reynolds. A short time before Thanksgiving vacation the "Big Game," with Miss Ransomis and Miss Bridges' School took place. Both our teams were defeated. The games were at all times hotly contested and very exciting. 66 Iunuuuuumumiuuuu FIRST jeane Meredith . Katherine Foulke Elizabeth Fogg . Charlotte Friend Vadna Rich . . jean Jacobs CCD . Marian Young . julia Keenan . . Constance Olney Betty Miller . . Carolyn Rowel . Ana' so be plays bit lwzrt. HOCKEY T EAMS Goal . . . .L.F.. R.H.. ' j .L.H.. . . C.H.. . R. W. . . R. I. . C. F. . ....L.I... LAW.. . . unummnnnnnIinIulIInImmmmuunnnmumnmnm SECOND . . Martha Lowsley . Elizabeth Canaga Dorothy Cadwalader . . . Beth Thomas . . Judith Hechtman . . . Lucy Fay . . Dorothy Bryant . . Dorothea Minot . Marilyn Blagan . Levinia Cressup . . Mary Hodgkins Substitutes: Betty Ross, Harriet Reeder, Betty Clark. Basketball Basketball is our most popular sport. This was shown by the large turn- out. The girls were all eager to take pointers in the technique of the game. It was not until a few days before the game with Miss Hamlin's School, how- ever, that the first team was chosen. The score was 29 to 25 in favor of Miss Hamlin's. Castilleja came up from Palo -Alto, bringing her three squads. Her third team defeated ours, Q23 to 15D but we won both with our first team and second, with a score of 43 to 12, and 24 to 14. 67 Haste thee nymph and hrihg with thee, A week later we played our "Big Game" with the Ransom-Bridges School. Both our teams came home with laurels, with scores of thirty-seven to thirty- five for the first team, and sixty-three to forty-two for the second team. On April first, we played Miss Burks' School in our last game of the season, and finished with a victory of forty-five to twenty-five. Everyone out for basket- bal.l deserves much credit, but a great deal goes to our coach, Miss Marian Reynolds. BAsKl3T1aA1.L TEAMS FIRST SECOND Agnes Irwin . . . R. F. . . janet Ronneburg jean Jacobs . . . . L. F. . . Elizabeth Dolman Mary Porter, and Helen Bowler . . . C. . . Mary Louise Cobb Eleanor Hunt . . S. C. . . Josephine Little Vadna Rich . . . . R. G. . . . Elizabeth Farmer Charlotte Friend . . L. G. . . . Harriet Reeder THIRD TEAM Dorothea Minor . . . R. F. S. C. . .... Lucy Fay Dorothy Cadwalader . . L. F. R. G. . . Betty Gerwick Levinia Cressup .... C. L. G ..... Peggy Craig Substitutes: Elizabeth Fogg, Lucile Soule, Martha Howe, Dorothy Douglas, Marjorie Cherry, Carolyn Rowell, Julia Keenan, Beth Thomas. I SOCCER This year sees a new sport in our school. It is soccer. Nearly all the girls are beginners, but a great deal of enthusiasm is shown. Each class is expecting to have a team, and the interest will be kept alive by inter-class competition. 68 fest, and youthful follity, Tennis Tennis has gained noticeably in popularity this year. A large number of girls entered the tournaments held for the purpose of selecting new members for the team. We have played several matches this year, preparatory to the Tennis Tournament. The first, with the Ransom-Bridges School, tied. The second, with Miss Hamlin's, ended with a score of one to three in their favor. Everyone looked forward with eager anticipation to the Annual Tennis Tournament and Luncheon. TENNIS T EAM First Singles . . . . . . Mary Cleveland Second Singles . ......... Harriet Peel First Doubles . . . . janet Ronneburg, Eugenia Cross Second Doubles . . Elizabeth Dolman, Dorothy Cadwalader Substitutes: Gloria Gillingham, Frances Umphred. 69 Qzzipf, and cmnks, and wanton wilef, The Girl Reserves The Girl Reserve Group is a new activity in the school since Christmas. The first meeting was held on january thirty-first. The following week the group had its formal recognition service, followed by refreshments prepared and served by the members. In the short existence of the group the members have had many a good time together, outstanding among which was a week-end at Asilomar. A banquet and evening entertainment with an original minstrel show, in honor of the mothers of members was given. 1 Tuesday, April ninth, an evening performance of Indian dances, given by Mr. Vernon de Mars, assisted by Mr. Paul Doane, in Alumnx Hall, furnished delightful entertainment. The bootblack shop, which the group has opened, has been great fun. The Tankhouse has been adopted as a meeting place, and the members have taken much pleasure in re-decorating the interior. Miss Marian Reynolds, advisor, and Madeline MacCracken, president, have made the first term so enjoyable and successful that the members are looking forward with eager anticipation to the fall term. 70 N ods, and Berks, and wreathed smiley, S W i m m i n 3 Owing to the gratefully received improvements on the pool, the swimming team has been able to keep 'up its practice nearly the whole year. The interest in swimming has increased immensely and this is partly due to Miss Reynolds, who has helped the girls greatly. Because so many more have come out for this sport in this last year, a much better team has been developed than in former years. vw i l 71 Such as hang on I-Iebe'r cheek, Elinore ln yellow When Elinore appears in yellow, Pale chiffon over satin's gleam, The man beside her . . . lucky fellow . . . Will think life all a primrose dream. From where the bodice ruille's petals Light rise and fall to breathing sweet, To where the chiffon floats and settles Softly about her dainty feet . . . l wish I were that other fellow To sit and dream the evening through When Elinore appears in yellow . . . What will that other fellow do? S. T. Commencement From out the haven of our youth Our little craft we launch, To sail upon Lifels unknown seas With sturdy hearts and staunch. And as the breezes briskly waft Our cargo of bright dreams We turn our thoughts to Anna Head Wfhose beacon brightly gleams. Encouraged by fond memories sweet Of pleasant school days here We press, undaunted, to our goal With ne'er a thought of fear. And though the troubled, angry sea May keep us miles apart, We know welll always have a place In Alma Mater's heart. ELIZABETH KANT, 30. 72 DRAMA All the w01'!d'5 a stage ramatics ECEMBER eleventh was as rainy an evening as could be imagined, yet Alumnae Hall was crowded with people who had ventured forth to see the Dramatic Club's presentation, produced under the able leadership of Miss Yancey. The hrst play of the evening was "My Lady Dreams" by Eugene Pillot. This was a very amusing and whimsical comedy, of which the scene was laid in a lady's boudoir. The characters were as follows: The Lady ..... . . . ELINOR RILEY Maria, her maid . . ELIZABETH DQLMAN A Lilile Old Lady . . ELINOR LATHROP The Other Wfomafz . ....... ALICE LUMGAIR The Two Adorahler . . TIMMIE PLIINKETT, VIRGINIA SAAM "Hearts," by Alice Gerstenberg, was a play cleverly centered about a bridge game. The characters in this play were: Mfr. jay Thorne . . BONNIE SQUIRES Mfr. Edwin Pug! . . . ELIZABETH SMITH Mfr. Rmrell Rune!! . . VIRGINIA LUM Mint. Mortangay . . BARBARA JONES The last play of the evening, a fantastic love story called "The Vanishing Princessn was written by john Golden. It had an abundance of funny incidents and some delicate pathos. The members of the cast were: Mr. I. Say ........... BETTY MILLER Min Cindy . .... FRANCES REID Matinka . . GERALDINE BINGAMAN The King . . . . HELEN BIGGERSTAFF Reading of Prologue . . . JUNE NORVELL 74 IIIIIIIIIIIIII Anal all the men nncl women merely lblnyem' IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIInIInIImIII:IIIIIIIInuIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIInIImIIII:IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII The second red-letter day of the year for the Dramatic Club was that of April thirtieth, when the club presented its second group of plays. This work also won general applause. The "Knave of Hearts," by Louise Saunders, which was the first play presented, gave a truly original version of the conventional villian knave, by showing him in the character of hero. The characters were: llfldlldgel' . . BETTY MILLER Blne Hore . . NANCY S1-IERWIN Yellow Hare . . . JUNE NORVELL Firfl Herald . . MARTHA HEYWOOD Serond He:-alll . . SALLY MONROE Chancellor . . ELIZABETH KANT Urmla . . ALICE LUMGAIR Violetla ............. VIRGINIA LUM Pager: Ruth Kuns, Eila Kohnke, Mary Kinnock, Elizabeth Sparling, Mary Lou McLemore, and Virginia Saam. "Pirates," by Colin Campbell Clements, has a title which is a little mis- leading. One expected to hear about "fifteen men on a dead man's chest," But not at all. The plot centres upon a series of misunderstandings. The town gossips have it that the heroine is about to elope with a man already married. The untangling of the resulting complications gave the audience an exciting half-hour. The cast was as follows: Aflrr. Wdl'l'6lZ Betty lVarren flflrr. Lowry . Mfr. Romney Mfr. Pickering Mfr. Val . . Clara . . . ALLA PATERSON DOROTHY DILLABOUGI-I BARBARA SHERBOURNE . CORNELIA GREGOR . BETTY FARMER A . ANNE BARR . SALLY MYERS They have their exits' and their em'1'emce5,' The "Turtle Dove," by Margaret Oliver, is beautiful in its simplicity The entire stage setting consisted of a willow plate. The plot was a love story interwoven with the history of the willow pattern. Every member of the cast did her part excellently. This play concluded the program. C horzzr . . . Chan-S111-Yen . Mmzdarifz . . . K wen-Lin . God of .Fale . . P1'0P61'fyllfldIZ . Gong Bearer . . . FLORA LAMSON . . LUCILE MAST MARY EMMA JEFFRESS . PATSY ANDERSON FRANCES HAMMOND . CAROLYN ROWELL CYNTHIA CHAPMAN The Dramatic Club has had a very active and enjoyable year, and its en deavors have met with general commendation. 76 ' 1 Q .. A 2 L. 1 I 1 -I . F , . I ! , A x 1- Y ' 4 1 ' ' I ' '! g 1 1 A -I' , , if ' .1 'G' I ' , -gg 'J ' A - A' 'I f, 'A 273451 A I ' ' 1-i-55? A.. ' . A FA'3i:1'-A' A f - - ,535-' ,yi 'JA - '. f L-A:,Y 1' If I' A J ' A. W A ff'f -5 , ' -Af 1 YQ .I A ', .' 51.1. A 52:5 -5: yi - 6? 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A- :H 51- 5,52 if 'Age LV- " 1" 21. as 1' xf-,' .- '1 ' '.iA1A ' -. -3 :YA1-4--F fA- .Af " '5-: fwi A., ,,. , AM L A- 13 1 qi'-51A .1 51 2 igiljl'-, -Aw M V. ig. :A-fag A 12 H: 45 1-'47 MJ A L Q AA 4- 13 1 F- I -5. A " xg 1 -'hi - A-31 gg- ' Q' fail ' - 'Aff .':j,A.-' ': , , A-,QA '1A.3 , V A A: A, 5 ' 1'ig,'Y3,f' '. '91 A. -7' . - .255 .ni f- 5' .?11-:A1Ai' v' - ...if 1 TEV , AA :Q-2.3-Q-' 55 -vi' I ,fff 535 : Q-h .1 .3,. 'n A ga 155114 Agaia f' Q,-1'- egg: - ,fm 1- I, .EA A wif., 'f ggi! 5' QR, .A -ZA MA L ug Aki Af.'f . ':A ,f H ,A f' 'fir '1' A Af 'fl f'A"L '5j,iALf?g: A4A 3 ' -Sf' N . . , , , 3 'iff A 15353: iff gif' 'M : ALR ,f Wi! L, Ajeyigf., -,Ag-gf "AH 'A ' A 2 IV Y ws.. iiffinfj 'iv .- fAfAl25AT ' 5,--, -gpg, . ,A - - A, A - , A ,Q ,A -Lag- my 545 .:,.-1, -1-5 122 -Qfig Ajzf-Ai sp, . A-:fv ' 'AT A' A' -AME-A .-:'2.f,,A-if A-f?A'i-,1fA -"iff Ag A- 1,234 , ii 'V ' ,I , F-llf QM- A A 5, 7315! IAA! 2.295135 .1 g'f,5AG,f 1 Q .gf ' ,Sl H73 . 5:21 " .: gr'--5 h A, FA.: ,I ' .Aff 'f gg??ffAf'l " in '-'AV 5 ' ' ' igxf 33' AE? LAW.- ,Afgp .5 2j'Aj5'. -Q i k- A .gl '-- gggmgfig -A 'ig' iw Q 11.1432 .. 'ia'-WA- -1.: I f ,r p A , 33. 1-FA-we-ly. . W?" A-u-AfKz.!As--4- A -. Af A. . A if ASIA- .gvfvl 5 A-3 2fi,..2Ei - H .If F -: if A ' JV " ,A1'..Az,':f4f:A'5Ff'i'?"5AfI1A Af, 33, AQ'-N 'Lift-' -- .A I ., Af 1-1 . A AAA1'JnfA1A-AQ.f-Avg- M A , -f:,2:, . 35' A ' !egg.A:.fA, 'A-A' -A wi A -,A . .-- , . M 'I JA A143 .-225: . YA , Vgu- il y :Mg v. , Rl lv , -I -M V 1, Q 1 l ei M In-Q QA 1 A. is .- , Ag 'A ' QA AA ,..:--4 -A W ' 5333313-1 A- ' ?!!.p"FA'A. 'Aff5513?,?'53'A A11EvT:Vl?A? ' EA' A5i"'."' -.fag -ix A' Q 1,-AA,-AA AJ- -'...' gf" .-,, 'Kiev y ,-.-' ff r:.- AAf.n1v.A,5n:' . 45 9. , . . e,r.. ,,, , , ., .. ., . , , . ,, ,- .. ,,,,,5,.,,,,, ,., , , f A g, :P bf Qs I J: - E Y ,-lf. . 'wk W 2 2 A "" qgj' ,N ? '13 -5, A'-fd Hg. A- . ':, 9 ,, . A - -' ., , AA -.. A -Ap , 1' AAG- if A - . -ie' ,A .- f fzhaw - -1 A Q' .f AA A'tA2.'k-ff-. fs? A. g A - - H ,.,.f?: A, A p ix A - ,W .pk eff- -. i , , , ..-,L-gi nf- . 5, , is 9.5-Q .A ,AA A 2 . Lk V I qt if . Q4 "' :fu-AA'-' j,3j,.JA -I , . M 3 , I H" . 1. E-if ff 2 W?-.As-A ,ffaisf A 'A -2' ' .A Af? A ' 5' WA 5 ' . , - 1 F 3' , 'A:E'.lA,f' AA lg .. -259 'A ' A Af.. , A Z, Q.: A' ljlt 2 4:15.51 .A - 3, . 5? - .. -- A t A Q. 1 A l,A', QA juli! 'U V - ,nib -A I , iff, A M ' .,.'A :E fi ,rg " gg-iff? NW A B' 19577 XI " 1 lf' 'U 'Qi V AJ, A-, A fg: 3.1 Q 51.A 'Aeg I , ..--' A -2 K Q , , , nn-., : . .iv 1 'A 2 :I Img pak? . -ge,-1 fj:r:,AA"!!iAf :AAS-'L g' .4 A, ,A ,,,,. - , ' A A ,:.-35.552, 1 2 ! ' Al A 'A 'xAf'A:,fHf' AFA-.ziv J f',A ' ' S' . ,.,, . -. , -,, . , , . A A . . -- ,-,- , Ei, , .A .. X A - ,Ek J 1 U -.,:' 1 - A --A---7.13 ul? I H , 'ig' l -,K -3 Q0-X. A -51. , Aiwa eg- - , . - . ' ::- .. , Av 5- Wm . ga'-1 Y x,. , "1 - -. K ,K y X , - . A . 15" -A ,le . - ,, A -. . f .- --1, if It .14 11 A, k- , A 2 3, .g --2 . .. ,A '- C , C ff- 1 , Q .5 . , - A -- L.jA, -,z,A,-Af. A . f. 4..A " 7 iz? ALA .5 ya ' lf , . --:ff"' .,. fig . A i N. S! 5:31-.5553-,ffl-. yu.1L ',,,K.c-ki. ,A 1 -, ' ,1fi.aAif -. A2AQ1AA"' f' 5'l1A-A1'2iA AA-5 if-3- 'A . ' A f A' .- ., 'WA A - , A -A S 1 ,- " 'H ' '7 7 -J .'iA!g:A A, if 4 -A- A -IA A ..f-'45'2gjRfgf,3-523' 513551 j, A U-,,., , ,V Jn.. ,, . l , ., g.-Afff' 'JA Gill' A, - ... 'Af . 4' V A j Yi'- ,-gsm-'A kj! . ' 5325222- 1 Hp... .4 4- F I., 1 'f:.,, .L , Y GL EE CLUB ,RN PN'- Ami one man in hir time plays many party, Tlm Cvlw Clul, HE Glee Club has worked under the direction of Mrs. Helen Moore for the past two semesters, and has given two very original programs. "At the Cabaret," a Russian skit, was presented, in which Jonatha Jones danced to the accompaniment of the entire chorus singing "The Pedlar," a Russian folk-song. ' The club presented a series of old English carols, arranged by Mrs. Moore, before school closed for the Christmas holidays. An old English Christmas Eve, with wassailers and a family gathering, was followed by an interpretation of midnight mass, with the Glee Club singing a Bach Chorale. The program ended with Aciesle Fidelir. Settings and color schemes for both performances were made by some of the members under the guidance of Mrs. Moore. There will be no operetta this year, but the club will sing at the Bacca- laureate Service, and at the Commencement exercises. 78 M414 iii ,w 'ff-Q 6 , E, s A" I f f - W X if 9 gigggf .- , - ,gf A' pp-,,,, ia- ,- .q.i:"'-'J ' ' .' H-' P , - 4, ' ,ur 1 - ' A fav ,I J if v f J fn I' 'X if " 55 Ji' , f pf ,.,f' X I ' wi . .V , -, J Ff' YA ., rf , f f X , f ' sv X , f' 9 N' J. I Wu I 3' s l af f .W ff t ff' f L I 'B Y 11 . if x it J i , . fi JL r U E ' a f -1 Lk f f, x af 1 , A1 R ff f- I 4 H P 3 x si' 1 1 f 1 '4 f il 3- vb 5 ' 1 1 4: 94 7 1' Y fi 4 5 . 'E J V. 1. vw WN - f -2 H1 : V, W., XE, M, . , KX 15.3, xy :,, -1 , Vx . M.. L. -JR . NL xx 1 f - 1 ' 'fax-1 's -, ' 1 ME. . . - . ya xg, -'.. f . , I' A , v Q w- - 3, Yin ' Q' . . . .9 ., 475-H: ,, , 1. .A , fa, , ' 1 '56, ' ., ,vfX.N., . . .,f, . .11 . Q ffl .. I W e ' '-.,1- . ,f 5 ' X- r ,. . ...A ff" . I - , F ,- X . , ., ,, , 45 , If - ,ff ' 1 X. ,x W. ,K , 1, ' AI" ' 2' 4 ' ' 'KW I 5 f ' - '-L ff ,ll I A ,vi ' . f' , 5:-li: ' 1 1, ,UL fbi -"TQ -. W " ff -+-ze' 12 'P fag- 1 A A fl' - ' 11 'f , ' 'L' ,' 'm ,Q 'A' ffg, , ,531 5: 'f gk ,HA-nf'2: sg ' : 12 V, - V' K ff A L' Q, be , I, f. f -1' f 42 Q , A - " r ff x ' -1' , ,V fri V 3 f- 1 52 . - . -...E-FJ-: f :ff 2 . ff-f , 7 ' ' fk w ff 5 1 1 3 , 21 22 . M -. . ,,. , - 2, i ,,.. A, , V. Q ,- : 54' , IT f 11,5651-WS, - ., .X . . . 'KX , I L -v A -. U, , -f . ff -, 1 ifgm. 7 L,-,txyy - ,M .1 I ,11 -,Q Z N. var, ' ff , ' Q- 543' ,. f '+,,ff,5', Ei :i l I QF 4iC,:-4-- mc 'C ,wr 'lf qgiff 'mf CDRCHE TRA Then the whining rcnool-boy, willy lair siztcliel I The Qrchestra HE orchestra has always been a rather small organization in the school. It meets on Friday, every week, in Alumnae Hall. The chief duty of the orchestra is to furnish music before and in between acts of the Dra- matic Club plays. Both classical and Popular music is played, and all types of instruments are welcomed. The Personel this year has been as followsg Leizclei' ............ Miss Sherwood Firrt Mandolin ......... Elizabeth Webb Frances Hammond, Mlle. Werleman Second Mandolin ...... fPres.j Martha Lowsley Guitni '..... Jane Graham and Martha Heywood Ukelele .... Elizabeth Canaga and Ruth Hammond 'Cello . ....... Laura Leigh Foulds Pinnirt . . . . . . . . Virginia Foulds 80 ,ad lf ! 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' E 3 3 N 1 tk I 5 2 5 v E f , ., ' X I 1 .W .y H.- ,V ., W... , , I 1 Xf--------W.-.-v-. --,1 . .-.' v V'-W ..........,.....-,M, ..,...,..,.,,-,, YL., .-.W .... ., ,,,.,,,...,4..,Y,,., CGK CLUB Arm' Jlaining morning face, creeliling like mail Tlw Book Club HIS year under the able leadership of Miss Throop, adviser, the Book Club has reviewed many interesting works by Well-known writers. Although the club has so few members this year, it has been able to discuss thoroughly the works of such writers as G. B. Stern, Don Marquis, Christopher Morley, The Bronte Sisters, a group of distinguished poets, and autobiographies of many interesting men who have made our literature and history. There are several other authors who will be discussed before the year is over. The meetings are held on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month. These meetings began at school, but as the term progressed, the club was asked to the homes of members. These gatherings were very delightful and they were enjoyed by all the members. This year Elizabeth Kant is president. In the membership there are Carol Craft, Madelene MacCracken, Anne Hus, julia Keenan, Folra Lamson, Betty Gerwick, Marjorie Campbell, Elizabeth Goodfellow, Elizabeth Van Loben Sels, and Cornelia Abbott. 82 SGCIETY Lconn Ufzwillifzglpy to .tckoolx mmf than the lover, nnimimiiiniinmnnnniimiminininmmnmnmnnnnnminmnmmmiininnmimimiminninmnvnininnmmm ociczty HE first function of the school year was a delightful tea f given by Miss julie Swobe and Miss Marjorie Mathews, Mm at the Orinda Country Club, on Friday, October eleventh. On the nineteenth of October, Miss Frances Reid, and her sisters, Mildred and Dorothy, former students of Anna Head, entertained with an attractive tea given at their home. . x ,,Q,'.,,v n ml, ', 0 , 315 ' if it Q L, Jain . 'ei H B. A., 'J 1. ,-F' ew-1 W. The home of Miss Betty Gerwick was the setting for a delightfully appointed tea on Friday, October twenty-fifth. Saturday, December twenty-first, Miss Helen Segelhurst entertained at a charming formal dance given at the Claremont Assembly. The room was decorated in keeping with the Christmas spirit. On Saturday night, November twenty-seventh, the Norfr and Becky Group entertained at a lovely informal dance, which was held in Alumnae Hall. Among the first events of the year in the junior Class was an attractive dance given by Miss jane Mathews. Miss Toria Pinckney entertained at a delightful luncheon on January third. The home of Miss Naomi Smith was the setting for a charming tea on January eleventh. The junior Class entertained the Senior Class on january eighteenth with a gorgeous dance, held in Alumnae Hall. On February the fifteenth the Claremont Country Club was the setting for a lovely tea given by Miss Eugenia Cross and Miss Sally Myers. Among those serving were Betty Holly, Harriet Peel, Vadna Rich, Jean Jacobs, Mary Porter, Dale Andrews, Helen Segelhurst, Elizabeth Armstrong, jean Conglin, Miriam Dungan, Helen Frisielle. Miss Charlotte Willotigliby and Miss Alice jean Floyd entertained on February twenty-second with a tea. Miss Betty Holley entertained with a charming tea at her home on March first. The table was beautifully dressed in harmony with the spring season. Miss Barbara Sherbourne entertained at her home in North Berkeley with a lovely bridge luncheon on March Hfteenth. The home of Miss Constance Olney was the setting for a delightful tea on March the twenty-second. Among those serving were Marion Cory, Gloria 84 Si bin like 111716166 with az woe zzl ballad. 8 8 . f Gillingham, Charlotte Willoughby, Toria Pinckney, Harriet Peel, Margaret Wentworth, Mildred Reid, Helen Segelhurst, Betty Holley, Vadna Rich, Margaret Place, and Alice jean Floyd. On the evening of March twenty-second, the Senior Class entertained the junior Class at an attractive dance given in Alumnae Hall. The patronesses were Miss Wilson, Miss Shunk, and Miss Peckham. The Orinda Country Club was the setting for a delightfully appointed bridge luncheon, given by Miss Julia Keenan, on Saturday, March twenty-ninth. Miss Elizabeth Fogg gave a lovely dinner at the Claremont Hotel, on Wed- nesday night, March nineteenth. Miss Enid Burgess and Miss Anne Craycroft entertained at a semi-formal dance, on Saturday evening, April fifth, at the Orinda Country Club. Miss Elizabeth Webb and Miss Mary Bell entertained at their home on Roble Road, with a lovely tea on the afternoon of Friday, April fourth. The Nods and Becks Group entertained at a gorgeous bridge-tea given in Alumnae Hall under the patronage of Miss Throop, on Saturday afternoon, April fifth. Miss Vadna Rich entertained with a charming tea given at her home on Saturday, April twenty-sixth. Miss Estelle Perry and Miss jean Anderson were the hostesses at a lovely dance given at the Claremont Assembly on April twenty-sixth. The College Womenls Club was the scene of a delightful dance given by Miss Madelene MacCracken, on May third. Miss Martha Howe entertained with a tea on Saturday, May third, at her home on the Uplands. Miss Marion Corey, Miss Margaret Wentworth, and Miss Harriet Peel, were the hostesses at a delightful tea on Saturday, May seventeenth. On, May third, the tennis year came to its climax in the Tennis Luncheon held at the Claremont Hotel. On the twenty-eighth of May, the most thrilling day of the year for the Senior Class, Miss Wilson will be hostess at a Senior Banquet, in the afternoon, at the Orinda Country Club. The evening of the same day, Miss Wilson is again hostess at the Alumnae Banquet. On May twenty-ninth, a day of mingled joy and sorrow, the Senior Class will say good-bye to Miss Wilson and to Anna Head School. 85 Full 0 f wire wwf and modern immnceJ,' n maginary ay ln The Life of John Milton ILTON had scarcely risen, one snowy morning in January, before a messenger arrived bidding him make haste to see Cromwell on a matter of pressing importance. Milton dressed as quickly as pos- sible and hastily ordering his carriage, drove through the deserted streets with the messenger. As he rode along, Milton reiiected on the character of the man whose merest suggestion he obeyed so implicitly, and upon the succession of events which had changed England in a few short months from the gaiety and color of the latter part of the Elizabethan age to the sombreness and religious atmosphere of the present day. He reviewed with satisfaction the growth and advancement of the common people toward the goal of complete liberty that was his dream and burning ambition to have England achieve. While he was thus meditating, ideas for a splendid essay came to him. He resolved to write it that night, although he felt a faint regret that he must neglect his poetry to write "with his left hand." However, freedom was the most important thing, and he must expect to sacrifice something to help achieve it. He was soon ushered into the presence of the man most feared, hated, and yet at the same time respected, in all England. The stocky, dynamic figure was seated at his desk when Milton entered. His eyes, when they rested upon the poet's, gleamed almost with the light of fanaticism, but they were counteracted by the firm jaw and practical manner of the Lord Protector. 'lMilton," said he, "we realize how indebted we are to you for your many valuable contributions to the cause of the Commonwealth, and we are request- ing you to do one more task for us. Leyden has written a book attacking the Commonwealth and upholding the late king. You realize, of course, that if such literature were to fall into the hands of the people it would seriously undermine the principles for which we stand. Therefore, we wish you to write a fitting answer, one that will undo all this harm." 86 And 50 be plays his part. Milton felt his blood fired with enthusiasm as ideas began to formulate, but he showed no sign of his emotion when he promised to write the essay, and at once took his leave of the Lord Protector. As he drove hastily through the streets, he passed one of the most popular theatres in London during the reign of the late king. It was now closed, boarded up and deserted, with fragments of posters on the outside only in- creasing the desolation of the scene. Milton, the man whose mind years before had pictured the glowing enchantments of Comus, the pure beauty of the lady, in a masque full of exquisite imagery, a dramatic composition that surpassed anything since Shakespeare, he who had penned L'Alleg1'0, charming and merry . . . gave a sigh of satisfaction that such frivolous and abandoned places as theatres were now closed. "It is well," he murmured to himself, "that people are thinking more to the saving of their souls than to the entertaining of their senses." Arriving home, he entered his study and immediately began to write down the thoughts that had been surging through his brain all day. He wrote steadily all afternoon and far into the night. So engrossed was he that he had no conception of time, but at length the blinding pain in his eyes forced him to lay down reluctantly the Pro Popzzlo Anglimno Defemio. which was to cost him his eyesight, He went wearily to bed, conscious of an inward glow of satisfaction over what he had accomplished on that day. LISBETH CHENOWETH, '30, 87 Om' Autloor tonight cl clarzllzter will borrow Calendar, 1929:193o EPTEMBER 10: Boarders arrive! Ransacking of trunks for .55 xv new clothes and photographs to show! And oh! so much to tell about a glorius summer. September 11: School starts. The old routine again. if. just watch the boarders gain! Q September 14: The old Girls ive the new irls a art . - gf 1 1 . .O g . V 1 Frightened looks vanishing. I . my vi' P! ,,, . . . 'K " ' September 15: lrirst male caller! Faithfully scrutinized by the boarders and deemed adorable. September 26: Dramatic Club members fight for parts. September 27. We go to Don Pasquale and on the return trip eat hamburgers with Miss Wilson in a dignified manner. September 28: Faust . . . superb! And whatis more, the boarders are still going after a week-end of dissipations. September 50: Casts chosen for the plays. Congratulations to the lucky ones. October 43 The Cafm1'el.! Again a huge success, both socially and financially. October 9: A genius in our midst! Little Ruth Slenczynski gives us an amazing concert. October 18: Mwzlb Emi! ! ! October 21: Infirmary full! Wfhat diff the boarders do? Ask the innocent day pupils! October 211: First Symphony. October 25: Cold cream jars found empty! Lost cold cream located in most peculiar places in the gables and on third floor. October 26: Half of Anna Head plans to be aviarrix after Miss Kelly's winning talk on aviation. October 28: Meeting of all house seniors called by Miss Wilson. New girls quake. Old girls prelend nonchalance. Oh! just a discussion of senior privileges! October 31: Hr1llowe'e12.'! Peculiar odors force boarders to cease studying. Door knobs disappear. Beds applepied. Ghosts! ! ! November 7: Senior rings . . . and seventy-one proud seniors. November 9: Our first dance of the year, given by the N oflr and Berks group. November 12: Report cards again. ' November 19: Miss Ransom's win in hockey, but just wait for basketball. 88 From Life with ity llnuglalef' and ity Sorrow uiiimivIIivIIiiIIinmimmimnimmummmmnnmnmmmvvummumnnnmmmmimummimnmiummmmnnunmunnum November 23: Senior pictures. And Oh! Do seniors like flattery? That poor photographer! November 27: Once more home for Thanksgiving. December 4: Dr. Hunter tells about Alaska. December 11: Dramatic Club plays a grand success. December 15: Friday, the thirteenth! Something went wrong! Two newly vacated beds found on the sleeping porch. December 18: Infirmary full and running over! With big red stockings, this time, not boarders. No, not even Gin Warden! December 20: What a commotion. Ch1'iJ'll726l.l' wzmli0n.' January 15: January 18: january 20: january 22: january 24: Everyone breathless! Finalrl We catch our breath and recuperate at the junior-Senior formal. New semester . . . new girls . . . and plenty of new resolutions. Mr. Weisshaus entertains us with a concert of modern music. Senior lectures. February 5 We have our intelligence tested! February 20: Our last monthlend, but weill make it worth remembering, never fear! March5: Our primary department publishes "Quadrangle News, our first school paper. March 6: Opening of our basketball season by playing Miss Hamlin's. March 13: We trounce the faculty, but found them perfectly good sports. March 15: Up comes Castilleja! But down to defeat they go! Afterwards, we serve a novelty luncheon. March 17: Miss Ransom's, Thirty-five. A. H. S. Tlmty-Jetfefzf Barketbtzll . . . Rah! Rafal' Rah! March 20: We are entranced by Roland Hayes. March 22: Senior-junior formal. All that it should be. A lovely dance. April 1: We end our basketball season with a victory over Miss Burkls. April 2: French plays. Ils ctaient tres bons! April 5: N only and Beckr bridge tea. Bigger and better than ever. ' April 11: Easter Vacation! April 22: Boarders, closets a profusion of colors, which proves vacation a SUCCCSS. 89 Am! the rtory he tells is true. April 26: Boarders' informal dance. May 5: Tennis Finals at Claremont. Everyone enjoys luncheon and songs afterwards. May 22: Finals again. May 28: Wlaat a day to remember! The Senior luncheon, followed that night by the alumnae dinner! May 29: Gmdualionff 'Midst a feeling of triumph and success comes that lonely, hollow feeling, at the thought of leaving our Alma Mater. But we'll all come back for the alumnae dinner and between now and then, Anna Head, "Our love is forever with you." I K- W., ' . L.- - 'e q . . . " AI'-C"f - -1 .. e- ' if -' " , il-m ent ' V ' " -N ,ae--v .1 Q. s A A. ,3-gg-13, ,- .- f.-5p,:g.,I, ,,rf,f.i,,.q,, --i:..--fwjigz.-f,.. 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'ffm . - ' " -1. gg'-" ,Q f ff - '-5016 " ' 1 .A h avnt -. ,Mg '- 2 FI'1"T.",5l: --wmsf' 15,5 ,A :L ' ' .iff ' . -' r '- 562723112 'L4:'i1'-'1-11'f.-..,E.gfr.' , 1 - 1 if . .i ff v 9 - Zi,-,.1ig..,-Q-' aw QQH1 '52, f' 1 1 f.:"1f': -12.4 fa .523 L-' .2-,lg Q -. 1:4 .'r'j. - 1 1- -v. Q- 5. xii,---"FS "" PRE.-, - 'fl' 1Tx'TL..-zz. " ' 'QF " """' . ' .. '1- V . 5' ' f':'f'Af"'5'-2521511512 - 3 I igtdffgi ' W., ,.,f. 4, ,.:-pf:fg:b,li2x611 "Z.aq..,k-asf".-1-14,1 -, ff- nl' " ' r - f:4,:... 'fi-, ' ' 'mir 2'-1l:Li:v,r: Jr 'A - ' ",1sw,'4,-'--yakv: mi,dfg:.H-5. ,i . i .yi Q,-'-L1 ' M H, 3,5133 fifgaazi gi 'J-.yv'f., g1z., ,'1,,?2Jf'5 ',: 1-'tE.'31P5-QW. A1':fm"2.-f:-::f1- , 5 iifgrf 2-M., P. .1: , :- . ...Av xii-',Q5,,. LJ!-we . .Ni-7:--.-fl ' ' '-'-gg. A .2 ' ' 1 -- ., ' ' 5 .5-153' -' 1 rf mf e' -. 7 W ,. ..i..... - . . ' iv 1-Ig-:.1.v-:-Lu:-. ,.. .7 , K , N U , Q ,, . . . .. - A - ' - 90 X x f.. xv cgi- v ,.- :Z-1,2 '1 - . ' 'gl " , - - 'f:?5.Qf,,:v2a JVY- .41:. 3 -y',5:Lg:f,., L H up f yea?wif'-"""'K'i1v.hL5zN,,Q:,.,2 . -ff' ' , 'fi 'M' ' 'N . ., X Y' wwf -Q : , X , A w X. , N Ji R 4 -,,,, '33, f X I Z ff' f 1 . ,' 1 E .' N JCKES ,.. , x 1 x ? 144 -WN-.. fx....m.Q. Sport, that IVl!7'flZkf6!Zi rare aferider, Tl12 Vacuum CIQAHQI' It lurks within the closet just as dark as it can be, A saving of its hunger 'Til another Saturday. And on that awful morning It comes roaring out to eat The dirt and dust and rubbish Thatis Caused by grimy feet. It eats all sorts of scraps and things That donit taste good at all, Like pins, and threads, and bits of strings, And bugs that creep and crawl, And once it ate some curtain rings, But they were rather small. You always know it's Coming By the bellow and the roar, And the growling and snarling, As it creeps along the floor. lt's funny, when it's hungry It's small, and thin, and Hat, But when it starts to roar and eat, It's big, and round, and fat. But some night when it's hungry lim afraid that it will Creep From its Closet to my bedside, And eat me, while I sleep! MARY EMMA JISFFRISS, '32 92 Ami Lfzfzghter, holding both hir rider, The Crouch l'Croakity, croakity, croakity, croak . . . I'll tell you something that isn't a joke," So spoke a grouchy, mean old frog, Who lived in a cool and mossy bog. "The whole round world is nothing but dirt, Look at the slime on my shoes and my shirt, You needn't laugh, and you needn't fun poke, Life is miserable, Croak, Croak, Croakf, But the old marsh hen cried, "Bless my soul, Why don't you get out of that old mud hole? Don't sit there in that slime and soak, And do nothing about it but croak and croak. "Look up, and you'll see a mountain grand! And skies that cover the smiling land, And an eagle, who spreads his splendid wing, Flowers that bloom, andbirds that sing." "My friend," said the crane, with a look most wise, "If that croaker looks up it'll be a surprise. He enjoys wearing sadly a martyr's yoke, Don't waste your advice on people who croakll' MARGARET GILMOUR, '3O. 1 1 Flora Lamson freading model essayj: "Our faithful horse is very old and has served my grandfather from the time he was a colt.', 1 1 Miss Throop: Cornelia, what is an arsenal? Cornelia Abbott: It's a machine that shoots arsenic. 1 1 Miss Yancey: This playful attitude is all right in its time and place. julia Keenan: Well, I must have my dates and times mixed. 95 Come, and trip it as you go A Boarder Going Home Cn Sunday There is a little flivver, just as cute as it can be, And once a week you'll see it coming here for jet and me. It parks among the Packards, and Lincolns, in a row, And we seem to feel them thinking, "Does the old thing really go? -va It may not be as shiny as the other cars that come, But we never have to worry, ,cause we know that it will run. We bump along the highway, and pass a limousine And they laugh at us, and say welre like a comic magazine, But you see, we all love Henry, though he's not a one to climb, For he takes us home on Sunday, and he gets us back on time! DOROTHY BRYANT, '30, April ls Here Miss Vfilson Qvery seriouslyj: Girls, you are probably anxious to know just what has been decided with regard to the house dance. Well . . . I've slept on it, and turned it over in my mind, ancLI've decided that for all con- cerned, and for the best reasons in the world, it would be best not to have a house dance this year. Dead silence in the dining-room for thirty long seconds. Forty glum faces stare at forty portions of breakfast. Disappointment hangs like a heavy morning fog. Miss Wilson fsinging gailyj: April Foo!! Mrs. Kilburn: Why is our rising bell like a little pig's tail? Nancy Mackle: I don't know. Mrs. Kilburn: 'Cause it's toiearlyl ftwirlyj 9-1 On the light fanmrtik toe, A Short Story 5 , ,,,: HE moon shimmered on the lake. A faint breeze per- - " .,, ' , , kiwi '4 fumed the air with the odor of honeysuckle. All was calm and peaceful . . . a perfect night in june. The 355 roadster parked under the tree was half-hidden in the ,E shadow, but the occupants could be seen in the dim light. f A WH The man was ordinary. His type may be seen on any I " M-at ,.:., crowded city street. The woman was well dressed and good looking. One would have picked her for a society headliner. He spoke, "Can't I possibly persuade you to stay with me? I can give you every advantage. You may entertain your friends and if you wish to go to the theatre once or twice a week, you are free to do so." "No," she replied, "No inducement can persuade me to stay any longer. Please drive me to the station." He yielded, but pleaded with her all the way. Finally, when the station lights gleamed a block away, he slowed down, and then stopped the car. "You can walk the rest of the wayf' he said peevishly. "I'll be shot if I'll take so much trouble for any cook!" 1 1 Syntax A Kiss A kiss is a noun that's common, and when desired May be quite proper, so some say . . . Its gender is common, second person required Plural in number, in a singular way. Its case is objective, you plainly can see, And agrees in most cases, with you and with me. ' 1 Y Eugenia: I hear a person is supposed to sleep eight hours a day. Sally: Yes, that may be so, but who wants to take eight subjects? 1 Y Miss Peckham: NW hat has primitive man contributed to us? Margaret Gilmour: Ancestors. 95 Ami if I give thee laonozn' due Conversation overheard on the study hall stair: Constance: I wish my legs were longer. Elizabeth: Oh, theyill do. They're long enough to reach the ground, anyway. Y Y Miss Hoffman: How was iron first discovered? Virginia: I think I heard Pa say they smelt it. Y Y Well meaning botany teacher: Stand up, Margaret, and show Marjorie what an earthworm is. Y Y Rock-a-bye Senior, on the tree top, As long as you study your grades will not drop, If you stop digging, your standard will fall, Down will come Senior, diploma, and all. Y Y jean: I am studying the origin of blotting paper. Snick: That must be very absorbing! Y Y Vadna: Have you ever taken chloroform? Johnny: No, who teaches it? Y Y Miss Pool: Translate, "Rex fugitf' jane Wartl: The king flees. Miss Pool: The perfect tense takes has. jane Wfard: The king has flees. Miss Yancey: Virginia, what is a proper noun? Virginia Phelps: I'd like to tell you, Miss Yancey, but I think that it will do you more good to look it up for yourself. Y Y How simple during class to let My scrambled wits lull to repose, And in my seat just set and set, And dream and dream, and doze and doze. 96 Mirllo, azdnzit me of thy crew, jane Umphred Qreading from Halleckj: "Like Macaulay, Newman excelled in the use of the concrete." Wfhat does he mean, Miss Throop? I thought that Newman was a writer. 1 Miss jones: Explain gender" Betty. Betty Midgely: Gender shows whether a man is masculine, feminine, or neuter Mt. Eyring Jane Ward Mr. Eyring: jane Brock: 1 1 Would you mind telling me your name? Wlmy, there's my signature. Yes, that's what aroused my curiosity. 1 1 I can't sleep with anything on my mind Nancy Sherwin: You usually sleep well, don't you? 1 1 Miss Throop freadingj: If you have tears, prepare-t Voice from the back: Going to read our grades? 1 1 Jane: There are only two girls I admire. Estelle: Who's the other? 1 julia Keenan: Do you play bridge? o shed them now Agnes Irwin: Yes, London Bridge, with the Primary Department. 1 1 Helen Mallet: Here's a nice cool drink of sparkling water. Tram : Sort lad but I have an iron constitution and I mi ht rust it Y Y: v 8 1 1 Little marks in Physics, Little marks in French, Make a sterling athlete Sit upon the bench. 1 Y - Miss Throop: Are you sure this theme is original? Marie: Well, you may find a few words in the dictionary. 1 1 Miss Yancey Q sixth period classy 1 You recited that perfectly as to words Flora but it has such a hollow ring. Flora Lamson: Yes, that is the natural result of speaking on an empty stomach. . 97 4 I ,f H. 1 a d w W W 'L i p 1' o gf u e .5. To OUR Ri1AD1sRs From the now familiar title of our Annual came the suggestion for the theme of this book. We found an expansion of that theme in the lines we have quoted from I lJuglif1t'L'i, from A5 You Like II, and from Ijfiflegm. We hope that you have found here something of the gaiety of Col- umbine, the versatility of Harlequin. And in the spirit of our friend Pierrot, whose naive efforts to please are at least sincere, we thank you for your kind reception of our book. Nous AND Blacks, 1930 ',f..,g-ivy jj' .A . hh .1 1 r ,Q v - A-M11 . 71"-'W' .1 f.,':f15'-2"-. - f 'ei sf ..1IQ?::l.-AL1f 3efQ-fE.3+f'f ' ' ' '..2'il'.f1I'-vA4f.':J 1: ' . 1i..d,.51ffj51 ' ' f' f . '- 1 ' ,I -. .f + 'iri- .L . A QF-'f:f..,,?32F..' 'A : - 1-1-biff., 2" . - . - -' . - 1--p.,fff:.-1'-T.. 4--:..-.:'3,,.1.-f.. rv ,gg 1.-1 ' ,..-..,.-,,5.- -L. W ' -Q. fi'FI.-'Jf'?I.-l.'fv"- F N"-V , :aes-:V ,':gg'..'fr'.'r' 1 1 ' '-1' ,.j-yUg.3,,fSa-52gf:'.gPf5..-.A ' ....tnif'ffJ,y::.f-fvF- ., mf '7::I4fi1.,,,-.g1,f, -I. - N .. "" 1 ff-'Ri'-J."fflwJJf'f-23252'ffiliissff ., ,.Q',..f'1r.12 'ff1f" .:,.- .,,gfj,,.4..5i-J'iss.-,f?"'if:1f.'--:fd,,,b:.:'ipQ ,, rw' ' x .1 , -5 1. ,eng-Mir W ' ,Y . gr-air-QE-:F 12fgffff7'ri..rm' ' ' f . -....qy.g.-.c,.. 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Suggestions in the Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) collection:

Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

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Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

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Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 1

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Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1944 Edition, Page 1

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Anna Head School for Girls - Nods and Becks Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

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