Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN)

 - Class of 1923

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 108 of the 1923 volume:

 r TO HAMILTON H. KEEP Faithlul Teacher, Wise Counselor, True Friend this volume is respectlulhj dedicated ITHE KEY W i Annual Issue Published by the Senior Class • of A ngola High School I 5 1--------------------------------f SOPHOMORE NOTES. JUNIOR NOT • - had the Ian; ■•lent having jh A the I f . I , |- M V' Y A u- « (• |,‘J.V r— 1 . m rtV , x ,r r ' Thot to T -V «L '1 • ,it Ilf M ’ - 'V.z? e G= $ c Flint H. S. I. II. Chorus IV; Key Staff IV; Mikado. Iona brings Vergil to light with alarming speed. She too carries home a near-ideal report card. Hi-C. M.; Orchestra I. II, III, IV; Chorus I, II, III, IV; Mikado. Step right up, gentlemen, here we have that pleasing combination, a pretty girl who is a Domestic Science star. Hi-Y III, IV; Track II; Orchestra I, II Historical Club III; Chorus IV; Minstrels IV; Mikado. “Spud” is a “good fellow well met’ on all occasions; knows a good joke every time and is a shining light among the Hi-Yers. II. Ill, IV. Whose hair is always perfectly arranged and who has a smile for every one. The art classes and the girls’ basket ball team will miss her. (2 Stroh H. S. I. II. Ill; Girls’ Chorus IV; Chorus IV; Mikado. We wish Bertha had come to us for more than just her senior year. Inasmuch as she didn’t we have tried to make the most of this year and she has surely done her part in fitting in and promoting school spirit. Orchestra II. Speaking of giggles? Here is a fresh supply—real ones too. She has even been known to do it in the Assembly, and whisper too. Scarcely believable.f (.iris’ chorus I, II, III, IV. When Ruth is happiest she dons a frown and declares she is “mad!” Why try to fool us that way? Orchestra I, II. Ill; Key Staff II, III. IV; Class secretary II, III. IV; Junior Dramtics; Editor Annual Staff IV. A decided success as “Ye Editor.” Has a magic touch with a violin, probably due to his hair cut. Chorus I, II, III, IV; Key Staff IV; Annual Staff; Mikado. Eleanor, our Salutatorian, has an unbroken record for good work. She is going to be a Latin teacher—now what do you think of that! Art Editor of the Key III. Arlene’s ability along lines of Art has always been of great honor and benefit to the class. Success to you as you continue your work, Arlene. Fremont H. S. I, II; Chorus III. IV. Helen commenced work rather late but nevertheless has carried her work admirably, especially in the Commercial Department. Girls’ Chorus I, II, III, IV; Key Staff IV. Ruth comes from Arkansaw and has all the southerner’s reputed charm of manner. “Key” copy, class work and Public Speaking have all profited by her willingness to help.Orchestra I, II, III, IV. History Club II. Mikado. Junior Dramatics Pres. Hi-Y. Minstrels. After four years as class sheik Bill demands and rightly deserves a rest. Still that’s doubtful especially as long as Garrett stays on the map. His ‘‘Crox-ton” grin and good humor never fail. Orchestra I. II, HI. IV; Chorus I. II. HI. IV; Mikado; Class Valedictorian. Valedictorian of the class and one of our best and most earnest students. Ruth has always been ready to help the school and her class in whatever manner she could. T HiC. M.; Chorus I, II, III, IV; Junior Dramatics; Minstrels; Mikado. Short hair, a higgle, a sweet disposition and a knack for piano playing. a rX-4 Hi-C. M. Chorus III, IV; Mikado. Who said school spirit? Someone page Lurene. She doesn’t play Basket Ball but knows how to boost those who do. Orchestra I. II. HI, IV; Chorus I, II. Ill; Hi-C. M.; Junior Dramatics. Key Staff I. II, III, IV; String Trio I, II. III. IV; Jazz Orchestra III, IV; Annual Staff IV History Club III. “Pat” our bright and shining light along literary and musical lines; characterized by bobbed hair, a black fiddle case and a d:sjointed walk. Orchestra I. II. Ill, IV; Track III, IV; Basket Ball III, IV. Base Ball III, IV; President A. A. IV; Junior Dramatics; Minstrels. Here’s the senior with the ‘‘Arrow collar face.” and debonair manner. He has been known to drive a car as slow as thirty miles per hour—once or twice.Z-X e 5 Hi-C. M.; Historical Club III Chorus I, II, III, IV; Junior Dramatics; Mikado. Modesty rather than inability along this line keeps Mildred from speaking for herself. . o. 0b Uti Orchestra I, II, III, IV; Baseball I. II,; Track II; Director or grade orchestra IV. A decided success as director of the grade orchestra. A good student, better cornet player, and all-around good fellow. Historical Club, III; Hi-C. M. Ill, IV; Orchestra I, II; Chorus I, II. IV; Basket Ball II III, IV; Mikado. Boys beware of those dimples—they are a trifle misleading. She guards her B. B. opponent and Naurie with equal skill. Scott Center I. II. III. Hi-Y. IV. Minstrels. Mikado. Although really above most of us by a foot or more he doesn’t feel that way at ail we know. He didn’t come to A. H. S. ’till this year but has done good track w'ork and equally well in other lines. Girls’ Chorus I. II. A deathly aversion to bobbed hair is Audra’s main hobby. She has gone through four years, but only as part time student the last two years. Stroh H. S. I, II, III; Girls’ Chorus IV; High School Chorus IV; Mikado. Pauline comes from Stroh at the beginning of her senior year. She has made a host of friends and is one of the best students in our class.25 e g: 3 3 Vi. Orchestra I. II. Ill, IV; Hi-Y III. To the class of '23 belongs the school’s radio authority and most expert electrcian—Marion. He's also a real trombonist. Chorus II, III, IV. And as for a domestic minded girl— such as you hear there is everything else but -well, here’s your chance gentlemen and a true one too. Flint H. S. I, II. Basket Ball III, IV; Base Ball III, IV; Hi-Y. Just why he’s so willing to sit on the freshmen side of the Assembly Room we can’t imagine. Hard to think it’s because he’s such an obedient lad in following the teachers’ requests. Chorus II III, IV; Hi-C. M.; Orchestra II. Ill, IV. Junior Dramatics. Be seated, all of you. This is literal when Dorothy starts to debate the KKK or most any question goes down before her wicked tongue. Class Treasurer II; Vice president III; Secretary and Treasurer IV; Hi-C. M.; Historical Club III. Junior Dramatics; Orchestra I, II, III, IV; Chorus I. II. IIII, IV; String Trio; Jazz Orchestra; Key Staff III, IV; Annual Staff IV. Babs holds the record for good humor and good sense. We of the class swell with pride every time we hear her play cello. Junior Dramatics; ‘Historical Club III; Minstrels IV; Track. The most dependable of fellows, particularly in shop work and as general utility man; the under-classmen will find it hard to take his place.t e Chorus I, II. IV. History Club III. Tri-State again shares, in the A. H. S. girls’ interest. However Helen ranks high in our Commercial course. She is one of the few who started with tne class twelve years ago. Class President IA, IIB: Hi-Y, Sec. Treas. Ill, IV; Track III, IV; Sec. A. A IV; Minstrel; Mikado. As a mathematician Lyle can’t be beaten—trigonometry is his specialty. Although not a charter member of outclass he has helped us remarkably. Hi-C.M.; Orchestra I. II. Ill; Chorus I, II; Key Staff III. IV; Annual Staff IV. Polly claims the distinction of being a god s'udent and has an enviable record of grades. She’s strong for bobbed hair and sports. Orchestra I. II III; Chorus I. II. Ill, IV; Girls’ Quartet III. IV; Basket Ball I. II. Ill, IV; Hi-C. M.; Mikado. The Basket Ball team’s best player and the high school’s best contralto. No one will ever forget Margaret’s wonderful voice. President Ag. Club II; Track III, IV; Hi-Y. Ill IV; Mikado. Bink is one of our Ag. fellows and with a surprising record along that line too. A food representative in track and is interested in all school life. Tn ATI Orchestra I. II, III: String Trio; Chorus I, II. Ill; Hi-C. M. Page the violin, boy! We’ll always remember Mary for her ariistic playing and for her work in Domestic Science— a rare combination. VA ir.nf r y H -Y.; Orchestra I. II, III, IV; Chorus IV; Key Staff IV; Annual StafT IV; Jazz Orchestra; Mikado. A rare article—a logician. He has always been willing to share his keen insight and views on general matters to the class. History Club; H. S. Chorus. Mary is apt to leave us sadly neglected and give Flint the preference, but we know she is really strong for her school. Else why those marvelous grades? Basket Ball II, III, Capt. IV; Chorus II, III. IV; Hi-C. M. History Club III; Mikado. We direct all future “would be Bes-ket Ball Stars” to Martha as their model. Without doubt her hair won most of our battles and her dodge the remainder of them. Pleasant Lake H. S. I, II; Basket Ball III, IV; Mikado; Base Ball III, IV; Minstrel; Ag. Club III, IV. Gene’s ever ready good humor and basket ball speed has won him numbers of admirers this year. He is another of the Ag. division. Beulah’s poor health and not unwill-ngness has kept her from taking part in the school activiities. She has helped keep our honor roll in good standing in spite of drawbacks. Junior Dramatics; Jazz Orchestra; Orchestra III, IV; Minstrels; Mikado. Perhaps our memory is a trifle faulty but we can’t recall two successive days of good standing to Jack’s credit. Popular vote proclaims him the best of sports though. e G= 'v-v-i ayy y President I, II, III, IV; Basket Ball I. II, III IV; Base Ball I. II, III. IV; Key Staff I, II. Ill, IV; Vice president Athletic Association II; Historical Club II. III. Junior Dramatics; Hi-Y III, IV. Track III, IV; Minstrels IV; Annual Staff IV; Mikado. Sorta hard to know just what to put in about Shrimp. There’s scarcely room for the personal eulogy he handed in. You’re the reigning favorite anyway. we’ll all admit. Orchestra I. II; Chorus I. II, III. One of our representatives in society life with a particular craving for tall men and the dance. Never was known to lack pep. Basket Ball II. Ill, Capt. IV. Base ball I. II. III. Track III. IV. Hi-Y III, IV. Key Staff I. History Club III. Minstrels. Mikado. Eddy’s list of H. S. activities speaks for itself. He’s our athelete, bold and reputed lion with the sophomores. l C t L+SV Girls’ Chorus II. Ill, IV. She of the vanity case and the curling iron, with a peculiar fondness for throwing erasers in Room G. Chorus I, II. Sec. History Club III, IV. Her ever doubtful desire to study has not affected her all-around popularity a bit. Hi-C. M. Ill, IV. S’more giggles! Quite a relief from these worldly wise examples who breeze through these halls of learning. Giggle on, Wilma. Hi-Y; Jazz Orchestra; Track II, III; Orchestra I. II. Ill; Orchestra I. II. Ill, IV; Chorus IV; Minstrels; Mikado. C’mon let’s all grin! Here’s to another senior who has done his bit for the mid-year freshmen welcome. It seems he has succeeded beautifully too. Brilliant hair and a savage eye in a school inarm usually make the victims toe the mark! Treat ’em rough, Josephine. Basket Ball II, III, IV. Orchestra I, II; Chorus I. II. Ill, IV. Hi-C. M., HI. IV History Club III. Mikado. Teresa has a punch for playing jazz and basket ball with equal ease. Though she was of the senior B class we are glad she is going out with us. Orchestra I. II. IV. South Whitley H. S. Ill; Chorus I. II. IV; History Club II; Basket Ball IV; Key Staff I, IV; Class treasurer I; Annual Staff IV. Sadie lays claim to the distinction of being one of the wittiest girls in H. S. She’s known by her laugh and her air of comradeship.Class History Otic morning' in September, 1911, when we were mischievous six-year-olds instead of dignified seniors, we were awakened unusually early and then dressed with most painstaking care as if for some event of great importance. Then we were taken to the schoolhouse for that was the place which we were destined to know for the first time that morning. We were greeted at the door by our new teacher. Miss Ricketts. At first we were simple and bashful but we soon became wiser and lost all trace of timidity. Having been accustomed to nothing but play we felt that there were many hardships and restrictions but in a short time we adapted ourselves to the new situation and decided that we liked school life. We went on through the next six grades of hard work mingled with good times under the instruction of Miss Keep. Miss Reynolds, Miss Kunkle, Miss Luton, Miss 1 Iranian and Miss Kint. During this time many new students joined us. among them being Mary Taylor. Pauline Taylor, Ralph Lampman, Allenc Lowther. Robert Ramsay, Howard and Beulah Flaishans. Our last grade teacher was Mrs. Utter. During this year the class dramatized and successfully presented “A Man Without A Country.’ When the end of the vear came and we were presented with our diplomas, we realized that one chapter of our school life was closed but we were eager to begin the next or hi Mi school. In September. 1910, our class of fifty-eight began the high school course which we had looked forward to with such eagerness. Early in the year a class meeting was called to organize the class. After choosing our class motto, flower, and color, and after electing the officers, we adjourned feeling that we had raised our class to a most important position. The officers chosen were: Ralph Lampman, president: James Williamson, vice-president: Sarah Barron, secretary and treasurer. Among the large number of new members entering the class were: Marv Benfer. Audra Faulk, Ruth Barber. Lucile Fry. Pauline Clark. Ruth Alvison, Maisie Bair. Josephine Sutton, Hcr-schel Sutton, Cleveland Collins and Marian Graham. At the beginning of the second semester, sixteen mid-year freshmen who had finished the eight grades in seven and one-half years, joined us. It was immediately shown that our class was talented in different lines by the large number who entered the orchestra, chorus and athletics. Our first representatives on the Boys’ Basket Ball team were Ralph Lampman and Cleveland Collins and later ones were Wendell German, Oscar Pence, Lawrence Wolfe and Et gene Yockev. A large percent of the orchstra and chorus and the entire String Trio were from our class. Time flies very swiftly when filled with fun and work, so soon vacation time rolled around and our freshman year was finished. After a seemingly short vacation, we assembled again to begin our duties as sophomores. This year we elected: Ralph Lampman, president; Byrona Allison, vice-president: James Shearer, secretary; and Barbara Cline, treasurer. During this year Dorothy Burns and Mary Williamson entered the class. This year a Girl’s Basket Ball team was organized in which our class was represented by Margaret Fast. Pauline Taylor, Adeline Hughes, Teresa Beil, Wava McKenzie. Lucy Graf and Martha Wood. Further evidence of the talent in our class was shown by the fact that two members of the Girls’ Quartet, which won first place this year and next were from our class. Our representatives w-ere Ruth Williamson and Margaret Fast.We began our junior year by electing Ralph Lampman, president; Barbara Cline, vice-president: Janies Shearer, secretary, and Lucy Graf, treasurer. This year seven new members, Iona Iddings, Helen Sliutts, Jeanette Hendry, Wendell German, Eugene Yockey, Elizabeth Delano and Harold VanHusan joined our class and two. Eva and Louise Dirrim, left us. About the last of Yarch the class officers began looking for a play which would be suitable to be given as our junior production. Finally they decided on "Betty’s Last Bet." A tryout w'as held and the different roles were assigned to the students w ho were able to play them most naturally. After much practicing the play was presented to a very large crowd on the evening of Vay 5th. It was given in a way which was a credit to the cast and to our class. In a few weeks we began to plan for the Junior-Senior reception. At last after the invitations were sent, decorating done, amusement and program planned and the refreshments arranged, the banquet w'as held on the evening of Vay the seventeenth in the parlors of the Christian church. Although outside the weather was damp and rainy, all was gay and jolly inside and everybody had a wonderful time. After the final examinations and the Commencement Exercises at which the members of our class were ushers, were over, our junior record was closed. Following a pleasant and busy summer vacation, our class assembled once more. During the summer one of our members, Elizabeth Delano, decided to substitute married life for school life. Three new members, Pauline Frederick and Bertha Perkins, from Stroll, and Preston Moody entered our class. We elected as class officers: Ralph Lampman. president: James Williamson. vice-president, and Barbara Cline, secretary and treasurer. Soon we held a class meeting to discuss the matter of class rings and pins. After choosing the design, the pins and rings were ordered and they arrived about the middle of December. When the mid-year examinations were over, we began to plan for the Commencement Issue of the ‘‘Key,” determined to begin early so that we should have plenty of time to prepare an especially good number. In February we began working on the opera “The Mikado” which was to be given as a Senior production with the assistance of choruses from the sophomore and junior classes. After a great deal of hard work on the part of Mr. Braman, the cast, and the choruses, it wras presented on Friday and Saturday evenings. March 23rd and 24th, in the Community Buildinig which w'as packed with spectators both evenings. The opera was very highly complimented and was said to have been the greatest success in the line of dramatics or music ever produced by Angola High School. After the excitement following the staging of the “Mikado” had subsided. we began planning the different matters connected with our graduation. Although graduation will close the chapter of the grade and high school history of our class, still each member as he goes forth to meet the problems of life, and we hope each one will become distinguished in whatever path of life he follows, will help to form the future history of our class. Among the original members of our class who are graduating are: William Croxton, James Shearer. Lawrence Wolfe. Sarah Barron, Barbara Cline, Byrona Allison. Yoland Miller. Rolene Rowley, Eleanor Robertson, Helen McNeal, Mildred Thomas, Ruth Williamson, Martha Wood. Ruth Wert, Areline Fast, James Williamson. Emmet Spade and Adeline Hughes. —Ruth Alvison, ’23Last Will and Testament We. the members of the Senior Class, residents of Steuben County, Indiana, and, being of sound and disposing minds and memories, do make, publish and declare this to be our last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills by us made: We. the Seniors, do leave our most sincere respect to Mr. Allman for the patience and the tact with which he handles the delicate situations which sometimes arise in the management of the school. To Mr. Estrich we give our apologies for the trouble which we have caused him and wish him to know that we appreciate his many efforts to make our school life pleasant as well as profitable. We, the Seniors, do leave the services of Robert Ramsay—alias I. B. Candid—to next year's Key Staff. I. Jack Mayfield, do leave my reputation of being "hard-boiled’’ to Vernon Sniff. I. Josephine Sutton, do will to Carina Haley my ear puffs and my laugh. I. Audra Faulk, do hand down my rosy complexion to LuRayne Ober-holtzer, warning her that said rose-color is entirely natural and to be acquired only by a mad dash to a 12:15 class. I, Lawrence Wolfe, do bequeath my "man-of-the-world” air to Horace Fifer. I, Iona Iddings, do give my ability as a Latin student to Helen Schin-beckler, providing she agrees never to get better grades than I have. I, Helen Shutts, do will to Ketha Powers my hearty voice and blustering manner. I, William Croxton. do bequeath my reputation as a “sheik-passonatc” to Daniel Bessie, provided said recipient of said reputation uses said inheritance often enough so that it will lose none of the fascination and notoriety which I have given it. We, Pauline Frederick and Bertha Perkins, do give our sympathy to any stranger entering the senior class next year. I, Wilma Harmon, do hand down my power of making speeches that are right to the point to Marion Dick. I, Clark Bowles, do will my little black string tie to Tubby Douglass. I. Ruth Wert, do leave to Marjorie Ryder my curly hair and my pink face powder. I. Lurene Klink, bequeath my grey coat to Lois Golden, providing she wear it with an artistic air. We, James Williamson and Wendell German, do leave our magnetic power over the freshman girls to Fred Starr and Collins Burns. I, Teresa Beil, do bequeath to Edytha Shank my love for certain of the college students. I, Helen McNeal, do hand down my green sweater to Sarah Elizabeth Ramsay on condition that she wear it as calmly as I have. I, Cleveland Collins, do leave my good will and best wishes to next year’s captain of the team. I, Dorothy Long, do bequeath my dramatic ability to Hope Johnson. I, Adeline Hughes, do resign my position as governess to a certain underclassman in favor of Maple Ogden. I, Howard Flaishans, do give to Ketha Powers my strickly paternal affection.I, Lyle Clark, do leave my record as a student to Wilbur Markham, so that there will be one studious boy at least in A. H. S. I, Allene Lowther, do will my “flapper” coiffure to Willoene Spangle. 1, Beulah Flaishans, do bequeath my long silences to Rachel Collins, hoping that they will come in time to relieve her associates. I, Emmett Spade, do leave my collection of classical periodicals known as "Whizz-Bangs” and "Hot Dogs” to "Tuffy” Tiffany, knowing he will enjoy the same. I, Dorothy Burns, do bequeath my “Shanky” to Gertrude Taylor, providing she can get him. I, Mildred Thomas, do give to Robert Reek my generous flow of language. I, Ralph Lampman, do will my carefully tended curls and waves to whoever will assume the responsibility of watering and pruning said locks. I, Pauline Clark, do give my formula for keeping my hair clean without washing it to Lucile Covell. I, Yolande Miller, do bequeath my daily slenderizing exercises to Lucy Graf (said exercises consisting in a constant dodging to avoid talking to boys.) 1, Eleanor Robertson, do will my ability as a flirt to Virginia Whitman. I, Eugene Yockey, do bequeath to Austin Brokaw my grin and sweet disposition. I, Ruth Alvison, do give my sweet smile to Sammy Finch on condition that he look at me occasionally and return same with interest. I, Arlene Fast, do will my talent and my art work to Frank Willis providing said heir use aforementioned talent to benefit the Key. I, Margaret Fast, do bequeath my reputation as a baseball star to Opal Kreischer. I, Fred Morley, do will my famous twelve buckle galoshes to Don Collins on condition that he wear them as steadily as I have. I, Jeanette Hendry, do turn over my giggle and my “innocence abroad” expression to Nettie Dolph with no provision knowing she can use them without instruction. I, Marion Graham, do bequeath to Bybe Pence my bored and languid air. I, Ruth Williamson, do will my place in the quartet to Thelma Butz. We, Byrona Allison and Rolene Rowley, do bequeath our “eversharp” tempers to whosoever may lie unfortunate enough to need them. I. Preston Moody, do hand over my height to any personable young man who for any reason may wish to become tall. (Get on the job girls! Who is it that wants a tall man? I, Mary Taylor, do will to Helen Holderness my pious and angelic disposition. I. Mary Benfer, do with regret leave my affection for Flint to Joyce Alvison. I, James Shearer, do bequeath certain letters from my Porto Rican girl (said letters being written in Spanish) to James Austin, providing he is able to interpret various crosses found in said letters. I, Ruth Barber, do will my good grades to Sidney Williams, hoping the same will arrive in time to be of some service. I, Martha Wood, do bequeath to Lee Keister my tendency to go without a hat (to keep my head cool). I, Pauline Taylor, do will my modish air to Leona Fifer with the restriction that she may not giggle while using said air.D a I, Sarah Barron, do bequeath to Gladys Meyer my slender and graceful figure. I. Barbara Cline, do leave my position as associate business manager to any individual who is foolish enough to take it. I, Maisie Bair, do will my "baby-doll” stare to anyone of the sophomore girls who can wear it as effectively as I have. Witness our hands and seals this tenth day of April, 1923, at the city of Angola, Indiana. The foregoing instrument, signed, sealed, and acknowledged by said members of the Senior Class, as and for their last will and testament, in our presence, who. at their request, in their presence, and the presence of each other, have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto this tenth day of April. 1923. BYRONA ALLISON, ROLENE ROWLEY.WIRELESS TO ST PETER Right Hand Gatepost, Heaven’s Portals June i, 1933 Dear Peter, In accordance with your wishes, I have looked up the class of ’23 from Angola High. I find they are doing very well. None of them are ready yet for your attention or advice and they are all health}' enough to stay on Earth for years longer. Here are a few of the notes which I have jotted down about them: Doc Wolfe. He graduated from his Dental college with honors and is now specializing in filling work. His office is the “Goodrich Filling Station’’ on the Pleasant Lake road. Marion Graham is happy in his ideal job. He is with the El Ropo Cigar Co. and his office hours are from twelve to one wit ban hour for lunch and an assistant. Pauline Taylor and Jack Mayfield are not prosperous, but quite happy, apparently. I saw them frying bacon and eggs over a gas jet in a boarding house. They are making expenses by playing one nlight stands in “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” Maisie F air and Howard Flaishans make, sell and demonstrate the excellent product—“Xever-crack Face Enamel.” They, also, seem very happy and have made a fortune. I find Beulah Flaishans on the feature staff of the Chicago Tribune. Her column is “Advice to the Lovelorn” and it is read all over the states. Some of her steady readers and questioners are: Emmet Spade, Ruth Alvi-son, Eugene Yockey and Helen McNeal. I saw Lyle Clark loafing around a stage door in Detroit. Some one said he was waiting for Eleanor Robertson. A burly policeman walked up and ordered him away. As I watched, I was astounded to see them look twice at each other and then shake hands frantically. I came closer and found that the policeman was Eddie Collins. I never should have known him, had it not been for his laugh. Ruth Barber is now the editor of “College Humor.” On her staff are two of her old classmates—Mary Benfer and Dorothy Burns. They are striving to give the public better work. I was unable to locate Ruth Wert. Pauline Fredrick, Audra Faulk or Iona Iddings. However. I have heard rumors concerning them which hint at fashion shows and models. Lurene Klink runs a boarding house, and she has become so prosperous that she no longer works at all, save in the mornings. Then she flips the pancakes, because none of her assistants can perform this delicate duty with the true artistic touch. Allene Lowther and Arlene Fast are tennis champions, this year. Clark Bowles and Wendell German are caddying for golf players and Yolande Miller holds the world’s record for checkers. Evidently ’23 still has her athletic spirit. Bertha Perkins is a farmer’s wife. She raises Baldwin apples, and every year she is visited by Mr. Braman who advises her concerning them.Helen Shutts and Mildred Thomas own a huge farm. Their property is peppered with signs, saying “No Trespassing. Especially Men” or, “Keep Off. Especially Men.” Rolene Rowley is travelling on the chautauqua circuit. People say she attracts great crowds by her ballyhoeing. Mary Taylor and Wilma Ilarmon are travelling all over the country, playing violin duets. Byrona Allison is still pursuing Sarah and Barbara for the write-ups which they gave her. She carries a razor and a hatpin and she shouts “Vengeance” every twenty-five feet, as she runs. Of course you've heard of James Williamson and Pauline Clark. Their romance is known all over the world, and their spectacular marriage in the freight is still being discussed. And now, Dorothy Long and Margaret Fast are in court, suing Knight Whitman for breach of promise. It is said that he intends to patch is up, however, and marry Teresa Beil. I was pained to find William Croxton slipping nickels out of the change belt into his own pocket, as he walked up and down the street car of which he is conductor. He is contented, however, and specializes in keeping the car on the track. As I rode a way in the street car, I saw Jeanette Hendry and Preston Moody, in a huge electric. They sailed by and kept their eyes and noses turned upward. Ruth Williamson was in the kitchen of a little bungalow when I saw her. She was rolling out pies with a huge rolling pin, and although she wore the same sweet smile, there were several dents in the rolling pin. Shrimp Lampman sat huddled by the stove, whittling, and whistling “Tit Willow.” As I passed by Sing-Sing I saw a face behind the bars which looked vaguely familiar. Upon examination, I found it was James Shearer. Since they had shaved his head, is was nearly impossible to recognize him. No one could tell me exactly why he was there, for he had been in so long that they had almost entirely forgotten the cause. Martha Wood, Adeline Hughes, Josephine Sutton and Fred Morley I find, are traveling with a small road show. They have a peculiar work— each night they save the company’s light bills by sitting in the front and posing as foot lights—red foot lights. You have heard, of course, that Barbara Cline and Sarah Barron have added fame to the class of ’23. Barbara annexed the world’s heavyweight boxing championship by knocking Jack Dempsey for a row of tombstones in the twenty-seventh round, last month, and Sarah, not to be out done, took the heavy weight wrestling title by throwing Joe Stetcher for two straight falls, at St. Louis. I believe that this covers the entire class, my dear Peter. If at any future date, I can be of service to you, I beg you to let me know. It will be most easy for me to keep track of the class, for I am well acquainted with every one of them. Yours MEPHISTOPHELES. Northwest Coal heap. Sulphur Settlement.SALUTATORY "The Apprenticeship of Life” On behalf of the class of 1923 1 wish to welcome you, parents, teachers and friends, to this occasion which crowns our twelve years of effort in the Angola Public Schools. Xo one can better appreciate the efforts and sacrifices which have made it possible for 11s to be here tonight than this group of people. It is with a deep sense of gratitude that the members of the class of ’23 accept those efforts which have brought them through the first step in what might be termed their apprenticeship of life. Apprenticeship has been defined as the state in which a person is gaining instruction under a master. Years age more than at the present time is was customary for a person desiring to learn a trade to apprentice himself to one of that occupation and, by working for him, learn the profession. What could apply better to an education. Is not education the apprenticeship in which one prepares himself for the business of life? The true order of learniiijg should be first what is necessary; second, what is useful ; and third, what is ornamental. Not so many years ago college or even high school education was not thought so necessary, but that is no longer the case. The times have changed and the world has no time to wait for the self-made man. The first question asked to-day, in seeking a professional position is, “Have you a college degree?” I even heard of a young man applying for a position recently who was asked first, "Did you take an active part in athletics?” The man asking the question knew that if the young man had taken part in college athletics he was a good student for in colleges and universities, more than in high schools, creditable grades are necessary for membership on athletic teams. It has been truthfully said that education is the defense of nations. The ideas of anarchy and revolution are best instilled in ignorant minds. People without education often have no respect for law and order, except, perhaps, through fear. They are incapable of governing themselves for their minds are not trained for activity and leadership. The prime necessity of higher education is preparation for life; the second, and of course important, is the qualification for earning a living. For most professions a college training is a positive essential, but even if one were to do the most menial task an education would make him much more proficient and would enable him to lead a much happier life, for the wider his knowledge the greater his appreciation of the better things of life. The text-book information is not nearly so important as the training of the mind received from the study. It will be only a comparatively short time until much of the information received will have been forgotten. How much will a person remember of higher mathematics, who has not looked in a text-book for ten years? But, on the other hand, will not the training in initiative and leadership remain always? When one attends an institution of higher learning he is made to realize his relation to the world and through ideas and Straining is better equipped for citizenship. He is fitted for leadership and so can better serve his country. In college one gets a certain culture from the constant association with people who care for the higher things of life, that is more difficult to acquire elsewhere.e 3 3 Another excellent reason for attending college is the independence a young person receives by being thrown upon his own resources. When he is among his friends he will depend upon them for many things; but if he goes where he knows no one he has to depend upon himself and it is the best thing that can possibly happen to him. A college education, you may contend, is so expensive that many cannot afford it. It is expensive but many young people earn either a part or the whole of the funds themselves, so it is not out of reach. However, it is not best for one to attempt to earn all his expenses while he is in school for in so doing he must necessarily neglect his studies and the social advantages, and are not these the things he is paying hard earned money to obtain? Nevertheless, no one must get the idea that he should not put much time on study. Study is what one goes to college for but the social side is important. No one can be educated by merely loafing arojind a school. It requires a great deal of earnest, diligent work to obtain an education. Neither is education something that can be inherited; it must be obtained by each person for himself. One may inherit the ability and desire for it but the education itself cannot be handed down. Tonight we are completing the first part of our apprenticeship of life. It is to be hoped that many of us will go on through some institution of higher learning to complete this apprenticeship, and thus prepare more fully for citizenship and service. 4 VALEDICTORY “Our Aims” Every young person should and must have some definite and noble aims and ideals in order for him to fill a really worthwhile place in the world and to leave behind him the memory of a life which had some influence on the progress of humanity. How many times you have seen people struggling aimlessly through life with no hopes of attaining any goal and with no ideals to inspire them to do better things each day, simply because they have never placed any for themselves. There is no better time for establishing our ideals and determining our goals for life than during our youth since then our habits are formed and the molds of our lives are begun. Then, if ever, our opportunities are more golden and the possibilities for life more numerous. Our goals should be high, very high. so that our best abilities will be developed in attempting to reach them. Rut when we once reach our aims, we should not stop, content with our attainment but place them higher. It is only by thinking about great and beautiful things that we have a desire for them and only by desiring them do we seek and eventually achieve them. A healthy body and a clean mind should probably be our first aim. Almost any other goal which we may set for ourselves will be unattainable in its fullest sense unless we strive to keep our bodies in as nearly a perfect condition as possible and our minds free from harmful and destructive thoughts and impressions. Education also plays an important part among the goals of life. We must seek to gain as thorough an education for ourselves as is reasonably possible so that we may be well prepared not merely to be successful in our profession or occupation for a few short years, but to be the best possible citizens and to contribute something imperishable to the betterment of mankind. Our aims should be: First, to gain a rich supply of knowledge re- garding the things that have happened and are going on about us every day so that we may really be at borne in the world. Second, we must endeavor to reach as great a height as possible in our particular vocation. Last, and most important, we must keep our minds open and alert for knowledge from every source. The practice of keeping our minds closed and prejudiced against everything new. is one of the most serious misfortunes that can befall us. The world would indeed be a very miserable and tiresome place in which to live if each one of us did not receive some new thoughts from others each day or originate something new ourselves. But the minds which are capable of producing ideas of a type which will contribute to the advancement of the world are wide-awake, keen, and observing, eagerly drinking in every atom of knowledge for future use. In every one of us should be the desire to be thought well of by all with whom we come in contact. Few people realize that the sincere commendation or the unfavorable criticism of their employers or teachers may either open or close for them, the doors to greater opportunities. What more important thing, then, can we begin during our days of youth and education than the foundation of an enviable reputation? Another goal which we should place for ourselves is self-confidence. For who can accomplish great deeds or reach difficult goals unless he first not only thinks but is determined that he is able to do well, the task which he has set for himself? If we but recognize the opportunity and realize ourstrength, then, who can place the limits which we are able to reach? Neither on the other hand should we he over confident for over confidence is oftentimes the seed of downfall. Closely related to this goal is perseverance. No one can accomplish anything without perseverance. In our education and preparation for life we must he very persistent in our efforts. We must first choose our life's work, then determine to secure the training for it in some way. Although conditions may be unfavorable and misfortunes many, still we shall surely find a way if we but remain steadfast in our purpose and keep earnestly trying. But when the door of higher education which in many cases is necessary to prepare us for our life’s work is opened to us, the battle will not yet be won but only commenced. For difficulty and hard work will confront us and they cannot be successfully met unless our courage is as firm as a rock and our perseverance as strong as steel. Among our aims perhaps there are none more noble than service which presents unlimited opportunities, and for which we shall surely be rewarded in many ways. But in order to serve others we must make many sacrifices and we shall probably find that worthwhile life is made up of more sacrifices than we now realize. But only those who are unselfish and thoughtful are willing to sacrifice for others therefore, in order to live a perfect life of service, we must possess a characteristic which is considered to be one of the most beautiful that anyone can have and which the world so needs today, namely, unselfishness. If we ever expect to be helpful, we must begin now even if our attempts at service seem small and unimportant to us. If we keep putting off that which we should begin today until tomorrow, that tomorrow may never dawn. To be most successful in everything we do. we must aim always to be happy and keep our thoughts on the bright side of the cloud. First of all in order to keep our minds and hearts full of happiness and love, we must be living our lives for the great Creator, secure in His promises of Eternal Life. Then we must ever seek to think more about the pleasures and desires of others than of ourselves. Finally, we must become interested in some worthy cause. The person with the self-centered mind is the one who magnifies hardships, grievances, and slights while the person whose mind is intent upon some project outside itself is the one who is most able to meet trouble with a smile, a truth which is well expressed in the quotation: “After all the man who is really worthwhile is the one who can smile when everything goes dead wrong.” Let us aim to develop some individuality and to seek the many untried experiences so that we may get away from the practice of imitating and exactly copying in every way the deeds which have been achieved before our time. Although our parents have accomplished great deeds, let us aim to accomplish even greater ones, for how can the world make any progress unless its youth take this attitude? Last of all let us aim to form many valuable, lasting friendships for which our college days will offer many opportunities. Friends are absolutely necessary and it is impossible for us to live entirely to ourselves since each one is dependent on other in many ways. Indeed, it is for kind friends and parents who have given ever)- help and opportunity and made possible someone’s graduation that this graduating class and every other one is most thankful. —Ruth Alvison, ’23fJunior Class President—Tla Lytle Vice President—Anna Marie Yotter Secretary-Treasurer—James Finch Class Roll Harold Brooks Naurice Owens Nettie Dolph Max Buck Oscar Pence Lucile Fry Joseph Carpenter Robert Reek Lucy Graf Merrill Cline Harold Sellers Helen Hendry Floyd DeLancey Ray Stiefel Estella Howe Edgar Field Herschel Sutton Ilylda Hurley James Finch Chester Tuttle I la Lytle Nyhl Harman Harold VanHusan Wava McKenzie Gerald Hubbell Sterling VanHusan Gladys Meek Charles Janes Winifred Avery Maple Ogden Lee Keister Rhea Barber Ketha Powers Ralph Newnam Florence Carr Marvell Sutton Kenneth Newnam Choral Cravens Anna Marie YottersonnonooESophomore Class President—Florence Dilts Vice President—Hope Miller Secretary—Arlene Craun Treasurer—John Williamson Janies Austin Class Roll Andrew Ramsay Willa Dick John Beebe Harley Rathbun Wilma Dick Daniel Bessie Lawton Shank Florence Dilts Austen Brokaw Harold Shuman Leona Fifer Mark Brooks Vernon Sniff Jeanette Green Carlton Chase Wayne Sutton Esther Jenkins George Clark Kenneth Tiffany Violet Jewell Horace Fifer John Williamson Dorothy Mayes Harold Fisher Sidney Williams Gladys Meyer Allen Green Frank Willis Mildred Morrison Russell Handy Joyce Alvison Hope Miller Ralph Janes Gladys Beaver LuRayne Oberholtzer Lewis Jarrard Arnona Bodie Wanda Ogden .Milton Leininger Rachel Bradner Mildred Parrott Powers Luse Thelma Butz Marjorie Ryder Wilbur Markham Lucile Covell Sarah E. Ramsay F'loyd Martin Hortense Cramer Willoene Spangle Marshall Miller Arlene Craun Marie Snyder Byron Pence Martha DeLancey 3 Freshman Class President—Mildred McXett Vice President—Hugh Sanders Secretary-Treasurer—Alice Rozell Harvey Allion Glen Beatty Cecil Bickell Collins Burns John Brokaw Robert Bryan Don Collins Marion Dick Joseph Douglass Herschell Fast Maurice Grimes Russell Hanselman Kenneth Hemry Carroll Ickes Ramsay Jackson Maynard Kint Vinson Klink Farl Lampman George McConnell Russell Miller Hugh Sanders Frederick Schieber Roy Sellinger Class Roll Fred Starr Clyde VanAuken Henry Waller Eduard Willis Herschel Wise Fern Adams Zora Berlien Vivian Caywood Eva Cline Rachel Collins Frances Cook I la Cool Lorene Diehl Florence Dirrim Pauline Fisher Carina Haley Winifred Harshman Lueil Hendry Helen Holdcrness Evelyn Jeweli Hope Johnson Esther Ickes Mable Kiles Opal Kreischer Iola Landis Mary Alice Leininger Yolande Lowther Leona Mallory Cornelia Masten Mary McNcal Mildred McXett Valera Ransburg-Arlene Rathbun Alice Rozell Helen Schinbeckler Edytha Shank Xina Smurr Evelyn Snowberger Ruth Somerlott Hulda Sutton Gertrude Taylor Hazel VanWye Helen Wagoner Virginia Whitman Dorothy Wilcox7 2—I Girl’s Chorus. First Soprano— F'ern Adams Joyce Alvison Ruth Alvison Sarali Barron Teresa Beil Dorothy Burns Thelma Butz Vivian Caywood Hortcnse Cramer I la Cool Willa Dick Carina Haley Adeline Hughes Evelyn Jewell Yolande Lowther Ila Lvtle Wava McKenzie Helen McXeal Dorothy Mayes Gladys Meek Gladys Meyer Bertha Perkins Kctlia Powers Valera Ransburg Helen Schinbeckler Evelyn Snowberger Hazel VanWye Ruth Williamson Byrona Allison, half Second SQprano— Winifred Avery Ruth Barber Rachel Bradner Arnona Bodie Rachel Collins Francis Cook Martha DeLancey Wilma Dick Leona Fifer Pauline Frederick Iona Iddings Ltirene Klink Dorothy Long Hope Miller Mary McNeal Mildred Me Nett LuRayne Oberholtze Maple Ogden Elizabeth Ramsay Arlene Rathbun Nina Smtirr Marie Snyder Anna Marie Yotter First Alto— Zora Berlien Pauline Clark Eva Cline Arlene Churn Pauline Fisher Jeanette Green Helen Holderness Esther Ickes Cornelia Masten Edytha Shank Helen Shutts Marjorie Ryder Dorothy Wilcox Second Alto— Maisie Bair Florence Dirrim Arlene Fast Margaret Fast Hylda Hurley Fstella Howe Esther Jenkins Mabel Kiles Allene Lowther Eleanor Robertson Willoene Spangle Ruth Somerlott Ruth Wert Martha Wood Accompanists: year Anna Marie Yotter, half yearFirst Violins— Ruth Alvison Byrona Allison Sarah Barron Willa Dick Luella Hendry Kenneth Tiffany Ruth Williamson Second Violins— Earl Lampman Robert Lowther Gladys Meek Royal Reek Marie Snyder Viola— Jeanette Green Orchestra Cellos— Barbara Cline Hortense Cramer Basses— Dorothy Burns Helen Hendry Flute— Charles Janes Trombone— Lawrence Wolfe Jack Mayfield Marion Graham Oboe— Fred Morley Clarinet— James Austin Saxaphones— Kenneth Newnam James Williamson First Cornets— Morris Grimes Knight Whitman Second Cornets— Glen Beatty Carlton Chase Ralph Newnam Frank Willis Tuba— William Croxton Drums and Bells— Joseph Carpenter Piano— Anna Marie Yotter A. H. S. CONCERT ORCHESTRA Violin ..................................Byrona Allison Cello ...................................Barbara Cline Clarinet.................................James Austin Trombone ........................................Marion Graham Saxaphones...........James Williamson. Ralph Lampman Cornet ..........................................Knight Whitman Banjo ...................................Fred Morley Drums ...........................................Joseph Carpenter Piano .............................Mr. Earl A. Braman The Concert Orchestra was organized last September under the direction of Mr. Braman and has done much to put pep into the High School parties and meetings. It has played at several receptions, given by ladies of the town and during the latter part of the year has played for H. S. receptions and commencements all over the county. The people of the town and all ohers who have beard it have been very well pleased with the work done. The orchestra plays a better class of music for the commencements and programs but for parties and receptions it plays music of a more popular order. It has met with the best of welcomes and greetings wherever it has gone.Hi-Y Club. »•' y. In the middle of the school year. 1921-1922, Mr. O. M. Brunsen, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, came to the Angola High School to introduce the idea of the Hi-Y Club. Quick to see the value of an organization of its nature, the students of the three upper classes organized the Hi-Y Club, without doubt the most popular club of this High School. Upon its organization the following officers were elected: Theodore Wood, president: James Williamson, vice-president: and Lyle Clark secretary and treasurer. At the first of the school year, 1922, the club was reorganized with William Paul Croxton, president: (antes 'Williamson, vice-president, and Lyle Clark secretary and treasurer. The purpose of the Hi-Y Club is embodied in its slogan: “Clean Speech; Clean Athletics, and Clean Lives,” known familiarly as the “Three C’s”. Another important factor of the Club's purpose is the promotion of good fellowship. At every alternate meeting of the club, Reverend Humfreys has been present, giving a series of very comprehensive lectures on the Bible. At the othjsr meetings there have been discussions, led by some member of the club. Soifie of these discussions were: 1 “What is Your Idea of a Regular Fellow?” led by Mr. Phillips. '•“Crabbing,’’ led by Mr. Braman. “Money, Its Uses and Abuses,” led by Mr. Gonser. “What I Like Best in High SchoolClub discussion. “Camp Life and ExperiencesClub discussion. At the first of the year the Club’ held a Father and Son banquet. Some of the young huntsmen furnished rabbits for the dinner. There were speeches by several club members and also by several of the fathers. The club feels deeply indebted to Mr. Estrich who has given his time so unreservedly for the benefit of the organization. We sincerely hope that the Hi-Y Club will continue to flourish and meet the long felt need in the lives of our high school boys, as it has done so admirably since its organization two years ago.Jean Leclair The fifteenth of January found our party on the trail between Fairbanks and Valdez. We had started six days before, Robert Servier, our Indian collide, and myself. I. for one had seen enough of Alaska and I think that my friend was of the same mind. It was a queer mission that had brought us here in the first place. Robert Sender's father had once owned a small mine on the Koyunkuk River. He had been killed unexpectedly while in Alaska, and the most that was known of the mine’s location was found in a few old letters which he had written to Robert's mother years ago. It was a search for this claim that had brought Robert Servier to Alaska and I was here simply because he had asked me to come with him. The trail over which we were traveling was a difficult one, even in good weather. We had hoped to start much sooner than we did and thus avoid the late snows but as it was, we w ere caught in the grip of a most severe Alaskan winter. To make matters worse, the snow was very soft and therefore unfit for rapid progess on snow shoes. We made camp at the head of a small pocket canon which afforded ample shelter from the wind and the driving snow. Our guide "turned in" at an early hour as was his custom hut Rob and 1 were w'ont to sit about the fire and talk. My friend is an excellent story teller and I was in hopes that he would be disposed to "spin a yarn" this evening. His first few words proved beyond a doubt that this was the case. "I suppose,” he began, "that you have heard of the old French-Canadian trapper, Jean Leclair, who at one time lived in the little cabin at the head of Queen’s River?" "I can't say that I have," I rejoined. Then feeling that I had side-tracked a story of some sort. 1 continued. "No Bob, I don't believe that 1 have ever heard the story, but I should he more than glad to hear it now." This seemed to he just what he wanted for he immediately pulled out his pipe, lighted it and settled back into a more comfortable position, ready to begin his tale. "The story," he began, is a long one and there are parts which I do not know hut I shall tell you all of it that I have heard and remember.” "It was the first fall after the great Dawson rush that they found gold in Sandy Creek." he continued, “and it was that same year that Jean Leclair came to the settlement. Jean Leclair was a French-Canadian. He was a mighty man, nearly six feet in height, with black, shiny hair and steel grey eyes. The only thing that distinguished him from the other breeds w'as tile fact that he was drunk oftener and was, if anything, a little handier with the long thin knife that always graced his belt. “He was usually to he found in a half sober condition and on all occasions was ready to fight over the merest trifles. No one seemed to knowwhere he came from and few cared. Everyone was mad for gold and as long as he behaved, people did not bother him. “Jean Leclair was not, strange as it may seem, a gold seeker. He lived by himself in his little cabin and watched his line of traps. He had only a handful of friends among the other trappers and for the people in the camp, he saw no more of them than was necessary. Jean Leclair’s greatest friend did not prove however to be a person but a dog. “One night as he was returning from the camp a small white dog followed him to his cabin. When he reached the door his first thought was to kick the dog into the snow, but for some reason he allowed him to enter. The next morning he viewed his visitor with a more sober eye and decided to keep him. He fed the dog and fashioned him a place in the corner in which to sleep. The dog was an Eskimo with a slight cross of wolf blood and so, for want of a better name, Jean called him Wolf. " ith the care which he received he became strong and sturdy. Every day lie went with Jean to the traps and proved to be a boon companion. Jean Leclair loved this dog. Wolf's affection, too, seemed to be a natural one and with every action he showed that he fairly worshiped this big rough man. "Three years had passed and Wolf had grown rapidly. These same three years had wrought changes in Jean Leclair. He was not drunk so often and his reputation as a fighter was not to be compared with that of the old days. In the fall of the fourth year after Wolf's arrival, Jean Leclair was on the upper branch of the Koyukuk River with Fere Genet. They were trapping and hunting along the river and on the whole they had enjoyed a very profitable season. Finally they took up their traps and started for home. One afternoon they made camp on the summit of one of a long range of cliffs overlooking a deep box canon. The edge of the cliff was not over twenty-five feet from their camp fire. Jean and Fere were standing near the edge looking down at the river below. Jean was holding Wolf by the collar. He ventured that his dog's love for him was so great that at his word he would jump over the edge of the precipice. Intending to hold him he told Wolf to jump. The great dog gave one mighty leap and cleared the edge. "Jean Leclair had been so taken by surprise that the dog had broken his hold on the collar. “As Fere told the story later they returned to camp in silence. The thing was quite beyond his understanding. The next morning Jean Leclair was nowhere to be found. His tracks in the snow showed that he had gone to join Wolf in the river below. "That." concluded Robert Servier, “is all that I know about Jean Leclair.” —James Shearer, ’23. -------OOO----- Cootie, the Pet Squirrel. One Sunday early last May, I set out for a patch of woods where I knew I could learn much about the nesting habits of crows. This seven or eight acres of woodland contained six nests, two of which were in use. All the nests were made of sticks, and the hollow in the pile was lined with the shredded bark of wild grapevine. ()ne nest, in addition to the bark, was lined with the fibers of binder twine, carefully plucked apart. There were four ore five eggs as large as a small lien's egg, green, spotted with brown, in each nest. I saw a nest about forty feet up in the dead top of a big, leaning basswood and climbed to it. Apparently it was only an old nest blown full of leaves. I tossed the leaves out. and noticed that instead of blowing apart, they fell as a compact ball. As soon as 1 reached the ground 1 pulled the solidly constructed ball of leaves apart. It was warmly lined with shreds of leaves and grass, and in it was a single baby squirrel. He was no bigger than a mouse; his eyes were not yet open, and he was nearly hairless. 1 would not have willfully disturbed the nest, hut there was nothing to do now. So I took the squeaking, squirming little thing home, and proposed raising him. It happened that our cat had a litter of kittens two or three days old. When I suggested letting her raise the squirrel, everyone said it would mean nothing hut an easy meal for her. Secretly T agreed, but I went ahead and tried it. From the first he was as well fed and cared for as any of them. I doubt if the cat ever knew the difference. Two days later the squirrel's eyes opened and within a few weeks hair grew' on his tail, his ears began to stand up, and he was every bit a squirrel. He about doubled in size every week. Within two weeks he would sit up on his haunches and eat bread or corn. He and the kittens played together a great deal, but I think he had more than his share of the fun. Although he was plump and sleek, he was so quick and tireless and the kittens so fat and slow that he could overturn one, bit anothers ear, roughly break up the snooze of a third, escape the mad rushes of all and be ready to do it all over again before they fairly came to their senses. I named him “Cootie.” I think it was an appropriate name, especially when he went exploring inside my shirt. As the kittens grew older they drank milk gluttonously. More than once I have seen them crowded around a pan so closely that it seemed impossible for another one to squeeze in, when Cootie would tumble headlong from somewhere above, wedge his head in between the kittens and drink as he stood on his nose. After having him take a swim in a pan of milk, carry off various things from the kitchen and visit us at two o'clock in the morning, we set about shutting him out. It was no easy task, for there are many entrances about an old farm house for such a little scamp with no thickness at all and an insane desire to get in. We never completely succeeded. Making his claws grip iron bothered Cootie for a time. He got so he couid climb the steel windmill tower without any trouble; but one time when he was running pell-mell along a fence lie leaped recklessly onto a big sheet of steel roofing lying near. He slid and tumbled and finally collected himself the most surprised animal I have ever seen. Cootie was usually easy to pick up and handle, except when he was in a certain barrel in the barn that had a little corn in the bottom. He considered himself lord of that, and bit savagely if molested . Perhaps Cootie was so healthy and full of life because squirrels discovered vitamines sometime long ago. Anyway, as long as he had plenty to eat he never took anything hut the germ from the corn kernel. He would get nuts from the supply we kept in the barn, burrow in the feed bin and hide them: and he liked to hide geen pears, r r to snip off a rose blossom, carryit inside and scatter tlie petals over the house. He ruined several vases of flowers this way. But he lived mostly on corn, milk, and what breadstuffs we jjave him or he could steal. None of the old cats paid the slightest attention to his playful attacks; but he was wary of dogs, and able to take care of himself. YVhen he was three months old, we began to see him less, and finally he disappeared altogether. In the fall 1 found him living in a hole in an old apple tree nearby. He was full grown, and showed that he knew ns. He wouldn’t quite let us touch him, but we hoped he would come back when cold weather came. But he must prefer his own life, for he is still living in the apple tree. —Wilbur Markham, '25. All is Well and Then Some "I've heard that he is a woman hater,” said a girl with a drawl. "That's what lots of them say," observed another of the little groups who sat upon the beach. "We'll give you first chance to break him of it, Hazel.’’ "That's kind of you,” said the first girl, "but he’s said to be all that could be desired of a popular college man. and if that’s the case, you’ll all likely make a mad dash for him. Don’t bind yourselves by any inconvenient promises to let anyone else try first.” A bobbed haired girl joined the group. "Who are you talking about?” she asked curiously. “Don Headley,” responded Hazel. “His college is just out for vacation and he and his mother are coming here for the summer. He’s reported to be a woman hater and highly unattainable. We’re just wondering how long he can hold out.” They giggled and dismissed the subject. Nothing was seen of the newcomers for several days, but late on a Saturday afternoon they came, in a long lined roadster. As the young man helped his mother up to the hotel, the few girls on the veranda conceded that he was undeniably handsome but “so stand-offish looking,” as one said. At dinner that evening he showed an inclination to confine his glances and gallantries to his mother, and after they had greeted a few acquaintances, he ignored them all, save asking where the younger men were. They had gone to arrange for a picnic, he was informed, and would soon he back. When they did arrive, those who knew him greeted him boisterously and those who did not, soon found he was one of the best liked fellows of the “gang.” They told him of the picnic which was to be held that evening— “a moonlight picnic, boy, and everything is all set for it.” Later that evening the young people of the resort met and followed the guides to the place which was prepared for their picnic. Logs made seats for the crowd, and a huge fire was lighted. Marshmallows on long sticks went into the fire to "roast” and came out, burned to a crisp. Girls laughed and their escorts shouted. Don seated himself on an unoccupied log and gave himself over to eating a marshmallow. He was devoting his entire attention to the third one when he became aware that some one was sitting beside him. He looked up. It was a girl—a bobbed haired brunette whom he remembered had been introduced as Annette somebody. Promptly he moved a little away from her.“You don't need to move away,” said the intruder in a high voice, “I won't hurt you.” "I beg your pardon—Miss—Viss—" floundered Don vaguely. “’Sail rieht. Just call me Annette." replied the girl. A silence fell. Annette was obviously waiting for Don to make some reply. But he sat gazing into the fire, silent, and wrapped in his own thoughts. Presently she tried again. “I'm just dying to go for a canoe ride, but I'm afraid to go alone. The moon is wonderful and the water is so smooth." Don saw his duty. He 'gave her a cpiick glance but she was looking innocently, pensively, out over the water. He cleared his throat twice. Then: “I should be ulad to take you for a ride. Shall we go now?” Annette squealed her delight. "1 should say! Come on, let’s hurry! Some time later she observed from the cushions in the bottom of the canoe. “Aren't you working too hard? Would you like to stop paddling and just drift?" “Hadn't we better be going back?” questioned Don. “We’ve been out quite a while.” “Only about ten minutes." pouted Annette. “You are in such a hurry to go back—one would think that you didn’t like it out here with me. This was the third time she had made the same remark but before he had remained silent. However, this time he ventured a question. “Did you ever read Curtis on the 'Manufacturing of Bronze Statues’?’ he queried thoughtfully. They pulled the canoe up on shore and came up to the crowd. Annette went at once to the tall jgirl from whom she had learned of Don. “I'm done out. Hazel.” she said, angrily. "Is he hard? He's about as impressionable as a stone wall." The party was going swimming for the last feature of its moonlight picnic. Most of the crowd was already in the water when Don got to the shore. He paused. The diving board and platform probably would be empty. Plunging in. he made for them. But even as he went. Hazel saw him and swam more slowly after. He seated himself on the platform and gazed out over the path of silver which the moon made. A little noise called his attention to the other side of the raft. A igirl was climbing upon it. "I beg your pardon." she said with what was certainly a sob in her voice. "I didn’t know there was anyone here.” “Well—I'm just leaving," said Don nervously. He hated crying girls. "Please don’t. I'm going back as soon as I get myself together.” Don gritted his teeth. He was not even remotely interested in what her trouble was, but he felt obliged to ask. The girl crossed the raft and sat down by him. “I don't want to shout it,” she said. Speaking in a confidential voice she told him of the death of a dear aunt and how unconsolable she was. "I've just tried to bear up all evening but it got too much for me." She sobbed distinctly and leaned her head upon Don’s shoulder. He sat up, as stiffly as a wooden soldier. "I—well—it'll probably be all right," he said uneasily. The girl changed the subject. “How strong you look." she told him wistfully. “You look as if you’d never get tired." Don thawed a trifle.“And yet you look as if you'd be the kind who is misunderstood,” she added, “I think some men are misunderstood for even courage and things like that, you know.” He thawed still more. The girl perceived her advantage and played up to it. “Isn’t it wonderful out here on this raft?” she finished, leaning heavily against his shoulder. He did not reply hut his expression changed and he set his jaw firmly. She pursued the course. “They say when the moon has those stars near it, it in earns Cupid is reigning. Did you ever read ‘A Biography of Cupid’?” “No,” said Don grimly, “but did you ever read ‘The Manufacturing of Bronze Statues’ by C. C. Curtis?” When Hazel reached the rest of the party, they were just leaving the water. “He's hack there on the raft, alone,” she told a small group of girls disgustedly, “dreaming, with a perfect moon and empty raft, about Bronze Statues!” Don had wandered idly about, all day Sunday, making himself agreeable to the older women who had no daughters, and talking idly to the men. There seemed to he nothing to do. The tennis court was scattered with girls who were watching an aimless game. He turned away from it. The fewer girls he saw, the better he would feel, he decided. The walk to the beach looked empty at first sight and then he saw two or three couples and some few girls sitting on the shady benches, placed along the path. With a sigh he turned back to the hotel and dropped into a steamer chair on the veranda, a few feet away from his mother. Their lazy conversation was broken presently by four or five of the younger girls who came noisily up to them and dropped upon the steps. They wanted nothing, apparently, save to giggle and criticize those of their number who were absent. Don was disgusted. When his mother rose and went inside he got up immediately and sauntered over to a corner of the long veranda and sat down in a swing. The day was very hot and dusty, and the heat of mid-afternoon was oppressive. Still more girls walked lazily out of the woods at the right of the hotel and came slowly up the steps. As they went inside, two separated themselves from the group and made for the swing. As each girl saw the other’s evident purpose, her face assumed, for a moment, a peculiar expression. Then they both came together toward Don. They seated themselves in the swing on either side of him. “Excuse me if I crowd you.” said Hazel, “but this is rather small for three.’’ She glanced meaningly at Annette, who ignored the look. “Certainly,” Don told her. with his most polite air. “I was just on the point of leaving, anyway. That will make more room.” He rose, excused himself, and took his way off the veranda and down the road. The two girls sat stiffly when he had left them, and then moved by a common impulse, without a glance at each other, they got up and went inside. As Don walked slowly down the road, he denounced women and their transparent wiles for all time. He wandered along and came at last to a break in the fence which bordered the road. He turned into it and followed the twisted foot path, with his head down and eyes bent on the ground. Suddenly he stopped. A fence—a barbed wire fence—cut directly across thepath. Don glanced up and then looked along the fence for a spot through which he might crawl. Me stiffened and looked amazedly to the right. A few rods away sat a girl on one of the fence posts. She was obviously very unsteadily balanced on it. Another woman! He resigned himself to his bad luck and hastened toward her. “Can I help you down?" he asked the strange girl. She was quite pretty he decided. The sun which was getting low, made a lovely halo about her silky amber colored hair. “I don’t think you can." she told him. “I’ve been trying for quite a while to do it successfully.” Don surveyed her carefully. “Why can’t you get down?” “Well, the truth is," she informed him gravely. “I’m caught in the barbed wire.” “Why don’t you tear yourself loose?” he questioned. “Well,” returned the girl. “I was just deciding to do that when you came, but I hate to because this is Hazel’s dress, and she’ll be so exceedingly peeved if I tear it.” A suspicion crossed Don’ mind. “Who is Hazel?” “My cousin,” said the girl promptly. “I’m visiting her and I borrowed this dress because I just got here and my trunks haven't come.” “I see.” Don was interested in this girl but he certainly couldn’t let her know whether he cared about her cousins and visits or not. “I’ll see if I can help.” With Don's aid. the dress was successfully rescued, and the girl jumped down. “Shall I take you back to the hotel now?’’ he asked her. “I'd rather not go just now.” she told him. “Goodbye, and thank you.” Don watched her walk away with a blank expression upon his face. He hoped he wasn’t becoming interested in a girl—a blonde at that. Slowly he turned and went back to the hotel. She was not in the dining room that night and no one volunteered any information concerning her. He felt that he should be too indifferent to ask, and so ignored his curiosity. As they sat on the lawn in the cool air. that evening, he looked about for her but she was not there. At last Hazel who bad secured a place by his side said absentmindedly, “I suppose Winifred has her trunk unpacked by this time. I'll go up and bring her down.” She left the group on the lawn and went into the hotel. “Who’s Winifred?” asked some one. A chorus of masculine voices informed the 'questioner that she was 'Hazel’s cousin, a peach, most easy to look at. and a heart breaker. The girls who did not know her sniffed, and those who did looked anxious. When they returned, Don’s suspicions were confirmed. It was the girl of the barbed wire fence. When he was presented to her she chose to ignore the incident which he was hoping would make her a little more friendly and less impersonal. All through the evening Don watched her. She directed less attention. if anything, to him than to the others. It did not please him to be overlooked and he tried to center her attention on himself. Hut she remained as before—impartial. As he watched her he found himself saying under his breath, “1 am not interested—I will not be interested." But ine. spite of his efforts to remember himself as a woman hater, he found himself playing to the footlights of her approval. l'or two days that followed he was forced to remind himself constantly that he was impervious to women. Ilut on the third day he found himself admitting that he cared for nothing but to be near Winnie. He was sitting alone on the veranda when this thought first dawned on him. He awoke from his reverie to hear voices from an open window. “But Winnie, he's marvellous looking and it’s plain that he likes you. I'd be so flattered! Why don't you get him if you can?” A silence and then Winnie’s cool voice responded. “Hazel dear, why don't you let me manage my own affairs?” Don heard no more. If the rest of the crowd knew that he was no longer a woman hater, what was to prevent his showing it to Winnie? He no longer needed to keep up his reputation. He made a dash for the garage and twenty minutes later drove his shining roadster up to the front door. No one knew' what persuasion he used, but the few onlookers gasped as the woman hater led Winnie down the steps to his car, a little later. All througth the ride and the supper which followed in the little road house, Don berated himself for allowing three whole days to pass before taking Winnie out. When they drove back, it was long after dark. They entered the front door and found all the young people assembled in the lobby. A perfect silence followed and then it was broken by Winnie’s soft voice. “1 won my bet. did 1 not?” she asked sweetly. “But on the whole since he's a token of it. 1 believe I shan't let him go.” Don gasped. Then lie rose to the occasion like the sport that he was. “Let me go?" he cried. “Let me go? You’ll have to drive me away, now.” The spell broke and the crowd laughed and talked noisily. Under cover of the general tumult, Don and Winnie turned and slipped back into the darkness. —Byrona Allison, '23 -------000 The House in the Pines To the occasional traveler there was no apparent unusual excitement in Sand Cap. but the natives were, nevertheless, enjoying the bliss of mysterious robberies. Every man seemed to view his neighbor with more or less suspicion, and to make a sudden move toward the general direction of his hip pocket would have been suicide for anyone. Sand Gap was a typical western village, rough, hot. and unsightly, but surrounded by such a magnitude of natural beauty that from a distant hill it was a welcome sight indeed, seeming to nestle between three small foothills. These hills or rather the cattle ranges on them were the main resource of this prosperous community and it is with them that we are chiefly concerned. In the days immediately following the Civil war a few hopeful prospectors had searched the low mounts for gold and an occasional abandoned shaft still remained a mute testimonial of their efforts. The present inhabitants, however, did not search beneath the sod for riches for they were reaping a golden harvest from the surface—namely thoroughbred stock. Sand Creek cattle took first honors in count, state, and national shows and lovers of fine horses often found their exact needs on the ranges or in the corrals of Sand ranchers. aSand Creek, the origin of the name of the district, tumbled down the distant snow covered mountains, and then glided coolly, and gracefully through the foothills to the level plain beyond. On the bank of this stream and scattered among the hills were several rude cabins, abandoned except for the occasional hunter or Ike Walton caught in a sudden shower. ()ne of these cabins which possessed an air of being less antique than the others stood about two hundred yards from the bank of the creek and at a (joint where a sheer cliff made an approach to the stream itself impossible. It was into such an atmosphere that Vincent Jack Rossman was unduly shoved by a hurley brakeman one broiling July morning. The “Vincent” he acquired from his mother and the “Jack” was bestowed by his father after a long and strenuous battle. Returning from France he was unable to (vulgarly speaking) "fall” for his mother's plan of a round of afternoon teas and social fetes. Having seen Hurope at its worst he now set out to sec America by way of a side door Pullman. 1 le had been discovered in his stateroom. by the previously mentioned brakeman. and now found himself sprawled on the freight platform at Sand (dap ruefully watching the disappearing caboose. Being of a rather curious nature he lost no time in making a thorough investigation of his surroundings. As every other traveler did he ended his wanderings along the dusty streets at the front of the “Tavern.” As he approached, the usual groups of idlers with a causual. "Howdy boys,” he was given several half concealed but suspicious glances. For although it was not uncommon for a certain class of travelers to appear when the 9:58 freight hesitated for water, they were not as a rule taken into that fraternal order of “city dads" who spent their time cutting up soap boxes and reducing the tax levy under the “Tavern" awning. Rossman made himself agreeable however and offered fags when a corn cob pipe was produced and soon was calling the boys “Bill” and “Take” as if he had lived in the town sixty months instead of that many minutes. He became quite interested in the discourse concerning the recent cattle rustling. The ranchers, and main losers in these episodes, would have, no doubt, looked with more suspicion on this stranger but to the easy going “boys” there was no reason why he shouldn't know every detail of the affairs of the community. He was indeed surprised when that afternoon a rattling buck board thundered up to the step and when the occupant had made known his wants (additional cow hands) and Jack had laughingly accepted that he was curtly told to. “Hop in." This sounds absurd indeed but William Mason, the most prosperous of the valley’s ranchers was no one's fool and his sweeping appraisal of Rossman took in more than the grizzly chin and battered apparel of that individual. He did not intend to accept but there was something about Mason, who had introduced himself, that was pleasing “to see," and Jock Rossman was out “to see." Being assured that an outfit would not be wanting the purchase of which would have obliterated his supply of cash, he joined his new employer and the late afternoon found him in the —X bunk house. He had learned a great deal more concerning the nature of the recent crimes from Mason during the ride to the ranch. Mason had been the heaviest loser. The rustlers were familiar with the country because it would be impossible to move the cattle swiftly for any extended distance due to e 9 == — the heat. A goodly number of choice shorthorns had disappeared from —X ranges during the last night and the sheriff was not putting forth any effort to discover the rustlers. All this Rossman gathered from a series of disjointed sentences hurled crisply between puffs on odorous stogies. He also learned that a famous detective was at that moment working on the case but with rather indifferent results. It was a season when, with no unusual excitement, the hands would all he working around the buildings preparing the equipment for the fall drives. Instead it was almost deserted. v'ason and his family, the Chinese cook, two cowhands, (one with a sprained ankle) and Vincent Jack Rossman were holding the fort, so as to speak. The men under the leadership of the detective were patroling the western and most distant ranges of the —X. The next few days brought no new complication and Rossman puttered around trying to help, getting in the way, and making friends with everyone from Mason’s daughter to the cook. His experience on the polo field was used to good advantage in the corral. The day before the hands were expected to return a very unusual, thought not unwelcome, shower laid the dust of the plain and gave the whole sweltering atmosphere a new beauty and wholesomeness. That night Jack sat under the stars thinking and enjoying the cool breeze. He was determined to return to his home and friends. A comrade and buddy once suggested a partnership in the real estate game. Would the return of the detective throw any revealing light on the mysterious disappearance of the stock? Suddenly he started, he heard a rather unusual sound in the horse stables and decided to investigate. The stables were the most distant of the buildings from the house and the faint sounds that greeted Jack would not come to the ears of the others. As he approached the door lie was almost sure he had heard voices. Wonderingly, he stepped through the door, and then—darkness. Jack was crumpled by the force of a blow on his head and it was nearly dawn before he staggered before his employer with the news that four thoroughbred horses were missing. After learning the details of the attack Mason was for rushing to town for a posse to round up the rustlers and recover the horses, but was persuaded to wait for the return of his men and make a final search, by Jack who remembered the none too ambitious “boys’’ on the “Tavern” steps. He suggested, however, that Mason and he attempt to follow the faint tracks that were left by the visitors. The shower of the day before allowed the sand to pack and it was with little difficulty that they followed the tracks to the foot hills. Here the rocks took the place of sand and consequently they were forced to rely on their imaginations more or less for tracks. After losing the trail entirely they rode aimlessly about. While slowly returning to the ranch they decided to separate. Mason returning to the ranch directly and Jack to leisurely explore the banks of the creek for signs of a possible ford. It was in this manner that the house in the pines became first implicated in the mystery. As he rode along the edge of the ravine near the cabin, something seemed to tell him that he was being watched. What it was or why he knew this he could never tell, but lie was as certain of it as if he had read it in a daily paper. He turned suddenly toward the cabin and as he did so he thought he perceived a slight movement in the door oftlie cabin, as if a bird had flown across his range of vision or a leaf fluttering. Jack dismounted and advanced slowly toward the door. The trampled grass and packed path was evidence that the cabin was receiving more than usual attention. He walked slowly around the cabin and as he did he noticed that the hark of several of the pines were chafed and an occasional tuft of hair would fairly shout the presence of cows. lack Rossman was no coward, hut nevertheless, he carried a savage looking automatic in his hand as he slowly opened the door and stepped inside. Once inside he could see absolutely nothing that would justify his suspicions. The cabin was furnished with two store boxes and a rustic cot. There was a fireplace at one side of the door, big and homely, it seemed to have an air of loneliness with its cold and black hearth stone. Jack walked to this and stood examining the only unusual part of the cabin, a heavy plank floor. As lie leaned against the rude mantel the floor seemed to drop down before his very eyes. Jack rubbed his eves, staggered and then recovering from his astonishment, pushed the mantel still farther and stepped off from the hearth on to the sinking floor. He was not deceived by the whining growl of the modern elevator and as the floor settled firmly to the bottom of the pit he looked slowly about, giving his eyes time to become accustomed to the darkness. On the far side of the room or cave into which the shaft descended he could see a dim archway; walking toward this he heard faint footsteps echo through the tunnel and dim light became visible. Jack stepped back and waited. The foot steps became louder and as their owner stepped through the archway he lifted his gun and struck. A sob. and then the slow reluctant lurch, a thump, and a man lay sprawled at his feet. Jack removed his victim’s weapons, tied him with a length of leading rope which he found on the floor of the cave. He was uncertain as to whether he should return to the ranch or not, but finally his curiosity overcame all doubt and he started down the tunnel. He had gone perhaps two hundred feet when he could see the dim outline of an opening ahead of him. Continuing to the mouth of the tunnel, for so it proved to be, he found that the cleverly concealed opening opened directly on to a difficult but not at all impossible ford in the stream. Deciding that further progress was impossible with out additional force he returned to the cave and placing the Mexican guard, who had now recovered from the force of the blow, on the elevator floor he started the motor and soon the cabin looked exactly as it had when Jack Rossman had stepped through the door an hour before. The overloaded pony made short work of the trip to the ranch, and it was an enthusiastic group of cowboys that Jack and Mason led to the cabin. The clever mechanism that had been so useful to the thieves proved to be their undoing. Mason and his men rode out the tunnel and slashing through the creek came out upon a narrow and dry coulee that joined the creek at almost right angles. The trail ended at the ranch of a half-breed Mex on the western side of the range. There was some shooting and much shouting, but in the end the boys from —X led their cowed captives back through the cabin to Sand Gap. Some of the stock was recovered but the brand no longer read —X, for it had been blotted and changed to the register mark of the ranch upon whose ranges they were found.The raids no longer gave the "boys'' on the “Tavern” stoop any excitement and Jack Rossman decided that the introduction of modern equipment in the cattle rustling game was spoiling the natural beauty of the west. He yielded to the pleading of his family and friends and returned home, leaving a host of admiring friends who delight in telling the story of the man from New York. —Preston Moody, ’23 —Ralph Lampman, ’23For the purpose of instruction in the high schools, History is divided into three courses. The first is called Ancient Hitory. This presents the early development of manykind showing the archaeological ages, and traces the progress of civilization as the race passed through the nomadic period and began a settled life thereby necessitating the organization of states and the development of civic and political institutions. It traces the growth of language, of writing, of art. literature, sculpture, architecture, music, philosophy, and political and social institutions. The story of each of the leading people is taken up in detail, and credited with its positive contribution to civilization, the Mesopotamian valley and the valley of the Nile are discussed first. Then follows the story of the Hebrews, telling of God’s revelation of the true religion; then the story of the Phoenicians who gave to the world the earliest knowledge of a monetary system and a phdhetic language. The development of the modern European nations is traced from 1600 to the present. In this division of history nationalities and national growth and development occupy the center of attention. World movements such as the rise of republican form of government, the improvement of industrial methods, the reorganization of educational opportunities, and the liberalizing of religious institutions, are emphasized as supplementing national development. The conditions in Europe in the fifteenth century that led to the discovery of the new world, opens the course in American history. The scramble of European nations to control the new lands is then followed with special emphasis upon the struggles between the French and the English. The story of each of the thirteen English colonies is briefly sketched, and the colonial period is dramatically closed with the successful struggle for liberty and independence. The second semester in the senior year is devoted to the study of government. In this course the origin of American institutions is traced; the form of local, state and national government is.carefully outlined; and vital social and economic problems discussed.The study of high school English is of great importance. The leading educators tell us this and urge that more stress be laid upon this vastly interesting and profitable subject. The primary purpose of an English course is to enable the student to speak and write English correctly and so all of the different branches of the work arc taught with this thought in mind. Three years of English are required in the high schools of Indiana, the fourth year work being elective. The first year course consists, in the main, of a study of grammar. Special attention is given to the structure of the sentence and the uses of the different parts of speech. Composition, oral and written, is a part of the entire English course. Comparatively few classics are studied during the first year—perhaps three or four at the most. During the sophomore and junior years, the English courses embrace a study of the classics of American and English Literature. Less of the history of literature is taught today than ever before. The courses are beginning to include more of the actual study of the literary masterpieces than discussions and criticisms of the works and the biographies of their authors. The fourth year work includes a study of the drama, the short story, the novel, the essay and one or two carefully selected classics. Most of the students feel that this is the “cream" of the English work and that this is the most enjoyable part of the whole course. A distinctive and interesting branch of the English department is the systef of outside reading. Lists are compiled upon which books are listed at a certain number of units each. The books are classed as fiction and nonfiction or A and B. Forty units a year arc required, twenty at least of which must be chosen from the 1!. list. Books of a jejune nature are, of course, not included in the lists. On the contrary only the valuable ones are listed. If a teacher knows of a book which he thinks will be of particular benefit to his pupils, he is urged to recommend it. The principle of the outside reading system is that unless a student reads a representative number of worthwhile books while he is in high school, other things too often interfere and this is never accomplished.The science department consists of four subjects: General science, physical geography, physics, and chemistry. It is one of the most important in the school as it gives us not only explanations for the seemingly miraculous chemical and physical actions, but also the principles and laws governing many things in our daily lives. These are of vast importance since it is only through a knowledge of such principles and laws that we are enabled to work out new and improved methods. Although general science is usually classed as a first year subject, many students prefer to make it a part of their sophomore work, which arrangement is thought to be very commendable by some teachers. It consists of a brief introductory study of the subjects to be given more fully in physics and chemistry. It is an excellent preparation for these sciences and at the same time it affords the student, who can not take both physics and chemistry, an opportunity to gain at least a “speaking acquaintance” with science. Physical geography takes up a study of the winds, tides, erosion, the weather, etc. It should be taken by every high school student for although few will enter work in which these things will play a large part every person should have some understanding of them. Physics is a subject which appeals to boys as it takes up the mechanics of solids and liquids, heat, light, magnetism, electricity and radio. However many of the girls who are members of the class say that they find the work interesting as well as instructive. Chemistry is the major science usually recommended for girls but it is equally interesting and useful for the boys. It is recommended for girls because it treats of the composition, preparation and properties of many compounds used in the home, such as ammonia, iodine, baking soda, washing soda, and the acids. At the same time it affords the boys a study of the extraction of metals from their ores, the sources and preparation of elements, the properties of their compounds, and a knowledge of what has been done in the commercial world through the aid of science. These things are of the utmost importance to any boy entering business and may in some future time prove to be of inestimable value to him. A four year course in mathematics is offered. This course consists of one and a half years of algebra, one year of plane geometry, one half year of solid geometry, one half year of commercial arithmetic, and one half year of trigonometry. The knowledge of mathematics already acquired by the student should be used by him in the study of algebra. The student’s knowledge of arithmetic is a basis for his algebra work. The fundamental laws of addition, tion, subtraction, multiplication, and division should be studied with great care and mastered. If this is done the following work is much easier and time is saved. Factoring, fractions, transposition, the equation, and the stating of problems should be studied with equal care. (ieometrv is a science which has occupied the minds of the best thinkers for centuries. Each generation has added to it. The Egyptians, the Babylonians, the Greeks, and all the modern thinkers have contributed to it. At first it was studied as a theoretical and logical subject. Modern mathematics made it practical by applying it to engineering, astronomy, architecture and other sciences. The beginning pupil should become very familiar with the different figures. Constructions should be made with exactness. The angle, triangle, quadrilateral and other polygons should be easily recognized. A complete proof of each theorem should be given. The pupil must clearly understand the theorem that is to be proved and how to prove it. Constructions are again used. After the proof is given the next essential is the application of the truth learned. The polygon, circle, the square and all their essential relations and applications are carefully studied. Trigonometry is offered for the first time this year. The prospective college student has an excellent opportunity offered him. The course is made as practical as possible so that the student may apply it to surveying, analytical goemetry and calculus. The angle with its six functions, the sine, cosine, tangent, cotangent, secant, and cosecant is the basis of trigonometry. By the use of these, solution is made easy. When we consider how many of our words and phrases are derived from Latin and how dependent we are upon this language for an intelligent understanding of English, we realize more full}- the importance of its study. Its place in the curriculum of our high schools is insured and in some states its study begins in the eighth grade. The Angola High School has always had an interesting and well balanced course in this language. There are four departments of Latin taught each year, Virgil and Cicero being taught alternately. In the Aeneid we trace the adventures of Aeneas who was destined to be the founder of the Roman race. The Aeneid, a masterpiece in classical literature, is one of the world’s great epics. Although beginning Latin, as taught in the freshman year, is rather difficult. at the same time it proves to be very enjoyable for the students who arc truly interested in its study. This first year work is of the greatest importance in laying a foundation for future and more advanced study. The student who neglects his beginning Latin is apt to find himself in all sorts of difficulties later on. The course for the second year consists of the study of Caesar’s Gallic ar. Caesar, although taught during the sophomore year, is thought by many to be far more difficult than either Cicero or Virgil. Aside from the reading and study of Caesar, the Rennet Grammar is used during the second year, thus carrying over from the first year the study of the rudiments of grammar and syntax. Cicero, which was taught last year, treats of the conspiracies of Cataline. Last year's class, which was an especially large one, was under the direction of Miss Love. The fourth year Latin has proved to be more enjoyable than any of the other three years. This year’s class in Virgil is taught by Miss Williams. At the outset it was a little difficult for the members of the class to accustom themselves to Virgil's style but in a short time this was accomplished and the work progressed rapidly. Reports show that from fifty to seventy-five per cent of university students are working to pay part or all of their expenses through college. A large number of our students need not give up hopes of a college education even though father and mother can't afford it. for many have been receiving training that will enable them to join the ranks of that seventy-five per cent. Those who will not use their commercial training in this way will, never-thehless, find it beneficial no matter what work they may choose. During the past year Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Typewriting, Commercial Arithmetic, Commercial Geography, Commercial Law and Business English have been offered. In the Shorthand class, sixteen girls have been working earnestly to master the principles which will later mean speed. They may well be proud of the results of their efforts, for shorthand is not only of practical value but also develops the power of concentration, habits of accuracy and neatness, and quickness of judgment. In Bookkeeping the students have been learning how to keep a systematic record of transactions and also the value of such a record in properly managing business, the home, or one’s private affairs. In Arithmetic, a review is made of the fundamentals, then problems of frequent occurrence in business such as measurements, percentage, profit and loss, interest and discount are studied. In the Commercial Law class an effort is made to apply the principles learned to everyday affairs of the students. Actual cases are discussed to give the student an opportunity to apply his knowledge of the principles and to compare his decisions with the judicial decisions rendered. Then there are the classes in typewriting. It is this that appeals to all students until they learn that it really isn't play after all but good hard work. Imagine their dismay when they first learn that they are not to write with the “hunt and punch" or the "hit and miss” methods but that the “touch method" is the only one permitted. Of course, it is slow at first but when they see some of the more advanced students writing, without even so much as glancing at the key board, at a rate of sixty or seventy words a minute, they take heart again.Domestic Science is one of the most practical courses in the high school for girls. It teaches the girls the fundamentals of sewing, cooking and home management. Of what knowledge could girls make better use than this? Of course not all girls will have homes of their own but every girl and woman should know something of plain sewing and food compsition. In Angola High School cooking is offered the first semester and sewing the second. In the cooking w'ork one learns a great deal about theory of food composition that may seem foolish at the time, for a girl may say that she can learn how to cook from her mother. That may be true but with a working knowledge of food composition one knows what foods and what combinations of foods are best for the individual. The girls also learn the best method of canning fruits and vegetables. The students learn not only how to cook meats but also what cuts are best for different purposes. One very popular part of the cooking is the candy making which comes just before Christmas. In the more advanced classes first aid and invalid cookery are taught. This is a very important part of the training. The girls in the first year sewing class make complete suits of undergarments and some of the simple art stitches. By doing this the girls learn the different seams and stitches and the operating of the sewing machine. Those in the second year class have made either percale or gingham dresses. These are plain dresses but the principles are taught and without these principles many a woman cannot make an undergarment for herself. These students do some work in tailoring. The girls are obliged to make a pair of trousers and a blouse for a bov. These trousers are made from old material which the girls have renovated themselves. This may seem impractical but the girls have a knowledge of the basic principles of tailoring and making things over. This group does some embroidery. During the third year the girls have a choice of the garments they make. Each girl has made a beautiful tailored cape. They have done some work in millinery, making miniature samples on account of the cost of materials.During the last five years the musical activities of the Angola High School have been numerous and varied. A high school orchestra, a girls’ chorus, classes in theory, harmony, appreciation, musical history and counterpoint have helped to make the music department one of the most popular. The orchestra was first organized by Mr. Gatwood around a nucleus of ten pieces. Under his encouragement and teaching the personnel increased rapidly and some very accomplished musicians were produced. At the end of Mr. Gatwood's supervision of three years the orchestra had a membership of about seventy. Mr. Miles, who succeeded Mr. Gatwood, continued the system with few changes and the orchestra concerts of 1921-22 school year were truly wonderful. During the last year the music department has been under the supervision of Mr. Uranian who comes to us with a record of six years of successful work in eastern schools and colleges. His work in the Angola Schools, more-t ver, confirms all these records and the year of 1922-23 has been a banner year for the music department. The orchestra has been somewhat reduced by graduation but this group of musicians makes up for want of size by the high quality of their work. Jt has played at various school functions and the concerts of the musical department have been very much enjoyed by everyone. Mr. Braman has also organized a grade orchestra which will be a great benefit to future orchestras as the lack of new material to replace the graduating members has been detrimental to the organization in the past. There has always been some chorus work carried on in the high school, usually in morning assembly periods, but it was Mr. Gatwood also, who, as with the orchestra, was the founder of the chorus and the girls’ glee club. The boys have seldom appeared in this part of the musical concerts until this year. The girls’ glee club under the direction of Mr. Gatwood gave the cantata "Pan" and last year took a very creditable part in the musical concert with the cantata, “The Slave’s Dream.’’ This year chorus work has been brought into the limelight, a boys’ chorus was started at the beginning of the year and the members proved their ability by giving the “Minstrel Show.”“WHY BOTHER ABOUT ART?” “Because a knowledge of art can give you more pleasure than anything else. It can make you rich. It reveals hidden beauty. It is like the window in the workshop that lets in the sunshine and gives a beautiful outlook, it makes life more worth while. It makes common things more valuable. A flower pot is worth a few cents, a bowl of the same clay a few dollars, a vase exquisitely formed and finely glazed or decorated, sometimes hundreds of dollars. The difference between a kitchen chair and a Chippendale chair is a matter not of materials, but Art. 1 he cities of Europe are visited because they are beautiful works of civic art. 1 he artistic home is the one everyone would choose. The difference is a matter of choice, taste. Art is one of the few things in the world that is permanent—the art of Greece is still the glory of that great nation. ?o is the art of Italy and of France. Art is a factor in the civilization for which many gave their lives. It is for all. It enriches life, both for the individual and for the nation."—American Federation of Arts. There is nothing of greater value than good taste. We are judged largely by onr appearance. School art builds in the pupil's mind the greatest of human assets, creative imagination. Napoleon once said. “Imagination rules the world." The A. H. S. Art department offers two lines of work. Design and Com mercial Art. There are three years of work in Design. The first year we learn design principles using analysis drawings of flowers as our source of color and design tin ts. The second year we take up color theory and home planning with special emphasis on the choice of furniture and use of color in the home of moderate cost. The third year we study costume design including the suitability of line to figure, colors becoming to the different types and appropriateness of costume for various occasions. The Applied Design includes basketry, pottery stencil and batik. The Commercial Art consists of lettering, advertising and poster problems. cast drawing, portrait from copy and life, cartoon and practical drawing for reproduction in line and color. Since the war, with its astounding revelations of the physically deficient, a new interest in physical education has been awakened in the minds of the American people. The changes in the social life of the past two centuries present new and complex problems that a reluctant public is slow to acknowledge. What are the needs to be met by physical education? hirst of all comes vitality—its conservation and improvement. A program that deals with hygiene and health habits falls short because vitality needs to be restored and conserved. The program must therefore present big muscle activities which will secure proper development of the nervous system of our boys and girls to bring about co-ordination of mind and muscle. The development of coordination cannot be postponed until an individual reaches the age of twenty or twenty-five. It takes place largely in youth, so postponement means a nervous system never properly developed. Without question, a new' era of sport it at hand. America is fast coming to recognize its value and is destined to become a nation of sport loving people. Every high school boy and girl should fall in line and become actively, not passively engaged in one or more sports—base ball, tennis, swimming, golf, track or basket ball, for instance. In the past, athletics w'ere for the few. Now is your chance to get off the grandstand and into the field. Adopt a sport. Make it your hobby. Work at it faithfully, ceaselessly: let it provide for the worthy use of leisure. Practice the tenets of physical education. carry on. even to your four score and ten. Physical education offers every high school pupil normal growth, organic vigor, relaxation and life extension. Through its play and games he develops alertness, accuracy, quick perception, correct and rapid judgment. Co-ordination is perfected and multiplied: correct posture and poise attained: co-operation and sportsmanship promoted. Vocational Agriculture is in its third year in the Angola High School program. In this time, it has become an essential part of the high school work, offering to all boys interested in agricultural pursuits, a course which will train them for the business of farming, for related agricultural work or to enable him to enter an agricultural college. Angola is in the midst of an agricultural community and there is a need for this kind of training in our school system. Vocational Agriculture differs from straight high school agriculture in that the pupils spend a full half day carrying two agricultural subjects each semester for four years rather than one subject for one period and for two vears. Considerable laboratory and outdoor work of practical farm jobs and problems is given and each subject is covered more in detail. The boys also carrv on a home project under the personal supervision of the agricultural teacher. During the past two years, the vocational agricultural boys have produced (eggs, poultry, hogs, calves, milk, corn, potatoes, apples, etc.) on their home farms having a value of $4828.92 and making profits totaling over $2000. Some results of this work have been: The bringing in of forty bushels of Wisconsin Certified Potato Seed (the first to enter Steuben county) which were planted by vocational boys and gave exceptionally higher yields and freer from disease than our native stock and are now in demand for seed: four new poultry houses have been built, modeled after the very best type, and at least fifteen have been remodeled: many prizes have been won by agriculture boys at cur District Fair and at Purdue which has given them encouragement to grow superior products and the spirit of competition. Carrol vaxton won a trip to the International Livestock Show at Chicago because of his vocational work: the popular Fat Barrow Club was originated in the county. The vocational agricultural teacher also carries on club work with non-vocation.'1 boys in the community. This has been largely Lamb and Pig Clubs. The past two summers, these non-vocational boys produced products valued at $810.67.Manual Training is classed as vocational work and is looked upon as an extra, i. e„ a subject that was not taught when reading, writing and arithmetic were considered about the only essentials. It is, as the name implies, a subject that trains the hands to do wood work and shop work of the elementary kind, and is taught for the purpose of enabling the boy, after he leaves school and grows to manhood, to do and understand the necessary manual work about the home and be able to help solve certain community problems that may arise. It is also a foundation for certain trades the boy might care to take up. In a measure it is to the boy what Domestic Science is to the girl. Our Public Schools are for the purpose of broadening the child and giving him an education that will enable him to choose his vocation—that is not accomplished when only the academic subjects are taught. A few years ago Manual Training was taught in the larger schools only. Now there is a law in Indiana requiring all commissioned high schools to offer a course in this subject. There are several branches such as wood work, metal work, concrete work, mechanical drawing and blue printing. However, all schools do not teach all of these branches. The larger schools teach most of them while the small city schools and township schools confine their course to wood work only. Our school comes under the second class, teaching only wood work. We have a large basement room below the Community Building equipped with benches and tools for this purpose. Here the boys are taught the care and use of tools and how to construct worthwhile projects. The articles made are not merely toys but articles which may be useful to the boy and the home, such as library tables, piano benches, book racks, floor and table lamps, taborets, clothes racks, phonograph cabinets and several smaller articles such as bird houses, kites, coat hangers, broom holders, tie racks, and many others. This course is given to the seventh and eighth grade boys once a week and to the high school boys, who choose to take it. two double periods a week. We believe that the subject not only teaches the boy something practical, but also teaches him to be neat and careful in what he does.« 4The Mikado The Mikado...........................Cleveland Collins Nanki-Poo.........................William Paul Croxton Ko-Ko ............................... Ralph Lampman Poo-Bah ..................................Fred Morley Pish-Tush .............................. Jack Mayfield Yum-Yum ............................. Ruth Williamson Pitti-Sing..............................Margaret Fast Peep-Bo .............................. Adeline Hughes Katisha..........................................Helen Hendry Nee-Ban ............................. Joseph Douglass The Mikado more than fulfilled the highest hopes for its success. Before it was given many people thought that this composition, written for professionals. could not he given successfully by high school students. But afterwards a great number of people, among them some of our ablest critics, were heard to remark that it was the best thing ever given by A. H. S. It would be difficult to say which one in the cast was the star for each one did his part in a way that is beyond criticism. Perhaps the success of the boys was more marked than that of the girls because never until this year have the boys shown their ability to sing. The chorus, too. was very well trained. It is a notable fact that they followed their director unusually well for amateurs. Miss Parsell and the art students who assisted her deserve much credit for the beautiful scenecry which gave the setting and atmosphere so essential to the production. Mr. Uranian cannot be given too much praise for the success of the entertainment because for high school students "The Mikado” is a stupendous task and the success depends almost entirely upon the director.The Minstrel Show given on November 9th under the direction of Mr. Braman was a complete success. In fact it attracted the largest audience that has ever witnessed any entertainment given in the gymnasium. “Our Awful Aunt,” a one act play, was presented as a curtain raiser. The members of the cast were: Dorothy Long. LuRavne Oberholtzer, Lucile Coveil. Rolene Rowley, Ralph Lampman, Lawrence Wolfe and Fred Morley. The Minstrel was presented by the members of the boys’ chorus. The city orchestra furnished musical accompaniment. A sun flower field formed the back ground, with the members of the chorus on the stage. The dance given by little Lewis Jackson was certainly a novel feature, Lawrence Wolfe was particularly good as interlocutor. The dancing of Joseph Carpenter and the songs of William Paul Croxton, Fred Starr, James Finch. Ray Stiefel, Cleveland Collins, Ralph Lampman, Max Buck, and Earl Lampman were given with real ability. All of the numbers were given with credit and were very much enjoyed by the audience. The Program: Opening Chorus: “Hail, All Hail”................Entire Company “Oogie, Oogie. Wa Wa”...........................William Croxton “We Just Came in to Say Hello”...........Fred Starr, Cden Beatty Lewis Jarrard, Carlton Chase, Earl Lampman, Hugh Sanders “I’m Hungry for Beautiful Girls” ............. Ralph Lampman “Fairy Tales”.......................................James Finch “Three O’clock in the Morning”....................1. ...Ray Stiefel “Mr. Gallegher. M'r. Shean” ............. Fred Starr and Chorus Specialty Act (piano and saxaphone) ....................... John Williamson, James Austin “Don’t Leave Me Mammy”................................Lewis Jackson Specialty Dance .............................. Joseph Carpenter “Oh! Is She Dumb” .............................Cleveland Collins “Sing. Sing, Birds On the Wing” ................. Earl Lampman “I Love Her, She Loves Me” .......................... Max Buck Closing Chorus ............................... Entire Companye Individual Player’s Record Player Position Games PI’ d Field G. Foul G. Points Per. Fouls Collins ... ... F 17 47 96 200 21 Lampman ... F 18 13 26 24 Yockey .. .... F 18 38 10 86 14 German . . ... G 15 24 48 28 Finch .... ... G 15 5 10 16 Owens ... ... F 10 11 2 24 5 Stiefel . .. ... F 7 4 1 9 8 Cline . ... ... C 8 17 34 5 Wolfe ... .... G 2 1 2 1 Shank . .. .... G 2 I 2 2 Fifer .... .... C 5 5 10 6 Pence ... .... C 15 7 4 18 11 123 469 141 Total 173Cleveland Collins—Forward— Captain “Eddie” secured a regular berth, as forward, on the team in his Sophomore year. He has a reputation as a consistent point-getter for his team that is hard to beat. His fighting spirit often kept his team together in times of need. He was selected as all-district forward. Ralph Lampman—Forward “Shrimp,” basket-ball I, II. Ill, IV, and the fastest man on the floor. He was a consistent point-getter and the scrappiest man. per square inch, on the team. His playing was always clean and'aggressive and his defense faultless. All-district forward. James Finch—Guard “Sammie” with his clever pass-work and faultless guarding has become a big asset to the team. He was always to be found in the thick of the battle. All opponents try to give “Sammie” a wide berth on the playing floor. He has one more year with us. Wendell German—Guard “Dutch,” our long-shot specialist, was a hard-fighting aggressive player. The uncanny ease with which he made the longest of shots sapped the vitality of our opponents while his close guarding prevented their duplicating his shots. ,« 'V. Eugene Yockey—Center “Gene” made an enviable record in the pivot position this year. By his calm and heady playing he proved a tower of strength to his team. His never-failing courage and ability to hit the basket consistently proved to be a valuable asset to the team. Ray Stiefel—Forward “Steve” was one of the most dependable of players because of his thorough knowledge of basket-ball and ability to put his knowledge to practice. He was a good shot and a clean and clever player. He has one more year. Oscar Pence—Guard “Oc” was a man to be depended upon to do more than his share of winning the game. He was a good shot, a clever passer and a hard fighter. Merril Cline—Center “Merg” assisted Yockey in holding down the pivot position, both being so valuable as to render it unwise to risk injury to either by overplaying. “Merg” is one of the few who know basket-ball from A'to Z. He has one more year of school. Naurice Owens—Forward “Norry” made up in quality what he lacked in quantity. His speed and cleverness made him more than a match for many of his larger brothers. He was a marvel at basket-shooting and pass-work. He will be with us one more year. Lawrence Wolfe “Doc” was a general utility man and well deserved the title for he possessed sufficient knowledge of the game to enable him to play in any position. He was a speedy player and a good shot. Lawton Shank—Guard Shank played his first year on the team but soon proved to his fellow-players that he was a capable, swift and conscientious player. He gave the game all he had and in return exacted praise and admiration from all who saw him in action. He has one more year. Joseph Carpenter—Forward “Carp” got started rather late in the year but made up for lost time. He commanded the respect of his teammates because of his earnest and untiring efforts to better the game by giving all he had to it. Horace Fifer—Forward Fifer, the Sophomore representative on the squad, proved himself a valuable asset to the team. Although young, he has the necessary size to make a good center. He is a good shot and an accurate passer. We expect much from him in the next two years.f e D 2 2 Martha Wood—Jump Center— Captain “Watch out! here conies the girl with the fiery red hair.” This is what her opponents said as she came on the floor. Martha was always good natur-ed and full of pep. She leaves this year, hut will appear on the Angola Independent squad next year. Lucy Graf—Side Center We always found Lucy a silent, but very dependable player. She was exceedingly quick in action, and a better dispostion than her’s could not be found. Adeline Hughes—Guard “Rosie” made lots of weird faces at her opponents, but not in vain. She graduates this year, but no doubt her many admirers will see her playing with the Independent squad next season. Margaret Fast—Forward “Zip” was the big noise of the defense. Her footwork fairly dazzled her opponents while her ability to hit that basket was uncanny. Margaret leaves us this year and she will be greatly missed in the ’24 sextet. Teresa Beil—Guard “Bill” has the reputation of being star guard. Few baskets were made by her opponents while she held the floor. Wava McKenzie—Forward Wava is a fast player, always in the thickest of the game. We’ll hand it to her for getting around the— er rather fleshy guards she happened to meet once in a while. Pauline Taylor—Forward “1’eanie” played a good game. She was dependable and full of fun. She is leaving us this year with full inten-t ons of helping to organize an independent team next fall. Nettie Dolph—Sub. Side Center Who said small girls couldn’t play B. B.? Well this one can. Nettie managed to dodge with ease the big side centers whom she usually opposed on the hard wood. Sarah Barron—Sub Guard Leave it to“Sade” to keep up the spirits of the team. She was a good player to say nothing of being a fine sport. She is one of the graduating members of the squad.Boys’ Basket Ball Squad Schedule and Scores ig22’’23 Opponents Score Angola Score Where Played Ashley 15 30 Angola Waterloo 11 27 Fremont 15 24 Angola Salem 8 44 Angola LaCi range 16 , 19 LaGrange (‘Hamilton 16 23 Angola Kendall ville 25 23 Kendallville Waterloo 4 36 Angola Auburn 14 23 Angola (iarrett 23 38 Angola I t. Wayne Central 23 14 Angola LaGrange 23 25 Angola Auburn 24 17 Auburn Decatur 29 Angola S. S. ht. Wayne 23 14 Fort Wayne Garrett 3i 15 Garrett Kendallville 20 21 Angola S. S. Ft. Wayne 10 22 Auburn 8 H District Ashley i5 11 District Total •••• 343 Games won, 14; Games 469 lost, 6 Girls’ Basket Ball Squad Schedule and Scores I922“’23 Date Opponent Score Where Played Angola Score Nov. 3 Ashley 8 Angola 36 Nov. 16 Waterloo 13 Waterloo 11 Nov. 18 Fremont 5 Angola 25 Dec. 1 LaGrange 16 LaGrange 5 Dec. 8 Kendallville 25 Kendallville 17 Tri-State Girls 12 Angola 23 Dec. 15 Waterloo 1 Angola 15 Dec. 22 Auburn 12 Angola 16 Alumni 3 Angola 34 Dec. 29 Garrett 17 Angola 19 Jan. 12 LaGrange 4 Angola 19 Jan. 19 Auburn 23 Auburn 6 Jan. 26 Decatur 13 Angola 18 Fremont 7 Fremont 12 Feb. 16 Kendallville 9 Angola 8 Feb. 9 Garrett 15 Garrett ISMr. Fast (speaking to Margaret who is just getting home at 3:00 a. m.): “Good morning, child of Satan.” Margaret: “Good morning father.” Helen Hendry (At the photographers): “Mr. Braman, go ask that lady where she is.” There are a lot of jokes, but few of us are original. ------00--- Three Times Three For Marconi Mildred: “Are you sure 1 am the first girl you ever kissed?” Marion G.: “Sure, I learned to do that from a radio lecture by Beatrice Fairfax.” Slow One: "Don't you know that late hours are bad for one.” Not So Slow: "Oh yes, I know that they are bad for one.” ------00--- Carp.: “Do you want your suit brushed off?” Sam: “No, my B. Y. D.'s are dirty.” Margaret F.: "Run along, I am saving my kisses.” “Bill”: "That being the case let me add to your collection.” ------00--- Some Handicap Teacher: “Do you remember what 1 told you was the greatest diffi- culty George Washington had to overcome?” Pupil: "Yes, he couldn’t tell a lie.” Editor of The Key: “But I can't publish these poems.” Byrona Allison: "I don t see why—they're very pathetic, my mother said that they made her heart skip a beat." Editor: “That’s just it, you see, we can't publish anything that vill in- terfere with our circulation.” Mac (in History III): “What is meant by Universal suffrage?” Winifred Avery: “Everybody suffer.” Cutting Eh? Red (at Mikado Practice): “Gillette me take your book? Gillette me take your fan? Gillette me have your pencil?” Jack: “Hey! Where d’ya get that safety razor stuff?”Mac: “Who was Columbus?” Bright scholar (No? Well then, pupil): “The Gem of the Ocean.” ----oo---- ".Mamma," said the little boy who was puzzled about evolution, “am I descended from a monkey?” "1 don't know," replied mother, "1 never knew any of your father’s people.” ----oo---- Mother: “Johnny, stop using such dreadful language.” Johnny: “Well, mother. Shakespeare uses it.” Mother: “Then don’t play with him. lie's no fit companion for you.” ----oo---- “Yes, William, you must learn your catechism.” “But, mother, this is too hard, can't you get me a kittyism?” ----oo---- Mr. Allman: "But why did they kill a man for stealing a sheep?” Milton L.: “Why, I suppose so he wouldn’t do it any more.” ----oo---- "Oh—I dropped an egg. what shall I do?” “For Heaven’s sake cackle.” ----oo----- Pauline: "You drive awfully fast, don't you?" Doc: "Yes. I hit seventy yesterday.” Pauline: “Goodness! did you kill any of them?” ----oo----- Robert Ramsey: How do you pronounce audire audacissme, Miss Williams?” Miss Williams: “Au dearie, an du kiss me.” "“.Ever study a blotter?” “No, foolish.” “Very absorbing thing.” ----oo----- The following note was given to Mr. Estrich to O. K. one morning. "Vernon was unable to attend school yesterday, as he just shaved himself for the first time.” iI • UI limit i ■ | 1_____________________I Class of 1915 Bair, Russell ....................Teacher Lyons, Ohio Bronson, Laura...........................................................Deceased ♦Chadwick. Bva Orwig................................................... •Emerson, Mildred Leininger............................................ •Ferris. Bess Coleman...............................................Jackson, Mich. •Foraker. Winifred Walcott..........................................Detroit, Mich Goodwin, Arlene.................................................Washington, D. C. ♦Hoag. Marjorie Kunkle...........................................Washington, D. C. ♦Kohl, Joyce Miller........................................................Angola, Ind. Martin, Eva.....................................................Washington, D. C. ♦McCoy, Constance Williamson........................................Detroit, Mich. ♦McKay, Floy Hammond........................................................Bryan, Ohio Stage, Ora ..........................................................Angola, Ind. •Zimmer, Ford....................................................Fort Wayne, Ind. ('kiss of 1919 •Blake. Daphne Goodale.......... Cain, Harold.................. Castell, Stanley.............. Clark, Glen................... Cline, Dean................... •Dorricott, Mildred Hanselman ♦Emerson, Thomas................ Fairfield. Myra............... Gundrum, Lolabelle............ ♦Holderness Jeanette Pollock •Horrall, Bernice Moody.... Howell, Harold.................. Ireland. Ana.......................Teacher Lehman. Lois.......................Teacher Mast, Erwin.......................Student Metzgar, Gaylord............................ Morgan, Marjorie........................... Moss. Ellen................................. Redding, Lois.............................. •Rising. Gertrude Ingalls................... Slade. Phyllis............................. •Somerlott, Ruth Masters..................... McClellan Sterling......................... Wambaugh, Anna............................. Webb. Jane.........................Student.. Webb. Lucile................ .Student. . •Whitlock. Elsie Rinehart................... Wilcox, Leo................................. Wolfe, Dono................................ •Wolfe. Henry............................... ..........Wolcottville, Ind. ................Angola, Ind. ................Angola, Ind. ..Kimberlin Heights, Tenn. ................Angola, Ind. ............Birmingham, Ala. Newspaper Contest Worker ............Washington, D. C. ....................Deceased ..............Ligonier, Ind. .............St. Louis, Mo. ... .Callahan. Fla. ......Tokio, Japan Ann Arbor, Mich. Washington, D. C. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. Clearwater, Fla. .........Angola, Ind. .........Angola, Ind. Bowling Green, Ohio Bowling Green, Ohio ........ Angola, Ind. ....Fort Wayne, Ind. ............ Deceased ........Angola, Ind. ♦Married.•Aldrioh, Edna Spade. . . . Bair, Leo................ •Brooks, Samuel.......... Cline. Dorothea......... Coy, Paul................ •Dirrim, Wilma Johnson.. Douglass, Robert........ Dygert. Newton.......... Emerson, Valta Garver. . •Pink, Hobart............ Goodw:n, Walter......... Griffith, Willa.......... •Hansel man. Let ha Rozell Hendry, George........... Kankamp, Martha......... •Landis, Pearl Johnson... •Lepley, Alice Stayner . . . N u tz. Paul........... Reese, Paul.............. • Riblett, Nina Ritter.... •Seeley, Mary Ogden..... •See’ey, Wayland.......... Smith Carlton............ •Stallman, Lucile Myers. . VanAuken, St. Clair...... Waugh, Emily............. Weiss, Aubrey............ ..................Hamilton. Ind ........................Deceased ....................Angola, Ind. ....................Angola, Ind. ....................Angola, Ind. ....................Angola, Ind. ....................Angola, Ind. Radio Operator in Marine Service .....................Salem, Ind. ...............Fort Wayne, Ind. ..................Lakeland, Fla. ..................................Angola, Ind. ..................................Angola, Ind. .............................Fort Wayne, Ind. ..................................Angola, Ind. ..................................Ashley, Ind. ......................................Deceased ............................Fort Wayne, Ind. ..................................Angola, Ind. ..................................Angola, Ind. ...................................Angola, Ind. ..................................Tampa, Fla. ...................................Flint, Ind. ..................................Chicago, 111. Teacher...........................Angola, Ind. ..................................Angola, Ind. Class of 11)18 •Anderson. Bertha Johnson.. •Aranguren. Dorothea Pence •Barnes, Esther Harman.......................... • Boyers, Bruce......................Teacher. . •Butz, Paul..................................... Chrystler, Clarence.................Teacher. . Cole, Robert................................... ♦Cranklin, Rachel Bohner........................ Cr ssinger, Roscoe .......................... Flaishans, Russell..................Student.. Garis Gonda.........................Teacher.. Garrett, Irma.......................Librarian. Gay, Fred...................................... Gay, Paul.......................... ........... Graf. Paul..........................Student. . Graf. Ruth........... Harman, Ora.......... •Holderness, Harry. . . . •Hurley, Inez Griffin.. •Ireland. Grace Berlien •Kincaid, Marie Ellis. Libey, Wade..........................Teacher Mast, Florence ......................Teacher •Myers. Hazel Newnam......................... Myers, Vera..........................Teacher McCool. Florace......................Teacher •Orwig, Beatrice Wilcox................. . ... Parsell, Maurice............................ Parsell, Enos........................Student •Spangle, Grace Stiefel...................... Taylor. Lillian............................. •Terry, Ethel Eckert........................... ......Angola, Ind. Caracas, Venezuela ...Jackson, Mich. ......Angola. Ind. ......Chicago, 111. . .Nevada Mills Ind. ......Angola, Ind. ..........Erie, Pa. ........... Deceased .....Oberlin, Ohio .......Butler, Ind. ......Angola, Ind. ...Annapolis, Md. .....Angola, Ind. .Fort Wayne, Ind. . . . . Ligonier, Ind. .Fort Wayne, Ind. ......Lynn, Mass. . . . Corunna, Mich. .....Garrett, Ind. .......Howe, Ind. ......Angola. Ind. .......Flint, Ind. .Fort Wayne, Ind. .....Albion, Mich. ......Angola, Ind. Bloomington, Ind. ......Angola, Ind. ......Angola, Ind. Washington, D. C.♦Tiffany, Frank ♦Tuttle, Vera Callender Wells, Troas Zabst, Ruth Class of 1919 Baker, Henry.............................. Bates, Laura.......................Teacher Brown, Chelsea....................Student Carpenter, Lucile.................................... Clark Claude......................................... Cline. Hilda......................................... Cox, Harold.......................................... Crain, Gaylord....................................... Cravens, Russell..................................... Croxton, Mark......................Student........... Ewers. Marian........................................ Fink. Carlton......................Student........... Gregg, Lavornia...................................... Griffith Byron.....................Teacher, T. S. C Hardy, Esther......................Teacher........... ♦Lemmon. Edna Stetler................................. McBride, Elizabeth................................... McBride, Lyle........................................ McClellan, Esther..................Student........... McClew, Emmett....................................... Miller. Mildred....................Teacher........... Myers, George...............................•'....... ♦Parker, Birdie Morrison.............................. Parsons, Oscar......................•................ ♦Parrott, Emmett...................................... ♦Pogue. Wilma Slade................................... Ralston, Wesley...................................... Shoup Gail........................................... Stiefel, Mildred..................................... ♦Swanger, Burton...................................... Ulch. Wilma.......................................... Welch. Martha......................Teacher........... ♦Zimmer, Kenneth...................................... Williams, L. D.....................Student........... Wolfe, Mildred....................................... Battle Creek, Mich. ......Boyd, Nevada .........Urbana, 111. ......Angola. Ind. Los Angeles. Calif. ......Angola, Ind. ........Salem, Ind. ......Angola, Ind. .Fort Wayne, Ind. . .Ann Arbor, Mich. ......Angola, Ind. .Indianapolis, Ind. ......Angola. Ind. ......Goshen. Ind. Pleasant Lake, Ind. .....Auburn, Ind. ......Angola, Ind. .Bloomington, Ind. Columbia City, Ind. ........Angola. Ind. .......Orlando. Fla. ........Angola, Ind. .....St. Joseph, Mo. ........Angola, Ind. .......Angola, Ind. ......Detroit, Mich. ...Fort Wayne, Ind .......Jackson, Mich. ...Fort Wayne, Ind .......Angola, ind. ........Angola, Ind. .......Chicago, 111. ..Pleasant Lake, Ind. Class of 1920 ♦Barto. Pauline Hanselman ♦Butz. Dae Whitman........................... Cole, Glen.................................. Collins. Floiad......................Teacher ♦Creel. Donald........................Student Croxton, Marian......................Student ♦Ellis. Wilma Powers......................... ♦Essex. Cora Baker.......................... Evans, Elizabeth....................Student ♦French. Ethel Shippey ♦Hammond. Don............................... Harman. Clarence.......................... Harman, Glen............................... Heckenlively, Joan.................Student ♦Higgins, Clara Hirsch...................... Holderness, Louis......................... Martin, Harold............................. Mast, Herman.......................Student ..........Warren, Ohio ........ Chicago, 111. ..........Angola, Ind. ..........Angola, Ind. ........La Fayette. Ind. ....Bloomington, Ina. ........Anderson, Ind. ..........Monroe, Ind. ..........Albion, Mich. ........Jackson, Mich ..........Orland, Ind. ..........Angola, Ind. ..........Galion, Ohio Colorado Springs, Col. ....Fort Wayne, Ind. ..........Angola, Ind. ..........Angola, Ind. . . . . Ann Arbor, Mich.Mast, Otto..........................Student Metzgar, Clifton....................Student. Metzgar, Marian.....................Teacher Miller, Garcile............................ Miller. Pauline.....................Teacher. Miller, Clarence........................... Owens, Ronald......................Student. Peck, Mary E.......................Student. Redding, Ral’ph............................ Rinehart, Wilma.....................Teacher ♦Roberts, Ethel Harman...................... Shoup, Wavel...................... Student. ♦Smith, Louise Hetzler...................... Sutton, Opal........................Teacher Terry. Eleanor.....................Student. Zimmer, Harold......................Teacher . .Chicago, 111. LaFayette. Ind. ...Flint, Mich. ......Ionia, Mich. Fort Wayne, Ind Ann Arbor, Mich. . .Hillsdale, Mich. ......Angola, Ind. ......Flint, Mich. ......Angola, Ind. ......Olivet, Mien. ......Angola, Ind. . . . . Fremont, Ind. . . . . Oberlin, Ohio .....Angola, Ind. Class of 1021 Boyers, Beulah............................. ♦Brooks, Beulah Latson...................... Butz, Ivene................................ Cline, Helen............................... Cook, Ruth..........................Teacher Crain, Charles............................. Easterday, Hazel....................Teacher Fast, Ralph................................ Fast, Wandalee............................. Garrett. Harold.....................Student Graf, Frederic......................Student ♦Johnson, Catherine Frazier................. Johnson, Howard.....................Student Lowther, Ned............... ♦McClure, Leah Leininger IMllsbury. Marion.......... Pogue, Mary................ Sanders. Mark............. Spade. Clyde............... Stiefel, George........... .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. ........Edon, Ohio Fort Wayne, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. ...Annapolis, Md. ......Homer, 111. .....Olivet, Mich. . . .Owosso, Mich. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. Class of 1022 Adams, Wayne......................Student AUion, Marvin.....................Student Anspaugh. Martha..................Student Anspaugh, Ralph.......................... Baker, Mildred....................Student Burns Ruth............................... Cramer. Carl......................Student Cravens, Berniece.................Student Dolph, Harold............................ Doudt. Wauneta....................Student Elliott. Lucile.......................... Emerson. Lawrence.................Student Frazier. Myrtle......................?. . . Greenley. Earl........................... ♦Hardy, Freda Burkhalter.................. Harman, Hugh......................Student Hoagland, Vern........................... Honess, Leon............................. Hunt, Nellie............................. Jackson, Russel!......................... Janes, Harold.....................Student .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. . .LaFayette, Ind. Fort Wayne, Ind .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. Fort Wayne. Ind. Fort Wayne, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, In a. Fort Wayne, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Angola, Ind. .....Olivet. Mich.Mast, Carl................................. Maxton, Carrol......................Teacher McDormand, Adah.....................Student Miller, Allee.......................Student Miller, Jett........................Student Morley, Bayne.......................Student Ransburg, Pauline.......................... Rose. John..........................Student Sellers, Mildred....................Student Shoup, Roy................................. Shumann, Viviene........................... Story, Helen............................... Swift, Wayne............................... Taylor, Aileen............................. Wheaton, Lawrence. . . ♦White, Georgia Parsell Williamson, Ralph.... Willis, Eloise......................Student Wood, Theodore......................Student Wyatt, Lily.........................Student ......Detroit, Mich. ........Angola, Ind. .......Angola, Ind. .......Angola, Ind. .......Angola, Ind. .......Oberlin, Ohio ........Angola, Ind. ........Angola, Ind. . . .Fort Wayne, Ind. ......Detroit, Micli. ........Angola, Ind. Grand Rapids, Mich. ........Angola, Ind. ........Angola, Ind. .......Angola, Ind. . . .South Bend, Ind. .......Angola, Ind. .......Olivet. Mich. ..Bloomington, Ind. .......Angola, Ini.I To Insure in j Sure Insurance j Call I F armers and Merchants’ Insurance Agency H. W. MORLEY MARY METZGER Manager Secretary A. H. S Students Enjocj (Ehc Luncheons and Dinners CECIL IDEN, Proprietor Smoke Angola Maid Cigars W. W. Love Spaulding Athletic Goods Liggett s Candies Lord Baltimore Stationery Kratz Drug Store The ft XaJIS StoreThe 'Road to Happiness Tlirop’s Bread and Cakes JLS InaCiG 1X1016 smooth by a sub-1J |) stantial savings (u( j account. ]) Money is not A v everything, but it 1 certainly helps over the rough spots in life. And it must be saved while it is being earned. Open Your Account Here and Build for Happiness Call for Them at Your Grocers or Phone Bakery. Angola, Ind. Phone 359 | For THE LATEST Newspapers, Magazines or Fancy Groceries, Go To THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK Angola, Indiana SCHINBECKLER 5c and IOc VARIETY STORE The Store that Does Things The East Side of the Square Angola, Indiana GIFTS! That Are Alwaqs Appropriate j APPROPRIATE be-cause made and selected especially to Braun’s Meat Market Always Has the Best of Everything in MEATS meet the demand for tasteful remembrances. In our store you can do all your gift shopping. Both artistic and useful articles are here for every requirement—and very moderately priced. WILLIAM BRAUN, Prop. BURT’S JEWELRY STORE — — 4 Suits for tlie Graduating Exercises tkat Give a Parent’s Dollar Lots ol Exercise Value here in every suit! And the garments themselves are the trimmest we ever talked about. Blues, Browns, Grays, Mixtures—all new models—all priced to make a sale with the parent—a friend for the store—and a hit with the boy. Two Pan , Suits......$7.50 to $15.00 Serge Suits ... •....$8.50 to $15.00 First Long Pants Suits........$22.50 Shirts, Caps, Neckwear—everything a boy needs for handling a diploma with dignity. For Service and Quality Bunte Chocolates atyr Jlalarrof | ‘t We can take care of your wants for everything in our line. If we haven’t it, we will get it. Let us show you. Everything for ) oung Men to IVear W. L. JARRARD t 4--------------- | The Angola Herald For Local and Court News Job Printing of All Kinds New Modern Equipment ... The ... Golden Garage Accessories, Battery Service Storage and Repairing Phone 275 Angola, Ind. Hardware Sporting Goods Building Material Paints and Oils WILLIAMSON and COMPANY Wlien You Want Anything Try Us First KOLB BROS. Drug Store NEXT DOOR TO POSTOFFICE for Hardware China and Toys MEANS sound sleep, good digestion, cool judgment and independence. We pay interest at 4' on certificates and savings, and solicit you Banking Business. Steuben County State Bank R. J. Carpenter, Cashier .....................................•+ THE BANKING i HABIT"Business is Good... But we are never too busy to give your work prompt and painstaking attention. Our improved facilities and expert workmen contribute toward first class printing service. We are sure we can please you STEUBEN REPUBLICAN Printers of this Publication — and Others Wliat is Your Financial Efficiency ? Hr HE efficiency of engines is measur-A ed by the difference between the potential power in the fuel given them, and the power they actually produce. What is your financial efficiency? Do you get every cent’s worth of value from your dollars? A checking account here assures you a detailed record of expenditures, without which financial efficiency is impossible. Open a checking account with us today. Angola Bank Trust Co.Radio Supplies Electric Appliances Fixtures and Lamps Wiring - “ " ” Cleon M. Wells | FOODS Telephone 143 Angola, Indiana WILLIAMSON ELECTRIC CO. Compliments of Brokaw Billiard Parlor Angola, Indiana We Wash Everything But the Kids MODERN STEAM LAUNDRY ... The ... New Meat Market If good quality, good service and low prices appeal to you, you will trade with MAST BROTHERS Phone 400 N. Elizabeth St. Variety Store A little of Everything Not Much °f Anything H. MENZENBERGER 210 W. Maumee 378 Phone Pictures F rained Duckwall Furniture Store Angola, Indiana Angola Shoe Repair Shop R. OTIS YODER Jc? When you think of Shoe Repairing Think Of Us We Use Nothing But the Best Material h— ——•— It is our effort to give our customers the best shoes for the ... » —•— — —- » — Slade Porter money in Angola. Stylish and Dependable Barbers Footwear Is Our Motto We can sell as GOOD cheap shoes as sold in Steuben 221 W. Maumee Angola County. We do sell the best SHOES and at lower prices than most stores. Our line of HOSIERY is complete and no KICKS about the Hotel Hendry wear. nr Come to Goody Clean Elston’s Shoe Store Reliable Banquets and Sunday Dinners For SERVICE Our Specialties Quality Groceries and Bulk Collee A Musical Home is a Happy Home f}osctcks F. J. RICHARDSON SON Phone 260 Angola 21Tusic Roy Cox MEAT MARKET Quality and 0 n Service Headquarters for Phone 20 Angola, Ind. “everything musical” — ——tYour Training Should include the use of modern conveniences. Your home life will he more pleasant if you use Electric Appliances to shorten your labor hours. Hot Point Curling Irons Toasters, Irons, Grills and many other servants please the receiver of the present. THE INDIANA UTILITIES CO. Angola, Indiana ROSS H. MILLER Tailoring and Drx) Cleaning Hats Cltaned and •Blocked Phone 484 Angola, Ind. For a Clean, Cool, Comfortable Shave Come to Our Shop Four Barbers No Waiting Adams Bender Goodale Abstract Co Loans and Insurance ANGOLA, - - INDIANA Angola Shoe Shine Parlor Stync N. W. Cor. Square Angola+• Good Eats Every Day Boys and Girls, Eat Where the Eatin’s Good Breakfast, lunch, dinner, supper—any time day or night—we serve the best, most wholesome food in the city. Eat Lunch With Us Every Day Meal Tickets at Liberal Rates CRYSTAL CAFE ■+ That’s Us THOMAS BEATTY, Props. WATSON’S New Restaurant Department The Best in the City Everything for Everybody Try Mother Watson’s Pies Meals and Short Order Featuring Home CookingExcellence y AR book specialists WASH DRAWINGS RETOUCHING PEN DRAWINGS COPPER HALFTONES ZINC HALFTONES ZINC ETCHINGS COLOR ENGRAVINGS EMBOSSING DIES ELECTROTYPES NICKELTYPES ENGRAVED ANDJlMBOJSED STATIONERY jt. Wamefnf n FOR T WAYNE, I ravim INDIANA a V


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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

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