Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN)

 - Class of 1981

Page 1 of 224

 

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1981 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1981 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1981 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1981 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1981 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1981 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1981 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1981 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1981 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1981 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1981 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1981 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1981 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 224 of the 1981 volume:

J.6- toyox ( !9l ; W x o 2S I 1 L-.- f EN COUNT PJBUO LIEJnARt ' IllIlK 833 01771 3014 GENEALOGY 977. 20a ANhAHS ••• • m The biggest statistic of the year was the 444 days spent in captiv- ity by the hostages in Iran. The hostages were finally released on January 20, 1981, right after Ronald Reagan took the oath of office of President. KEY 1981 Angola High School blj; Wayne Angola, Indiana Volume 60 Opening nt Life . . emics . . Organizations Ads Closing Index iJkMA A familiar sight for many Angola residents and tourists was the re- decorated water tower. An average of 14 people saw the tower per minute. The painting was done anonymously on a summer night. k During Homecoming week, Penguin the senior bell. The bell has Point voices their approval of been a tradition for 16 years. On Halloween night, JoEllen -«e, Amy Koomler, and Lori Hartei, ) along with 23 other Student C icJI members, collect money for UNICEF Mark Patterson bites the dusi after being tackled by a pair of Bluffton players. Angola came 16 tug-of-war competitors from the class eventually won in a sudden back to win this Homecomlnj -ie freshmen class try to out-tug the death competition between the by a score of 35-6. opposing sophomores. The junior junior and senior girls. 2 Stata Incredible Stata lncredib!e 3 Light catches the eyes of this gazing cat. An average of 57% of AHS students have cats in their homes. Kelii isenhoff won the most votes for a pie-in-the-face during a pep session for the Delcalb basltet- baii game. Erich Weiss, Jim Blaltesley, iWiilce Lesialc, John Blanchard and Todd Clouse stuff a van of sophomores A total of 215 students filled the four vans on Games Day. McDonald ' s is a popular cruising place for bored students. The average student drives through McDonald ' s twelve times a week. Junior Steve Hipskind struggles against two Hamilton players in the Holiday Tourney as he attempts to shoot for two. Steve ' s average was 8.8 per game with a 54% free throw average. stats lncreda le S Jamie Simons, DeeDee Browitf Ummel, Lisa Caruso, Terry Kimes, Kari Hoyer, and Diann Craighead show their spirit by wearing togas Ken Duniap dresses as a sand creature, a character of " The Em pire Strikes Bacl( " for a special performance of the band. asB s •TTjr: I JT71 .1 iTi.iiiiW-Mimirr. his notes in IMrs. IMcKeever ' s class. Composition classes took an average of one test per week. M Lunch prices increased eight per- cent throughout the year, but John Lindsay still pays the price. -heck James, the most popular lake; ouTthViiew ' I ' SBO key t ' lhe ' Home- ? » ' • " .» " «• ' " ?. « " » ' « " » " " »y ' coming Dance. Over 300 yearbooks ' » » ' ® • ' 8 ' ' » • " • " " » « PO - were distributed that evening. " ' ® picture. , -l M -1 . .J.XJl--l-il-J-AJ.. . -t. i A J. i: ._22222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222 13333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333 - J5555555555555555555555555555555555555555555555555: 66666b666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666e: s • - S t I ,:.. ' " 333 6 7 ...8 .88888888888888885 ... 99999999999999999999999 1 2 ' 3 -5 ::8 __ " ' ,22222222222222; cc 66666666666017 ?777?7777- 888888886 999999999 OOOOOOOOC 111111111 222222222 333333333 5555555555 ..._..,-......-_ ..5555555555555 D666( jfgg 666666 66666666( - 7?7777777?7777-: 88888888888888t 999999999999999 000000000000000 [lllllllllllllll 22222222222222: 333333333333333 .555555555555555 66666666666666C " 77777777777777: 88888888888888t 99999999999999S OOCOOOOOOOOOOOr 11111111111111: 22222222222222. 33333333333333 (. 44444444444444 ' OOOOOOOOOOOC ,111111111111....-..., :22222222222222222 533333333333333: ,44444444444444 55555555555555:. ., , .. ., ■66666666666666666666 : 77777777777777 " - )88888888888888l....„ ' 99999999999999999999999 .lOOOOOOOOOr i.llllllllli-.-... 1 • 2 3 4 ' 5 6 7 v99 1 . 22222222222222222. 2 " 333333333333333333333:33 4444444 444444444444 4 ' 4- 4 4 5555555555555555555555 666666666666666666666t 77777777777777777777? " 7 88888888888888888888888 ;,QQOQQ9Q9QQ99QQOQQQQQQQ9 L},4444444444444 ' . 56666666666666666 77777777777777777 38888888888888888c 99999999999999999QQ9C 30000000000090; lllllllllllilli.... 555555555555555: 6666666666e-?4tt666666666666666: 777777777- r 1 77777777777777 888888886 9999999 oc 88888888888888 ; 0999 0999090999 OOOOOOOOC M 66006666606660 illlllllll — -- ' 11111111111111 222222222 L :22222222222222, 3333333333aiJj3333333333333333 ;-44444444 ' P3iwi-444444444444444 ' ' ■ 5r »-.-,- : ' H OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOuuuuuuuouuuooouuuuooowoo ouv uouw jsiiiii mill 11 111111111 11111111 1111111111111 111111111 1111111 1 -.- . : . ' ' ; - ' ?222222222222222222???222222222222222222222222222222222222 . ■ii a " ' n • ■ ' ' • ' ' ' ' - ' ' O,- ' " Ill £22 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . 222222222: 2222222222222 33333333333333333333333333. 55555535555555555555555 55555:. D66666666b666666666666666666 6Ar ??777?777?77?7?77????7777?77???7V, 388888888S888888888888888888888888t -99999999999999 999 ' J99999QQ99Q90QQOV JOOOOOOOCCOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOnOGOOOCOO 111111111111111111111111111111111111 11 _ £2222222222222222222222222222?22: 22?22 ' ?2 333333 333333333333333333333333333333333333 ' ; % " ' . igOGQ 6660OCOOOOOOQOO 9999.9999999999999999999999; 999999999999999 ,,,,,,,,,,, ,, OOOOOOCCGCCOOOCGOOOCCCCCOOOOCOGCCCGCCC 11 11 111 1111 111 11111111111 11 111111 -,111 111 11 1111 1111 11m ;2222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222 c . % % 888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888 iiiiiiii« B m . r, 22Z222Z2M ■ ■ Bpp ?- ■ ■ ■ Jjy M 1) What football player scored his jersey B | K o ' 2 o :: - o if i|-44 ' i-4i(- ' H number In points during the Homecoming B | M f ' ' i. ' cf iTcc; c tH game? H H ■- - ir- s--. ;?H 2) When the senior girls jogged to the ■ ■ m555555555 OOOOOOCM first Sectional game in February, who 1 | B 2,2 xl 2 ? - 77777777 dribbled a basketball non-s op? H H ' M uni SiJbsA b jo jsoo eqj sj 08 ' 8ZI.$ (fr B X- X I IXM- 8888886cH ' many couples attended the Winter H H juoAe eq) pepueue sajdnoo zi Jo |bjoj v (£ I -I i - A -; CGCQOCQrH Prom? ■■ Bunqqijp peddojs jeAau H Cbb68 C 5 C C C C : ; ; r; ; -- ' H 4) ' ♦ student eats lunch in the school HH ' siJiB gi. eqj ,o euo ' UMOja eeaeea (z ■ OOCCC : CC :. CC LOUUOCOlM cafeteria every day, how much would he ■ 1 uow nig |8uib6b | i ; - i :,;;;- llllllllH »Pon l in a year? ■ ■ siuiod zz pejoos (k) jo|dded Apjon ( i H !r ' " " " " " " ' " 333333331 ■ ■ B -- - -: 5666666 D H H ■ " 5-? -?9- - - ?7777777iVHMHHMHHHHHMi ■■■■■ ■■ ■ ■H ---— -- ' 3888888868888888888888888888888888688M88S888as68 A8 -- sp.5Q;:cc;::QccQ = cc c ?999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999Q99 )QooQGoSSocScoScSocoocSSc c ,iii:ili- 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111- imi ' 11 -1- 22 2. 22 22.. 32222222222222222222222222222222222222222?252. 2?22?;- 2 22 ' " " " = " ' ' ' " 7777 I i i H l l I 77?7 idGbobdC;885o8683!fBW 88CT88£ " " " " - ' - J:-si.q«,Q,Qf 99999999999999999999999999 - .ooooooqScccc- . -iiiiiilllli ■llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilii iiTi 2222227?-?- 2222222222222222222222222222- 7 : 7 " ? 22 " 2 22 VTut: ,,,,,, , , , , . - . .. 3333333333333333333333333333 ' ' C 3- 33 35 " - 3 _2 5g;55555555555555555555555555555555555555555555355-9- - --- --i ? ' n7:r: 00 Q The latest additions to the cheering squad, Ann Linsberg and her escort Pat Zuber ac- Tom Wells, Pat O ' Beirne, and Tim Sirk, es- cept the applause given to them by Terri tablish tha t " they ' ve got legs. " Carpenter and Greg Worman as Ann is crowned. During the pregame show, Tom Walters dis- plays perfect form while playing the theme from " The Empire Strikes Back. " As an added treat, while the band performs, two figures from the movie show up. 10 Hom»coming Tradition is something that has always been associated with Home- coming at A.H.S. Tradition means doing the same things, the same way every year. The Student Coun- cil broke out of the bonds of tradition and injected some new ideas into Homecoming Week 1980. One of the " tradition-breakers " was class struggles which took place on Tuesday. Classes com- peted against each other and teachers in such events as van-stuffing, egg tossing, pyramid building, and the obstacle course. The junior class girls clinched the victory trophy after winning the tie- breaking tug-of-war against the senior girls. Thursday night also brought some- thing new. The junior class sponsored a " Unhomecoming " fea- turing powderpuff football, skirt and sweater clad male cheer- leaders, and male " queen " can- didates complete with formats. Keith Roddy took the honors in this contest, as the sophomore girls won the football battle. Another tradition breaking event was the " no-float " rule. This eliminated such past problems as egging, late night float- building, and vandalism. The weather even played a part in the " new " Homecoming causing cancellation of the annual parade. However, some things did remain traditional such as Spirit Week, the crowning of the queen, and a Homecoming Dance. Mr. Fleming proves that the " hen ' s fruit " used in the egg-tossing during class Struggle Day was definitely not boiled. IfA. Greg Silberg exhuberlantly signals that down during the Homecoming " blow-out " " We ' re number one " after scoring a touch- Bellmonf In which the score was 44-14. of Homecoming 11 With eyes glued on the Bellmont runner Gordy Peppier ( 22) zeroes in on the tackle. Coming up from behind to support in the effort are Craig Best ( 24) and Dick Simmons ( 20). Keith Roddy collects the heralded weeds DeLois Nester and contestants Craig Best awarded to him for being " Unhomecoming " and Scot Biernat with their escorts Katy queen. Applauding the decision is escort Sanborn and Kelli Isenhoff respectively. The 1980 queen candidates and their escorts: FRONT ROW-Martha Hipskind, Lana Zimmer, Debbie Lamott, Gretchen Reynolds, Colleen McCarthy, Lisa Piaiek, Terri Carpenter, Ann Linsberg, Faith Stpy, and 1979 queen Laura Kyle; BACK ROW- Jon Sprague, Jay Baker, Scott Snyder, Tom Atha, Jim Clearwater, Gary Hutchins, Greg Worman, Pat Zuber, Ted Grossback, and Mark Loveberry. O O O mwmmm o o o ! " H .5V •quad includes: FRONT ROW-Sharri Husa, Mary Carrigan, Debbie Lamoil; ROW 2- Mary Ann Stoudinger, Debbie Penrod, Cat Schieber, Shirley Hager; BACK ROW-Jody Magic Company has the gym rocking with week of Homecoming festivities, tunes to brmg to an end a successful Sophomores Jeff Bledsoe shows his spirit by wearing this crazy hat on " Crazy Hat and Sunglasses Day " of Spirit Week. Other dress-up days in Spirit Week were Cowboy and Indian Day, Impersonator Day, Slave Day, and Toga Day. O O O Itilii Homeeoming 13 Dr. Chumley (Dan Cripe) shrieks at the thought that there really may be a Harvey. in his first performance as an Angola Thes- pian, John Carmack, portraying Dr. Sanderson tries to explain the complexities of their relationship to Nurse Kelly. Mrs. Chauvenet (Amy Clark) graciously ac- cepts praise from her dear friend, Mr. Dowd. Returning from the sanitarium, Mrs. Sim- mons (Janice Erwin) is confronted by her daughter Myrtle Mae (Tara Goings) and Judge Gaffney (Rich Davis). A classical comedy, " HARVEY " , was chosen as the fall play by Diana Cook, Thespian Director. " HARVEY " was set in the forties and showed the problems faced by the family of a man who had an unusual friend. Not only was his friend unusual, he was not even human. He was a six foot white rabbit. Now, that might not be so bad, but the pro- blems that evolved were Mrs. Sim- mons tried to get her brother, El- wood P. Dowd, admitted to a sani- tarium and the result was utter chaosi She not only didn ' t get him committed; she ended up being committed. Fortunately for every- one involved, most of the troublesi were resolved and life returned t0( " almost " normal in the Simmons ' household. HARVEY Cast Myrtle Simmons Tara Goings Veta Simmons Janice Erwin Elwood Dowd Jeff Tanner Mrs. Chauvenet Amy Clark Nurse Kelly Mary Penick i Wilson Jeff Bledsoe Dr. Sanderson John Carmack Dr. Chumley Dan Cripe Betty Chumley Pat Zdawczyk Judge Gaffney Rich Davir E.J. Lofgren Erin O ' Nea 14 " Harvey " An insistent cab driver (Erin O ' Neal) ex- plains to Mrs. Simmons (Janice Erwin) that they " DO NOT " take checks. A very affectionate Nurse Kelly (Mary Penick) shows her appreciation for a comment made by Mr. Dowd (Jeff Tanner). Duane Wilson (Jeff Bledsoe) examines an encyclopedia to find out just exactly what a " Pooka " is. " Harvey ' VIS r c T tl ri ' Q Also seen with slacks and skirts, cowboy boots are paired with Deb Putman ' s jeans. Hooded sweatshirts became a frequent occurance among students. Lynette Bristle and Gretchen Reynolds model their favorite college choices. Kelli Isenhoff displays a popular fad of oxford shirts with blazers. 1S Fashion8 Fashions are ever-changing in this ever-changing world of ours. Everyone has their own idea of fashion-to some it may mean the latest look from France; while to others it may mean their oldest and most faded pair of blue jeans. To some it may mean their old din- gy T-shirt that won ' t live through another washing. Styles are dif- ferent for each person. Not many six foot girls would want to wear a pair of AV2 inch heeled pumps. Or would they? Or what guy wants to give up his grubby " good " sneak- ers for a brand-spankin ' new pair of cowboy boots. Although most people would want to be considered " in " , who says dingy T-shirts, grub- by sneakers, and faded jeans aren ' t " in " ? Doctor shirts were often seen throughout the halls. Preparing to go to class, Keith Roddy displays his fashion trademark. Fashions 17 Shelley Elston and Marvin Clark peer out on- to the floor before entering the prom. King Jay Baker with date Jamie Simons is crowned by president of Hi-Y, Dan Sanders, and president of Y-Teens, Teri SanGiacomo. The court included: Jack Fraley, Teresa Cope, Mike Hiler, Karia Penix, Roger Roddy, Libby Cliffton, Bruce Knox, Mary Zimmer, Steve Hipskind, Kelli Isenhoff, Monica Mahnesmith, Steve Kelley, Michele Shirley, and Joe Byerly. A look from the balcony gives a view of the The theme of this years prom was " A Night decorations prepared by Hi-Y and Y-Teens. Under the Stars. " f % .. r? 18 Winter Prom »« Bi- — » DJann Craighead and date Jim Eggleston stroll througti the entrance in anticipation of the evening to come. Enjoying their evening, Dean Mattox and JoEllen McKee laugh together. Taking a break from chaperoning, Mr Scott and his wife enjoy a slow danc( together. Posing for a quick shot before entering the prom are Brad Reichenbach and his date Jill Boxell. The Hi-Y and Y-Teens gave to the prom a new dimension, instead of the usual Christmas prom, because of problems in obtaining the gym- nasium, the clubs held a winter prom, January 10, 1981. The band selected was the John Day Band. Held from nine to twelve, the prom ' s decorations included a wishing well placed in the center of the dance floor with several stars containing couples names ' . The remaining stars were scattered throughout the gym. With a court of eight young men, Jay Baker was given the honor of being King. Winter Prom 19 Ifc. I ' ooo OIL Rick Hantz trys to get away from all the Just barely taller than the lockers, Roger " Frosh Perils " by seeking refuge in a Hawks looks a little apprehensive with locker. Mike Hiler towering over him. Freddie Freshman has just gotten back from a trying week of band- camp. He got the usual treatment: shaving creme, beanies, etc. As he nears the big doors, he thinks high school isn ' t that bad, but at Angola it ' s terrible. With antici- pation he heads for his " new " locker. Unbeknownest to Freddie, his locker is so old and moldy that the biology classes used sam- ples to make penicillin last year. With a little luck Freddie makes it to his first hour class-P.E. 9. " Run thirty laps and you have to run ten more for everyone who passes you, " is said by a man in shorts with a whip in his hand. Physical Science is next on the list and Freddie is forced to learn all the elements on the Periodic Table plus ninety-seven others created by his teacher to equal an even 200. Lunch time-Freddie is practically knocked down by people long jump- ing down the stairs. " I didn ' t know track practice was held in the school, " he is heard to say, while being passed by a runner obviously trying to gain the school record in the lunch room sprint. Freddie makes it down to the line without any major in- juries. Ten people have just cut in front of him; what a price to pay for getting inedible food. Freddie sure counted his lucky stars when the whole English class was asleep during his and Fredia ' s kissing scene in " Romeo and Juliet " . Yuck, Study Hall-sleep city. This dull routine happens for days, weeks, months. Then one day Freddie hears " Beeeep You are dismissed for the day. Have a nice summer " . Be sure to catch the next episode of Frosh Perils entitled " Driver ' s Ed. " Diane Smith manages to smile in spite of the colossal mound of homework she is hauling to study hall. A duty of the freshmen basketball players is to work the concession stand. Rod Springer and Don Boyer rest during a varsity game. During physical science Mr. Grill gets a chance most teachers only hope for-strang- ling student Steve Parnin. Frosh Perils 21 Sam Nash (John Carmack) and his secretary (Deb Penrod) discuss business contracts. Explaining to Karen about the Savoy Plaza that no longer exists, is the bellhop (Paul Dahl.) The waiter (Scot Biernat) questions Karen Nash (Janice Erwin) as to what she would like for dinner. (L 2 ? 22 Winter Play Attempting to restrain her irate hustand (Dan Cripe), Mrs. Hubley Erin O ' Neal) grabs his tuxedo and in the process splits the tails. Mimsie Hubley (Tracey Grimes) finally emerges from the bathroom and tells her husband-to-be " I ' m ready now. " In his first Angola Thespian production, Jerry Duguid directed a Neil Simon comedy, PLAZA SUITE. Consisting of two one-act plays set in the same fiotel suite, the first act entails the problems of a wife and her fiusband, who is having an affair with his secretary (Deb Penrod). Mthough Karen Nash (Janice Erwin) knows about the affair and is willing to discuss it with ler husband (John Carmack), he -efuses to face the issue. in the second act, a husband and wife duo (Dan Cripe and Erin O ' Neal) try unsuccessfully to remove their daughter Mimsie (Tracey Grimes) from the bathroom. For fear that her upcoming marriage will turn out like her parents ' marriage, Mimsie has locked herself in the bathroom. In an attempt to remove her, the antics include a ripped tux, an injured shoulder, a crushed diamond ring, a torn pair of panty hose and an unexpected visit to the room next door. Luckily, Borden (Lynn Sherer) arrives at the scene and with a simple " Cool It " , Mimsie exchanges the bathroom for the altar. Winter Play 23 John Lennon killed by Mark David Chapman. Pope John Paul II shot by a Turkish terrorist. Russian grain embargo lifted. Iran and Iraq engaged in war. Hunger striker Bobby Sands dies. " Yorkshire Ripper " caught. Prince Charles marries a young Lady Diana. The former Shah of Iran dies of cancer. The 52 American hostages are free after 444 days of captivity. Quale beats Bayh in senatorial race. Controversy in Steuben County zoning. Angola ' s first stoplight at Mill and Wayne. Consolidated Freightways spurs violence. Arsonist sets blaze to Bledsoe ' s Beach complex. 128 arrested at senior party for trespassing. Judge Purdy found dead with a shotgun wound to the head. Angola ' s City Planner, Craig Rice, ,pgj.Q employees return to work after resigns. an eight month strike. 24 Curnnt Evenla The President, a secret service agent, a policeman, and the press secretary were injured in an assassination attempt by John Warnick Hinclcley Jr. Voyager I gives us views of Saturn. Steven Judy executed in Indiana. Carter, Reagan, an Anderson debate. Indiana-NCAA basketball champions. Boxing great, Joe Louis, dies of heart attack. Atlanta ' s child killer still at large after 28 deaths. Discrepancy on Indy 500 winner. Rash of hotel fires across nation. Reagan defeats Carter in Presidential election landslide. Space shuttle blasts off after a two day delay. mm-m Will golf, gymnastics, cross-country, and wrestling be cancelled for A.H.S. students? Driver ' s education triples in price. Six snow days. Teacher ' s face reduction in force. No Homecoming floats. Tom Seiman makes all state football team. Terry Thompson resigns as vice principal. Lunches raised to 70 Record attendance at school board meeting. Five National Merit Finalists. School fog deiay-a first for many A.H.S. students. Current Events 25 Two of the familiar sights at Notre Dame are the golden dome atop the Administration Building and the statue of Moses in front of the library proclaiming, " Notre Dame is 11 " Looking north across the piazza of Tirey Memorial Union at Indiana State University is the main building of TMU dedicated in 1940 by Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt. I 26 College Choices Tri-State University ' s campus is full of picturesque buildings such as the Science Building. ' • ' i ' ' jr. • On campus at Indiana University is this modern sculpture. It ' s a Picasso and located in front of the School of Music. " YOU ' RE GOING THERE FOR YOUR EDUCATION! ISN ' T THAT KNOWN AS THE PARTY CAPITAL OF THE WORLD?! " Unfortunately, that narrow- minded attitude exists all-over the state. People don ' t seem to realize that certain colleges throughout the state are known for more than their so-called " social activities " . They are known not only throughout the An over-zealous Ball Stater mounts the statue of Benificence. Benificence was sculpted by the same sculptor that did the Lincoln statue in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. Benny, as the statue is called, was erected in 1936. State but also the United States as colleges that specialize in fields. Even in the town of Angola, there ' s Tri-State University, which is one of the foremost engineering schools in the country. Indiana University is well-known for it ' s music program and its School of Business, and of course when one hears Purdue, he immediately associates it with agriculture. Ball-State University is known as a " teacher ' s college " and Notre Dame is known as an outstanding Catholic-affiliated school. What should one look for when choosing a " higher education " ? Consider these 7 points: Two or four year college, the college location, admissions selectivity, college size, private vs. public, college costs and financial aid, majors and study programs available. College Choices 27 1111 When someone looks at a yearbook what do they see? Usually just words and pictures. The words belong to whoever created the page. The same person arranged the pictures in an order they chose. However, the pictures themselves were usually taken by a completely different person. Until now the only recognition a photographer got came at the back of the book in the photo credits. He had little or no say as to the arrangement of the pictures on the pages. This year the KEY has decided to change things. These two pages have been devoted to the photographers. So, with your permission, allow us to show you our version of the Night Gallery. 28 Gallery GaMery 29 » While April (Amy Morin) participates in the calliope, Joanne (Ann Kirkman) portrays a judge worn out by the persistence of Summer (Lynn Schmidt). Vonda (Vonda Roberts) and Robin (Ingi Skaug) hold a dancing pose during " Save the people " . nf Socrates (Laurie Eberhardt) speaks of the " doctrine that corrupts the youth " . ■ EWT ' C AST- Stephen-Ron Short Gilmer-Laurie Eberhardt Jeffery-Dave Martin Germaine-Elizabeth Headley Lamar-Mark Russell Summer-Lynn Schmidt April-Amy Morin Peggy-Tracey Grimes Herb-Jack Fraley David-John Carmack Joane-Ann Kirkman Hope-Debi Putman Vonda-Vonda Roberts Sonia-Patrice Crimmins Albert-Mark King Robin-lngi Skaug Nathan-Dan Cripe 30 Spring Play Herb (Jack Fraley), Sonia (Patrice Crimmins), and Joanne (Ann Kirkman) perform the liand motion for " Light. " Stephen (Ron Short) tells David (John Carmack) he is worthy to baptize him. CHORUS- Amy Clark Richard Davis Dee Dee Eggleston Martha Hipskind Amy Hirons Mary Kyle Karen Lin Crystal Orewiler Deb Penrod Mary Stoudinger Laura Vorndran Robin Wilsey BAND-Evan Ford Ruth Martin Trish Sova Jeff Tanner Seven people sing seven different songs all at once, a prostitute with a pink scarf struts down the auditorium aisle, a would-be prophet baptizes people with a sponge and bucket, a tall skinny savior in a " Superman " shirt crucified on a scaffolding-all these elements were discovered on April 24 and 25 in the production of GODSPELL. Earning their three standing ovations, the cast had the magical touch of unity and enthusiasm to put on an excellent performance. To enhance this unusual musical. Jeffery (David Martin) sings his praises in " We Beseech Thee " while the other cast members raise their arms in celebration of love. Gibbon (Lynn Schmidt) and Davlnci (Mark Russell) add to the noise in the " Tower of Babble " . there were no curtains and the back wall was painted with graffiti of all sorts and colors. Augmenting all the other elements were the clashing, brightly colored, and anything- but-matching costumes. The audience was kept alive by such exciting songs as: " Save the People, " " We Beseech Thee, " and " Oh Bless the Lord " . Amusing the spectators were: " Turn Back Off Man " and " All for the Best " . Everyone was emotionally moved by the beautiful melodies of: " By My Side, " " Alas for You, " and the " Finale " . Spring Play 31 I 4 « m km ¥ j m f p 2 David Martin and Jodi McLauchlin glide together in perfect rhythm as they dance. Talcing time out for a picture, queen Ann Linsberg and first runner-up Ellen Barnes pose with their dates for the evening D.J. McKnight and Scot Biernat. While moving with flow of the music, David Scott and Linda Esselburn listen to the tunes of Sunrise. 32 Jr.-Sr. Prom 10:00 a.m., Saturday, May 2nd-The alarm goes off. He reaches over to shut it off, puts his hands behind his head and lies there thinking about the night ahead of [lim and how it all began ' Good Morning! These are your Student Council daily announcements. The Junior- Senior prom will be held Saturday, May 2nd at Stewart ' fall from 9-12. Tickets will be $10 md that includes the price of }reakfast. " Last night " The est of the announcements are ost on him as he begins to think f who he will ask. He sidles up o her at lunch that same day md smoothly asks, " Going to the rom with anyone yet? " When the shakes her head, he promptly asks, " Wanna go with me? " How could she resist that? She said yes. So how did he spend the rest of the time until the prom? He had to get fitted for a tux. (He thought he was getting fitted for a monkey suit.) Get dinner reservations? Nah, they were going to eat at her house. He did have to borrow Gram ' s car, though. (Cadillacs are more impressive than compact cars.) They ' d double with her best friend because she wanted it that way. Mom would pick up her flowers since he had a ball game that day. Meanwhile across town 10:00! Oh no! She ' d never be ready-all :icking up their heels are Jim liearwater, Colleen McCarthy, Todd outs, Stacy Bucknam, Vern Smith, and eri SanGiacomo as they form a kickline. Michelle Wagner and Stacy Lahnum diligently work to get Stewart Hall decorated in time. Decorations included stars, seagulls, and balloons. the things she has to do yet. She ' d been in a rush ever since he ' d asked her. Last week she went to Fort Wayne to pick out a dress and it took her 4 hrs. to do it and another two to pick out shoes. Today she has to get her hair done, do her nails, and pick up his flowers. She hopes he gets done with his ball game in time to make dinner. She was glad she is doubling with her best friend; she ' ll be less nervous that way. What if she burned dinner? Oh no! She has to make a list of cute things to say Finally 9:00 arrives, they smile at each other as they walk through the door. Maybe they realize that these really are " The Best of Times " . Entering (or one of " the best o( times " are Greg Waite and his date Colleen Kuhn. Jr.-Sr. Prom 33 To tone up and strengthen his muscles for track, Dan Sanders spends some of his practice time pumping iron. Jp- " " f I Kraig Goings, Steve Kelley, Roger Roddy, , . j u ■, Ron Elliot, and Joe GriHith spend a frac- Tina Anderson, Laura Ohis and Linda Hauck tion of their baseball practice taking get their kicks judged for he.ghth by spon. he mandatory fifteen laps. sor Diane DeMara and captain Lisa Caruso. g[ Pg€? 34 Practice8 Practice isn ' t all hard work. Patrice Crimmins and Wendy Wenzel prove this by the grins on their laces. Drilling to perfect his jump shot, Jack Landis works at his form. Miles Dayholf concentrates on sharpening his blocking skills by working out with the one-man sled. Leg lifts strenghten the stomach muscles. They are just one of the exercises the cast of Godspell do prior to practicing. »» " - =« " " II Practice makes perfect? Perfect?! Well maybe that ' s the way it ' s supposed to work. If the more one practices the better he gets, then some people should be better than perfect! Okay, so maybe practicing iloesn ' t make one perfect in performance, but it does help liim perform to the best of his ability. Is that all it does, though? No actually, there is more than one aspect to a practice. rhere ' s a lot of what ' s sometimes Jailed " Mickey Mouse " stuff done it a practice prior to actual ' practical " practice such as scrimmaging or acting on stage with props. There ' s body condition, memorizing plays, reviewing basic fundamentals for sports, memorizing music and dance steps for both band and pom-pon, and for a play there are the breathing exercises, memorizing lines and the task of blocking. Another aspect of practice? How about the sacrifices participants sometimes have to make? Members of the baseball team, and pep band know what it ' s like to sacrifice sleep as they had to arrive for some practices at 7:00 or 7:30 AM. The pom-pon corps and band know what it ' s like to give up an evening at home as the date of a contest draws near. The cast of any play can relate to not leaving some practices until 10:00 or giving up a Saturday or Sunday night to construct a set. Finally, practices can teach an individual important things that not only relate to his situation now, but can also help him in the future-in how to get along with people, how to learn through his mistakes and those of others around him. Practices 35 ALL IN A DAY ' S WORK A referee stands only 4 feet tall, As 10 foot football players struggle to get the ball, He runs out on the field in short small strides. To stop a massacre at the sidelines. Stepping between the two. He tries to separate the gold- from the blue. With one final blow, the fight finally stops, And out comes the referee, in short little hops. The game is in the final rounds, And the referee calls a penalty on the blue team ' s grounds. The penalty was really called for at that. Because a player hit a linebacker with a baseball bat. The game ended with a tie-really, in a way. Because nobody was left and willing to play. Teresa Araque Tammy Greenslade ' s pencil drawing indicates just how bad a pair of shoes looks at the end of a hectic school year. This time exposure by Mark King lights the way to Angola from Hoosier Hill. WISHFUL THINKING Adolescence is looking into a mirror and wishing: Your eyelashes were as long as your feet. Your feet were as small as your eyes. Your eyes were as wide as the gap between your teeth. Your teeth were as straight as your hair. Your hair as thick as your waist. Your waist as thin as your lips. Your lips as red as your nose. And your nose was as small as your CHESTI Shelley Gibbeny 36 Seareh For Talent mm ' mi ) 1 " T A Iresh bouquet of wild flowers was drawn by Robin Wilsey. :: 7 %. ye - i ' N O , WHAT YOU ARE TO ME You are my shining star, on the dark nights. You are my sunshine, through the hot days. You are my teacher, who teaches me things I need to know. You are my chair, after a hard day. You are my bed, to which I rest my aching body. You are my leaning post, whenever I ' m tired and weary. You are my teddy bear, to cuddle when I ' m frightened. But best of all You are my friend and lover, And you ' re everything to me. Shelley Elston This pencil sketching of a young girl thinking about life while enjoying the outdoors reveals one of Deborah Penrod ' s thoughts. I ' V % A tribute to the late John Lennon was drawn by Ed Plock. ' ' V l -- l- ' ' J v.. 38 Aviardis Charles W. Argerbrlght Scholarship P.E. Awards College Awards Diann Craighead American Legion Awards Laurie Eberhardt Tom Walters Land Of Lalces Lions Ciub Beth Clark Steve Schannen Debbie Waite Greg Silberg Lisa Sharp Miles Dayhoff Wayne University Of Cosmetology Sclioiarsiiip Scholarships Dan Cripe Laurie Eberhardt Lorl Harter Tom Kundenreich Masuma Rahman Jim Rowland Jamie Simons Elks Award Julie Coleman Scholarship Lori Harter PSI IOTA XI Lori Harter Yearboolc Awards Music Math Honors Stacy Bucknam Janice Erwin Gordy Peppier Jeff Tanner Scholarships Colleen Kuhn Robert Price John Blanchard Alan Moor David Pinkham Tom Walters «- ' tv»i ii% i « X f L A wards 3S 40 A wards cm? Q ,«5 ' JWCKT .._ Hoosier State Sctiolarstiips Melody Arbuckie Stacy Bucknam Eben Carper Ronald Cook Diann Craighead Daniel Cripe Terry Dirrim Laurie Eberhardt Denise Eggleston Melody Hammond Lori Harter Max Hug Terri Kimes Thomas Kundenreich Kirk Lee Jodi McLauchlin Alan Moor Teresa Parnin Gordy Peppier Masuma Rahman James Rowland Teri SanGiacomo Jamie Simons Faith Stoy Deborah Ulch David Ummel Diane Ummel Thomas Walters Steuben County Business Professional Women Award Diann Craighead Home Economics Awards Angela Pentico Faith Stoy Sigma Ptii Epsilon Sctiolarsiiips David Ummel Tom Walters Tri ' Kappa Scholarship Mary Penick March Of Dimes Schoiarships Lori Harter Jamie Simons Hornet Newspaper Award Ron Cook Awards 41 Amy Koomler is off to sectionals-the hard Tom Kundereich and Tom Atha model the way. Amy was one of the 13 senior girls latest in " senior attire " -shirt, tie, sweats, who dribbled basketballs to DeKalb. and tennis shoes. LiiOTPid 42 Senioritis At graduation practice Pat Zuber and Craig Best study ttie hand outs from the office. ' m ■I V lk.V . ' i I I Mark Klink is on his way to becoming an " ex-senior " as he proceeds in the graduation exercises. . Graduation practice is just a small step away from being " cured " of senioritis. The class of ' 81 listens to Mrs. Cook because they want the " remedy. " Another class is cured of senioritis as graduation day arrives. The class of ' 81 listens to the speaker as they wait for the moment their names will be called to receive their diplomas. i ' wn i WALK IN FRONT OF U£. UATSOT DON ' T VMj; BEHIND itf: 1 kKi NOT News Flash-A new disease has just been discovered at A.H.S. it seems to affect seniors only. The school administration has called it senioritis. Apparently there are three stages: mild, medium, and severe. Mild senioritis occurs near the beginning of the year. The symptoms are such things as protecting a big bell and dribbling basketballs to DeKalb. Medium seniorities occurs near the end of the first semester when the seniors do such projects as sing Christmas carols in the halls and make Santa wish lists. Severe senioritis takes place near Spring Break. Watch for locker signs counting down the days until Spring Break. This disease reaches its peak the last week of school when seniors begin dressing a little out of the ordinary. Examples would be bathrobes, sweats with nice shirt, ties, and even stranger a V Te at Awards Day. What is the antidote for this dreaded disease? The best thing to do is let it run its course. The disease leaves its victim by a simple turn of the tassle. Seniorit s 43 WklK ooo And let ' s reminisce awhile as we glide through the arches. Looking back at the past years, we realize that they weren ' t so bad. All the tests and all the studying; well, they weren ' t so terrible either. The friendships we ' ve made we ' ll treasure forever. Football and basketball games, proms, parties and all the other fun times will always remain in our minds. Ordering gowns and sending out announcements were an important part of making today, May 24, 1981, successful. It ' s still hard to believe-me, graduating from high school. As we take our seats in the gymnasium with Mr. Kelley, Mr. Thompson, Mrs. Cook, the superintendent and several School Board Members seated on the stage, we realize one life is over and another one is about to begin. As the senior ensemble begins, my mind again wanders to the past. Now as my name is called I proudly walk up and receive my diploma. Good-bye high school and-ready or not- Heilo World! Accompanying the senior ensemble on her flute, Jamie Simons plays to the tune " Reach for a Star. " Receiving her diploma on the long awaited day from School Board Member Skip Klink is Julie Coleman. Lori Harter, president of National Honor Society, introduces co-valedictorian Tom Walters. 44 Graduation K fl rORS m mm Marching to the traditional ' Pomp and Circumstance " , Kevin Sattison prepares to head for the archway and his seat. Leading the senior boys into their graduation processional, junior class president Renee Nichols checks to make sure she is synchronized with the leader of the graduating girls. After thirteen years of a lot of hard work, the Class of 1981 ' turns their tassles " at the command of president Pat Zuber. Graduation 4S 6666666666 6666666666666666666 G666666666G666666666( iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiillllllllll OO ' - - onocooooooo oooggoqqqgmQogqogoog 90 909999999990 )Ooooonoooooooooooooonoooooooooooooo oooooooooooooo( iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimmm - -ii -iii- ;2O2909222222222222222222222222222222222222222222a. 3333333333333333333333333333333333333333333 3B : 4A ' Uhkl-Akkk 444 A44A. ,.A , 4A A A i hh Uh kk 44 i 4444444 i; t ' i- in 44 ' 555535535555555555555355555555553555555555555555555! 6 b6666C6666666666666666666666666666G666666666o6666i ' ■ r. r ■■■ ' . r ' c r ' ' r Q ! C r •• c r f C O I.. O C ' 1 v) v; (.1 O O w O C O C.) C (. u C V. ' " VQQ 9 9 990am 0009 99 99 99 99 9 9 ' loooooooonooooooooooonoooo ' 1111111111111 lllllllllMl- :22 j o 1 i. •. :» O O O .; O o I. ' v- O ► C V.1 (J t- V.J O v-f V . ' J v " ' ■ , ■-. - ■• " % i ■ ' ) • ' l ' ' x ' . J _ J J J J J j -f-j j ' - - ■ 33333 33 n -V ' 1 ' 1 •) " 5 • _) J J J J _ J . . cV . 444444 4 4 4 ' ■, A 4 4 - i 1 4 4 4 A 4 4 A 4 4 4 4 A ' ojjjjj-)jjjjj5;355j555555555555- I C :- u C ' -■ (: c I ■ ■ ' ri ' iii il J ; O O ' -Ji.; o u Llllllllll 222 2. 2.: ' " J ' i " " ' ; ' ) " I " ■ ' ' f ' :44 ' i-444 ' ' i ' J J J j J J j-)5- -fc66i3666o( 7777777 7 " J O O O ' . ' .i o o u O ■ :»y999t;: ' 99 ' 30 ' )j )0 ' .j-jO iiiiiiiii: .22 .222z2. ' i- ! A A 44 44 i jj j5 jj j55 666666G6O 11 11 mil Ij O O C; O O j O u 99999: 99 u a;0Ct666666666 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 77 7 o O vJ O o O ' v- J O O O »- O ■ 9999999999Q99O. j0 90;.)3;.)0603000 11111111111111 7 ) ;■ j 1 , ' .) ; 9 ■■ y •■) 33333333333333 4 4444 4 4 4 4 A 4 4 A A 555555 j5555555 66S6 0O6666666 • 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 77 7 7 7 ' o b o 6 ' wi tj o u O u o i ij o 1.- ' 99999 9 9 9 9 9 ' 9 9 9 9 9 OJOOOOOOOOOOOO ' ) lllllllllllilll ,• ■•, p )■,■ " ) ■; L i. •- .-- i. i- !. 22222222222222222222222 ;33 33333333333333333333333 A i44444444A44444A 4444444 ' .555555555555555555555555 •6 666 66666666666666666666 77777777777777777777777 o ■ " ■ c . ■ C: ' 1 ,) r (.■ r- (1 ' O o O O Q O O O O Q O ■ )00 ' ' b0li6ouo00O0u JO000uOu Q99Q9999999Q99999909oo9qq ' onooooooooooooooooooooo xlllllllllllllll ' ' ' ' ' ' -11 ' 2222222222222222: . - -:2 53333333333333333333333333 ■,444A444444444444A444A444 ' ' i 35555555555555555555555555 5 6 6 6 6. 666 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 666666 6 77777777777777777777777777 2222, CL LJ J J J J ) 11111 • ; J . Z. 4l_ :- 33333 44444 j5535 6o6( ' u 7 77 77 O O Ci 9 9 ) - 9 99 JO J 1 1 1 " 1 T 1111 2222 3333 4444 51;55 O L ' b ' . 1111 OuOO 9 999 U9J9: iili; . ; 4 , , 4 44444 444 4 A o5555555555j55 ' - ' 6 6 6 f ) 660666606 6 ' 11111111111111 I CJ b 5 J O J O d O b b O 6 w 9999999999999v jOJ ).30090j00006 " 111111111111 -r-jf- D. i2. 1 • 222222: mil ]33333333333333 ■- i-i 4444 444 ' i A 444 A ' i " " b (;■ u 6 b b C; 6 G 6 6 6 6 " -• - ' 7 1111111 7 77 7 7 7 - ; .1 j j (.y ' J ' .. ' -6 o -J ' 1 o ' _ ' .; ' ... ij ••,. " " -- --) 9 9 9 9 o u 9 9 9 9 3 9 9 O .J llllllllll ill 1111111111 1111 11111111 " o 9 7 9 " ! •) , ' ■; 9 ' ; ) ' ? 9 ' ' 2 ' - ' - 2 ' - ' 2 2 2 2 ' ' ? 2 ' ? 11111 n ' ) ' ) 9 1 1 1111111 9 2 2 ' 2 0000 ' .) 11111 90070 oooooooo;i: ■ 1111111111: 22 2 2 " 2 2?! ■OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOT. ,111111111111111111- :22222222222222222222. ... 3333333333333 333 33 333. 4 4 4 4 4 4 A 4 4 A A 4 i 4 1 4 ' ' i A 1 ' ' i ' ' i- 4 ' i A 4 A «■ . " 55555555555 35555555 555!).. 66666666666666666666666666b 1111111111111111111111111111 , o5 :3S8cic)oSbo3o8ou6868b883u8b 8888ik 99999999999999999999999999999999999,, OOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOf; ■■ uiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 1111 111 1111 Hi. 22 22222222222222222222222222222222222. 333333333333333333-3333333333333333 -J 555555555555555555555555555555555555555: ,66666 6666666666666 6666666 566666 666 f i 6 6 6 6 6 6 L . ' . ' , 777.77777777777777777777777777777777777777777, S8o88833SS8o8888b8o86886dS88oSS68oob888SS8383S8888b. 99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999997 nnnni nnnnnooooOOOOOOOOUOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO.. llllllllllllllllIHllIlllllllllllllllllllllll 222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222. 3 3333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333 J, 4444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444444 , j jd53j555555555555j5j555555 5555555555555555 555555555555 5 555 5555- 66666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666. 7777777777777777777777777 77777777777777777777777777777777 777777777 bbooooubuub5o8bouoouuouuub8uououu38ou88o88 83aoooS888S8o8S8388SSouoSo 99999999 ' l O O O O • , O O n O C) O n n D O O O o o n f) g i) O n f) O A o n A o o n i-i -T o Q. n o .- - r% -. o r o r. -, o ooooaooo ' llllHlli 222222222 333333333 444 A 4444 ' 55555555 L)6b6bb6b 77777777 Dbobbbbb J9999999- ..-_333333| ! 44444444| J5553 ' b6666s 77777777777777777777777777777777777777 77., 9. 000. 11111. 2222222. 33333333J 4444444444 ' -, 555555555555 566666666666 777777777777 3S88S8888888 49999999qci99 300006000600 llllllllllll 222222222222 333333333333 i44444444444 55555555555 . 66666666666 11111111111 999999999999999999999999 99999999 9 9q9Qg9Q9QQQQ99QQQQ9 )ooooooouaooooooooooooooooooooo6oooooo6oooooo6ooooo6oo Ulllllllllllllll ,2222222222222222 iJJ33333333333333333j3 :,.444444444444444444444ii. )535355 5555555555555555 j666666666t666666666t6666bbboe6 ii. 99999999999999999999999 999 noOOOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO lllllllllllllllllllllllll 222222222222222222222222 333333333333333333333333 444444444444444444444444 555555555555555555555555 06666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666 SPDRT J i:i .1 , i I . i The varsity tennis team finished up another winning season with a 10 and 7 record. The player with the best mark for the year was Steve Kelley with a 14 and 3 record. This record was the fourth all-time best in Angola history while Tony Hackett ' s 14 and 7 was seventeenth all-time. Both of these men received all- conference honors with Hackett being first team and Kelley being second team. The squad this year was very young with only three returning letterman. Additional members who played well were Max Huq at 11-9 and Mike Lecknei who were strong at number one doubles. The team finished fourth in the conference, runner-up in sectional, and runner-up at the Bremen Invitational. According to Coach Wright, even though the squad lacked experience, they came together as a unit and playe good tennis. Tcnnii TalliO 10-7 marh Keeping his eye on the ball, Mike Slauson walks into a patented backhand on the Angola Middle School courts during a big win over DeKalb. ■ , a ri »! r . » ' Max Huq watches on with amazement as doubles partner Mike Leckner reacts with a backhand volley shot. Number one singles player Tony Hackett shows the form that earned him all- conference honors while hitting the ball bounced to the backcourt. TENNIS-FRONT ROW: Mahfuz Huq, Mike Leckner. John Weicht, Eric Simons, Rich SanGiacomo, Alan Fox, Sean Blair; BACK ROW: Mike Slauson, Steve Kelley, Mark King, Mike Slack, Larry Weicht, Tony Hackett, Monte Yarger. 48 Varsity Boys ' Tennis •™ ' oooooooooooooooooooo " A 10-7 record for a young team is very respectable we played well and have created a challenge for next year ' s team. " OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO Pat O ' Beirne follows through with an over-powering serve in a convincing win over the cougars of Central Noble. In the " I " formation, Tom Walters uses a backhand volley to return the ball, while playing the net for the Angola doubles team. All-conference Steve Kelley loses his racket attempting to retrieve an excellent shot by his Homestead opponent. w -L .:. 1 T 1 , ' ; " ' • — r m I III ■! I ' . . . , Varsity Boys ' Tennis 49 oooooooooooooooooooc " We did expecially well considering our age; we will be lot more tougher (sic) and experienced next sea- son. " ooooooooooooooooooo HVPGr Harrier Race To Concentrating on keeping a steady pace, number two runner Ed Steele charges around a turn while gaining on the leaders. Chris Jolin surges forward as he models his winning stride. Jolin excelled as the Hornets ' number one harrier. With the help of a little sideline coaching, Eric Sank accelerates to keep a DeKalb pursuer at his rear. Guy Lamott gains on a Baron while Wayne Mortorff remains a lew yards ahead. SO Cross Country Finishing with an 11-6 season, the harriers proved to be an extremely competitive team. The boys began the year with two wins (Eastside 26-29 and Hamilton 25-30) and completed the year with an overwhelming win (Eastside 15-50). The team was the youngest of Coach Poor ' s years and was comprised of six juniors and six underclassmen. The lack of senior leadership forced the younger boys to have a rebuilding year. The runners finished eighth in Conference play and ninth at Sectionals. Number one runner, Chris John was honored by being chosen second team All-Conference and established a record for the 5000 meter run (17:09). This was the first year for this distance after years of 2 2 mile races. Other leading performers for the harriers included Ed Steele, Jay Ice, Tom Wells, Roger Hawks, Jon Sprague, and Tim Sirk. ODinning ear Nearing the finish of the race, Gary Hutch- ins gives one final spurt. CROSS COUNTRY-TOP TO BOTTOM: Eric Sank, Guy Lamott, Chris Jolin, Tom Wells, Tim Sirk, Gary Hutchins, Wayne Mortorff, Veronica Hawks, Roger Hawks, Coach Poor, Jon Sprague, Jay Ice, Ed Steele. During the first competition on the new Middle School course. Jay Ice and teammate Tom Wells pass the 1000 meter flag leaving a trail of runners behind. - . " ' . Cross Country 51 oooooooooooooooooooo " Overall [it was] a good season, maybe not in statistics of " win-loss " but in learning to work together OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO The J.V. volleyball team (Karen Lin, Julie Beth Clark, Mary Stoudinger, Sherry Johnson, Georgia Knotek, Teresa Araque, Hager, Patrice Crimmins, Wendy Wenzel Masuma Rahman, Jodi Spraque, Tracey and Coach Dygert) huddle Johnson, Lisa Sumney, Kathy Haines, enthusiastically celebrating a close win. Jumping to meet a set ball, Patrice Crimmins tips to a Hamilton defender. The line judge watches carefully as Amy Sherri Hufnagle awaits the airborne bump Koomler displays her unique style of of Jill Boxell. serving. S2 Volleyball 7-BVzr quaMiGcl Bv Bcid Bounce Ending with a 3-17 season, the volleyball squad had a hard time pulling the individual talent and potential together as a team. As the season progressed, Diane Stock improved steadily to the extent that she became a regular starter; LeeAnn Hodge also gained valuable playing experience as a setter and hitter while Jill Boxell was a consistent hitter. Amy Koomler was voted MVP, received honorable mention on the conference team and established a record for sets and serves (242 -26); (101 -29). Sherri Hufnagle received honorable mention on the conference team and set records for bumps (351 - 124) and spikes (101 -26). Special recognition was given to Diane Stock for MIP and to Mary Stoudinger for Mo8t Determined. Linda Esselburn was awarded All Sectional Second Team while Terri Kimes received honorable mention for the sectional. The girls had diffuculty concentrating on the whole match, so many matches were lost during the second game. Close scores in the first game usually led to loss of all concentration and composure in the following game. Diane Stock precautiously bumps a returned ball while Oedra Boxell repares to aide her teammate. Masuma Rahman forcefully serves initiating the start of the game. VARSITY VOLLEYBALL-TOP TO BOTTOM: Sherri Hufnagle, LeeAnn Hodge, Dedra Boxell, Amy Koomler, Terri Kimes, Jill Boxell, Jamie Simons, Lisa Crain, Diane Stock, Linda Esselburn Volleyball 53 ooooooooooooooooooo " We stuck with it , we didn ' t quit. " OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO In an attempt to gain a few extra yards, Craig Best struggles toward with the help of blocking from all-state tackle Tom Selman. ( 76) During the Homecoming rout, Darrell Gurtner breaks through the Bluffton offense to sack the Tiger quarterback. After a big gainer for the Hornets, full- back Mark Patterson falls toward for a few extra yards while in the grasp of a Tiger tackier. Gordy Peppier sweeps around right end for a big gain against South Adams ' " Black Attack. " VARSITY FOOTBALL-FRONT ROW: Jon Onofrieiti, Rick Shipe, Mike Lesiak, Dick Simmons, Eric Ameling; ROW 2: Todd Saylor, Gordon Nelson, Craig Best, Mark Patterson, Mike Hullinger, Terry Dirrim, Gordj happier, Todd Fouts, Scot Biernat, Scot Ringicr, Brad Wilcox, Andy Somerlott; BACK ROW: Bruce Knox, Coach Saylor, Greg Silberg, Coach Harter, David Klee, Dave Piatek, Lynn Sherer, Roger Roddy, John Lindsay, Tom Selman, Miles Dayhoff, Steve Peppier, Ketih Roddy, Greg Waite, Coach Simon, Dan Sanders, Coach Moyer, Tom Schroeder. S4 Varsity Football 6d- ,Hungrv For more The Angola varsity football team compiled a season record of 6 and 4 finishing tied for third in the N.E.I.A.C. conference race. The Hornets started out slow by losing their first three games, but quickly picked up momentum, winning 6 out of their last 7, with 5 wins in a row. The team was captained by Gordy Peppier, who was the team ' s leading scorer with 78 points, and tackle Tom Selman who was awarded first team all-state honors, a first in Angola history. The biggest win of the year was a one point victory over state ranked and undefeated East Noble. As an offensive squad the team led the conference in rushing with over 2,200 yards per-contest. Coach Saylor stated, " I was v ery pleased with the team ' s ability to come along and win the big games. It takes great effort to finish with five straight wins. " Tom Selman, Mark Patterson, Dick Simmons, Darrell Gurtner, and Mike Hullinger combine on a gang tackle ending a short gain by a Bluffton ball carrier. Excitement fills the air as the Angola bench rushes the field after their upset win over previously undefeated East Noble. Roger Roddy makes sure of the handoff as sophomore halfback Greg Silberg searches for a hole on a T-3. Varsity Football SS Sponsor Lori Sanborn persuades a stubborn Julie Springer to practice her mounts. J.V. CHEERLEADERS-TOP TO BOTTOM: During a close game against Garrett, Kelle Celia Karst, Monica Mahnesmith, Karen Ruckel boosts the crowd ' s spirit. Lin, Debbie Lamott, Gretchen Reynolds VARSITY CHEERLEADERS-Colleen McCarty, Ann Linsberg, Julie Springer, Laura Willig SB Cheerleaders Losing bits of the squads to de- fection and moving, proved to be a small problem for the Hornet cheer- leaders. It was very difficult on both the new cheerleaders and the rest of the squad to make mid-sea- son adjustments. The new yell lead- ers had to learn all the cheers and chants very quickly, while the old- er cheerleaders had to be very pa- tient. The situation was soon reme- died because of the close-knit squads who enjoyed working and learning together. It was difficult to arouse school spirit at away ball games because few students attended these games. When fan buses were available for sectionals, there was a very good turn-out and school spirit was easily ignited. Making money for the squads ' funds was accomplished by sharing the concession stand with the ath- letic office at football games and selling " flippy flyers " (frisbees carried in the pockets of their owners). Varsity uniforms and pom-pons were bought with these profits. VgII LcaclGr Come U Go J Laura Willjg and Kelli Isenhoff, atop " chick- en-fighters " Tom Selman and Todd Fouts, celebrate the " ole-fashioned pep rally " , which helped end a three game losing streak. Warming up for the homecoming game against Belmont, Ann Linsberg and Debbie Lamott chant a popular cheer. FRESHMAN CHEERLEADERS-TOP TO BOT- TOM: Barb Griffith, Kelle Ruckel, JoEllen McKee, Kim Musser, Lana Zimmer JOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC " There were some fights this season in our own squad and among all the cheer- leaders, but all together we had a good year. The school had alot more spirit this year. " Cheerleaders S7 oooooooooooooooooooo " A fair year, except for all the whimps that quit. " OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO manpocoGf Lack Semi-State qualifier Frank Fenton shows one thing he learned well during the season; having his hand held up in victory. With his chin driving into the Easlside wrestler ' s back, Lynn Sharer applies pressure to the half-nelson hold. While being in the down position Dan Burrell struggles to keep from being broken down by his Busco opponent. Gregg Hoyer rides his opponent on the mat while attempting to turn him over for that crucial pin and 6 points. it: % QMI v sa The Angola wrestling squad finished up a disappointing 2 and 9 season defeating only Howe Military and Fremont. One major problem the team encountered was the lack of participation. Many meets the grapplers forfeited points because they were unable to fill all the weight classes. The team was captained by Robert Shumaker and Dan Burrell. Burrell earned a first place finish at sectional and compiled a 7-6 record during the year while wrestling injured. A bright spot during the year was 98 lb. wrestler Frank Fenton. Frank finished with a 16-6 record, a first place at sectionals, and a second at regionals which earned him a trip to semi-state. Brian Wieble was the other Angola wrestler to go to regionals by earning a second place finish at sectionals. Coach Konieczki feels that the team improved and will continue to if they can get more wrestlers involved. The need for a middle school program is a prerequisite for a successful high school program. Back Brian Wieble wins a massive decision in the heavyweight class with a third round pin after being behind in points. With a little extra effort, Todd Saylor fries to forcefully connect the Churubusco grappler ' s face with his knee while applying a cradle hold. VARSITY WRESTLING-FRONT ROW: Frank Fenton, Todd Saylor; ROW 2: Todd Clouse, Gregg Hoyer, Tim Boone, Bob Shumaker; BACK ROW: Coach Konieczki, Brian Wieble, Jon Onofrletti, Eric Ameling, Dan Burrell, Lynn Sherer, and Assistant Coach Hall Wrestling 59 Flying through a pack of Eagles, Sherri Hufnagle finds herself twisted as she eyes the hoop. ooooooooooooooooooooo " Our record didn ' t show our talent, but we tried our best in every game to win. " xx ooooooooooooooooooo Becky VanWagner stops the charge of a Sarah Hipskind checks out a Pirate Heights Panther opponent while teammate Shari offender while teammate Amy Koomler ap- Huss positions herself to block the shot. plies a little pressure. Deb Parks anxiously awaits a loose ball in the confusion. so Girls ' Basketball Ending the year with a 3-15 sea- son, the 1980-81 girls ' basketball team never got it together. The hoopsters found it impossible to maintain one intensity throughout the thirty-two minutes of play. Finding themselves far behind at half-time, the girls spent the re- maining minutes filtering up from behind. When asked to sum up his feelings toward the season, Coach McKinney replied, " I was disappointed in the record, but happy with the de- sire we had. It was a learning experience for all of us. " Captained by senior Amy Koomler and junior Diane Stock, the team placed eighth in conference stand- ing with Koomler (avg. 13.5) and senior Sherri Hufnagle (avg. 14.3) receiving second team All-Confer- ence ratings. Another leading performer for the hoopsters was Becky VanWagner who led the team in free throw percentage. Coaching Turn-0 Gr HinclGO Hoop tGO Searching for a hid den ball, Diane Stock steps around a Laker for a quick steal. GIRLS ' BASKETBALL-FRONT ROW: Sarah Hipskind, Patrice Crimmins, Shari Huss; ROW 2: Lisa Sharp, Deb Parks, Jodi Spra- gue, Martha Hipskind, Becky VanWagner; ROW 3: Tracey Johnson, Amy Koomler, Ja- nice Fiedler, Lisa Sumney, Sherri Hufnagle; BACK ROW: Wendy Wenzel, Debbie Waite, Beth Clark, Diane Stock Leaping to meet the opening jumpball, Pat- rice Crimmins stretches beyond the reach of her Homestead opponent. Beth Clark back pedals Into position fast break after Tracey Johnson down a defensive rebound. for a pulls Girls ' Basketball 61 oooooooooooooooooooo " The season was overall successful a lot more fun during the winnings better than the losing (sic). The team attitude was great! It will continue to carry over until the 1981-82 season. " x ooooooooooooooooooo ) Entering the home court, Tim Sirk eyes Steve Hipskind and Tom Selman rip down the pick being set up by the big man the boards as Tom Wells and Steve underneath. Kelley set up the fast break in a bitter loss to Homestead 66-67. Being underclassmen on the varsity squad means waiting for junior Tony Hackett, and sophomores Chad German, Phil Roe and Roger Roddy. In an attempt to block his opponent ' s shot, Tom Wells gives his all, but Dekalb makes Angola fall 61-70. 62 Var. B-Ball Finishing the season with a record of 15 wins and 8 losses, the varsity b-ballers posted the winning record inspite of being the youngest team Coach Grill had ever coached. He often started a lineup consisting totally of juniors. The inexperience was a problem especially in the early season because the Hornets had to play the best teams in the conference, and so they were out of the conference race by Christmas. Receiving a special award from all-conference was Steve Kelley. Tom Wells and Steve Hipskind received honorable mentions on the same team. The Hornets won the County tournament and lost to Dekalb in the final game of the sectionals. In the 74-62 regular season win over county rival Fremont, Tom Atha and Steve Kelley scramble for a loose ball In pursuit of the ball, Gary Hutchins sacrifices his body in order to save the ball in a 51-44 win over Fremont. BOYS VARSITY BASKETBALL-FRONT ROW: Tom Wells, Ken Beavers, Craig Best, Tim Sirk, Steve Kelley, ROW 2: Tony Hackett, Tom Atha, Chad German. Phil Roe, Gary Hutchins, ROW 3: Tom Selman, Roger Roddy, Steve Hipskind, BACK ROW: Coach Hochstedler, Coach Poor, Coach Grill. Vanity B-Ball 63 Finishing the 1980-81 season with a 3-5 won-lost record on both optional and intermediate levels, the lady gymnasts struggled all season with a small squad. This was especially apparent in the uneven bars where only a few girls worked the bars. The highlights of the year were Shelli Flora winning first all-around at the sectionals at the intermediated level. The gymnastics team finished in eighth place in the conference meet. Lack oF LacliO loco Gvnina ty ::3 I f GIRLS GYMNASTICS-FRONT ROW: Melody Baird, Coach Lautenheiser, Ellen Barnes, Dennlse McHenry; BACK ROW: Colleen Kuhn, Julie Springer, Shellie Flora, Coach Wenzel, Ann Linsberg, Kathleen Blodgett. Doing one o( the required exercises on the floor, Colleen Kuhn displays her limberness. Julie Springer shows what appears to be easy, but could become treacherous on the 4 " sli ce of wood. 64 GymnasUc8 ooooooooooooooooooo " The main thing in gymnastics is you have to want to try; the coaches can ' t give you that. " •ooooooooooooooooooo Vhile being suspended up side-down, ihellie Flora gracefully muscles through ler routine. Showing uncertainty, Leslie Presley holds a move in her balance beam routine. he vault is ' hands down ' for Ellen arnes as she prepares to spring off. Team captain Ann Linsberg runs on the floor mat while she gets set up for the next motion. Gymnastics 6S ooooooooooooooooooocx " I feel that the season went well as soon as we started to win. " OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX With concentration in mind Chad Dunnavan lines up a long putt in search of making par. Attempting to reach the green, Rich SanGiacomo uses his three iron for distance. ■t Rob Burd tees off in the hopes of coming up with a good shot and the thought of helping the team. All-conference Jim Rowland shows the form that earned him this recognition by sinking a testing putt. -.Mum 66 Golt GolFcr Chip In OSinning car The golf team finished up the season with a respectable 6 and 5 record. The team was captained by the lone senior Jim Rowland who also earned all- conference honors and was voted the team ' s MVP. Rich SanGiacomo gained special recognition by being voted the most improved player. A few problems the young team encountered were inexperience and the talk about cutting the golf program. One team member commented that it was hard to get up for the meets with the negative talk about the program. Through all of the problems and bad weather the team improved and had a winning season. The biggest win of the season was the victory over the Barons of DeKalb. Jeff Peppier eyes and follows home his ten fool putt. Gary Hutchins attempts the Improve his position on the course by chipping out of the sand trap. GOLF-FRONT ROW: Jim Smith, Bill Hartsuff, Rich SanGiacomo, Jim Rowland, Jeff Peppier; BACK ROW: Coach Vaughn, David Pinlcham, Alan Fox, Gary Hutchins, Rob Burd, Erich Weiss, Chad Dunnavan, Coach Wenzel. GoU 67 A lack of depth in many events proved to be a small problem for the trackers. There were some outstanding people in many areas but not enough to get the seconds and thirds necessary to win a lot of meets. This problem contributed to a losing record for the girls, but they really stuck together and kept trying. Leading performers for the runners included Sarah Hipskind who jumped 5 ' 10 " in the high jump and qualified for sectionals, Dee Dee Brown showed outstanding improvement and performances in the high jump (sectional qualifier) and in the 400 meter dash, Mary Kyle and Masuma Rahman both qualified for sectionals in the 1600 meter run, and Linda Esselburn was the leading hurdler for the second year in a row. Becky VanWagner was an outstanding participant as she qualified for reglonals in the 200 m. dash and placed second in conference. Two records were established this year by Deb Parks in the discus (100 ' 11 " ) and the 1600 m. relay team (4:26.6). Spirited Trackcrb Take q Tumble Heading the pack of 800-meter runners, Kelly Landon pushes to win her event against Fremont. During the county track meet, Becky VanWagner ends the 200-meter dash strongly as she leans to break the string. GIRLS ' TRACK TEAM-TOP TO BOTTOM: Kim Allen, Becky VanWagner, Dee Dee Brown, Masuma Rahman, Diane Craighead, Linda Esselburn, Dorsey Link, Deb Parks, Sarah Hipskind, Susan Gajewski, Deb Lamott, Gretchen Reynolds, Coach McCain, Mary Kyle, Coach Dygert, Michelle Ridenour, Delois Nester, Kelly Landon, Martha Hipskind, Veronica Hawks 63 Girla ' Track Deb Parks accelerates while her teammate Martha Hipskind quickly hands off the baton in the 800-meter relay. Attacking the final hurdle, Linda Esselburn stretches to finish ahead of the crowd. Long-distance runner Mary Kyle lengthens her stride to keep an Eagle opponent at her heels. oooooooooooooooooooo " Personal goals were achieved throughout the entire season, but unfortunately the talent of our team wasn ' t shown in our season record. " OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO DeeDee Brown arches over t he high jump bar and easily flops onto the porta-pit during a meet with Leo. Cirls ' Track 69 oooooooooooooooooooo " We are a young team and the future holds much for us. But we need a lot more work. " oooooooooooooooooooc ill vnwif Tom Wells concentrates on his landing Following in a record setter ' s footsteps is technique while clearing six feet. His high the only way for Ed Steele to replace jump made him the county champ. senior Tom Kundenreich as 1 hurdler. 1 ; In a bitter loss to Westview, Hornet Being little does not mean being slow, as sprinters Eric Simons, Bruce Knox, Mark Roger Hawks shows his stuff while Patterson, and Kurt Eberhart fight to gain doubling in the 1600 and 3200. the needed points. 70 Boya ' Track Finishing a very successful season, the boys ' track squad boasted a 7-4 record. The tracksters also won the Tingley Invitational and placed fifth in N.E.I.A.C. meet. However, the team was slowed as they missed several key runners in the midseason especially in the distance events which were only one or two men deep. The teams first places were anchored by both Tom Selman and Dan Sanders who had nine apiece. Next, was the most valuable player, Tom Kundenreich, who had six firsts. New records were gathered by Kevin Wray (200)- 23.1, Tom Kundenreich (300 low hurdles)-40.9, Dan Sanders (di8CU8)-151 ' 4 " , Tom Wells (high jump)-6 ' 3 ' 4 " , and the 400 relay team (Bruce Knox, Mark Patterson, Kurt Eberhart, Kevin Wray)-46. 3uccG3 tir Trackmen Being relaxed is one of the secrets of a good sprinter runner as Kevin Wray proves while breaking the 100 meter tape. BOYS ' VARSITY TRACK-FRONT ROW: Rick Shipe, Roger Hawks, Tom Kundenreich, Kevin Wray, Dick Simmons. Mark Patterson, Kurt Eberhart, Tom Selman; ROW 2: Tom Wells, Coach Saylor, Mike Nevois, Bruce Knox, Ed Steele. Todd Saylor, Phil Carroll, Ed Mitchell. Allen Jennings, Paul Dahl, Eric Simons: BACK ROW: Wayne Motortf, Guy Lamott, Roger Mills, Denis Denham, Chris John. In one of the colder meets of the year. Dan Sanders throws the shot placing third. Boys ' Track 71 The girls ' tennis team tool( a big step this year as they had a winning season. Many experienced players returned to build a strong backbone for the remaining girls. Outstanding performers for the team included Sherri Hufnagle (one singles), Amy Koomler (two singles), and Lisa Piatek (three singles). Freshman Tracey Johnson had a great season of only one loss at four singles. Taking the net, Pat Zdawczyk prepares to put away h er Homestead opponent. The girls pulled together as a team this year and showed tremendous talent throughout the line up. During sectionals, the doubles teams of Hufnagle-Koomler and Pat Zdawczyk-Amy Clark both dropped tough matches in the first round. Piatek fell during first round singles play while Johnson made it through the fourth round to place fourth overall. RackGtGcr oooooooooooooooooooot " With a lot of effort from some juniors and seniors, I felt the team really pulled together and helped each other to bring a winning season in every way to the team. " oooooooooooooooooooc Tracey Johnson lobs to her opponent to allow time in returning to the middle of the court. Meeting a cross court shot, Lisa Piatek positions herself for a return down the line. VARSITY GIRLS ' TENNIS-Janlne Fiedler, Amy Clark, Tracey Johnson, Beth Clark, Amy Koomler, Sherri Hufnagle, Amy Hirons, Mary Stoudinger, Celia Karst, Coach Wright NOT PICTURED-Pat Zdawczyk, Lisa Piatek 72 Varsity Girls ' Tennis ignitG park Amy Koomler stretches to add power to her service. . Sherri Hufnagle slides to cut a low hit ball to the backcourt. Varsity Girls ' Tennis 73 900000000000000000000 " It hurt when we didn ' t hit " 30000000000000000000C Co-MVP Chris Rodesiler struggles to score from second on a ball hit to the outfield against the Eagles at Fremont. Craig Best goes down swinging as he takes a big cut against the state-ranked East Noble Knights. Roger Roddy makes a long stretch in an attempt to nip the Hamilton runner at first. Ron Elliot hustles to back up the throw. 9 Stev e Kelley turns the ball over and shows good follow-through as he hurls another pitch toward the awaiting Columbia City batter. 74 Baaeball Moco tick Mall Hornets The baseball team compiled a season record of 8 and 12. The record was kind of a disappointing year since the team started out being 7 and 3. The squad was captained by Gordy Peppier, who along with Chris Rodesiler were Co-MVP ' s. Rodesiler led the team in hitting with a .419 batting average. Roger Roddy pitched two shut out games for the Hornets, one being a no-hitter against Prairie Heights. The major problem the team faced was hitting the ball. They couldn ' t connect when they VARSITY BASEBALL-FRONT ROW: Dedra Boxell, Todd Fouts, Dianne Dowell, Ron Elliott, Wendy Conrad, Roger Roddy, Jenny Chapman, Gordy Peppier, Vern Smith, Monica Mahnesmith, Janice Erwin; BACK ROW: Coach Knauer, Joe Griffiths, Greg Silberg, Coach Hossler, Todd Alexander, Scot Biernat, Steve Kelley, Kraig Goings, Greg Fraley, Joe Richardson, Gregg Hoyer, Chris Rodesiler. needed runs. The defense played sound ball all season. Coach Knauer enjoyed coaching this group of ballplayers and Is pleased to know that he will have almost everyone back for two more years. Coach Knauer passes along a little bit of his baseball knowledge to sophomore outfielder Greg Silberg in an early season baseball contest. N. U r- Ai . Different emotions are displayed in the Hornet dugout as the Angola diamonders play in the overcast weather. Baseball 75 !Rooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo x oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooe corcbox I »ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo| X-Country Football OPP. 21 15 22 12 35 6 14 14 Boys ' Basketball TEAM New Haven South Adams Garrett Coi. City Homestead Btuffton Pr. Heights East Noble Dekalb Belmont TEAM Pr. Heights Fremont Coi. City New Haven Leo Dekalb Bellmont Homestead Garrett East Noble Lakeland South Adams Westview Eastside Hamilton Bluffton Wrestling OPP 27 66 63 71 39 24 48 62 62 47 75 3rd Sectionals TEAM Howe Eastside Garrett Dekalb Leo Fremont Churabusco Edgerteon Col. City Westview East Noble West Noble Howe East Noble 76 Score Box Boys ' Track ANG 37 37 97 89 85 61 88 90 45 62 1st 5th OPP. 19 57 41 30 38 42 66 39 37 82 65 Tingley Invit. N.E.I.A.C. 6th E. Noble Relays Gymnastics TEAM East Noble Dekalb Leo Eastside Lakeland Hamilton Westvlew New Haven Girls ' Tracit TEAM Garrett E. Noble Pr. Heights Fremont Col. City Howe Dekalb Eastside Hamilton Leo Westvlew ANG. 39 25 32 61 30 30 63 70 37 65.5 45 OPP. 66 80 73 44 75 75 42 35 68 39.5 60 TEAM E. Noble Dekalb Pr. Heights Fremont Col. City Lakeland Eastside Hamilton Garrett Homestead Leo ANG. 3 6 9 7 5-6 7 1 2 3-6 4 1 2 5 Baseball OPP. 2 11 9 3-3 3 2 1 13 3 5-3 5 I 7 3 4 8 5 11 TEAM Fremont Pr. Heights Col. City Homestead Eastside Bluffton Concord Elkhart Dekalb South Adams Hamilton Garrett New Haven Bishop Dwenger East Noble Concordia Leo Bellmont East Noble Girls ' Basketbal RNG. OPP 45 46 45 85 48 58 48 62 51 66 34 49 56 50 37 45 71 73 45 56 53 56 34 30 50 67 51 83 (JBiO) e County Tourney 49 48 44 51 Conference Tourney 37 45 Sectionals 38 69 TEAM Homestead East Noble Westview Dekalb Col. City Pr. Heights New Haven Lakeland Fremont Hamilton South Adam| Garrett Belmont Bluffton Hamilton Pr. Heights Garrett Dekalb 0 0 OOOOOOOOOOOOOOCK 00000 X 00000000000000 bcorcbox I Scorebox 77 omc GDon; Others Lo t A fine 6-1 record was the reward for an outstanding season by the reserve gridders. Dave Piatek was the leading rusher with 719 yards, while, prominent pass recievers were Todd Saylor and Bruce Knox. Receiving fabulous protection from Lynn Sherer, Eric Ameling, and Greg Waite, was the reserve quarterback, Steve Peppier. The key to success for this season was the defense keyed by Rick Shipe, Brad Wilcox, Lynn Sherer, and Jon Onofrietti, which forfeited little yardage. In a season plagues with injuries andlack of numbers, the freshmen footballers limped to a 2 and 4 record. After losing both first string running backs to preseason injuries, followed by numerous other illnesses, scoring points became the main downfall with a total of only 16 offensive tallies in the six contests. Captained by Brain Staup, and Tom Cranston, the squad designated special recognition to tacklers Jeff Budd and Mike Millhouse and leading rusher Marty Holiday. Reserve quarterback, Scot Biernat, takes the snap against a strong Dekalb defense. Biernat and his teammates ' efforts were fruitless as ttiey lost to the Barons 8-6. Dave Piatek, with the help of a Scott Ringler block, breaks goalward in the reserves only loss of the season against Dekalb. Anticipating the outcome of the game, the freshmen gridiron squad stares silently at the action. FRESHMEN FOOTBALL-FRONT ROW: Rick Phillips, Jack Fraley, Todd Alexander, Chad Sherburne, Phillip Foley, Craig Jenkins, Alan JInnlngs; ROW 2: Tracey Daler, Bill Hartsufi, Jeff Snyder, Scott Olinske, Kevin Hantz, Tom, Cranston, Doug Mattox, Don Boyer, Jim Smith, Coach Sanborn; BACK ROW: Coach Wenzel, Marty Holiday, Brian Staup, Ed Mitchell, Terry Mocherman, Jeff Budd, Mike Hiler, Scott Culbertson, Bill Wellons, Chad Dunnavan, Mike Millhouse. 78 Frosh JV Football oooooooooooooooooooo " We had a lot of ups and downs especially downs, but we stuck together and kept our pride. " OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO Jack Fraley struggles to acquire another yard as Doug Mattox looks on. The freshmen tallied a losing season with a record of 2 wins and 4 losses. RESERVE FOOTBALL-FRONT ROW: Jack Fraley, Ed Mitchell, Mike Lesiak. Rick Shipe, Eric Ameling, Steve Peppier. Dave Piatek, Mike Millhouse, Coach Moyer; BACK ROW: Todd Clouse, Gordon Nelson, Marty Holiday, Jeff Budd, Lynn Sherer, Chad Ounnavan, Scott Ringler. Greg Waite, Brad Wilcox. Steve Peppier receives limited protection as he releases a bomb during the reserves ' excellent 6-1 season. Frosh And JV Football 79 oooooooooooooooooooo " The attitude was good we always worked together, we fought sometimes but got over it. " OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO k Roger Roddy rejects the ball under the hoop preventing his Baron opponent from an easy basket. Up and over his DeKalb Baron opponent, Chad German launches the ball in the air for two. After peeling off his warmup top, John Lind- say awaits final instructions from Coach Hochstedler before checking in at the scor- er ' s table, much to the delight of the Luna- tics. J.V. BASKETBALL-FRONT ROW: Chad Ger- man, Eric Sank, Steve Peppier, Jack Landis, Greg Silberg, Bruce Knox, Chris Rodesiler; BACK ROW: Coach Hochstedler, Russ Car- penter, Mike Slack, Roger Roddy, Tony Fifer, John Lindsay, Ed Steele, Coach Poor. 80 Junior Varsity Basketball Ho U- Ho hoco CDho ' 3 rhe junior varsity basketball team linished up the season with the t}est J.V. record ever at Angola hiigh School. They won 15 games while losing but 3. The squad was :aptained by team members Roger Roddy and Steve Peppier. Chad Serman was the leading scorer for :he year with a 14 points per game iverage. The B ' s finished the ear tied for first place in the :onference while also capturing he Steuben County Tourney trophey. rhe Hornets showed great versatility Jon Sprague drives the baseline and puts up a one liand push shot as Rod Springer and Mike Hiler fight lor rebounding position. in changing offensive and defensive strategy. Coach Hochstedier commented that they were very coachable group who carried on the winning tradition in Angola basketball. The freshmen basketball team com- pliled a 7 and 9 record during the course of the season. The major problem the team had was poor shooting, hitting only 37 percent from the field and 47 percent from the line. Mike Hiler tallied Bois the most points and rebounds for the year and also was moved up to the J.V. with Todd Alexander and Jon Sprague at the end of the sea- son. Coach Mossier stated that the team improved tremendously not only in their basketball skills but also in their attitudes, team concept, and leadership abilities. f L ;iJ 7f - Going up strong inside, Mike Hiler powers a five foot jump shot in an attempt to defeat the Marines from Hamilton. FRESHMEN BASKETBALL-FRONT ROW: Coach Hossler, Donny Beyer, Mike Schieber, Andy Somerlott, Coach Haneline: BACK ROW: Rick Phillips, Craig Jenkins, Todd Alexander, Jon Sprague, Mark King, Rod Springer, Chad Dunnavan, Mike Hiler, Bill Hartsuff, Eric Simons. s The reserve boys ' tennis team finished their season with five wins, five losses, and one tie. One outstanding performance of the team was at the Howe Invitational where they placed third. The team captain was Sean Blair who was also the 1 singles player. Awards were given to most valuable freshman Mafuz Huq and most improved player Larry Weicht. The girls ' reserve tennis team learned invaluable experience while finishing the season with a one and nine record. The record was not nearly as impressive as the team had hoped for. One possible reason for the disappointing outcome was the fact that the reserves played against higher ranked opponents so all girls could compete. Celia Karst had a 6-2 record at 1 singles. aa on 1 Good For ncttcr Playing at 1 doubles, Lisa Grain prepares to return the serve. She finished the season with a personal record of five and five. h .-ttL ., M. .V.H.- . I " n RESERVE GIRLS ' TENNIS-FRONT ROW: Robin Wilsey, Jenny Wren, Cindy Wise, Karen Lin, Wendy Mowan, Lee Ann Hodge, Laura Vorndran, Georgia Knotek; BACK ROW: Julie Johnson, Michelle Wagner, Teresa Araque, Marta Daler, Lisa Lambert, Susan Gajeski, Coach Wright. In their usual cold weather attire of sweats under uniforms, Marta Daler and Cindy Wise warm up before practice. Laura Vorndran serves while her partner Lee Ann Hodge prepares for her next move. The two girls were among the most improved players of the season. ..«.,HU «i ' 82 Reaerve Girls ' Tennis oooooooooooooooooooo " I know I gained a lot of experience from the competition. It also teaches you trust, and self discipline. " stopped midway through a serve, Monte Yarger struggles to regain his balance. With a look of intensity, Sean Blair delivers a smashing forehand to his opponent. Playing doubles, Dana Herman misses a volley and turns to see if his partner, Greg Finn will get it in an important meet against Fremont. Mafuz Huq tries to outsmart his opponent by tipping the ball over the net. Reserve Boys ' Tennis 83 . £ i i. £ i_i-.L-i l- _. jl_i_---— .1 ;ii " - .133333333333333333333333 -3333: oooouo 999999 TDOOOO _ _- - j .444444 ' 7 iCiboObo r, :-i n ■ ' 10! ' ) " " 1 j333j. _j_ j,i3JJJjJ3J3JJjJj 44444444Zf44 f 44444444444 444444444444444444444 44444444444444444444444444 ' 3553-- " ' -.555555555555355 — — — — — — — --555555555555555555-- -■rr-r ' ' r c cc{ c,f,r,f. " .6u66656fi6G66666C6 7777777777777777 ' - , ; " " ' " ' " ' O ( " O O ' ' f O O O ( -) 9 9 Q 9 Q 9 9 9 9 9 9 q 9 o 9 9 9 9 9 1 onooooooQj66ooo6ooor)0(|__ 11111111111 ■ • ' ■ ' ' 22222221 3333333: -4444444 5555555i 666666 jooob - SSSSSSo ' ? 10000 , 9999999s OOOOOOOOOOOi mil 1 -n i- 2 3 4444 ; 1 ' i ' - ' ' 1 7 77777 j8oob6ooOii66bdo6o6C)uu(.jub ..0)99999999999999999999999 OOOOOOOOOOOaApOOODOOOOOOuO 4 7 7 - bb J99 X il 1 . T ■ " ■( O j33333 44444 .- ! r- r- i D 5 ' ' ■66 77777 Sbobb 99999 boooo 11111 [•T O O O ' Z. i 4 OOUO 9 9y 0000 3333 4444 — r " r- r- 6666 77777 ■ ' : ' IQ V ' 9 : 99 0000 1111 ' ) ■■) o . L, i - -wJ -w ' -w? ■«■ -rf ■-. ' ' (.44 4 ' ' •4 ' +44 4 4 4 M- ' f i S53553555555; . 066666666666s 11111111111111 8 3 b 8 6 6 6 6 6 b ; j 99999999999 00000000000 11111111111 , 1 o ' i ■) O ■) ' _ z- z, . J33333333 4444 3555 6666 7777 o u b b O iwi 6 b 0555595 1 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 7777777 ,)0 99999999999 00000000000 11111111111 o 2 " ' ' ' " ' 1 1333333333. [; 33333333333 f444444444q- ' 4 1-444444444444 55555555553 555555555555 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 ' V- i ' 6 6 6 6 6 6 666666 lllllllll LiJ 11111111111 bSbbobSSSc - Cb - BObubbbSboG 99999999999999999999999999 00000000000000000000000000 Illlllllllllllllllllllllll - -:-.:i222222 ' : ' " 1 ' - ' - o o , Academics „ „ „ ob3_o 3333„ +444 ' 4-q-4i+4444444aaaitZi.4444a.i 0- 0222222 ■333333 OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOf 111111111111111 " 222222222222222 . i .- .... . z. 3333333333333333333333333 OOOOf y. 1111111111111111111111. 22222222222Z22222222222k. 33333 333333333333 3 J33.333 3. 55555553555335555!) 5555555555. 66666 66G6ef,6G6Ce6666666G6C6666v llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli - ■ - . r- - t.. ■ r- X - :■ . I, ' r r ■■ - c , ; , r ( - .- •; q r. r " . r ' . O O u U U O U U vj u CJ O o O O O O O O OO O O O - O O O ; ...i •.) O O , 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 q 9 9 o Q q o 9 Q o o o o o 9 o q Q o 00O0l6o3aO3050 ' " n000009Oqoon " 1099O00T; lllllllllllllllllllllllllllillll]lllll„ 7 7 ' ■■- ' y 2 7 ? ' 2 ■- ' ' ' ■ ' ■ ' ' ' ■ ) ■■ 7 o Ti - o ' , o 9 V o o o ? o o ' , ™ " ■ — — - •— " " — — -- - - — » - - - 4 — J— ■- _ %-- — t— JW « ' - -— ■- 333333333333333333333333333333333 33 333333 3. Z:444Z;A44A4.?i44 ;444A4444A4444 :44A iA :4444A4 ;4A ' 4 % 55555dj5553555553555553555555535j555j55355j35. ' " ' " ■ ' ' " jGboGbbOGuoouGobGnC; 6 66666 6 6 6 666 ' 7 7 T 7 7 7 -; 7 7 7 66666ooo66666u 7777777777777 77777777777777777777777777777 . . b6obu-38iib60uobubtiobbL o6ol5ddybud3c56oG8S!jSuru ' " ;r 8 ' ;Gr)C.ii 9999999999999 999939999?9 ' 59999 ' ) ' 9 59Qqq9Qqqqo99Qq90O9o 000000000903000030090000 )00o5aoD9onooooo9()90oo5io6onno iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii] iin iiin 111 11 11 11 11 , 222222222222222222222222222222222222222222 ' ?222 ' ' 222 ?222 33333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333330 4444444 . 4444 44444444444 4444444444 44 4444 4 4444 44444 44444444 444s j555 555 5555 555555 5 55 535 5 55 55 555 5 55555 5 555 5 55 3 5555 555 55 55 555 5 55- §29?§? ' 6 606666666666666 66666 66666 6 66 66 6 6 66 666666 6 6 66666 60 % q q Q ' 111! I ' niliinrniiiii ' ninniniin b b b O u b O b b 8 b b 8 u 3 O O 6 u b 3 ?■ • " i -■ ' ' ' " 999999999 99 lQ ' ' -jQ qQ9Q 000000000 11111111: 222222222 333333333 44444444 55355535- O C O u O I 77777777; UOOObbbb-.. o q " 5 o o o - n ' ' f . JJJJ-JUUV ■- llllilll] 22222222: ?777 777777777777777 77777777: O O u j O O W u O O O O O O- J O O O b .■) : 0000 a 3 o I 1) How many minutes of classes does a student attend each school year? 2) Which faculty member has taught at Angola High School for the greatest number of years? 3) What is the total number of graduates who passed Government? -aienpejS Pinoo eq ejoieq luauiujaAoo ssed o) ioruss e jo| a|e|s am Aq pajmbej sem || -(uauiujeAoo passed se|Bnpej6 i nv (g -tsa6uo| eqi jooqas i|Bjh e|o6uv JB ueeq seq leuiujBH uqop {z puiui s,|uepn)s aBBJOAB ai() Xdnooo auj|) »o sainujui osi ' is XiejBujjxojddv (l bb3 - r i-j -i rt ,. b J JJ J. 4444 4444 ' 777777777 -- - n ' :■ ■ ' ■■ f. 1 ' " i " r - ' . ■ r 1 3; 111: ■J u b ■ i u b J U u U llllllllUii x x ... . 222222222 2 ' - ipT ooo ooo n 33330333333333333333333 " 444444 5555 ' ' r • ■ ry ( j-iiiijiiiiiiii] mil] 6666cs ' • b -; b J J . 7 7777 7 7 7 7 9999;i9999v jj- jbJbbjbbjjojjjjjjj33333J333j333333333 3 ' ;.v flCHDEmiCE 212c. 33333 4444444. .0O555555553- oco6oDcc5cL 111111111111 ■ : J b b b b o b 3 3 S S S 2 [loqoqaQQoqoqGqc OOOOOOOOOODO llllllllllllllll I333333333333333 ' . •• ■■ ' ' I555555555555555. ' 6666666-6666666 - ' •- v; .; I ■ -J c : .• j i. ■ , ' o b -u . 5 b u b ' -J b cj b C O _ ' -3 G S 3 3 G S " - ' " " " ■ " ■ ' " q o c 9 q 9 o n 9 9 o n a 2 q c q 9 q q 9 o o q d c b Q 9 q q jOOJ 33 33333333333533333333 ' , ' ' " - .- , ' . .- ,-; ,-1, - . -i -•. -, rs r .--. - A n ■- .- _- ' ' -, A -■. Ti 1l1 ' ' 1 ' ' ' !l ' i11177 " illl " !l1 ! q 3 q O G b I " " 1 T . o ' ■ . o ' s ri - . . — ■ -J V ' V ' _ _ ' .■ v N, ' -J " ! " ' ■ ' " ■ lllllll t " • " O ' ■ " ■- ' 7 7 -T T ' 5 TO. ■. bjOlOObjOOOOObu .. .; j;-. ■ IJJ. . ' b.,ii ouonnqnooc )no! r f. c ' .- ■: c q 6 5 6 6 6 6 c 6 6 6 r 6 6 1 bSbObSSooSbSSSSSSbS: " . 9 9 9 q 9 Q q q 9 q c q Q Q q : ■ObOOOOOOOOOOOOof HHi " i i iHiiHHHiiiHi iiiiiiiiiiii iiiuuiHiii liiilmi nvn?? uH- " i;to o ' ?o r ' -- ' ---22222i22222222 ' ' 2 ' " ' - • ■ ■-• ---- ' --•■- v--.: t;--;.t::.t ?? ? ? p3b333333333333333333333333333333iB33 3 3 " 5 3 ' ' t- --1-- t 4444..44444444 4444444444444444444444d242:4444444d4b4 •arrtn Mrs. Owens listens while one of her students gives a speech. Mr. Scott ' s fourth hour English class discusses the Globe Theater. During his English 11 class Gary Hutchins takes a break to read the morning paper. Mrs. McKeever is appalled by a remark made by one of her students. SS English The English department had a new addition this year. Mrs. Janet Boone, who took the place of Mr. Tom Dougherty, taught English 9 and was the sponsor of the Hornet paper. Adding English 11 to the curriculum as a required course raised the total number of required years of English from two to three years. There are a number of elective courses that were also available; they include English Literature, American Literature, Speech, and Composition I II, and reading lab. Sean Blair, Kevin Egly, and Steve Harter listen carefully as Mrs. Boone explains a short story theme. T " Allan Fox does his English assignment (or the following day in the reading lab. English 87 Although the gorilla had a hard day, Mrs. Boyer and Dee Dee Matson live it up. by sampling Christmas goodies. Mr. Dygert goes over a test to start off the day in Senior Math. Demonstration is a major part of learning in math. Keith Cook, Lana Zimmer, Barbie i Griffith, and Vonda Roberts show hovK to work square roots in Geometry. Several new learning aids were added to the math department this year. A new class, pre- algebra, was enacted to develop freshmen and sophomore skills in algebra before they take Algebra I. Mr. Hossler was the instructor. Also new books for general math, geometry, Algebra I and 11. were adopted to update student understanding of mathematical concepts. The four classes of general math were taught by all the teachers. As an added attraction, general math classes learned how to figure their income taxes. The senior math class had a section on Computer Science which was taught byguest instructor, Mrs. Lansford from Tri-State. Once again, the Actuary Society conducted a national test for senior math, analytical geometry, and select Algebra 11 students which was held on March 10th. 8$ Math Like grandfather, like granddaughter. Mr. Hammel and his granddaughter, Alysaa Tierney, show their spirit as a mid-season football game. Mr. Hammel could be found at almost every football and basketball game guarding entrances. Max Huq, Tom Kundenreich, and David Ummel exhibit their technique lor equation solving on the board in Senior Math. Despite being temporarily distracted, Mr. Hossler prepares for a Pre-Algebra class. Bewildered by the complexity of a graph, Dan Sanders puzzles over a possible trig solution. Math 89 Preparing for the Water of Hydration lab, j John Carmack and Rick Puthoff set up the lab while David Pinkham measures the I amount of magnesium sulfate. IHiding from his students out at the middle school tennis courts, Mr. Wright laughs evilly at the enormous homework assign- ment he just instilled upon his chem stu- dents. Lectures seem to flow naturally for Mr. Grill as he explains to his physical science class, not basketball, but the make up of matter. After a hard day ' s work, Mr. Snyder has to prop himself up while grading homework papers for Biology. For a biological experiment, Ed Plock con- structs a pond water slide as Mary Ann Ben- nett prepares the microscope to view the tiny sea creatures. 90 Science A different view of tfie greenhouse, from the window, shows Steve Kelley transplanting his sunflowers with Lesley Presley assisting. Chemistry-a joy? While waiting for her copper sulfide to heat up, Lisa Grain tries to contain her laughter at a fellow student ' s joke. Gertine Zuurveld altemps to ask Mr. Rodman a question while he demonstrates " How to Talk to Your Plants " in horticulture. Mt. St. Helens is where? Ken Thomas, Kirk Lee, Darrol Young, and Wendy Mowan watch Intently as Tom Wells ' volcano, not Mt. St. Helens, erupts. " Labs are due tomorrow. " This was a familiar phrase heard by all those who have had any kind of science. However, with the lack of funds, labs were not as plentiful as in years past. But this did not stop the science department from educating any the less. On the biological side, first year biology students learned the basics, but those who interests were deeper went into anatomy and physiology and or advanced biology. Future chemists started out in physical science but could go into basic chemistry or apply their mathematical know-how in physics. Those interested in our planet could study its make-up in earth science, discover the different types of plants and how they grow in horticulture, or learn how to make our world a better place to live in ecology. r7==D Science 91 A member of the ICE program, Missy Mudrack, pastes up business forms at Moore Business Forms. V. " But don ' t use so much foam that you lose your patient in it, " Rita Crimmins, HOE coordinator, appears to be saying as Mary Penick, Julie Coleman, and Lisa Crain watch Crystal Orewiler shave her " patient " . ICE student Teresa Parnin types up an insurance form at Croxton and Roe Insurance. After shaving " patient " Jeff Smith, Mary Tony Ford waits for Building Trades Penick cleans up the excess shaving coordinator, Clem Sniadecki, to finish cream while Dar Hampshire from Fremont measuring the paneling before helping watches. him position it in the kitchen. ICE director Maureen Baker goes over the homework directions for her business law students. 92 COOP u s a. The Vocational Education program advanced into another progressive year. Four co-op programs were offered this year as in the past. The students spent three hours on the job and the rest of the day in school. The Building Trades classes constructed a Cape Cod style house on Shawnee Drive. The jobs of plumbing, heating, and electricity were undertaken by these students. After transferring some information, FFA president Darrol Gurtner hands Ag director Leon Walker a pen to do some paper work. The HOE students, which stands for Health Occupations Education, experienced hospital procedures first hand while the related learning class met for added education on the body, plus CPR certification. Learning the office part of a job was the venture of the ICE, Interdisciplinary Cooperative Education, program. Students acquired jobs in local businesses to discover the inner workings of the business community. To learn how to provide for this country ' s food needs in the future was the agricultural students ' job. Animal nutrition, breeding, agricultural economics, and financial planning were also discussed. However, most activites revolved around work on the FFA farm on State Road 827. After ttirowing a pie in Kelli Isenhoffs face and getting one in return, PVE coordinator, Don Tokarz, attempts to regain control at a basketball pep session. Ag Co-op student Joe Means reads the handout before going to the farm to feed cattle a new type of grain. As Tony Ford positions sheathing, Denny Surfus and Brett Brueher search for more nails at th ? building trades site on Shawnee Drive. Coop 93 W hile checking over Jon Onolrietti ' s printing work, Mr. Moody stops to answer another student ' s question. While filing an irregular curve on his baby cradle, Rick Shipe observes the rule of safety first by wearing his gogles. Acting like a guardian angel, Mr. Krebs watches over a student to make sure the project that is being drawn is correct. Framed by drafting machine and table, Marta Daler peers off into space during her first semester drafting class. 94 Industrial Arts roJuz Jim Swiniuch deftly uses the lathe to produce a coffee table leg in woods class. If you ' re interested in a skilled trade, industrial arts is for you. Skilled tradesmen are more in demand now than ever before due to a tremendous shortage. Preparing students for these vacancies became the challenge of Mr. Stevens, Mr. Moody, and Mr. Konieczki. Every area had advanced classes such as Printing I and II, Metals I and II, Woods I and II, and Drafting I and II. In these courses, more emphasis was placed on planning, but workmanship and skill were not forgotten. Also, graphic arts progressed successfully into its second year of providing free printing jobs for the community. Mr. Stevens and new teacher Mr. Konieczki watch a cutting on the band A slight yawn escapes Steve Martin while With the help of Steve Peppier. Scott reading his assignment in drafting. Hantz cuts an irregular angle on the table gr- tM saw. Industrial Arts 95 The business department is a very important area. It deals with various skills which will benefit one after high school. Some of these areas included in the business department this year were Typing, Accounting, Business Law, Business Math, Introduction to Business, Office Practice, and Office Machines. In this computer growing society, business is becoming a more important and popular department. Mrs. Baker ' s Business Law class busily attacks the assignment for the day. Ron Cook listens as Mrs. Baker discusses the chapter. As his class takes a test, Mr. Thalls monitors. mo rro ' s bus In ss omm ge Business Mr. Knauer takes the daily attendance during his Business Math class. After receiving a test, Colleen McCarthy examines it very carefully. Business 97 • - ' ' " - The Social Studies department offered a wide variety of courses this year. The classes included World Civics, U.S. History, Government, Economics, History of the American West, State and Local Government, and Psychology. All students are required to take U.S. History, Government, and at least one elective before graduating. The classes covered the beginning of man to the present day man. They included the organization of state, local, and county governments. Mr. Fiandts third hour Government class listens intently while discussing a chapter. Mr. Nesbitt works on the following day ' s plans while his class takes a test. While taking a test during U.S. History, Steve Hipskind debates over the answer to one of the questions. During Mr. Nesbitt ' s sixth hour class Mike Arnett concentrates on a tough essay. 98 Soeial Studies Mr. Harter pauses during a lecture in his history class. 2ln i n " 1 I Todd Fouts seriously attacks his History of the Ameri can West assignment for the day. Dan Stakely confirms an answer with Richard Smith during government. in m Ky ( l Id r ' s n- JL y Social Studies 99 Expectant mother, Mrs. Karen Bal, sorts tlirough some of her E.D.-related papers before taking a second semester maternity leave. i - S3- . - In economics, Carmen Schieber concen- While Dan Strong chuckles at a fellow trates on preparing her resume for a prac- student ' s pranks, Rick Emerick diligently tice job interview with Mr. Fleming. works on an assignment. - W Mr. Poor leans back and relaxes while re- While Mrs. Antrup watches for misbehavior, viewing the answer key for the test he is Mrs. Yoder examines a new piece of learn- giving. ing material. ■ J ' ■ The presentation on the cassette filmstrip projector keeps Chester McLain ' s attention riveted upon the screen. 100 Special Ed. During U.S. History, Bob Miller reads his asBignment for the next day. Waiting for Karen Szeman to reload the Du- kane audio-visual machine, Mrs. Antrup and Calvin Moore discuss the last tape. New teaclier Mrs. Woody checks over Jeff Foster ' s homework in U.S. (History. L.D. assistant Mrs. Knauer takes time out from her schedule to laugh at a student ' s joke. " These classes, (Special Education), are helpful in that they provide the student with the opportunity to learn in the many areas of academ- ics at a pace which affords him a chance for greater success. " With this in mind, all the special educa- tion teachers rolled into another rewarding year. With the addition of two new teachers, Mrs. Woody and Mrs. Antrup, this thought was made even more beneficial. Mrs. Woody came in to assist Mrs. Knauer in the Learning Disabilities class while Mrs. Antrup aided Mrs. Bal. In the economics class, job interviews were conducted with Mr. Kelley, Mr. Thompson, Mrs. Reed. and Mr. Fleming. Using video-tapes, the students were able to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses in this job-hunting activity. Other academic areas in which stu- dents were taught at their own pace included English, math, science, and government. iL rmsm Special Ed. IOI As the enrollment increased, so did the emphasis on color in the Art classes. This was especially true during design in Foundations I. The production of slides was added to the Foundations II class, and a new class. Advanced Photography, developed photog raphers ' skills all the more. Aside from all this, the art students continued to design beautiful works of splendor for the cafeteria, and their showcase. The music department also produced their own form of art. During fourth hour, the band and choir could be heard working to perfect their proficiency, so that the public The French horn section adds their part to fulfill the selection " Broadway StowStoppers " . In cMi] ts Both could hear their excellence, the choir and band held a Christmas program. At the Methodist church in February, the Vocal class performed for a group of senior citizens. Then in mid-year, the band and choir joined together for a March concert. They each ended the year by executing separate spring concerts. Despite cut fingers and broken strings, beginning strummers eventually learned to play. The more advanced guitarists didn ' t suffer as much, but they continued to develop their gifts of music. After giving his class their assignments, Mr. Robinson catches up on some paper work. J Waiting for their cue in choir class are Framed by the jigsaw, Jenney Wren Jodi McLaughlin, Ann Kirkman, and Pam sketches a charcoal picture. Kruger. 102 Art And Music t 1 ' 41 i " I can ' t hear you " , Mr. Meyers appears to be saying wtiile directing the pep band at one o( the baaketball games. Helping wjth the spirit Is the Hornet mascot. The statue has caught the attention of Ingi SIcaug ' s pencil as she attempts to sicetch him. Looking on are David Dixon, Wendy Hocker, and Mitzi Stackhouse. a piece of music. " Hold it right there! " Miss Siebold is caught writing down the words of a popular tune. Art And Music 103 Laura Detar begins to copy homework on the board for French I. Miss IMyers pronounces some words in hopes that her Spanish 11 students can speak them also. While preparing for another class, Mrs. ; JP " Trennepohl answers a student ' s question. H Mrs. Cook keeps her French class ' Russ Carpenter muses over 8orne«hing attention by speaking repetitiously. that he finds humorous. Could it really be Spanish? Lisa Jensen slices and dices carrots and celery tor a salad that her fellow students may taste. 104 Foreign Language And Home Ec S xplor |Aaz: l s Discovering a culture different from our own was the foreign language students fascination. On the other hand, learning to cook supreme souffles, sew fashionable garments, or the refinements of family and bachelor finances were the endeavors of home ec students. Those starting out in French or Spanish I wrestled with strange pronunciations, while those in Unlike Kelli Kensil ' s and Ken Moonen ' s Spanish, Brad Belcher ' s Spanish is not quite as interesting. their second year started to learn of the foreign life-styles. The advanced classes took in every aspect of their chosen field. Meanwhile, the home ec students learned how to prepare delicious and beautiful creations. Also, classes were offered in Family Management, Single Living, plus Child Care, all which dealt with the practical side of everyday life. During a basketball game, Mrs. Cook keeps an eye on the doors. Many faculty members aid in crowd control at various athletic events. During Food Preservation. Elsa Sawvel prepares a wonderful dessert delicacy using powdered sugar. Foreign Language And Howe Ec 105 r Gymnastics, basketball, volleyball, wrestling, field hockey, and more aided the physical education classes in experiencing a very active year. The advanced gym classes experienced a new kind of activity called, gaelic football. This is a combination of basketball, soccer, and volleyball. They were also involved in learning about lifetime sports- sports you can use once you get out of high school. The underclassmen worked on boardening their bases in exercises, so they will know what they need to work on in the future in order to maintain physical fitness. r Js s Mr. Robinson ' s first hour P.E. class does its usual routine of warming up for the day ' s activities. After winning the game, Chris John displays a fist of victory. While stretching to hit every tire, Miss Lautzenhiser shows exquisite form during the games day competition between classes and teachers. 106 Physical Ed. ' OG n f n Ly r Displaying his enthusiasm during homecoming week, Mr. Robinson dresses appropriately for hat and shades day. While playing field hockey, Mike Slack takes a breather and lets the other members of his team cover for him. Mr. Saylor, football coach plus P.E. and health teacher, is caught unaware while taking attendance during his second hour class. Ken Onofrietti checks the condition of the gun while learning gun safety at the Armory. 1 -5. -5, " !, -5 " 1 ' ), ' 5 - " ' , ? " ' 5 " ' 5, " SSSSS -..666666666 nillllllllllll 999999990999 , .. _, lOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOf .111111: I333333333 33.333-. . 3.555555555555555555 ' -666666666666666666 ' 777777777777777777 338888888888888 " " - :) 9 9 0999 09 99 9 9 99,. lOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO Lllllllllllllllllll _ .. lil. ««» «™. ■ — i6- — " -■ w - ■ ' " B3333333333333: " 7 : -9 -I 12 . " .3 4 ' ' . 6-44-44 555553-i 6666666 7777777 nnonogg oooooon 1111111 A o 9 9 7 9 DDJD m 6666.. " 777777777- bbbiiaOouu 99)999999 OOOOUOOOO 11.1111111 222222222 ' 3333332 :U4444i j3553555: ' ' 66 6 666c 7777777 DOoSoOt 999999 JOOOOOC 111111: ...222222: 33333333: .44444444 J 3 J J 5 5 J .3 J 66666666: -7 -7 -7 -: -7 — - -T - V. ' L. u ■■- ' J 99999999- 00000000 -i -; - . -! -, -i -5 - u D. JJjjJ JjJ.- u D- 777777777777777 O o u o u 5 u u 5 b 6 c3 u (J 999999999999 ' 000000000000 1111111111111 ■ 222222222222 333333333333- ;. ii 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 » -- 5555505555553: 6b6666b666666r 7777777777777 OKiooiibiiii ' o ' oo ' o ' c 90999999999099 0000000000000 - 111111111111 O -) 1 1 9 9 7 ' ■ ' ? V 3 ' " I " . ' v ' ' ) . O ' ! O ' ' " ' ' . t i. Z(. . ' j. 4 4 ' - 4 4 h 4 4 4 4 • j55555555_)533555 ' 6 6 £ 6 6 6 si 66666666 I I ! I i ! ! i i I I ! ! i I O O O O ' . O o CJ w o o o o o -■. . A4444 ' kLhl kAk 444444 4444- 66666666666666666666 6 1111 iiniilllllinilllUlllll ill ni 03888888888838S888888885 ,9999999999999999999999? )n00000000000000000000000( 1111111111111111 " Ill " 222222222 22222 .22: 333333333333333 :33: -, 44444444444 44444 444444 05555555555555555555555 : : r. i; : i z:: r. £ . g g ; g f 5 _ 5 j- ' ' , { 6 6 6 6 665 6 • ' " 6 6 6666666666666 7777: lilt ' -, ' ., ' . ... f.- -., i ,-, r; " ( n Q C . f O O . O C O O O o O O O O O O O U k. u O O O O O-Q O f H-i ' ( MM -r ' - 1O8 Peopl0 } g 9 9 9 q 9 --5 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 Q 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 ' ' ' " " " oooooooo ooooooooooooono 111111111111111111111111 22 2 22 22 2 2 2222 22222222222.-- 3 3333 3333333333333333333 .: 444444i4444A44444444444 5 550 553505 535555555555555 666606 6666666066066666666 , ' J J f . ' I . ' -■ rs ; ,— - " ; - ' -. c f fy C ' n I ' j o L- u O o a o O .)(JOOO O 00 000000909999 r- : " : " ,• ' ' , rs .■ . --v r ■•-) f ' - rs f ( H r f C f) p 1 1 " 1 ' lllllllllll.llllll - " ■■ ' ( t kL. ji, !. if d . :_. -u- iC. -C— -C i- ' . " T33333333333333333333333 ,1: , .- ' : - A . A.: A i444 44044444444 00000000000000 . Z 2 ' l. £- ' Z2 iL . - ' . - -. ■■■■ -- -; - « -- " i " j " 1 ■ - ' - ' ■ .. ' ,.- J J ' J J J J .) J J J J :) - - • L- C ' .; r ' ' : C 6 (9 (}GC6f.C O !,, ' L. ' " . ' ' -.■ ' ' f -J ■■..■■ ■ . ■■■ " , r. ■ " ! " ' r-j n r • oooonooooooooooooo lllllllllllllllllli 22222222222222 ' 3333333333333: ■. r t r r r% 555555555555555555555555555555:. S66666666666666666666666666666 . v, 7777777??77777777?7777777?7777? ' r ' V ?e88888888888838888888e88e888R8B8y5c )OOOo66oooooocoGooooooobooo6oo66boGcooo .11111111 11111111111111111 1111 11 UUl 11 li 222222222222222222 22222 ! 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 J. " Q O J J .- ' ;,i4.iia,£i- ' - J J . ' .- ' -. ' J .. ; o o b o c -.-■ -5 -- " . -•■ ' -P J5 - J .J J J J J J , ' J ' ) J - J c; c; r c n; cr s f , t: c: c iX •v ' -r " ' - ' - ' ■■■— " - ■• ! ' i ' . ' ' 6. ■ , , , , . . . — , c c: c c c L- c- c- c - - ' -- -- " J J J J _J J .,- V ,- V - 666666666866666666866t5 ' - ; s - 5 - " S ' - ' -■ J - • ' y ' ' ) O O o o o o 1888888888888888888888888888 88888883888888863888680 |QQQOQOQ9QOGQOQQg0900gQqQOQOQQQacqOOOGOOOOriGOOQOOGC. ' .r . f y - , ' y . J ' , ' . y , y , y , y . y y y , - - ' y . y , ' y , ' , y y y " ' ' } n n o f 00 n o - ' n ( " " - " o n f " ; n " n ri n i ; " n P n o " o " r- n r r ? r . 111 11 111111111111111111 111111111 11 in 11 11 n-? ' iii 111 " n 222222222222.; . V People 109 fhAZ ib A ERiOR SENIOR (sen ' yer) n. 1. a senior person. 2. a student in his fourth year of high school or college. Dictionaries can define what a senior is but not how it feels to be a senior? To some, being a senior means graduation and the chance to start a new life. To others, it is sharing memories of past years with friends, tears, and long goo- dbyes when summer ends. Every senior has a different idea of ' senioritis " . When the KEY staff interviewed seniors, some of the most memorable high school moments for the class of ' 81 included: Phi Kappa ' s beach party, the disputed girls ' track conference championship, " sleaze initiation " , sophomore skip day and summer detentions, senior picnics in the cafeteria, mashed potato glue, " The Flying Rust Spot " , winning a 1st at Nisbova and being the last class to go to state, Hochstedler ' s trash can beating, Fouts ' split end, kidnapping officer Bal, " Flat tires, " Horizon " , and egg confiscation. " To be a senior, it feels like you have reached the peak of your independence. You are ready to go out and start your life; set your goals. You will always find someone who will put you down, but as long as you know you ethics are set and you believe in yourself, you can always pull through. " Patrick Lee Zuber Kim Allen Roger Ayers Mel Arbuckle Sandy Ayers Paul Aronen Jay Baker Tom Atha Ellen Barnes ilO S»nlon Janet Beattie Jerry Beck Jill Boxell Tim Brock Stacy Bucknam Chris Bunch Craig Best Deanna Brown i jk Dan Burrell Terri Carpenter j Eben Carper Niki Bowman i ' - V Tammy Brown Joe Byerly Lisa Caruso Sue Cary Senkm 111 Debra Chrysler Ron Cook Dan Cripe Kim Clouse Julie Coleman Kelly Conrad Dianne Craighead Lisa Crain Steve Creecy Polly Dailey Marta Daler Miles Dayhoff Bruce Delucenay Danny DeMara Donny DeMara Terry Dirrim Laurie Eberhardt Denise Eggleston Linda Esselburn lilEmO iE Spending most of a night in the county jail while looking for the senior l eii and TPing Mr. Scott ' s house with 52 rolls of toilet paper. Lori Harter My most memorable experience was Homecoming ' 80 and chasing all over Steuben County fo r a bell which rightfully belonged to the seniors. Diann Craighead Surprised by the mention of her name, Dee Dee Eggleston whips iround to identify the speaker. Mary Ferrier Shellie Flora Tony Ford SwNdfS f«3 Jeff Foster Todd Fouls Gwen Gawlick Dana Hall Scott Fraley Melody Hammond Gary Fritz Lori Harter My moat memorabi ex- p«rianea waa Homa- coming " 80 chaaing all ovar Stauban County for a ball which righthilly ba- longad to tha Saniora. Diann Craighaad Showing ua the lightar side of Toga Day, DaeDea Brown, Stacy Bucknam, and Lori Harter demonstrate their version of a Greek water fountain. lU Smien Lori Hayden Todd Hornbrook Kari Hoyer Roger Holiday Kay Howell Deb Parks models the latest popular fabric-sho curtain vinyl. Sherri Hufnagle Mike Hullinger MaxHuq Rick Johnson Terri Kimes S mmon 115 Jeff Klebe Mark Klink Amy Komler Tom Kundenreich Penny Landis Brenda Lee Kirk Lee Kenneth Lehman Ann Linsberg Linda Loffer Dallas Lowrance Don Martin Ruth Martin Todd Martin Denise Matson Dean Mattox lie Senion Jodi McLaughlin Ken Moonen Ruth Mortorff Robert Means Alan Moor Jerry Mocherman O » Kelvin Moore SENIOR OFFICERS-DeeDe« Eggleston. V-Pres.; Steve Hastrieter, Secretary- Treasurer; Pat Zuber, President. Kevin Mock Perry Morin Missy Mudrack Sanion 117 Hurrying to class, Lisa Schannen talcas the fast Ian from tlie tliird floor. Chrystal Orewiler Brett Noll Lori Ort Wendy Nagel Derek O ' Neal Kelly Parker , Don Nagler Chris Ordway Deb Parks Teresa P Marcia Patterson Mary Penick Gordy Peppier 118 Seniors Paige Peppier Marilyn Puckett Teresa Ridenour Holly Perry Mike Ringier Jeff Piatt Keith Roddy Carolyn PuckeK Masuma Rahman Brad Reichenbach , Todd Richardson Jim Rowland To be a senior feels like a sigh of relief, and yet maybe a feeling of " where do I go from herer Amy Koomler Laura Ruckel Martin Ryan Seaion 119 Katy Sanborn Dan Sanders Greg Sanders Paul Sanders Shari Sawvel Richard Smith talces his coat off preparing for government class Sarah Saylor to start. Lisa Schannen 120 Seniors Jim Shieber Tom Schroedei Tom Salman wsem Lisa Sharp Gathering her books for typing class, Rutli IMortorff warily oyes the cameraman. Marianne Shawver Caria Shoup Teresa Simpson Michelle Shirley Ron Short Robert Shumaker Jamie Simons Jeff Smith Richard Smith Vern Smith Judy Somerlott Trish Sova Pam Stackhouse gewiow tgl taBt :. Reliving his childhood memories, Kevin Wray hugs Santa Ciaus while impatiently waiting for Christmas. Dan Stakely Faith Stoy — --f , Dan Strong Jeff Tanner Laurie Sullivan Suzanne Thalls Karen Szeman Dave Tadsen " Memories of a Senior " As I walk through the hall, Many things I recall Friends smiles that I will miss, The playfully blown kiss, The rush not to be late, The school food that I hate, Practices for the play. The " A " that made my day. The many prayers I ' ve prayed. The efforts that I ' ve made. Tons of homework I ' ve done. The miles that I have run. The secrets that were shared. Classmates for which I ' ve cared. All these beautiful thoughts. Memories Oh, yes lots. All these thoughts I recall As I walk through the hall. Diane Ummel en Thomas Paul Thomas ' 122 Seniors Debbie Ulch Scott VanAuken Casey Walker Paul Kevin Wray David Ummel Becky VanWagner Judy Walters Darrol. Young Rich Voges During oim of Mr. Fiamirs govammmit cl«ii «i, Sarah Saylor, anxiously awaits for ItM " You may roport to your noxt hour cl — " Tom Walters Cindy Wise Not Pictured EnkBorg scolt CaMwoll Sn m Pat Zuber Troy Curtis Umy Oavonport EarlDoyo David Gurzynaki Stovo HMlnstai l auliColiii KannoUi Lsfiman DawOrt BrwidaRowo IngiSgaug JohnSmiUi CAlCH lI-Al jUniO Pi iL Led by officers Renee Nichols, president; Colleen Kuhn, vice president; Julie Springer, secretary; and Pat Zdawczyk, treasurer, the junior class responded with a rewarding 1980- 81. Class Struggle D ay gave them a chance to flaunt their muscles as they won the class competition with a victory in the tie-breaking girls ' tug-of-war. Two days later the Class of ' 82 initiated a new homecoming event-the Unhomecoming- taking second place in girls ' powderpuff football competition. With the spirit instilled by unhomecoming cheerleaders Jay Ice, Tim Sirk, Tom Wells and Pat O ' Bierne, the class elected " queen " candidates Scott Biernat, escorted by Kelli Isenhoff, and no show Steve Kelley. For the traditional homecoming queens ' court Lisa Piatek and Colleen McCarthy were escorted by Gary Hutchins and Jim Clearwater from Coldwater. For January ' s " Night Under the Stars " winter prom junior kings were Steves ' Hipskind and Kelley. At the end of January the class served as hosts with a sloppy joe and pancake meal for the school ' s speech team as it hosted its first speech meet. With funds raised primarily through the annual magazine sale in November, the class climaxed the year by treating the seniors to their Prom. Jeff Alexander Mike Arnett Brad Barney Mark Beer Scot Biernat Kent Bledsoe Jeff Boone Angela Book Dedra Boxell Kathy Breese Kim Brock Amy Brown Anne Hull samples a three year staple on the lunch menu, the salad bar. Heading for the pyramid building contest, Chris Myers displays the relaxed atmosphere surrounding Games Day. 124 Juniors As a prevention against double vision and a cold head, Guy Lamott celebrates " Hat and Shades Day. ' Brett Buehrer Robert Surd Tammy Bush Don Bussing John Carmack Jack Carpenter Jenny Chapman Amy Clark Sheila Cleverly Anne Collom Wendy Conrad Gary Cook Troy Curtis Denise Czeck Pat Damron Juniors 125 Pam Dangler Richard David Randy Davis Renee Delaney Dennis Denham Mike Denham Elaine Dent Mimi Dixon Kurt Eberhart Kevin Egly Lori Elliot Jim Elston Janice Erwin Tim Erwin Randy Eyster Janine Fiedler Connie Fierra Greg Finn Christina FItton Greg Fraley Pam Fraley Colleen McCarthy signals her victory on top of the juniors ' pyramid which helped them win Games Day. 126 Juniors John Fribley Joni Fry Craig Gafi Susan Gajewski Mary Gibson Curtis Goings Mark Green Debbie Griffith Darrell Gurtner Tony Hackett Melinda Hantz Scott Hantz Bob Harris Rod Henderson Dana Herman Steve Hipskind LeeAnn Hodge Julie Hornbrook Jim Horr Leona Horton Greg Hoyer Juniors 127 Anne Hull Gary Hutchlns Jay Ice Ruth Ireland Kelll Isenhoff Cheryl Jenkins Julie Johnson Larry Johnson Carrie Johnston Chris Jolin Missy Keller Steve Kelley Jefl Kessler Rita King Ann Kirkman t l H Deb Putman tabulates her yearbook receipts from the November sales campaign. 128 Juniors Frank Lee " quietly " approaches the paper rack to get the latest news. Jefl Klink jeorgia Knotek am Kruger Colleen Kuhn Mary Kyle Stacy Lahnum Lisa Lambert Guy Lamott Kelly Landon Mike Leckner Frank Lee Kim Lee Pat Leiand Kelly Leslie Cecil Martin Richard Marten Steve Martin Colleen McCarthy Denise McHenry Brenda McKee Doug McNaughton Juniors 129 Joe Means Jessie Meyers Bob Miller Troy Miller Dale Millhouse Bob Morgan Amy Morin Lisa Morton Amy Moser Chris Myers Gordy Nelson Delois Nester Renee Nichols Kim Noll Pat O ' Bierne Candy Ordway Kevin Osmon Randy Parrish Mark Patterson John Penick Angle Pentico Ann Kirkman appears calm and serious-looking about going through the test to see if she can give blood. As Mark Beer approaches his seat in the library, he turns to laugh at a snide remark. Jeff Kessler, Craig Gaff, Joe Means stand in the corner talking till the last minute before dashing to their classes. P- ' V| x 130 Juniors striving toward first base, Gregg Hoyer attempts to beat the throw from a Columbia City inflelder. Dusty Petre Terry Petre Lisa Piaiek David Pinkham Ed Plock Rick Puthofi Deb Putman ' s home away from home hides many of her special mementos. Debi Putman Deanna Rathbun Daral Ratliff Joe Richardson Scott Ringler John Ritenour Jim Roark Mike Romero Todd Russell Michelle Ryan Elsa Sawvel Mary Saylor Patty Schall Lynn Schmidt Lorl Sevlts Juniors 131 A slightly sprained ankle to Denise McHenry doesn ' t deter Coach Lautzenhiser from advising her other gymnasts. While sorting scrap lumber, tradesman Brett Buehrer selects the right board for his next cut. Jane Sheahan Lynn Sherer Lily ShJIey Tim Sirk Richard Simmons Ingi Skaug Mike Slack Mike Slauson Dan Smith Tina Smith Scott Snyder Chris Spitler Julie Springer Barb Steele John Stevenson Diane Stock Joyce Stoy Denny Surfus LuAnn Tubbs Janelle Unger Shawnee Van Dyne Margo Van Wagner Val Varner Don Voges 132 Juniors With 30 seconds left before being tardy, Chris John dashes to his locker for his books. Junior Class Officers: Colleen Kuhn, V. President; 1 Julie Springer, Secretary; Renee Nichols, President; " Pat Zdawczyk, Treasurer; use the library ' s water supply to primp for another school day. H Laura Vorndran Michelle Wagner Greg Waite Peggy Wall Julie Walter Tom Wells Jim Wengerd Susan Whitcomb Laura Willig Janean Wolfe Bonnie Wyatt Monte Yarger Pat Zdawczyk Gertine Zuurveid NOT PICTURED | Steve Brewer John Ritenour John Curtis Kent Rogers Don Davis Sharon Rohm Angie Green Todd Schieber Tom Keller Noel Snyder Phil Miller Enos Steury Roger Mills Joyce Stoy Brenda Murphy Connie Tierra Doug Noss Larry Weight Rick Onofrietti Juniors 133 OPI-OmORE GO FOR Lhc DOUGK Officers John Lindsay, president; Bruce Knox, Vice-president; Kathy Haines, secretary; Susan Ireland, treasurer; and Rich Davis, sergeant at arms led the sophomores through 1980-81, topped by the girls ' victory in the " Unhomecoming Powder Puff Football Game. The sophomore girl gridsters built up their muscles by pounding the freshmen and senior powder puffers. The sopho- mores weren ' t as fortunate in the Class Struggles as they took third place. The Unhomecoming queen candidates were Dave Piatek, escorted by Patrice Crimmins, and noshow Jack Landis. The official Homecoming queens were Gretchen Reynolds and Debbie Lamott, escorted by Tom Atha and Scott Snyder. Sophomore winter prom king candidates were Bruce Knox and Roger Roddy. For fund rais- ing, tenth graders activated two different activities. On a sunny, breezy day last September, they washed cars for a total splash of $125. The most profitable money maker was the half-court basket- ball shot contest which raised $300. In this contest a fan from Eastside was the only contestant at any home basketball game to even hit the rim. The sophomore Student Council Representatives were Jeff Bledsoe, Patrice Crimmins, Besty Gutstein, Jon Onofrietti, Gretchen Reynolds, and Mary Stoudinger. Also last January, the sophomores had a chance to purchase class rings from two differ- ent companies, Herff-Jones or Josten ' s. Elizabeth Headley shows us her morning excite- ment as she awaits instructions from Mr. Scott. Silting in a very happy and positive position are Penny Bush and Teresa Cope. Tony Adomaltis Eric Ameling Tina Anderson Mirza Baig Melody Baird Ken Beavers Tammy Beechler Brad Belcher Sean Blair Jim Blakesley John Blanchard Jeff Bledsoe J 134 Sophomores Troy Book Tim Boone Lynette Bristle Darren Bryant Julie Burrell Penny Busli SKielley Carr Mary Carrigan Phil Carroll Jerry Carnahan Janet Carpenter Russ Carpenter Todd Clouse Beth Cole Dean Collom Elected to speak about an upcoming basketball game. John Lindsay shyly mumbles a few words to his await- ing audience. Johnny Blanchard works away on a chemical formula. While trying to escape from Mrs. Boone ' s Hornet class Rich Davis runs Into the door. Sophomores 135 Teresa Cope Patrice Crimmins Steve Curtis Jim Davis Richard Davis David Dixon SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFI- Mary Carrigan concentrates on CERS: Mr. Hossler, sponsor; the egg she has thrown to Suzie Bruce Knox, V. Pres.; John Eaton. Dave Martin anxiously Lindsay, Pres.; Rich Davis, awaits the results of his toss. Sgt.-of-Arms; Susan Ireland, Treasurer; Kathy Haines, Sec- retary; and Brad Belcher, mo- rale officer. Ken Dunlap Suzie Eaton Shelley Elston Ron Elliot y Randy Embry i Tony Emerick Rick Emerick Jeff Engle 136 Sophomores Frank Fenlon Dawn Pernor Tony Fifer Gary Forbes Mark Fritz Wendy Fuller Julie Gardener Mary Garrison Chad German Shelley Gibbeny Cheryl Gill Kralg Goings Tara Goings Rhonda Gomez Tammy GreensI Joe GriHiths Betsy Gutstein Shirley Hager ade Kathy Haines Brian Harter Steve Harter Elizabeth Head Sarah Hipskind Amy Hirons ley Student Council member Jetf Bledsoe awaits for customers to purchase Free Fare concert tickets. Jack Landis ignores the hilar- ious remarks made by Jeff Hoi- man and Kralg Goings at the WMEE vs. Faculty basketball game. Sophomores 137 With his free throw headed goalward, Ed Steele concentrates on the all-important follow through. Jeff Holman Kevin Hullinger Sherri Huss Chad Hyska Susan Ireland Dennis Jack Beverly Jones Frank Kaczmarek Fred Kankamp Celia Karst Bob Kelley Shawn Kennedy Kelli Kensill Andy Kiesel Marilyn Kinney David Klee Becky Klink Bruce Knox Fred Kohli Kim Lambert Debbie Lamott As Ted Walters listens to the lecture from an Army officer, Rick Shipe checks out a M-16. 138 Sophomores Jack Landjs Loren Lehman Scott Lepley Mike Lesiak Karen Lin John Lindsay Dorsey Link Bobby Loomis Monica Mahnesmith Shelley Carr flashes the trademark of the Featurettes-a winning smile. Marty Mansfield Dave Martin Ken Martin Sophomores spurt up their spirit at the sectional pep session by out- pyramiding the other challenging classes. Displaying determination and ' relaxation, 400 relay man Bruce Knox narrows the gap. Sophomores 139 Mary McDougle Robyn McKinley Chester McLain Tim McNaughton Rick Mills Lydia Miranda Wendy Moonen Junior Morales Wendy Mowan Marty Muse Mike Musser Brad Noll Erin O ' Neal Laura Ohis Suzie Oliver Jon Onofrietti Charity Orewiler Dean Orewiler Tom Parker Jodi Parks Karia Penix Debbie Penrod Steve Peppier Dave Piatek Yearbook photographer Mike Lesiak is used to being on the other side of the lens so the surprise was on him. Jack Landis displays the dream girl that he keeps in his locker in the basement. 140 Sophomores Tony Adomaitis brushes up on his Krajg Goings awaits for the ball in a punctuation-homework in Mr. Snyder ' s pre-game warmup before the Hamilton science class. encounter. Patty Powell Lesley Presley Teresa Pressler Robert Price Joe Quinn Bryan Reed Gretchen Reynolds Mark Richardson Matt Richter Michelle Ridenour Sue Ritenour Roger Roddy Chris Rodesiler Phil Roe Bob Roland Kris Rozeii Mark Russell Eric Sank Marie Saylor Todd Saylor Carmen Schieber Dawn Schieber Curt Sharrow Tom Sheets Sophomores 141 Although it ' s only a few minutes into second hour, Mr. Rodman ' s biology lecture has them stumped. Tracy Sherer Mary Sherman Rick Shipe Jennie Short Greg Silberg Joe Smith Shannon Smith Diane Stakely Ed Steele Regina Stetler Steve Stetler Charity Stewart Julie Stillabower Mary Stoudinger Chris Stoy Doug Strong Allen Sturtz Lisa Sumney- Debbie Swift Jim Swiniuch Lisa Taylor Rob VanDyne Cindy Verburg Debbie Waite 142 Sophomores Jim Walker Ted Walter Brian Weible Doug Welcht John Weicht Jenny Wren Ray Wood Lori Yarger Mary Zimmer Kirk Noll Sophomores 143 The Class of 84 ' s Student Council members were Tracey Grimes, Jesse Johnson, Mark King, Jo Ellen McKee, Scott Olinske and Jacque Smith. Todd Alexander and Dave Shearer were elected as unhomecoming queens with Alexander being escorted by Beth Clark and Shearer by Wendy Hocker. In the Powder Puff football clash the freshmen girls came in last while in the Class Struggle competition the Class of ' 84 struggled to a last place finish. The class Prom King candidates were Jack Fraley and Mike Hiler while the Homecoming queen candidates were Martha Hipskind and Lana Zimmer. A break during " Godspell " play practice allows Martha Hipskind to express herself more vividly than theatrically. Kelly Alaura Todd Alexander Tami Alman Teresa Araque Betty Arnett Maria Baird Lisa Baker Paul Barfell Jim Beechler Susan Berger Kathleen Blodgett Laura Book Mary Bowman Donnie Boyer Beth Brown John Broxton Jefl Budd Brian Buehrer Roberta Carpenter Tom Carpenter Brent Church Beth Clark Keith Cook Tom Cranston FADE OUiCaV i y[ ' %: ■hA 144 freshmen Scott Culbertson Eric Davis Ooran DeMara Debbie Denham Laura Detar Cheryl Dixon Diane Dowell Chad Dunnavan Sheryl Durnell Dale Egly Mike Eidenier Robert Fitton Sean Flora Phillip Foley Evan Ford Scott Olinske debates on whether to react to a Wright joke while the jokester chuckles in anticipation. With thoughts of possible scholarships four years hence, Tracey Johnson, Julie Klink, Jill McLauchlin, Linda Hauck and Mary Bowman listen perceptively to Awards Day winners. Alan Fox Jack Fraiey Terry Friend Danny Fuller Jeannie Gardner Wanda Garrison Bart George Bret George Todd Gorrell Rick Grace Kristine Green Barbara Griffith Freshmen, 14S Attention before the start of a Student Council assembly is scattered within the freshmen section. Michelle Grubb Tracey Grimes Sherry Hager Kevin Hantz Rick Hantz Shelly Harris Bill Hartsuff Linda Hauck Roger Hawks Veronica Hawks Teresa Henderson Mike Hiler Martha Hipskind Wendy Hocker ' , " ' ' v Positioned at a lab table, Darren Randall reads his textbook assignment. 146 Freshmen Marty Holiday Seth Holtzman Allen Morton Sherri Hullinger Mahfuz Hug Craig Jenkins Lisa Jensen Alan Jinnings " ., . ' 1 Doreen Johnson Jesse Johnson Tracey Johnson Mark King Julie Klink Jacqueline Knotek Donnie Boyer appears totally unconcerned by the joint review of a physical science handout which involves Vonda Roberts, Amy Waite, and Diane Dowell. In a contemplative mood, Rich San GiaComo momentarily escapes the distractions of the school day. Freshmen 147 After being deserted by his classmates, Todd Alexander patiently persevers to finisti liis cake. Doug Mattox Jo Ellen McKee Jill McLauchlin Rae Ann Meek Mike Millhouse Ed Mitchell Margee Mocherman Jay Morton Wayne Mortorff Kim Musser Brad Nester Matthew Nodine 148 Freshmen Scott Olinake Steve Parnin Deb Peel Todd Penrod Rick Phillips Jell Peppier Kamie Porter Randy Puthoff Jim Parks Darren Randol Lori Reid Vonda Roberts Chuck Ringler Dana Rowe Kelle Ruckel Rich San Giacomo Steve Schannen Mike Schieber As a last minute preparation for a quickly approaching test, Veronica Hawks scans her notes. Freshwen 143 Jennie Sharp Dave Shearer Howard Sheets Chad Sherburne Eric Simons Diane Smith Jacquelyn Smith James Smith Jim Smith Keith Smith Louis Smith Marie Smith Duane Snyder Jetf Snyder Andy Somerlott Jeff Sonner Jodi Spraque Jon Spraque Seth Holtzman and John Broxton break away from the normal congestion of the freshman hallway in route to a math class. Before the start of the Awards Day program, parents of ■ graduates are oblivious to the " muscle beach " profile of Jesse ■4 Johnson. The lecture in physical science-a required course (or freshmen- commands the attention o( Brian Buehrer and Deb Peel. The success of Mike Millhouse ' s bubble-gum blowing m class is not only measured by size but also by silence. Not Pictured Bart Forrester Dennis Caylor John Kloer Terry Mocherman David Nelson David Noss Ralph Rowe Rod Springer Angle Stackhouse Brian Staup Roberta Steele Dawn Stoy Todd Strawser Jan Sfultz Debi Taylor Dennis Taylor John Van Aaron Vierling Allan Vierling Amy Waite Bill Wellans Todd Wells Doug Wicker Chris Younger Lana Zimmer Freshmen 151 Taking time from his daily routine of pink slips, and disciplinary actions, Mr. Thomp- son R-E-L-A-X-E-S. SUPERINTENDENT ' S SECRETARIES-Fran Atha, Susie Hobbs, Carol Schock, Marge Patterson, and Bonnie Moor. Mr. Fleming, substituting for Mr. Thomp- son, looks over the file of one of the students. JL W Doing one of her many tasks, Rosie Reade types up the daily absent sheet. .c: _D= v_ J 152 Staff BUS DRIVERS-FRONT ROW: Lois Snyder, Dons Snyder Judy McKinlev, George Coney, Jim Swilt, Jesse Greenamyer; BACK ROW: Carol Holiday, Harold Snyder, Jerry Groshon, Bob Anstett, Don Anstett, Cliff Nilson, Roger Parks, Toby Libey. Sending an important message to ttie bus drivers, Mr. Schock reaches for the microphone. While giving the CAT tests to sophomores, ■Checking ouf the books in the library 5 Judy Jones keeps a watchful eye out for are librarians Kathy Harris and Ramona cheaters. Lowe. n fi 80 8. . . arid staff 153 pp if . u ■ dul s COOKS-Jon Parker, Margeurite Harter, Carol Smith, Emma Griffiths, and Sheron Olinske. CUSTODIANS-Carlton Erwin, Carolyn Pentico, Howie McKeever, Stevie Grain, and Bob Gebhart. 154 Peraonnel S tools n During his last days at Angola High School Bob Gebhart cleans the scuff marks off the walls. While taking a break, Mrs. Margaret Reed enjoys herself with some goodies. Personnel 155 Ill: ■333: -+ ' n- ' 4- , J 3 J i; ' 3 :; 3 . . 6 c G 6 6 6 6 6 C 6 n t; 6 6 f: 6 r, 6 6 f ' 6 f (j (•• 6 f ( 7 77 77 777 77 77777 77 777 7 77 77 77 6 6 u o o o o ' L o o o w o o c- o o .3 u v w ■ o o q ■ :) o ' 1 Q a a f; ' 1 .1 o a o rt a o ' ) y •,} q n (] c ■ ' } ' i -) : 1 )5joocoo:)joonoii - -llllllllLIllll J J J J J u mill y ;; ■: , ' ; " 1 1 ■ O ' 1 ■ J J J J _; J -444444 3 5 J 3 i) D _. ) ' ' ) ■) ■ . ' ' ; -T ) ' -i ' ■ ■) -1 ' ' ■, ' -J --% ' -1 ' ' - n - ; J _i J J ._) J J J - _; J J -) J ,A4444 .44444A4 353:) 5555333353 3 660o666 Ar 6 6 6 6 ( 6 (j (j 6 6 6 6 6 ( ' 7777777777777; M ■ ' ■ f ■ ' .■ ' ' :■ O t- ' - ■ ' ' ' ' ' ■ I I J U ' - O O Ul O O J o O o C s, V 125 ,) 9 9 9 9 9 9 9999 ' ■} 9 9 - CC JOOGOODOOOOOOOt ' rn iiiniiiiiiiiii |- 22222222222222., bpj 33333333333333 LLm ). 4444 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 [ 555333555j5335 566666666 6 66n6t ' J o o ■ J o o 6 j 9 9 9 9 9 9 iOQOOOO _111111 - --f- V -, 4 A„ i_ il„ • ' . -- ' " ■■! ■•) " l : 3 J J 3 3 J 1 ii i.i ' J J J 6 6 6 b 6 6 - ' 777777 I O O C. ' O ' 1: Ci ; ;j vj ' .J , - Q . ' 003000 .111111 " i ■ ' ! ■-) -■ 1 ' i ' J J J _ _! -J - .:+ i4 ;+ cj, 9 q ,-, _,- - ■ .J . J _. -. J 666666 ' -] -: y -J — - ■■7 ■ ■777- u DL ■■ o ■■... ' o O ' 0 ' o o o O o k 9 9 9 99 999999; ! u illllilllllJ , - ■• .-. f ; n ' . ' J ' ' , , o -- . u;. .. ' . -.; . ' .;. ; ; L ;. .4 ' li t). Z i 7 7 J . - -J U ' .. 9 9 ■; " 9 9 , ' 99999 ' ' ' J ' . ' ' J ' . ' u J u J 1; J u- ■ Q Q ■ 55 ' 66 ' 77 O G Q 555 r . ' ' j ' J 777 555555 666666 777777 . .; . T -. ,- o ' . O O O V j o o 156 Organizations 111111 1:. 22222222: ..■ T o o q ■ 9 o Q 9 9999 9999 iOiOOOOOOOOOOOOOGO .1111111111111111 :0222222222222222 • j .- ' 3 J J 3 .J J 3 3 3 J J) 3 3 555 666 777 GS 999 000 111 222 333 55555 J J l ' -; - ' 6 6 6 6 6666 77777777 Ooooooou 99990999 nooooooo 11111111 22222222 33 33 333 J 6 6 6 6 7777 n ■ (■: r ■oOOO 9999 0000 1 X i 1 2222 3333 4444 ».f tj. t.j. t ._(. .. 1. ,. t t . t , t 1.). 555555555555555555 666666666666666666 77777777777777777 8338C0333888 ' 38838o 999999999999999999 00000000000000000 lllllllllllllllllx 22222222.2222222222 333333333333333333 lllllllLllllllUlllll 2222222222222222222222; 333333333333333333333333.. oi555j3i)j!)35l;53555!35j55335j: 666 6066 666666666666666660 6 666 llllllllllllllllllllirillUlllj j8JCi jot366688duo£)b88y6bbo6u ' jb38Si ' 3c 4999999999999999999999999999999999 ' :,. iOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOboOOOOOOOOOO ' . aim iiiiiiiiLiiiuiiiLiiii 1111111111 i2222222222222222222222222222z22222222 i33333333 333 333 33333333 3333 33333333333 , 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 ; 4 4 4 : k 4 4 U i-. ; 4 4 hh 4 ( 4 4 ; 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 - ' i - ' i 3j5j55353553!;5555355j55 3 55555555553555 66666666666666666666666666666666066666 7 777 777777 7777777 777777 7 77 777 7 77 777 77 J- O o u o o o o u o O o !. u O o o ' J o o ;. ' ! u (_i v.; o i ) .j ; j O O -j f ; . j o u ' . n ■ o : 9 9 9 9 ..) 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 q 9 9 g q 9 9 9 9 a j o q o o 9 9 o lOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOODOOOOOOOOOOOOOO illlllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllll ._:222222222222222222 2222222222222222222 33333333333333333333333333333333333 333 44444444444 444444444444 ; A44 4 ' ' ■ 4444 A4 I.44 j355:;j55j55555j555; 553j3j5355j5I 555555 ' 6 6 6 6 6 G 6 6 G 6 6 f 5 6 ( j 6 C 6 6 C 6 (U; 6 6 6 6 1 ' r 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 77 7 7777777777777 7 7 777 7 77777 7 7 77 777 77 J D o b u iK) b y O b O o b o b b b b ii 6 O u b ii C-i b o 5 w 3 u u O d O b O 9999999999999999v ' 5i ' -3o-- -iqooo - 000000000 L i 1 1 1. 1 i 1 . -.33333333I 4 444 44 44 j5555j555| :)66d66G6 777777 i u o b b U b b 59999999 :)0000000: llllllll .„ !, . 33333333, -:.4444444 ' . ' 35555335.: G 6 6 6 6 C ' " 7777777 u O O O o b O b u b b b b b b u O b b b O b b u o o b .U, ' b b ■ • b b o b b- ■9999999999 99999 99 99999999999999 ' 3999cjQ t O ' T j3 J . 4 : 44 %. % 66666666.. 7777777777 (.i wc Oj -b- :. Oti ■•. " ' .. ' ■ ;; OQCOi.SQqOQQOIb , C iOOOOOOO ' inoooO 1111 1 llllllll 1 1 1 1 . 9 O ' J ' 1 -y O o ■ 1 " , 9 9 2 ■■ ' ' 9 O ■ ' ) 33333333333333333333. 4A44A44444Zi44 | 4A - ' .44 - 5535555555 5 55 5 555555555 . 66GOGGGG66666G6666C6GG0GGt. 7777777777777777777 77777777. ; w-i r . (_i ..,, " .. I ;.(. p .: n : ; " , t ' ■ ■ ( ! O ' ' ' ' ' ' . ' V o O o b o O O o O ' .- C O ' . J 00b --J O -J o O O O O O O b . 1) What was the 1980-81 membership total of the Art Club? 2) How many years has Diana Cook been French Club advisor? 3) Of nine Speech Club members, how many belong to the National Forensic League? ' uo!iez|ue6jo sno!6||sajd sjii) 10 sjsquieui aje auju em (o eAjj (e ' SjeaX ue) jo| josuods uaaq seq |ooo sjh (Z -6)uepn)s BAj) -X|ueM) passeduiooue qn|3 )jv sqx { . .1 i 9? b bj J . , J, J o 5 5 3 " ■ 6 6 6 : 1 1 1 .ii.. " . - - -- n 6 5 6 3 J ; r r ' 5 ' „ !,, o U •- ' • J ' .J O K ■ •. J ' j O vj O - -J ■ .) w O O s_ ' U O O O C C b c , 9 9 9 9 ci 99909990 n n c a o 9 a n r, o o a q ; .0 O .0 ' " . ' ' n ' " ' " . " 1 . ' " 1 f ' . ' 1 ' O ' . ' . ' " f; .■ " . ' " . . " ■ " " 1 , ' • " . ■ DRGflNIZHTONS 6666 65660606 CO G6Gu6666£66t 666GGGt of- llllllTnillllllllllllllllllllll ' iil-, -, V , -: ' " ' . ' ' ' ' ' ' .- " r " . rs . " 1 ' ' ■ . , -.- ■ r rs n r i t r i " . r-i - " . , . ' .n .- .% f . " - .v -. - .-. " • . ..v - UOO .J j --■o Uu ooc--UvjkJO:,)uaooOi.; i -L ouOt. 1.J b O u ,M.i,jbK. ' Oii 0,0 10 ob b bbb c- b b 93353999939I}9999999 9999995999999Qnn9 09 bqno9Qq ' ibboqb.Tooo 0300 300000000000000 9noooo5oooooonoo 6nooc ' o " ' onon ' i- ' n- 1111111111111111111111111 1111111 lllllllllill 11111 il U 22222222222222 ' ' ' ' ' ' 222 ' ?2 ' ' 2 " ?22 ' ' ' ' " ' 2 ' ' ' ' " ' ■ " ■ " ' ■ ' ' ' ■ " ' ' " ' ■ ' ' " ' " • " " 33333333333333333 33333331333333 33330 ISno ' oT ion ' l 5 5 5 5 5 . " 3 5 5 ) ) 9 ' i 3 S ' • 1 S ' -i - ' ' i ' " 1 ' " . " 1 1 ' ■ S ' . ■ =; ' , s = •■;■; ' ; 1; n r i " . t:; c :::;:;:::; ;; Organizations 157 Creativity was at an all time high for the 1980-81 Art Club. Besides making and selling the candles and stretched bottles advertised in the Art Club show case, the members showed their talent through making buttons, artistic work, and photography. Their big- gest achievement and money maker was making signs for Gjfi Cameron Hospital and Gould Inc. The officers for Art Club were Tara Goings-President, Rick Onofrietti-V. President, and Debbie Chrysler-Sec. Treas. Mr. Robinson was very pleased with the group, saying that they were one of the most tal- ented groups he ' s taught. The Club had a record high 25 members. The mushroom is one of the Art Club ' s i unique candle molds. Many different kindst of molds were also used. ART CLUB: FRONT ROW: Tara Goings, Ingi Skaug, Jenny Wren, Wendy Hocker, Beth Brown, Debra Chrysler, BACK ROW: The Face. Sherrie Hullinger, Steve Harter, Frank Lee, Doyle Marten, Rick Onofrietti, NOT SHOWN: Amy Brown, John Curtis, Richard Marten, Roger Mills, Todd Schieber, Lily Shiley, David Klee, Dean Orwiler, Curt Sharrow, Debbie Swift. Robin Wilsey, Ray Wood, and Howard Sheets. John Carmack checks the detail in his art- work before the next Art Club meeting begins. I QBlMlll The Club ' s display case, located between seen by a major second and third floor senior lockers and contains the best percentage of students, workings of the members. 1S8 Arl Club Being one of the major events of the year, Mardi Gras is vividly celebrated with food and decorations. Julie Burrell listens to instructions on one of the French games. FRENCH CLUB-FRONT ROW: Phil Roe, V. Pres., Diane Stakley, Sec, Diane Ummel, Pres., Guy Lamott, Treas., ROW 2: Candy Ordway, Laura Vondran, Joni Fry, Anne Col- lom, Georgia Knotek, Julie Johnson, Connie Tierra, Lori Elliott, Angela Book, Carrie Johnston, ROW 3: Susan Berger, Lisa Lam- bert, Amy Clark, Tara Goings, Jessie Meyer, Ingi Skaug, Gertine Zurrveld, Laura Deter, Tracey Grimes, Jenni Sharp, Deanna Rath- burn, ROW 4: Erin O ' Neal, Karen Lin, Evan Ford, Sefh Holtzman, Rich SanGiacomo, Mark King, Jack Fraley, Delois Nester, Dee Dee Eggleston, Pat Zdawczyk, BACK ROW: ALAN Moor, Tom Kundenreich, Michele Wagner, Ken Thomas, Mike Hiler, Karia Penix, Kris Rozell, Julie Burrell, Charity Orewiler, Amy Hirons. NOT SHOWN: Elaine Dent, Debbie Griffith, Jenny Chapman, Deb Putman, Jodi Parks, Jodi McLaughlin, Deb- bie Lamott, Jacquelyn Smith, Anne Hull. I eiicft The French Club started out the year by having a pot luck dinner with the Fremont High School French Club. It had a nice turnout with many differ- ent foods. The next event on the Club ' s list was the big- gest happening of the year; Mardi Gras. It was celebrat ed with colorful decorations, delicious French foods, and a large variety of custumes. There were games being played the entire time such as Concen- tration, and spelling bee, plus the playing of records. The major event of the French Club was going to see the French play " The Doctor in Spite of Him- self " by Moliere at Fort Wayne Elmhurst with many area schools. f r :« At a monthly meeting, officers Diane Um- mel and Diane Stakely relay information about an upcotWing event. Mrs. Cook, who has been the French advisor for 10 years, ponders over a tough question from a club member. T59 oucft. Orchestra, which finally became a regular class this year, seemed to make a comeback in a world of popular music. The orchestras ' first performance was their Christmas concert held in the choir room on Decembe r 7th and a few carols for the residents at Elliot Manor. They have played at different churches, backing up choirs and for a special graduation service. At NISBOVA, the AHS Orchestra placed a 2nd division rating. They had a spring concert in May and also performed at the Angola Middle School. They finished up a busy year with an all day event at Prairie Heights, providing music for both the high school and the middle school. Thus the benefit of daily meetings provided many opportunities for the 1980-81 orchestra. Beth Clark works alone on a difficult piece after scliool. Hours of individual practice is needed before group togetherness can be accomplished. ORCHESTRA-FRONT ROW: Cheryl Dixon, Evan Ford, Beth Clark; BACK ROW: Ann Kirkman, Pam Kruger, Mary Sloudinger, Dave Pinkham, Claudia Bryan. The orchestra starts an annual concert for the Elliot Manor residents. It was one of the many concerts containing a large variety of Christmas songs. N Mary Stoudinger plays with pure concentration while entertaining listeners during the Christmas concert. 160 OrcheBtra Ann Kirkman is just one of many who provide the background music for the concert performers. Framed by percussion, Susan Ireland adds a touch of rhythm to the choirs ' sound. CHOIR-FRONT ROW: Laura Vorndran, Janice Erwin, Elizabeth Headley, Terry SanGiacomo, Crystal Orewiler, Becky Wieland, Marcia Patterson, Colleen Kuhn, Susan Ireland, Mary Zimmer, Mary McDougal; ROW 2: Ann Kirkman, Tina Smith, Rhonda Gomez, Amy Hirons, Karen Lin, Dave Martin, Jack Fraley, Rob VanDyne, Ingi Skaug, Amy Morin, Ann Linsberg; ROW 3: Miss Siebold, Lori Ort, Renee DeLaney, Sherrie Hullinger, Mary Sherman, Phillip Miller, Ron Short, Pam Stackhouse, Mary Kyle, Susie Thalls, Lee Ann Hodge; BACK ROW: Pam Kruger, Susan Whitcomb, John Curtis, John Carmack, Dave Pinkham, Doug McNaughton, Rich Davis, Tom Walters, Amy Clark, Betsy Gutstein, Val Varner, Lynn Schmidt, Patrice Crimmins. cftoi The 80-81 year for the AHS Choir was the start of a newer and brighter type of concert. Changes included dance, more popular songs, the use of costumes and an overall modernization for the show. Many of the features in their concert were solos, duets, instrument backgrounds and a senior ensemble which also sang at the 1981 graduation service. Miss Siebold, who has led the Angola Choir for many years. incorporated a tremendous improvment in concert style. Despite all of the new additions and modernizing, the AHS Choir and Swing Choir, still relied on the one item everybody knows them for-their beautiful and entertaining music. J J During a choir-slngais concert, Dave Pinkham and Dave Martin groove to a popular song. j ' ... l m ' A The AHS Drum Line, consisting of Greg Finn, Jeff Tanner, Susan Ireland, Chris Jolin, Laura Vorndran, Trish Sova, and Bruce DeLucenay, creates and keeps the much needed beat lor the band during the song, " Over the Rainbow. " " »L. ) With Zionsville in mind, Patty Schall works on the line details of the 1981 Halltime show. At their annual NISBOVA contest, the AHS Marching Hornets strut their stulf while dancing to the tunes of " Vegas. " PEP BAND: FRONT ROW-Mary Zimmer, Jamie Simons; ROW 2-Cindy Wise, Colleen Kuhn, Ann Kirkman, Val Varner, Tom Walters, Elizabeth Headley, Betsy Gutstein; ROW 3-Deb Taylor, Suzie Oliver, Michelle Ryan, Pam Kruger, Mary McDougle, David Pinkham; ROW 4-Regina Stetler, Brent Church, Diane Smith, Jackie Knotek, Georgia Knotek, Ron Short; ROW 5-Doug McNaughton, Brian Buehrer, John Stevenson, Erich Weiss, Brad Barney, Todd Gorrell, Eric Simmons; ROW 6-Rich Davis, Robert Price, Ken Dunlap, Dan Cripe; BACK ROW-Jeff Tanner, Bruce DeLucenay, Pat Schall, Trish Sova, Susan Ireland, Laura Vorndran, Grog Finn; NOT PICTURED- Jesse Johnson. Rich Davis and Deb Peel, as seen by fellow band members, fill in the background music with their bass clarinets. J ojkIs Waiting for a ride home, Chris Jolin displays his socks after marching shoeless 1 ' : miles in the International Waterball Competition Parade. The five day August band camp opened practice for the 1980-1981 edition of the AHS band. Parades and football games were just practices to the performers, preparing for NISBOVA contest. Bucking the trend towards drum and bugle Corp., the Marching Hornets ' dance style presentation earned only a second division rating. The Pep Band, made up of the bands ' best musicians, provided entertainment and spirit for the home basketball games. At Zionsville, the AHS Pep Band placed 5th out of several Indiana bands. The concert band held three concerts entertaining hundreds of listeners. Because of late entry, the group was not able to participate in its ' contest. The Angola Band concluded the year with " Halftime Highlights " which was a two hour show of the best of all three bands. CONCERT BAND: FRONT ROW: Jamie Simons, Diane Smith, Kamie Porter, Sarah Hipskind, Patty Schall, Angle Stackhouse, Brent Church, Jodi Parks, ROW 2; Janine Fiedler, Laura Vorndran, Georgia Knotek, Pam Kurger, Kathleen Blodgett, Dawn Schneider, Mary McDougle, Suzie Oliver, Jackie Knotek, Amy Clark, Cindy Wise, Ron Short, Ann Kirkman. Dan Cripe, Dave Martin, Ron Cook, Todd Saylor, ROW 3; Regina Stetler, Mindy Hantz, Kim Lambert, Deb Peel, Rich Davis, Mike Eidenier, Rob VanDyne, Brian Buehrer, Linda Hauck, John Stevenson, Eric Wiess, Amy Waite, Martha Hipskind, Patrice Crimmins, Mary Zimmer, Eric Simons, Ken Dunlap, Val Varner, Tom Walters, Todd Gorrell, Elizabeth Headley, Colleen Kuhn, BACK ROW; Greg Finn, Susan Ireland, Trish Sova, Chris Jolin, Bruce DeLucenay, Jeff Tanner, Chad Dunnavan, Mr. Meyers, Brad Barney, Deb Taylor, Doug McNaughton, Steve Martin, Dave Shearer, Robert Price, David Pinkham, Betsy Gutstein, NOT PICTURED; Mary Bowman, Dawn Ferrier, John Fribley, Jesse Johnson. Asst. Drum Major Dave Martin and Head Drum Major Ruth Martin stand at full attention awaiting the awards presentation. Uojfuei The Hornet staff started out with different ideas, different talents, and a different advisor- Mr. Boone. The paper had it ' s changes-changing format, adding human interest stories, holiday issues, opinion polls, more photographs, and more ways to win money through contests. Along with additions, they dropped spotlights, face and car of the month, rowdy rumors, and clip art. With their savings the Hornet class purchased a much needed new Pentax K-1000 35 mm camera. Another new idea was critiquing, or proofreading, each issue by the Herald- Republican. The officers consisted of Senior editor Ronald Cook and Co-editor Scot Biernat. Overall, it was a new beginning for The Hornet. Todd Schieber inspects a layout print to see how the story will look in column form. Staffer Lynn Schmidt listens intently to a suggested future story during a brainstorming session. Cecil Smith patiently waits as Mrs. Boone corrects the final copy of his column. Proofreading is one of the most important stages of the writing of a story. One of the major activities of thie yearbook staff is selling the annual. Guy Lamott puts the finishing touches on a receipt for Mark Fritz. R I I I. I ' tii ' .i The KEY staff started out the year with a record high in ad sales topping $5,000. This was then followed up by the annual selling of the 1981 KEY. To get more people interested in the KEY, the staff had a raffle in which junior Gregg Hoyer won $200 worth of stereo equipment. In order to improve their ap- propriate skills, all staffers attended either a summer workshop at St. Marys ' , Ball State, or Bowling Green or a fall workshop at Notre Dame or Bowling Green. The rest of the year was basically the hustle and bustle of turning all the memories of a fantastic year into a book of black and white with that special added touch of color. Congregated around " The Counter " , Dee Dee Brown and Anne Hull show off their yearbook staffer shirts, while Lisa Piatek and Faith Stoy listen to Deb Putman ' s me- lodic morning serenade. Mr. Scott takes his usual position of " tight- rope walking " trying to keep calm commu- nications going between editor Stacy Buck- ham, and staffers, represented by Jeff Tan- ner. Key 16S The Future Farmers of America organization has grown steadily from the very beginning, prov- ing the great need for workers of the soil still prevails in our com- puter society. With a bountiful harvest com- ing in the fall, the Future Farm- ers look forward to another suc- cessful year in 1982. The mem- bers started working the area chapter farms in the early spring in order to ready themselves for the coming summer of working their wheat and corn fields. On March 21, 1981 Angola host- ed sixteen out of the ninteen schools in district three for the Future Farmers Convention. An- gola placed eighth of of those sixteen in the overall competi- tion. Special honors went to Jeff Ingle for placing fourth in forest management. Tim Simons placed first in the dairy pro- ducts competition. In the Sweet- heart competition, a quiz for the female gender of the organiza- tion, Ruth Martin placed second. Taking part in the quiz bowl was Dr. Waliter, Dennis Jack, and Ruth Martin of Angola. While keeping an eye on the harvesting process, Terry Mockerman rides through the fields of the local FFA farm on 827. FFA-LEFT TO RIGHT-Paul Barfell, Tom Car- penter, Marie Kohli, Bob Rowland, Terry Mockerman, Dan Strong, Jay Morton, Ruth Martin, Kim Brock, Jeff Klick, Janean Wolfe, Darren Randol, Enos Stewry, Darrol Gurtner, Randy Eyster, Dale Millhouse, Craig Gaff, Mark Beer, Scott Hantz, Steve Schannen, Todd Hornbrook, Joe Means, Scott VanAuken, Paul Sanders, Bob Means, Tim Brock, Jeff Filipow, Paul Kohli, Mike Millhouse, Andy Somerlott, Fred Kohli. President Darrel Gurtner and Enos Steury coax a young student to pet a cow during the FFA animal show at the local elemen- tary schools. 166 Officers Randy Eyster, Reporter, Paul Sanders, V. Pres., and Jeff Klink, Sentinel, take time out from a rigorous meeting to relax and have some fun. Participating in the dramatic interpretation division, sophomore Robin Wilsey pauses to emphasize a point. sjieccfi Being a fairly new organization, only two years old, the Speech Team shows great promise for the coming years. They did not win any tournaments but several members of the team did very well. Lisa Lambert, Janice Erwin, Melody Hammond, and Deb Chrysler all won ribbons in their respective divisions. Lisa, Melody, Deb, David Pink- ham, and Veronica Hawks have all met the requirements for membership in the National Fo- rensic League. One must par- ticipate in competitive speech contests and rank high in one ' s class in order to be initiated into the League. With ribbon winning ease Janice Erwin executes her radio broadcast. Using her alotted 30 minutes, Lisa Lambert completes a speech from a magazine article. I Melody Hammond addresses the audience with her well-practiced speech in poetry interpretation. SPEECH TEAM-FRONT ROW: Janice Erwin, Lisa Lambert, Robin Wilsey, Deb Chrysler, Veronica Hawks, Deniese McHenry, Rich Davis, Melody Hammond, David Pinkham Speech Team 167 Ron Cook receives his cords, symbolic of graduating NHS membership, from president-elect Greg Finn at the Awards Day program. Being a National Honor Society member, Laurie Eberhart proudly dons her yellow cords during graduation proces sional. Helping themselves to the various types Ellen Barnes and Ann Linsberg work for of cuisine, members of NHS subdue their their hours of civic volunteer work at a appetites. local sports event collecting admission. 163 NHS Aiding at the November Open House. Tom Kundenreich and Teresa Parnin help parents with their nametags. The 1981 members of the National Honor Society had a new endeavor as they co- sponsored the bloodmobile on March 4. Although this was a first for the students at Angola High School, it was very successful despite the butterflies in the stomachs. In the contest with Fremont H.S. for highest percentage of donors, Angola placed second with over 100 donors. The Society also had their annual White Elephant Christmas Exchange with the members exchanging " gifts " with each other. These " gifts " of straw hats, " Grease " cards, toy horses, 3 day-old Big Mac ' s, chewed up gum, and plastic jewlery donned in a Gordon ' s box, were just a few that will be treasured for years to come. The annual NHS raffle was won by Sandy Smith who used her $1 ticket to win the black and white television donated by Sanborn ' s Appliance. SENIOR MEMBERS-FRONT ROW Rowland, Tom Walters, Tom Kunderenreich, Dan Sanders, Amy Koomier, Becky VanWagner, Laurie Eberhart, BACK ROW; Jodi McLauchlin Tres., Jamie Simons V.P., Ann LInsberg Sec, Diann Craighead, Lisa Grain, Lori Harter; Pres., Teri SanGiacomo. National Honor Society 169 Under the new direction of Diane DeMara the Angola Pom Pon girls had a very successful year. At Zionsville the girls placed ninth in a field of sixteen dance teams and their captain Lisa Caruso placed second over all for the best captain ' s award. For this contest the girls practiced a total of fifty-six hours for the eight minute show on April 11, 1981. Featured in the show was a " space ship " , laser swords, and changing of uniforms during the show, a first for the dance team. Other performances throughout the year included the " Trip Across America " football halftlme and NISBOVA program, the " Heartbreaker " basketball halftime program, Christmas Show, officer dance routine, and Half-Time Highlights. -■•Ill ■J- ' ' The drill team perform their Christmas Show ol the Homestead game. This routine was danced to " The March of the Wooden Soldier. " Showing their patriotism, the girls salute the flag during their pre-game performance of " America the Beautiful. " Wendy Mowan holds at attention while the bands finished the National Anthem. Competing with dance teams from four surrounding states, the Angola Half-Time Featurettes proudly placed 9th over-all with their show, " A Journey Beyond The Stars. " Performing at Half-Time Highlights as a member ol the Flag Corps is Laura Ohis She has been a member for two years. Kloqs The Angola Flag Corps went under a change of directorship when Karen Rose resigned and Missy Enyeart and Paula Latson took over the position. Being previous members of the corps aided them in their new job. The flags were a positive aspect to the NISBOVA show. They accompanied the Pom- Pon girls and band to band camp in August where the trio practiced all day taking three breaks during the long hot sessions. For the second year in a row the corps performed at halftime highlights with the drill team. The flags have improved every year with the aid of new routines learned at summer camps. To finish the year the girls performed with the band during the Memorial Day parade. Participating during a football halftime, the flag corps adds to the excitement of between halves festivities. Mary Kyle poses in the finishing position for the football show which was also performed at NISBOVA. FLAG CORPS: FRONT ROW-Teresa Pressler, Susan Whitcomb. Lisa Taylor, Michelle Ryan, Joni Frye; ROW TWO-Mary Kyle, Laura OhIs, Linda Hauck, Charity Stewart; BACK ROW-Lynn Schmidt. Chris Younger, Jodi Parks, Theresa Henderson. i ♦ . ' r? Flags 171 ■ -_•._ _» »u_ - Annlhor noronn that When one looks at the Thespians one usually reaches the decision they are a great group of people joined together to produce one common goal. In speaking about her year as a Thespian one member commented, " Being a member of the Thespians was a great learning experience for me. Helping out with the plays made me more aware of what a play really consists of. " Tara Goings, portraying Myrtle May, holds still lor the make-up artist at work. Another person that helped immensely with the production of " Godspell " was Jerry Duguid. Jerry was the choreographer for the play and was a great asset to the Thespians. The Thespians spent many hours this year trying to obtain new equipment for the stage productions. They received this equipment in time to make a remarkable production of " Godspell. " Getting ready to go on stage is the psychiatrist, alias John Carmack. John was also active in the winter and spring plays. Thespian oflicers, Rich Davis-V. Pres., Advisor Diana Cook, Dan Cripe-Pres., and Sec.-Treas. Crystal Orewiler, converse about the up and coming play " Plaza Suite " . At the first meeting of the year the Thespians pay close attention to the fall play credentials. 172 Thespians Martha Hipskind assists Rich Davis with stage make-up application for the next scene. Crystal Orewiler takes a basketball game tan ' s coat. The Tliespians were responsible for coat check during the games as a means for money making. Thespians 173 I cIhR The Y-Club kept with their traditional " duties " by coming up with an excellent Winter Prom and again selling cookie dough. The cookie dough was sold at $1.25 per pound and there were two choices- chocolate chip and cherry nut. This turned out to be a great money-making project for them since they were able to turn out enough money for decorations for the Winter Prom. The prom was attended by over seventy-five couples. There were stars in everyone ' s eyes by the time the night was over since some of the decorations consisted of stars with each couples ' names on it. » n vf r v Y-CLUB-FRONT ROW: Mr. Wright, Robin Wilsey, Lisa Taylor, Matf Nodine, Phil Foley, Eric Davis, Tom Carpenter, Rich SanGiacomo, Mahfuz Huq; Row 2: Linda Esselburn, Crystal Orewiler, Deb Pulman, Denise Eggleston, Masuma Rahman, Jamie Simons, Sean Blair, Becky VanWagner; Row 3: Pam Kruger, Susan Whitcomb, Jodi McLauchlin, Lisa Crain, Todd Russell, Ann Kirkman, Valerie Varner; Row 4: Dick Simmons, Jeff Tanner, Mike Slack, Dan Cripe, Ron Cook. " Master Chef " Sean Blair fluffs the eggs for the cookie sale. 174 Y-Club pep- clfifi The Angola Pep Club was again a great spirit booster at all the varsity football and basketball games. The club, under the direction of Mr. Tokarz and President Mary Penick, ordered new uniforms consisting of white jerseys with gold trim and purple bib- overalls. These uniforms were ever-present at the games. Two " unofficial members " , John Lindsay and Dick Simmons, helped immensely at the DeKalb Sectional. These two were responsible for getting the whole crowd fired up. At a pep session Mr Tokarz ' gets it in the (ace " with a whip cream pie. PEP CLUB-FRONT ROW: Brenda Murphy, Deanna Rathburn, Patrice Crimmins, Wendy Wenzel, Lisa Sumney, Diane Stock, Amy Clark; ROW 2: Sheila Cleverly, Julie Walter, Mindy IHantz, Angela Book, Julie Springer, Laura Willig, Lana Zimmer, Kelle Ruckel, Sherry Harger; ROW 3: Debbie Swift, Veronica Hawks, Kathy Blodgett, Wendy Moonen, Amy Waite, Shelly Carr, Susan Ireland. Susan Whitcomb, Diane Stakley. Gretchen Reynolds. Debbie LaMott; ROW 4: Jill McLaughlin, Barb Grittith, Dawn Ferrier, Oia Clark, Julie Johnson, Lisa Jensen. Carrie Johnston; ROW 5: Theresa Cope, Kelly Alaura, Vonda Roberts, Candy Ordway, Judy Somerlott, Bonnie Wyatt, Laura Vorndran. A recent addition to the Pep-Club was the Pom-Pon girls and Pep Band. The two were at all home games to cheer on their teams. Pep Club 175 X council it was another very busy year for AHS Student Council- bringing the students an assembly every month, taking care of elections, bringing in student council members from other schools, starting an annual Teacher Recognition week, collecting money for different charities, helping the running of the blood mobile, and last but not least, trying to aid communications between faculty and students. A few of the assemblies were frisbee and horseshoe professionals, a band and a magician. Of course, every year is a busy one for Student Council members, but the 1980-81 group made the nine months at school a little bit nicer. Magician Rex Kolczynski demonstrates how to skewer witti Miss Vaughn as the demonstratee. lllllliitilliM Mark King sits as advertisement for the selling of hats and scarves. Money from this fund raiser helped support the activities during Teacher Recognition Week. Frisbee professionals show how to keep six discs in motion. STUDENT COUNCIL: FRONT ROW; Jesse Johnson, Rick Onofrietti, Jeff Alexander, Mary Stoudinger, ROW 2; Traci Grimes, Jacque Smith, Colleen Kuhn, JoEllen McKee, Patrice Crimmins, Amy Clark, Holly Perry, Betsy Gutstein, Ellen Barnes, sec, Mr. Scott, advisor, ROW 3; Tom Selman, Joe Byerly, V. Pres., Jeff Bledsoe, Scott Olinski, Anne Hull, LADDER; Jon Onofrietti, Ron Cook, Mark King, Amy Koomler, Pres., Sue Gary. 176 Council C9 Free Fare, a nationally known band, entertains the student body at the March assembly. Student Council has always drawn a large crowd for its ' assemblies creating different moods affecting every student. rf:Vf(«. ■ £« £ J»3»f« o " " ' Si - p«f+ ' Ow " ] ei ' c ' rfcs " o WoTfte - »Jj . v«cl +.ctr4 aWsx FREE Swarmed by people, junior rep. Jeff Alexander collects tickets before one of the monthly Council presentations. Rick Onofrietti collects another dollar during the Student Council March for UNICEF. 33333 ' i 44444 555555 66666 llllTi .88888 99999S lOOOOOC .111111 ;22222: 133333: ■44444 .55555! )66666(- ' 77777: 188883 ' 99999S lOOOOOC .iiiii: 122222. 133333: 555555555555555555555555555555f )666666666666666666666666666666( niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ' ni ' i88888S88888b88 88S888886dSb8688 ' - 199999999999999999999999 999999QC J .- ,J - - - -J . ..J -y.™ . ,V . , .sV .« w- ' 4 A . 4 44 ; 4444 A 44 444 ■444 5555555555555555555555 S6666666666666666666666 11111111111111111111111 338SGB8S338a8833GGS3SS8 00909099909999999999999 ooooooooooooooooonooooo _ 1111111111111111.11111111 ' 22222222222222222222222 :33333333333333333333333 .44444444444444444444444 .55555555555555555555555 666666 6666666666666666 nilllllllllllllllllllll ;88888308388o8883888o88S 99099999999999999999999 ;nO()OO0O0000000OOOOOO0Or iiiiiiiiiiiiiii: ::-i 2222222222222222x:ZZZz222 3333333333333333333333J ■ L LLLLLLLLLL 4 L L - 000 00 00 o; ' aiiiii;Q 222222222. i-n " ■■ " 3333333, b . 444444 L-U 555555555: 6666b666G6 1111111111 c58oo88836 999999999 000000000 111111111 222222222 333333333 444444 ' ! 44 ' 5555555555 u 666C66 6u 111111111 " : ' ' - O o O u O O O u O .J 999999999 OOOOOOCOO 111111111 222222222 333j_»j3J-i 444444444 55555 _o:)j oCoGoCcGG 111111111 iOOOuoOOOO 999990999 - OOOOOOOOOOOOOO ' aiiiiiiiiiiii: 12222222222222: 33333333333333 ' 1 k 4444 4 4.4 4444 4 ' 35555555555555: .. 6 6 G o 6 6 G G 6 6 G 6 6 G ' nillllllllllll - ■■ - , (_■. •• r- . o r -■ r-. _ ' •. .- JOUOoOOOOw-wOUu (9999999999999 )O0OOOOO0OOOG0 llllllllllllll 1 o 2 2 9 2 2 2 2 ' ' ■ ' 2 2 2 33333333333333 «■ 4 4 : 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 m 4 4 rrj 555555555555553 6 G G G 6 6 6 6 G G G G G G G L . ■7 77 LJ 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 ' J o o o o O O u o o u o u o o o I.. o ij ki i,j vv kj o vj o o u o u O O kli Cs o a o u o o u u o cj a O o a O o O o o o O u O i_ o (J i..t ) 9 9 9 D } 9 9 9 } 9 9 9 9 9 " ' 9 9 9 9 9 9 ■ ' ) 9 5 9 9 ' T 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 ' 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 : 9 5 9 9 ' ' ■)oo666oooo;)03 39009000090 loonnoooonoooooooooooooooooooooooooo ' lllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllT 222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222: 3333333333333333333333 3333333333333333333333333 3333333333333.. ■i44444 i 444G :44. ' i 444444 . 444 . ; : 44 A 444 ' ' ; M ' ' : ' ; 4 444444444 44444 444444 ' 5551)555555555555 5 55 355 555555555555555555555 5 55555555555555555; GGouGGGoGGGGGGttG6Gi;G6GGGi;6GrG6GGGG6GG66GG6G666666G6G6G66b66G ' 77777 7 7 77777777777777 7 7777777777777 77777 7777 7777777777777777 O O O O O O 6 O G O O d O O O 8 C; C.; u O u O O o o O v u O O O O t O O (J b • J u i. J C) O u d O J O 5 ' ' ) 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 } 9 9 9999 c 9 9 q 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 o n q 9 9 9 9 9 9 q 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 ' ooooooooooooooouooojOoooo 000000 oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooi II 111 1111111111111 iiii 111111 11111 11 mill 11 111111111111 111111111111111111111 222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222: 178 AdvertiBing i3333333333333333333333 . . . 44 4 4 444 ' ' ' - ' ' ' ' - ' ' ' ' s N_ ' ; c. =; r; ' V " =: . C C c :: c c ,c c .c. ' O ' ) O ' ) o ■ i _) -J J J ,J . 4444 ' -tM. j .4444 ' i !44444444 i|.; 333 3 3 3333333333333333333333333333 ' 444444444444 ; 4444444444444444444_ 222222222222222222222222. 33333333:33333333333333333 3dbGo00oo8oobCutj jouoo6ubooooo6uo6oov, :i90Ciqo9qq9oo}999999g9999999999:- ' 99999:;. 3OOo6o9309O0OO9OO000O000O0OOO0000n0nOO ' , iiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiii-iiiiUiiiiJ:. 2222222222222222222222222222222222222222ZZ 3333333333333333333333333333333333333333333. e - 77777777777777777777777777777 77777777 77777 777 77777, obboouoouGo333 3b8bbb3oG33b o3o3oobBu8bb8S8GS68Gbbu 9999999999qg9999999qq 9 9 59999999999999 999999999999999 3000000000000000000000000000000000009000000000000030000. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiumiiiiii ' iiii ii ' - i illiih- : 2222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222 333333333333333333353333333333333333333333333333333333j33333- ;.44444A444444444444444444444444A4A4A444AA iA444ii444AAi ;A !44A444 j55555355535ib53355555355555555553555555 5535 55555555b555D55553D5. 566666666666666 6666666666666o6666GC60D66666666666606D666666666obbfc 77777777777777 7777777777 77777 77 7 7 7777777 3db888ou55L 9999999999? DOOOOOOOOOC 11111111111 222222222221 33333333333] 4444444444 ' ' ' 33353i3i3: 5666666u0e( 77777777777777777777777 r, -r: ■-.■ ' V r o O 1 - n I— I r-. n n o r 7777777777 " 99999999991 3000000000C 1111111111:1 7 7 T 1 T ■;■ o • 1) How many students worked at Sutton ' s during ttie school year of 1980-817 2) What was the total number of times that the yearbook staff attempted to take the Home Decorating picture? 3) How many times did Rex Stevens check the Tri-State Realty ad before he finally approved it? IjSIA mXjS am uo pe em peAOjdde sueAeis m (C iseiuji xis iseai le ua)|B) sbm ejnioid em (z -8,uo)|ns le pe)|JOM OAeq s|uepn|S e|o6uv Ct io |e|0| v (i- 333333333; i4444A 444441 5555J53553: ' | 566666666Gt!| 7777777777 r , " • C ■ - - ' -■ i " . ' ■ — ■ " ' ■ ' C ' O ' ' i ' C ' • " ' " ' - O — y " — C i ■ C ' ' - C ' ,■ r . 59999999 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 99999 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 999999909999 9 999999999999999999° 9 9999 )ooooobooooooooooooo66ooooonooooobnoo; ' 900- 6ono " ' •nooo ' " 9 llllllllll - — -- — — — - — - -- - ' - ■) ' j -J O o •■ ■-) •- _ z, (6 -: jC. x:„ ,£_ 3333333333 V444444444 55555535d5; S6666666C6666666 .- w ...w6666b .. v ' ..•v.•v. ...... w. . ' 66661 .«v - . . -. Tiiiimiinniiniiiiniimiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiuii 111 11 385o883 883 38o3 8S88bSSS6888S888GSS888888SSeB3S8SS8SS33S58SS )999999 9 99 9 99999999 99 9999 9999 9999 999999999999 99 99 9999 99 99 9 ' 1 9 " r- ■ J00OO00000O00O000OO000OOOOOOOO00000O0O0000O0O0OOOOO0O0CG099OC:0: ' . Lii 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 iiiiiiiiiiiiii: !22222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222? - 2222. 33333J. 555555555. 6 6 6 6 6 6 ■: ' 3 6 6 ?7777777 " 7 oooo- oooo: .1111111111 " 1 -T O 1 " ■■ 7 " 5555.55- 66 i — n ■ c: :; o c . 533333333333 33333333333333333 33333333 J j • J 3 J) J J . " -■1 , 3 3 • J5555 535 5 55. 5555555 5555555555 55 55 555555555 55555. .-J . -. -s . ' - ' I o • " " 2 ■ ' " 3 O " J J J 3 J j! 3 J .:) J J J 3 J 3 J 3 3 _ ' 55555- 55555- :Advertiamg 179 ' Weatherhead ' Div. of TD ' N Corp Brass Fittings Brass Valves Angola Division Angola, IN 30000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 angola sand gravel Have Bulldozer And Crane Will Travel THE WYATTS Jim-Dan-Don R.R. 2 Angola, IN 46703 Phone 665-2412 Or 665-9915 O o o o o o o o o o o o o o g g s o o o o o o o o TRI - STATE AIRPORT Scenic Rides Charters Repairs Cessna Sales Line Service O O o o o o o 180 Cakes • Cookies • Pies • Breads South West Public Sq. Angola, IN 665-3364 M . Fetzer ' s Bakery i SOUHD CELLnR IHC. o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 8 o 8 o ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc 11 Us Records • Tapes • LP Cutouts Smoking Accessories Open Mon.-Sat. 10-8 303 W. Maumee Angola, IN TM WT0M0B11E- AEROSPACE -AGRICUlTyRU 1MPLEME ' T WORKERS irrnw- " AMERICA (OAW Local Union 1406 ANGOLA, INDIANA 46703 ■-VCRKING PEOPLE, WORKING TOGETHER TO INSURE CUR FAMILIES A BETTER TOKCRROW. 181 ! TOWNE SHOPPE Terri Carpenter, One Of The Friendly Clerks At The TOWNE SHOPPE, Helps You To " Say Hello To Everything Beautiful! " X ' KSSXXSSXSSSlSSSiX Put The Male Room On Your Route! 182 SUTTOn ' S SUPER uniu For All Your Shopping Needs Open 8 A.M.-9 P.M. Daily 9 A.M.-6 P.M. Sunday i m , ' . ill Public Square Angola, IN 665-2166 643 N. Wayne Angola, IN I ST " OR 183 CAMILLE ' S £)SE39 U [ J d JJ UJ . L J 1 1 50 Public Square-Angola 665-2511 46 Public Square 665-6312 184 ANGOLA M s w»e OF AMERICA iLn-TU I ' THE WORLDS INNKEEPER Banquet Facilities For Up To 300 Available For Proms And Class Reunions XIOS.A.CK S T.V. A-NO 109 W. Gale Since 1915 First Federal Savings and Loan Assn. of Angola E. Maumee 665-2910 Insured For $100,000 Savings £. f a " ASSOCIAriO-. f LAKE JAMES COUNTRY CLUB. INC. Dinners Tues.-Sat. Luncheon Tues.-Sun. CONGRATULATIONS TO THE GLASS OF EIGHTY-ONE FROM TRI - STATE UNIVERSITY 185 °- i ss ' oejasTc s ' 305 N. Wayne St. Angola, Indiana 46703 665-2515 Df lRY QUEEN of ANGOLA) o %, N. Wayne St. Dairii Queen B B fl 8 8 ll ' 6- B B 8 B B B a B 8 B 8 B B a ' a - yB 8 8 8 8 8 -8 TB ' B - 5 - B - »T T n » B B 8 fVtm 8 8 8 8 8 B ' B ' B 8 8 " BBB 8 ' B 8 8 6 B B ' B ' BTrg T BTB T B 8 8 B ' B ' B ' B ' B 8 8 B ' B TTBTI First National Bank of Angola FDIC 186 i -. S £i Division Of Steuben County Sanitation Residential Commercial Service Available 665-7031 309 W. Stocker Angola i.9 B.g.a-8-9-B_fl-fl-9-fi-B.fl P.afl.9-9-fl-fl-IHLa-IL9-ILIUUULfl-tt.9,9 888980998 0_q QOQOUP 0000 0000000090899006996008898888 8- Bob Ellison Ford ° o o o o ca©o aaKjaoB e i;? ' We Bend Over Backwards For You ' A Subsidiary Of ARO CORPORATION Angola, Indiana (cfrcC 187 STROCK ' S MEN ' S WEAR }OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOi enys mnRKEil wayside FURNITURE Save the Gay Way Markets In Fremont Angola O O o o o o o § o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o g -«« l ' wSrono ArnSnXiQ (y " FURNITURE CARPET CENTER 1 Mile North On Old 27 665-3121 -Ji Ed And Ann Mahnesmith Owners Plants Floral Arrangements 303 S. Euclid 665-5061 O O O O O O o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 8 o 8 THE FAMILY AFFAIR w c o a •DC o, UttL ■ - ' c - « O (5 ■o -2 c , • 0) 0) CO = .£ « aoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo JACOB INSURANCE SERVICE 15 Public Square Angola, Indiana 665-3194 189 i HANSEL GRETEL CHILDREN ' S WEAR KCiH PHAftMACX 105 W. Maumee Next To Strock ' s North Wayne Plaza ' Your Rexall Pharmacy ' MCMOCMSStSKSeMSSOP aO£»OKXSOaOK«K«MK30««WS« 665-3149 Old 27 South Angola, IN 46703 Joe Tanner Manager FARM BUttAy rstrihwejE 4 t r«0EATtt 190 Villaae II Faith Stoy And Katy Sanborn Check Out The Distinctively Different Fashions For The Girl Who Knows The Difference At The VILLAGE II. Public Square Angola, IN 665-2917 John Williamson Owner (%3 S»I For Complete Hardware, Paint, Plumbing, Electrical, Building Supplies 665-2563 HAKDWARE Jenny ' s buttons FABRICS Classes-Hand Machine Quilting Applique, Smocking St. Rd. 127 N Angola 665-6077 cp( CRC]y[CBO cpOO 211 N. Wayne Street-Angola, IN 665-9605 imfel " Someday You ' ll Own A Yamaha " Sales Parts Service ' l lll M iiir 192 ANGOLA LUMBER CO. Lumber • Millwork • Roofing 665-3125 -r- i. US 20 West PO Box 28 Angola, IN 46703 liii c i LAKELAND ELECTRONIC SUPPLY Best Of Luck To The Class Of 1981 202 W. Pleasant St. Angola, IN The perfect gift for the less-than-perfect student. • Cartridge ribbon system • Quick, clean corrections • Work-saving features • Carbon film and Fabric ribbon • Extra-wide carriage • Double-walled carrying case ' Smith-Corona Cartridge Typewriters QUALITY TYPEWRITERS DISCOUNT PRICES! STEUBEN PRINTING COMPANY 1007 SOUTH WAYNE ANGOLA 193 OZZSF " BaaaB Bta b ' b ' b ' b ' b Baa b ' B ' ii b b b b a ' B 8 a a a o ' B ' B ' B ' S ' B ' CB B ' B ' BTfl ' e ' a o bbU ' o Kitchen Cabinets Vanities-Linoleum Wall Paper Countertops a a a a-B B " B ' B B a a ' B ' B ' B a a b BB ' B ' a-B ' a ' aTnrB ' a b b ' bb ' b ' b a a a a b a ' aTH ELASTOMER PRODUCTS DIV. 503 Weatherhead Street Angola, IN 46703 Major Supplier Of Truck Parts Offering Steady Employment Excellent Fringe Benefits Wages Higher Than The Area Average Good Working Conditions GOULD INC. 194 ANGOLA BOWL " THE " FAMILY BOWLING CENTER 665-9312 Family Fun • Billiard Tables Snack Bar • Complete Pro Shop Bowling Equipment • Instruction US 127 North Angola IN BOWUNm for Year ' Round Activity 3QQpg0QOOOO00Q( jflaQ0Q O B 00QQ0aQgfl88 fl9B9flB Qaatt I ♦ J if t I I i i ♦ i j i i i i ii i i j I i i I I ; j 1 1 f I ' ll he ' e OOOaOOOQQO OQOOQQ 00 0008 0000000000800008088889880 cX. 402 N. Wayne St. Angola, IN Ph. 665-3171 a J C a ifiJ 200 S. Wayne Angola, IN 195 For Best Impressions 300 S. Kinney Angola, IN 665-9577 oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo o o o Redwood Chalet For That Special Occasion Proms • Plays • Concerts Homecoming 665-3562 US 20 W. Angola, IN Fantastic Salad Bar " So Complete You Can ' t Imagine " Steaks • Seafood • Sandwiches Budget Menus Available Banquet Facilities Dancing • Entertainment Exotic Cocktails INOtANAt UOST OUJSTANUhtG " SMCMtCASBOftD " 7 DAYS A WEEK 196 o o o o o o o o o o o Public Square-Angola, IN Sizes infant To 14 Yrs. ' Maternity ANGOLA STATE BANK The Bank With The Chime Clock Member FDIC Main Office-On The Square Branch Office-700 N. Wayne Serving This Community Since 1927 O O o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 8 o CROXTON and ROE INSURANCE SERVICE 418 N. Wayne-Angola 665-9537 tooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocooooooooooooooc HOMCSITE CAAPCT SALES HOMESITE CliRPETifiLE: Wallpaper Hard Surface Floors 665-3410 Carpet • Wallpaper • Hard Surface Free Estimates 665-3410 Vjet 712 NORTH WATNE STREET x 6 OVYS A WEEK ANGOLA. INDIANA TM 197 ,j,j,j,j,j3«3S3CWS3SS«OS3S30»% V% i XWZOODV ' S Books And Office Supplies TRUE VALUE 90 0 N. Wayne Angola, IN $XSS5t3t«S3S«3SXX3£X3S«X3«X3tX3KXXX3SX3KX3S 5X ANTHOJ Y CATHOLIC CHURCH 198 Gift Sho p CANDIES, TURQUOISE SILliER JEWELRY, TOYS SOUUEIMIRS, POSTCARDS PERSONAL ITEMS AND MAGAZINES Snack Bar SANDWICHES, ICE CREAM AND COLD POP PAR 3 GOLF RENTAL CLUBS CARTS BALLS BAGS V AND ACCESSORIES .RENTALS - PRO SHOP Bledsoe Brothers S ports Clothin g Sho p BATHING SUITS, SHORTS, SOCKS, MOCCASINS, SANDLES, SHIRTS, TANK TOPS AND COl ER UPS M_ J PINBALL, POOL, BOWLING MrCaOG AND OTHER GAMES 18 HOLE MINI- GOLF a£X%X3»«X«KS«X3C««SW30K3«3CSSSK3S«3t« olddn IL C e a( fi iJ 665-5002 ShiJn % f iu I 5 I I f 1 f Mf 110 Wohlert St. Angola, IN 199 Carpenter ' s Towne House 2 Blocks West of the Mound 200 Carptnttft TOXYME HOUSE 901 North Wayne Street - Angola. Indiana Telenhone: 12191665 F2n Z E C O R .A.T ' Z XtO " G 113 E. Maumee Angola, IN 46703 " Sample Clothes at Sample Prices " Coast to Coast Stores 12 Big Dapartments Open 9-9 Monday-Saturday 9-6 On Sunday 201 TEEPLE STUDIO CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY 206 W. Maumee Angola, IN 46703 665-3312 214 S. Main St. Kendalle, IN 46755 219-347-2131 NORTHERN INDIANA FUEL AND LIGHT Clean And Dependable Gas 665-3196 Angola, IN 8 8 8 5 S t m BBB ' B ' B T fl 8 B 8 " fl l) ' B " a ' " 5 " i n) " 8 ' B 6 B B B ' B ' BTBTB ' B 8 " B 8 6 fl B fl BVB Tv(:. ° " mM ■■,j tr ■ 6 pfl a5 " g " " " 6 " a " 5 " a " fl " 5 8 6 a 8 fl " D " g " fl " a " 5 " 5 " o " 5 " a ' a g ' g ' CTa e b 5 p a os ' o ir an Wagner ' s Slaughterhouse CUSTOM SLAUGHTER AND PROCESSING R.R. 5 Box 1053 Angola, IN 46703 Phone: 219-665-2279 202 Sawlfea Saw Miil 1000000 0000000 o oooo opoooooooooQOQoooQo o oQQoooooQooaaooooooQOQoooaoQfl iflflaagaaaeB8CflBag8989Qfi TDon and kick ' s Tlowers " Flowers For All Occasions " Don Koomler-Dick Waters 114 E. Gilmore St. Angola, IN Phone: (219)-665-5505 .-Is • -ig a uLMj p vjtM ' ? ' -- 3«J S ai l i I I ♦1 1 ♦! | ♦I | ,♦ ♦ J ♦1 1 ♦1 J ♦J I ♦I ! l ithitt Iffl! o ftCDWOOD LANCS For Family Fun US Highway 20 West Angola, IN 665-6218 OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOG o o o o o o o o o o o o o 1 ' John stock Broker Rex Stevens Broker Lake • Farm • Commercial • Residential O O o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o , d s. o v c Contractors Engineers SERVICE " " WtRO !UJMB!NG SUPPLIES Angola o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o Book Center Best Seller Paperbacks Magazine Candy Tobacco SANBORN APPLIANCE 1102 N. Wayne 665-3361 o oo : oooooooooooooooooooooo x c oooooooooooooooooooc MOTEL FOOD an.a— ' Pincher IS Family RestMvmnts andfams Your moneys worth and more. Every tiine. LB m ( m m 205 KleiVs 1« Create Ulcc Und SHcll Oliue Sales Co. One SVep AuAb Cen tfr T?r odl Oil Cbwvfxvrt PflTRQMS Hand fc Biock f ocisc of SUsS_ ScWv fl«a »g and FUw t Town ' s PoAuts " if i Skie Insoira ce ry 4y ' s TV av i A!fp} •■ " ■■ ' ,? lt«Mi ce Pr. P Ok tlc SOVV BOaSTERS (I I Li. ' ' 206 CDJ-QPHah I Cover. Artwork by Stacy Bucknam and Rich SanGiacomo Paper Stock: Dull Finish 191 Copies Printed: 560 Trim Size: 8V2 by 11 Headlines: Zipatone, Normatype, Formatt Endsheets: Stainless 289 Print Style: Helvetica Bold Italic Opening Captions-10 pi. Body Copy-10 pt. Caption Copy-8 pt. Folio Tabs-8 pt. lndex-6 pt. Publisher: Jostens American Yearbook Co. 1312 Dickson Hwy. Clarksville, TN 37040 Representative: James Arthur Advisor: James Scott Special Thanks To: Steuben Printing Co. Corner House White ' s Drug Store Bill Wilcox Orville Moody Underclassmen Portraits: National School Studios PAGE CREDITS: Shelley Gibbeny: 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143 Amy Morin: 88. 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105 Stacy Bucknam: Cover, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 46, 47, 84, 85, 108, 109, 156, 157, 178, 179, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216 Anne Hull: 86, 87, 96, 97, 98, 99, 106, 107, 152, 153, 154, 155 Pat Zdawczyk: 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 22, 23, 36, 37, 44, 45 Janice Erwin: 10, 11, 12, 13, 24, 25, 32, 33, 34, 35, 42, 43 JeH Tanner: Photographer, 28, 29 Bruce DeLu cenay: Photographer, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 176, 177 Mark Russell: Photographer Faith Stoy: 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205 Elizabeth Headley: 20, 21, 24, 25, 30, 31, 38, 39, 40, 41 Guy Lamott: 62, 63, 64, 65, 70, 71, 76, 77, 78, 79, 82, 83 DeeDee Brown: 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175 Lisa Piatek: 50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 57, 60, 61, 68, 69, 72, 73 Debi Putman: 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123 Gordy Peppier: 48, 49, 54, 55, 58, 59, 66, 67, 74, 75, 80, 81 PHOTOGRAPHER INDEX- Jeff Bledsoe-7, 19, 69, 70, 71 Stacy Bucknam-6 Paul Dahl-32, 33, 43, 44, 45, 155, 169, 170 Bruce DeLucenay-2, 4, 17, 20, 28, 62, 80, 88, 90, 91, 92, 99, 100, 101, 103, 104, 105, 106, 118, 120, 121, 122, 124, 127, 128, 129, 133, 135, 139, 141, 152, 154, 155, 156, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 169, 174, 175, 178, 183, 194, 200, 209, 210 Dygert, Mindy-14, 15 Erwin, Janice-27, 34, 35 Grill, Steve-21 Mark King-12, 36, 135 Bruce Knox, Sr.-70, 71, 139 Mike Le»iak-16, 17, 21, 28. 32, 33, 35, 42, 43, 62, 74, 75, 82, 91, 98, 100, 101, 107, 129, 130, 131, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 154, 155, 163, 166, 178 Dave Martin-78 Marty Mu8e-140 Lisa Piatek-68 Mark Russell 18, 20, 21, 35, 59, 62, 65, 77, 90, 92, 93, 94, 107, 124, 125, 138, 142, 148, 162, 163, 170, 188, 189, 190, 208, 210 ■2, 3, 4, 6, 10, 11. 12. 13, 16, 46, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 78, 80. 83, 84, 86, 87, 88, 95, 96. 97, 101, 104, 105. 126, 128. 133. 134. 135. 136, 149, 151. 153, 154. 156. 160, 171. 172. 173. 175. 182, 184. 191, 196, 197. 199. 200. 204, Rich SanGiacomo-4, 18, 19. 20. 22. 28. 30, 31, 33, 34, 42, 46, 56, 59, 84, 86. 104. 148, 167, 171, 178, 213 James Scott-68, 69, 72, 73, 174, 211 Ron Short-15 Jetl Tanner-1, 2. 6, 10. 11. 13. 16. 17. 24, 26, 28, 35, 46, 48, 49. 50. 51, 54. 57. 61. 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78, 79. 83. 84. 86. 87. 88, 89, 92, 93, 97. 99. 102. 106. 107. 113. 114, 115, 117, 128. 130. 131. 132. 134. 152, 153, 156, 159, 160. 161. 164. 165. 166. 167, 169, 172, 177, 178. 180. 181. 183. 186. 187, 189, 190. 191, 192. 193. 194. 195, 196. 197, 201, 203, 204, 206. 208 James Wilcox-162 Colophon 207 Co-captain Mary Penick remains in her drill team attire while selling doughnuts for Mrs. Crimmins ' HOE class. THE LIFE YOU MAY BE YOVB om ). Gary Cook illustrates a wrestling hold for his boys ' physical education class while his partner attempts a knee to the stomach. On March 4, Amy Koomler and Lori Harter spread the word about the Student Council, NHS, and Y-Club sponsored bloodmobile. While singing in fourth period choir, Patrice Crimmins and Mary Zimmer giggle at a private joke. " Mad scientists " Mike Leckner and Gordy Peppier smile as they demonstrate the proper way to break a dessicator. 208 Stat8 Incredible stats Incredible 209 1 Senior Ellen Barnes shows near perfect form while attempting a stag handstand on the beam. The Marching Hornets compose a major portion of the pep block at an early fall football game. Smash! Diane Stock and Amy Koomler make an Eagle sandwich of Fremont ' s Risa Beams and Kelly Robinson. 210 -!,._ While trying to teach the special techniques of water skiing on Lake Gage, Ed Jolin awaits the boat ' s return after his fifth fall. He flies through the air with the greatest of ease . . Todd Saylor pole vaults to a victory for the boys ' track team. stats Incredible 211 Shelley Gibbeny-Underclassmen Amy Morin-Academics Stacy Bucknam-Editor, Theme Anne Hull-Faculty Pat Zdawczyk-Student Life Janice Erwin-Student Life Jeff Tanner-Photographer B ruce DeLucenay-Organizations rafl] KEV STAFF Mark Russell-Photographer Faith Stoy-Advertising Elizabeth Headley-Student Life Guy Lamott-Sports DeeDee Brown-Organizations Lisa Piatek-Sports Debi Putman-Seniors Gordy Peppier-Sports 212 Key Staff I We have completed part of our journey. The 1980-81 school year is over. It is history now and all that remains is what we hold as memories. The 1980-81 KEY staff has attempted to capture a few of those memories on the pages of this yearbook. Many things have happened to each of us during this year. We have faced new experiences and new challenges. We have met many people and made new friends. We have opened our minds to new ideas, though many times others refused to open theirs. At times we have challenged these ideas and have worked together to form new ones. We have all undergone a change and because of us, Angola High School has undergone an even greater change. I would like to reach out and express my appreciation to each person who helped make this book a reality, but there are too many and not enough space. But I will say thanks to Scotty for being a super advisor and a really good friend, and thanks and lots of luck to Pat. So sit back, read, and remember the memories of 1980-81, for it really was INCREDIBLEIII 6tojojj sBunJ riajn editor 213 raai CEMsus 214 lndex r Brown. Amy 124.164 r Fitton, Chris 1 L Brown. Beth 144.158 11 Fitton, Robert 1 ! f Brown. DeoDee 6.68.69.111.114.165,178. 1 1 Fleming. James 11.1 ' 1 1 183 1 1 Flora. Sean 1 ■ Brown. Tammy 111 LJ Flora. Shellie 64.65.1 Bryant. Darren 135 Foley. Phillip 78.145.1 Adomaltis, Tony 134.141 Bucknam, Stacy 33.111.114.165.170.213 Dahl. Paul 22,71 Follet. Ron 1 Alaura. Kelly 144.175 Broxton. John 144.150 Dailey, Polly 112 Forbes. Garry 1 Alexander. Jelt 124.176.177.180 Budd. Jell 78.79.144.149 Dailey. Rulh 1B3 Ford. Evan 145.159.1 Alexander. Todd 46.75. 78.81. 144. 14a Buehrer. Brett 93.125.132 Daier. Marta 82.94.112 Ford. Tony 92.93.113.1 Allen. Kim 68,110 Buehrer. Brian 144.151.162.163 Daier, Tracey 78 Foster. Jell 101.1 Alman, Tami 144 Bunctl. Chris 111 Damron. Pat 125 Fouls. Todd 33. 4.57.75,99.114.178.1 Ameling. Eric 54.59,79.134 Burd. Robert 66.67.125 Dangler. Pam 126 Fox. Alan 48,67,87.145.1 Anderson. Tina 34.134 Buriingame. Rose 190 Davis. Eric 145.174 Fraley. Greg 75.1.. Anslell. Bob 153 Burrell. Dan 58.59.111 Davis. Jim 136 Fraley. Jack 31.78.79.145.159.11 Anslell. Don 153 Burrell. Julie 135.159 Davis. Randy 126 Fraley. Pam i; Antrup. Hilda 100.101 Bush. Penny 134.135 Davis, Rich 14.103.135.136.156.161.162. Fraley. Scott 1 Araque. Teresa 52.82.144 Bush. Tammy 125 163.167.172.173 Fribley. John i; Arbuckle, Melody 110 Bussing. Don 125 Dayholl. Miles 35,54.112 Friend. Terry 1 Arnelt. Belly 144 Byerly. Joe 18.111.176 Delhi. Brice 190 Fritz. Gary ] Aronen. Paul 110 Deianey. Renee 126,161 Fritz. Mark V Arnell. Michael 98.124 V M DeLucenay. Bruce 28.112.162.163.165 Frye. Joni 127,159,- Atha. Fran 152 1 DeMara. Danny 112.183 Fuller, Danny 1- Aiha. Tom 12.42.63.110 I DeMara. Diane 34 Fuller, Wendy i: Ayers. Roger 110 1 - DeMara. Donny 112 Ayers. Sandy 110 ■ DeMara. Doran Denham. Dennis 145 71.126 1 T Carmack. John 14.22.31.90.125.158,161. I l Denham. Mike 126 ■ 1 172.190 Dent, Elaine 126 1 1 ■ Carnahan. Jerry 135 Detar. Laura 104.145.159 1 J 1 •Carpenter. Alice 200 Dirnm. Terry 54.112 Baig. Mirza 134 Carpenter, Glenn Carpenter, Jack Carpenter. Janet 200 125 135 Dixon. Cheryl Dixon. David Dixon, Mimi 145.160 103.136 126 Gatf, Craig Gaiewski, Susan 127.130.ie 68.82.12 Baird, Maria Baird, Melody 144 64.134 Carpenter. Roberta Carpenter. Russ 144 80.104.135 Dougherty. Tony Dowell. Diane 28 75.145.147 Gardner. Julie Gardner, Jeannie 12 14 Baker. Lisa 144 Carpenter. Tern 10.12.111.182 Dunlap, Ken 6 136 162 163 Garrison, Mary 13,13! Baker. Maureen 92 Carpenter. Tom 144.166.174 Dunnavan. Chad 46.66.67. 78.79.81. 145. 163 Garrison, Wanda 14 Baker. Jay Bai. Karen Bartell. Paul 12.18.110 100 144.166 Carper. Eben Carr. Shelley Carrigan. Mary 111 135.139.175 13.135.136 Durnell. Sheryl Dygert. Charles Dygerl. Mindy 145 88 52,68 Gawlik. Gwen Gebhart. Bob George. Bart 11 15 14 Barnes. Ellen 32.45,64,65.110.169.176.210 Carroll. Phil 71.135.199 George, Bret 14 Barney. Brad 124.162.163 Caruso. Lisa 6.34.84.111.170 German, Chad 62,63,73,77,80.137.14 Bassell, Carol 188 Cary. Sue 111.176 Gibbeny. Shelley 13 Bassett. Larry 188 Chapman. Jenny 75.125 Gibson. Mary 12 Bealtie. Janet 111 Chrysler. Debra 112.158.167 1 Gill, Cheryl 1 " Beavers, Ken 63.134 Church. Brent 144.162.163 1. Goings, Curtis Beck. Jerry 111 Clark. Amy 14,72.84,125.159,161,175.176 Goings, Kraig 34,75, 13T Beectiler. Tammy 134.144 Clark. Beth 61.72.144.160.163 Eaton. Suzie 136 Goings. Tara 13,14,137,158.155, Beer. Mark 97.124.130.166 Clark. Dia 175 Eberhart. Kurt 70.71.126 Gomez, Rhonda 137. Belcher. Brad 105.134.136 Clark. Marvin 18 Eberhardt. Laurie 30.113.169 Gorrell, Todd 145.162.il Bennett. MaryAnn 90 Clearwater. Jim 12.33 Eggieston. Denise 113.117.159.174 Grace. Rick 1 ' Benson. Imogene 190 Cleverly. Sheila 125.175 Eggleston. Jim 19 Green, Kristme Berger. Susan 144.159 Chiton. Libby 18 Egly. Dale 145 Green. Mark Best. Craig 12,43.54.63.74.111 Clouse. Kim 112.202 Egly. Kevin 87.126 Greenamyer, Jesse 15 Biernal. Scot 12.22.32.54.75.78.104.124. Ciouse, Todd 4.59.79.135 Eidenier. Michael 145.163 Greenslade, Tamm 13 164 Cole. Beth 135 Elliot. Lori 126,159 Gritfith. Barb 57.88,145.17 Biernat. Tina 6 Coleman. Julie 44,92,112 Elliot, Ron 34.74.75.136 Griffith. Debbie 12 Blair. Sean 48.83.87.134.174 Collom. Anne 125,159 Elston. Jim 6.126 Griffiths, Emma 15. Biakesley. Jim 4.134,192 Collom. Dean 135 Elston. Shelley 18.136 Griffiths, Joe 34.75.13 Bianchard. John 4.134.135 Coney. George 153 Embry, Randy 136 Grill. Steve 63.9 Bledsoe. Jell 13.16.134.137.176 Conrad. Kelly 112 Emerick. Anthony 136 Grimes, Tracey 23.31.146.159.171 Bledsoe. Kent 124 Conrad. Wendy 75,125,128 Emerick. Rickie 100,136 Groshon, Jerry is; Biodgett. Kathleen 64.144.163.175 Cook. Diana 105.159.172 Engle. Jell 136 Grossbeck, Ted i; Book. Angela 124.159.175 Cook. Gary 125.208 Erwin. Carlton 154 Grubb. Michelle 14( Book. Laura 144 Cook. Keith 88.144 Erwin. Janice 14.15.22.75.126.161.167 Gurtner. Oarrell 54.55,93.127. 16» Book. Troy 135 Cook, Ron %.102, 112. 163.164. 169.172. Erwin. Tim 126 Gulstem, Betsy 3.137.161.162.163.171 Boone Janet 164 174.176,195 Esseiburn, Linda 32.53.68.69.113.174 Boone.Jell 124 Cope, Teresa 134.136.175 Eysler, Randy 126.166 1 Boone. Tim 59,135 Counterman, Chris 87 J Booth. Dick 186 Covell, Darryl 199 1 " Bowman. Mary 144.145 Craighead, Diann 6.19.68.112.113.169 r " 1 Bowman, Niki 111 Cram, Sieve 154 1 ■ Boxeii. Dedra 53.75.124 Cram, Lisa 53.82.91.92.112.174 r Boxeii. Jill 19,52.53.111 Cranston, Tom 78.144 1 Hackelt.Tony 48.62.63.127 Boyer. Donnle 21.78,81.144.147 Creecy. Steve 112 ■ Hagor. Sherry 52.125.146.175.19C Boyer. Sue 88 Crimmlns. Patrice 31.35.52.61.136.161. Hager. Shirley 13,13i Breese. Kathy 124 163.175.176.208 Fenton. Frank 58.59.137 Haines. Kathy 52.136.135 Bristle. Lynnelle 16.135 Crimmlns. Rita 92.208 Ferrier. Connie 126 Hall. Dana 11i Brock. Kim 124.166 Cripe. Dan 14.23.31.102.112.162.163.169. Ferner, Dawn 137.175 Hall. Tim 5S Brock. Tim 11 1.166 172,174 Fiandt. John 99 Hammel. John 8! Culbertson. Scott 78.145 Fiedler. Janine 61.72.126,163 Hammond. Melody 45.114.16; Curtis, John 161,164 Filer. Tony 80.137 Hampshire. Darlena 9 Colli ' . Steve 136 Flllpow. Jell 113.166 Cuilis Troy 125 Finn. Greg 126,156.162.163.169.189 C;eck Denise 125 Haneline, Greg 81 Johnson, Jesse 147,150,162,176 Lepiey, Scoti 1)9 Haniz, Rick 20,146 Johnson, Julie 62,82,128,159,175 Lesiak. Mrke 4.54 79, 139 140 Haniz, Kevin 78.146 Johnson, Larry 127,128 Lesire Kelly 129 Hantz, Mindy 127.163.175 Johnson, Rick 115 Libey, Tobey 153 14£ Hantz. Scott 95.127.166 Johnson, Tracey 52,61,72,73,145,147 Light, jeH Harris. Kalhy 153 John ' .tfjri Carrie 128,159,175 Lin, Karen 52.56.82.139.159,161 Harris. Robert 127 John Chiis 50,51 ,71,106,128,133,163 Lindsay. John 6 64.80,135,136,139 Harris. Shelly 146 Jotin, Edward 115,210 Link, Dofsey 58,139 Harter. Brian 137 Jones, Beverly 138 Linsberg. Ann 10.12,32.56.57.64.65.116. Haner. Don 54.99 Jones, Judy 153 161,169 186 Haner, Lon 2,44.84.113.114.176.208 Loomis, Bobby 139 19 ) Harter. Margeurite 154 ■ i f Lovebefy, Mark 12 Harter. Steve 87.137,158 Lowarance, Dall. as 116 HartsutI, Bill 67.78.81.146 Ul ■ Lowe. Ramona 153 Hastretier. Steve 117 H I Hauck, Linda 34.145.146.163.171 1 1 Hawks, Roger 20.51,70,71.146 ■ 1 V B Hawks. Veronica 51.68.146.149.167,175 1 VI Hayden. Lon 115 Kaczmarek, Frank 138 1 1 Haynes. Mary 195 Kankamp, Frank 138 1 1 Headiey, Elizabeth 13.134.137. 161. 162. 163 Henderson, Rod 127 Henderson. Teresa 146.171 ienney, Dorothy 183 lerman. Dana 83,127 Hickman, Richard 189 Hilar. Mike 20.46.78.81,146,159 Hipskind. Manha 12.6l.68.69.l44. 146. 163. 173 Hipskind. Sarah Hipskind. Steve Hirons. Amy Hobbs, Susan Hochstedler. Dan Hocker. Wendy Hodge. LeeAnn Holiday, Carol Holiday, Many Holiday, Roger Holman. Jett Hoitzman. Seth Hornbrook. Julie Hornbrook. Todd Horr, Jim Honon, Allen Horton. Leona Hossler. JeM Howell. Kay Hoyer, Gregg Hoyer, Kan utnagle. Shern ' II. Anne .illinger, Kevin uilinger, Mike .Juiiinger. Shern Huq. Mahtuz uq. Max jss. Shan Hutchins, Bob Hutchins, Gary Hyska, Chad 13,60,68,137,163 5,18,62,63,98,127 72.137,159,161 152 63,80 103,146,158 53,82,127.161 1 3 78,79,147 115 137.138 147.150,159 127 115,166,193 127 147 127 46,75,81,89,136 115 58,59,75,127,131 6,115 52.53,60,72.73,115 124,128,165,169,176,188 138 54,55,115 147.158,161 48,83.147,174 48,89.115 13.61,138.143 191 12.51,63,67.86.128.191 138 Ibrahim, Khaieei 115 Ice, Jay 51.128 Ireland. Ruth 128 Ireland, Susan 103, 136, 138,156, 161, 162, 163,175 Isenhoft, Kelli 4,12,16,18,57,128 J Jack, Dennis Jenkins, Cheryl Jenkins, Craig Jensen, Lisa Jinnings, Allen Johnson. Doreen 138.166 128 78.81.147 104.147,175 46,71,78,147 147 Kennedy, Shawn Kessler, Jeff KensiM, Kelh Kiesei, Andy Kimes, Tern King, Mark King, Rita Karst,Celia 56,72,138 Keller, Missy 128 Kelley, Bob 138 Kelley, Steve 18.34,48,49,62,63,74,75,91, 127,128 136 128,130 13,105,138 138 6,53,115,186 20,46,48,81,147,159,172,176 128 Kinney, Marilyn 138 Kirkman. Ann 30,31,102,128,130,160,161 162,163,174 KiebeJeli 116,189 Klee, David 54,138 Klink, Becky 13.138 Klink,Jefl 129,156 Klink, Julie 145,147 Klink. Mark 116 Knauer, Debbie 101 Knauer, Roger 75 Knoiek, Georgia 52,82,129.159,162,163 Knotek, Jacqueline 147162,163 Knon. Bruce 18,35,54,70,71,80,136,138,139 Kohli.Fred 138 166 Kohh.Paul 166 Kohli, Mane 148,166 Kolczynski, Rex 176 Koomler, Amy 2,42,52,53,60,72,116,169 176,203,208,210 Konieczki, Tony 69,95 Krebs, Harry 94 Krohn, Kurt 148 Kruger. Pam 102,129,160,161,162,163,174 Kuhn, Colleen 33,64,129,133,161,162 163 176 Kundenreich. Tom 42, 70, 7 1,89,1 16 159,169 Kyle, Laura 12 Kyle, Mary 43,58,69,129,161 164 171 I Lahnum, Stacy Lambert, Kim Lambert, Lisa 82,104,129,159,163, LaMoti, Debbie 12,13,56,57,68, LaMotl,Guy 50,51,71.125,129,159, Landis,Jack 35,80,137 Landis, Penny Landon, Kelly Lautzenhiser, Bobbt 64, Leckner, Mike 48 Lee, Brenda Lee, Cindy Lee, Frank Lee, Kim Lee, Kirk Lehman, Ken J Lehman, Kenn Lehman, Loren Lehman, Scott Leiand, Pat 33,129 138 164,167 138,175 165,178 139,140 116 68,129 106,132 129,209 116 199 129,158 129 91,116 116 139 148 129 28, 32 Mahnesmith Monica Mansfield, Marty Ma ' Ien, Cecil Manen, Doyle Marten, Richard Marlen, Tammy Martin, David 3 Martin Don Martin Kenneth Martin, Ruth Martin, Steve Martin Todd Masseau Scott Matson DeeDee Mattox Dean Mattox, Doug Mayer David McCarthy Colleen McDougle Mary McHenry Denise McKee Brenda McKee JoEllen McKeever Howard McKeever Olive McKinley Judy McKinley Robyn McLain Chester McLauchhn, Jill McLauchlin, Jodi McNaughton, Doug McNaughton Tim McKntght, D J Means Joe Means Robert Meek Raeann Meyer, Jessie Meyers Bob Miller, Phil Miller Robert Miller, Troy Millhouse, Dale Miiihouse, Wike Mills, Rick Mills, Roger Miranda, Lydia Mitchell, Ed Mocherman, Jerry Mocherman, Margee Mocherman, Terry Mock, Kevin Moody, Nancy Moody, Orviiie Moonen, Ken Moonen, Wendy Moor, Alan Moor, Bonnie Moore, Brad Moore, Kelvin Morales, Amador Morgan, Bob Monn, Amy Morin, Perry Morton, Jay Morton, Lisa Mortorff, Ruth Mortorff. Wayne 18,56,75 139,189 139,142 129 148.158 129 148 1 32 136,139 161,163 116 139 116,156,163,166.199 95.129.163 116 88,116 180 19,45,116 78 79,148 54 79 12 33,56,97 126,129 140 161 162,163 64 129 132, 167 129 2,1957 148 176 154 686 169 153 13.140 100,140 145 148,175 102.117,169.170.174 129.161.162.163 140 32 93 130 166 117 166 104 148 17,130,159 192 103.163 161 101.130 130 130.166 78.79.148,151 166 140 71 140 71.78.79.148 117 148 78.166 117 198 94 105.117 140,175 117 152 186 101.117 140 130 30.130.161 117 148.166 130 117.121 50.51.71.148 Mo-,«r Art., Mcwar, ijrdf Mudrack M tii ia Murph Brenoa Musilf Marty Musser. Kim Mij s ) ' Mike Mu ' er Rotrfrrt M eri, Chr.s Myers. Marilyn Nagei Wend Nagier, Don Nelson. Gordy Nesom. Carroll Nesier. Brad Nesler. Deiois Nevois. Mike Nichols. Renee Niison. Cliff Nodine, Malt Noil. Brad Noll Brett Noll Kim Noll, Kirk OB, erne Pal Ohis, Laura Olinske, Scott Olinske, Sharon Olivers, Suzie Onofrietti, Jon Onofrietti Ken Onofrielli, Rick ONeai Derek ONeal Erin Ordway. Candy Ordway, Chris Orewiler. Charity Orewiler Crysta Orewiler. Dean On Lon Osmon. Kevin Owens. Rose 1- ■UlM ' i Ktn 17i 140 57 1 S ' 40 lie 24 130 104 h a lie -68 i-e 5479 130 96 148 12.68 130 159 71 45 125 150 113 153 148.174 140 118 130 1 3 10 49 130 1334 140.171 78.145.149.175 154 140.162.163 54.59.140.176 107 158.175 118 13.15.23.140.159.173 130.159.175 118 140.142.159 92 118.161 172.173.174 ' 40 118.161 130 P Parker. Jon Parker Kelly Parker Tom Parks. Debbie Parks. Jim Parks. Jodi Parks. Roger Parnin. Sieve Parnin, Teresa Parrish. Randy Patte ' son. Marcia Patte ' son, Marge Patterson. Mark Peel. Deb Penick. John Penick. Mary Penix. Karia Penrod. Deb Penrod.Todd Pentico. Angela Pentico. Carolyn Peppier. Gordy Peppier. Jeff Peppier. Paige 154 •18 ' 4C 42.60. 6e.69. " 5,--S 149 13.140.163,171 1S3 21.149 92.118 130 118.161 152 3.54.55.70.71.130 149.151.163 130 15.92.118.208 104.140.159 13.22.140 149 130 154 12.54.75.118.209 67.149 119.194 Index ns 216 lndex Snyder, " jeff 78,150 1 ■ Peppier, Steve 54,79,80,95,140 I " H Smith, Tina Smith, Vern III 132,161 33,75,121 f Perry. Holly 119.176,182 1 ni Sniadecki,Clem 92 Petre, Dusty 131 1 1 1 Snyder, Dave 90 Van, John 151 Phillips. Rick 78,81,149 1 LJ Snyder, Duane 150 Van, Linda 116 Piatek, Dave 54.78.79.140 Snyder, Harold 153 VanAuken, Scott 123,166 Piatek, Lisa 12.72,131,165 Sanborn, Lori 56 Snyder. Lois 153 VanDyne, Rob 142,161,163 Pinkham. David 6.67,90.131,160.161.162, Sanborn, Katy 12,120.178.191 Snyder. Scott 12,132 VanDyne, Shawnee 132 163,167 Sanborn, Tom 78 Someriott. Andy 54,81,149,150,166 Vanette, Terry 190 Piatt. Jeff 119 Sanders, Dan 18,34.45.54.71.89.120 Someriott. Judy 121,175 VanWagner, Becky 60,61.68.123,174.186 Piatt. Linda 194 Sanders, Greg 120 Sonner. Jeff 150 VanWagner, Margo 132 Piatt. Sharon 197 Sanders, Paul 120,166 Sova, Trish 121,162,163,180 Varner,Val 132,161,162,163,172,174 Plock. Ed 90,131 SanGlacomo, Rich 48.66.67,147,149,159, Sprague. Jodi 52,61,150,199 Vaughn, Lori 67,176 Poor. Scott 51,63.80.100 174 Sprague. Jon 12,46,51,81,150 Verburg, Cindy 142 Porter. Kamie 149.163 SanGiacomo. Terl 18,33,45,84,120,161, Springer. Julie 25,56,64,132,133,175 Vieriing, Aaron 151 Powell. Patty 141 169,170 Springer. Rod 21,46,81,151 Vieriing, Allan 151 Presley, Lesley 65.91.141 Sank. Eric 50,51,80,141 Stackhouse. Angle 151 Voges, Don 132,133 Presley, Pam 199 Sattison, Kevin 45,120 Stackhouse. Mitzl 84,103 Voges, Rich 123 Pressier. Teresa 13,141,171 Sawvei. Eisa 105,131 Stackhouse. Pam 121,161 Vorndran, Laura 82,133,159,161,162,163, Price, RotMrt 141,162,163 Sawvel. Shart 120 Stackhouse. Rita 190 175 Puckett, Carolyn 119 Saylor. Marie 141 Stakely. Dan 99,122 i ■ ■ Puckett, Marilyn 119 Sayior, Mary 131 Stakely. Diane 142,159,175 1 1 1 Puthoff. Randy 149 Sayior, Sarah 120,123,193 Staup. Brian 78,151 1 1 1 Puthoff. Rick 90,131 Sayior, Todd 54,59,71,141,163,211 Steele. Barb 132 1 1 J Putman. Debl 31,128,131.165,174.191 Sayior, Tom 54,71,107 Steele. Ed 50,51,70,71,80,138,142 V V Schall, Patty 28,129,131,162,163 Steele, Roberta 151 » r r " 1 Schannen, Lisa 118,120 Stetler, Regina 13,142,162,163 Wagner, Michelle 33,82,133,159 L 1 Schannen, Steve 149 Stetler, Steve 142 Waite, Amy 61,147,151,163,175 ■ 1 Schieber, Carmen 13,100,141 Steury, Enos 166 Vi aite, Debbie 13,142 ■a J Schieber, Jim 120 Stevens, Rex 95 Waite, Greg 33,54,79,133 ■bd ■ Schieber, Mike 81,149 Stevenson, John 132,162,163 Walker, Casey 123 Quinn, Joe 141 Schieber, Todd Schmidt, Lynn 164 30,31,131,161,164,171 Stewart, Charity Stillabower. Julie 13,142,171 142 Walker, James Walker, Leon 143 93,166 ri 1 Schneider, Dawn 141,163 Stock, Diane 53,61,125,132,175,210 Wall, Peggy 133 1 1 Schock, Carol 152 Stoudinger, Mary 13,52,142,16 0,176 Walter, Julie 133,175 b- L Schock, Paul 153 Stoy, Chris 142 Walter, Ted 138,143 ■ ' 1 Schroeder, Tom 120 Stoy, Dawn 151 Walters, Tom 10,49,123,161.162.163.169 I 1 Scott, Christine 19 Stoy, Faith 12,122,165,191 Weible. Brian 59,143 Scott, Dave 32 Stoy, Joyce 132 Welcht, Doug 143 Rahman, Masuma 52,53,68.119,174 Scott, Jim 19,46,84,91,165,176 Straw, Lisa 191 Weicht. John 48,143 Randol, Darren 146,149,166 Selman,Tom 54,55,57,62,63,71,120,127, Straw, Mitch 188 Welcht. Larry 48 Rathbuh, Deanna 131,159,175 176 Strawser, Todd 151 Welland. Becky 143 Ratllft, Darai 131 Sevits, Lori 131 Strong, Dan 100,122,166 Weiss. Erich 67,143,162,163 Reade, Rosle 152 Sharp, Jennie 150,159 Strong, Doug 142 Welions. William 78,151 Reed, Bryan 141 Sharp, Lisa 61,121 Stultz,Jan 151 Wells. Todd 151 Relchenbach, Bradley 19 Sharrow, Curt 141,180 Sturtz, Alien 142 Wells. Tom 10.51,62,63,70,71,77,133 Reld, Lorl 149 Shawver, Marianne 121 Sullivan, Laurie 87,122 Wengerd, Jim 133 Reynolds. Gretchen 12,16,56,68,141,175 Sheahan, Jane 132 Sumney, Lisa 13,52,61,142,175 Wenzel, Mike 64,67,78 Richardson. Joe 75,131 Shearer, Dave 149,150,163 Surfus, Denny 93,132 Wenzel, Wendy 35,52,61,143,175 Richardson. Mark 141 Sheets, Howard 150 Swift, Debra 13,142,175 Wheeler, Linda 190 Richardson. Todd 119 Sheets, Tom 141 Swift, Jim 153 Whitcomb, Susan 133,161,171,172,174,175 Richter. Matt 141 Sherburne, Chad 78,104,150 Swinluch, James 95,142 Whittaker, Chris 143 Ridenour. Michelle 13,68,141,142 Sherer, Lynn 54,58,59,79,132 Szeman, Karen 101,122 Wicker, Doug 151 Ridenour. Teresa 119 Sherer, Tracey 142 Wickizer, Matt 143 Ringier. Chuck 149 Sherman, Mary 142,161 r Wieiand, Becky 161 RIngier. Mike 54,119,192 Shiley, Lily 132 1 Wiiber, Kim 143 Ringier. Scott 78,79,131 Shipe,Rick 54,71,79,94,138,142 I Wiiber, Sonya 143 Ritenour. John 131 Shirley, Michele 18,121,170,189 I Wilcox, Brad 54,79,143 Ritenour. Su e 141 Short, Jennie 142 ■ Wlllig, Laura 46,56,57,133,175 Roark, Jim 131 Short, Ronald 31,102,121,161,162,163 Wilsey, Robin 82,143,167,174 Roberts, Vonda 30.88,147,149,175 Shoup, Caria 121 Tadsen, Dave 122,192 Wise, Cindy 82,123,162,163,169 Robinson, Doyle 106,107 Shumaker, Cindy 184 Tanner, Jeff 15,122,162,163,165,174 Wolfe, Janean 133.166 Robinson, Nell 102 Shumaker. Roljert 59,121 Tanner, Joe 190 Wood, Ray 143 Roddy. Keith 12,17,54.119 Sleboid, Nancy 103,161 Taylor, Debi 151,162,163 Woody, Linda 101 Roddy, Roger 34.54,55.62,63,74,75,80, Silberg, Greg 11,54,55,75,80,142 Taylor. Dennis 151 Woosiey, Jeff 143 141,178 Simmons, Richard 12,54,55,71,132,174 Taylor. Lisa 13,142,171,174 Worman, Greg 10.12 Rodesiier, Chris 74,75,80,141 Simon, Richard 54 Thails. Abe 96 Wray, Kevin 71.122,123 Roe, Phillip 62,63,141,159 Simons, Eric 48,70,71,81,150,162,163 Thails. Suzanne 122,161 Wray, RIna 194 Roland, Bob 141 Simons, Jamie 6,18,44,53,121,162,163, Thomas. Kenneth 91,122,159 Wren, Jenny 82,102,143,158 Romero, Mike 131 169,174 Thomas. Paul 122 Wright, Tony 72,82,90,145,174 Rose, Ron 186 Simons. Julie 154 Thompson. Terry 152 Wyatt, Bonnie 133,175 Rowe, Dana 149 Sirk.Tim 5,10,51,62,63,132 Tiarra. Connie 159 ■ ■ ■i V Rowland, Bob 166 Skaug, ingi 30,103,132,158,159,161 Tierney, Alyssa 89 1 1 1 Rowland, Jim 66,67,119 Slack, Mike 48,80,107,132,169,174 Tokarz, Don 4,93 J Rozell, Kris 13,141,159 Slauson, Mike 48,132 Trennepohl, Beth 104 w - Ruckei,Kelie 56,57,148,149,175 Smith, Carol 154 Tubbs, LuAnn 132 1 £3 Ruckel, Laura 119 Smith, Cecil 164 Tubergan, Kim 189 143,170 Russell, Mark 25,31,141,178 Smith, Dan 132 Tubergan, Ray 189 Yarger, Lori Russell, Todd 131,174 Smith, Diane 21,150,162.163 Yarger, Monte 48,83,133 Ryan, Joan 184 Smith, Jacquelyn 150,176 ■ Yoder, Sandra IOC Hyan, Martin 119 Smith, James 150 1 Young, Oarrol 91,123,19e Ryan, Michelle 131,162,163,171 Smith, Jim 67,78 I Younger, Christine 151,171 Smith, Jeff 84,92,121 ■ Zaidel, Father Bernard iw Smith, Joe 142 Ji Zdawczyk, Pat 72,133,15E Smith, Keith 150 ZImmer, Lena 12,57,88,148.151,17; Smith, Louis 150 Ulch, Debbie 123 Zimmer, Mary 18,104, 143,161, 162, 163,2M Smith, Marie 150 Ummei, David 89,123 Zurveld,Gertlne 91.133.15( Smith, Richard 120,121,180 Ummel, Diane 6,123,159 132 Zuber, Pat 10.12.43.45.11 7. 12J; Smith, Shannon 142 Unger, Janelie I a i I i i i i I S I 1 ■, 1 RECHARGE FdR KEY 1982 % i.


Suggestions in the Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) collection:

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

1969

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Page 1

1970

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1971 Edition, Page 1

1971

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1973 Edition, Page 1

1973

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1974 Edition, Page 1

1974

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1975 Edition, Page 1

1975

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.