Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN)

 - Class of 1921

Page 1 of 68

 

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1921 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1921 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1921 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1921 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1921 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1921 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1921 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1921 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1921 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1921 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1921 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1921 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 68 of the 1921 volume:

DEDICATION In the members uf abr JFnruitg, mho arr lentoiuj us, U e, the l e t rrspertf ull bebicatr the 1 21 issue uf the fte i.ANGOLA HIGH SCHOOLHigh School Song We’re a bunch of jolly students. Brightest bunch of jolly students, That you ever saw in any school. 'I'be teachers all acknowledge, when we go off to college The world will know where Vr we go, Angola evermore. We’re strong in athletics, and we’re there in mathematics Yes we know the text books one and all by heart, The people who have seen us all say we’re each a genius, Conic, let’s give three cheers for A. II. S Hah! Hah! Rah! (Honrs Hail Angola may your praises resound, the shouts pass around, 'Pill the echoes rebound, Talk of agility we’re full of ability, 1‘jVer shirk a duty, No! Hobble-gobble, robble-gobble, ris, ras, ris. Long may our banners wave as ever before, 'Pile purple and gold forever more. Talk of intellectuality we have it in reality Three cheers for dear old A. II. S.The Key Staff Editor Frederic Graf Assistant Editor Catharine Frazier Business Manager Aileen Taylor Assistant Business Managers Lawrence Emerson Mark Sanders Exchange JJernieCe Cravens Alumni Beulah Boyers Athletics Ralph Lampman Society Vivienne Shuman Art Ralph Fast Jokes Charles Crain News Reporters Leah Leininger James Shearer Harold Janes Norris Owens Advisor Faculty Committee ♦ TIIM KKY Pa«r » Five A. l apro Six r J II. Ii. ALLMAN, Superintendent History IN’ E. . . GAT WOOD Music ('. ( IIAKSII, Principal Latin Met in h sil nit ut Ihstor III si Till-: KEY Page Seven .MISS i-aK ELIj Art .Miss LOVE Latin-English MRS. RAF RON Domestic Science .MISS imWELL EnglishPage Eight THE KEY •J. L. ESTRICH Science-M athematics K. E. GOXSER Agriculture H. H. KEEP General Science-Bookkeeping I). W. GATWOOI) .Manual 'l'i aining-Mal hematicsTil 1C KICV Page Nine T. I). MASS Commercial Department MRS. ROSE History II Due to an oversight, the picture of .Mrs. Rose was not obtained until to late to have a cut made, for this issue of The Key.■ THE KEY Page Eleven Senior Class Officers President Frederic Graf Vice-President Leah Leininger Secretary Aileen Taylor Treasurer -Marion Pillslmry Historian Ivene Butz Prophets Marion Pillslmry Helen Cline Wandalee Fast Will Leah Leininger Poet Nellie Coleman Colors Silver, Blue and Gold Flower PansyPage Twelve T1IK KHV BAYNE MORLEY “ Bing” Treasurer A. A.—IV, Senior Dramatics “lie was a man, take him for all in all, 1 shall not look upon his like again.M BEFLAH LATSON Junior Dramatics, Senior Dramatics “Her voice was ever soft, gentle and low— an excellent thing in a woman.” NED LOWTIIER “A little nonsense now and then. Is relished by the wisest men.” WAXDALEE FAST Metz High School—I, 11 “Happy and gay is she.”Page ThirtiVh HAROLD GARRETT ‘-Garrett” ‘lf silence is golden, thou art a nugget.” NELLIE COLEMAN l’oet—IV. •‘Key” Staff—II,—Senior Dramatics ‘‘She is pretty to walk with, And witty to talk with, And pleasant too. to think on.” GEORGE KT1EFEL ‘‘Seems so |iiiet in school, 1 1.1 has been known, the faculty to fool.” RUTII COOK Class Secretary—1, II, III, Senior Dramatics "Ruth is so shy, so modest, so still Put whatever she does, she does wit) .■ will.”Page Fourteen THE KEY MARK SANDERS “Fat” t'lass Vice-Pres.—III, “Key” Staff—III, IV, Baseball—II, III, IV, Junior Dramatics, Seii-ioi Dramatics “None but himself could be his parallel.” MARY POGUE “Poggie” Junior Dramatics, Senior Dramatics ‘‘She is a little chimney, and heated hot in a moment.” MARION PILLSBURY “Pills” Basketball—II. Ill, IV, Baseball—II, III. IV. t'lass Treasuier—IV, Junior Dramatics. Senior Diamatics “last all expressing.” LEAII LEINiNGER “Phat” Senioi Dramatics "it is a necessity of her nature to love somebody.”THE KISY Page Fifteen HAZEL EASTERDAY Etlon High School—I, II, III, Senior Dramatics “A countenance in which did meet Sweet records, promises as sweet." CLYDE SPADE “Shorty” "Is a comic chap, llis sayings in classes olten make us laugh.” i EXE Ml TZ Class Historian—IV “die had tongue at will, yet was never loud.” HOW ARD JOHNSON ‘‘Johnson" “i will be faithful to my convictions and strong in my principles.”Page Sixteen Tin : key CHARLES CRAIN “Chuck” Basketball—II, III, IV, Baseball—I, II, III, IV, “Key” Staff—IV, Junior Dramatics— Senior Dramatics “Unknit that threat’ning, unkind brow, It blots thy beauty, as frost do blight the meads!” CATHARINE FRAZIER “Kate” Junior Dramatics, Senior Dramatics, Spectator Staff—I, “Key” Staff—III, IV “Who chooseth me must give and hazard all he hath.” FREDERIC GRAF “Fritz” Treasurer Class—I, Spectator Staff—I, “Key” Staff—III, IV, Class President—III, IV, Basketball—III, IV, Baseball—III, IV, “O wonderful son, that can so astonish a mother.” AILEEN TAYLOR “Taylor” “Key” Staff—II, IV, Basketball—IV, Class Secretary—IV, Senior Dramatics “Small in stature but great in mind."TilK KKV Page Seventeei HELEN CLINE Senioi Dramatics “A perfect woman, nobly planned." RALPH FAST “Red" .Metz High School—I, II. Basketball—1 '. “Key” Staff—IV, .Junior Dramatics, Senior Dramatics. “A man I am grown, A man’s work I must do.’’ BEULAH BOYERS Senior Dramatics—“Key" Staff. IN’ “A little, tiny, witty charming lassie she.” AN EXPLANATION Owing to a recent law passed by the State Board of Education, students are required to attend high school for a period of not less than seven semesters, or three and one-half years, before they can graduate. An intelligent law, passed by intelligent people, but, it should apply with equal strictness over the state, and when one student at Bluffton and two at Decatur are granted diplomas in three years, why should that same favor be withheld from three Angola students of the ’21 elass. To the above mentioned students, namely, Nellie Coleman, Aileen Taylor and Bayne Morley that little high school sheepskin is a most desirable aiticle and no partiality should be shown by the state in the tendering of same, and it was a great disappointment to these three A. II. S. students when they learned that others had been favored who had finished the required studies under the same eondi tions as they had finished.1’age Eighteen THE KEY Class Poem Last night as I sat by the fireside, A new thought came to me, Of the change that will take place in the future, Or just what our future will he. Ah, schoolmates, long have we waited, Looking forward to this day. But now that it is nearing. Sadness, not pleasure, holds sway. How do we know that in the future, Ever again will we see our friends— Our dear old classmates and teachers. To whom we must make amends, For many of yesterday’s follies, By tomorrow’s great success. On our way dropping seeds of kindness, That may glorify our A. II. S. But whatever our success in the future, Or what honors to us are due, A. II. S., our dear alma mater, We are deeply indebted to you. This is the parting of our good classmates Into paths to us unknown. With the past left far behind ns, With the deeds we must atone. The past is gone but not forgotten, Still there is no need to grieve. Misdeeds scattered ’long the wayside Undying effort will retrieve. A dreamer is hut a failure. Unless he is willing to strive, For that goal far into the future, As do the bees in the hive. You must be willing to sacrifice A 1 pleasures now and then, li you would he w hat you wish to be, Ilcao cd—by tongue and pen. Class History In the year of 1909 the members of the present Senior class began their school career with seventeen pupils under the instruction of .Miss Tinkham. There we endured the many hardships of first graders. .Next came the second grade under Miss Keep, then the other six grades under Miss Schoville, Miss Crain, Mrs. Utter and Mrs. Hubble, respectively. In the year 1917 we entered High School with the number of thirty-eight, six of whom were from the original seventeen. During that year twelve of our classmates left us and went to other schools. Thus it was that during the following three years that several of the students sailed away in the boat of Matrimony, while others entered, until our present class numbers twenty; four of whom belong to the original number. We sincerely hope that in all our school days we have conducted ourselves in such a way that A. 11. S. will be proud to claim us in the future.THE KEY Page Nineteen Last Will and Testament We, the Senior Class of nineteen hundred twenty one, of the city of Angola, in the county of Steuben, and state of Indiana, being of sound mind and disposing memory, do hereby make, publish and declare this to be our last will and testament, making null and void all former wills and testaments made by us. I. We hereby give to Miss Powell the spirit, work and expense of the Key to be held in trust for the rising Senior class. It shall be passed on each year and the Key shall not cease publication for any reason. II. To the Class of 1922 we do will and bequeath our dignity, our seats on the east side of the room, our English IV, History IV.. and Chemistry. III. To the Class of 1923 we do will and bequeath our late hours and class dues. IV. To the class of 1924 we do will and be-quen'h our enduring pep, obedient natures, and ability to walk through the halls without talking. V. The accomplishments and personal property shall be distributed by Mr. Ilarsh as follows:— I, Frederic Graf, do bequeath my ability as Class President and head of various activities to Myrtle Frazier. I. Mark Sanders, do will my gift of silence and quiet and reserved manner to Adeline Hughes. I, Charles Crain, do confer my athletic ability to Sammie Finch. I. Ned Lowther, do will all my knowledge and fondness for all English subjects to Oscar Pence, on condition that he take not less than four English courses a year. I, Clyde Spade, do bequeath my graceful and special poise in dancing to Earl Greenley that he, too, may be popular with the ladies. I, Ralph Fast, do will my practice in writing notes to the fair sex to Knight Whitman. I. George Stiefel, do confer my spirit of recklessness to Howard Flaishans. I. Bayne Morley, do bequeath my privilege of making all the noise in the orchestra to Cad Mast. I. Howard Johnson, do will my popularity with the lower class women to Douglass Emerson. 1. Harold Garrett, do bequeath my good reputation to Pete Weicht. I. Marion Pillsbury, do bequeath my timidity and inclination to blush on all occasions to Ralph Lampman. I, Aileen Taylor, do will my position of honor in Mr. Allman's office to Lucy Graf. I. Nellie Coleman, do bequeath my tendency to carry all Commercial subjects to Al-lee Miller. I. Hazel Easterday, do will my monopoly of all the fellows and my abilities as a vamp to Estella Howe. 1, Ivene Blitz, do bequeath my popularity with the T. S. C. Engineers to Teresa Biel. I. Katherine Frazier, do confer all my prescriptions for “Anti Fat” cure to Anna Marie Yotter. I. Beulah Latson, do will my many hours spent in diligent pursuit of knowledge to Lawrence Wolfe. 1, Beulah Boyers, do bequeath my slowness and gentleness of speech to Margaret Fast. 1, Mary Pogue, do confer my popularity with the inhabitants of the city of Flint to Eleanor Robertson. I. Ruth Cook, do bequeath my oratorical ability to Ketha Powers, to be used in the new auditorium. i. Helen Cline, do will my classic bearing and bold manner to Jeanette Hendry. I, Wanda Fast, do will my ability to comb my hair in the latest and most approved style to Pauline Taylor. We hereby appoint Supt. Allman as administrator of above estate. As a witness thereto the undersigned has hereunto subscribed his name.Class Prophecy Pn ge Twenty THE KKY New York, City, July 1, 1931. Prof. H. B. Allman: Indianapolis, Indiana. Dear Friend: I read in this afternoon’s paper about you being promoted to “Superintendent of Public Schools in Indiana.” I am sending you my hearty congratulations and sure wish you the best of luck. Now I shall relate to you the experience I have had in finding all my old graduating classmates of 1921. Last Monday I decided to go on this search so I left my business in Wall Street in the hands of Frederic Graf, who, by the way, is a very capable business man. lie is president of the Merchants Trust Corporation here in upper New York. You know he married Helen Morton, of Metz, and left poor Aileen an old maid. lie is blessed with seven children so far. The airplane in which I came over made one 15 minute stop between here and Angola, this was at Buffalo. To my surprise I found Mark Sanders going down the Niagara Falls in a barrel in order to reduce and be as thin as he was in the A. II. S. lie said he had had many chances to marry but inclined to be free and single so he may continue to be a society king. When I went to pay my fare, who should it be but lvene Butz, the conductor, who had married Harold Garrett, the aviator of this plane. This is their permanent business and they are very prosperous. In the back of this bird is a pen where they shut their children up to keep them out of trouble, cute kids, too. They informed me that Wanda Fast had married Kenneth Reese and they were running a hair dressing establishment at Ellis Island, apparently Wanda also likes the east. We landed on the old ball grounds in Angola and took the street car up town. To my delight 1 sat down beside a lady who happened to be Helen Cline, she was on her way to her summer home on Fox Lake where she has a beautiful park that is a wonderful addition to Angola. This park is to Angola the same as White City or Riverside is to Chicago. As we looked out the street car window 1 saw a sign which read. ADDED ATTRACTION TONIGHT HAZEL EASTERDAY (in person) FAMOUS NATIVE TOE DANCER. Also Plays Roll of LADY MacBETH in Opera Helen said we were very fortunate in getting her to come to such a small city and she was merely doing it in honor of the A. II. S. By this time I was very hungry so went in a restaurant where the sign read “Ruth Cook's Busy Bee. Open all Hours.” Ruth was looking fine but was much fatter and a little gray. She says she is president of the Katinka Cooks Union. Before I was through eating in came Clyde Spade, who has married Dorothy Myers ami they were ptaying at the Croxton Opera House this week in Mutt Jeff. Clyde has h:s full growth now. They ship him around in a special box car. He has two children and he calls them Rake and Hoe. I met Senator Boyers in the new Court House. She is up for reelection on the Socialist ticked. Beulah is a very brilliant woman you know, and 1 think she will get my vote. She said she thought Abraham Lincoln was right on the slavery |iiestion and also claims the scientist should learn the atomic theory. Listen Teddy, after an all days search 1 found only one more class mate and that was ex-convict Charles Crain, who has turned over a new leaf. He is now Reverend Crain of the Angola Christian church. He is (). K. except a few troubles with the females of his congregation. The following morning I took the inter-urban to Metz and here I found Ralph Fast, the Idol of the West, working out an invention in chemistry to be used by thriving children. You know, no doubt, that Ralph was the first one to have a successful perpetual motion machine. On my way back on the train, I stopped at Detroit, where I saw Leah Leininger. SheTill-: K10V Page Twenty-One is playing l»a 11 with Detroit this year and is showing a wonderful batting average. Of course you are well aware that her husband is coaching Indiana University this year. Their friends, Coleman, Vass Co., are staging some real comedy on the screen this year. At Pittsburgh I saw Ned Lowther in the bug house. The poor fellow had gone crazy and was still trying to find his brown and white sweater. I asked him if he remembered ine and he said, “Sure I do Napoleon, don't you remember the day I killed C. C. HarshThe guide says he will recover if he pulls through the first 100 years, on bread ami water. At Philadelphia I met George Stiefel, a prominent manufacturer, making saw dust pumps, lumber stretchers, second hand dish towels and numerous other useful articles, lie also owns the Stiefel’s Dry Goods Stores throughout the land. I had to journey down to Washington, D. C., in order to see Beulah Latson, the society queen of that place. She refused to marry cither Phil Davis or Berton Swanger, but married some South American Tri-State student who has a lot of jack. I got to New York in time to see a fight shown in Madison Square Garden. The athletes were Battling Johnson vs. Kid Mor-ley. Howard had quit the farm and is making big money now. He is very popular in the society circle here in New York City. After reaching home that night I was very tired over this four day trip, but felt I certainly had spent my time enjoyably and profitably. Mr. Allman, you should see my home here, and such fine neighbors. On my right lives Mary Pogue Arnold and she has the nicest little boy, the little chap told me the other day he heard his mother and father talking about the time they got held up at the Angola fair grounds, and how her father hunted her up at 5:30 in the morning, after the A. 11. S. Senior Class play. Now don't forget to come over and see me the first time you can. My wife is always home in the morning, and 1 am at my office in the afternoons. Come we will take a little vacation on the beach and will show you how we people live here in the largest city in the world. Sincerely yours, MARION'PILLSBURY.ALQ Twrnty-Two THE KEYJunior Class Roll President........... Vice-President .... Secretary-Treasurer Historian.......... Poet................ ... Myrtle Frazier . Berniece Cravens Pauline Ransburg ... . Vera Bachelor Vivienne Shumann —Motto—“Dig"— Colors—Blue and White Flower—Lily of the Valley ROLL Harold Dolph Roy Shoup Ralph Anspaugh Carroll Maxton Hugh Hannon Carl Mast Lawrence Wheaton 1 larold Janes Martha Anspaugh Myrtle Frazier Berniece Cravens Vera Bachelor Vivienne Shumann Helen Hunt Pauline Ransbug Eloise Willis Theodore Wood Helen Storey Jessie Mountz Carl Cramer Ralph Williamson I larold Brandoberry Earl Green lev Lueile Elliott Ruth Burns Lawrence Emerson Wayne Swift Lillie Wyatt Allee Miller Marvin Allion Vern Hoagland Mildred Sellers Jett Miller Blythe Rockwood Mildred Baker John Rose Jeannette Hendry Wayne Adamsir THE KEYt TI1K KKY Page Twenty-FiveSophomore A Class Roll President ................ Ralph Lainpman Vice President ............. Bvrona Allison Secretary...................James Shearer Treasurer................... Barbara Cline MOTTO—Grit, Grace and Glory Flower—Lilac ROLL Clark Bowles Joseph Carpenter Willard Case Cleveland Collins William Croxton Howard Flaishans Marion Graham (Jerald Ilubhle Ralph Lampman Jack Mayfield Ruth Barber Sarah Barron Mary Benfer Freeda Burkhalter Dorothy Burns Pauline Clark Barbara Cline Eva Dirrim Louise Dirrim Arlene Fast Audra Falk Lucile Fry Adeline Hughes Alleen Lowther Robert Ramsay Janies Shearer Emmet Spade Ilershel Sutton James Williamson Carroll Wolfe Lawrence Wolfe Bvrona Allison Ruth Alvison Maisie Bair Helen MeXeal Volande Miller Ruth Pulver Eleanor Robertson Rolcne Rowley Josephine Sutton Marvel Sutton Mary Taylor Pauline Taylor Mildred Thomas Ruth Wert Mary M. Williamson Ruth Williamson Martha WoodPage Twenty-Eight TIIK KKY T1IK KEY Page Twenty-Nine Sophomore B Gass Roll President ...................... Lyle Clark Yiee-President ........... Knight Whitman Secretary .......................... Estelle Howe Treasurer .................... Margaret Past MOTTO—Labor omnia vineit. Flower—Brown eyed Susan CLASS COLORS'—Brown and Gold ROLL Theresa Bell Lyle Clark Choral Cravens Everett Davis Margaret Fast Walter Gordon Lucy Graf Wilma Harmon Helen Hendry Estelle Howe Lurene Klink Dorothy Long Fred Morley lvetha Powers Ray Stiefel Knight Whitman A. AHH MILL Aiuiil %)Ttuc!THE KEY Page Thirty-One Freshnan Class Roll President .............. Annie Marie Yotter iee-President...............Norris Owens Secretary .................. Kenneth Tiffany Treasurer ................ Ilortense Cramer Blanche Stoneburner Evangeline Faekey Edgar Fields Austin Brokaw Nihl Clay Nihl Ilarmon Florence Carr Pa Little Merril Cline Harold Brooks Leona Rice Harold Spumann Rachel Brad'ner Kathryn Goodwin Sarah Ramsey Lawton Shank Echo Shaull Herbert Cole Nettie Dolph Rhea Barber Vernon Sniff Dorothy M vers Maple Ogden Ernest Bland Sheldon Rinehart Robert Peek Winifred Avery Hilda Hurley Louis Jarrard Powers Luce Lu Rayne Oherholtzer Marjoiie Fink Marjorie Ryder Mildred Parrot Edra Griffith Joseph Weicht John Beebe Carleton Chase Lewis E. Kint Byron Pence Sidney Williams Ilortense CramerPage Thirty-Two TIIE KEYPage Thirty-Three TIIK KEYPage Thirty-Four TIIK KRYPage Thirty-Five , J1111! I| i!«! T11E KEY 1 lt« Thirty-Seven ✓Page Thirty-Eight THE KEY The Team “CHUCK ” was one of the fastest men on the team and was always found where he was most needed in the game. His ability to shoot foul goals has pulled us out of many a hole. This is “Chuck’s” last year. He leaves a record that is hard to beat. “PILLS” held the position of floor guard, but he usually accounted for a good share of the baskets. $n losing “Pills” we lose one of the best men we have ever had; he could be depended on wherever he was needed in the game. Give him the ball anywhere near the basket and he got it through. “FRITZ” is rightly slated as the scrappiest man per square inch on the team. He always preferred to be useful rather than ornamental in a game. He was in it all the time from start to finish. “Fritz” leaves a place hard to fill. “IKEY” was a new man, but he played the game like a veteran. His position was back guard and he did keep them back. His close guard work was a big asset to the team. “Ikey” will be with us again next year. Look out for “Ikey.” “SHRIMP” is small, but oh, how he could cover the floor. His long suite was guarding. When “Shrimp” got started it was hard to follow him with the naked eye. “Shrimp” is expected to hold down a regular berth on the '21-’22 squad. “OCT” started subbing this year. He is a general utility man playing either forward or guard. We expect “Oct” to make a good showing next season. “HUGH" got started late in the season but he made some stqpt- We expect him to show us some real basket ball next year. "EDDIE” subbed at forward this season. His playing is clever, especially his ability to sink markers. “Eddie” is a good prospect for the ’21-'22 squad. “RED” became a member of the first ten late in the season. He is an excellent guard. We believe that he would hold a regular position another year, but lie is leaving us tli is year. “HAL" has the distinction of being not only the biggest man on the team, but the cleverest as well. His cleverness kept his opponents in confusion. “Hal” could be depended on to make accurate passes, his headwork has saved many a game. He was declared star of the tourney at Auburn for a second time. “Hal” is the captain of the ’21-’22 squad. Watch him! Charles Crain, “Chuck” (Captain) Forward Frederic Graf, “Fritz” Forward Carl Cramer, “Hal” Center Marion Pillsbury, “Pills" Guard Theodore Wood, “Ikey" Guard Ralph Lampman, “Shrimp" Sub Oscar Pence, “Oct” Sub Cleveland Collins, “Eddie” Sub Ralph Fast, “Red” Sub Hugh Harmon. “Hugh” Sub Sam Finch, “Sammie” Sub THE DISTRICT TOURNAMENT. The District Tourney was Angola's from the start when they won the first game from Auburn, who was our strongest opponent. The Auburn crew were outclassed and the purple and gold boys carried through their teamwork with clock-like precision. The Angola squad was supported by a large crowd of loyal rooters from Angola, many of whom were business men; they gladly left their woik and turned out to boost the team, nor were they disappointed in the result. The other teams which Angola met in the tourney tell easy victims. The tournament was a huge success from every standpoint and much credit is due the Auburn management. Below are printed the scores of the games Angola played: Angola 22 Angola 74 Angola 21 Angola .'51 Auburn 13 South Milford 10 Pleasant Lake 4 Hudson HiTHE KEY Page Thirty-Nine THE REGIONAL TOURNAMENT. It was our lot to go up against one of the strongest teams in the regional tourney, South Bend. Our boys fought a hard, con- sistent battle but were unable to get the bacon. The floor was much larger than the one on which they had accustomed themselves and although the purple and gold boys were on top for a time, they soon fell behind. Our Record Winning Team Losing Team Score Date Referee Played at Alumni Angola 21-18 Nov. 5 Angola Angola Hudson 24- 2 Nov. 12 Hudson Angola Waterloo 24- 8 Nov. 19 Angola Waterloo Angola 28-16 Nov. 24 Cleary Waterloo Kendallville Angola 17-15 Nov. 26 Griffith Angola Angola Flint 2! -21 Dec. 4 Denman Flint Angola Ligonier 84-17 Dec. 10 Bratton Angola Angola Hudson 86-20 Dec. 15 Hudson Angola Washington ('. 20- 7 Dec. 18 Bratton Angola Angola Bluflfton 24-21 Jan. 5 Bluffton Angola Elkhart 88- 9 Jan. 7 Griffith Angola Kendallville Angola 85-21 Jan. 14 Snodgrass K endallville Angola Washington ('. 28-20 Jan. 15 Washington Conti Angola Bluffton 84-28 Jan. 21 Griffith Angola Auburn Angola 24-28 Jan. 28 Ritter A u bum Angola Garrett 62- 6 Feb. 2 Bratton Angola Angola Ligonier 52-25 Feb. 4 Sacks Ligonier Angola Decatur 86-11 Feb. 5 Griffith Angola Angola Flint 28-25 Feb. 9 Bratton Angola Angola Hillsdale 86-18 Feb. 10 Schell Hillsdale Jackson Angola 84-16 Feb. 12 Jackson Angola Pleasant Lake 14-12 Feb. 19 Bratton Pleasant Lake Angola Garrett 24-22 Feb. 16 Williams Garrett Angola Auburn 80- 4 Feb. 18 Griffith Angola Angola Pleasant Lake 47-11 Feb. 25 Bratton Angola Angola Alumni 46-18 Feb. 25 Bratton Angola Decatur Angola 28-26 Feb. 26 Johnson Decatur Angola. (I). Tourney) Auburn 22-15 Mar. 4 McGeath Auburn Angola. (I). Tourney) South Milford 74-10 Mar. 4 McGeath Auburn Angola, f I). Tourney) Pleasant Lake 21- 4 Mar. 4 McGeath Auburn Angola, (1). Tourney) Hudson 86-18 Alar. 4 McGeath Auburn South Bend. (Regional) Angola 31-16 Mar. 12 Lafayette This year has indeed been a banner year in the history of athletics in the Angola High school. We have been represented by boys who were not only good athletes but good students as well. The faculty and school board have fully appreciated the value of good athletics in the school and cooperated in the organization of the various teams. During the first few weeks of school the athletic association was reorganized and the following officers elected: President - - Frederic Graf Vice-President - Ralph Lampman Secretary - - Carl Mast Treasurer - - Bayne Morley Through the cooperation of the SteubenTIIK KKV ;y County Athletic Association, a county base ball meet was held at the fair grounds which terminated with an exciting game between Angola and Flint in which Angola was re- turned victor. Later in the season a county track meet was also held at the fair grounds: Angola was victorious in a majority of the events. The Girls’ Team This is the first year since 191 that Angola High has supported a girls' basket ball team. The team this year got a late start— its first practice being about Christmas. The girls turned out strong for practice and four or five teams were formed. After several practices class teams were picked and prepared for an Inter-Class tournament. A loving cup was to be given to the class with the highest percentage at the close of the tournament. We congratulate the Freshman A girls on being the lucky winners. After the tournament, two teams were chosen—the first and second teams. The following girls qualified for the teams FIRST TEAM A ILK EX TAYLOR, Capt. R. Forward Taylor played a good clean game and tried to keep the team cool, although sometimes she stid harsh words we knew that it was just for the minute and never took them to heart. She was our basket player and when the ball left her hands it seldom missed its mark. She leaves us this year and we wish her much luck. MARGARET FAST L. Forward. Margaret’s playing was deserving of much praise. She could always be depended upon in a pinch and many times saved the game for A. II. S. It took an exceptionally good guard to stop her, size was no obstacle. We hope that margaret will show us some more good playing this next year. PAULINE TAYLOR Sub. Center “Pean” was undoubtedly the fastest player on the team. Only the A. II. S. girls could keep track of her in a game. She kept her opponents guessing. She could get the ball into the hands of the forwards before you could locate it. although you couldE .via could locate it. Although a little rough now and then when asserting her own rights, she played a good clean game. She is leaving us this year and we hope that she will enjoy her two years in finishig school and wish her much luck. ROSE MAI N .Tumping Center Rose was the tallest member on the team and was well fitted for our jumping center. She was quick and always there in time when the game was on. Rose was an all-round player, playing guard as well as center. This position she liked best, but no one on the team could compare with her for a jumping center. She leaves us this year to return to Geneva, where she has made her home for several years. ADELINE HUGHES Guard "Red” was that little girl that the mem-he’s of opposing teams feared. She didn't look dangerous but just get her interested in a game, then look out. We might truly have called her "Dynamite” and warned our opponents before the game. When she started towards a forward she was sure to come back with the ball. TERESA BEIL Guard Teresa was a reliable player. She never said much but always played her best and stood up for her rights. Some times her temper got the best of her, but in a short time she would be cooled off and into the thickest part of the game. SUBS NETTIE DOLl’H Running Center Nettie subbed for running center and she was the fastest player we had. She is small and so fast that it was hard to follow her. WAVA McKENZIE Guard Wava played a good clean game and never whimpered. She was always at her post and her opponents soon learned to keep shy of. her. LUCY GRAF . Forward Lucy was a very capable player and could do credit to any position. She could always he relied upon in a pinch. CORAL CRAVENS Jumping Center Coral played several games this year and she could get the tip off no matter who her opponent might be. Coral will play jump center on the first team this coming year. •I y-( )n Page Forty-TwoSenior Class Plays TIIK KEY Page Forty-Three On the evening of May 12, occurred the Annual Senior Class Play. On account of the shortness of time, three one-act plays were given instead of tin usual three-act play. Special scenery was made by the class and tl:e opera house stage was changed by having a large blue curtain hack of the regular curtain. Two girls, Hope Johnson, and Car-lotta Walker, very prettily dressed in blue Oriental costumes, opened and closed this :urtain. The first play staged was “Neighbors." CAST Mis’Able.................. Aileen Taylor G.andma ................ Hazel Easterday Ezra Williams........... Marion Pillsbury Inez, Mis’ Abie’s daughter .. Beulah Latson Peter ...................... Bayne Morley Mis' Moran .......................... Ruth Cook Mis’ Trot ................. Beulah Boyers Carrie Ellsworth ............. Helen Cline VScene: A kitchen in a rural village.) '1 he play started with Mis’ Able doing the week’s ironing and Grandma sewing carpet rags. Both women were as cross as two sticks. Soon Ezra Williams appeared at the window and announced that someone had unloaded some cord wood on “the piece that is new-seeded and I’ve tended like a baby.” Mis’ Able emphatically declares that they have not ordered any wood. Ezra has just departed when Peter comes in to see if any groceries are needed. He laments the fact he can not get Inez to notice him at all and says that he can’t say anything when she is around. Inez returns from Mis’ Ellsworth’s .1 h the news that Carrie Ellsworth’s “sister has died out West and they’re sending her boy to Mis’ Ellsworth.” This excites e eryone and just as Inez goes to get -Mis’ Trot Mis’ Moran “drops in." She knows nothing of the news and keeps telling of her numerous complaints. Mis’ Trot finally arrives but declares she can not do anything to help because she has just found a buffalo hug in the parlor carpet. At last the neighbors decide that they will canvass the town ami that they will have a party for the boy when he arrives. Just as their plans are nearly completed Mis’ Ellsworth comes in to tell them that “the little boy ain’t coinin’ at all." Everyone is shocked, but Mis’ Moran says it was nice that “ the little chap didn't have all the way to come alone." Mis’ Trot declares that “ anyone that is rich enough to have five children can afford to have six." Peter shows Inez what he has done for the little boy and this makes Inez love him. Everyone realizes what a blessing it is to have neighbors and Grandma says "folks is folks, no matter how different or similar." The interlude “The Very Naked Boy" next appeared. (Before the curtain.) CAST lie.........................Frederic Graf She ....................... Nellie Coleman Brother....................Fred Starr, Jr. (Scene: A hall—Halfway to a proposal.) Genevieve (she) appears with Henry (he) following after her. He asks her why she did it. She answers that she didn’t do anything. He insists that she did, but she denies it. He is violently in love with her and she finally acknowledges that she is crazy about him. Suddenly a bare arm reaches through the curtain and Henry is told to get out of there. Genevieve refuses to go. Brother puts his head out of the curtains and says he will come out if they do not go and get his clothes. Neither one will go but finally they bring him a cape to put around him. Brother comes out nearly dressed and when asked v hy he has acted thus be explains that he has been swimming and his father nearly caught him and he went in there but he was cold and wanted to come out. He goes out singing “Sweet Genevieve” in a very inharmonious voice. The “Maker of Dreams" came next. CAST Pierrot.....................Charles Crain Pienette............................Mary Pogue Manufacturer of Dreams .... Mark Sanders (Scene: A French Kitchen.) Pierrette ,the partner of Pierrot, has been playing all day at the show, but hurries home to prepare tea for her lover Pierrot. When Pierrot comes home he is very cross and finds all manner of fault with the supper PierretteTHE KEY Page Forty-Four has prepared. Pierrette tries her best to please him but to no avail. After tea Pierrot goes out to find the fine lady he saw at the show. Pierrette sits sadly musing by the fire when a knock is heard at the door and the Manufacturer of Dreams enters. He inquires why Pierrette is so sad and when he learns that Pierrette is in love with Pierrot and that Pie'rrot doesn’t care for her, he sets to work and makes a dream for her. Pierrot returns and rudely greets his visitor. Pierrette goes out to do the marketing. The Manufacturer tells Pierrot of a dream which he has made that is just suited for him. When Pierrette returns Pierrot realizes that she is his dream and at once begins to love her. The last play was the comedy “Suppressed Desires.” CAST Stephen Brewster............... Frederic Graf Henrietta Brqjysjtpr, (Stephen’s wife) . TV. yt • •. •......... Catherine Frazier Mabel, Henrietta' s sister .. Leah Leininger (Scene 1: Apartment in Washington Square) (Scene II: Same place about two weeks later) The first -scene opens with Stephen and Henrietta at breakfast. Mabel who is visiting them, soon comes in but refuses to eat any breakfast. Presently she mentions that she had such a queer dream. She tells them that she dreamed she was a hen and was in a large crowd and a voice kept shouting Step Hen! Step Hen! Henrietta at once says that Mabel has a suppressed desire for someone besides her husband. The two sisters bother Stephen, who is an engineer and is planning his house to the extent that he exclaims, “Good Lord, I’ve got the roof in the cellar.” Tie also has a dream about being in a room and having the walls recede from him. This dream Henrietta interprets as signifying a loss of grip in his work. She urges both Stephen and Mabel to go and see Dr. Russel, a great psychologist. Iti the second scene Stephen comes to Henrietta while she is writing a paper on psychoanalysis and tells her he has been to see Dr. Russell. He reports that the Dr. said his dream meant that he should be released from marriage. Henrietta has not yet recovered from this blow when Mabel comes back from Dr. Russel and shows that S-t-e-p-h-e-n both spells step hen and Stephen. She explains that Stephen is step-hen and step-hen is Stephen. This further enrages Henrietta, but finally Mable tells that the first syllabic of Stephen’s last name should be said separately, “B rewster.” Thus Stephen’s name reads “Step-hen Be rooster.” This so astonishes Henrietta that she bursts out crying. Mabel tries to make her believe she never thought of such an intepretation, but now believes it is correct. Henrietta decides to give upon psychoanalysis. Stephen then desires to stay with his wife, but poor dear Mabel has to keep suppressing her great desire. ...........' • j'I..-.' ' ’ Pan At the'Crbxtbn Opera House the girls’ chorus sang'“Pan” to a well filled house. Paul Bliss, who has written many successful cantatas and operettas has none which is more beautiful than this nature cantata. It takes “Pan” the God of Nature through a summer day; from the early morn- ing when the birds begin their morning songs; through a summer shower; the drowsy noon; a great storm, and twilight, then ends in a poem of praise to the “slow rising moon.” The cantata was a complete success in every way and gave the town reason to be proud of its High School Chorus.TIIK KEY Paj'i1 Forty-FivePage Forty-Six TIIK KEY Follow Your Spend an Evening Friends At To Hotel Hendry Brokaw's Theatre For Sunday Dinners A good Paramount Picture each evening BOGAN ANDRES Proprietors Come and Enjoy Yourself The Cheapest Place in Steuben County to Trade F. E. Jackson Our Motto: SCHLOSSER BROS. CREAM STATION CECIL 1DEN, Manager “Never Be Undersold” Phone 152 Angola, Ind. H. K. WOOD The Man Who Does Things Light Machine Work S. I. DICK A Specialty GENERAL STORE■ THE KEY Page Forty-Seven First Row—Gonser, Goodrich, Case, Gordon, Kie3ter, Dolph, Swift, Maxton, Whitman. Second Row Sellers, Delancey, K. Newnam, Ramsay, Bland, Clark, Green, Wheaton. Third Row—Brooks, R., Newnam, Harman, Bowles, Spade. Carr, Sutton. The “AG" Club Officers President Vice President Sec. and Trens. 1st Semester (Mark Howies Harold Dolph Knight Whitman 2nd Semester Clyde Spade Wayne Swift Carroll Maxton Organized—Oct. 12, 1920. Purpose—Social, to promote better friendships among members of the class; to give short talks on agricultural subjects at meetings; to become acquainted with parliamentary procedure; to promote vocational agriculture in the community.Page Forty-Eight THE KEY r A. H. S. Students You know where I stand, always ready to serve you—nothing too good for A. H. S. Said the Little Nimble Nickel, “I can go to any shop And bring yon out a thingumbob, or a silly lollipop. But if you ask my wishes, I will tell you free and frank, That I’d rather be deposited in the First National Bank ’ SLADE OS, PORTER Barbers 221 W. Maumee Angola, Ind. Ross H. Miller TAILORING And Dry Cleaning Hats Cleaned and Blocked Phone 484 Angola, Ind. THE KEY 1 a«re Korty-Xiii KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES ('orrect styles and snappy models for Young Men. Better drop in and Select one. 4 Do You Swim? EAT ICE CREAM in Con.fort Then ou know how hungry you at the are, when ou are ready to start home. Why not have a Soda or Sundae before starting home? Palace of Sweets C. J. WHITING Known to be the Lake James Indiana V J COOLEST PLACE in the City J Cline’s Adams Bender Photograph Barbers Shop Angola, IndianaStrawberry Ice Cream THE KEY Hagc Fifty-One Then- was strawberry iee cream for supper that night, Betty, however, gave it nothing more than an indifferent glance, as her untouched plate was carried away. Then, as she absently placed a spoonful in her mouth, she made a little grimace. Her favorite confection that she usually anticipated with such delight seemed Hat and tasteless. What was strawberry ice cream beside the deeper, more serious tilings of life? Betty could not understand what made her feel this way, what could take away her appetite, for like any other normal high school girl she had always been ready to eat on any and all occasions. Strawbwerry ice cream, too, had always been her favorite dessert, but now it remained untouched in front of her. All at once, thinking of a conversation of that afternoon, she realized that she was in love. Then, she wondered if everyone lost his desire for food after being wounded by Cupid. As she sat making small mountains and canals in her ice cream with her spoon, too abstracted by her own thoughts to pay any attention to the family chatter in which she usually took an active and animated part, she seemed to hear her mother’s voice. “What diil you say?” asked Betty, pulling her thoughts back with an effort to the family group. “Don't you feel well? You have hardly touched your supper. If your head aches dear, go upstairs and lie down, and I’ll have one of the boys help me with the dishes,” said her mother. “Well, yes, it does ache some, so I think I will go upstairs if you really don’t mind,” replied Betty, glad of an excuse to be in solitude where she could meditate on this wonderful new emotion. “Something ails Betty,’ remarked her mother anxiously, after they had left the table. “She doesn't even eat her ice cream.” “Oh, I suppose she is getting ‘boy’ on the brain. Wonder who it is. Could it be the Owens lad?” inquired her father, who seemed to know young people and their weakness. “Nonsense, she is merely a child. Why father, she never even notices young men.” “Well, there is always a beginning, and Betty is getting along in her ’teens. Lets hope you are right. She is only sixteen with plenty of time for that sort of thing.” he said as he cut the tip off his cigar, and unfolded the evening paper. Betty was a typical high school girl, neither extraordinarily pretty, nor, to use that most convenient phrase that prevails in all small towns, was she a “homely girl.” She never w’on all the class honors, still she did not rank at the foot of her classes. She played on the basket ball team and always took part in all school activities. Her hair was of a deep brown, almost bordering on auburn, and her eyes were of a quiet grey. Betty had always been popular, pc: Imps because of her infectious laugh, but probably because of her friendliness to everyone. Like other high school girls, in spite of her mother’s remarks to the contrary, she had a touch of sentiment. Her interest had centered first on one masculine member, then on another; never remaining long on any, much as a humming bird flits from flower to flower. Now as she sat alone in her room, she thought over the day, and out of all the happenings stood the one “great event.” He h"d stopped to talk to her, and talked not merely as to a child, but rather as to one of the girls in the older crowd. Slit had been in the drug store when he happened in and invited her to lm e a sundae with him, and she wa« sure tney had sat there at least an lion- Oh, how time flies when one is with one’s affinity! Affinity? Yes, Betty was sure that was what it was called, this meeting a person that was so understanding as he seemed to be. He was tall, with sparkling brown eyes, crisp, black curly hair, and a smile that charmed all ladies, were they young or old. He had even said that he’d see her later when they had parted at the bank -corner. She wondered if this could really be the “grande passion ’ ’ that it seemed for she was very young, but then, after all, she reasoned, some of the greatest lovers in history had been almost infants in arms. Wouldn’t Marion, her chum to whom she confided all her secrets, be thrilled, and probably just a trifle envious too, when she told her? Then she decidedPage Fifty-Two TIIH KEY r We can not do all the printing, so We try to do the best The Angola Herald C. L. MOTE r' EAT Successor to W. L. Burkett Best Electrical three-chair Barber Shop COX C WATTERS in the city Shower and Tub Bath Rooms MEAT Shine Parlor in connection Northwest Corner Public Square It pleases the taste and builds up the strength to combat the hot weather V Get Pictures Summer Girl’s Desire: Framed Fancy Beads, Pencils Lingerie Clasps Dinner Rings Pencils —at— White Gold Bar Pins DUCK WALL’S FURNITURE STORE V y H. W. HOLDERNESS THE JEWELERPage Fifty-Three TIIK KEY she had better go right over to see her that very night. Putting on her red sweater she hurried over to Marion’s, just two blocks distant. Once secluded in the privacy of Marion’s room sin proceeded to tell her all the details of the conversation between Ronald Phillips and herself, dwelling longest on the things he had said, and the way In looked when In said them. “Wny I think it is so exciting. lie must be fully twenty-five years old and you are only a Junior. Just suppose he’d ask you to the big “Diamond Dance.’’ I know Sliddy Owens is going to ask you too. but of course you'd rather go with Ron,” said Marion with a little flutter of her hands. “Yes, of course I’d rather go with Ronald,” answered Hetty dreamily. “I wonder if he will ask me, or if In will take Leah Frazier. lie usually does. Oh, wouldn't I like to get ahead of her just once? After talking with someone like Ronald, Sliddy seems so young.” “I suppose you'll be calling me young next, perhaps silly, too,” said Marion, rather provoked at the change in Hetty. “Oh, no, you are not silly. You are somewhat like me, only no one has discovered how grown-up you are like Ronald has in me.” The more Betty thought, tin more every word her hero had said that afternoon seemed filled with a deeper meaning than had at first appeared. “Someone will some day though.” Added Hetty with her new found wisdom. Gradually the conversation drifted into other channels, and soon Betty took her departure. She found that even Marion did not seem fully able to understand her. Of course she reasoned love was something personal and something that could not be shared with one’s friends. The truth was that Marion felt that Hetty was getting away from their old companionship, and had been changed by the appearance of Ronald Phillips, who was in a much different crowd. Two weeks passed and Betty kept more to herself. Even her family noticed and marveled at the change and it was the subject of much discussion between her father and mother. She ate little, and spent hours read ing lyric, love poems and the tales of lovers of by-gone days. Hetty was permitting her imagination to sway her these days. She never oluntarily offered Marion any information besides the mere pleasantries of every day conversation. She had several talks with Ronald Phillips, most ol which were of her own seeking but that appeared to have been accidental. Finally, two days before the “Diamond Dance” be asked her to accompany him. In her most grown-up manner, she hesitated; “Why, let me see, Thursday, you say?” Then, with a little bob of her head which she considered to be a graceful bending, she gave her consent. “Yes, I think 1 can go, alright.” “Good, 1 11 be up around eight-thirty. He sure and be ready,” laughed Ronald as he swung down the street, a clean-cut, good-looking figure in his tennis togs. I hursday night arrived. Betty was all anticipation, but there was still the dreamy look in her eyes which had been there since her first conversation with Ronald several weeks before. To the raillery of her family especially tin younger members, Hetty maintained a dignified silence. Sin had a new, orchid dress of sheer organdie, with ostrich tips running up and down the sides, and around the slender, white column of her neck was clasped a string of pearls that her father had given her on her sixteenth birthday, just three days before. Her mother examined her dress while Hetty turned, and revolved her slim young figure before the long mirror. There was a shrill piercing ring and Hetty hurried to usher in the much admired Ronald. When she went to dust her nose with one more little dab of powder, she thought how handsome and attractive In looked in his white flannels and dark coat. Sin was full of an exhuberant joy, for here she was going to the largest dance of the year with the man of her choice. Then her thoughts flew to her former friends. Poor Marion, still running around with infants like Sliddy and Buddy Culver! On the way to the dance Betty kept up a lively flow of talk for she wanted him to be entertained as well as he would have been by an older girl. She would not want him to regret having asked her. When she floated out on the floor in the arms of Ronald to the strains of the syncopated orchestra, she was unable to imagine any greater bliss. Shel’agi Fifty-Four TIIK KEY Designers, Engravers, Electrotypers Pen Drawing Photo-retouching Illustrating Wash Drawing Bird’s-eye Drawing Two, Three and Four Color Work Copper Half-tones Zinc Half-tones Den Day Plates Zinc Etchings Embossing Dies Tint Plates Electrotypes Nickel-types FORT WAYNE ENGRAVING CO. FORT WAYNE, INDIANA The Banking Habit Means sound sleep, good digestion, cool judgment and independence. We pay interest at 4% on certificates and savings, and solicit your banking business. Steuben County State Bank CHAS. E. WELLS The Original Cash Grocer Pure Food Products and Table Luxuries Vegetables Fruits and Produce Angola - IndianaTill-: KHV Page Fifty-l-ive was sure she was the envy of every giG there. There did not seem to he a single thing to spoil the joy and gaiety of that evening. Then, accidentally, standing near a door leading to the hallway, Betty overhear I a conversation not intended for her ears, and it was the voice of the beloved Ronald. “Gee, I’m in an awful mess! Leah Frazier got back tonight and is peeved because I took little Betty to the dance tonight. Leah is the only one that counts with me, too. I only asked Betty because she is so young and I was sure Leah wouldn’t mind my taking a mere kill tonight. She hasn't a thing to he jealous about, for 1 don’t care a rap for Betty. She talked so much on the way up here I could hardly get in a word. I only w ish--------’’ l’oor Betty fled with burning cheeks and ears. She had heard enough. “Kid! Little Betty!" So that was what he thought! Her air castles were tumbling fast around her. She was determined to go home, but on second thought decided that would be cowardly, and Betty was not a coward. Then Betty reviewed the past few weeks from a common sense point of view and not from a rosy haze of dreams. How silly she mus1 have seemed! How absurd and ridiculous, even ludicrous her actions now appealed. How could she have given up real fr.cnds like Marion and Sliddy for such a si rm 'is Ronald Phillips? These were some of the thoughts that passed through her mind as she d need through numberless dances, f he made resolution after resolutoin of how she would make up to Marion for all the neglect of recent weeks. On the way home she v.as too wrapped in her ova thoughts to vouchsafe even a word and when he spoke answered only in monesy'.tables. At the door •she bade him a grave good night after thanking him for the lovely evening. Next day Betty was her old self. She and Marion were again inseparable and she even flashed Sliddy, whom she had lately ignored, a smile. For supper that night there was straw! erry ice cream. This time Betty looked upon its approach with delight, and as each spoonful reached her mouth she rolled its cold, delicious creaminess around with her tongue. Then she dreamily closed her eyes, and a siiglit smile played around her lips as she muimured to her self—“Men may come and men may go but there is no dessert like strawberry ice cream.” AutographsPage Fifty-Six THE KEY ______ Stop at Take Your Choice One of the immutable laws of life is The Eat that we each of us must pinch at one end of the string or the other. WE MAY TAKE OUR CHOICE If we save early in life our later days will be bounded by peace and comforts. If we spend in youth then must we And get a pinch in our old age and then obtain only the bare necessities of life. High Class WHICH WILL YOU DO? Meal We have a savings book for you. Angola Thomas C Bassett .1 J Bank Trust Company TIRES AND ACCESSORIES Kratz DRUG Store The Rexall Store STAFFORD’S GARAGE Eastman Kodaks Jonteel Toilet Articles Liggett’s Candies Phone 254 Bucklen Building Lord Baltimore Stationery CAREY’S CASH Printing That Pleases and CARRY GROCERY 2 Stores Any Kind—Any Time We’ll treat you right LAKE JAMES and ANGOLA Quality Groceries for Less Money v Steuben RepublicanTHE KEY Page Fifty-Seven WISE AHD OTHERWISE “Two Points of View “Girls, he remarked scntentiously. “arc prettier than men.” “Why, naturally!” she exclaimed “No,” he gently corrected her, “artificially.” “A Puzzle to Him.” “What can I do for you, my boy?” asked the shopkeeper. “Please” replied the boy, “ I've called about your advertisement for a man to retail canaries.” “Yes, and do you think you could do the work ? ’ ’ “Oh, no sir; 1 only wanted to know how the canaries lost their tails." cannot le true,” but Frederic pointed to the sentence: “Abraham Lincoln split rails for clothing.” So to Speak. “The dentist said all my teeth must be replaced.” “He said a mouthful.”—Louisville Courier-Journal. Changed for the Worse. “Esther, can't you tell us the shape of the wot Id ?” asked the teacher, encouragingly. “Yessum; it's in a pretty bad shape, just now,” replied the precocious child, who had heard her daddy say a few things at home.— Florida Cnion. A Week-Ender’s Definition of a Week-End A place that costs you fifty dollars to reach, a hundred dollars to stay in, and where you have the privilege of doing what you don't want to do with some one you don’t want to do it with. “Poor Abraham Lincoln” Frederic Graf was studying the life of Abraham Lincoln at school and was impressed by what he had learned. One evening he was engrossed in a story of the hero’s boyhood days, which he had found at home, when suddenly Frederic exclaimed in a pitying voice: “O, mama! Just think! Poor Abraham Lincoln had to wear wooden clothes!” His mother said, “Oh, no! that Poor Orphan “Say. waiter, is this an incubator chicken? It tastes like it.” “1 don’t know, sir." “It must be. Any chicken that has had a mothei could never get as tough as this one is.”—Wampus. True to Form The girl reporter accepted the editors’ invitation to dinner and when asked how she enjoyed it, said: “Oh, fine, but I’ll never go to dinner with an editor again.” “Why not?” "Well, the dinner was fine, but he blue-penciled about three-quarters of my order!”Page Fifty-Eight T1IH KEY ' TheCollege Inn OLLIE BASSETT, i The Stove That Is Worth the Money Proprietor Ice Cream I STRONSI I Soda Parlor i It makes a Good Present Fancy Candies i for the young as well as the old. Tobaccos i —Sold by— 1 The Indiana Utilities Co. ANGOLA, INDIANA Angola - - Indiana ! J Willis Love’s Billiard Parlor Angola, Indiana At 212 South Wayne There’s a man who relieves your pain; Insurance He gives you a pill, made by Bill, And your pain never comes again. is one of the necessities of life. You can buy all kinds of The Farmers and Merchants Insurance Agency “ Waller Block (Ipposite Hotel Till : KEY Page Fifty-Nine “Heading Her Off’’ Catharine: “Can you keep a secret, dear?” Leah: “Certainly; Can’t you?” Catharine: “Why, the idea! of course 1 can.” Leah : “Well, why don't you then?” Leah: “Mac has placed his heart in my keeping.” Catharine: “Well, you had better be very careful of it, my dear. lie told me last week I had broken it.” English Knights and Irish Knights Two men were lolling in front of a Broadway hotel. The first touched the other on the shoulder. “Pardon me, my dear man, but could I trouble you for a match?” After lighting his cigar, he continued: “Bah jove, this is a remarkable city. This is my first visit to New York, d’ye know? I’m a deuced stranger, but on the other side I’m a person of importance. I am Sir Francis Daffy, Knight of the Carter, Knight of the Bath Knight of the Double Eagle, Knight of the Golden Fleece and Knight of the Iron Cross. D’ye mind telling me your name, me dear man?” Replied he of the auburn hair in a deep rich brogue: “Me name is Michael Murphy, night before last, last night, tonight and every (censored) night.” “Signs” “Excuse my Dust” ran the sign on the back of Mark Sanders’ Ford. “Watch my Smoke” said the speed eop as he started in pursuit. “Evolution in Grammar” “Can’t you stretch a point?” “Certainly,” said the period. And thus was born the comma. A Blooming Chicken Little Mary was visiting her grandmother in the country. Walking in the garden, she chanced to see a peacock, a bird she had never seen before. After gazing in silent admiration, she ran quickly into the house and cried out: “Oh, granny, come and see! one of your chickens is in bloom.”—The Christian Register. I'lusion Shattered Stage hand (to manager): Shall I lower the curtain, sir? One of the livin’ statoos 'as got the iecups!"—Passing Show (London Several Birds with One Stone. A Virginia editor threatened to publish the name of a certain young man who was seen hugging and kissing a gill in the park unless his subscription to the paper was pai 1 up in a week. Fifty-nine young men called and paid up the next day. while two even pa d a year in advance.—Labor Clarion (San F.an-cisco). Hazel Easteiday: “I want a fan to match my complexion.” Clerk :“ Here's a hand-painted one.” Ned Lowther: “Mark, what is sadder than a man who loses his last friend?” Ma’k Sanders: “A man who works for his board and loses his appetite." “The Kind of Exams We Like” 1. What two countries fought in the Russo-Japanese war? 2. Who was president of the FiiPed States during Lincoln's administration? M. In what year did the war of 1S12 begin? 4. Name the famous historian who wrote Webster’s early European History?" r . Who wrote Franklin’s autobiography ti. What president of the Cnited States issued the Monroe Doctrine? Two Horns to Her Dilemma A little girl asked her mother, “If I grow up, shall 1 have a husband like papa?” Mother replied: “Yes. my dear." “And if I do not get married, shall I he an old maid like Aunt Susan?” “Yes,” was the reply. The little girl thought for a minute, put her hands to her head, and said: “Well, 1 am in a fix.”—Washington Post. Beulah Latson: “I hear Mrs. J. H. McClure is the most attractive matron in Wisconsin. Ruth Cook: “Yes, she’s always one husband ahead of any other woman.” Sign on a new seeded lot—“Keep off the grass. The blades might cut your feet.”Page Sixty TIIE KEY Let JOHN KRATZ Fit Your Eyes for a Pair of Shelltex GLASSES The Glasses That Suit v______________J All Kinds of Fresh Fruit -At— Jos Coscarelli’s Dealer in “BERGO” Society Brand Clothes For young men and men who want to stay young W. L. Jarrard ___________________ COME IN AND SEE OUR Glass, China and Cooking Utensils jm Everything In MAGAZINES, GROCERIES, CANDIES and ICE CREAM at ANGOLA .IN (BAN Atiik key I’ago Sixty-One The Sad Cat?strophe 10. Ton awful errors of speech all went out to dine, “Ain't” choked his horrid self, then there were nine. {). Nine dreadful errors of speech sat up very late, “Done' '.just went off to sleep, and then there Were eight. 8. Eight naughty errors of speech dreaming of heaven, The nightmare caught “had got” and then there were seven. 7. Seven ugly errors of speech chopping up sticks, “That there” chopped himself in halves and then there were six. 6. Six curious errois of speech playing with a hive, A bumble bee stung “git” and then there were five. •'). Five cautious errors of speech going through a door, “Had went” was caught, then there were four. 4. Four frightened errors of speech going out to sea, A red herring swallowed “hadn’t ought” then there were three. 3. Three bold errors of speech walking in the zoo, A big bear hugged “leave me go.” and then there were two. 2. Two sad errors of speech, sitting in the sun, “Seen” was melted, then there was one I. Lonely little Mr. “lie don’t” living all alone, Ran away with .Miss “They doesn’t,” then there were none. Adeline II:—“What'll we do?’ ’ Pauline T.:—“I'll spin a coin. If it's heads we’ll go to the movies; if it’s tails we go to the dance and if it stands on edge we’ll study.” Mark S.: What the deuce did you mean by telling Ned that I was a fool?” Frederic: “Heavens! I’m sorry. Was it a secret ?’’ Heard in Freshman English. Miss Powell: “Give me a concrete noun.” Charles Janes, “Sidewalk.” Tlrnnas Yr.ss: “Does your mother object to kiss': g?” Xel’i - : “Now, say, just because T let yen ! ss me you needn't think you can kis Ike whole iamily.” Charles Crain—“Miss Powell. I can tell you how much v ater runs over Niagara Falls to the nuart.” Miss Powell—“Why, you can not. How much ?” Chuck—“Two pints.” James Shearer—“1 can’t explain that problem I put on the board.” Mr. Estrich—“Who told vou how to work it?” James (hesitating) “Cleveland” Mi. Estrich—“Explain it, Cleveland.” Cleveland—“I can’t.” Mr. Estrich—“Where did you get it?” Cleveland—“From William Paul.” .Mi. Estrich—“William, where did you get it?” William Paul—“Well, my mother helped me, hut I did the biggest part of it.” “Where are you going?” “No place. “You must be going some place.” “No, I’m not. fin coming back.” Seen At? A1 who? Alcohol. Kerosene him the last day of June and he ain't benzine since. In the spring a young mans’ fancy lightly turns to Girls Baseball ('anoes Girls Dances Girls Girls In the spring a young girls' fancy lightly turns to I tresses Powder Boys Silk hose Powder-Dresses PowderPage Sixty-Two Till-: KBYT11K KEY Page Sixty-Three Class of 1914 •Gillmore, Harry...................Detroit. Mich. ♦Allwood. Florence Garrett..........Angola, Ind. Coy. Blanche.......................Angola. Ind. ♦Pence. Samuel .................... Angola, Ind. Junod, Frances ............... Washington, D. C. •Willsley, Zema Cramp ton .................. Wis. Miller, Ruth.......................Angola. Ind. •Floyde, Wilson ................... Angola. Ind. •Gates, Rose Kohl............Pleasant Lake. Ind. Rummel, Helen............................Michigan •Foraker. Adabelle Walcott .... Detroit. Mich. Jeffery, Eber......................Angola, Ind. ♦White, Bernice Ramsey................Gary. Ind. Dygert, Florence...............Washington. D. C Bixler, Genevra................. Plymouth, Wis! Sheldon, Donald ...................Angola. Ind. ♦Gerfen, Esther Chard ..........Ft. Wayne, Ind. Parsell, Allen.....................Fresno, Calif. ♦Smith, Agnes Pollock ............. Fayette. Ohio Class of 1915 Bair, Russell ...................Lyons, Ohio •McCoy, Constance Williamson Detroit, Mich. Leininger. Mildred....................Angola. Ind. ♦McKay, Floy Hammond . . Albuquerque. X. M. ♦Zimmer, Ford................Ft. Wayne, Ind. Bronson .Laura ..................... Deceased Goodwin, Arlene.......................Angola. Ind. Martin, Eva.................Washington, D. C. ♦Kohl, Joyce Miller....................Angola, Ind. ♦Foraker, Winifred Walcott .... Detroit. Mich. Coleman. Bess ................. Angola, Ind. Stage, Ora............................Angola, Ind. ♦Hoag, Marjorie Kunkle .... Washington, D. C. •Chadwick. Eva Orwig ............ Auburn. Ind Cline, Dean .....................Angola, Ind. Webb, Lucile...................Wauseon. Ohio Lehman. Lois ................... Hiram. Ohio Moody, Berneice............... LaFayette, Ind. Redding, Lois................... Angola. Ind. Emerson. Thomas................. Angola, Ind. Gundrum, Lolahelle .................. Deceased Class of 1917 Brooks, Samuel ................... Angola. Ind. Bair, Leo ............................. Deceased Cline .Dorthea......................Angola .Ind. Coy, Paul ........................ Angola. Ind. •Aldrich, Edna Spade............... Angola, Ind. ♦Dirrim, Wilma Johnson..............Angola, Ind. Douglass .Robert.................. Angola, Ind. Dygert. Newton ................... Angola. Ind. •Emerson, Valta Garver....................Mont. Fink. Hobart.......................Angola, Ind. Goodwin. Walter..................Lakeland, Fla. Griffith. Willa.......................Ft. Wayne. Ind. ♦Hanselman. Letha Rozell .... Hamilton. Ind. Hendry. George ................... Angola. Ind. Kankamp, Martha ............. Fort Wayne, Ind. •Landis, Pearl Johnson . . . Pleasant Lake, Ind. Neutz, Paul............................ Deceased Reese, Paul......................Annapolis ,Md. •Riblet, Nina Ritter..................... Angola, .Ind. •Seely, Mary Ogden..................Angola. Ind. •Seely, Wayland.....................Angola, Ind. Smith, Carlton ...............New York. N. Y. ♦Stallman. Lucile Myers............ Angola. Ind. Stayner, Alice...............South Bend. Ind. Van Auken. St. Clair...............Angola. Ind. Waugh, Emily................Battle Creek. Mich. Weiss, Aubrey......................Angola. Ind Class of 1916 Class of 1918 Fairfield, Myra...............Washington, I). C. Hanselman. Mildred.......Tillamook, Ore. ♦Wolfe, Dono........................Angola, Ind. Wambaugh, Anna .................. Angola, Ind. Morgan, Marjorie..............Washington, I). C. Howell, Harold ................... Allen, Mich. Moss. Ellen ......................Angola. Ind. Mast, Erwin..................Ann Arbor, Mich. ♦Holderness, Jeanette Pollock . . Eldorado, Kas. Metzgar, Gaylord...................Angola. Ind. Goodale, Daphne ................. Angola. Ind. Clark, Glen........................Angola. Ind. Slade, Phyllis.....................Angola, Ind. Cain, Harold.......................Angola, Ind. Ireland .Ana.....................Ft. Wayne ,Ind. .Wilcox, Leo ..................... Angola, Ind Webb, Jane..............................Wauseon. Ohio Myers, Lois........................Angola. Ind. ♦Whitlock, Elsie Rinehart...........Angola. Ind. Castell, Stanley..............LaFayette, Ind.. ♦Rising, Gertrude Ingalls...........Angola. Ind. Sterling. McClellan................Angola, Ind. •Somerlott. Ruth Masters .... Fort Wayne, Ind. Wolfe, Henry ..................Jackson. Mich. •Aranguren, Dorothea Pence .. South America. •Anderson. Bertha Johnson .... Ashley. Ind. •Boyers. Bruce.............. Bloomiirrdale. Mich. Butz, Paul........................Angola, Ind. .Chrystler, Clarence................Angola. Ind. Cole. Robert .................... Angola, Ind. Crissinger. Roscoe..................... Deceased •Cranklin. Rachel Bohner............. Erie. Pa. •Eckert. Ethel .................Washington. D. C. Flaishins, Russel..................Angola .Ind. Garis, Gonda ............... Greencastle, Ind. Garrett .Irma ................... Angola, Ind. Graf. Ruth ...................... Angola, Ind. Graf. Paul.....................Annapolis, Md. Griffin. Inez...................... Flint .Mich. Gay, Fred..........................Mongo. Ind. Gay. Paul......................... Mongo, Ind. Harmon, Ora ..................... Albion. Mich. Harmon. Esther................... Angola, Ind. •Holderness, Harry ............ Eldorado, Kans. ♦Kincaid. Marie Ellis............Corunna. Mich. Libey, Wade .................. Lafayette. Ind. Mast, Florence.....................Oxford .Ohio Myers, Vera .................... . Angola, Ind.Pago Sixtv-Pour TilK KEY McCool, Florace...................Angola, Ind. Newnam, Hazel ................... Angola, Ind. ♦Ireland, Grace Berlien West Gloucester. Mass. ♦Orwig, Beatrice Wilcox...........Angola, Ind. Parsell, Maurice..................Angola, Ind. Parsell, Enos.....................Angola, Ind. Taylor, Lillian ............. Washington, D. C. ♦Tiffany, Frank...............Ft. Wayne, Ind. ♦Tuttle, Vera Callender . . Pleasant Lake, Ind. ♦Spangle, Grace Stiefel ......... Angola, Ind. Wells, Troas......................Angola, Ind. Zabst, Ruth.......................Angola, Ind. Class of 1919 Miller, Mildred.........................Angola, Ind. Zimmer, Kenneth.........................Angola, Ind. ♦Lemmon, Edna Stettler . . . Pleasant Lake, Ind. McBride. Lyle.......................... Angola, Ind. Carpenter .Lucile.......................Angola, Ind. Swanger, Berton...........Battle Creek, Mich. McClellan, Esther...........Turtle Lake, N. D. Griffith, Byron ................. Angola, Ind. Brown, Chelsea......................... Angola, Ind. Fink, Carleton ............ Indianapolis, Ind. ♦Parker, Birdie Morrison...............Orlando, Fla. Welsh, Martha...........................Angola, Ind. McClue, Emmet....................Fremont, Ind. Gregg, Lavornia..................Seattle, Wash. Williams, L. D.......................... Flint. Mich. Shoup, Gail ................. Ann Arbor, Mich. Crain. Gaylord......................... Angola, Ind. Uclh, Wilma.....................Ft. Wayne, Ind. Parsons, Oscar..........................Angola. Ind. Bates, Laura .................Red Lodge .Mont. CoX, Howard . . Helmer, Ind. Clihe, Hilda .................... Angola, Ind, Cravens, Russel.........................Angola, Ind. Ralston .Wesley.........................Angola, Ind. Hardy, Esther...........................Angola, Ind. Myers, George ................... Angola, Ind. Ewers, Marian ....................Angola. Ind. Croxton, Mark..................Ann Arbor, Mich. McBride, Elizabeth......................Auburn, Ind. Stiefel, Mildred...............Ft. Wayne, Ind. Baker. Henry .......................... Germany Clark. Claude.................. Lafayette, Ind. ♦Pogue, Wilma Slade.................Angola, Ind. Parrot. Emmett.................... Angola, Ind. Wolfe, Mildred.................... Angola. Ind. Class of 1920 Holderness, Louis............... Angola, Ind. Martin, Harold...................Angola, Ind. ♦Smith, Louise Hetzler ...........Angola, Ind. Owens, Ronald....................Angola, Ind. Baker, Cora......................Angola, Ind. Peck, Mary E.................Hillsdale. Mich. Miller, Clarence.................Angola, Ind ♦French, Ethel Shippey..........Jackson, Mich.' Harmon, Clarence.................Angola, Ind. ♦Higgins, Clara Hirsch............Angola, Ind. ♦Creel, Donald................... Angola. Ind. Rinehart, Wilma ................ Angola. Ind. Metzgar. Marian ................ Angola, Ind. Hammond, Don.....................Ashley, Ind. Miller, Pauline .......... Indianapolis, Ind. Metzgar. Clifton ................Angola, Ind. Evans, Elizabeth........................Albion, Mich. Harmon. Glen ................... Angola, Ind. Harmon. Ethel...................Angola, Ind. Cole, Glen......................Angola, Ind. ♦Barto, Pauline Hanselman........Angola. Ind. Mast ,Otto......................Chicago. 111. Whitman, Dae.................Mercer, N. Dak. Zimmer, Harold..................Angola, Ind. Redding, Ralph ................. Angola, Ind. Collins. Floiad ................ Angola, Ind. Mast, Herman ............... Ann Arbor, Mich. Terry, Eleanor..................Oberliu, Ohio Sutton. Opal ................... Angola, Inci. Shoup. Wavel ................... Angola. Ind. Heckenlively, Joan . . . Colorado Springs, Col. Croxton. Marian ................ Chicago, 111. Miller, Garcile ................ Angola, Ind. ♦Married— V . • v-y ft


Suggestions in the Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) collection:

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

1917

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

1918

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

1920

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

1922

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1923 Edition, Page 1

1923

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

1924

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.