Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN)

 - Class of 1922

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 98 of the 1922 volume:

10 THE LIBERAL DONORS WHO HAVE .MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE ERECTION OF THE COMMUNITY BUILDING A MORE PLEASANT AND PROFITABLE HIGH SCHOOL LIFE, WE RESPECTFULLY DEDICATE THIS, THE I! 122 “KEY."TABLE OF CONTENTS Dedication............................................. Foreword............................................ Key Staff.............................................. In Memoriam............................................ High School Faculty ................................... Community Gymnasium ................................... Senior Class History .................................. High School Graduates ................................. Senior Class Prophecy ................................. Senior Class Poem...................................... Last Will and Testament................................ Salutatory and Valdictory ............................. Juunior Cartoon and Class Roll......................... Sophomore Cartoon and Class Roll....................... Freshman Cartoon and Class Roll........................ Organization Cartoon................................... A. H. S. Quartette..................................... A. H. S. String Trio................................... Vocational Agriculture................................. A. H. S. Chorus........................................ A. H. S. Orchestra.................................. Hi-Y Club................................................ Art Classes............................... Hi-c m. club.................................. Literary .............................................. The Consolidated School................................ Teachers in A. H. S.............................. The Master of the Lady Marie (Carl Cramer).......... Jim Sanderson, Detective (Wayne Swift)................. Fundamentals of Artistic Piano Playing (Pauline Ransburg) Dramatic Cartoon ................................... Senior Class Play, “Fifty-Fifty”.................... Junior Class Piay, “Betty’s Last Bet”..... Where But in America?............................... Athletic Cartoon ..............................’ ’ Boys’ Basket Ball team and Writeup.................. Schedule of Games and Individual Records...........’ ' ' Girls’ Basket Ball Team and Writeup.............. Cartoon........................................... ’ ’ ’ ‘ Joke Cartoon and Jokes.................... Alumni Cartoon and Alumni..................... ’ Advertisement Cartoon and Advertisements. 1 3 4 5 G 9 I s 0-15 16-17 IS 10-21 22-23 24- 25 26-27 25- 20 30 31 32 33 34-35 36-37 3 8 30 40 41 42 43 14-47 4 8-51 52 53 54-55 56-57 58 50 60-61 62-63 64-65 66 67-72 73-78 70-02= ANNUAL ♦ 9 HE CLASS of 1022, in saying farewell to the Angola High School, wishes to express its appreciation for the earnest, untiring service given by the faculty that we might come to the close of our school work well equipped for the years beyond, in every department we found a spirit of helpfulness, a desire or our success and a diligent endeavor to give us of their best At times they may have felt it a hopeless task and wearied in well doing, but in our hearts was always the knowledge of their interest, sympathy, and co-operation; though often we may have kept that understanding pretty well disguised. Hut now as we pass out from their watchful care and protection, we do so with appreciation and gratitude for all they have done for us and with the wish that they may continue in their helpful guidance to many more classes. We offer this Annual hoping and anticipating a kindly toleration because of its personal value. We expect for it the sentiment that is “Just between Friends.”i=A. M'. l.== r Urt llemoriam SHELDON RINEHART Sweet as the tender fragrance that survives When martyred flowers breathe out their little lives. Is thy remembrance. Now the hour of rest Hath come to thee. Sleep, comrade, it is best.” —Longfellow Sheldon Rinehart entered the Angola High School as a member of the Freshman class in September, 1920, and continued in attendance until his fatal illness. His (|uiet and unassuming manner won him the respect of all his classmates. The best interests of his fellow students and the welfare of the school were his chief concern. Sheldon had an abiding interest in the sciences; and it was in the study of this best loved subject that the dreadful poisoning was contracted. He died after an illness of several weeks. Our sympathy we extend to his parents and relatives. Our memory of his friendship we sacredly cherish.=«B» - Q- ANNUAL J_ COMMUNITY GYMNASIUM This year, through the eo-operative help of all liberal minded citizens of the community, one epoch in the history of the Angola schools was brought to a close and another of broader usefulness to the community was ushered in. The plan of the Hoard of Education to construct a new vocational building, incorporating a gymnasium and auditorium, could not be realized, di e to the fact that the cost of construction exceeded the bonding capacity of the School City by more than +20,000.00. The demand on the part of the students and patrons of the school for a gymnasium was very general, but hope for obtaining the coveted object was waning when a courageous citizen voiced the sentiment of the community and called a meeting of those interested in building by voluntary subscription a gymnasium for the use of the school and various organizations of the e. mmunity. It took the prophetic vision of Major Guy Shauglniiss to foresee the possibility of actually building a community gymnasium. He had a plan drafted and called a meeting at the court house of all citizens. The fact that only a few people attended the meeting was no indication of a lack of interest. The plan was presented and served as a basis for discussion. A committee consisting of A. Redding, chairman; Guy Shaughniss and II. B. Allman was then selected to determine the actual needs and to revise the plans. A few days later, a second meeting was called, where the building committee presented more detailed plans. Attorney A. C. Wood recommended that a corporation to be known as the Angola Community Building Company be organized. Major Shaughniss was selected as president, and the previous building committee was endorsed and instructed to proceed with the completion of the plans and the erection of the building. A finance committee consisted of P. A. Emerson, Ed Williamson, and Herb Menzenberger, to whom was delegated the task of raising funds. The building committee then employed W. A. Hunker as superintendent of construction. During the fair week vacation, boys of the high school volunteered work ami began excavation for the basement, and dug trenches for tin foundation and walls. The building committee then called for bids and let the contracts tor the foundation and materials for construction. C. A. Redding, chairman ot the building committee, took charge of the work in person, and the success of the project is due to his tireless efforts to get the building enclosed and ready for use during the present year. Much credit is due to carpenters and helpers, whose inteiest in the undertaking prompted them to put in extra louts and expend extra ene'gy to hasten the work. The dedicatory ceremonies were held on January 27-211. On the opening evening the school children gave a program. This was followed on the next afternoon and evening by a series of basket ball games, with the formal d dication at a mass meeting Sunday afternoon. Since the day of the opening the building has been in constant use. Extensive improvements have been made in staging and scenery. The building can be changed quickly from an attractive auditorium with a seating capacity of 2,000, to an excellent gymnasium with a playing floor fifty by eighty feet, and room to adequately accommodate 1,500 spectators. Through the contribution of citizens, +0,300 was raised, of which +.),200 has been paid. The total cost of the building to date is approximately +12,000. The lot on which the building is located is leased to the Community Building Company. The Hoard of Education then rents the building from Ihe Community Corporation. The building is still unfinished, and as soon as the funds are available the brick veneer will be placed around the outer walls.SENIOR CLASS HISTORY Br-r-r-r-ring! My sleep-befuddled senses again began to function and my rirst thought was to smother that bothering nuisance, the alarm clock, with my pillow. But I was wrong, 1 had no pillow. I had merely been day dreaming in my easy chair. And that alarm clock, turned out to be my telephone which I went to answer. “Yes,” I answered, “I was loafing on the job, in fact dreaming. But suppose I relate my dream. It starts with myself and eighteen ot hers reluctantly entering the first grade. We were under the guiding hand of Miss Mathews, whom we soon found understood us very well and was a fine teacher. Then we went on thru grades under various teachers, some of whom we liked and one or more not so well liked. But as 1 look back I find they were really all fine people and good teachers, although we misunderstood them at times. Then how eager and proud we were when we got our diploma which proclaimed to the world our privilege to enter High School. Most of us did enter, some leaving our ranks and new ones entering. Even while we were still subject to the usual ridicule bestowed upon Freshmen, we began to prove our ability. We soon established a record for parties and social affairs. Then from our lines emerged individuals who distinguished themselves as orators, debators, essayists, and athletes. There were prominent students in every phase of school activities. Then came our graduation. There were left in our Senior Class only about seven or eight of the original group which first started. Of these I remember the following: Pauline Ransburg, Allee Miller, Carl Mast, Wayne Adams, Earl Greenley, and Wayne Swift. Your untimely ring of the telephone interrupted me in the act of receiving my desired diploma with the most dignified and man-of-the-world air I could assume."HUGH HARMON •Hi-Y” (’In! B Historical Club Track HI Orchestra III MILDRED SELLERS Historical Club —K— Mildred is a happy girl, roiy of complexion. About her there may he a little rogue but no rouge. MARVIN ALLION Presklent Historical Club III-IV IVImting team IV —K— “Marv” doesn’t waste any time when there is anyth’ng to be done he goes right ahead and does it in the shortest and most efficient manner possible. His rsgular. sens'ble hulrts have made him a student of the first order. —K— “Harmon” is noted for his friendly smile and his quiet persistence. The type of man who is able to build a big. permanent business. RUSSELL JACKSON Ashley II. S. 11-1II K— “Rus.” When it come3 to being—well red. Russell takes first honors. Aside from that, he’s a pretty good scout. NELLIE HUNT •Hi-CM” Club Historical Club IV —K— Nellie does not have much to say when a teacher is near. She l kes to sit on the back row during recitation. RALPH WILLIAMSON President "Ak" Club IV Orchestra 1I-III-IV —K— Rass holds to the fact that one must toot his own horn. He certainly practices what he preaches.io =•:■ Till.; KKY== =:«= THEODORE WOOD Class President I "Hi-Y" President IV Basket ball TTI-IV Baseball IV —K— “Thee” is the pride of the school. A general in leadership, a hero in athletics, a master in scholarship—a man in everything. As much at ease behind the counter as on the hardwood court. PAULINE RANSBURG Annual Staff Class Secretary III-IV Secretary Athletic Assn. IV Orchestra 11-111-IV Chorus Il-IIl-IV —K— “Beany,” the guardian of the class treasury, has preserved the credit of the class in times of financial stress. Her business judgment, musical talent and social art mark her as a leader. VERN HOAGLAND Senior Dramatics K “Hoagv“is our automobile specialist. If he can’t drive a Ford nobody can. He expects to buy out the Ford factory in a few years. GEORGIA PARSELL Annual Staff Basket Ball IV —K— Here, ladies and gentlemen, you witness a rare combination. She is studious to a tolerable degree and cheerful beyond description - -yes, she has quiet spells some times, but once you get her started the only remedy is distance. HAROLD JANES Key StafT lll-IV 'nnuc 1 StaT Class President IV Junior Dramatics 11 -111 Discussion IH-IV Historical Club 111 -1V “HI-V” Club —K— “Tuffy” is the orator of the class. He would rather speak than eat. When he was not busy preparing a speech, he was taking care of the large volume of Senior class business. MILDRED BAKER Historical Club IV IC— We are expecting Mildred to h come a great teacher; especially after all the training sic has had. =■— "Sf ANNUAL 11 ALLEB MILLER •Hi-CM" Club Chorus III-IV —K— It has often been said that valuable things come in small packages. Doubters consult T. S. C. students. LEON HONESS "Hi-Y” Club —K— Leon never comes late unless he has “engine trouble.” We predict he will be able to keep pace with his brothers if he does need the help of his Ford. MYRTLE FRAZIER Class President III Key Staff III-IV Annual Staff Quartet III-IV Class Vice President IV ••HI-CM" Club Orchestra III-IV Chorus III-IV’ —K— “Myrt” was always found among the boosters for anything worth while which was started. She helped very materially to win the county contest. RALPH ANSPAUGH Huso ball III-IV' —K— “Ralph” is a practical person not given to flights of fancy or mischief; more at home in the pitcher’s box than on the classroom floor. FREDA BURKHALTER Historical Club IV’ —K— Freda is a person of unassuming ways, yet beneath the calm exterior we have reason to fear there lurks a very mischievous spirit. ROY SHOUP Annual Staff “Hl-Y" Club Orchestra III K — Roy may get sleepy occasionally but he is always on the job. He is in training for selling books, and after that expects to study medicine.12 THE KKY= r RUTH BURNS Key Staff IV Annual Staff Senior Dramatic —K— Ruth holds herself aloof from most of us with a high and mighty scorn for the pettiness of our careers. She understands the science of bluffing passably well. BAYNE MORLEY Treasurer Athletic Ass'n. m-IV Key Staff Annual Staff ••hi-y" Club Orchestra II-III-IV Historical Club 11F-T V Track IV Senior Dramatics III —K— “Bing” has mastered the art of repartee and clever toasUng. His versatility in oratory, music and journalism d'stingnish him as the genius of his class. VIVIENE SHUMANN Key Staff III Annual Staff Class Poet III-IV Junior Dramatics Senior Dramatics —K— “Cleopatra” has an abiding interest in the students of T. S. C. She is the Mary Pick ford of iho high school stage. CARROL MAXTON Historical Club IV "Hi-Y” Club K— One of our progressive young Agriculturists, winner of trip to Purdue. WAUNETA DOUDT Hlptor’cal Club I' Debating team IV K— Although there is a Doudt about her name, th?re is no doubt «•: to her standing in druses. LAWRENCE WHEATON Historical Club IV ‘Ag" Club III-IV K— Lawrence has that quality which has helped many men to success. He is always on the job, and has been so busy at his work that he has never had time to annex a nickname. ELOISE WILLIS Key Staff IV Annual Staff Junior Dramatics Senior Dramatics “HI-CM” Club Chorus III-IV e« f “‘May” is an exponent of the simple virtues. Success in scholarship holds more interest than the lures of soe'ety. She is noted for her common sens?, and admired for her moda.ity. WAYNE ADAMS Annual Staff Senior Pramat’cs Orchestra III-IV —K— Wayne appears to he away on an imaginative pleasure trip at times, hut the teacher usually finds he is on the job. A good story writer. MARTHA ANSPAUGH Historical Club IV Chorus 11T K— )ne would nev?rsu9peet Martha of carrying note3 in her pocket for help in examination, and she never did. She is one on whom the teachers and her friends could always rely. ADAH McDORMAND Chorus IV —K-— “Ada.” qu o! and unassuming; hut ju it get her started to talking and you will he surprised at the case and persistence av’th which she does it. JOHN ROSE Senior Dramatics “HI-Y” Club K— “John” disdain; pretention? boasting. Sincerity and simplicity are not less a part of him than his patience and good humor. JETT MILLER Historical Club IV —K— Jett was one of the most regular attendants of thi entire class, ft doesn’t take her long to speak her mind, hut “after cloud;, sunshine.”= :• — TilB KKV=; CARL CRAMER Valedictorian Key Staff IV Annual Staff Class Historian IV Basket Ball II-I11. Capt. IV Base ball II-III-IV Track III-IV Debating team IV “Hi-Y’ Club Historical Club IV' —K— “Hal” disproves the idea that one cannot be both a Rood athlete and a good student. He has a record in either field that mav well he envied. BERNIECE CRAVENS Class Treasurer II Class Vice President III Key Staff III Annual Staff Junior Dramatics Senior Dramatics “HI-CM” Club Orchestra III-IV Chorus III-IV —K— Berniece never seemed to be blue; if she was no one ever knew it. Next to Lucile Elliott, she could drink more pop than any member of the “Key” staff. WAYNE SWIFT Salutatorlan Junior Dramatics Senior Dramatics Historical Club IV K— Much to his surprise. Wayno found himself loaded down with the Salutatory honors. Next time he will not work so hard. LILY WYATT Historical Club IV —K— Assumed the big task of making up several units of back work, missed because of illness earlier in her course, in addition to her regular Senior work. She managed to use all her time to advantage, finishing in a creditable manner. LAWRENCE EMERSON Key Stafr III Class Vice President II Junior Dramatics Senior Dramatics “Hi-Y” Club —K— “Doug” has many interests from dispensing drugs to selling automobiles. He will never die of a broken heart. HELEN STORY “HI-CM” Club —K— “Helen” is our blooming stenographer and chemistry shark. We expect to find her head “Stenog.” with some big company a few years hence.Sir ANNI' 15 AILEEN TAYLOR CARL MAST LUCILE ELLIOTT ('lass President II Key Staff 11-1II-IV Annual Staff Ibtsket Rail 111-1 V Athletic Ass'n. Pres. IV "Hi-CM" Club Senior Dramatics 111 —K— Aileen is a Rood plan-maker: she has devised more ways to raise money for the Athletic Association than was necessary to put it out of debt. Furthermore, she helps execute her own plans. ('lass Secretary II Junior Dramatics Key Staff IV Annual Staff Yell Leader III-TV Secretary Athletic Ass’n. Ill “Hi-Y" Club —K— “Mastie” can Ret all the rooters to rooting. As for himself, he hasn't much to say. Junior Dramatics Annual Staff Reading. County Contest IV “HI-CM" Club —K— “Lucy.” the gracious and graceful actress and reader, won honors for the school and the gratitude of her fellow students. She will never want for admirers. (Pictures could not he secured) EARL OREENLEY HAROLD DOLPH Raskct ball III-IV Rase ball IV Historical Club IV —K— “Abe” possessed that trait most of us lack—perseverance—and when he set out to do something he stuck to it until he had accomplished it. Historical Club IV —K— Harold is always busy. When not studying, he finds some other useful thing to do.SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY One summer day while walking in the woods, I grew tired and sat down on a rock to rest. As I sat there day-dreaming and looking oft' into space, along came a wee little old man and tapped me on the shoulder. I was surprised that he did not frighten me for lie had a queer, dried-up face. Suddenly in a cracked little voice he said : “Follow me," and immediately trotted down a little path that until now had escaped my eye. At first 1 decided that I would not follow hut my curiosity was so strong that I could not resist. Every few minutes I caught a glimpse of my little guide, so he was evidently staying just ahead of me. On and on we went until 1 was beginning to feel disgusted with myself for following him. Hut finally we stopped before a mammoth cave. “Come on,” he beckoned as he noticed how dubious I looked; so 1 followed. The cave being rather dark, 1 had difficulty in following. At last the man stopped before a little door. “You’ll have to crawl through this,” lie said and immediately scampered through. It wasn’t so easy for me, but when I did get through, I opened my mouth in astonishment; for I was in a miniature land of sunshine. Flowers, palm trees, tiny lakes and vines, were everywhere. But I followed the little man to the edge of the largest of the lakes. It wasn't really a lake; rather a whirlpool which was still for a moment and then surging away again. The little old man said, “Watch it," and obeying him I saw a sight which held my eyes to the spot as though it were a magnet. There was our old schoolmate, Jett Miller, a missionary in Japan. I rubbed my eyes to see if I were dreaming, but no, it was real. The waves washed away the scene. Then I saw a toe dancer come tripping out on the stage. Mildred Baker! of all things! And she had always planned to be a school teacher! The whirl-pool stopped and the scene vanished. After the pool had resumed its surging who should appear but John Rose behind the bars of that famous institution, Sing-Sing. My little friend informed me that John had been given a life sentence for having only 159 units in his Outside Reading while he was in high school. It seemed that the case was brought into the court of which Pauline Ransburg was the judge, Miss Powell being the plaintiff. The vision disappeared. Next the Capitol loomed before me and Cu re Abe Z. Greenly sitting in tin “President’s Private Office.” For the past iwi years he had guided the destiny of this great nation. He was reading the “Angola Morning Mugle.” There in heavy, black type was a picture of our beloved orator, Harold Janes. The account beneath the picture reed as follows: “Hon. Harold Janes, Speaker of the House, breathed his last breath at 1:39 this morning. In delivering an oration on ‘Sunshine and Tempest,’ he choked on a big word and died before it could be dislodged.” This was a great shock to the President and also Berneiee Oavcns who was his private secretary. Harold had resided in the White House for the last two years. The waves washed away the sight. 1 next saw in the pool my o'd classmate, Leon lioness, whom my guide said was now successor to Billy Sunday. He was engaged in earnest conversation with Georgia Parsell, who was playing the stellar role in “Cncje Tom’s Cabin.” I noticed that he was car-= ANNTAL=' = 17 ♦ rying two books under liis arm; oik was “IIow to Grow Old Gracefully,” by Helen Storey, and the other, “The Art of Staying Thin,” by Mildred Sellers. The setting of the picture changed. Theodore Wood came galloping into the scene on his horse, followed by liis wife, who was our one time class-mate, Vivienne Shuman. They were closely followed by Lay re nee Emerson and his bride, who was formerly Vellie Hunt. It seemed they were spending their honeymoon with their old friends. The scene followed them to a carnival. Entering the grounds the first thing that caught their attention was a large sign on which was printed; See Russell Jackson—heavy weight champion of the world. Walking on Lawrence exclaimed, “Why, there’s Hal Cramer; I'd know him in a million." “Hey! Cramer, what are you doing here?” “Well. I'll be---if it isn't Dug,” said Hal. Of course they made the most of this opportunity by talking of each other and also of their old friends. Ilal had .just returned from a visit to Indiana. While in Metz he had been entertained at the home of the mayor Laurence Wheaton, who had lately married the business woman of the A. II. S., Aileen Taylor. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Carl Mast, a noted evangelist. Hal had also visited the “Swift” Hospital, of Summit, Indiana, where Wayne Swift and Roy Shoup were the surgeons. The scene of the carnival vanished and in its place came the Angola Fair Grounds. As I glanced over the crowd in the grand stand 1 heard Ralph Anspaugh yelling at the top of his voice, “lee cream cones, 5 cents." Then I noticed two people enter the stand who looked strangely familiar. When 1 heard someone say, “There comes Mr. and Mrs. Morley," I remembered Lueile Elliott, who had won so many laurels in A. II. S„ and Bayne, who had always been so prejudiced against the gymnasium. My attention was now attracted to a stage before the stand. There were Marvin Allion and Adah Mc-Dormand, doing acrobatic stunts! In the Exhibit Hall was a booth very prettily decorated in orange and white. I was surprised to see Ruth Burns, crossed entirely in white, demonstrating the famous “Burns’ Freckle Cream. 'i'llis scene gradually faded. On the race track at Indianapolis there appeared an automobile race. On inquiry 1 found that Ralph Williamson was driving one of the new “Iloagland Super Twelve” racers. Wayne Adams was the mechanic. 1 also noticed Freida Burkhalter Maxton and Martha Anspaugh, her maid, as they left the grand stand. I asked my little old friend beside me, if he knew anything about the rest of my old classmates, and immediately the whirlpool brought forth another view. Hugh Harmon was waiting for a train in a railroad station in Fort Wayne. He picked up the “Youth’s Companion” and the “Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette” and started to read. 1 was amazed when I saw at the top of the “Youth’s Companion.” Editor—Eloise Willis. I also learned from Myrtle Frazier, the ticket agent, that Eloise had bobbed her hair. As Hugh then took up the “Gn ,tte," I noticed on the Woman's Rage" these words: “Letters to Lovers and Others” by Allee Miller. She had remained unmarried all these years so of course she knew a great deal about lovers. When ! asked about Hugh, 1 learned that he was on his way to Purdue University since he had lately acquired the position of athletic director there. Wauneta Doudt suddenly entered the station and purchased a ticket. I ' as curious to know what Wauneta had been doing since graduation, so 1 went over and talked to her. She told me she was starting for Ft. Sumner, New Mexico, where she had been called to coach the play, “Fifty-Fifty.” I walked outside with her for the train was almost ready to leave. Horrors of horrors! There was Lilly Wyatt in her uniform—a conductor! Will 1 ever get over all these surprises, I thought. Then I gave a start, for as I opened my eyes I again saw the trees and the big rock on which I had sat down to rest. Then it was all a dream! BERXEICE CRAVENS RATLINE RANSBTRGSENIOR CLASS POEM How swift is time! In vain I think The past four years have been a dream. Four years as one; thoughts, link by link From “Memory’s Chain,’’ a mystic gleam Before us shines on life's wide brink— But these are only things that seem. Our boat is waiting by the shore. ith backward glance, we furl the sails; With faltering grasp we take the oars Firmly now lest courage fails, As oft it seemed it would before. We strive to face the fiercest gale. When the end draws near, and trials are more, Our pilot may despair. We know these waves were beast before, So we the same may dare; And brave the billows, all efforts due, W ith cherished ideals full in view. Boll on swift time; may you bestow On those we leave behind, Oood luck. Success, rich gifts, also True friends, in whom they’ll find Contentment, hope, and jov divine.LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT We, the Seniors of Angola High School, being all of fairly sound mind, do wish before ending our bright careers in High School, to make and publish this, our last will and testament to rightfully dispose of all property. We bequeath to our beloved Juniors all the privileges, deeds of charity, and partiality shown us on the part of the Faculty, that we as Seniors have enjoyed for the past year; also the large, honorable title of Seniors; the clock which has an uncanny way of gaining time during the noon period when it is left alone with tin freshmen. Also do we dedicate to the Juniors the "Senior Assembly.” At the departure of said Juniors, the real estate aforesaid, we give to our dear Sophomore class on condition that each member thereof graduate with high honors. If, however, any of said Sophs should fail to receive a diploma because of extraordinary grades, then their share of said property is thereby turned over to our darling protege, the Freshmen Class. To Mr. Estrich, we leave the high office of "Bug Examiner" for the Freshmen, and "Puzzle and Formula Solver" for the Seniors. To Mr. Keep, we do bequeath all the compasses, rulers, protractors, and all Math books found lying on the radiators in the Assembly room. To Mr. Miles, we will all the recent popular song hits, such as "Wabash Blues" and "1 Ain't Nobody’s Darlin’ " so that "Love's Old Sweet Song" might have a rest during the chapel period next year. To Mr. Gonser we leave all stock and poultry belonging to the Senior class, provided he does not allow the agriculture class to experiment upon them. To Mr. Phillips we do bequeath all histories, basket balls, base balls, etc., that the Seniors leave, and we wish him much success in his future work. To Miss Powell, we leave the right to all dates which are not mentioned among those in Literature. To Miss Love, we give all note books, ponies, etc., which originated with the Seniors. To Miss Shewmaker, we leave all bookkeeping and commercial arithmetic lules and laws which were long ago rejected by the coming business men and editors. To .Miss Parsell, we leave the right to cut out and preserve all works of ,-.rt she might find on the covers or pages of the discarded Senior texts. To Miss Pugh, we bequeath the privilege of taking all pins, tape measures, needles, etc., she might have use for in her classes of the future. To Miss West, we leave all grease paint, powder and lip sticks, or in short, all our cosmetics; provided she reform and use same only for stage make ups. To Mr. Allman, under whose loving care and thoughtful advice we have jived for the past four years, and who, we know, deserves to be remembered in our will, we leave our best regards. I. Mildred Baker, do bequeath my short dresses and pencil stubs to Edna McKim, provided she lengthens both. |, Alice Miller, do will my dancing shoes, as well as my hearty laugh, to Dorothy Long, provided she wear out neither.key I, Jett Miller, do bequeath my good disposition and vanity ease to Vernon Sniff. I, Lily Wyatt, do bequeath my popularity with Flint boys to Wava McKenzie. I, Georgia Parse!!, do bequeath my popularity with college fellows to Jeannette Ilendry, provided she does not lose same. I, Lueile Elliott, do will my ballet dancing to Arline Fast. We, Nellie Hunt and Wauneta Doudt, do bequeath our winning ways to those students who need them. We, Freda Burkhalter and Martha Anspaugh, do will our ability as students to Goldie Craun and Willoeue Spangler. I, Adah McDorman, do leave my love ot' study to Mildred Thomas. - I. Vivienne Shuman, will my oratorical powers to any student who thinks that he can bear the burden of same. I. Pauline Ransburg, do bequeath my ability to handle currency and seo-retorial books to Lawrence Wolfe. I, Aileen Taylor, do will my ability as a business manager to James Williamson. I, Mildred Sellers, do leave the memory of my quietness to be placed on record as a model, loyal A. II. S. student. We, Eloise Willis and Berneice Cravens, do leave the remembrance of our musical talent to the orchestra, believing that they need the afore named talent. We, Ruth Burns and Myrtle Frazier, do leave our grade cards to be put on record as examples of Senior brilliancy. T, Helen Story, do leave my sweet smile to Helen McNeal, provided she does not use the same when looking at Mr. Phillips. I, Marvin Allion, do leave my distaste for everything that would make me use strenuous effort or quick movement, to Joseph Douglass. We, Lawrence Emerson and Vern Iloagland, do leave our popularity with the Pleasant Lake girls and ability to miss 8:00 a. m. and 12:15 p. ni. classes, to Joseph Weicht. I, Harold Janes, do give my unquestionable ability as an orator, to any Junior who can pronounce difficult words before an audience. I, Theodore Wood, do bequeath to Ralph Lampman all translations of Virgil in recompense for the bad influence 1 have exerted over him during the last year. I, Carl Mast, do leave to William Paul Oroxton the right to miss classes while attending football games at the University of Michigan. We, Leon lioness and Carroll Maxton, do leave our popularity with the girls during noon period, to any Sophomore who lives in the country. 1, Carl Cramer, do. with pleasure, give to Eddie Collins my popularity with the people of Auburn. 1, Earl Oreenley, do leave tIn right to ride up and down with the elevator girl in Lafayette, to Merrill Cline. I,Bayne Morley, do leave my indoor gymnastic ability to our promising athlete, Austin Brokaw. I, Harold Dolph, do leave my pep to Charles Janes. I, Roy Shoup, do give my ability as a Latin student, to be awarded bv Miss Love to any Freshman who is worthy of same. Me, Wayne Swift and Lawrence Wheaton, do leave our horses to any student who lives in the country and who can get up early every morning so that he may have time to get to school, but we warn the aforenamed student that the said horses will not be of any value at night, having never had proper training. I, John Rose, do bequeath upon Byron Pence mv reputation as a general “cut-up.” I, Ralph Williamson, «lo give my ability as a student to Lawrence Wolfe.21 I, Hugh Harmon, do leave my ability as a track athlete to Joseph Carpenter. 1, Wayne Adams, do bequeath to livrona Allison my vivid imagination, provided she use same to benefit the II. S. paper. I. Russell Jackson, do leave my red hair to Xaurice Owens, so that he might have time to study and to play basket ball. (Who said Add-a-line?) Signed, sealed, sanctioned, subscribed and censored by the above named sane Seniors, as their Last Will and Testament, in the presence of us and each of us, who, in their sight, and at their solicitation, and in sight of each other, have hereunto subscribed our signatures as attestants. CRAM HR I JCRNS.V =THE KKY=-5- -- SALUTATORY Parents, teachers and friends, in behalf of the Senior Class of PJ22. I wish to extend to you a hearty welcome. I wish first of all to welcome those, the parents of this class, whose untiring efforts and innuinerahle sacrifices have made it possible for us to graduate to-night. Next, our teachers, who by their willingness to lend a helping hand and to advise in times of difficulty, have piloted us safely through the four years of high school life. I .wish, also, to welcome the friends of this class and the citizens of Angola whose whole hearted co-operation, in times of need, have made our school life exceedingly pleasant. I extend a hearty welcome to you all. As a class we have struggled through our tasks and have safely buffeted the waves of discouragement and now ride easily at anchor in the harbor of the Senior Class; as a class we have found abundant pleasure and happiness in our school and social activities; as a class we have become united as one large family, bound together not by the. ties of blood, but by the ties of friendship. As members of one great family, we have held common interests, common purposes and common ideals. Tonight will see the fulfillment of at least one of our purposes, the increasing of our interests and the advancement toward our ideals. We. as a class, have not specialized in any one subject, but have attained some knowledge in such subjects as science, mathematics, history, literature, and foreign language. However, we do not consider the possession of this knowledge the greatest benefit that we have derived from our sechool life. Patriotism and good citizenship have ever been before us and have become instilled in us, it remains only for us to show that we have profited by them. Tonight we feel that our education has only begun. We are on the verge of going into the world to cope with new situations and new problems. We have our fundamental equipment and feel confident that we shall be able to apply it. In our school life we have made many mistakes, but we sincerely hope that the succeeding classes will profit by them. Again we extend to you a heartv welcome. WAYNE SWIFT. ’22. VALEDICTORY Friends: For tour years we have looked forward toward this night, an i now dint it is here, we have, as probably did every class before us, conflicting emotions: one a feeling of enthusiasm and eagerness to see and do what we shall after we are out of high school, and the other, a feeling of regret that we must leave our school life behind us. Tonight we are inclined to turn back a few pages in our memory and think ol our lit since we first entered a school house. We are particularly inclined to think of our past four years in Angola High school. .Most of us rail live again the first few days of our freshmen life. We can live again in the embarrassment of unforseen, and difficult conditions into which we got. They seem like tiivial things to ns now, but they were real—very real—then. During the first year we learned to work together, as one great body for the betterment of A. 11. S. We learned to be ready for any school activity and io act in a way that would lie a credit to our class. Next we were Sophomores. Then truly iid we begin to be a part of the school. Our members began to represent A. II. S. in music and literary work. Our members first appeared-5AXNT on tin athletic teams of the high school. Ami then another year was from . We were Juniors. We became a more important part of tin school. Again we took our part in musical, literary ami athletic lines. Again we upheld our honor as a class and helped uphold tin honor of the school. Next we entered on our career as Seniors. The past three years had slipped so swiftly by that we began to he fearful that our high school life was nearly over, and we determined to make the best of what part of it was left. We entered with a vengeance into every possible school activity, and still did our utmost to keep our records as scholars. We believe that this last year has been our most successful. We have represented and helped represent our II. S. in every kind of a contest: in literary and musical contests, in athletic contests of all kinds. We have tried to do our share in bringing honor to ngola. During these last four years we have worked together in making history for A. II. S., and we realize that we are together responsible for what she lias done. Whether these past four years are to he a credit or discredit to us, only time will tell. In any case, tonight, our only wish is, that we had worked harder, made better use of our time, and been a correspondingly greater credit lo our high school. We feel that in life's school, just as in school life, there are tasks for us to do, and with the benefit of our high school training we hope that again we shall feel the joy of accomplishment. During the last four years we have learned the value of team work. We have learned that by working together v e can accomplish far more than we could by working as individuals. I believe that this is the most valuable lesson that has been taught us. It is this theory of a nation working together that makes a democratic government possible. If our high school training has tended to make us better citizens than we otherwise would have been, it has been a success. If not it has been only wasted time. We shall soon know whether or not we have taken proper advantage of our training, and whether or not we have studied enough and understood the principles upon which our government is founded; or what is better, if our training here has put into our minds a thirst for greater knowledge, and with tin satisfying of this thirst a correspondingly greater efficiency in our place as citizens of a great country. Ilonoiable members of the school board, members of the faculty, parents, and citizens of Angola, we feel that you will understand and sympathize with our mingled feelings of joy and sorrow, of enthusiasm and regret, this evening. Many among you no doubt can remember when you were in similar circumstances and experienced like emotions. We want you to understand that we appreciate the advantages that you have given us: that we have appreciated the privilege of attending a good high school, and the privilege of being under the guidance of good teachers. We want you to know that we have appreciated the loyal way you have supported the school activities in which we were interested. Before the curtain falls that raised tin morning of our first iay in school, we want to express our heartfelt gratitude to all those who have helped make our school life a success. Four years ago we may have made a great many mistakes while trying to gracefully enter the II. S., but it will never be said that we knocked as we entered. And now, as we leave, because of the splendid co-operation of the people of Angola in making us happy while here, we will leave the same v ay, without knocking, from what we consider the best and dearest old H. 8. in Indiana. With the best wishes that friend can have for friend, we bid you all a kind farewell. CARL CRAMER.President—Ralph Lampman See ret ary—dames Shearer Vice-Pres—Barbara Cline Treasurer—Lucy Graf Clark Bowles Joseph Carpenter Cleveland Collins Wm. Paul Croxton Howard Flaishans Wendel German .Marion Graham Gerald Ilubbell Ralph Lampman Jack Mayfield James Shearer Emmet Spade Harold anllt.san James Williamson Lawrence Wolfe Eugene Yockey Byrona Allison Ruth Wert Ruth Alvison Maisie Bair Mary Benfer ROLL Dorothy Burns Am Ira Faulk Pauline (lark Barbara Cline Elizabeth Delano Arlene Fast Lucile Fry Jeanette Hendry Adeline Hughes Iona hidings Allene Lowther Helen McXeal Josephine Sutton Yolande Miller Eleanor Robertson Rolene Rowley Helen Shutts Mildred Thomas Mary Taylor Paulim Taylor Mary Williamson Ruth Williamson Martha Wood Ruth Barber Lyle (lark Fred M or ley David Ramsey Ray Stiefel I bu shel Sutton Knight Whitman Teresa Beil Chorai Cravens Margaret Fast Beulah Flaishans Lucy-Graf Wilma Harmon Estella Howe Lurene Klink Dorothy Long Keith a Powers Marvel Sutton♦ % o MANNUAL % SOPHOMORE CLASS President—Nanrice Owens Secretary—Max Buck Vice-Pres.—Ila Lytle Treasurer—Byron Pence Class Colors—lied and White ROLL Ernest Bland (‘(tester Tuttle Annie M. Yotter Harold Brooks Sterling Vanllusan Austin Brokaw Max Buck Winifred Avery Carlton Chase Merrill Cline Rhea Barber Xihl Harmon Everett Davis Florence Carr Lewis Jarrard Floyd Delaney Nettie Dolph Powers Lnse Edgar Field Kdra Griffith Byron Pence James Finch Helen Hendry Harold Shumann Roy Goodrich Hvlda Hurley Lawton Shank Charles Janes . , Ila Lytle Kenneth Tiffany Lee Keister Margaret Master 5 Sidney Williams Kenneth Newnam Wava McKenzie Rachel Bradner Nanrice Owens Gladys Meek Hortense Cramer Oscar Pence Pauline Oberlin LuRavne Oberholtzer Robert Reek, Maple Ogden Mildred Parrott Harold Sellers Eunice Rowley Marjorie Ryder Vernon Sniff Blanche Stoneburner Elizabeth RamseyTHE KE= A N Nl' A L ♦ President Willa Dick Secretary—Wilma Dick Vlce-Pres'd nt Earl l.am|inian Treasurer Florence Dills .'aim s Ai.stin ROLL Martha Rulloek Frances Cook .Ichn Riche Thelma Blitz •Joseph Douglass .Mark Rrooks Arlene 'rami Pauline Fisher •Vihl Clay Lucile Coveil Luell Ilendrv 1 lorneo Fifcr Martha Delaneev Morris Grimes Allen (ireeil Willa Dick Winifred Harshman Russell Handy Wilma Dick Irene llefflinger luUipll .lanes Florence Dilts Ruth Howard .Maynard Kint Marjorie Fink Mary Jane Jackson Miitou Lininger Jeannette Green I lope Johnson Floyd Martin Esther Jenkins Mabel Files Walter Mayes Violet Jewell Vinson lvlink Marshall Miller Dorothy Mayes Earl Lampman Ralph Newnani Edna MeKiin Dolores Lucas. Andrew Ramsay Gladys Meyer Valera Ranslmrg J larley Rathhun Hope M iller Edytha Shank • Heho Shaul Mildred Morrison Ruth Soine-rlott Wayne Sutton Wanda Ogden Helen Schinheckler John Williamson Leon Shrider Gertrude Taylor Frank Willis Marie Snyder Virginia Whitman Alice Adams Willoene Spangle Dorothy Wilcox Joyce Alvison Harvey Allion Donald Woodard Gladys Reaver Zora Berlien Anna Wilsev Arnona Rodie 1 )on ('ollins Mary Alice Leininge3 31 .'.WTAL A. H. S. Quartette Until Williamson, first soprano, ’23. Anna Marie Yotter, second soprano. '24 .Myrtle Frazier, first alto, '22. Margaret Fast, second alto, ’23. Onr quartette lias won first honors in the county contests for two years. We are convinced of their excellence and school spirit. The girls deserve p-aise for the hard work which they have put on their numbers and for the willingness with which they sing at all school affairs. They have been under the direction of Mr. Miles all year.A. H. S. String Trio Mary Taylor, violin, ’23. iivrona Allison, violin, ’23. liarlnira (!line, cello, ’23. The trio has been playing together ever since they entered high school, and as a result have worked up to a degree of fine artistry. With the help of Mr. Miles, the trio has played several of the heavier concert numbers this year and expect to go on with the study of concert music next year.The Agricultural department lias grown in popularity as evidenced l»y a gain in number of pupils, equipment and increased interest on the part of the community as well as by the pupils taking the work. From the selection and exhibiting of products at the Angola Fair and the testing of milk and cream to the testing of nearly 2,000 ears of seed corn, we have found it interesting, practical and easy to remember. Twenty-three of our number are carrying one-quarter acre potato projects this summer. Through bi-weekly meetings, pot-luck luncheons, our Agricultural Club has given us many good social times together. Our athletic ability cropped out when we won a basket ball game from the Auburn Agricultural boys and a base ball game from Scott Center High School. VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE34 ♦ A. H. S. Chorus I lie Lice ( lull is another of tbe high lights in our music department, and is composed of eighty good voices. The chorus took a prominent part in the concert and added a great deal to it. It lias been very popular with the community and has been asked to sing many times during the seliool year. With Mr. Miles as director, the girls have formed the chorus into a body which has an enviable reputation, and deserves it. As in the orchestra, and indeed, in all the music department, .Mr. .Miles is to be congratulated upon his work. To his skill and unfailing efforts, are the results due. lt RON A ALLISON, Accompanist.A. H. S. Chorus ♦ First Sopranos Rachel Bradner Leone Slirider LuRayne Oberholtzer Gladys Myers Thelma Bntz Lueile Coveil Ruth Somerlott Eva Mine Ilazel Van Wye Florence Dirriin Helen Ilolderness Mary Me Neal Carina Haley Luell Hendry Gertrude Taylor Maple Ogden Jeanette Green Ruth Alvison Helen Slmtts Ruth Wert Mildred Thomas Ila Lytle Dorothy Burns Gladys Meek Helen Sehinbeckler Edytha Shank Virginia Whitman Second Sopranos Anna Yotter Evelyn Snowberger Adah McDorman Marjorie Fink Lurene Klink Dorothy Long Keith a Powers Ruth Williamson Hortense Cramer Barbara Cline Marie Snyder Mary Taylor Wanda Ogden Winifred llarshman Mary Jane Jackson Valina Ransburg Mary Alice Leininger Zora Berlien Alleen Lowther Lueile Fry Martha Wood Alloc Miller Hope Johnson (Mela Mast on Arnona I’.odie Berneiee Cravens Helen Hendry Eloise Willis Mazie Bair Yolande Miller Altos Myrtle Frazier llvlda Hurley Winifred Avery Hope Miller Sarah Elizabeth Ramsey Eleanor Robertson Dorothy Mays Edra Griffith Pauline Ransburg Pauline Oberlin Willa Dick Wilma Dick Choral Cravens Esther Jenkins Lucy Graf Rhea Barber Wilma HarmonA. H. S. Orchestra Thirty-six instruments are in use in the orchestra this year. The orchestra has succeeded in constructing a well balanced ensemble and an almost perfect instrument division. In the annual concert which was given in .May, Mr. Miles showed what i e had accomplished with the orchestra as a step toward real orchestral achievements. We are proud of it and, according to statistics, have reason to lie, for it is one of the largest in Indiana high schools and has an instrumental balance which is remarkable for a high school assemblage. To Mr. Miles belongs the credit for any virtues which it may have. The orchestra has enjoyed the year’s work with him, and found it very profitable as well. A brilliant musician, and a gentleman—we wish him all luck in his work at Illinois University next year.INSTRUMENTATION ♦ ♦ First Violin Mary Taylor B.vrona Allison James Shearer Ruth Alvison Ruth Williamson Rolene Rowley Choral Cravens Second Violin Estella Ilowe Gladys Meek Marie Snyder Willa Dick Duel I a Hendry Earl Lampman Kenneth Tiffany Viola Panline Ransbnry Cello Barbara Cline Hortense Cramer Bass Berneice Cravens Helen llendry Dorothy Burns The orchestra is indebted to Miss trombonist, for assistance during tl Flute Eloise Willis Charles Janes Oboe Fred Morle.v Clarinet James Austin Sidney Williams Wayne Adams Saxaphone James Williamson Cornet Ralph Williamson Knight Whitman Ralph Newnam Glenn Beatty Trombone Jack Mayfield Lawrence Wolfe Tuba Paul Croxton Tyrapani Bayne Morley Piano Myrtle Frazier Hilda Cline, cellist, and Mr. Bert Wilcox e year.“HI-Y” What promises to he the liveliest elnh that ever met in Angola High School was begun this year when the Ili-Y Club was organized. This elnh is composed of hoys of the three upper classes. The idea of the Ili-Y was first given to us by Mr. ). M. Brunson, of Fort Wayne, about the middle of the winter. The club was then organized and has met once a week since that time. Two “feeds” have been given in this half year, and were thoroughly enjoyed by all that attended: in fact, every meeting has been enjoyed, for. although they have all been instructive, the instruction has been presented in such a way as to he very interesting. Every other week, Rev. Ilumfreys lias given short, interesting talks, and asked questions pertaining trt the Bible. Orville Stevens, E. I). Willis and others have been to the meetings on one or more occasions and have contributed to the program with short talks, generally on some subject relative to the problems of tin- average high school boy. On nights when no speaker has been able to come, the club has discussed suitable subjects by reports from members; in some cases the round table discussion has been carried out very successfully. Among the subjects discussed this year are: “Tobacco and its use in the High School;” “Man- ners, in School and Out;” “Girls, and the Proper Attitude Towards Them," and many others. The club has also contributed very materially in the outside functions around school. The week before the basket ball tournament was spent in ■ 5AXNUAL = helping Mr Estrieh arrange for the visiting teams. Cars were furnished to meet the tiains when teams or rooters were coming, and all the visitors were shown to their lodging places bv members of the club. The club furnished cars at the time of the meeting of Superintendents this spring, and thereby contributed a great deal to the success of that event. The success of the club has been made possible through the untiring efforts of the President, Theodore Wood, and of Mr. Estrieh. who certainly deserve special commendation for their splendid work. The club has filled a long felt and much ....led want in the life of the high school boys, and we are hoping and trusting that it will be taken up and continued next year with the same lively interest which so characterized Ihe meetings this year. ART CLASSES We aie taking this space to call your attention to the work of the Commercial Art classes of this year. During the latter part of the year the boys of the class have been doing the drawings for this Annual and we consider them as good as were ever put out in an Annual from Angola. The headings and designs were made by the following people: “Juniors,” N.vhl Harman: “Sophomores,” Kenneth Tiffany; “Freshmen,” John Williamson; “Jokes,' Andrew Ramsay; “Advertisements,” Roy Shoup; “Athletics,” Cleveland Collins, and “Organizations,” James Austin. Eunice Rowley, of the Applied Art class, did the heading for the “Dramatics.” The Applied Arts girls have been doing raffia basketry. They have worked out some very artistic designs in both the “lazy squaw stitch and the “Navaho stitch.” The pottery made by a former class has been sent to Indianapolis to receive the glazing. This pottery is made from clay from the Angola day pits, and should be of interest to the community because it is a native product as well as because of its beauty and usefulness. The local tile mills have been very kind in firing the biscuit fire, but do not have the heat necessary for glazing. This made it necessary to send the pottery away for the last treatment. All high school students in the Art Classes have been working on the scenery for the stage of the Community Building. The design for the back drop was made by Nyhl Harman, while the other accessories were designed and drawn to scale by Kenneth Tiffany and Cleveland Collins.HI-C M. CLUB President Vice-President .. Secretary OFFICERS MEMBERS Eloise Willis Martha Bullock Maple Ogden Dorothy Burns Wauneta Doudt Marie Snyder Choral ('ravens Georgia Parsed Winifred A very Eunice Kowley Pauline Taylor Esther Jenkins Nettie Dolph Adeline Hughes Martha Delaneev Keitha Powers Eleanor Robertson Hope Miller Dorothy Long Mildred Thomas Mabel Kile Wava McKenzie Myrtle Frazier Dorothy Mayes Estelle Howe Margaret Fast Ruth Burns Aileen Taylor Byrona Allison Lueile Elliott Lucy Graf Rolene Rowley Virginia Whitman Edra Griffith Lilly Wyatt Gertrude Taylor Teresa Beil Freeda Burkhalter Luell Hendry Martha Wood Barbara Cline Berniece Cravens llortense Cramer Lurene Klink 1 la Lytle Helen Hendry Ruth Williamson Thelma Blitz Lueile Covell Anna Marie Yotter Hope Johnson Jett Miller Mary Malinda Williamson hwoyovovTHE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOI The consolidated school, it appears, has come into its own. Fought tootli and nail for many years, it is now quite generally accepted as the latest and best idea in rural schools. Volumes have been written on the subject, but it was the building and successful operation of such schools which finally turned the tide in their favor. Indeed, in the light of present knowledge, it is rather difficult to see what valid objection could have been made to the abandonment of the old, one-room, ‘‘little red school house” in favor of a larger centralized school. Perhaps it was the novelty of the idea, as much as anything else which led to the opposition. Smaller changes than this have led to events far more serious than heated discussions, and many good ideas have failed to win approval merely because they were new. Then, too, there was the matter of local pride. As the number of children i?i the school district increased the district was divided and a new school house built. This was repeated again and again, as the land became more thickly settled, until many—a great many—communities were able to boast that no child had to walk more than a mile to school. Land near a school was more valuable, usually, than land farther away. Therefore, argued the doubters, land would fall in value if the local schools were abandoned. Besides, the school house was a convenient land mark. How were they going to direct travelers if they hadn't anything to go by? The mothers also had something to sav about it. The children were not going to go so far to school during bad weather especially, and then on top of that, eat a cold dinner. Lunch, as city people know it, was almost unthought of in the country. If it had been thought of b most of the housewives, it would have been regarded as almost criminal. The idea of having cold food in the middle of the day! All these objections were effectually answered long ago, for the consolidated school is not as new as most suppose. The first one was begun in Massachusetts in 1869, and with others of the same kind, has proved to be practical in every way. They are no longer innovations; property has not depreciated; the children are carried to and from school in hacks protecting them from the weather, and covering five or six miles in as short a time as the children formerly needed to walk one; warm food was provided by the Domestic Science department; and travelers still managed to keep from getting lost. Thus all the opponents of progress had lelt was the argument that a consolidated school cost more than the old district schools. This last argument joined the others when it was announced that in a certain township in Ohio the total cost of a centralized school, including all the hacks necessary for hauling the pupils, was $245 more than the cost of the nine one-room schools which it supplanted. Only $245 for all the benefits of a larger school! If all benefits could be secured as easily as these, this would indeed be a fine world. No one today questions the advantages of a graded school over an ungraded one. The consolidated school makes better guiding possible; it leads to longer recitation periods, for each teacher has lewer grades. Better equipment can be provided from the increased amount of taxes coming from the greater taxable valuation ot the new district; longer terms result for the same reason; the weaker teachers are eliminated, because a smaller number is required; better iacilities lor play, now regarded as being of great importance in education, are provided; the curriculum in the larger school includes music, drawing, domestic science, manual training, agriculture; in short, everything that a city school can give may be given in a centralized country school. A consolidated school tan do things that even a city school does not do. For instance, the students are hauled to school in the morning, and home again in the evening. They ate protected from the weather. They are at ANNUAL-ZZ. -U- ■5 till times under the care of a responsible person, for such the driver of the hack should he. A country school offers far more opportunity for nature study and agriculture, when they are included in the course of study, than a city school. A fertile mind, familiar with both the country and the city, will have no difficulty in finding other points of advantage. If has been found that the enrollment and attendance in a district increased as soon as its schools were consolidated. The older boys and girls, attracted by the increased value of the course offered, returned to complete their education. In most cases they would have remained in comparative ignorance if tin one-room schools had been retained. An interesting side light on the attendance question is flu tact that tardiness is eliminated and absence reduced when the pupils are transported to school. The effect is more marked when the driver of the hack is given some of the powers of an attendance officer, as should always be the case. Still another advantage gained by centralizing the schools of a community is the fact that a new, large school building can very well be used as a community center. On a large irrigation project in the West is a school which is regarded as a model of its kind. There is no other school on the project; its district comprises se eral hundred square miles. The building is large, built of brick, and possessing the latest and most up-to-date equipment. lint the most unusual thing about it is that there are no churches in tin district; all religious services being held in the school house. '1 his probably could not be done in all localities, and would not be necessary where churches have been built, as would be the case in all long settled communities. Hut the school could be made, and nearly always is, the center of all social affairs in its territory. At many of them motion pictures are shown regularly, saving the long drive to town. Parties and socials of all kinds can be given and will be better attended than if they were held in the old district buildings. They make convenient centers for county agent and county nurse demonstrations, they—but what’s the use of continuing? One can easily think of the uses in his own community. The consolidated school, as stated before, is here to stay. With the publication of articles and series of articles in the leading magazines of the country, public opinion, in some cases convinced in spite of itself, has changed. Mo longer is opposition based on no reason at all. There are local conditions which sometimes are made the grounds of attack, but these are rare. By all means, if your own schools are not consolidated, investigate the matter thoroughly. Then do as you see best, and in ninety-nine cases in one hundred you will circulate a petition for consolidation. ___________________ MARVIN ALLION. Teachers in A. H. S. for 1922-23. Hoard of Education TEACHERS Gertrude Sehinbeckler, Fifth Grade. Elsie Covell, Sixth Grade. Angie I'tter, Eighth Grade. ( ora Keckjer, Lower Opportunity. The following teachers have been employed by the ior the school year of 1922-23: GRADE Madge Gleckner, First Grade. Maude Kchovill, Second Grade. Grace Grain, Third Grade. Lucile Baker, Fourth Grade. 11IGII SCHOOL TEACHERS 11. B. Allman, Superintendent. •). L. Estrich, Principal. H. H. Keep. Edith Shewmaker. Ardith L. Phillips. Florence Parsell. Sarah Powell. K. E. Gonser. Mr. Miles, Supervisor of Music, is resigning to accept a position at the University of Illinois as an instuctor of Organ. Miss West has contracted for a position in the schools of Auburn, Indiana. Miss Edith Love and Miss Lucile Pugh are seeking more lucrative positions. Miss Lemmon is moving with her parents to Denver. Miss Goodale will discontinue teaching. Miss McWilliams is still considering her contract.Tin-: key he Master of The Lady Marie The sun was just about to sink into Lake Michigan. The sky was ablaze with fire, but there seemed to be a sinister power lurking in the heavens. The weather vanes swung hack and forth as a puff of wind came from one direction and then from another. There was a flapping of canvas and a creaking of blocks from a small sloop that was just entering the harbor which was formed where a river had enlarged itself nearly to the size of a lake before it entered Lake Michigan. A final puff of wind longer than the others, sent the sailboat scurring into the harbor just as the sun went out of sight. Even in the setting of the sun there seemed something strange; it was neither buried in the water nor obscured by a visible bank of clouds- The firey ball generally pauses just a moment and then makes a final, |ttiek dash out of sight, but tonight it was not so. It hesitated as usual when still a slight margin could be seen between it and the lake, then instead of sinking quickly, it merely faded slowly from sight, but there seemed to be neither clouds, mist, nor smoke to obscure it. Every streak in the sky, every lap of the waves upon the sandy beach, and every scream of the gulls seemed to foretell that some hidden monster was about to swoop down on the trembling earth. Men who had lived on and understood the lake, were thankful that they were on land for the night. Kehind the wheel of the small sloop, Lady Marie, that had just entered the shelter, stood a young man of a striking personality. Possessing dark eyes, and a mop of black hair that flew at will before the wind, and dressed in white duck trousers and blue middy that set off his athletic figure to the best advantage, he was, indeed, an imposing looking person—at a distance—but when one approached nearer he was invariably disappointed. Every action of this young man had a swagger to it. Every sentence he spoke began with I. He was eager to advertise himself to the world ; he was a grand-stand player in life’s grim contest. There were four other persons on board the boat, all about the same age as the first. They were sitting idly about waiting until their services would be needed in the handling of the sails. Presently one of them broke the silence and addressed the one at the wheel. “I say, Heed,” he asked, “we are not going to stay all night in this one horse town, are we? Wilbur Heed looked around for a few seconds and then replied: “No, I don’t think that I will stop long. I will just dock long enough for you fellows to run up town and then pull out again.” ■fS ANNUAIj= z? » ♦ Then after a pause, he added, confidently, “It looks a little as if it would blow tonight, but I can easily handle this boat, besides we will not be out long before we get into a harbor where there is a town that has some life to it.” Without further conversation they skimmed up to the dock and the sails.were temporarily furled- Four of the boat’s passengers started in search of a restaurant, but Reed, after giving instructions to bring him something to eat, went down below to write a letter The four that started up town were hardly out of sight when Reed heard footsteps on the dock. He had writing materials ready, but he waited to see who was approaching. Two men came near the boat and stood there surveying her After passing several general remarks about the boat, one of the men spoke longingly. “There is just the kind of a boat that I have always wanted to own. Just the right size to cruise around with: but I think that I would like an auxiliary in her.” The second nodded in approval, but upon a moment’s thought he objected: “I don’t agree with you on the engine question. I think there is more real sport in sailing a boat when you have to rely only on the wind. I don’t think there is as much art in sailing when you have a motor to use when you get into a tight place. Of course," he added, "it is inconvenient to have to lie just a short distance out of a harbor for two or three hours waiting for wind.” Wilbur Reed, down in the cabin, heard the conversation and thought that one voice w-as strangely familiar, but he was not interested so he started to write his letter. After he had finished he happened to hear his own name mentioned by the men on the dock, so he listened again. “This fellow, Reed,” he was saying, “is the most conceited fellow I ever heard of. He knows about as much about sailing as a camel, but when someone tried to give him a little advice up north this summer, he answered by boasting about his powers as a sailor. The only thing interesting about him is the remarkable regularity with which he uses I. To hear him, you’d think that he was a parrot and all he knew how to say was: I this, 1 that, and 1 the other thing-It would do him good to lie cut away from the Trust Co. in Chicago that has charge of the estate that was left him by his father, and be thrown on his own resources for a few years. He’d last about as long as the proverbial snowball in ------” but the speaker had starteu to walk away and Reed heard no more. Reed looked at the letter he had written anil then tore it up in disgus . Healing what he had would have made anyone make new i so.utious, and while the stinging words were still ringing in his ears. l:e wrote the following letter: Sept. 21, 10---- American Trust Co., Chicago. 111. Gentlemen: Beginning with the date you receive this letter, you will kindly re-invest all interest money accruing on my father's estate. I his will probably be the last correspondence you will receive from me lor the next ten years, and you will be carrying out my wishes it you do not accept any orders from me for the above period of years unless 1 appear in person in your office. Thanking you for your services in the past and assuring you£=TIIE KEY=if that I know you will carry out ray desires for the future, 1 remain. Very truly yours, WILBUR REEI). After sealing and addressing the letter, Reed went up on the dock where he found a small, ragged, freckle-faced boy who, when intrusted with the letter and given a cash consideration, departed in the general direction of the Post Office with a speed that would have done Mercury credit. Reed then went back on board the sloop and stretched himself out on a bunk to think of what he had done. After the first fit of resolutions was over, he wondered if he had not been a little hasty in writing the letter. Well, anyway, he had enough money to last him until he got to Chicago and then he could change matters if he so desired. He must have fallen asleep for the next thing 1m knew the boat was rolling heavily and some one was calling him from above. He climbed up the companion-way and looked out. Not a light could be seen except in the distance- The heavens were black as coal; not a star was in sight. His companions told him that they had left the harbor nearly two hours ago, and that they had called him because they thought a storm was coming. It did not take an experienced eye to see that they were in for a blow. Without question Reed took command, but if was without his usual bluster. Perchance it was the impending storm that m ;de him lose his self-confidence, but more likely he was stdl wondering if the man he had overheard on the dock, was not correct in v, hat he had said. As soon as Reed took the wheel, he brought the boat al cut and headed back for the harbor they had just left. The wind was more favorable for sailing in that direction and there was a chance that they could get in before the storm broke. Sharp orders were given; the sail was double reefed; a storm jib replaced the one they had been sailing under. All four who were receiving commands from Reed, sensed a change in him, but they did not stop to question. In critical periods paltry things are ignored, and nun rise to meet whatever situation may come up. They were perhaps half way back to the harbor when suddenly the sail began to flap. They were in that dead, dreadful ca.ni that always precedes a sudden storm. They stood spell-bound until it was too late to act. The wind struck with such fury thai it fairly took their breath away. Had they not been sailing with the least possible amount of canvas, the’rigging wcu.d surely have gone out. As conditions were, the boat lay over until they had to cling to the rail to keep from falling out. Farther ai d iarther they listed until it seemed certain they would go over- Family the lead-laden keel conquered the wind and the boat began to gain in speed, and as she did so, she righted herself. They oegan lanly to tty along. The speeding boat seemed to assume powers of a living tiling. Foam covered the bow ot the vessel, whicu gave it the appearance of a wi.d horse that had been running hard, it seemed to spring from one wave to another. Every frame, every prop, and every stay was as strained as the muscles cud bones 01 tne wildest horse in its mad dash for freedom. Waves began to dash into the boat and two of the party were kept busy on the pumps. Reed, in command, thought oi trying toride the storm out at anchor. Imt he realized that neither he nor his companions were capable of lowering the sail in such a gale. By working like galley-slaves on the pumps and by using all their limited skill in handling the boat, they might safely get into shelter. When Reed thought that they had a chance to make the harbor, lie failed to consider that the vessel was already strained to the limit and that the wind was increasing. When still about two miles out, the peak of the storm struck. The Lady Marie lay over before the wind until more than half of the sail dragged in every wave. There was a report like that of a cannon. Then several smaller cracks. Next a final splintering crash and then quiet. There even seemed to be a lull in the fury of the storm. The boat righted itself, but no longer did a proud spar point towards heaven. Instead, alongside clung a tangled mass of wire cables, ropes, canvass, and pieces of broken spar. The five men stood in awful silence, then someone uttered the word, “Lifebelts.” No sooner spoken than each started to adjust upon himself the cork jackets. The broken spar began to pound the side of the boat and each occupant knew that if left there it would soon stave in the side, but it was Reed who seized a hatchet from a locker near at hand and ran forward to cut away the rigging that held the spar, lie was still working at the fore part of the vessel, when they struck bottom for the first time. At last they were nearing shore. Dimly they could see the outline of hills and trees, and a light twinkled some distance away. They drifted nearer to shore, and began to strike bottom regularly between each wave. Each time they struck there was a cracking of frames, and splintering of planking. No boat made could stand under such abuse for long. Reed gave command to jump into the water and try to make the shore, and the four obeyed him. Last of all, Reed went to the extreme after part of the boat and seated himself, after taking firm hold to keep from being washed off. lie thought again of the things he had overheard; he seemed to forget bis condition, and sat absorbed in deep thought. The next morning, along with reports of other boats lost in the eighty mile gale on Lake Michigan, papers mentioned that a sloop was totally wrecked and that the owner, Wilbur Reed, was drowned. It also stated that the body had not been recovered. • Ten years elapsed, and all trace of the trim little sloop had disappeared. A prosperous looking man walked into the office of the American Trust Co-, of Chicago. One of the older members of the firm looked up aghast. Then in tones half afraid, half inquiring, he said: “Wilbur Reed, is that you or your ghost?” The man smiled pleasantly. “Don't worry, Tompson,” he answered, “it is I, not my ghost.” After a shaking of hands, he added: “If you will bring a statement of my affairs around to the Congress tomorrow I will tell you about myself since you last heard from me.” “But wait a minute, Reed,” Tompson interrupted, “why all the hurry?” then still questioning, he added, “You look happy.” “I’m on the happiest trip of my life,” Reed answered, and then he hastily left the office. CARL CRAMER, '22IM SANDERSON, Detective The day was dark and a heavy mist hung over the town as f pondered over my law hooks, trying to discover the points which would lead to a verdict of “Not Guilty” for my client. I summed up my work, and found that 1 still lacked evidence, which would produce an acquittal. All at once a happy thought struck me. Why not go to my friend and companion, James Sanderson. and get the needed advice. Sure, he would he just the man to aid me, as it was his duty to apprehend the criminal and my duty either to present his case in such a manner that he would be acquitted or convicted as the case might he. 1 collected my data and started for Jim’s office. As I neared the National Bank, I noticed a large crowd collected in front of it. However, as it was late in the afternoon, I did not stop hut passed without inquiry. As I turned a corner and stopped before the office of my friend, a large, powerful car glided up to the curb, and a white headed man, whom 1 recognized as the president of the National Bank, jumped out. lie ran at full speed up the staiis to Jim's office, evidently much concerned over something. I had nearly decided to postpone my visit, when my curiosity overcame me. What if Jim should have an interesting case thrust upon him by the banker’s visit. No! 1 would not miss a single opportunity of being present when Jim was working on a case. Having grabbed a few hooks from my roadster as an excuse for my intrusion, I too, ran up the stairs hut composed myself before reaching the office. I opened the door and walked in as usual. “Excuse me,” I exclaimed, as 1 saw and heard the banker talking to Jim. With this I turned as if to leave hut knew what the on tec me would he. “Wait, Phil,” commanded Jim. “You may he of some use iu this case. Mr. Gilpin, this is Mr. Beckett, my companion and associate.” "Glad to meet you. sir,” grunted Mr. Gilpin, still seemingly excited and very nervous. “Come, Phil, we must I e moving,” hrol e in Jim as I was about to repiy. Then noticing my inquiring look, he added. "Bam; robbery at the National. ’I la.t statement thiust aside my thought of consulting iim rat law. We laced downstaiis, jumped into the big car, which sped towards the hank. No sooner were we settled titan Jim began questioning the banker. “How dots it happen that you were not at the hank at this hour, Mr. Gilpin? lu asked. He replied: “I felt sick all forenoon, and as I was eating dinner a headache which seemed unbearab.e came upon me, so I remained at home.”r»JiE ANNUALS- 3 == 49 “How many employees were there at the bank this afternoon?” was the next question. “Two. .Jack Bennett and Joseph Paddock,” was the reply. “Both beyond suspicion?” asked Jim. “Joseph is, as he has been with us for years. However, Jack came to us only recently but with fine recommendations,” was Gilpin ’s answer. “Were they both present at the time of the robbery? and who phoned you?” “1 cannot say as to the first question, for it has been Joseph’s duty to take the checks to their respective banks preparatory to closing. He might have been away; however, Jack phoned me,” replied Gilpin. “Well, here we are,” said I as the car came to a standstill. We alighted and wormed our way through the crowd to the door. We were admitted by Chief of Police Kelby, who greeted Jim with, “Hello, Jim! glad you’re here; complicated case.” Jim smiled and made his way into the president’s office, where lie found Jack being questioned by some “plain clothes” men. They glanced up and nodded as Jim entered. After a few questions, they left. After being introduced to the cashier, Jim settled into a chair and lit a cigar. He sat smoking for a while, with his eyes closed and his forehead wrinkled. He soon roused himself, however, and asked : “Were you both present at the time of the robbery? “No,"” replied Jack, “1 was alone, Mr. Paddock, as usual, bad left with the checks.” “Mr. Paddock you may leave for the present while I question Mr. Bennett.” As he left, Jim asked of Jack: “How did it occur?” jack replied: “As 1 have said, Mr. Paddock was away. I was alone trying to balance the books when 1 heard the door open. Being in the middle of a column of figures, 1 did not turn at once. When 1 did it was to look down the muzzle of a Colt and meet the eyes of a tall, athletic looking fellow. He held a revolver in one hand and fumbled in a satchel with the other. 1 also noticed another man of smaller build creeping around the teller's desk. Both were dressed neatly and heavily masked. ‘Not a word, laddie, or you’re a dead one,’ coolly stated the first, recklessly handling his revolver. By this tinn the second man had reached me. The first tossed him a gag which lie slipped over my mouth and then bound me. They then proceeded to rifle the safe. This accomplished, they deliberately placed the money in their satchel and started to leave by the back way. The one who was not carrying the money ran back to the front door, which lie unlocked and turning ran swiftly after his companion who had disappeared. It could not have been more than five minutes, although it seemed hours as I lay bound, until the front door opened and after a second, two faces peered through the cashier's window at me. These were men employed at the Central Steel Works. They at once saw the situation, and while one loosed me, the other darted out and soon returned with the police. My first action, when I could speak, was to summon Mr. Gilpin. That is the complete story, Mr. Sanderson.Jim remained quiet for a while, then asked: “Can you describe the thieves a little more fully, Mr. Bennett? Do they resemble anyone hereabouts in build and stature?” “Yes,” slowly replied Bennett, “they were perhaps five feet eight in height and resembled the general class of workers employed at the iron or steel works, being strongly built and well set. however, their features were more refined than the ordinary steel workman’s.” “Um-hum,” grunted Jim. “By the way, Bennett, can you give me the names of those two fellows that unbound you. 1 should like to look them over and perhaps question them.” “No, Mr. Sanderson, I can not. I know them only to be steel workers from the fact that they cashed their checks here at noon and were dressed as laborers.” “What bank does business for the Steel Works? T presume Mr. Paddock delivered those cheeks to that bank, did he not?” questioned Jim. “The National Trust and Loan Bank, sir. Yes, Mr. Paddock delivered the checks,” replied Bennett. “Thanks,” then turning to Mr. Gilpin, he added: “I will try and have something definite to report soon. In the meantime let your mind rest easily, Mr. Gilpin, for there is nothing gained by worry.” After that statement we took our leave. We hailed a taxi and were soon on our way to Jim’s office. “What do you make of it, Phil?” asked Jim smilingly. “Make of it! I can't make anything of it. Bennett seems honest enough and the crooks are probably miles away by now. As to your inquiry concerning those steel workmen its as so much Greek to me,” I replied. “It does not come in bad to be well informed before starting a case,” was his reply. By this time we arrived at his office, and after obtaining the needed advice that had brought me there, 1 returned to my home. I tried to think of some solution for the robbery case, but none that 1 could reason out seemed probable.” Jim had told me that he would call in ease he got a clue as to the criminals. This was consoling, but to think that now in all probability Jim was out working on the case was nerve racking. All the following day and the morning of the day after I tried to concentrate upon my work, but my mind was ever turning to Jim’s case. At last to relieve the situation 1 decided to find Jim and learn his progress. 1 jumped into my roadster and sped to Jim’s office. Racing up the stairs 1 burst into the room only to be confronted by an innocent looking office boy. My first question was, “Where is Mr. Sanderson. Billy?” “Don’t know,” he replied, “but he said that if you should arrive or call to tell you to be here at eleven o clock. It's nearly that now, sir.” Ah, then he had thought of me. 1 sat down and tried to become interested in the paper. Presently the door opened and as I turned, Jim’s voice greeted me. But such a sight; 'there stood a man clad in union alls, with a grease smeared face and grimy, toil stained hands, smiling broadly at my discomfiture..fr------------A TNITAh= ‘Z=— =JC!= .-,] “Well. Phil, don’t yon know me?” There was no more doubt as to identity of person. It was Jim, but such a change in dress and visage. “What's the idea, lost your ease? What’s happened?” I exclaimed. “One at a time, Phil,’’ lie replied. “You see I am dressed as a laborer, in fact, a steel worker. I've been shadowing my men. You’re just the man 1 want to see. Get Kclby and a squad of police and come to bench twenty-three, Central Steel Workers, at twelve o’clock, i’ll be there. Better be well armed. They may show fight. So long.” he said as he left the room. I, with a thousand ideas and questions jumbling in my brain, stood as if paralyzed for an instant. Then Jim had found the robbers cud I v as to lead the capture. 1 was all action. Back to my office I sped, secured a revolver, then hastened to the police station. I burst into the room, bawled out my command, returned to my ear and with Kclby close belling driving the patrol car, 1 led the way to the steel works. We arrived just on time. I took the lead and we marched straight to bench twenty-three. Our approach was not noticed by the two at work there. They soon became aware, however, for Jim at bench twenty-two snapped cut: “Arrest those two. They’re your robbers.” They offered not the slightest resistance on seeing the odds against them. They were immediately taken into the patrol car, which was driven off leisurely. Jim and I followed in my car. It was then that 1 found time to inquire. “How did you do it?” Jim replied: “Thorough investigation, inquiry and deductions, I found the two who robbed the bank to be no other than the two who entered the bank and unbound Bennett, and then summoned the police. Wonderful alibi on their part and would have succeeded had it been carried out right. I secured their names from the checks they cashed. It was then that I made a startling discovery. I found tlu‘ handwriting to be identical with that of a copy which I received from headquarters the other day to aid in the apprehension of two noted bank robbers, a very large reward being offered for their capture. My next step was to secure labor beside the signers of the checks. Through inquiry I found them to have been absent on the day of the robbery. With a few simple deductions I determined the criminals.” “But Jim, those men looked familiar. Have I not seen them or their pictures before?” “Yes, no doubt you have. They are John and Henry Farthings, alias, Pete and Mike Malone.” he replied, smiling broadly. “Pete and Mike Malone!” I exclaimed. Not the two for whom the twenty thousand dollars reward is offered in connection with the Brooklyn robbery?” I eagerly asked. “They are one and the same, Phil,” he laughed. WAYNE SWIFT.he Fundamentals of Artistic Piano Playing The art of piano playing rests upon certain fundamental elements, and to become an artist one must master these. Few people, when they listen to the rendition of a Beethoven Sonata, are able to realize to any great extent the labor and thought it has cost tin player to master it, that you may be stirred by the grandeur and wonderful beauty of it. You may think tin player is inspired to draw from the instrument that which stirred the depths of your soul. In this idea you are mistaken. The artist has attained command of the instrument only by a vast amount of time and practice, and concentrated thought. Now we come to the fundamental elements which are, mechanics, technic and the art of rendering. Mechanics of piano playing are those exercises which tend to develop the hand. This makes possible the power of playing with the greatest rapidity, and also the power of playing with ease, passages that are difficult because of awkward fingering or various other reasons. Mechanics is always the first thing a student must learn when studying the piano. Your fingers are not naturally the servants of your will. They are rebellious and can be trained into habits ot obedience only by constant practice. Technic is the brain side of piano study; mechanics is wholly manual One doesn’t have to exercise his Inaiii to play scales, but the study of technic requires brain work. Technic is mainly concerned with touch and tone. It includes rhythm, accent, phrasing and quality of tone. One must master many things to be technically efficient. One of the most important and difficult habits to acquire is perfect relaxation. Then again the seeker of technical proficiency must learn to make every muscular movement have a purpose. Many plave.s Hap their hands wildly in the air, up and down, back and forth, over the keys until it would seem that they were trying to give an exhibition rather than to render a piano composition. Furthermore, the student must learn all tin various touches, how to play a well rounded legato and a sharp, clear staccato. Above all lie must iea n to concentrate. The third element to 1m considered is the art of rendering. Some players put no expression or feeling into their work and as a result their playing is dead and woithless. It is difficult to define the requirement of the emotional in piano playing, but one thing is certain. It must be developed through an inborn aitistic sense. For after all, what is music but the expression of the emotions of the composer, his soirows, joys, anxieties, triumphs, despair and love. Music is not music, however pe.feetly played, unless the (‘motions which it is intended to express are put into it. Then it has the power of lifting us out of sordid depths into higher and sublimer realms, of creating in us a desire to live better and nobler lives. —Pauline KansburgANNUAL J54 = =TIIE KEY Scene in “Fifty Fifty” SENIOR CLASS PLAY “Fifty-Fifty” CHARACTERS Henry Brown ... Paul Green ____ Patrick O’Malley Smudge......... Cap ........... Mrs. Podge..... Sophie Bland ... May Dexter Mrs. Hawley Josephine...... ... .Wayne Adams Lawrence Emerson ........John Rose .....Wayne Swift ... Vern Hoagland ... Wauneta Doudt Vivienne Shumann .....Eloise Willis . Berneice Cravens .....Ruth Burns If there is a moral to this merry comedy of complications, it is that it is possible to get too much of a good thing. Paul and Henry are struggling to achieve fame and bread and butter money in literature and art. Utter failure is their lot until one of Henry’s paintings, accidentally displayed upside down, is enthusiastically purchased by an art collector, and the “impressionistic painter” becomes the talk of the town. Paul, following the hunch, writes his stories backward, and success follows swiftly. But some innocent fibs, told for reasons of necessity, reach the newspapers, and the pals find themselves headed straight for trouble. Their love affairs go awry, and in the predicaments which follow as a result of their propensity for spinning yarns, they find success an empty thing. A woman who claims to be Paul’s wife, an elusive vanishing painting, a mysterious sea-faring man, a meddling landlady, all contribute to the mixup. Of course it all comes out happily. The play was given Wednesday evening, May 24th, in the Community Building. It went over in a very satisfactory manner. The coach. Miss West, the cast, and those responsible for the setting and business in connection with the play, all deserve commendation.KEY Scene in “Betty's Last Bet” JUNIOR CLASS PLAY “Betty’s Last Bet” CHARACTERS Mrs. Darling.............................................Barbara Cline Kitty....................................................Byrona Allison Peggy................................................... Mildred Thomas Dolly.................................................... Dorothy Burns Betty.................................................... Pauline Taylor Hannah ..................................................Dorothy Long Richard Wentworth........................................James Shearer Perry Wentworth...................................William Paul Croxton Jack Van Loon.......................................... Jack Galloway Hamilton Moriarity......................................Lawrence Wolfe Edgar Darling...........................................Howard Flaishans Betty’s propensity for wagering keeps her in hot water, and her mother and sisters, too. Mrs. Darling is struggling bravely to promote matches for the other girls when Betty, expelled from boarding school, returns home disgraced but unabashed. And straightway she makes her last bet—and her greatest one—with a likeable but unintroduced young man. He wagers that he can successfully impersonate a distant cousin, and get all the sisters engaged within twenty-four hours. Three kisses are the stakes. Betty’s last bet incites an amazing train of complications, and when she loses the bet, she loses her heart as well. The play was presented in the Community Building on the evening of May 5th, before a capacity house. It was given in a way that would have been a credit to a company of professionals. The selection of the cast was a happy one, each fitting naturally the role assigned. THE RIDER OF DREAMS CAST Madison Sparrow ...............................Bayne Morley Lucy Sparrow, Madison’s wife...................... Teresa Beil Booker Sparrow, their son..................... Jack Mayfield Zekiul Williams, the landlord....................Harold Janes Tin public speaking class gave a negro sketch entitled “The Rider of Dreams,” at the Athletic Carnival on Hallowe’en, with great success. Extensive preparations resulted in a finished production which did honor to the class. The story of the play centers around a negro, Madison Sparrow, who had a slight disinclination to manual labor, and his wife who took in washings to support the family. Madison comes home one evening with a valuable guitar, which he claims a white man by the name of Wilson Byrd, gave him because they were going into business together. Lucy believes, however, that Byrd stole it from the rightful owner, Zekiel Williams, who happens toown the house the Sparrows live in. Madison lias some money with which he and Byrd are going into business, but he finds that he has lost it when Luey enquires about it. Lucy, after questioning him, finds that it was the $800 that she had saved up to pay for the house and that William Byrd had forged a cheek for it. Madison starts to go out in search of it when Uncle Williams, the landlord, enters. Ib asks them to pay for the house immediately. Madison discloses that the money has been stolen and then Uncle Williams surprises them in saying that lie has found the money and that the bargain is closed for the goods have been delivered, one guitar at $800. Madison threatens bodily injury to Uncle Williams, but the landlord shows a confession that he has from Wilson Byrd, confessing that he had stolen the guitar. Finally, Uncle Williams decides to give the guitar to Madison and to sell the house for the $800 which he has found. lie gives the guitar to Madison on the condition that he come and give his little boy lessons on the guitar, and of course everyone is more than satisfied. WHERE BUT IN AMERICA CAST Robert Espenhayne.................................Carl Mast Mollie Espenhayne (his wife)..................Aileen Taylor Hilda (the maid).............................Lucile Elliott SYNOPSIS Place—New ork. Time—Tin present. Seem—Dining room of the Espenhaynes. Mollie and Mob are discovered at the dinner table. Mollie is telling of the wonderful home which Fanny Russell, her friend, has bought on North Shore. She says the man who built :t was simply great. Mollie tells Bob that the Russell s have a garage built onto the house which they use as a play room, but Bob says as they can’t afford a car, the garage would be too much of a temptation. I In conversation is stopped as Mollie rings for tin maid, a Swede, who enters quickly and removes bouillon cups. The conversation is resumed until the telephone bell rings. Hilda starts to answer it, but Mrs. Espenhayne tells her Bob will answer it. The call is for Hilda. Bob comes back to the table and the two await patiently the return of Hilda. Of course it is part of their plan not to let Hilda know anything of their intention of moving. Bob becomes very restless while waiting and annoys Mollie very much. Finally Hilda returns and begins to serve the dinner—she acts as if she wants to say something, but hesitates. Mollie asks her what the matter is, and she explains in her broken language that Mr. Linquist, the man who bitilt Mrs. Russell’s house, is the young man who comes to see her, and to whom she is engaged. Mr. Linquist has told her of Mollie’s intention of moving to North Shore. Of course Mollie and Bob are very much surprised. Hilda tells of his business, their engagement, and his own little home and and finally ends up by saying that Mr. Linquist said to tell Mr. and Mrs. Espenhayne that when they got ready to look for property on North Shore to let him know and he would meet them at the station with his automobile. The Play was presented at the dedication of the Community Buildingon THE KEY= CARL CRAMER—Captain. Center. “Hal,” known to most neighboring schools as “Angola’s lanky Center,” has held down the pivot position for three consecutive years. He was a heady player, a good shot, and could handle the ball with perfect ease. He knew the game from A to Z, and it was his size and ability that played a big part in the success of the season. He was selected as all district center and captain CLEVELAND COLLINS—Forward. “Eddie,” playing his second year on the team, was the main stay of the offensive. He was an unusually hard player, always following the ball, and with his consistent playing and accurate shooting was able to bring Angola to the front In many a game. He will be with us again next year. Eddie was selected as all district forward. THEODORE WOOD—Guard. “Ikey,” although small for a back guard, made up in speed and quality what he lacked in quantity. He was a good floor man as well as a demon on defense. He was a good shot and excellent dribbler, and was able to break from defense to offense and back again quickly. He was largely responsible for the many low scores of our opponents. He was selected as all district guard. RALPH LAM PM AN—Forward. “Shrimp,” the little forward with his never ending smile, will always be remembered for his speed and fight. He was one of the most consistent and valuable factors in forming an effective offensive; was always in the thickest part of the fray from the start to the finish. He is especially noted for being able to take hard falls and knocks with apparent ease and indifference. He will be with us again next year. WENDELL JERMAN—Guard. “Dutch,” coming from Flint last fall as a part stranger to the school, overcame that obstacle, and due to his fighting qualities and hard playing, secured a regular berth on the team. He was a fast, aggressive player, putting heart and soul into his efforts. He has another year with us. — JAMES FINCH—Guard. “Sammie” was the real surprise of the season. He joined the squad the second semester and in the short time following made a name for himself by assisting in the defeat handed Auburn and in the winning of the tournament. Finch is a large, heady player, and is exceptionally good in breaking up plays and recovering the ball from the back board. He has two more years of school. EUGENE YOCKEY—Forward. Yockey came into our midst not as a stranger but rather as “Pleasant Lake all district guard.” On account of injuries he was able to play in but very few games, but those few were enough to prove his exceptional ability. He is very clever in handling the ball and in passing, very calm and a good shot. Much is expected of him next year. NAURICE OWENS—Forward. “Norry,” the “little wonder” with his good basket shooting and quick passing, was a valuable asset to the squad. Although small, he was always a ready and desirable man to put into the game to revive the offensive. He has two more years with us. EARL GREENLEY—Center. “Abe.” tall and slender, was the only man able to compete with Cramer at center. He was a good shot, hard player and clever passer. He is especially to be commended for his consistent and honest efforts. No one was more faithful than he. This is his last year. MERRILL CLINE—Guard. Cline, a Sophomore, due to his slow but sure method of guarding, has been a valuable member to the team in the several games he has played in. He is a tall, lean lad. and in the two years following should develop into a player of the first class. RAY STIEFEL—Forward. Stiefel’s steady playing and earnest attempts made him a valuable man in times of need. He was a good shot, a neat player when needed. He fought through the season in a praiseworthy manner, putting into the game all that he had. He has two more years. —■S ==TIIE KEYi Individual Player’s Record Player '-P X O Collins.......F Lampman.......F Owens.........F Yockey........F 'Stiefel......F Cramer........C Greenlee......C Wood..........G German........G Finch.........G Cline.........G '"3 o X P-i O cs o X w O 3) 5 V e o s 29 101 24 26 38 0 14 15 0 6 10 4 4 9 0 31 119 78 3 3 0 27 35 48 29 20 0 8 6 0 6 1 0 x x c 5 o Ch E-I 226 32 24 76 37 14 30 4 1 24 6 3 18 5 0 316 10 21 6 0 0 118 14 13 40 40 13 12 8 4 2 3 4 ♦ Totals 357 154 868 159 97Basket Ball Schedule and Scores Opponents Score Score Played in: Hudson 12 A. 11. S. 36 Angola LaGrange 24 A. 11. S. 34 Angola Flint 8 A. 11. s. 42 Angola Keudallville 32 A. II. s. 16 Angola LaGrange 21 A. H. s. 27 LaGrange Decatur 38 A. 11. s. 11 Decatur Washington Center 25 A. 11. s. 18 South Whitley Hudson 18 A. II. s. 25 Hudson Decatur 30 A. H. s. 23 Angola Ligonier 22 A. II. s. 44 Ligonier Elkhart 15 A. II. s. 27 Angola Washington Center 7 A. II. s. 34 Elkhart Hillsdale 19 A. II. s. 24 Angola Central Catholic H. S. 20 A. H. s. 10 Angola Keudallville 27 A. 11. s. 26 Keudallville Howe Military Academy 10 A. H. s. 56 Howe Waterloo 20 A. II. s. 30 Angola Auburn 22 A. II. s. 18 Auburn Auburn 16 A. II. s. 13 Angola Garrett 11 A. H. s. 34 Garrett Central Catholic II. S. 19 A. II. s. 27 Fort Wayne Fort Wayne 31 A. II. s. 24 Port Wayne Garrett 24 A. II. s. 36 Angola Waterloo 16 A. II. s. 34 Waterloo Ligonier 18 A. II. s. 52 Angola Auburn 18 A. 11. s. 30 Angola Orland 4 A. H. s. 34 Dist. Tournament Hamilton 16 A. II. s. 28 Dist. Tournament Auburn 7 A. H. s. 13 Dist. Tournament Hudson 7 A. II. s. 32 Dist. Tournament Goshen 16 A. 11. s. 10 Regn’l Tournament Total............579 868 Games won, 21. Games lost, 10.IIIK KEY — i wmm GIRLS’ BASKET BALL TEAM MARTHA BULLOCK, ’24—Captain, Jump Center. Martha holds down one of the most responsible positions and doei some quirk work in spite of her southern drawl. We’re expecting some more fine things of her next year. MARGARET FAST, ’23—Forward. “Zippo” lives up to her name and the score always climbs the highest when she’s there. She is one of the players which visiting teams always notice favorably. MARTHA WOOD, ’23—Running Center. One of the “high lights” on our team in more ways than one. We do not know why, but the—er—bright haired girls usually do make exceptional B. B. players. PAULINE TAYLOR, '23—Forward. Another good forward, and when occasion arises, a good running center. Pauline has been one of the team from the beginning of her high school career, as have several others, and has worked hard to make it a success. GEORGIA PARSELL, 22—Guard. Georgia’s specialty is snatching the ball from the firmest kind of a death grip and throwing it the length of the floor, almost in one move. We couldn’t get along without her. ADELINE HUGHES, '23—Guard. Perhaps our opponents think something’s on fire, as Adeline streaks along; or maybe they think she’s a comet—but it’s certain that they get out of her way, whatever they think. She does some “brilliant” work. WAVA McKENZIE, '23—Guard. Wava’s generally a guard, but you’re apt to find her almost anywhere, and doing good work wherever she is. LUCY GRAF, '23—Utility. We can’t say too much about Lucy’s usefulness, and we couldn’t do without her. She’s everywhere that she’s needed and plays well in every place. We are proud of her. AILEEN TAYLOR, ’22—Forward. Aileen covers ground when she starts, to say nothing of frequently dropping the ball in. TERESA BEIL, ’23—Guard. Sometimes it’s very effective to sit on the ball. But that isn’t the only effective thing which Teresa does in the course of a game. She makes every move count. Record of Games and Individuals not available.o o W ft «ANNUMHARD BOILED Son—Thou liest, thou shag-ear’ 1 villain. First Murderer—What, you egg! —Macbeth. Exit Miss Powell, fire in her eye and an alarm clock, which she can not stop, in her hand. Leon lioness, (in an awed voice,)—She’s met her match at last. It is wonderful what one will do when surprised. Miss Powell has been heard to mutter distinctly, “Thunder! Three witches!” Freshie—“Where do you get your jokes?” Carl Mast—“Out of the air, so to speak. Why do you ask?” Preside—“Nothing. I would merely suggest that you go where there is some fresh air.” Of all the letters of the alphabet, only two are O. K. Whatever troubles Adam had, no man could make him sore by saying when he told a joke: “I’ve heard that joke before.” Innocent—“Do you think a girl should learn to love before twenty?” Experience—“No, too large an audience.” “This school certainly takes an interest in a fellow, doesn’t it?” “How’s that?” “Well, I read that they would be very glad to hear of the death of any of the alumni.” Prohibition Nothing brewing now but trouble. Wanted—A steady man to look after a garden and milk a cow who has a good voice and is accustomed to sing in a choir. An Epic in Blank Verse (very blank, indeed.) The Freshmen Are a most noisy, Wiggling Hunch. They are characterized By open mouths and Awe stricken eyes. Where ever you see a round eyed Kid in A. H. S. you Know he is a • Freshie. They usually Wear red flannel And have their chests Greased until the Middle of May. A Sophomore is Hard to describe. At a bare glance, one gets an Impression of Something very, very important. At Investigation It is found to be only the infant's opinion of its self. A Sophomore is hard to Describe. Juniors are almost Every thing. They have Seme of the habits of The species called Seniors, and One is Able Occasionally To trace a mixing of the Presides and Sophies Characteristics. The Juniors Are a most Happy Careiess, Brilliant, as well as Provoking (sometimes) Class. We like them. The Seniors! Ilail to thee, Blithe spirits! Birds thou never wert. The Seniors Beggar all description (especially by a feeble Junior) They’re all our Fancy painted them. They’re lovely, they’re Sublime. With this last Thought I shall close. Many thanx.The Inquiring Reporter Question—“Do you believe in doing up your hair before you are out of II. S.?” Where asked—A. H. S. April 13. Maple Ogden—“No, 1 do not. A simple coiffure of curls is much more girlish. Forty-nine or so will make a very satisfactory number ter a school-girl’s mode.” Elizabeth Delano—“Why, I don't know, for myself, l‘m sure an elaborate coiffure adds to health, beauty and power of concentration.” Margaret Fast—“Well, why don’t you have it bobbed? Much less work and so convenient.” II Question—“Do you believe in love at first sight ? Horace and Lucile—“Yes.” James and Rolene—“No, it takes time.” Nan rice aid Adeline—“Yes. Take ’em young and train them.” Ted and Thelma—“Absolute!” Vernon and Helen—“One party should lie reluctant, should use discretion.” Ill Question—“What do you like best about A. H. S.?” Gerald Iluhhell—“The door.” Clark Bowles—“The east office.” A. II. S. Girls—“Mr. Phillips.” Jimmy Austin—“Oh, it’s fun to try to go down the stairs in three steps.” Ruth Alvison—“My Cicero!” Nobody—“ Book reports.” • • • Oh, My! Hortense—“Carl slipped on the veranda last night.” Marie—“Did it tit?” Heard at Brokaw’s “Adeline, tell that man to stop holding your hand.” “Tell him yourself! He’s a perfect stranger to me.” We've Found It True George Washington couldn’t tell a lie. Well? That’s where II. B. has him skinned. He rail te1! ’em a mile off. o • • • • Them’s Cur Sentiments. Do you think Adeline will ever go with anybody ? Yes, anybody. Haw! Eve—“S’matter, Adam? Why so restless?” Adam—“Dogonit, I used poison ivy for my winter overcoat.” Eleanor Robertson has developed a wisdom tooth. Elizabeth Delano has two. We'd think they both deserve a mouthful. Ain't nature grand? She gives all faces, but we pick our own teeth. Love Rhyme of a Little Fresh “Oh, hully gee. Oh, hully gee, My love for you Is like warm tea.” The Vamp She spoke to me with honeyed words As to my arm she clung, But honey usually comes from bees, And soon 1 found that I'd been stung. Hugh II.. (in Eng IV)—“Can a spot of grass be heavenly?” Miss Powell—“I'm sure I don’t know. I’ve never been there.” Here’s a Good One. L. W.—“Max, I don’t think M. F. told me the truth last night.” Max—“How’s that?” L. W.—“Well, she said I made her cheeks burn and I couldn’t for the life of me smell burned paint.”Heymau Barnabus Allman says: “I have looked forward for many years to the time when I {jet rid of that class of wildcats." BOYS! BOYS! BOYS!! Attention Boys! And all sorts of dope. Mavis face powder And witchhazel soap, Violet perfumes, Cute little sideburns Vaseline 'till you “croak,” My gracious! These boys, They're simply a joke. A little, round, Hat hat. Pour corners on top. Bell bottom pants That go flippitv flop. They go over the campus With struts proud and long; They're either singing “Ma” Or some other song. Whenever the boys grow A little less nifty, Then we girls will agree To go fifty-fifty. • • • Dippy Dope A tramp may be all wool and a yard wide, but he is goods that will not wash. We always need a holiday most on the day after a holiday. s Jimmie Austin—“Yes, but what made Oen. Grant so sick during his campaigns?” Mr. Phillips—“He wasn't sick.” Jim—“Well, it said he threw up entrenchments every night. " o .Miss Powell—“Well, I'd just like to give him a piece of my mind!” Voice, (cautiously,)—“We don't want to rob you.” o • • A la the Continued Movies In the big steam-roller’s path Was gentle Jane, expressing wrath. It passed over. After that Gentle Jane looked rather flat. Much surprised was gentle Jane When a bullet pierced her brain. “Such a thing as that,” she said, “Never came into my head !" Gentle Jane went for a ride, But the automobile shied; Threw the party all about— Somehow, Jane felt quite put out. • A Transformation A man named Stone and a man named Wood met on the street one day and began talking of current affairs. A pretty young lady wearing clothes of the latest style passed. Stone turned to Wood, Wood turned to Stone, then they both turned to rubber. Georgia Parsell—'“My, what a talkative girl I just met. I thought she never would stop talking.” carl Cramer—“My, what a coincidence." “It must be great to be down and out," ventured a convict in the upper row of cells, o « • • « Sophomore—“Did you ever take chloroform?” Freshman—“No. Who teaches it?" • • Carl Cramer—“Ever study a blotter?” Docile E—“No! Foolish.” Carl—“Very absorbing thing." • • • • e From the Sophomores Caesar conquered many nations— A mighty man was he. And in my examinations, lie also conquered me.Eunice It. (to Mr. Phillips at the piano,) “Play something for us, please.” Mr. Phillips—“What shall 1 play?” Eunice, (thinking a minute,)—“I Wonder if you still care for met” Mr. Phillips—“Yes.” a o o a e Kind Friend, (before Assembly room.' — “lu all my travels 1 have never seen sn.h a handsome hunch of girls or such a rug 'cd bunch of boys.” Loud applause from the girls. • Miss Powell, (in Eng. IV,)—“Lady Macbeth always kept a candle beside her when she slept. Why did she do this?” Harold Janes—“Well, there were so many murders taking place that she wanted a light so that if anyone murdered her she would be able to see when it took place.” HIGH SCHOOL VARIETY CONTEST Gir’s Said— The Most Popular Girl.....Pauline Taylor The .Most Popular Hoy.....Ralph Lampman The Best Looking Girl..............Pauline Taylor '1 lie Best Looking Boy......Theodore Wood The Best Natured Boy.................Bayne Morley 'File Best Natured Girl......Barbara Cline Tile Best Natured Teacher......Mr. Estrich The Most Popular Teacher.......Miss West The Most Easily Fussed Girl...Margaret Fast The Most Easily Fussed Boy...Naurice Owens The Best Athlete............Carl Cramer Boys Said— The Most Popular Girl.....Pauline Taylor The Most Popular Boy.... Theodore Wood. The Best Looking Girl.......Pauline Taylor 'The Best Looking Boy.....Theodore Wood The Best Natured Boy......Carl Cramer The Best Natured Girl.....Wauneta Doudt The Best Natured Teacher.....Mr. Estrich The Most Popular Teacher.......Miss West The Most Easily Fussed Girl....Margaret Past The Most Easily Fussed Bov...Naurice Owens The Best Athlete............Carl Cramer He and She When I am dead you’ll find it hard, Said he, To ever find another man Like me. What makes you think, as I suppose You do I d ever want another man Like you ? If you can’t laugh at the jokes of the age— Laugh at the age of the jokes. lie was teaching her arithmetic— lie said it was his mission, Anti said, “Now that’s addition.” And as he added smack by smack In silent satisfaction, She sweetly gave his kisses back And saitl, “Now that’s subtraction.” Then lie kissed her, And she kissed him Without any explanation. Then both together smiled and said, “Ah, that’s multiplication.” Then dad appeared upon the scene And made a tpiick decision, lie kicked the teacher down the hall And veiled, “That’s long division.” It’s all right for a maiden fair, To wear somebody rise’s hair, But, goodness gee! We’d like to see Her choose the color with some care. Bill—“Have you read ‘Freckles’?” Pauline—“No; that’s my veil.” Ring out, wild bell, ring out! Wait not a moment more, I’ve bluffed a full half minute now, Ring out, that period’s o’er! Ring out, wild bell, ring out! I’ve stood here long enough; I’ve used up all my energy— 1 can no longer bluff.Before the Exams. 72 m = S ==TIIE KEY-.- — “You say you work? At what?” “At intervals.” Douglass E.—“Here is something new.” Bayne M.—“What is it?” Douglass E.—“The Health Board is going to hold tests, in order to issue permits for kissing games.” “Did your son get much out of college?” “His room-mate, two fraternity brothers and himself.” Slogans of the Day 1. Burn Cole and save Wood. 2. Keep to the right and shorten the Miles to Love. J. Don’t he Fast or Swift, be steady. 4. The Shuman is the Seller of the Shew-maker's goods as the Baker is the Miller’s. f . A fruitless Hunt is better than none at all. 6. Don’t be a sluggard, he Allman. 7. If you have a Craven disposition do not win your cause by Harmon someone. Ralph Lampman, (to Harold Janes at the soda fountain.) “Won't you have something to drink, ‘Tuffy?’ ” Harold Janes—“Yes, 1 guess so?” (to John Christ,) “Lemme see, what have you in the line of phosphates?” Jack Gallow, (in a play at the Gym.) “Look! Look! A Ship.” Enter—Harold Janes. Mr. Estrich, (to Ralph Williamson,) “How did you know that was cast iron?” Ralph W.—“I can tell by the sound.” Echoes from “Macbeth.” Miss Powell—“Very well, will you begin, Harold?” Harold Janes, (Reading,)—“It shall be done.” Oh, Lord of Hosts, be with me yet, Lest 1 forget, lest I forget. After Exams. The Lord of Hosts was with me not, For I forgot, for I forgot. Triolets She threw me a kiss, But why did she throw it? What grieves me is this— She threw me a kiss, Ah, what chances we miss If we only could know it! She threw me a kiss But why did she throw it? Any girl might have known, When I stood there so near! And we two all alone Any girl might have known. That she needn’t have thrown! But then girls are so «|ueer— Any girl might have known, When I stood there so near! 0 a • Things of Note in A. H. S Gerald Hubbell’s sleepiness. Knight's glasses. James Shearer’s musical hair cut. Lucile’s peroxide hair. Carl Cramer’s smile. Helen Hendry’s laugh. Helen Story’s orange sweater. The Freshman side. Ralph Anspaugh’s sweater. Fred Morley's cowlick. (For reference ask Miss Powell.) Allee Miller’s pearls, ruby comb and rat. Mary Taylor’s tardy excuse blanks. • • • Then dead Silence James W.—“Why don’t you learn to play on the piano?” Bibo P.—“Well, I did try once, but I fell off so many times that I had to give it up.” • • ANNUM J =TIIE KEY • C lass of I Ml I ♦Allwood, Florence Garrett.............................................. Angola, Ind Blxler, Genevra, Teacher............................................South Bend, Ind Coy. Blanche............................................................. Angola. Ind Dygert, Florence, Civil Service.......................................Washington, D. C. ♦Eldred, Helen Rummel ................................................. Napoleon. Ohio •Foraker, Adabelle Walcott .............................................. Kunkle, Ohio ♦Gates. Rose Kohl ................................................ Pleasant Lake, Ind •Geiser, Esther Chard, Clerk........................................Fort Wayne, Ind ♦Gilmore. Harry, Battery Service..........................................Albion, Mich ♦Jeffery, Eber, Teacher ................................................. LaOtto, Ind Junod, Frances, Civil Service.........................................Washington. I). C. Miller. Ruth. Milliner............................................. Kansas City, Mo ♦Pence, Samuel, Clerical................................................. Angola, Ind Parsell, Allen .......................................................... Fresno, Cal Sheldon, Donald, Office Manager..................................... Fort Wayne, Ind ♦Smith, Agnes Pollock .................................................. Fayette. Ohio Willsle.v, Zema Crampton .......................................... Minneapolis, Minn ♦Wilson, Lloyd. Farmer................................................... Angola, Ind •White, Bernice Ramsay................................................... Angola, Ind Class of iui: Bair, Russell. Teacher.......................... Bronson Laura .................................. •Chadwick, Eva Orwig............................ Coleman, Bess, Student.......................... ♦Foraker, Winifred Walcott ..................... Goodwin, Arlene................................... •Hoag. Marjorie Kunkle.......................... ♦Kohl, Joyce Miller............................. Leininger, Mildred ............................. Martin, Eva. Civil Service...................... ♦McCoy, Constance Williamson.................... •McKay, Floy Hammond............................ Stage, Ora, Farmer.............................. •Zimmer, Ford, Electrician...................... Class of 1 Ml ft Cain, Harold, T. S. C. Student................. Castell, Stanley, Purdue Student............... Clark, Glen, Johnson Bible College............. Cline, Dean, Photographer...................... Emerson, Thomas, Salesman........................ Fairfield, Myra, Secretarial................... Goodale, Daphne, Teacher....................... Gundrum, Lolabelle...............,............. Hanselman, Mildred, Teacher.................... MIolderness, Jeanette Pollock.................. ♦ Married. ....... Lyons, Ohio .......... Deceased ....... Auburn, Ind ....... Angola. Ind ..... Kunkle. Ohio . . . . Lakeland, Fla . Washington, D. C. ....... Angola, Ind . . Kansas City, Mo . Washington, I). C. ..... Detroit, Mich Albuquerque, N. M. ........Angola, Ind . . Fort Wayne, Ind ...........Angola. Ind ..........Lafayette, Ind Kimherlin Heights, Tenn .......Indianapolis, Ind .............Angola, Ind ......Washington. D. C. .............Angola, Ind ............... Deceased .........Tillamook, Ore ...........Ligonier, Ind Howell, Harold, Parmer.............................................. Allen, Mich Ireland, Ana, Stenographer......................................Fort Wayne, Ind Lehman, Lois....................................................Chicago, Illinois Mast, Erwin. Student............................................Ann Arbor, Mich Moody, Bernice. Teacher.............................................. Auburn, Ind Metzgar, Gaylord, Body Works........................................Angola, Ind Morgan, Marjorie, Civil Service................................ Washington, D. C. ?doss. Ellen. Clerk...................................................Angola, Ind Myers, Lois, Teacher..................................................Angola, Ind Redding, Lois, Clerical ............................................Angola, Ind ♦Rising, Gertrude Ingalls............................................Champaign, 111 Slade, Phyllis, Student.............................................Angola. Ind ♦Somerlott, Ruth Masters.............................................Angola, Ind McClellan, Sterling.................................................Angola, Ind Wambaugh, Anna .....................................................Angola, Ind Webb, Jane................................................................ Kunkle, Ohio Webb, Lucile.............................................................. Kunkle, Ohio ♦Whitlock. Elsie Rinehart............................................Angola, Ind Wilcox. Leo. Jeweler................................................. Angola, Ind ♦Wolfe. Oono, Electrician............................................. Angola. Ind Wolfe, Henry..........................................................Angola, Ind Class of I!)I 7 ♦Aldrich, Edna Spade.................. Bair, Leo............................ Brooks, Samuel, Clerical ............ Cline, Dorothea ..................... Coy, Paul............................ ♦Dirrim, Wilma Johnson ............... Douglass, Robert, Salesman........... Dygert. Newton, Naval Radio Operator ♦Emerson. Valta Garver................ ♦Fink. Hobart......................... Goodwin. Walter ..................... Griffith. Willa, Stenographer........ ♦Hanselman. Letha Rozell.............. Hendry, George....................... Kankamp. Martha ..................... ♦Landis, Pearl Johnson................ Neutz, Paul ......................... Reese, Paul, Naval Academy........... ♦Riblet, Nina Ritter.................. ♦Seeley, Mary Ogden................... ♦Seeley, Wayland, Farmer.............. Smith, Carlton....................... ♦Stallman. Lucile Myers............... Stayner, Alice.......................... VanAuken, St. Clair.................. Waugh, Emily......................... Weiss, Aubrey........................ . . . . Stroll, Ind ...... Deceased . . Angola, Ind . . . Angola. Ind . . . Angola. Ind . . . Angola Ind Cleveland, Oh:o ......Angola, Ind .....Angola. Ind . . . Lakeland, Fla . Fort Wayne, Ind ......Angola. Ind .....Angola, Ind . Indianapolis. Ind Pleasant Lake, Ind .......... Deceased . . . Annapolis. Md .....Angola. Ind ......Angola, Ind .....Angola. Ind . .New York, N. Y. ........Metz, Ind ..South Bend, Ind .......Angola, Ind Battle Creek, Mich .....Angola, Ind ♦ Married.Class of 1018 ♦Anderson, Bertha Johnson . ♦Aranguren, Dorotheo Pence Barnes, Esther Harmon . . . ♦Boyers. Bruce. Teacher Butz, Paul, Student........ Chrystler, Clarence. Teacher Cole, Robert .............. ♦Cranklin, Rachel Bohner . . Crissinger. Roscoe......... Flaishans, Russell, Student . Caris, Gonda, Teacher...... Garrett, Irma, Librarian . . Gay, Fred. News Reporter . Gay, Paul.................. Graf, Paul. Naval Academy Graf, Ruth................. Griffin, Inez.............. Harmon, Ora................ ♦Holderness, Harry........... ♦Ireland, Grace Berlien...... ♦Kincaid, Marie Ellis........ Libey, Wade, Student....... Mast. Florence, Student Myers, Vera, Teacher....... McCool, Florace, Teacher . . Newnam, Hazel ............. ♦Orwig. Beatrice Wilcox .... Parsell, Maurice........... Par sell, Enos............. ♦Spangle, Grace Stiefel Taylor, Lillian, Civil Service ♦Terry, Ethel Eckert......... ♦Tiffany, Frank.............. ♦Tuttle, Vera Callender Wells, Troas............... Zahst. Ruth, Teacher....... ........... Ashley, Ind Caracas, South America ..........Horton, Mich ..........Angola, Ind .......... Chicago, 111 ....Nevada Mills, Ind .......... Angola. Ind ............California .............. Deceased .........Oberlin, Ohio .......... Butler, Ind .......... Angola, Ind ....Fort Wayne, Ind ........Sturgis, Mich ........Annapolis. Md ...........Angola, I ml ...........Angola. Ind .......Jackson. Mich .........Ligonier, Ind . . . ....Lynn, Mass .........Corunna, Mich ........Lafayette. Ind ...........Oxford, Ohio ...........Angola. Ind ....Fort Wayne, Ind .......... Angola, Ind . . . .Pleasant Lake, Ind .......... Angola. Ind ...........Angola, Ind .......... Angola, Ind . . . . Washington. D. C. . . . . Washington, I). C. ...........Angola, Ind ...... Hillsdale, Mich ............Angola, Ind . . Indiana Harbor, Ind ( lass of IS)IS) Baker, Henry, Company M, 29th Inf...............................Camp Jennings. Ga. Bates, Laura, Teacher .......................................... Red Lodge, Mont Brown. Chelsea. Bank Clerk............................................ Angola. Ind Carpenter, Lucile......................................................Angola, Ind Clark, Claude. Dry Cleaner.......................................Indianapolis, Ind Cline. Hilda.......................................................; Angola, Ind Cox, Howard.......................................................... Crain, Gaylord, Decorator..............................................Angola, Ind ♦ Married.Cravens, Russell, Student ..................... Croxton, Mark. Student......................... Ewers, Marian. Hank Clerk ..................... Fink. Carlton, Student......................... Gregg, Lavornia, Stenographer.................. Griffith, Byron, Student....................... Hardy, Esther.................................. ♦Lemmon, Edna Stetler............................ McBride, Elizabeth, Clerical................... McBride, Lyle. Clerk........................... McClellan, Esther, Student..................... McClue, Emmet, Oldsmobile Co................... Miller. Mildred ............................... Myers, George.................................. ♦Parker, Hirdie Morrison ........................ Parsons, Oscar. Mechanic....................... Parrott, Emmet, Student........................ ♦Pogue, Wilma Slade.............................. Ralston, Wesley................................ Shoup, Gail.................................... Stiefel, Mildred .............................. Swanger, Burton, Salesman...................... Ulch, Wilma, Stenographer...................... Welch. Martha, Student......................... Williams, L. .................................. Wolfe, Mildred. Stenographer................... Zimmer, Kenneth................................ ( lass of 1020 Baker, Cora, Teacher.......................... ♦Barto, Pauline Hanselman. Teacher............. Cole, Glen.................................... Collins, Floiad, Teacher...................... ♦Creel, Donald ................................ Croxton, Marian, Student...................... Evans, Elizabeth, Student..................... ♦French, Ethel Shippey......................... Hammond, Don, Clerk........................... Harmon, Clarence, Student..................... Harmon, Ethel, Teacher........................ Harmon, Glen, ................................ Heckenlively, Joan. Student................... .....Angola, Ind . .Ann Arbor, Mich ......Angola, Ind . Indianapolis, Ind ____Seattle, Wash Ann, Arbor, Mich .....Angola, Ind Pleasant Lake, Ind .....Auburn, Ind .....Angola, Ind .......Chicago, 111 . . . . Lansing, Mich .....Angola. Ind ........Angola, Ind ..... Orlando. Fla ........Angola. Ind ........Angola, Ind ........Angola, Ind .......Angola, Ind East Lansing. Mich . Fort Wayne, Ind Battle Creek, Mich , . Fort Wayne, Ind . Bloomington, Ind . . Fort Wayne, Ind ........Angola, Ind ........Angola, Ind ........Angola. Ind ........Fremont, Ind ....... Angola, Ind ........ Angola, Ind ....... Angola, Ind . . . Bloomington, Ind ........ Albion, Mich .......Jackson, Mich ..........Angola, Ind . . . Indianapolis, Ind .........Angola, Ind .......Gallion, Ohio Colorado Springs. Col Married.fc—==rTllK KEY= 78 -- • ■ •Higgins, Clara Hirsch.......................... Holderness, Louis.............................. Martin, Harold ................................ Mast, Herman, Student.......................... Mast, Otto, Student............................ Metzgar, Clifton............................... Metzgar, Marian ..:............................ Miller, Oarcile................................ Miller Pauline................................. Miller, Clarence, Student...................... Owens, Ronald.................................. Peck. Mary E., Teacher . . . .................. Redding, Ralph................................. Rinehart, Wilma................................ Shoup, Wavel................................... •Smith, Louise Hetzler.......................... Sutton, Opal, Teacher.......................... Terry, Eleanor, Student.................. Whitman. Dae, Teacher..................... Zimmer, Harold, Teacher........................ ( lass of 1021 Boyers, Beulah, Teacher........................ Blitz. Ivene, Clerk............................ Cline, Helen, Clerk............................ Cook, Ruth, Teacher............................ Crain. Charles, Student........................ Easterday, Hazel .............................. Fast Ralph..................................... Fast, Wandalee, Student........................ Frazier, Catherine, Student.................... Garrett. Harold................................ Graf. Frederic................................. Johnson, Howard................................ Latson, Beulah................................. Lowther, Ned .................................. 'McClure. Leah Leininger........................ Pillsbury, Marion ............................. Pogue, Mary, Student........................... Sanders, Mark.................................. Spade, Clyde................................... Stiefel, George ............................... . . . . Angola. Ind . . . . Angola. Ind . . . . Angola, Ind Ann Arbor, Mich . . . . Chicago. Ill . . . . Angola, Ind . . . . Angola, Ind .... Butler, Ind . . . . Angola. Ind Fort Wayne. Ind . . . . Angola, Ind . . . Toledo. Ohio . .. . Angola, Ind . . . . Angola, Ind . . . Angola. Ind . . . . Angola, Ind . . . . Angola, Ind , . . Oberlin, Ohio Stanton, X. Dak . . Hamilton. Ind . . . . Angola, Ind . . . . Angola. Ind . . . . Angola. Ind . . Fremont, Ind . . . . Angola, Ind . . . . Edon, Ohio . . . . Angola, Ind . . . . Angola. Ind . . . Oxford, Ohio . . . Angola, Ind . . . Angola, Ind . . . Angola, Ind . . . . Angola, Ind . . . Angola, Ind . . . Auburn, Ind . . . Angola, Ind . . . Angola, Ind . . . Angola, Ind . . . . Angola, Ind . . . Angola, Ind • Married.ADVERTISEMENTS WE HAD A HARD TiME HDDKIfT EMKSHEHSXSMSHEHSXSXSHSHSHSHSHSXSHSXS ROSS H. MILLER TAILORING 3 3 AND DRY CLEANING Hats Cleaned and Blocked Phone 484 Angola, Ind. KEY =5= HZHXiMXMSHSXXMSXBXSXSXSXgXSHSXSXSXS We Wash Everything | but the kids Modern Steam Laundry "sMXMBMEMXHSMSMSWSMEXEMEXEMSMBMEMX MSMSMSMSMSMSMSMEMSMSMEHSMSMSMSXEXg R oy Cox Meat Market Telephone 143 Angola. Slade Porter Barbers-. M-AI.==fr- —O -v- —s EKEMSMEMEK13M 2XEKEKEKEKSKBKBKSKEKSKEKSKSKBKSMEKSKEKEKSIMBKEKEKISMSIXjBKEHEK3}] M 3 S High School Students O —----- -------— — And their parents will always find it pays to see what the best store in Steuben County has to offer in the line of wearing apparel— from head to foot, for male or female—that’s EKCEEKnKBKSK KBK3KSKEBCBKSMSM3KEKSM3KBMSKBKaKISKEKEMSI»aBMSM3KSE3BKnilB««MBKBt3 MBMEMSXSMSMSXSMEMBMBMBXBMBXBXBMEXBMEMEMEXSMEMSaEaiEMSKlEXBXSXSMEXSXESlSXEXE You Have a Servant Who is willing to work three hundred sixty-five days a year and put in twenty- |j four hours every day. By means of this servant you will find that your household duties become pleasures and drudgery is banished forever. More Electric Servants and Electric Servants for More of Us Electric Servants are Not Luxuries Service by electricity means a saving in time; a saving in material; a saving in health, and a saving in happiness. INDIANA UTILITIES COMPANY | 215 W. Maumee St, Angola, Indiana |jj SKSKEMEMEKSKBKEKSKEMEMEKECCEKSKEKEMSKEKiXMZKEKIBWEMEMEMEMEMEXXKiraEKIXMEMEKlEXSMSMXMXMSwXMEMZMSMZSISIHEMKaSMaMEJflEIlOE m To Insure in i Sure Insurance ! Call FARMERS’ AND MERCHANTS’ INSURANCE AGENCY ZKSXEKXKSKSKSMSKEiCZtXXKSKXHZMZKSKr 1 A. H. S. STUDENTS I ENJOY Luncheons and Dinners H H. W. MORLEY, u 50 Manager. MARY METZGER, kfi Secretary. S SMEMSMEWEWEJCEMSHEGCSIHEMSMSKKDilEeSBKEM m Dassett Ransburg- | Proprietors g ■ a go MEMirXIENEMEMESBMSHBWSMSMEMBMEMSMBJJS aKXKEtSEKSKaKENSKE LKMSKSKEMSKSMSKEKEKSHEKEKSMEKEKEMEHEKZKSEE LIKSMEKSKEMSM CLINE’S Picture Shop BKSHBMBHSMSMSMSHEUSUSMStSZUSMSMSMSUSUS IZHSHSKiSMSMINaMSMSMZMSMSN HBHSMBMSttQuality Merchandise 6O35GXHXC0X60360X53B3OXHXHXC33MS6SX5 X:XX53XHX33S:!03HXMX:X!S53354E5gX;HX:)i: M H B tW For years we have steadfastly adhered to our policy—Quality Merchandise. Our success as merchants is due, we believe, to this policy. ' We feature today, as we have for years, merchandise of only the highest standards. ' , . ; The men and women of this community look to us to supply their needs, knowing full well that quality is of first import nee in whatever we sell. THE HOME OF QUALITY MERCHANDISE Euppenheimer Clothes, Walk-Over Shoes, Arrow Branu Shirts and Collars, Wayne Knit Hosiery, Bradley Sweaters, Ladies fine Resdy to Wear and Accessories. mmswn krl-MsKHr-r-l- A Big Store Ever Growing Into a Greater Field of Service 33flB3XS£XKX6SXI»Xli3XKBS3 1 1 H a H H M SMSMSMEKEKBMBKSMSKaKSMgKSMSKEMSMStiigMRMBKSKEKiaKaKEKSESKSKSKSKEKSMSKSKSKSK :53S5C360B03B53B33SS3S33S53S533l!3SK S508i3S53SD3S Business is Good s M 5? 53 ■ 53 B 53 S H 8 53 ■ H S H But we are never too busy to give your work careful and painstaking attention. |cnoir51 All Kinds of Good Printing S50SDSB53S03E03S60B03S63S03SS3S63E63E 3863S03S63S03 X M a X s 53 53 ■ X H 3 53 B B 53 N S 53 B a X | - 63 B H H 53 X X H 50 M H S X X 53 53 X 55 s X 53 H X X X X 53 50 XK3C5X33SS4XHXKX5C3KX63SCC36385CX6:2XX53S3IXiO Potted Plants S AND Cut Flowers Flowers for all Occasions Steuben Republican S 1 George “• Eggleston I “ « Florist s 53 Phone 310-L Euclid St., Angola | 53 B63S53353B53B53353353363B53B53S53B53B53B53B53B53S53I IIE KEY! := rcEMBMSMgMSMgSKSKBKBKgKSCCEKBMEKBKBKEKEKEHSKEKiBKEKgKEKEMEKEDiSKBKSMSKBIHEKBM I WE BELIEVE N the boys and girls of A. H. S., because of their accomplishments as students and athletes. We feel sure they are able to maintain their present high standard. Angola Ice Cream Co. KiSMSMSMSH HgMBXBHSKISMBHBKISSISMSMXHBHBXEHEMXMBiXIBMSXISHBMSXSMBHZKBMSIKSHSMSHfc A NEW ANGLE ON THRIFT HgSiEREMgRgSSRgRgRgKIgHgKIgMgRgjagJOERBiJgSgRgRgSEMgHgRgMEHgSIgRgRgRgRgSgRgRSjCS g M B 51 X M M 8 X H g M g H X M X X H M RSKIgREOOgKlgMgKISXIgKIgMgMgMgMgMgMgNgWgiagHgJagS Thrift is the management of your affairs in such a manner that the value of your possessions is constantly increased. In plain, every-day American, thrift is merely good business. It’s good business to be prepared for opportunity and emergency. It’s good business to have a bank account where your funds can accumulate and where the value is constantly being increased. We invite you to open an account with us. Angola Bank Trust Co. Cl 8 H g W M H CO 8 K N K DS X CO g M y. N M H g H IXBRERg EKEKEKEKEMBM' A N NUAIj !=5ftt5 [csaaMssisjcaMSSMSMsaaMSjaEJilaMsasasasxs 5s M H 3 a a co DO CO a CO H DO DO DO CO CO a CO a to co HIGH SCHOOL and SPORT SUITS We have them in an endless variety. Prices range from $18.50 up. All new up to the minute styles. Furnishings to harmonize. JARRARD’S TOGS CO COEOOSMSMBMaMEMSXiaaSHSMBMEMSMSMEaEOia B a CO a a E a a DO a co a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a co sascosasasooBascoEoosasaEOOStfsooBoasoo H:? a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a M a a a co a DO a a a a a co a to to SKSXEKSKSKEDCEKSDCEKEDCBMSKEBBDCEKEKSOO KE a y. a E a s a E CO E a E a E a E a E a E a a a a a E a s asasoosasjiEasaEotEasiosooscosoasasMEaE a If It’s SHOE SERVICE, FOOT FITTING STYLE ANI) PRICE COME TO Klston’s Shoe Store The kind that wears and does not Run Next time try "Tru Shape Hosiery” a a a co a a a a a a co a a a a a a a co a co a a a a Lil a do We Fit Your Feet—Save You Money a We can please you with our Silk Hosiery. a All kind and styles Tennis and Sport Shoes Prices the Lowest EHEaSKBKEasaSHEKSHBKSasaSKSaSHSXSa r;2:osaE:oEaEaaasaEaEasj3s:oE:oE:osasaEHi? I The Road to N a oa | Happiness | a a ' • e a Is made more smooth by a snl -H ... E stantial savings account. Money isn’t everything, but it certainly helps over the rough spots in life. And it must be saved while it is being earned. __________________________ __ E 5. ■ ■ ■ ” a Open Your account Flere And Build for Happiness | a a a a The First National Bank ? Angola, Indiana. Di EDCECCEKBD0EDCSKSCCEDCEKECCEDCSC03DCSKEDCSK2'3SG3XMXNSMXHXH2HXHgH2HgH2NXMSGGg 0gH2H2 0gC3SG0SH8HSG3ENXIH360XKi8GGS 8SM5GC2M2E i2K2HX60 S H H S S H Herald Your Wants CO X X GO fi M E M S GO S sa N s H g g GO GO 3 GO X H g X GO GO GO g M 3C g H g X 80 N N H S GO N X X GO GO GO S N GO The Angola Herald Telephone 3 B x x GO G3XNXHXMXMXMXMXMXMXMXMXGaXMSK£HXHXG8XH£G3XC3S!! 2M8M8308K8i»8!HSM8308W2MgMgE K(0SIK)2GO2NXG02G98GOXNSM2G02l02!)0SNXG02C0SG0SS0gGO3NSeaXHXG03NXNSG92 O23OSi)OSHg30SG02HSMSHSG(i2G0SGO2»XMX3OXM2NXH2GOXG82GOXGeXiX!2MgHBMEMSMSMSMEMSMEMEMSMEMEWSMBMSMEMf: KRATZ DRUG STORE The jl jodtJL Store BASSETT’S Ice Cream Parlor g Whitman’s and Aurentz’ CHOCOLATES Spaulding Athletic Goods IIGGETTS CANDY Lord Baltimore Stationery MEWSMEaSMEMEMEMEMEMSMSMEMEMBMEiXIEMK Sodas Sundaes Soft Drinks EMEKSMEMBHEKBKEKBWEMBKBMEHEWEMEKSW EKEKEKEKEKEMEMSKEKSHEKEKEKEMEKEMSM | Croxton Opera House ■ ,, , , n i The Best in Motion Pictures HEMSHSHSHSHSHSMSMSHSHEHSHg EKSHSHS 1 | Shrider’s MEAT Market | | n Always I-Ias the Best of Everything in 1 MEATS H s LESTER SHKIDER. Proprietor M nXEKEMECCEMEKEKSMEMEKSKEKEMSMEtaEMEeS E ■ E HSMEMEMEMSMEMSMSKIEMESlBMEMEHEMSMEaE 1 GOLDEN’S GARAGE $ Cool and Comfortable 1 H I Nightly Performance gj s s m n XMEMSKEMEMEMEMEKSMSMEKSMSKEKISMSMEM Automobile Accessories Filling Station on N. Wayne St. « Storage and Service E 1 Goodyear Tires—Best Yet « They Cost No More MSMSMEMSMEHSMSMSRSMSWSWEMBBSKiEKSMf Climax Barber Shop Best equipped four-ehair barber shop | in town. Northwest corner of Square. C. L. Mote, Prop. For a Bottle Of good old-fashioned Pop go to C. E. DOWNEND, Prop. s M M M S R R a ■ R s 50 H S R H M 3 N IX S M H EM 2 RC ECO M2 « M CO H IX M 3 H N M R B H CO If good quality, good service and low prices appeal to you you will trade with MAST BROS. « N H X. Elizabeth St. " 3 SHINE M Northwest corned Square. Angola RKBKBKEKSKBKBKSKEKSKEKBKEKBKSKSKEW LIKEKSKBKSKBXBKBKBKSKSKECrSKKXSKSMSM MEMBjaEMEXBMEMSHaXBMEXSXBXBMBXSMSXE For the Latest EKSKSKSKSKSKSK8KXKSKSKEKSKBKKIXEK2M R k Newspapers, Iv.'agazine or Fancy GROCERIES go to The Banking Habit AHCOLA.IHDIAHA ;;XSMSHSHSHSKBHSHSKSMSKEMEXEI SMSMBK FOR Plumbing and Heating I SNSKXKSKSKSKXMXKXMSKSCIRCCSXEKEKXM FOR 8 - " FIXTURES Call Wm. C. MAXFIELD X K H Means sound sleep, good digestion, ra cool judgment and independence. We jljj to pa.v interest at 4% on certificates and jjjj so savings, and solicit your Banking Busi- j£j | ness. M M Phones: a Office 326 Res. 328-X S RKEKSKBKBKEMSMSKEKSKEKSKSK3KEKEKEK | Steuben County State Bank | R. J. Carpenter, Cashier H Sira EKBKBKEKBKEKSKEKBKBKEKBKEKBCaSKEKSM» --gg A N NUATj= t ♦ The Most Complete Book o?i Annuals Ever Published Ca?i be Secured Absolutely ST Free ybr ,(o e£effA d oov pubWcstioivs staffer fajian.ep 1 1922 .V . .1 y %£ jK 'I r ; fevV. j 1 a ??; •; • ... •■ jt ifeSSSfe -fc'■; •'"-v ?» v t r3 ,a£ %f‘ij f ; |r .- .V tA. -£. JB?' fe5r '• y£f I. f Hal • is ? . T ' , «§.‘ • ■■» " •• |£g :y » ■. .a ■-•V 4g ’ ... a • - ' "ix. .- - 5 V . -; - f._ rw.r e. -• '£ - V’- ' .. •- ,.,v ' ' 2 sr - :i ■ L; ,a£ f - : r . :i :• st-.-. T; gp iS 2 Shjyyfc. J 7. ) V v ? -Hi«- ■ CT v a - w ,k . - v .? • Lit •£-'. V L i ' 71 7‘ -' ■ • A 4l '■x.'sAm, .- al ■ x ‘ a r ™ W: »- - v £ -A-‘ ' V Q . %K ‘ AdftSf-MLl Jpl-' ;S! i . , r- .«; ;•' }.;£. - V, •', JCjr ;• - --4 ' -i ■ j v iip|lp tf W '.A 3e ■ « ' . w ■ -.a’ I . J :- 5 . j Jrm% £• • .« .-• • - v :• v. 4v ;•? . % - 3| '■ r%U 5‘i|. ?v • ■a; E t -: ; • "-:-r ‘ V- •: f V ■ • i. M. - . wa: - J7 £ r»i» • • • A" .- -'- ■- ■ ,. »S- A r- '• %? tiL V, • r ’-US V-, •. -i • ■«¥ «•( 4 -XT iv 4Ji ’ V MF A "r - .■hp-.- “ ; • «• ' ! l "i ■»V . X«a. -C - , • ' W : -4 xi,1 I S 1 ml T r vV f fit ! •: , ;. - r i ,4r. .y« '• iff SK " 2 ,. A ■ifJr. , . • jKjI'v . , j r, ” •- v‘a ».S- f ■ - - .. r''.+ -'. ■ --' tr- X. r» - ZJ i Ki fcv i m -‘'A , tJr 4pHR 4 WPS." A jp • ;- V V 5 !W .’•:V. ■ 4fW2 -i ; •. ' V . V. Ssa s sg. -• -- ■• » : l-l - -v- "• ■. - i • sBsp ? . t. ■ „v » c jf. .' c? • •■ ■.• y iw ■' yf • a- ' A'-..: ligH If ‘ vti-» - -' 'f . wr -c. • . ■Sgri'•- •.iV 'A; Hk f ., -' ; ' x r jW . A tb - -•-« .ax'- u. At .’ M 7-. - A. 4 flV. 4t r ■XiffWMtf-fl.Si J- arH, -.-i jf -■• V. fe l..; .. v- vr aSg .W 4 i •,x e-. y Tr ? - 3t'Kjfc-ar«f M- •


Suggestions in the Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) collection:

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

1918

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

1920

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

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