Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN)

 - Class of 1918

Page 1 of 154

 

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1918 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1918 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1918 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1918 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1918 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1918 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1918 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1918 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1918 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1918 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1918 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1918 Edition, Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 154 of the 1918 volume:

» % D 1C ft TO KY the boys who have gone (I out from A. H. S„ and are doin t their hit in the uniform of Uncle Sam, we respectfully dedicate this, the 1918 SPECTATORThe Spectator Staff Editor in chief Business Manager Advertising Managers . Art Editor Literary Editor Athletics Society Gonda Gares Esther McClellan Alumni Mary Pogue Eleanor Terry JOKES Wade Libey Arthur Smith Chelsea Brown Wilma Slade Florence Mast Clayton Richener Frederic Graf Marian Croxton CALENDAR Inez Griffen Paul Graf Katherine Frazier Mark Croxton Esther Andres Wilma Powers Donald Stullar Louise Hetzler (Snapshots were collected and arranged by Wade Libey.) COURSE OF STUDY Period Allman Harsh Keep Powell Gilmore White Barron Cooley Lindemann 8:30 8:50 Opening Exercises, or Study, or Chorus led by Miss Cooley 8:50 9:30 Latin 1 E Book keeping A. R. Eng. 3 B Math. 2 (a) C • Shop 2 Drawing 2 9:30 10:10 History 4 C German 1 D Physics 3 E Eng. 1 (a) B A. Room Wed. Thur. Wednesday 10:10 10:50 A. Room Latin 2 D Physics Lab. 3. E. English 1 (b) B German 2 D Adv. Shop Wed. Thur. Domestic Science Sewing Mon. Tues. Cooking Wed. Thur. Lecture Fri. A. Room Drawing 1 Thur. Angola Fri. Foreign 10:50 11:30 A. Room English 2 C Math 1 B Mech. Draw. Monday Music 1 Angola Wed. Foreign Thur. fMOOINJ HOUR 1:00 1:40 Latin 3 Comm’l. Arith (A. R.) Math. 2 (b) B Math. 1 (a) Y ’ Gen. Sci. 1 E Drawing 3 4 Mon. Tues. 1:40 2:20 History 2 C Bus. Eng. Typ. Spell. E English 4 D Math. 1 (b) B A. Room 2:20 3:00 History 3 B A. Room Ch m. 4 E Shop 1-2 Mon. Tues. Mech. Draw. Wed. Dom. Sci. 1 Sew. M. T. 1 Cook W T 2 Lee. Fri. Drawing 0 3:00 3:40 Agric. B German 4 D Chem. Lab. E A. Room Math. 3 (b) C 4 Tuesdayi StMI THC NTXT CHfiRrCR, nn o IN YOUR MOTE DOORS, HNO POLK'S ITS TIME YOU H TO ThflT THREE thouj rho WORD THESIS I L FINISHED J 'SAY- CANT YOU see — Look out 'WHCBS. YOU t. stearino v STUDENTSCARL C. HARSH— Principal—Latin— German. Mr. Harsh came to us this year to take Mr Allman’s place as principal. He is an ardent advocate of everything that helps the interests of the school, and is an excellent instructor in the languages as we)i. HEYMAN B. ALLMAN—Superintendent —History—Agriculture. Although this is Mr. Allman’s first year as superintendent, he has shown himself to be admirably qualified for the position. His constant watchfulness and never ceasing energy have kept us in motion in spite of our tendencies to lag. HAMILTON H. KEEP—Science—Commercial. Mr. Keep is still with us and we certainly hope he will continue in our midst. No one ever went to his classes without knowing at least a little more after he came away. We all look up to him, and it is with all due honor and respect that we call him “Daddy Keep.” FLORENCE GILMORE—Geometry. Miss Gilmore has been with us for tw o years and has always been ready for anything that would help in our work. Being a graduate of this school she takes a natural interest in us and, when it comes to Geometry—she’s right there. SARAH POWELL—English. This year Miss Powell lias assumed the role of “Mother” to the students of this school. Stern in her class room, yet patient and loving to those who do her bidding, she has ever been honored and respected by all who have known her. K. X. WHITE—Algebra—Manual Training. Mr. White was our coach in basketball having an enviable reputation as a professional in the southern part of the state. He was taken by the draft and it was with great regret that we gave him up, although he answered the call of duty.DIANA LINDEMANN—Art. Miss Lindemann is indeed well qualified to fill her position, having received three years training in the Chicago Art Insti-l ife. Her sweet disposition and her love for the work are an inspiration to all who o: lz with her. Being a woman of broad experience, both in the class room and in the home, Mrs. Barron is a mcst able and efficient teacher in her branches. Her advice carries the weight of long experience and sound common sense, and she has surely won a place in the heart of every one who has known her. MADELINE COOLEY—Music. Though coining to us rather late in the year Miss Cooley tock the work in hand and has rendered important service. The music has become a prominent feature of the school work and representatives from this school have appeared. under Miss Cooley’3 direction, quite frequently in MRS. RHODA BARRON General Science —Home Economics.Senior' Class - I President ............................................ Bruce Boyers Vice-President ...................................... Minard Rose Secretary........................................ Clarence Chrysler Treasurer ....................................... Russell Flaishans Poet.......................................................... Irma Garrett Historian .................................................... Paul Butz Will......................... Grace Berlien, Ruth Zabst, Vera Myers Prophecy..................Florence Mast, Wade Libey, Vera Myers MOTTO Out on the bay, the ocean lies before. FLOWER COLORS Sweet-Pea Purple and Gold YELL Freshmen, Sophomores Juniors, SCAMPS. SENIORS, SENIORS, basket ball champs! ROLL Frank Tiffany Paul Graf Troas Wells Esther Harmon Bertrice Wilcox Enos Parsell Inez Griffin Mildred Wolfe Bertha Johnson Elorace McCool Paul Gay Fred Gay Ruth Graf Gonda Gares Lillian Taylor Grace Stiefel Roscoe Crissinger Dorothea Pence Ethel Eckert Maurice Parsell Rachel Bohner Harry Holderness Vera Callender Hazel Newnam Marie Ellis Ora Harmon Rob’t. ColeMINAKO F. ROSE. “Posey” — Editor-in-Chlof —Vice-President '.'rack '16, ’17, ’18—Senior Dramatics. “Posey” is our walking “Websters” and proves very capable as Chief Director of the Spectator. He takes an interest in muse, art, and athletics, and when it comes to scholarship he is the class stnndpat star PRI CE ROVER. “Boiler”—President Senior Dramatic s—Advei thing Manager. Track ’16-’J7-’18. He is I he fellow who can b 'ast of the “third term” stuff, lining held his office three successive years. He makes occasional trips to P. Like. Owing lo the practice received there he was able to play the gallant hero in the “College Siren.” RUSSELL E. FLAISHAXS. “Demosthenes” — Spectator Staff—Senior Dramatics. Russell is another all “A” student—He couldn’t miss if he tried. We never see him idle, ai d incidentally nev r unpre-p rel. Quiet, unassuming, he gees out among us taking care of our finances and giving his level-headed advice.MAURICE K. PARSE LL. “Johnnie,”—Spectator Staff. —Senior Dramatics. “Johnnie” the guy that put the “busy” in “business,” is our business manager this year. He has been with the class throughout the twelve years of its existence. GOXDA CARES “Peggy”—Senior Dramatics —Spectator Staff. She came to us from far off S ryker in her Junior year. Is always willing to do what is asked of her. “The College Siren,” who charmed the unsuspecting Bolton has effected a like influence over the genus homo. She is also an all “A” student and our socle'y girl. ROSCOE CRISSIXCiER. “Crissy”—Spectator Staff— Senior Dramatics. To Roscoe we owe a vote of gratitude f r the conscientious and skillful method in which he has handled our art department. He did practically two thirds of the work and our Spectator will present the best array of talent of any ever published in this school. He is, by the way, known to have a liking for certain lower clasoinen. women.)FLORENCE. MAST. “Slim,” “Tuesday,”—Senior Dramatics—Valedictorian. Florence has been with us throughout the twelve years we have been together, and has always placed the interests of the class first. A very capable student has she proven herself and it is with pride that we acknowledge her as one of us WADE LIREV “Benny,” “Shrimp,” “Stubby”—Senior Dramatics—Spectator Staff. “Jerry on the job” when it comes to jokes and fun. He visits F. Lake occasionally and has been known to remain for a while. IRMA GARFfiTT. “St?ve”—Class Poet—Senior Dramatics. She is noted for being occasionally caught in the act of conversing. She must have her Latin translations memorized in order to effect such rapid translations in class.CLARENCE CHRYSLER. ‘ Pete’'—Senior Dramatics. Steady, hard working, poetic, Fete, author of love lyrics chiefly addressed to fair freshmen in general, has been with us for 4 years. Is intending some day to cultivate waste places. DOROTHEA PENCE. “Dot”—Senior Dramatics— Spectator Staff. Dorothea is the letter girl. lwayg carrying ar und a dozen or more. U-ual'y one from Detri.it, another from Waterloo, another from Ligonier, ethers from Camp Shelby, in f'ct from almost any place in the U. S. A. Dorothea is a very cordial hostess, and was cnee known to promote a bob-sled I arty. HARRY HOLDERNESS. “Hairbreadth,’ “Jack’’ —Senior Dramatics—Spectator Staff. A perfect gentleman who ' isits an old friend anel grael-uate of A. H. S. quite frequently.RACHEL bohner. f “Bonny”—Senior Dramatics. The “Mrs. Vernon Castie” cf A. H. S. Spends much of her time dressing her hair and plying th ? powder puff. Is also frequently seen with students from the hill. PAUL GRAF. “Count”—Track ’16-17-18, —Spectator Staff—Senior Dramatics. The fellow who really smiles once in a while, and a good sport when you just get acquainted with him. He is long on the mathematical stuff, too. MARIE ELLIS. “Jane”—Senior Dramatics. She is the original A. H. S. comedienne. “Cleopatere never had nothin’ on her.” She’s always there with something to laugh about and no party is complete without her.MILDRED WOLFE. “Millie”—Senior Dramatics. Who likes parties, dances, etc. Has a great liking for those connected with the institution upon the hill. She rendered valuable service in making our play a success. FRANK TIMA NY. “Tiff”—Basket Ball ’18— Senior Dramatics—Spectator Staff. First a case on a Senior and then on a Freshie! Sorry to say, though. Ye could not make basket ball and school work jibe, but he sure starred while we had him. Ask him about the KeuJailville fair, lie is now in the army as a musician. INEZ GRIFFIN. Senior Dramatics—Specta- tor Staff. Inez was never known to be without her lesson. She cares little for society and is in school for what she can get out of it. She intends to be either a stenographer or musician.KITH ZABST. » “Tub” or “Slim”—Senior Dramatics. She loves dancing or card playing but she never fails in her classes. She is noted for keeping close tab on “Butzy.” PAUL BETZ. ‘ Butzy,”—Basket Ball ’17-’18—Senior Dramatics—Spec-tat r Staff. You can always see him traveling around all the way from Ellis to Fort Wayne in his Ford Coupe. VEKA MKYKKS. “Bud,”—Seni r Dramatics — Salutatorian. She comes to us from far off goge. for work and a determination to succeed. We are expecting great things cf Vera. She will stand before a class as a pedagogue.GRACE STKIFEL. “Silent”—Senior Dramatics. So quiet, so studious, never saying what she thinks, yet always thinking, she has endeared herself to class mates and teacher alke. Has rendered service as a sub teacher. ORA HARMON. “Slid,” “Ollie”—Senior Dramatics. He’s the boy with the wonderful dimples and is said to be the best looking boy in the class. He never skipped rehearsals or went to Ft. Wayne, or anything like that—Oh no! BKRTRICK WILCOX. “Bee”—Senior Dramatics. Perhaps they call her ‘Bee” because she is always buzzing, but anyway she is a jolly class mate and always ready to do her share.FLORACE MoCOOL. “Luelle”—Senior Dramatics. Has just joined the class this year, thanks to T. S. C., and will graduate after three years of torture. Her beautiful voice has often charmed its hearers and we expect to hear from her as an opera star. ENOS PARSE I jL. “Enick”—Senicr Dramatics —Basket Ball ’16, ’17, ’18. Our big, quiet, shambling, “Murf,” who caused the audible smile at the class play. His quick change from sonambulist to tiger on the basket ball floor fools them all and his fast work was a striking feature of the past season. ETHEL ECKERT. “Peto” or “Zip,”—Senior Dra matics. O yes, she is the solemn quiet girl who never has a date. She only averages ten a week. And of course never flirts.TROAS WELLS. “Joe.” She was always timid about giving an oral composition, yet it does seem strange, though, that she should go to such verbal measures to escape it. FRED GAY. “Bubbles,”—Senior Dramatics. Fred, the “village cut up” of Mongo, has been with us but a year, but we are sure that we have enjoyed it and we hope he has. He likes long jaunts to parts unknown and has been seen in company with several of the fairer sex. RUTH GRAF. Ruth’s career with the class has been rather broken and irregular, but whenever she has been with us she has always contributed whatever was asked for, or done whatever there was to do.HAZEL NEWMAN. i “Bud”—Senior Dramatics— Spectator Staff. Hazel is our jolly, gocd-nat-ured class mate who was once our hoste-s, and who, on this enjoyable occasion, distinguished herself by her hospitality. ROBERT COLE. “Bob”—Senior Dramatics. Robert is our jolly farmer boy who used to deliver lectures on the in’s and out’s of practical agriculture. During the winter he drove his Ford through all depths of snow. He expects to be a farmer immediately after graduation VERA CALLENDER. “Tom”—Senior Dramatics. She is the girl with the perpetual smile. Has been with us ever since we started. A steady hard working student, always cheery and in for a good time.BERTHA JOHXSOX. “Bert,” “Johnny”—Senior Dramatics. The girl with the supernatural memory. She always has her work in hand and is seldom seen idle or laughing at anything. PAUL GAY. ‘Skinny”—Senior Dramatics. “Skinny” has been with us only one year but looms up as the all round scientific man and undoubtedly the destired successor of Thos. A. Edison. LILLIAN TAYLOR. “Lilly”—Senior Dramatics. Lillian is noted for her inex-haustible good humor, also an inexhaustible faculty of keeping the boys guessing.ESTHER HARMON. “Sallie”—Senior Dramatics. Esth?r is not noted for anything in particular, she is just a steady, hard working student who takes things as they come and seldom makes remarks. GRACE BERI.JKN. Grace expresses great preference for domestic life and is entirely out of sympathy with the suflragettes. Senior Class Prophecy After returning from seven years of Red Cross work in France we decided to call on our old class-mates of the graduating class of 1918. As we landed in New York we were assailed by a small boy selling magazines. We bought one of him to read while we were resting. When looking through it, we were greatly surprised to find an article written by Russell Flaishains entitled “Why 1 am an Author." We went down the avenue and noticed a sign before one of the theatres: GONDA GARES (Herself) ---in---- "THE COLLEGE SIREN"Revelations of the startling love episode in College life of a fascinating young lady, written and acted by herself supported by minor characters. ADDED ATTRACTION Florace McCool ........................... Contralto MAJESTIC THEATER We then journeyed to Philadelphia. As we were walking up Penn Avenue we saw a sign upon the door of a very large building: ’'Harry Holder-ncss Specialty in Diamonds.” Mr. Holderness informed us that Irma Garrett was conducting a hair-dressing department and manicuring establishment in this city. Desiiing to spend a day or two at Washington, D. C., we started from Quaker City. We arrived at Washington and went to visit the Capitol, and whom should we meet here but Senator Minard F. Rose. We went to Cleveland, Ohio, where wc found that Ethel Eckert (that used to he in 1918) had settled down and attending to her domestic duties, after being employed as a stenographer for two years. As we went on to Akron we met Bruce Boyers, and on greeting us, his first words were, “Come on in and take out an Insurance policy.” Bruce was making money and, incidentally, is spending some. W e thought that wc could find a number of old friends in Indiana, so we went to Purdue L'niversity, at La Fayette, Indiana. We visited the Domestic Science Department, and there found Hazel Newman as instructor. In Indianapolis we saw Roscoe Crissinger decorating the windows ,of one of the big dry goods stores. In Indianapolis, we also found 'Esther Harmon and Grace Steifel teaching in the techinal High School. As we stepped off the train in Fort Wayne we met Frank Tiffany as the train-dispaul.cr at that station. Here we also saw Bertrice Wilcox, who was, at that time, a stenographer for the General Electric Co. Upon our arrival at Angola, we started up main street and at a crossing w'e were suddenly stopped by Wade Libey, policeman, so that Robert Cole, a prominent farmer of this vicinity, could pass with a wagon load of hogs. The next day we went back to old A. H. S. and found Inez Griffin teaching in the primary grade. She informed us that Vera Callender was in Pleasant Lake, attending to her household duties. To our great disappointment we did not find as many class mates as we expected, so we decided to take a trip to the Pacific Coast. We hurried to Chicago, and as we were going down Michigan Avenue, we saw a large sign upon which appeared in large letters, “Harmon Drug Stores, Harmon Syndicate.” Being very curious, wc went in and, upon inquiry, we found that Ora Harmon, our old friend, was President of the Corporation of innumerable stores of this kind, throughout the L Jnited States. A clerk informed 11s that the famous Paid Butz, Versatile Commedian, was to appear that evening at the LaSalle theatre. e went to a foot-ball game the next afternoon, and whom should we see there but Paul Graf, chief coach of the victorious Northwestern team. We then went on to St. Louis, Mo., and here we found Paul Gay in charge of a large grain elevator. From here we went to visit Clarence Chrysler’slarge ranch in the midst of the wheat raising district in Dakota. At his home we also met Bertha Johnson, who was hoarding there and teaching in a country school near by. We traveled on west to Salt Lake City, where we met Florence Vast chaperoning a party of girls at a summer resort. We visited her for a day or two, and then started on our journey. We went to Seattle, Wash., to visit the Naval Station, Fred Gay was the manager. We recognized him at once by his stern voice, which we remembered from our history class, back in 1918. We boarded a steam-ship at Seattle to make our trip southward to San Francisco, and whom should we meet on board but Enos Parsell. as Purser. When we landed at Los Angeles, instead of San Francisco, we attended a theatre, and there we found our friend Marie Ellis as danseuse. Her ability had been recognized by the greatest critics of America and Europe, and she was starting with a company which had been organized by Polowa. Pa v Iowa. We started fee Colorado, and the next week we spent at the light occupa tion of sight-seeing in the vicinity of Denver. While traveling about we were greatly surprised when we found Dorothea Pence, dressed in real cowgirl fashion, and she informed us that she owned a large ranch nearby. We stopped in Denver and. being very much in need of new hats, we entered a millinery store, where we found Rachael Bohner as proprietor. Then we went to Kansas City to spend a few days and there we saw in the papers that Maurice Parsell was chief engineer of the municipal lighting plant. We then went down the Missouri River to Jefferson City, where we had a two-hour wait for a change of steamers. We wandered about the city, then went back to the station, and while looking over some city papers, we saw in the advertising column the following announcement: Wanted: Pupils in Piano Forte. Taught by Leschetizky method. Beginners preferred. Phone 6135. Miss Lillian Taylor, 2136 Monroe Ave. Soon our steamer arrived and we hurried on back to St. Louis. We stopped there to visit some relatives and they told us that we should spend a day at the Art Institute, so we spent the next day at that place. To our great surprise we found Troas Wells and Ruth Graf under the instruction of a famous painter. We then started for dear old Indiana, the “Hoosier” state, and while on our way we were compelled to stop at Macomb, Illinois, on account of a railroad wreck near that place. We decided that it would be a good place to rest a day or two. On the street we met Mildred Wolfe (now Teirnan). She was so pleased to see us that she invited us to spend a few days at her home. When we left we assured Mildred that she was a charming hostess, indeed. So, in a few days we were back in Angola, and were quite satisfied that we had had a very enjoyable trip, and the time well spent, as we had seen and heard of all our old class mates of 1918 Signed: Ruth Zabst. Vera Myers Grace BerlienThe Senior Class Will Know all men by these presents, that we, the undersigned, the class of Nineteen Eighteen of the Angola High School, being of sound mind and memory, do hereby make and publish and declare this to be our last will and testament, hereby removing and making void any other will by us at any time heretofore made: To the class of 1921, we do will and bec|ueath our ability to produce a ful ( :) and orderly class meetings. Said meetings to be held the first Tuesday alter the first full moon after the first of each month. To the class of 1920 we do will and bequeath our popularity as a class. To 1 lie class off 1921, we do will and bequeath our abi.ity to produce a "comedy with music” equally as good as the "College Siren," providing said comedy has just as peaceful an ending. e, the following, do make and publish and declare the subjoined list of personal property: We, Enos Parsed and Frank Tiffany, do hereby bequeath our ability as Laskct ball stars to “Cully" and “Rip.” L Rachel Bohner, do hereby confer my ability of being a straight “A” student to Frank Robertson. 1, Troas Wells, do hereby will my ability as a graceful dancer to Clyde Spade, providing he uses said ability at the Lake dances at least eight nights cut of a week. We, Bertrice Wilcox and Grace Berlien, do hereby bequeath our facility in wearing diamond rings, to Edna Stetler in the hopes that she too may have one soon. L Mildred Wolfe, do hereby will my collection of class and frat pins to Clara llirsch, including also all rings. I. Ruth Zabst, will my affections for any of the masculine gender to Elizabeth Evans. I, Clarence Chrysler, do hereby impart my readiness to lend my knife to all the girls in the Senior Class to Ronald Owens. I, Paul Gay, do hereby bequeath my knowledge of chemistry to Adelbert Shank, knowing that same will be needed at some future date. I, Ruth Graf, do bequeath my culinary art to Catherine Frazier. I, Grace Stiefel, do hereby impart my love for Saturday night dates to Emmet Parrot. I, Lillian Taylor, do hereby will my tendency to be tardy to Ollie Bassett. I, Minard Rose, do hereby bequeath my ability to learn lines and cues in class plays to “Bub” Creel. 1. Dorothea Pence, do transmit my eternal habit of crabbing with the teachers to Esther McClellan. I, Maurice Parsed, do bequeath my efficiency as a business manager to some member of the Emerald Junior Class who may be so fortunate as to take upon his shoulders the said cares. I, Harry Holderness, do bequeath my talent as a billiard shark and my love for my good reputation to Mark Sanders.We, Hazel Xewnam and Robert Cole, do will our corpulency to Russell Cravens and Hazel Wisner. We, Vera Meyers and Bertha Johnson, do becjueath our ability to conduct a tranquil school to Wilma Slade and Laura Bates. I, Ora Harmon, do hereby impart my good looks to Emmet McClue. I, Paul Graf, do will my love for the girls to Louis Holderness. We, Inez Griffin and Esther Harmon, hereby bequeath our tomboy tendencies to Ethel Shippy and Opal Sutton. We, Florence Mast and Wade Libey, do bequeath our love for P. L. H. S. to whoever may be so attractive as to gain favor in said Southern region. I, Florace McCool, do bequeath my ability and fame as an opera singer to Martha Welch. I, Irma Garrett, do hereby bequeath my love for T. S. C. students to Wilma Miller. • 1, Vera Callender, do will my beautiful rosy complexion to Pauline Han-selman. I, Bruce Boyers, do hereby bequeath my ability as a good fusser, lady-killer and my tendency to keep the postal and telephone employees busy, to Orris Armentrout, said ability to be kept in trust by responsible persons until said infant becomes of proper age to care for same. I, Fred Gay, do hereby will my knack of “sod busting” to whosoever may wish the same and desire to inform all those taking up the art to consult me 1 efore doing so. 1, Paul Butz. do hereby bequeath my knack of selecting modest wearing appaicl to Burton Swanger. I, Gonda Cares, do hereby bequeath my ability to carry the role of leading lady in class plays to Esther Andres. I, Russell Flaishans, do hereby will my conceit to Howard Johnson. 1, varie Fllis, do hereby bequeath my ability as a seamstress and my tendencies to keep Mrs. Barron in a continual state of unrest, to Mildred Miller. I, Roscoe Crissinger, do hereby will my talent as art editor to Arthur Smith. I, Ethel Eckert, do hereby bequeath my ability as bookkeeper for the faculty and also newsboy to Laura Leininger. We, the undersigned, do nominate and appoint George Greek executor of this out last will and testament, and desire that be be allowed by the Court in which this will and testament is probated, to perform his duties as executor without being tequired to give bond. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, we have subscribed our names and caused our seal to be affixed, this the ninth day of April in the year nineteen hundred eighteen. (SEAL) CLASS NINETEEN HUNDRED EIGHTEEN. If, in taking in this will, Some humble one may get his fill. Just hold your peace—who'll be the wiser? Say! Go avenge it on the Kaiser.Senior Class Poem 0 1 ciiior class, thou that passeth four years trying toil and fire, l' er groping, ever hoping, approacheth Wisdom now a trifle nigher; '1 hou strange mixture of calm and sturdy toil and mad and shamless self-conccit, C f all of Nature’s awing paradoxes thou art truly hard to beat; 'I hou hast completed a monument more lasting than brass, aye, than memory or words or rocks, hicli can never be destroyed by winds nor years nor the storm-king’s ven-geant despoiling shocks; It can never, never, wholly die, but must follow to thy last, On every hand, each time afresh, thy monument—relentless, changeless past; Whcie’er thou turnest thy venturous foot, What’er attainest, What’er thou dost essay, 1 hy monument’s unending boundless shade doth alway mark and fix thy way. As now thou steppest forth and Ieavest the training path, thy hard-earned credits won. And entcrest then the final test, the common race of Life we all must run, ' av Future’s kindliest mood behold thy monument’s index shade willingly bless Thy honest effort, and Life's so trying race with Fortune’s crown success.Junior Class President .... Vice-President Secretary .... Treasurer .... Historian .... Poet ......... Chelsea E. Brown Mark A. Croxton .. Gaylord Crain .. . Donald Swift Esther McClellan Emmett McClue COLORS—Red and white. Flower—Carnation MOTTO Good, better, best. Never let it rest Until your good is better, And your better best. CLASS YELL Chick-a-waka, chick-a-waka, chick-a-waka chess We are Juniors of the A. H. S. We are sharp and we are keen— So watch our class in the year 9. Laura Bates B ron Griffiths I.’, cile Ci ' oi n:er O.ietire U nuT Hilda Cline George Mve s I n Roze 1 idred MdV '■arian E'-er, Emmett Parrott breed Ettinger Oscar Parsons Lavorina Gregg Wesley Ralston Claude Clark Edna Stetler Lyle McBride Mildred Stiefel Gail Slump Carlton Fink Wilma Slade Bertan Swanger Russell Craven-Martha Welch Kenneth ZimmerJunior Class Poem and History One, two, three, the juniors are we, As fine a class as ever you see— We're foremost in rank of the good old school. And always abide by every rule. ( ?) Now most of the classes as classes all run, Feel a little boisterous and full of fun. But the juniors do not in the class room play— But have their fun in a different way. When we were freshmen, we were green as grass, We didn’t study much, but they let us pass. But when we became Sophs we began to work, Studied very hard and never tried to shirk. And now this year we both study and play, And have hard duties given us every day. Such as tests, programs and some maps to draw— Which all have been done without a flaw. And we’re a great old bunch for parties too, In this all others we outdo. All our girls too are just the right kind— In all other classes no better you will find. So here’s to the Juniors of the A. H. S., A better class than all of the rest. And you can just bet, that we will be seen— .As Seniors in the year of 1919. —Class Poet. A group of youngsters came stealing into the garden where their mother had been busily doing her bit knitting but tired with the days work, had fallen asleep in her chair. Their arrival was announced by a clamorous shout of “Boo.” Mother was very much frightened at first but good natured nevertheless. “Why you woke me up dears,” she said, “Right in the midst of a very beautiful dream. It was of my old school days. Should you like to hear it? “Oh yes mother,” the children cried. “Well, to begin with, when I entered the first grade our class numbered thirty-two bright children and was the last class favored by having that splendid primary teacher, Miss Parish. The most of 11s passed and continued to enter the various grades until in 1915, forty pupils graduated from the eighth grade. Of course during this time some of the students dropped out and then many were added to our number. In our High School work we always took a leading part, especially along the literary line. Although we never had any “walking encyclopedias” the majority of our students had average grades. And there, my dears, is where you woke me up and my dream burst. Now scamper away every one of you so I can get to my work again, and when your supper is ready I will call you.Sophomore Class President ........ Vity-president ......... Secretary and Treasurer Poet ................... Historian .............. ... Louise Hetzler Pauline Hanselman . . Elizabeth Evans .. . Marian Croxton ... Wilma Powers MOTTO: “Semper Paratus” FLOWER: Lily-of-theVallcy YELL: Ilickety. rickety, rickety, rah. Freshmen, Juniors, Seniors, Bah, Short, tall, fat, skinny. That's the class of 1920. CLASS ROLL Wavel Shoup Cora Baker Ollie Basse': Glen Cole Pauline Har.seiman Donald Creel Glen Culve; Ray Glassburn Otto Mast Ethel Shippy Don Hammond Joan Heckenlively Glen Harmon Harold Mart .) Ethel Harmon Hermann Mast Marion Me yqar Clifton MeV'gai Clifton Met. gar Clarence Millet Pauline Mill r Ardath Nichols Frank Rob r'.son Ralph Redding Richard Pe ce Wayne Parsed Lewis H'd lerness Clyde Spade Elizabeth Evans Clayton Runner Wilma Rinehart Adeii't't Shank Ilarcourt Sheets Lucile Mark Warren Zimmer Guy Bair Eleanor Terry Harold Zimmer Otis Easthom Opal Sutton Ronald Owens Clara Hirsh Willis HarmonSophomore Class Poem In the year ’17, in September A class you will all long remember, As Freshmen, indeed, fifty strong Came to boost A. H. S. along. As students we ranked as the best, We seldom failed in a test; And when it came to exemption day We were usually there with a get-away. The school year passed, as years will do, Our Freshmen quarters we out grew; And took up others. O’er the door In green and white was “Sophomore.” This year in study and in deed, Our class has been far in the lead; How well we've done, how well we know. The high school record books will show. The algebra, with X Y Z, Before 11s had to bow the knee. Geometry we’ve waded through, The theorems and problems, too. In German, too, our works were grand, We talked like one from Fatherland ; Old Caesar did some running tall, We’ve chased him up and down all Gaul. In basket-ball our skill was felt, All class scalps dangle at our belt; Our spirit nothing can undo, Next year we’ll add a scalp or two. Sophomore lass History In 1908 forty-one boys and girls entered the first grade, which was then taught by Miss Minnie Tinkham. Of this number, fourteen remain. Some have joined us in the different grades, and others have with drawn, so that our roll now contains forty-five names. We have had kind and experienced teachers in all the grades. We thought our actions as Freshmen deserved very little criticism, but it was with a feeling of relief when we became Sophomores, and could see others get the brunt of the usual Freshman chaff. Our members take part in the various school activities; we are represented m the Glee Clubs and choruses and in the different fields of athletics. Our ambition is to leave a good record behind us. We hope that not only shall all of our present members be with us in 1920, but that many others will share our honors.Freskman Class President Vice-president Secretary Treasurer Poet ......... Historian Beulah Boyers . . Alice Gregg .. . Ruth Cook Frederick Graf Avis Easthom . Ralph Brown MOTTO ‘‘Veni, vidi, vici” COLORS Red, Blue, Gold. CLASS YELL Hippety rip, hippety roar. Red, blue and gold forever more, Rickety ram, rickety russ. Freshmen, that’s us ROLL Esther Andres Helen Cline James Baker Charles Crain Martha Berlien Alice Eackey Isabel Berlien Catherine Frazier Lawrence Bohner Hugh Harmon Ivene Butz Orris Armantrout Hilda Carlin Beulah Latson Ned Lowther Irene McClish Mildred Johnson Harold Garrett George Stiefel Mark Sanders Arthur Smith John Stetler Clela Somerlott Gay Wagner Carrol Wolfe Howard Johnson Rodella Wyatt Mary Pogue Marion Pillsbury Alla Leininger Laura Leininger Hazel Weisner Wilma MillerFreshman Class History With only seventeen members the present Freshman class began in 1909 its struggles for an education. It was under the care of Miss Tinkham. There we had to undergo the many trials which the first graders experience. Then to take a step farther we entered the second grade under Miss Keep. Here some of our former class-mates left us and some new ones came in. Next in order came the other six grades under Miss Schoville, Miss Crain, Miss Parsell, Miss Crain, Mrs. Utter and Mrs. Hubbel, respectively. From the beginning until the present time there have been many additions to the class and tho many have left us. we numbered at the first of the present term, forty-six, altho now, since eight have dropped out, we can boast of but thirty-eight, six of whom were of the original seventeen. When the 1917 term opened we made many mistakes and felt very much out of place in our new environment. However we have now gained a better knowledge of the rules and customs of the old A. H. S. and we no longer feel like "greenies.” Quickly will pass the short time which separates us from the Sophomore year in which we shall be known by the name that signifies a greater degree of knowledge. We sincerely hope in the future to acquire a high moral character which will make the Angola High School proud to claim us as former students. “HIGHER” We started high school life this year, Without a doubt, without a fear, For troubles disappear, we find, If we have this motto in our mind, “Higher.” Happy hours we’ll spend in school, And always try to keep the rule; And as the school year passes by We'll have this motto for our cry— “Higher.” We'll set a goal, and set it high, And we can reach it if we try; And when we’ve won it, as we will, We'll just keep working harder still; “Higher.” And when our High School life is done, Our greatest race must yet be won; And when upon this race we start. We'll keep this motto in our heart— “Higher.”Eighth Grade President ... . Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Historian .... Poet ......... .... Alfred Evans ... Vern Hoagland .. Theodore Wood Lawrence Emerson , ...Vera Bachelor . Nellie Coleman CLASS MOTTO “Where there’s a will, there’s a way.” FLOWER—Field Daisy. COLORS—Gold and white. YELL Whiz, whiz, hickety-sizz, Rickety ram, rickety russ. Eighth grade---“That’s us.” ROLL Earl Greenley Bayne Morley Karl Mast Pauline Ransburg Laura Baker Harold Dolph Raymond Smith Wayne Swift Russell Hart Leon Cole , Yoland Miller John Rose Aileen Taylor Viviene Shuman Marvin Allion Carl Freygang Roy Shoup Allee Miller Nona Wilcox Eloise Willis Jeanette Hendry Ralph Williamson Francis Alspach Charles Bresler Charles Frisby Ruth Wert Ruth Cline Wayne Adams Ralph Jenkins Howard McKensie Bernice Cravens Gladys Morrison Leonard Slaybaugh Irene Pierson Roy Harmon Clarence AdamsCLASS POEM We belong to the eighth grade class Of the Angola High School dear, We’re sure we all with honors shall pass For of good sound work we have no fear. Forty-four is our number here, It is not what you would call large; We always do our work with cheer, And on our lessons long we charge. CLASS HISTORY Eight years ago the eighth grade began its career under Miss Mathews, with an enrollment of nineteen pupils. We have always prided ourselves on being smad lor our ages, but nevertheless “wise.” Ih ring these years some of our class mr. s have left for different schools and cities, while many other have joined us. Two f cur number haw (bed. These traged. :s were a grea: shock to us all, and caused us to stop and think how the Almighty can take, so quickly, those who have been so near and dear to us. We have always worked hard with a great aim in view, that is, to get all we can out of our studies and work with the greatest energy. We hope that we can graduate with high honors from this grade, and that we may enter the high school as honorable Freshmen.Seventh Grade President ... . Vice-President Secretary Treasurer . . . Poet .......... Historian .... Harold Heckenlively William P. Croxton . . Ruth Williamson ..... Sarah Barron .... Byrona Allison ..... Barbara Cline CLASS MOTTO “We work, we win.” YELL Hegelty, regelty, rickety, rah. Fifth grade, sixth grade, eighth grade, bah. Short, tall, fat, lean. Seventh grade-nineteen eighteen. ROLL Byrona Allison Marvell Sutton Helen McNeal Marjorie Fink Morris Austin Leon Snyder Hugh Miller Arlene hast Sarah Barron Mary Taylor Wava McKinzie Howard Flaishans Loweta Brown Pauline Taylor Zora McNabb Beulah Flaishans William Paul Croxton Mildred Thomas Ruth Pulver Lola Glassburn Joseph Carpenter Irene Vose, Marian Potter Walter Gordon Barbara Cline Jamie Williamson Oscar Pence Adeline Hughes Wier Crowl Mary Williamson Eleanor Robertson Helen Hendry William Daniels Ruth Williamson Rolene Rowley Gerald Hubbell Eva Dirrim Edyth Whysong James Shearer Ford Harman Louise Dirrim Lawrence Whysong Emmet Spade Wilbur Lydy Frances Fairfield Lawrence Wolfe Martha Wood Ralph Lampman Alleen Lowthcr Geraldine Richner Harold Heckenlively Robert RamseySEVENTH GRADE CLASS POEM Here’s to the school that beats them all, You know the school I mean— It is the grand old A. H. S., 1'he btst you've ever seen. And here’s to the mighty seventh grade. That numbers fifty-two, We ll stand by her most gallantly, And e’er to her be true. We’re not like some who mope along. Rather than graduate— We ll stay right here and work away, Well win in spite of fate. Don’t you admire such plucky folk? We’re always on the spot, “We work, we win,” our watchword is. We'd rather work than not. CLASS HISTORY In the year nineteen hundred and eleven the seventh grade of the A. H. S. started in school with Miss Ricketts as our teacher. In the beginning of this year we had a class of fifty-two. We now have a class of forty-seven. Twenty-one of us began school together and have continued together through the seven years of our school life. Some have moved away and others have joined us later. We have a boys basket-ball team who have won their share of the victories as well as the defeats. In two years we will enter high school and hope to be the brighest Freshman class that has ever entered high school.Outline of Departments By the Faculty ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Language is fundamentally the basis of all education. Without a fair knowledge of his mother tongue, it is impossible for any person to become a clear thinker or to make himself understood. Therefore the work in English is emphasized in the high school course. Four years are offered, three years of which are required for graduation. The English course consists of the study of composition and rhetoric and the reading of English classics together with the history of American literature in the tenth year and English literature in the eleventh year. The twelfth year is devoted to the study of the classics and composition. In addition to this work a number of books are required for home reading upon which the student gives an oral or written report. Another feature of this course is the memorizing of choice selections, both prose and poetry. MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT The mathematics offered in the high school comprises three semesters of algebra, three of geometry, and one of commercial arithmetic. The first course in algebra gives a general survey of the field ordinarily covered in this subject in secondary schools. The topics studied in the first year are addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, factoring in cases of type forms, fractions, and fractional and integral equations. In the second year the fundamental processes, factoring and fractions are reviewed with further study placed on simple and quadratic equations, powers, and notes, j The latter half of the second year and the first half of the third year are devoted to the study of plane geometry. The first semester’s work completes the first book of plane geometry and about half of the second. The last semester completes plan geometry. The last of the third year is given to solid geometry which is elective. ij' ART DEPARTMENT The chief aim of the drawing course, is to aid in the complete human development of the child. Story illustration is used in the primary grades to develope the imaginative power. Applied design teaches us the use of our hands, trains the mind to constructive thinking, develops the standard of workmanship, and creates the power of appreciation. Drawing develops the power of observation and teaches appreciation of nature. Nature has been one of the greatest sources for inspiration from which students may gain knowledge of form and color. Analysis drawings of animals, birds, flowers, insects, seed pods, branches, butterflies, vegetables and fruits with a color scheme of each are used as material for design and composition.At this time we are all interested in patriotic posters of various kinds. This enables us to show our true spirit and to bring these ideas of vital importance to the public. Poster work requires knowledge of the figure, harmonious and simple color schemes in flat tones and good lettering. In studying figure posing, we gain a knowledge of size, placing, proportion, direction and action. People are beginning to realize now more every day the importance of applied design and are trying to discover the arts of the early people. It is interesting to study Indian basketry and pottery and connect it with history of an earlier art. Dr. Holborn in his lecture on the “Need of Art in Life,” which dealt especially with applied design, said: “The cry of the people is practical education.” Do you mean a bread and butter education or an education that is going to make your son a better man?. When you come to the fundamentals you learn that we have not progressed. Which is right— the practical man or the artist? Is the love of the beautiful fundamental? The world of art is one where recreation may be secured and where we may lift ourselves from materialism. “God fashioned the earth with skill And the task which he began He gave to fashion after his will Into the hands of man. But the flowers’ uplifted face And the sun and wind and sea Bring a message still of the Beautiful Place God meant the world to be.” HISTORY The course in history consists of a three years study of subject matter selected with view to giving the student an insight into a deeper appreciation of those customs, laws, institutions and privileges which are the common heritage of the race. The work of the first year traces the development of ancient peoples discussing in detail Greece and Rome. The second year deals with the period in which the Christian, Classical and Teutonic elements were being blended to from the modern nations. In the Senior year the history of the United States together with a brief study of Civics is required of all students. This course is designed to give the .student an intimate knowledge of the more important events in the history of our own country and to provide him with a working knowledge of our political institutions. AGRICULTURE Agriculture is not an exact science and hence is difficult to study in an effective manner from books. The object of the course is not to devclope skilled agriculturists, but aims rather to develope an appreciation for the problems involved in production and marketing. Two courses are offered which are given alternate years. The first consists of Animal Husbandry andHorticulture; the second one semester each of soils and Field Crops. The selected tests are supplemented with government publications and reports. MANUAL TRAINING Advanced courses in Manuel Training are organized for those who have an inclination to work with tools and desire to continue the courses which have been started in the grades. The student is put upon his own initative and permitted to build projects of his own design, working under the direction of the instructor. MECHANICAL DRAWING All shop classes are required to learn the elements of Mechanical Drawing in order to design the projects and make the necessary working drawings. Special classes are also organized and are open to all students who wish to obtain credit in the subject. LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT In view of the cultural, disciplinary, and vocational value, at least two years of foreign language work are required for graduation from a secondary school of first rank. As a result of the recent agitation for the practical and vocational in secondary education the study of the modern languages made great progress over that of the classics. During the past years both Latin and German have been offered in the Angola High School, and up until recently by far more than half of the students earned their language credit in German. With the entrance of the United States into the world conflict, a corresponding reaction ensued. To many it may appear inconsistent and embarrassing that we have been and are still training the future citizenship thru the language of our greatest national enemy. However, looking beyond the present conflict, neither the scientific nor the cultural worth of the language have been impaired. It is nevertheless expedient as we are mustering all our resources in the defense of democracy that we allow the German to be automatically dropped from our course of study. In view of this omission elementary French will be offered instead of the German. LATIN “I am convinced that the study of the classics furnishes a man with mental processes which he cannot otherwise acquire.”—Robert Lansing. Three regular classes in Latin have been conducted during the past year. The enrollment in the classes is as follows: first year 36; second year. 21; third year. 6; making a total of 63. Cicero and Virgil are given alternately as reading courses so that they are both accessible to students who have finished two years of Latin. Students who take Latin should continue it beyond the second year, for then they pass from much of the routine and monotony into the real literary excellence. GERMAN Three classes in German, with a total enrollment of 48, have been conducted this year. I he work has been successful in spite of the ever presentspirit of animosity toward the German nation. All national references or selections have been avoided. SCIENCE DEPARTMENT The Science Course consists of General Science in the ninth year. Ag-xiculture in the tenth year and Physics and Chemistry in eleventh and twelfth years respectively, one of the last two being required for graduation. More or less laboratory work is accomplished by each class, much of the work being done at a disadvantage because of lack of room. The laboratory equipment is up to the standard of most high schools outside the largeer cities. From 50 to 75% of the students in each class are enrolled in the science classes. COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT The work in this department was increased this year so that it now includes Commercial Law and Commercial Arithmetic as one unit, Business English and Spelling a second unit, Bookkeeping a third unit, and Typewriting the fourth unit. While these subjects are open to both eleventh and twelfth year students to some extent yet the Bookkeeping and Typewriting are confined principally to the twelfth year while other subjects in the course are often taken in the eleventh year. The Typewriting is the latest venture and has proven to be very popular with the students. The “Touch System” of writing is used entirely. HOME ECONOMICS. The aim of teaching Home Economics in the public schools is to increase home efficiency. In this department of our school we have enrolled 80 girls from the high school, and 78 from the grades. The high school classes in sewing, numbering 53 girls, have competed 230 garments, and about 60 pieces of art needle work. A detailed study of textiles and laundry has also been completed. The high school classes in cooking, numbering 38 girls, have completed a detailed study of the five food principals—both practical and theoretical— being able to determine the calorific value of foods and to obtain a nitrogen balance of rations. Some work in invalid cookery, infant feeding, and dining room courtesy has also been done. The girls vote this work a very important place in their high school training.A Will BEING THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT CLARENCE CHRYSLER. OE THE LATE To Whom it May Concern: Know all men by these presents, that I, Clarence Chrysler, being of sound mind and of legal age do hereby declare this instrument to be my last will and testament, and to have power and be valid over allother wills ever made by me. First, and by far the most important of these, I do will and bequeath to some poor benighted Junior that has been lucky enough to cheat his way through his class work, my most honorable seat, No. A7 of the A. H. S. Said seat being the last in said room, commanding a perfect view of South Wayne Street of the City of Angola. Furthermore, I bequeath my ability to get good conduct grades for such poor and bad behavior to some less fortunate Sophomore, who gets low conduct for good behavior. My ability for midnight study, I leave to some poor Freshman, badly in need of same, and may it some day help him to sit in my seat provided he or she, whichever needs it most, puts such ability to study to proper use at the proper time. Unless thus used, I, the deceased will not be responsible for the results. Hereby I affix my hand and seal to the foregoing paper as a voluntary act on my part, and do acknowledge the foregoing bequests. Witness my hand and seal this thirtieth day of April, in the year of our Lord, Nineteen Hundred and Eighteen. (Seal) Clarence Chrysler. Subscribed to and sworn to by me, a Notary Public, in, and for said H. S. for tbe dying Seniors, this thirty-first day of April, Nineteen Hundred and Eighteen. Tarzan A. Ape, Notary Public. My commission expires with my last breath.FROM THE DIARY OF ANO NYMOUS, Ph. D. I a-Rose one (Me)Cool morning on the Callender and went down town. My thots were Harmon-izing with the temperature for they were Harry-ed by anxiety for my supply of Cole for next winter when there would be so much Maur-ice that poor people might have to burn Hazel brush and Pete to keep their Garrett warm and their Wells from freezing. I stepped from Steifel’s with a couple of Parsells under my arm and everyone Ellis but myself seemed to be Gay. I stopped to Crain at a sign in the window of a “Boiler” factory which gave Graf-fic pictures of Marie-ne life and invited one to sail before the Mast. I was just about to enter a Taylor-shop when I was startled by the appearence of a Ruth-less Mild red Wolf. For a two-Pence I could have dropped to the ground with fear, but I fled with as much Grace as possible, tho my feet dragged so that I could have easily Wade-d the Myers of the Everglades with a pair of number fifteen Butz. But fear is like unto a sand-Ber-lein-ing on one’s foot and I soon reached home and tound the folks Al- gon-da a funeral except John’s-son. I had just settled down to listen to a favorite phonograph record of the famous Cris-singer and had just read the dear old Bible story of Rachel and started on a historical account of the famous “Griffin,” the first sailing ship on the Great Lakes, when a red-nosed man rapped on the back door. Ordinarly I shun such men as a Flai-shans a swatter, but I had to be courteous. He demanded a pint of Ethel alchol. I informed him that this was supposed to be a dry Count-y and I was about half thru with a Frank de-Clarence of my views on the subject when I was stricken to the ground and darkness settled over everything like a Paul.From the Camps Great pleasure is taken in presenting a few articles from alumni who are in the service of Uncle Sam “whacking the Hun.” A. H. S. may well be justly proud of the number of her boys who are “somewhere" doing the biggest “bit" anyone can do for the cause of Liberty. These letters voice some ol the spirit of the sons of our great free land, who have never permitted it to meet defeat, and never will allow it to meet defeat if we at home all will do our bit every where we can. I enlisted in Company P , 3rd Indiana Infantry, April 9, 1917; called into service August 5, 1917. Drilled with the company in Infantry Drills until October 1, when upon the arrival of my company at Camp Shelby, Miss., the entire 3rd Regiment was turned into Field Artillery. From the time of transfer I have served as Company Clerk. I have been able to fill the position because of my h igh school training received under the efficient tea , hers of An gola High School. One very important thing I have learned by my experience is that education received in high school and colleges developes individuality; military education developes nationality. 1 am sorry to say that not enough attention is given in high schools to the duties of every American citizen to his country. Only those that “get into it" have a conception of what citizen’s duties are to his country. I have learned many of these duties in the last six months. A civilian’s conception of the Army and its life is narrow. By this I mean that his idea is a general one. He sees the Army as a fighting organization. The Army is a school in which every American boy ought to be trained. Of course we are taught the ways of defense but more than that. We are taught things every high school boy ought to know, in order that he may grow up a real American citizen. These things are little things when taken separately but they are grouped together and become big things. How much better this country would be if every boy between the ages of ten and fourteen years wras given the proper physical training, and taught to hold his country first above every thing. Then along with the science of defense it would not only be a guaratee of future peace and permanent safety, but it would be an immeasurable contribution to the wholesomeness and virility of the race. 1 remember when the old soldiers placed the flag pole in the yard west of the school-house. 1 can see now why they wanted to do it. In a military camp every soldier is taught to salute the colors whenever and wherever the same are passed. When a soldier salutes the colors he is showing his willingness to defend the same, no matter what the odds are. Each man has to give, even if it takes him away from his personal prospects or his personal gain, or takes from him his life. He will defend that piece of bunting, which stands for so much more than the average boy is aware of until he becomes one of 11s. We must be taught the reason why we are fighting. “That is done by men who know. A soldier’s life is composed of work, lectures, drills and play. Maybe.when I say play, you think that that is queer, but it is the truth. We are having some good clean fun. On every Wednesday night a program is given by one battalion. This program consists of Band music, songs, wrestling matches. boxing matches and jokes. Our officers believe in the saying “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” The main thing that a soldier must acquire to be a success in the game is “Discipline." Upon discipline depends Victory. Upon Victory depends the future of the United States. Germany has a discipline hard to beat, yet the United States is striving to instill in each soldier a dicipline superior to that of Germany. A soldier is taught to obey orders, and in the absence of an order to do what lie thinks the order might have been. Germany instilled their discipline into their army with brute force. The United States on the other hand are disciplining its army by educational methods, and in that way the II. S. discipline is superior to that of Germany. On March 7th 1 was transferred to the Headquarters Company of the Regiment as Corporal Postman. I am willing to do just what the officers direct, ft is each soldier's duty to obey. The men are taught how to work together. This makes the army one large, magnificent, educated fighting machine of which I am but a minute part. Every man counts, and what he (k es, good or bail, is credited to his organization. If a man makes a good showing he is promoted the same as in school. As fast as a man becomes efficient he is given a job with certain responsibilities attached. Maybe this does not touch upon the subject that would be most interesting but there are some things that a soldier is forbidden to speak of. Wishing the Angola High School and the Spectator the best of success 1 am. Yours sincerely, SAMUEL A. PENCE. Cpl. Hqs. Co., 137th F. A. Camp Shelby, Miss. The following remarks from a letter not written for publication also reflect the spirit of our "hoys”: If you have any friends who will soon be entering the service, tell them to go and do their level best—the loafers and fault finders do not get along well. Conditions are very fine here and the men are certainly being treated fine. 1 have failed to see any cause for some of the stories that appear is some of our papers. All of you that are at home do vour bit by aiding and supporting every movement for the welfare of the cause. Give my regards to all. Sincerely yours, ROBERT G. PATTERSON, A. H. S. ’09.Since “Soldiering- for Uncle Sam” has been causually and profoundly, technically and “otherwisley” discussed and harangued, and since W. D. has issued orders against publishing military information, this sketch will state absolutely nothing. To begin with let’s consider the “dough-boy,” who sees the world on foot. It is hard on patriotism, and the majority of the afore mentioned “dough-boys” have definitely decided that it is a job for a strong back and a weak mind. But when they return to camp their spirits rise. Especially when soupie (mess call) sounds and they hit the bread line for their slum-gullion. (Don't any housewives ask me the receipt for that, because only one man ever knew all the things in it, and he died of nervous prostration.) That is, they all enjoy themselves—except the “kitchen cop” who peeled the spuds and put the beans to soak (if they soak them in the army). They (kitchen cops, not beans) get very disgusted sometimes. One I heard of became so disconsolate that he confided in his sweetheart (or somebody else’s) by letter, stating that he was kitchen police. She replied with a very soothing note saying, “Oh I’m so glad John! Now you must be easy on the boys under you. Remember you were a private once yourself.” Another thing which in the army comes as regular as composition Monday in A. H. S. is guard duty. There you go walking up and down,, walking up and down,—that is if you can’t find a shade tree to sit under where you are not liable to be surprised by an approaching officer. An officer once went up to a rather, as he thot, ignorant sentinel and thot to confuse him. “What would you do,” the officer asked, “if you saw a submarine coming toward you over the parade ground ?” The sentinel thot a moment, then answered, “Sign the pledge, sir.” And oh those sham battles! What joy! What bliss! You imagine that an enemy is entrenched about five hundred yards to the front. Of course you must keep under cover, and there is no imagination when it comes to the sand-burrs that you crawl thru. Oh how those dough-boys crawling thru the sand-burrs do envy the field artilleryman who rides a horse (provided that he doesn't fall off, in which case he rides a stretcher to the haven of the iodine and pill shooters). I heard an instructor say once, “Horses and men are both expendable. We have the hospital for one and the veterinaries for the other. Follow me.” And away he went, his horse leaping ditches, logs and rocks. Take it from me, that ride made a joy ride to James Lake look like ia prayer meeting beside a climax western reel drama. And when it comes to the bugle calls there is one sweeter than all the others—Mail Call. When looking for a detail to grade the company street you might not be able to find a man if you had a search warrant. But just holler “Mail” and look out; for there’s a drive coming. So write to ’em. Remembering you one and all I remain Yours truly, STANLEY CASTELL. 4th Btry. R. O. T. C. Camp Stanley, Texas.The Young Volunteer By Emmett McClue. It was about 3:30 in the afternoon when a young man about twenty years old rode up before the main building of a United States Army Camp somewhere in Louisiana on a long gray motorcycle. He stopped and rested his machine against a post and entered the building. 1 bis man was Corporal Harry Burns of the United States Intelligence Department. He had been detailed to go at four o’clock that afternoon about twenty miles to the westward and inspect several bridges which were very necessary for the transportation of an army unit which was to be moved. In a few minutes he returned and after exchanging a brief greeting with a fellow officer he jumped on his machine and soon disappeared down the winding road which stretched away to the westward. As he rode along his keen eye took in every detail of the level country bordering the road. The place to which he was going was quite secluded, there being no human habitation near it excepting a large cave which was reputed to have sheltered at various times bands of Mexican horse-thieves. He was slightly anxious as to his safety in the place. He had gone perhaps five miles and was riding at a good speed, when directly ahead of him there appeared a sharp corner which necessitated quick turning and perfect balance to avoid dashing into the boulders at the side of the road. He rode for about fifteen minutes without further incident, when suddenly, as he was riding quite slowly, gazing to one side, his machine collided with some obstacle hard enough to throw him ten feet into a sand pile. He immediately picked himself up. brushed bis clothes, and then inspected his machine. The front fork and wheel were utterly demolished. His quick eye saw at a glance that it would be impossible to repair it so that he could continue on his journey that afternoon. He was just lifting bis machine from the ground when he was startled by a cheerful voice behind bun. He turned quickly to gaze into the earnest blue eyes of a boy who was perhaps fifteen years old and about his own height. ‘‘Hello,” said the stranger a little timidly, “having some troubler” “Yes 1 am, and just enough to keep me from going any farther this afternoon. But say, where do you live? I didn’t know there was a human being within ten miles of here.’ “Oh, mother and I live just over the hill north of here. We have a small chicken farm and raise a few vegetables for the Orleans market. But say, yorl must belong to the army, don’t you?” he said glancing at Burns’ uniform. “Yes, I am serving in the Intelligence Department. I am supposed to go about ten miles west of here this afternoon and look over a few bridges. But by the looks of this front wheel. I can’t do it unless I walk.” “You can stay with us tonight and I’ll see if I can help you out in the morning,” said the boy. “Well I think it will suit me all right if your mother is willing.” “Oh yes. I know it will be all right with her. We’d do anything for the army men,” he added, again glancing proudly at the uniform.'I lley immediately made their way to the boy’s horn ;. There Burns quickly be« ante acquainted with the mother and learned that !•■ r name was Williams. She and her son Bob had been left dependent upon themselves by the death of the father two years before. They owned about forty acres of land on which they made their living by raising chickens and a few vegetables which they sent to New Orleans by a river steam boat which passed within a few miles of their home. While waiting for supper Bob showed Burns about the farm After supper they sat down to talk about the war conditions. They had been talking but a short time when Bob suddenly remarked: “There is one thing in this neighborhood that puzzles me and I am afraid there is something bad about it. About a mile southeast of here I keep seeing something which looks like colored lights twinkling. It seems about fifty or sixty feet above the ground. As there are few trees there it shows quite plainly above them. It lies straight across a deep marsh and I have never investigated it but am very curious about it. I would like to have you step outside and look at the lights.’’ Burns quickly stepped to the door and as they walked out Bob pointed toward the southeast. There, sure enough, were the lights just as Bob had described them. They were quite dim tho not so dim but that they could be seen quite easily. Burns’ suspicions were immediately aroused and he lost no time in telling Bob that he was going to investigate the matter and should like him to accompany him. In a few minutes the two set out, Bob with his boots and gun and Burns well clothed and armed. After about twenty minutes walk they arrived at the edge of a thick grove and proceeded as cautiously and noiselessly as possible toward the lights. Finally they came to a clearing in which two tents with a fire smoldering before them with a kettle over it. At the left stood a tall tower supporting a net work of wires from which large blue sparks intermittently came. Burns’ suspicions were verified. It was a wireless station. He remembered that a large wireless station was known to be in operation somewhere but army officials had tried in vain to locate it. On account of his connection with the secret service Burns was especially glad to have found the station, since it is quite a task to locate a wireless station in the Louisiana woods and swamps. The next question in his mind was, however, “how many men were there in charge? How would the operators defend themselves in case of discovery? How could they without other weapons than they had capture the station and the operators?” He soon settled these questions in his mind—he would investigate and find out. He crept up to the tower and peeped in. There were two men in the room. They were Germans, one about forty and the other about fifty years old. One was working with the wireless and the other was reading at a table. They did not seem to be uneasy and the boys investigating found no defenses whatever. The way seemed easy to capture them. The boys quietly entered the tower and surprised the men, relieved them of their arms and securely tied them. Burns wrecked the wireless instruments and secured all the papers which he thot would be valuable. They then prepared for a night’s rest, keeping guard all night by turns. In the morning they marched the prisoners ahead of them to Bob’s home where they ate breakfast while giving Mrs. Williams an account of their ad-ventures. They then set about repairing the motorcycle. Fortunately about eleven o’clock in the forenoon an army truck came along and Burns put the captives and motorcycle aboard and returned to camp, Bob accompaning him. It is enough to say that Harry was promoted to the rank of Second Lieut enant with good increase of salary. Bob was given as much attention and a reward for his services. He later tried to join the army but was refused on account of his age. He went hack home with his money reward which doubtless helped him and his mother not a little. When Harsh Steps Through The Door. Our thoughts are likely to wander, And our minds to far regions soar, But matters are quickly righted When Harsh steps through the door. Our joys and pleasures are over All racket and whispers o’er, The room all wrapped in silence, When Harsh steps through the door. He gets busy, who has been idle, There is silence where noise was before. And our books for us now have new interest, When Harsh steps through the door. There is a lull in the audible whisper, A pause in the noise and uproar. And our minds are plunged in our studies, When Harsh steps through the door. We may stir up a great commotion. And throw things on the floor, But many a poor lad is captured. When Harsh steps through the door. Then let us all be up and ready, For soon this brief life is o’er ; Let us be watching, waiting and ready. When Harsh steps through the door. —Freshmen class poem?Tlie Contract By Esther McClellan. The large reading room of the Gentlemen’s Club was filled with smoke from the many cigars. Here and there sat a man idling his time away, lounging back in a lazy back chair, his feet propped up often higher than his head, a long stogie in his mouth or pipe and reading in some book or magazine. Still others were moving about the room and passing in and out of doors. Quite apart from the others sat a middle aged man who seemed to be deeply engrossed in thought and waiting the arrival of some one. His hair was gray and his face was drawn and careworn. As he sat in his chair by the large window his eyes wandered to the crowded street below. And as he looked a taxi drove up and stopped in rout of the club house. A few minutes later a very handsome young man entered the reading room. He was tall and perhaps about twenty two years of age. His hair was black and wavy and his eyes were dark also. As he glanced about the room a frown was upon his face but all at once it vanished and with a broad smile he walked toward the gentleman sitting near the window. "Mr. Conrad, I believe?" he said. “That is quite right," said the gentleman shaking hands. “So this is Gilbert a full grown youth. Does it seem possible! to think that the last time I saw you was back in old England when you were just a child and my little girl was only two years old. That was the day your father and I bound our friendship by the solemn contract. Oh and things are so changed now! But I must not let my mind wander so. You had a pleasant voyage, I hope? I got your cable and have been looking for you." After being thus introduced the two men sat down and talked of the ocean voyage, of the younger man's deceased father and finally the sworn contract. "As to this contract.” said Gilbert, "I have been informed, father told me only that at or after twenty-one years of age I was to come in possession of a large estate in New York if I should marry your daughter Margery Conrad. That is all I know. After his death 1 found a letter directed to me. You may read it if you wish,” He handed a short note to Mr. Conrad who opened it and read: My dear Gilbert: If anything happens to me, go to Mr. Geo. P. Conrad. 4155 Hemington Ave., New York, lie was ever my dearest friend and will help you to carry out your father's wish to unite the Conrad and Gregory families. Your loving father. As the elder man read this, his eyes filled with tears, but he brushed them aside and said, "Poor Gilbert! Yes he was my dearest friend also. I will tell you of the contract. hen I visited your father in England with my wife and little Margery we spoke of uniting the two estates and to do this we signed a contract saying that when you became of age that two families shouldbe united by the marriage of Margery and you. It was your father’s wish my boy.” Gilbert hesitated a moment, then said, “If is was his wish I am ready to abide by it.” “But, my dear Gregory, you don’t understand. You can't ever marry Margery and you wouldn’t want to if you could. You see it was this way. After her mother died I was so absorbed in business that I saw very little of my daughter. Two years later I sent her to a girl's school and there, to my great grief, she fell in bad company and she joined an opera company as a mere chorus girl. She was only thirteen at the time but she had a beautiful voice. She has never written me for she knows I was so bitterly opposed to her doing this. Heven knowrs, 1 would forgive her if she would only come back.” Here the old man’s voice broke and his great form shook with grief. Gilbert seeing this, sought to get his mind off the subject, so began to tell him of his work back in England. Gilbert Gregory was the manager of the Lisbon Grand Opera Company in London. In two months they were to present the opera of “Christiline” but the lady who was to take the leading part was very ill. “And so I am going to have great difficulty in finding a person to take her part. It is a hard thing to do for she certainly had a wonderful voice. But let us talk no more of this and take a turn in the city or perhaps attend the Orpheum.” Gilbert Continued. To this Mr. Conrad agreed and after each had had dinner, a taxi was called and at precisely eight thirty they took their seats in one of the boxes of the Orpheum theatre. The orchestra when tuned, struck up a lively selection and a very lovely girl began to sing. It was only a simple song but the volume in that clear, beautiful voice was wonderful. Gilbert was tpiick to observe the fine quality of the voice and eagerly listened as the song progressed. Even Conrad as he looked at that beautiful face and listened to that song, became sad with longing for his own little girl. The whole audience seemed thrilled and every listener seemed to lean forward the better to get every word and tone that was uttered. Suddenly from beneath the velvet folds of the curtain there came a curl of smoke and all at once it seemed as if the whole curtain was aflame. The audience, forgetful of the singer, was like mad in the rush and confusion. 1 he girl screamed and rushed toward the exit but alas, all too late, the burning curtain fell, completely covering her form. She struggled but could not free herself entirely from the burning mass. Already her clothes had caught fire and finally she fell unconscious to the floor. There was one person ready to save her. Mr. Conrad had heard that piercing scream and seen her fall. That same pity and longing came back to him and soon he found himself scrambling over seats and down crowded isles to the stage. Twice he tried to go up the steps to the girl but each time was driven back by the stifling smoke. He could see no way through and was about to give it up when lie looked once more in that direction. He saw that her hair had caught fire. Then he thought he heard a low moan. Somethingprompted him to go on and so gathering all his remaining strength, he made one desperate effort and reached the side of the suffering girl. He gathered her in his arms and once more pushed his way through the dreadful smoke and down through the long hall and to a large hotel just across the street. When she regained consiousness, she was lying on a clean white bed with the doctor and nurse standing near her. Her hair had been burned and her arms and head bandaged, so that her features could hardly be recognized. A knock was heard and Mr. Conrad and Gilbert were admitted. The former walked to the bedside and, taking that frail hand in his, said, “And how is my patient this morning?” As she heard the voice she slowly turned her head and looked up into the eyes of the man. As their eyes met she gasped and grasping the little gold locket on her breast again lost consiousness. In that one look the man recognized the self-same eyes of his wife and his own little daughter Margery. He then looked at the locket, the little locket which had belonged to her mother and found it to contain his own picture. A little later when Margery was allowed to talk to her father, she said, “Oh father, please take me home for I am so tired of it all.” And he did take her home and soon she became well and strong again. She and Gilbert became very good friends and then she was sent back to Europe to have her voice trained where afterwards she not only became leading lady in the opera “Christiline” as was her father’s wish but mistress in the household of Mr. Gilbert Gregory. A RESIGNATION TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: I, Clarence Chrysler, being of unsound mind and illegal age, two faults which greatly handicap me in the dutiful performance of the duties relating to the honorable position of Secretary of the Most Honorable and Majestic Senior Class of the Angola High School of the year of Our Lord Nineteen Hundred and Eighteen, do hereby tender my resignation to the Most High President of the aforesaid august body, on this thirtieth day of April, of this same year. Being further handicapped by the necessity of leaving the aforesaid august body, and becoming a farm laborer, I express my hopes that this resignation will be accepted, and that some one. surely more worthy than I, may be inflicted with the dishonor of my position. Witness my hand, CLARENCE X. CHRYSLER. Subscribed and sworn to this 30th day of April, in the year of our Lord, Nineteen Hundred and Eighteen. .. Major Life Miserable, Notary Public. My commission expires June 1, 1918.How One Man Saved France By Lavornia Gregg On the western front in France where the long lines of trenches are, is one encampment of the French army. In this section of the army was a young French hoy scarcely seventeen, who had no fear of war and who loved h ranee with the zeal of a LaFayette. On this particular night several young Frenchmen were seated upon the floor of their dugout discussing the doings of the day. Among them was Alan, the boy, whom all his acquaintances loved and respected, because, altho he was so young, he was so willingly giving up his life for his country. As Alan listened to the stories of brave men who had gained valuable information from the enemy for their country or had died while performing some great deed (as told by these soldiers), he at once became enthusiastic over doing some great deed for France and at once began thinking what he could do best. A few days later by chance, he overheard some Wench and British officers talking about some most needed information. It seemed as if in some way they had found out that the Germans were planning an attack and it was very necessary for the Allies to know just when, at what place along the lines and just how they intended to carry it out. When Alan heard of this he at once conceived of a plan by which he could do something he thot worth while. At midnight that night one might have seen a figure creep slowly out of the French lines and thus on toward the German trenches. It was Alan. He was on his mission for France unmindful of his own danger as long as he could serve his most beloved country. Slowly but surely he drew neat tin German line, being careful not to he seen or heard. lie knew where the officers’ and General’s encampment lay and it was here that he turned his steps. At last he was near enough to hear voices and on approaching still nearer he discovered they were talking about the very things he wanted to know, not knowing that they were being overheard. lie had a pencil and paper with him and as he knew short hand he proceeded to take down the information. He heard them tell of the planned attack, the place where it was to be made and even the very hour it was to take place. Alan stayed here three or four hours until he had obtained all the information regarding the attack he thot necessary and then started back to his own camp. Just as he was stealing thru the German line a voice shouted, “Halt! who goes there?” Alan said nothing but tried to go on in silence, but the sentinel shouted again for him to stop. This time Alan ran and as soon as the sentinel saw he was tryig to escape and also thinking he was probably a German deserter or an escaped prisoner, shot. The bullet hit Alan in the side, wounding him severely, but still lie kept on toward the French line altho he could scarcely walk. He valued his life little as long as he could get his papers to the French officers. On and on he crept, each minute bringing him nearer the French and at the same time nearer the end of his short life. At last he managed to creep into the officers’ encampment and salute theCaptain and then he fell unconscious to the ground. An officer immediately sent for the ambulance and took him to the hospital where he lay for many hours hovering between life and death. About the middle of the afternoon he regained consciousness and began to incessantly call for the General. As no one could quiet him, the general was sent for and was brot to Alan’s bedside. He at once saw that the boy was dying but knew that he had something important to tell him. He dismissed' the nurses and doctor from the room and asked Alan what he wanted. Alan looked around the room to see that there was no one there and then drew his papers out of his shirt. These he gave to the General who not knowing how to read them asked Alan to translate them for him. With much difficulty Alan told his general what he had heard. The General was very much astonished and grateful for the information. He 'immediately saw that Alan was given the best of care but it was in vain as Alan was going fast and early in the morning he died. The Germans made a strong attack the next day but were easily repulsed because of Alan’s information concerning the German plans, and France was once more able to stand secure. In a day or so they buried Alan with the highest military honors a soldier could wish for and on his coat they pinned a “Cross of the Legion of Honor,” and they also sent one to his parents with many compliments and also much sympathy for them concerning their brave and noble son. Thus another youth gave all he had for his country, and probably wishing he had more to give, as Nathan Hale said, “All I regret is that I have but one life to lose for my country.” HIGH SCHOOL PSALM H. 1 . Allman is my teacher; I do chew gum. He leadeth me beside the waste basket, he maketh me to spit it out. I beggeth his pardon, he leadeth me on paths of a lecture for his ideal’s sake. Yea, though I walk through the valley of flunking, I fear no evil; For Allman is with me; thy lecture and my gum comfort me. I preferreth my daily lessons with the help of my gum. Thou annointest my head with knowledge, My gourd runneth over; Surely lessons and Spearmint will follow me all the days of my life. And I will dwell in the A. H. S. forever. Amen.The Voice of the Mail Box By Wilma Slade “Turn right around now, and clean off those shoes. A ’bringin’ in ithe whole state road on my floor an' me just a’finishin’ a’scrubbin’ it. Sure, the mother of three boys deserves a front pew in heaven." It was a short stout village housewife who had thus assailed her foster nephew. Having finished this vigorous attack she turned about and began scrubbing the kitchen sink, muttering to herself. ‘‘Pity you can’t learn in nigh nineteen years to clean your shoes afore you come into the house.” She was still at work when the boy entered again, minus the said portion of the state road. He was a tall and slender lad but his shoulders were square and his appearance very manly. Tossing his hat in the corner and stalking across the room, he pulled up a chair beside the range and stared a few minutes as tho watching the slow burning fire that his aunt had kindled to chase away the dampness and chill of the early spring day. “Don’t lean back in that chair,” began his aunt again, turning around from the sink. “Ain’t I said a dozen times chairs are made with four legs and two won’t stand the strain. And straighten down that rug. Laws! I get tired trying to keep things in order with men folks around.” She again resumed her scrubbing while the boy, with an air of indifference, straightened the rug and dropped into the chair, resting his head in his hands and apparently not hearing the old lady as she continued. “The wind’s blowed an awful sight all day and switched every bit of starch out of them clothes. It’s a pretty satisfaction to break your back a’washin’ an’ have everything iron as limp as a dish rag. I'd as soon eat offen a bare table as a table cloth without any starch in it. It’s everlastin’ a’diggin ’an no thanks nuther and when ye get as old as I am you’ll know how it goes. Phis here woikin' from morning till night an’ havin’ ye come home a,---------„ The sentence was unfinished. The aunt looked up and saw the attitude of the boy. Wiping her hands on her apron she stepped across the room lightly and stood by him, a melting look of sympathy in her eyes. “What, ye tired too, boy?” He did not stir. The woman frowned and brushing a stray lock of gray hair back of her, resumed her scrubbing, talking to herself. “Worryin’, and he’s been doin’ a lot of it lately. Somethings on his mind as he just can’t straighten out .” All the mud and her other bothers forgotten, the old lady worked away, awaiting the time when he would tell her all. “He’s just like his father,” she thot, “Everlastingly a’ worryin.’ I’ve always said it was Heinie’s worryin’ that made him give up the fight and leave Kurt to face it all alone.” “Aunt,” at last the boy spoke. His voice was mellow and gentle but there was a touch of strained effort in it.“What it is, Kurt?” she said, instantly stopping her work and taking the other kitchen chair. Setting close beside him she stroked his hair. “What is it, Kurt? I'm a’listeniu.” “Aunt, I've something to tell you. Can you listen a long time?” “Yes, boy,” she glanced across the stove at several pans on the reservoir. “My bread ain't quite ready to sponge yet.” "Lots has happened since this morning, aunt. Jerry and I got as far as Westfield in the car and a little way out of that town we had one grand smashup, but nobody hurt. The car was a wreck, tho, and Jerry had to get some papers across to Nodsville before four o’clock so as some money matters could be straightened out. I offered to ride Judge Henderson's pony across and let Jerry stay in Westfield and get his car patched up. It was a fine ride and I sort of enjoyed the novelty. Made good time to Nodsville, but took my time coming back and struck an old road. Must have been used before the state road was put thru. I wasn't far out of Nodsville when I was a'ridin' along a desolate stretch of woods, just a’drinkin’ in every thing when I heard a voice—a faint, highpitched, plaintive voice. The iariher I got the fainter it got, so I went back in a certain spot where it sourtded plainly and it seemed to say, “Come! come!” I-looked first on one side of the road then on the other. There was nothing but trees and an old deserted mail box fastened on a hollow iron rod that stood near the road. But after some searching I saw a tiny house, almost invisible, way back among the tree trunks. “I listened and then the voice sounded again a little louder. Finally I jumped from the horse and started straight for that house. There were no signs of life about it. The yard was strewed with old tin cans, kettles, ajpiece of a ladder, a broken chair, and at one side a circle of bricks, the 'remains of a flower bed I suppose. It all made a desolate scene. I tried the door and opened it. I was somewhat surprised at what I saw. Yes! there was someone living there. An old gentlemen sat by a coal stove smoking vigorously an old corn cob pipe. Beyond stood a feeble old woman wiping some broken dishes on a dirty dish towel. Beside her was a store box, which I suppose served as a cabinet, table and cupboard, altho I noticed many kettles and such setting around on the floor. In one corner was an old organ loaded with books, papers, and knick-knacks. It also supported a dirty lamp with a smoky chimney. In the other corner to my right was a tumbled down bed with no pillows and littered with several dirty pieces of clothing. To my left was another store box, standing on end, filled with old bottles and cans and serving as a stand for an old clock. The wall was papered in spots and ornaments here and there with almanacs and calendars and any number of articles, from ears of corn to cocoons and hornets nests. All this I took in at a glance. Finally I managed to say, “I beg your pardon but I am tired. Could I get a drink and rest a bit?” They didn't seem alarmed at all and were cordial to me. The old man set a chair beside his, where I sat down and the old woman handed me a drink out of a cracked tumbler. The wate was stale but I managed to down it wondering what next to say. Finally it came to me what 1 stopped for. “Curious but I heard someone calling here in front of the house,” I said, returning the glass. “I suppose it was imagination.”“The old people exchanged glances and then the old man shifted his pipe to the other corner of his mouth, drew his chair closer to mine and said in a most confidental tone, ‘‘Want.to hear a real story?” “A ghost story,” I thot and answered emphatically, “Yes!” “It’s war times you know,” he began. “Yes, I know.” He had struck a sensitive cord the first thing. “Well it’s been war time afore. It was when I was young. Yes sir, lad, my blood boiled and I fought—God only knows how I fought.” “Civil war’” I asked, for you know aunt how I like to hear about that war. “Yes me lad and it was an even match America against America—real spirit on both sides. I was on Round Top, lad, in Picketts charge and it was different from layin’ in a trench a’waitin' fer a shell to drop over. Oh, we saw ’em aim and fire and when they most made the top it was all hand to hand fightin’ with bayonets. It was real fightin' them days. They wasn’t no cowin’ down then, we faced the sizzin’ bullets and volunteered too. 1 dropped in at Nodsville last week when Company A left and it all came back—our leavin' about fifty years ago. And outer all that said good-bye from the neighborhood (they was eleven) only three came back and one had better not. “What do you mean?” I asked, “Crippled for life?" “No, no, and that gets me back to my story. It was my little sister 1 was feelin’ for. She was a little mite and only seventeen and promised to my best pal. Look! you can see the clearin’ now. It well nigh took the life outer her to see us both leave that way. I can see her yet a’standin’ on that platform a’wavin’ her handkerchief and a’callin’, “I’ll be waiting, I’ll be waiting. An’ she died, she did, as true as sky blue. She didn’t forget—it was him, damn him, that forgot. He went away down South, cabbaged onto some o' his pay and turned coward. Finally they caught him an’ sent him afore the Captain, but somehow he got away. Poor little Maggie! She heard about it all and she’d lots rather seen him dead than disgraced. She used ter sit out there by the mail box and cry an’ cry till finally one day we found her unconscious and she never come to—just wasted away. “Did that man ever come back ?” I asked. “Oh yes! after the rest of us had fought it all out, he showed up with a spick and span rebel bride. Why she came from the best of 'em down South—lots younger 'an him. She never knowed anything ’bout his soldier life till about eighteen years ago. We had a big camp fire meetin’ in Nodsville and most the whole county turned out and even him came a’slinkin’ in. Old P ill Myer, he spied him and he bursts right out, and said, “Cursed be the man in this country that shamed our service to our country.” An’ old Bill struck home I guess, for the next mornin’ we found Whitley’s county traitor dead in his barn—hung himself. An£ from that day to this yer can hear my little sister still cryin’ out there by the mail box.” “ ‘Mighty sad, sir, mighty sad,’ I said. An’ he answered, ‘That it is, and God spare us from any more Heinie Hohens’.” The boy stopped breathlessly and stared straight ahead at nothing. He was living over all he had been telling. His poor aunt knew he was suffering, as she had been. “I’ve been thinking. Aunt”—he seemed more like himself now—“I’ve known it must come, but for your sake I’ve tried to believe it was my duty to take care of you and the boy. But it’s all settled now— my country demands double of me—I must make up for what father did and give what America ex-pects of every able bodied American—the best and all that there is in him. I hate war, Aunt, Sherman said it was hell long before the Kaiser’s devilish contrivances were dreamed of. But no matter what it is. I'll go. I'll fight, and I'll paint father's yellow streak so thick with the blood of my sacrifice that my country will forgive and forget.” He arose as he said the last and his aunt stole into his arms and sobbed and sobbed. They soon found relief however in the fact that they had at last decided to make things right and their minds were lighter than for many a day. Bright and early one morning soon after this Kurt set out for the nearest recruiting station to clean a slate and to do his own bit for his great country. VARIOUS KNEES. If a man broke his knee, where would lie get another one? In Africa, where the negroes. If a baby broke her”s, where would she get another one? In Palestine, where the Sheeneys are. But if a child broke his, where could he get one? At tlie meat market, where they sell kidneys. Supposing a baby broke his, where could lie get one? At the delicatessen shop, where they sell wienies. If a crazy man should brake his? At the asylum where they have loonies. If a bandit broke his? In Mexico, where there is villany. (Villa knee.)A Bit of 1918 Teacher’s E xperience By Elizabeth Evans On rambled and rumbled the train thru the pouring rain. Hester Dudley turned her eyes from the usually interesting passengers in the coach to the rainy out-of-doors. But she had no more interest in the rain-soaked cornfields or the dense smoke clouds outside. She was too happy, too very happy. Some time before this her father's business had failed and late in the fjitmmer after her second year in college she found that she would have to leave her beloved Alma Mater and go to work. It was so late she did not think she could get a school, and she was therefore delighted when the day before she received a note from the trustees of the school at Limaville. Owing to the death of one of their teachers, another was needed in her place. Hester had never been to Limaville, which lay near North Bend, the last qity on the G. R. R. R., sixty miles south of her home in Harlam. To be sure she had asked Billy Ware, the brakeman, what kind of a town it was, but in his ever read)' slang he had described it as a “dear little burg.” Hester decided she would have to wait to see it before she knew what Billy really thought of it. Young William Ware was more than a brakeman to Hester, much more. Even after Hester told him that she went to college to prepare for her life work and didn’t take Domestic Science either, Billy still continued to spend his evenings at her home. The car door slammed and Hester’s air castles returned to earth. “Liberty «"enter,” shouted Billy. This was the last stop before Limaville. Mechanically she turned her coat collar and pulled her cap down over h. r face. The train slowed down, jarred over the tracks, and stopped with a jerk. Two little old men came from the station house and entered the coach. They were of a type that fifty years before would have been considered ancient. No two people ever looked more alike. Each wore a long-white square cut beard, a high crowned hat and a black silk duster, and each carried a huge folded umbrella. They walked the whole length of the car carefully peering over their spectacles into the face of each passenger. A murmur ran through the car. Billy”s eye caught Hester’s and his mouth formed the words, “Limaville school trustees.” They returned as far as Hester, and seeming to find her nearest their idea of a teacher they sat down in front of her. The crowd tittered again and Hester felt thankful for the thick black veil that hid her crimson face from the passengers. The men looked at her a while, then one of them said: “I think she'll fill the bill. She isn’t what the women call fashionably dressed. Of course we can’t tell about her teaching yet.” “Robert.” replied the other, “think of talking that way with Miss Jones just laid away.” “Well, don't mourn, let bygones be bygones. I’m not as sentimental as you are. Since these railroad passes don't cost us anything I don’t see any harm in using them to see a new teacher if it will satisfy my curiosity.”Billy, who had dropped into a seat across the aisle with a salesman, grew tired of this conversation and thought that Hester too would be glad of a relief. So, altho his seat mate had said nothing you heard, he spoke in a voice loud enough to be heard six seats away: “Who are they? Oh they’re a couple of trustees that were so eager to express their opinion of the new teacher that they had to go and meet her.” This silenced the speakers. The train whistled and Billy called, “Lima-ville!" All the hopes and dreams of the new teacher were shattered by her first view of the town. In spite of the rain the entire population seemed to have gathered to see her. Hester had but one idea when she saw' the rows of tumbled down, rain soaked houses and stores, the big bleak school house and the miserable townspeople. That idea was to shut her eyes to the hideous sight and take the next train to Harlem. The cars roared away, and putting away her disgust at the sight, Hester turned to one of the old men and said pleasantly: “I am Hester Dudley, the new teacher, and I think you are one of the school trustees?” “Yes’m,” he replied, "I am Robert Baynes and this is my brother William. William,” he said, “turning to his brother, “you had better be going home so your wife won’t have to wait dinner on you. I’ll be taking the Miss up to the hotel.” William meekly obeyed his brother, not even stopping to suggest that “Miss” might get her dinner at his house. Hester followed her guide over the old asphalt walk, past twenty or thirty houses, about half of which were vacant. The tenanted ones were ghostly and drear. Dirty ragged curtains hung behind the broken windows and the monotony of the tall grass and weeds that grew about the tumbled down porches was broken here and there by wild rambling rose and lilac bushes. Here and there a dirty urchin playing in the mud stopped to stare at the passing couple. They soon reached the shabby little stores and entered a small restaurant. The only occupants were the proprietor and half a dozen old men sitting at a counter. The men stopped eating to stare at Hester and the proprietor came forward wuth many smiles and nods and gave them a seat near the window. Afer the meal Baynes took her out past a little church to his home. It was a large unpainted house, back from the road, under a grove of moaning pines. An old Negro caretaker sat smoking on the low porch. Altho dreary, the place was neat and well kept. After this they went up to the old school house. The interior of the building was even w'orse than the outside. The lower floor was divided into two large rooms for the grades and an auditorium Besides being a class room, one served for a library, a relic of better days. Except for the summer’s supply of dust they would have been fairly presentable. But when Baynes rolled back the big barn-like doors of the auditorium, Hester was horrified by the first sight of the room. It was filled with boxes and barrels of sugar, grain, flour and seeds. They had been carefully covered, but Baynes’ near-sighted eyes failed to see that a rush of wind had blown the canvas off. Dirt and cob-webs prevailed, but not a desk was in sight. “There are so few pupils that we’ve never needed to use this room,” ex-plained Baynes. The wall was bare except for an American flag which was draped over a picture. “That,” said Baynes, “is Miss Jones. She taught here for thirty-five years. The folks bought this of their own accord without consulting us boys. We should have advised them to wait until the professor died. He’s been here for forty years already. There have been fifteen teachers here for this job but none of them would take it. We thought it must be the wages, so since 'tis getting so near time for school to begin, we ll pay you forty-five dollars a month if you’ll stay.” Hester was shocked. It wasn't very likely she could get another position and forty-five dollars would not go very far toward mending the family fortunes. Then she thot of all the dirty pinched little faces on the street and at the depot. “Yes," she said, '‘I’ll take it on one condition. That is that we may have that flag in the hall where the children can at least see it.” “Put it where you please,” Baynes replied. It was a sober thoughtful Hester that went home that night. Billy’s first question was, “Did you get the school?” “Yes, of course,” she replied. “Well then,” said Billy, "you just brace up and don’t you dare make a fizzle of it.” "William Ware, what do you mean?” she demanded. “Just this," he replied. “If Robert Baynes had any idea whatsoever that you wouldn’t make a flat failure he wouldn’t have hired you at all.” “The mystery deepens,” said Hester coldly. “Please explain how anyone with so pleasant a face as Miss Jones and as pleasing a personality as Professor Rach could be tied to that little town for forty years.” "Well,” replied Billy, “.Miss Jones and Professor Rach started teaching when the place was more up to date. They didn’t make enough money to get more education and they didn't have enough to teach any place else.” “Why has the town gone to wreck as it has?” she asked. “Because." he replied, " it’s just dying. The Baynes for three or four generations back have been the leading lights in it. They got the people to thinking that the world was going a bit too fast for them and that they ought to preserve the good old fashioned customs of their ancestors. I guess they preserved them all right, for they don't seem to be using them.” “Why do they have to run the school tho?” “They are the trustees. You see the school was built years and years ago. The Baynes had quite a sum of money so they put up the building and ever since they’ve kept the people paying a little every year for the building and teachers.” “Why don’t the state authorities do some thing?” she asked. “Because,” he answered, “it’s a private school. The state authorities are not as careful as they might be and they just take it for granted that it is all right. The town folks don’t know any better and no one else cares.” “What is all that stuff doing down in the auditorium?” she asked. “What stuff?”“Why Billy Ware, the room is half full of sugar and flour and stuff of that sort.” “I know, I know,” he cried. “Robert Baynes has a son, Eugene, who runs an elevator down at North Bend. Baynes can get the products for almost nothing and lie’s hoarding them till he can get a big price. Oh 1 Hester, here’s a job for you—be patriotic and give him away.” •Talk about being patriotic! You had better practice what you preach," she replied crossly. “One thing else, why am I destined to be a failure?” “Because,” he answered, Robert Baynes thought you were just a silly college graduate that would have a lot of pretty clothes. Of course the folks down there would want some just like them and would get them thru him because he runs a couple of the stores.” “Oh thanks," replied Hester cooly, "1 shall forgive you for what you’ve said because you’ve talked sense for a minute.’ A train whistled. “There's your train,” she said rising. Billy laughed. “Don't practice 'you may be excused’ on me,” he said. Then his tone changed. ‘‘Hester, you aren't mad, are you? I didn't mean to be rude.” “Oh I'll be over it by tomorrow,” she replied. “I shan't be here tomorrow,” he answered, “I’ll be at Camp Bennett.” “Oh Billy, are you going to enlist? How wonderful!” "1 thought you would be sorry.” “I'm not considering my personal feelings. It's a splendid idea that you are willing to give up everything and help fight it out.” A few days later Hester took up her school. The boys had been assigned to Professor Rach and the girls to her. There was nothing very encouraging about the work. The little pupils were regular in attendance and seemed to enjoy the school. They were all used to being in one group for their classes. The smaller the child, the smaller the problem he was given. Hester finally succeeded in getting them into their proper grades, but the older girls did not enjoy being in classes below some of the younger ones. Their leader was Anna Ross. She was a bright pretty girl who was used to being the belle of the town so she quite resented the quiet girl who was readily loved by the little children and the parents. When Hester suggested a domestic science class it was these girls who rebelled. “We don’t like sewing and cooking,” they cried, “we can get enough erf ?t at home and we’ll go there to do it.” What could she do? The state demanded domestic science and this school was to follow state rules. On Friday evening when she was picking up sticks and paper on the school ground, as if in answer to her question, Anna came along the street. Hester called out to her: “Anna do you want to go home with me tonight?” “Yes,” she replied, “I should like to but Mr. Baynes objects to our leaving town. You see we’re all under obligations to him for this building. If we don’t do what he wants us to he might just take away everything we’ve got.” “It seems to me,” Hester replied, “that by this time you must have paidfor the building and several teachers in advance. So long as your mother doesn’t care I ca'nt see why you should feel bound to anyone else.” “I'll go if she doesn’t care,” Anna replied. Then to herself she added, “I’ll see at least why she can come into a strange town and take my place.” Hester took Anna to the Saturday sessions of the Harlam graded schools. After the last session was over Anna asked timidly, “Are you going to have a domestic science class?” "I don’t know,” Hester replied, “You girls said you wouldn’t take it. We don't have any stoves and I am sure that Mr. Baynes wouldn’t get us any.” “I think mamma would let us use our stove and sewing machine. Those girls make everything just exactly right and they patch things so you would not know they were patched at all.” “That would be fine.” replied Hester, “We can’t do much baking because we can't get any sugar and flour.” ‘‘Can t get them! Why we can get all we want and more too.” “But you shouldn’t get them,’ Hester said, “The government only allows a little.” Anna immediately demanded a long explanation. “I don't care,” she said hotly, “it isn’t fair. Baynes isn’t doing it to be good to us. He's doing it to make money. Why don't you report him?” “I’m trying to make up my mind to. It isn’t fair, that’s sure.” That night a letter went from Hester to the food administration. One noon the next week she found a stranger conversing with Baynes in the hall. The old man seemed quite ill at ease until the stranger, who gave his name as Henry Quick, produced a catalogue and announced that he was a picture agent. “I dont believe in having pictures hung around,” Baynes remarked sullenly. “I do,” Hester interrupted, “We are going to use the proceeds of our sale next week for them.” “Now you see here,” said Baynes, “I am going to make it plain right here. These folks owe so much for this school that every cent that’s made here comes to me.” “All right,” Hester replied. “There won’t be any admission charged. If you don’t w'ant pictures you don’t need to buy any but I’ll get what I please.” “Xow Miss, you needn’t say too much. The professor can teach all the pupils alone and he won’t be taking them to the cities and filling their heads with silly notions of fancy stitches and candy making.” A voice was heard calling, “Hey, Baynes! Hey, Baynes!” f‘Yes,” answered Baynes. “Go open that door for me, dad, I’ve brought the rest of that flour.” “You've got flour?” Why take it down to the house you silly boy,” cried Baynes, excitedly, rushing down the hall. “But dad, you said you could easily hoard two truck loads more in the auditorium. There isn’t any school today is there?” cried the voice drawing nearer. Eugene Baynes, carrying a sack of flour, rounded the corner of the hall before his father could reach it. He saw the picture agent, paled, and stopped short.“Dad,” he said weakly, “We re gone. It’s Quick, the secret service man.” “Hello Gene,” called Quick, “Come and show me how much stuff you’ve got stored up.’’ Eugene obediently went but his father turned to Hester and said, “You go and don t you ever come back either. You are at the bottom of this.” “Well Baynes, don't be ugly about it. I’ll have quite a story to tell to the board of education, won’t I ?” asked Quick. 1 he next day Quick returned with Edison of the board of education. “Baynes,” said the board member, "the state will give you just fifty dollars for this building and ground. That will include all that these folks can possibly owe you. Now you let them alone. I am going from house to house and tell everyone that they're free from debt.” He needed to go only to the street for all the people had gathered there, attracted by the huge gaily decorated automobile in which Quick had come this time. He told the news and added: "You are going to have new teachers and you folks are all going to learn." “V e don t want new teachers, we want our Hester,” they cried. “Miss Dudley is a fine teacher, and if all that Miss Ross says about the great help she has been to you is true, she surely deserves a great deal of credit,” he replied, ‘‘and in that case we shall be glad to offer her sufficient inducement to remain here.” "It s all true! they chorused the unanimous answer. TO THE TEACHERS AND GIRLS Skip this paragraph. It is really unfit to be in the Spectator. It got into the magazine by mistake and we asked the printer to destroy it or p»int it upside down. pEaq jaq uo puBjs oj pnij aqs jj ‘puaj XpE3J|E S 31K uiaod siqj, ‘Avoqauios jt jb paqs A auq a ‘Suiqgiej e oj sjuaa uaj jaifB.w [|,3A a o •Moqs e jo puiq jse3{ aqi sjaS aqs j| ‘Moqaiuos jno j; puy [jaqs taq noX jug ‘MOuq oj tou tqSno aqs Suiqjauios s 3j ‘ueuioa e saujOM jEqt SuiqjXuB s(ajaqj jjA Successful Failure Some one has said that no boy is, at heart, thoroughly had. However that nay be, 1 am privileged to relate here the story of a youngster, or rather a young man of eighteen or nineteen, who lived in a medium sized middle-western city. He was so fortunate, or unfortunate, as the reader may judge, as to have the gratification of his slightest wish immediately forthcoming. Iis father thought, as do many fond parents, that the son and heir must never suffer the awful affliction of poverty, if it might possibly be avoided. In short it was a typical rich-father-and-only-son case. Had it not been for a very singular event in his career, things might have progressed in the usual manner and with the usual consequences. Late in January it was the custom to call for recruits for the spring track and field meets held during May and June with the nearby colleges and academies. So one damp and slushy afternoon, in the third week of January, some thirty or forty boys of various ages and all sizes, assembled in the old academy gym for the usual preliminary speech and admonitions of the coach. Within a few weeks regular work began on the gym and track and the ranks of the recruits were thinning rapidly. The workout consisted of a dozen rounds on the track, a shower and rub down. Though the thing itself seemed simply enough, it was apparently necessary to have something more than a mere interest in the work (for work it was) to keep up attendance. Every day or so the number of rounds was increased by one or two and inside of a month the boys were getting both morning and an afternoon run. The usual advice about eating and sleeping had been given, and the boys were living up to the letter of the law. Occasionally, during the month of March, a few days were mild enough that out-door practice could be indulged in. The first of April saw the beginning of the various branches of the sport. Though no tryouts were held, most of the boys knew what they wanted to do, and it was with difficulty that the coach kept the prospective athletes from running and jumping their heads off. The stars of the previous year were confident of their ability in their various events, and some anticipated branching off into different lines of endeavor. There were a few Sophomores who were as yet untried, and to them the coach devoted a great deal of attention. Cummins, a light, wiry Senior, really older than lie looked, was, since he had cleared the bar at ten and one half feet the year before, slated for the pole-vault. Smith, a medium sized, chunky-looking fellow, in his Junior year, was considered a good man for dashes, having run as “second string" man in the big open meet of the previous year. Rogers, the big husky Senior was known to have no equal as a shot-putter on any of the amateur teams in that part of the sae. As for the others, none had, so far, surprised anyone with his prowess, but it was supposed that coach Enwright would make athletes if anyone could. The academy had always been a close competitor for central-state titles inathletics and oratory, and it was thought that the chances for a clean sweep this year were exceptionally good. The past football season had brought them a hard-earned victory and basketball had also resulted in a glorious triumph. The fate of this embryo reputation then rested in the hands of the track and baseball teams. The pitcher and catcher and two of the infielders of the year before remained and were doing excellent work. They had won the three games played up to the time of the first track meet. To the track squad then, belonged the responsibility of saving the school reputation, and it was to them that all eyes were turned as all loyal boosters of clean athletics marched out to the field on that warm Saturday afternoon in May. Now we turn to the career of a certain young Sophomore—the young man mentioned at the beginning. Naturally bright and quick to grasp new ideas, he had graduated from grammar school with honors, and, after several years of travel, had chosen to attend the old academy, where his father had received his academic training. Not only was he of a brilliant mentality but something of an athlete as well. But the pity of it all was an habitual arrogance and a suggestion of conceit that made his friendship, at times, a painful proposition. Though the track work had been strenuous, he had had the perseverance to stay by it. It was with a feeling of confidence and expectation that he looked forward to the day of his first appearance in actual competition with boys of his own age, his own size, and whose ability he did not know and whom he had never seen before. These circumstances have a peculiar psychological effect on a boy in an interscholastic competition of any sort, and I have often wondered if they do not effect older persons in the same way. He had been picked as a high-jumper and great things were expected of him, as he had cleared the bar at five feet and six inches. He was also entered as a broad-jumper, showing great promise by having done a little over twenty feet. Two weeks before this eventful Saturday afternoon, the boys were out at the athletic field going through their usual Saturday work-out. As the coach could not well be watching two events at once, the field events were left until the last. When they were ready for the broad-jump the Senior jumper tried first so as to set the mark. He made a fairly go al jump and the voting Sophomore made an attempt, surpassing his team mate bv a few inches. The Senior winked at the coach and the coach smiled'. He tried again and fell two inches behind the first mark. The Sophomore was surprised. He then pm forth all his strength and skill and out-jumped the Senior by six inches. Again the older boy winked at the coach and again made a rather halfhearted jump, so skillfully however, that he appeared to have done his best. He made some remark about having played himself out and then retired to the gym. By this time the youngster was full of life, and his self-confidence was gaining a firm hold on him. The coach smiled and whispered a few words in passing, to the regular high-jumper, who had watched the performance, lie stayed with the youngster until they were well above five feet and then he began to allow his heels to tip the bar. After a few unsuccessful trials he gave up in apparent hopelessness. By this time the Sophomore was exuberant. For the next two weeks he kept at his track practice as usual. Everyone noticed his elation of spirit, which seemed an exaggeration of his usualcheery manner. His conversation frequently reverted to the subject held uppermost in his estimation—himself. His one redeeming feature however, was his unselfishness. Many an evening found him with his companions in the club rooms playing billiards on the “low-man” plan,—and he was a notoriously poor billiard player. Frequently he would come heme, in the early hours of the morning, after an evening with some of his friends at some up-town "••fp or some hilarious jaunt to a neighboring city. But the crowning inconsistency of hisprogram was that he actually thought the coach was ignorant of his conduct. But for certain reasons he would have been taken off the team. On the night before the track meet he attended a dance, returning home at an unusually late hour, even for him. The first meet of the season was with a very strong team from a nearby town. The two teams had always been close rivals, and his contest was regarded by critics and fans alike with very keen interest indeed. The dashes were over in very short time, one-fifth of a second being clipped off the state record for the two-hundred and twenty-yard sprint. The hurdles resulted in a sweeping victory for the home team. But in the middle distances there was no luck for them. Stillwell was forced back to second place in the half-mile after running neck and neck with his competitor to a point within twenty yards of the finish. Curtiss was completely outclassed in the quarter mile, being forced back to third place. The mile and two-mile events were also keen disappointment to the resident boosters. Carter and Flemming took second and third places, respectively. The score then stood: 34 points for us, as against 36 points for the visitors. By this time the crowd on the side-lines had nearly gone wild. The shot-put was next. Rogers, after a throw by one of his opponents, stepped forward and took his place. A hop and a skip, and then the iron ball catapulted into the air like a shell from a mortar, making a wide parabola, falling 33 feet and three inches from the circle—the state record! But in the sixteen-pound shot put and the hammer throw he was not so successful. His best trial with the shot was lost by a foul, the hammer slipped from his hands, going wild and losing several feet of distance. The best lie had clone was a first and two seconds, but the visitors had won two firsts and a second, thus increasing their lead. At this point the score was 45 to 49 against the home team. By this time things began to look bad. For some reason the managers of the meet had placed the jumping events at the end, but before the relay, which concludes the track meet. In the pole vault, Cummins easily cleared the bar at ten feet, and had one opponent in the field, as he began to go above that mark. In placing his pole for the leap he did not fix the point firmly in the hole. As he was nearly ready to throw himself over, the point of the pole slipped in its socket and destroyed his balance. He struggled in vain to regain it, and then plunged back upon the cinder path, striking upon head and shoulders. He was taken to the dressing room senseless and badly bruised, unable to continue. His opponent, however, was unable to go higher and tied for first place. Cummins’ second string man received third place, bringing the score to 5053 in their opponents’ favor. It was then up to the jumpers to save the day.1 The young Sophomore was given first trial by lot, in the broad jump. In the excitement he lost his stride and came to the take-off on the wrong foot. He put forth his best effort, however, and fell eighteen feet from the board. His opponent beat him by nearly eigheen inches. Then came a piece of bad luck that took the joy out of life for the youngster. His partner, in stepping on the board placed his foot too for forward and turned his ankle under his entire weight. 'This, increased by the speed he had gained, gave his ankle a tremendous wrench. He fell, head first, into the pit. rolling and groaning in agony. Now that the responsibility rested with him alone, the young Sophomore went to pieces. His next trial fell short of either of those of his opponent by several inches, and his last attempt was futile by his falling back on hands, in an endeavor to gain a little as his feet struck the sand, Fifty-three to fifty-nine was the score that kept staring him in the face as the trainer rubbed him down in preparation for the high-jump. The awful responsibility of winning or losing this meet might rest upon him, and him alone. Nothing but a miracle could save them now. He and his team-mate simply had to win their event. In so doing, they would win by the narrow margin of one point. The contestants had gone well up the standards, to a point over five feet, when the young Sophomore noticed a stiffness and a sort of exasperating and helpless feeling creeping over his limbs. Then again fortune frowned on them. His mate, in attempting for the third and last time to clear the bar, spiked himself and was unable to continue. The Sophomore, in a frantic attempt, on the third trial, jumped too far from the standards and carried the bar to the ground with him. Their opponent cleared the bar. He had done his best, but what did it amount to in the crucial moment? His strength had gone from him in his time of greatest need, and with it had gone his self-confidence. But the greatest of all humiliations was the accusation of his conscience. His school-mates knew of his past conduct, and insistently and impolitely reminded him of it. He could say that he had done his best, but who would believe him when everyone knew how he had prepared himself to do his best. In this hour of humiliation he made a resolution, and in it he placed all the force of his being. The old coach, student of human nature that he was, saw the change and understood.SENIOR SOCIETY Owing to many interruptions which occurred during the school year, the war activities, and the numerous duties of the Seniors, only a few social gatherings were held. The first party was given at the home of era Callender, on Sept. 23, I9t7-This being Vera's birthday. The party was a surprise to Vera, and was reported to have been a great success. In honor of one of our classmates, P.irdie Morrisson, who was leaving for the winter, a party was given at the home of Hazel Newman. A great deal of mystery surrounded the party but each one present claims to have had a very agreeable time. During the cold weather months only one bob sled party was attempted, which was apparently all they cared for. Owing to a misunderstanding as to the number in the party, we were late in starting and did not arrive at the home of Prof. Rogers, at Salem, the place appointed, until 11:30 p. m. Mrs. Rogers, however, was waiting for us with cups of steaming coffee and an excellent lunch, and throughout the evening proved herself a very able and hospitable hostess. The horses were unused to hard work, and on the way over several of us had to walk, and the young people were further inconvenienced by fatigue so that they were not able to start for home until 2 a. m., and did not arrive in Angola until 6:30 a. m. Only a few members were unable to attend school the next day and the bob load will long be remembered as one of the many good things which has been attempted and brought to a successful ending by the class of “1918.'’ t JUNIOR CLASS SOCIETY The Junior class of T8 has always been the class ready for a good time. “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy." is one of our mottoes. Along with our school work we are always to adyand willing to join all social gatherings which are afforded throughout the year. The first school function of the year was a party given at the home of Chelsea Brown. About seven thirty in the evening, seven automobile loads of Juniors left Angola and arrived about eight o'clock at Chelsea’s home. Then the fun began. The rooms were large, games plentiful and every one was injust the right spirit to have a good time. At midnight lunch was served followed by all the sweet juicy melons we could eat. Later the party disbanded and we all left for home in the first snow storm of the season. One Friday evening the Junior class was entertained by Kenneth Zimmers at his home in the country. This time we assembled at Carpenter's Floral store and left for Kenneth’s in machines. The evening was spent playing games, singing and dancing. At about eleven o'clock we all passed into the dining room and refreshments were served. At an early hour in the morning after everyone had proclaimed a jolly good time, the "little old Fords" (but they weren't all Fords) rambled right along back to Angola with a crowd of very tired Juniors. At another time a crowd of patriotic Junior boosters assembled and went to see the basket ball game. There's more than one way to have a good time, especially when we know there are good results coming for that is the night we won the Booster Banner and we’ve kept it ever since. The Junior class was very pleasently entertained at the home of Prof. H. B. Allman. After the guests had arrived they listened to a number of selections on the Victrola after which different games were played. At about eleven-thirty lunch was served. Soon afterward however all departed reporting Mr. and Mrs. Allman royal entertainers. One club has been organized called the J. G’s., a jolly crowd of eight girls. Several times they have attended the picture show together, but the best time was when they watched the old year out and the new year in at W ilma Slade's. After attending the movies earlier in the evening they took turns at popping corn and then told stories while eating apples and pop corn. Card games and dancing were the main features of the evening. At eleven thirty refreshments were served during which time the ringing of bells told them all that the old year had gone out and that 1918 had rolled in. The Junior class of 18 was entertained at the home of Russell C. Cravens on the evening of November 2. Russell proved an efficient and cordial host. After many games and some good music on the mandolin and piano, refreshments were served. This delicious repast was followed by more games and music. On another evening Emmett McClue entertained our class at his home on North Wayne St., after a basket ball game. After playing our usual games, patriotic that we are, to our stomachs and to the war, we enjoyed a dainty war lunch of cheese sandwiches, dillpickles and coffee. It certainly is too bad that the Sophomore boys don't get enough to eat at home: nevertheless we we had a bountiful feast and were glad to share with the poor hungry souls. The evening progressed in the usual way and our only regret was that the night wasn’t longer. rc left in the hours of the morning thinking this one of the most enjoyable times of the year. Another one of our parties was at the home of Carlton Fink. Their player piano afforded us good music and games were played throughout the evening. About eleven o’clock refreshments were served and later all departed reporting a good time.SOPHOMORE SOCIETY The first Sophomore party was given at the home of Clara Hirsch, Saturday evening, October 18, 1917. About thirty were present. The evening was spent in playing games, in which Mr. and Mrs. Allman took part and helped all to have a fine time. Luncheon was served, consisting of sandwiches, pickles and punch. George Borst was an out of town guest At a late hour the party disbanded, Clara will long be remembered by the class for the good time she gave them. Harold Zimmer royally entertained the Sophomore class at a party given at his country home, Jan. 12. Twenty of us assembled at the Hetzler home at seven o’clock, where a bob sled was waiting to be filled. Sleighing was good and the five miles were made remarkably short by songs and by story telling. Light boys who wished to be exclusive went in cutters. The evening was spent in playing games and dancing. A delicious luncheon of oysters and crackers pickles, fruit salad and cake was served by Mrs. Zimmer Evidently all ate too much for on the way home some of the members had to walk. All declared they had had a good time, one of “the best times ever.” FRESHMAN SOCIETY In October the Freshmen were entertained at Sander’s cottage at Crooked Lake. At five o'clock all members of the class met at the school building where a large hay rack was awaiting them. The way was made to seem shorter by singing any story telling. A fine supper was served as soon as they reached the cottage. And it was followed by a marshmallow roast. At a late houl the guests departed for home. All reported a fine time. Beulah Boyers entertained the Freshmen at a Hallow’een party Nov. 1st, Everyone came masked. Games and music were the main features of the evening. A Hooverized lunch of apples and popcorn was served. A good time was enjoyed by all.THE COLLEGE SIREN Under the personal direction of Charles E. Shank Billy Bolton, a half back .................................. Bruce Boyers Peter Witherspoon AM., PhD., President of Atwater College. Minard Rose Hiram Bolton 1)1).. LED.. President of K. H. R. R........... Fred Gav “Matty” McGowan, a trainer ................................... i .oil Graf Hon. Elam Hicks, of Spartamville .......i............... Clarence Chrysler ‘‘Bub" Hicks, a Freshman ..................................... Paul 'Gay Jack Larabee, the Football coach ..................... Harry Holderness Copernicus Talbott, post-graduate tutor .............. Russel Flaishans “Silent" Murphy, center rush ................................ Enos Parsell “Stub” Talmage. a busy undergraduate ........................ Wade Libey Tom Pearson, right tackle ............................ Roscoe Crissinger Students Ollie Mitchell Dick McAllister “Jimsy” Hooper Ora Harmon Paul Butz Robert Cole Town Girls Ludla Chubbs Bertha Tyson Sally Cameron Josephine Barclay Ruth Alton Florace McCcol Dorothea Pence Ruth Zabst Rachael Bohner Ethel Eckert Daniel Tibbetts, the town marshal .......................... Frank Tiffany Jane Witherspoon, the College Widow........................... Gonda Gares Bessie Banner, an athletic girl ............................ Mildred Wolfe Flora Wiggins, a prominent waitress ................................. Marie Ellis Mrs. Promplev Dazelle, a grass widow ....................... Florence Mast Students Vera Myers, Esther Harir.cn, Hazel Newman, Vera Callender, Lillian 'Bay lor. Bertrice Wilcox, Grace Stiefel, Bertha Johnson. Football Team Russel Cravens, Gail Slump, Wesley Ralston. tLyle McBride, Emmet Parrot, Emmet McClue, Gaylord Crain. After much “watchful waiting” and several months of indecision the Senior class was notified that Mr. Shank would return from his work in Northwestern University during his midyear vacation of ten days and would direct the annual play. Ten days was considered an absurdly short time and considerable doubt was expressed as to the success of the undertaking. But Ur. Shank told us that we could do it and then proceeded to see to it that we did it—with the result that we produced the most difficult play in the shortest time of any class in the history of the school. We got right to work, and, with few exceptions, every day meant three rehearsals of from two to four hours each. Even until the last but little complaint was expressed as to the fatigue which such work failingly brings to amateurs. Some anxiety as to its success was caused by talk of closing the school on account of a threatened epidemic of diphtheria. A pot-luck supper was served for the Senior class in the chorus rooms of the opera house by the Senior girls, and while there was an abundance of everything to eat, nothing remained but empty dishes. While not according to Hoyle or Hoover, it furnished an admirable occasion for the members of the class to enjoy the opportunity of being together in a social way once more before we separate. In Memoriam Donald G. Stullar. Our days begin with trouble here, Our life is but a span And cruel death is always near. So frail a thing is man. Donald G. Stullar entered the Angola High Schools in 1914 as a member of the eighth grade. He continued as a member of the present Junior class until the occurrence of the tragedy which resulted in his death. He was ever active in his school interests. As a student and classmate he was a general favorite, and bis relationship with teachers and fellow students was always pleasant.' During these years of association his life had become interwoven in an intimate way with the life of the school, and the fatal accident cast a deep shadow of sorrow over the entire community. Our memory of him should be hallowed and sacred. There is no death! What seems so is transition. This life of mortal breath Is but a suburb of life Elysian, Whose portals we call death.BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA The Boy Scout movement is supposed to have originated in England. Lieut.-Gen., Sir Robert S. S. Baden—Powell was successful in enrolling hundreds of thousands of boys in the movement. Soon organizations were formed in France, Italy, Germany, and all the foreign countries. The idea was brought to America, and in Feb., 1910, the movement was incorporated. In June, 191b; the organization was given a federal charter protecting the name, unifoim. badges, insignia, etc. The movement, in the United States has for its head a body of men known as the National Council. The headquarters are in New Ycrk. T1 is Council is composed of well known business men from all parts of the country. The movement has for its honorary president, Hon. Woodiow Wilson, Pres, of the United States. The honorary vice presidents are Hon. William H. Taft, and Col. Theodore Roosevelt. The president of the organization is Colin H. Livingstone. In large towns a local council, composed of business men, has charge of the scout work. They appoint Scoutmasters for the various troops. Under the local council comes the troop committee which is also composed of business men. These men have charge of the work of their respective troops. Next comes the Scoutmaster, who has the real oversight of the troop. There may also ke one or more assistant scoutmasters. Each troop is divided into patrols, composed of eight boys each. At the head of each patrol is a patrol leader and an assistant. The first boy scout troop in Angola was organized in 1911 by Prof. Ferrara, of Tri-State college. When Mr. Ferrara moved away, a few months later, the troop broke up. Scout work was introduced into the chautauqua program in 1912 and in Sept., of the same year James Hall organized a troop, but he also had to give up the work on account of the increase of his work. The next troop was organized in Feb. 1916 by Wymond Ritter. This troop has been in operation ever since. Last year Stanley Castell and Dono Wolfe were assistant scoutmasters but they are now in the army. Scoutmaster ......... Assistant Scoutmasters ................ Wymond Ritter Roscoe Crissinger, Wade Libey First Patrol (Fox) 1 arvin Spade, P. L. .' delbert Shank, Asst. P. L. Oris Armantrout James Baker Frederic Graf Bayne Morley 1 e nard Slaybaugh Austin Brokaw .Second Patrol (Stag) Wayne Swift P. L. Karl Mast, Asst. P. L. Oscar Pence '' aurice Auston Fmmett Spade Hugh Miller Joseph Weicht Wm. Paul Croxton Third Patrol (Eagle) Mark Croxton, P. L. Don Hammond, Asst. P. L. Douglass Emerson Gerald Hubbell Lawrence Wolfe Allen Green Edgar Field s Walter Gorden Francis Alspacht“BERT” 1 All you have to do at A. H. S. is to mention the name of Bert and every one knows who you mean. He has become such an important part of the regular school life that we not only7 greatly respect him, but regard him as one of the faculty,—We just simply could not do without him. He is a lover of music and rendered valuable service to the school orchestra, an organization which has made an excellent showing in this its first successful year.ATHLETICS The work in athletics this year has been very successful. We believe that a strong atl letic association is of value to any high school. If athletics are properly conducted, they not only promote physical development and good morals, but also create enthusiasm in the regular school work. It has been the custom, therefore, to place an eligibility restriction on membership of all athletic teams of this school, as required by the state association. On account of financial conditions, the college has very kindly consented to give us the use of the gymnasium this year. The only requirement was that we pay all running expenses. The following are the officers of the association: President ......................................... Vice-President .................................... Secretary ......................................... Treasurer ......................................... Yell Leader ....................................... Ass’t. Yell Leader ................................ •• Mr. Harsh . L. D. Crain . . Vera Myers Mark Croxton . Wade Libey Carlton Smith Schedule ol Basket Ball Games r. A. II. S. vs Auburn at Angola, ?—14. 2 A. H. S. vs Fort Wayne C. C. H. S. at Angola, 30—16. • 3. A. H. S. vs Albion at Angola. 35—9 4. A. H. S. vs Montpelier at Angola, 27—19. 5. A. H. S. vs Waterloo at Angola, 53—3. 6. A. H. S. vs Auburn at Auburn, 15—14. 7. A. H. S. vs Flint at Angola, 28—17. 8. A. 11. S. vs Kendallville at Kendallville, 28—34. 9. A. H. S. vs Ligonier at Angola, 25—9. 10. A. H. S. vs Fort Wayne C. C. II. S. at Fort Wayne, 13—19. it. A. II. S vs Coldwater at Angola, 41—15. 12. A. H. S. vs Albion at Albion. 16—18. 13. A. H. S. vs Pleasant Lake at Angola, 20—14. 14 A. II. S. vs Pleasant Lake at Pleasant Lake, 16—26. ig. A. H. S. vs Pioneer at Angola, 34—15.ENOS PARSELL. Guard, Captain. “Enick” is the three-year veteran cf the 1918 squad. He started subbing on the varsity in his Sophomore year, and each year since then he has held a regular position on the “five." Being a player of long experience and having been started well under the direction of Calahan, he was an invaluable player; he was recognized as the be:t player on the ’18 squad. PRANK TIFFANY. Guard. “Tiff" subbed in a few games last year but did not begin his active work until this season. During the first few games of the season he held down a forward’s position. Owing to the introduction of new players and a number of changes in the lineup, he was shifted to the positon of back guard, Parsell playing the floor. The two made a strong defensive pair. PAUL HUTZ. Forward. “Butzie’ began his career by caging the ball for the class team in its Sophomore year. His first appearance as a varsity man, however, was on the ’18 squad. Playing first back and then floor forward he distinguished himself by his exceptionally fast, brainy playing and his unerring aim. He was the fastest, quickest man on the squad. NAMES OF THE PLAYERS Glassburn, guard. Basset, forward. Culver, forward. White, coach. Butz, forward. Capt. Parsell, guard. Tiffany, guard. Clark, center and Crain, guard, are not in this picture.y[r. A.: “Gail, what is the matter with Byron today?” Gail S.: “He’s home with the toothache.” Mr. A.: “You tell Byron to have that tooth pulled.” Gail: “He’s having it pulled.” Gonda G. (looking at picture of Lincoln in the office) : “Say, was Lincoln’s one eyebrow really higher that the other?” MinardR.: “Why not? He was a high brow, wasn’t he?” Bruce Boyers is taking lip culture at Pleasant Lake. Prominent Positions Held by A. H. S. Students. Enos Parsell ..................... Russel Flashians ................. Fred (jay ........................ Frank Robertson .................. Russel Cravens ................... Marie Ellis ...................... Glen Culver....................... Lawrence Bohner, Oris Armentrout President of the gum chewers union. .............. High School Comedian ............• ■. . The English Shark ................... All A student .................. The Work Fiend ................ The Puritan Maid ................Hen Pecked Henry .................. Percy and Ferdie Seventh Grader (seeing Mr. White and Miss Cooley walking together): “Another job for a catholic preacher.’” Miss P.: “Did you understand what she said, Eleanor?” Eleanor: “All but one word.” Miss P.: “What was the word?” Mr. Allman: “What became of the men Athens sent to capture Syracuse?” Emmet P.: “Why a few of them were captured but I darsn’t tell where the rest of them went.” ....Freshman definition: “Pajamas are two-cylinder nighties. Contents of a note found on a Freshman’s desk: “Dear Alice—Have you been invited to Guy Miller”s party? If not will you go with me? Please excuse my writing to you instead of speaking, but I never found it convenient to do so.” Heard at a Brotherhood Party: Ralph R.: “Kiss me Alice.” Alice Gregg: “Well, I should say not!” Fred Gay in History: “Edison discovered the telephone.” Herman M. (erasing a pencil mark off Eleanor's hand in English II). Miss P.: “Well, Herman, if you want to hold her hand, you may.” Mr. Keep tells the Business Eng. class that he didn’t have much to say about deportment the first period but that he expects to be in on the killng the next time. Mr. Harsh: “Those of you sitting double may change.” Mr. Allman: “Who was Hannibal’s father?” Wayne Parsed: “Something like broken handcar.” (Hamilcar Barca.) Found on Sophomore test papers: Wirnon, Sarha, Henery, Fighest, ’.neat-able, spocken, anther, leanic poetry, ritch, ternument, Cooper’s Ivanboe, Tails of a Wayside Inn, Tom Saver, Silent Marmion (for Silas Marner). Mr. Harsh: “Now you Junior boys quit talking.” Martha W.: “I haven’t said a word.” Miss Powell (Eng. II): “Clarence, what have you read?” Clarence M.: “I have red hair.” Ethel and Maurice Meet. Ethel: “Hello, Maurice.” Maurice P.: “E-lope.” We always laugh at the teacher’s jokes No matter what they may be, Not because they are funny jokes, But because it's policy.Say, did you ever hear Algy bray? (Algebra). Miss Powell (in Eng. I) : “Oris, tell me what I might ask in a test?” Oris A.: “You might ask too many questions.” Miss Gilmore: “But Lyle, if a triangle had two right angles given where would the third one come in?” Lyle McB.: “Why, ’er, it wouldn’t come in.” Roscoe C. (Eng. IV) : “I believe I should like to read the Jungle Books.” Miss Powell: “Yes, they are usually enjoyed by children from twelve to fifteen.” Mr. Harsh (Lat. i) : “No, Irene, you're declining it wrong, you are losing something.” Miss Powell (Eng. I) : “Lawrence, what does conflagration mean?” Lawrence B. “Big time or pow-wow.” Heard in the Assembly room. Mr. Allman: “Freshmen make their shifts.” Mr. Harsh: “Assembly bunch pass.” Gonda G.: “My, 1 hope we have veal cutlets for dinner.” Rachel B.: “Oh, next week we are going to have lots of them, dad’s going to butcher a hog.’” Miss P. (Eng. i) : “Marion, will you read that sentence again? I didn’t understand it.” Marion P.: ‘‘I didn’t either.’” Mr. Allman (His. 3) : “Freed, what is a Mayfield?” Freed E. “A large ship, I guess.” Question: “How does the Columbia River resemble Clyde Spade?” Answer: "B is long, shallow and has a very wide mouth.’” Paul G. “De Sota discovered the Mississippi R. He went up and came down.” Guy Bair (quoting Patrick Henry) : “Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? forbid it, God Almighty. (Almighty God.)Mr. Allman: “If you had never studied Latin it would be hard for you to translate a page from Ceasar.’’ Herman M.: “It is anyway.” Florence M. “What date is yours?” (Meaning copy of city ordinances.) Wade L.: “Sunday nights, mostly.” Mr. A.: “Ollie, aren’t you ashamed to be down in this office so much?” Ollie.: “Oh, gee, no—I’ve been in lots tougher places than this.” Miss P. (Eng. i) : “Is the sentence, “He ran out of the barn.” correct?" Esther A.: “No, omit the “of” say ‘‘He ran out the barn.” Pauline Miller: “Don't you think we are regular angels, Frank?” Frank R.: “I’ll never repent of my sins if all the angels are like the Sophomores.” Clyde Spade: “Joseph was favored by his father because he was the smallest of the twelve brothers.” Mr. A.: “You haven’t the slighest chance, have you Clyde?” Hr. Harsh: “A woman's tears will move a man quicker than anything else.” Dorothea P.: “Mine never seem to feaze my father, at all.” Miss Gilmore: “Claud, what is a pyramid?” Claud C.: “What page did you say?” Mr. Allman doesn’t know whether Pleasant Lake is incorporated or not but thinks that some of the Seniors know it is on the map. Freed E. (Bus. Eng., parsing,.“was.”)j “Was, is a pronoun.” If the room becomes too hot, open the back door and see the fire-escape. Mrs. Barron (Teaching Nutritional Physiology) : “Marie, can you give me an example of where the cells are similar?” Marie E.: Oh, yes, in the county jail.” Can you imagine anything worse than a giraffe with sore throat?” Yes, a centipede with corns. Freed E. (Bus. Eng., giving the principal parts of a sentence.) : “President, is the bare subject.” (Grand Hub-bub.)Miss Powell: “What does percute mean?” Lawrence B.: “Harness, I guess.” FRESHMEN DON’TS Don't go to class; let the other fellow go. Don’t apologize to the prof, for flunking, the reason is plain. Don’t waste the time of the class by asking foolish questions. Don't stop in the pool room more than ten times a day. Don't give advice, take it from the Seniors. Miss Powell: "Freed, how do you spell Revolutionary?” Freed E.: “R-e-o-v-o-n-a-l-i-t-a-r-y.” Miss P.: “X-Y-Z-, etc.” Miss Powell: “How was Cooper especially fitted to write stories of Indian and backwood’s life?” Freed E.: “He was in the navy two years.” Teacher in assembly room to a poor Sophomore: ‘‘You’re not fit for decent company, come over here with me.” Emmet P. (Geom. 3) : “All lines eqi idistant Pom a point, etc.1 It was cold And she was cold too And I—well wouldn’t you? If it was cold And she was cold too. —Roscoe Crissinger. If it takes brass to make a boiler, how far is it to Pleasant Lake? Mr. Harsh (finding Ray Glassburn reading a magazine) : “You’re cutting your own throat.” Ray: “Well let her bleed.” Miss P.: “Now Emmet, you must think.” Emmet: “It will take me too long.” Emmet Me., (translating German) : “They tied him to the bed-posts. Mr. Harsh “Well how many bed-posts could they tie one man to?” Emmet: “Why four of course.” Mr. Harsh: “Well that would be quite an experience.” Mildred W.: “He wrote a book, “Honeymoon,” I guess it was a farce.” Miss P.: “Yes, it usually is.”Class Pins Class Rings Engraved and Embossed Commencement and Wedding Invitations Athletic Medals-Trophies Write for catalogue. Samples submitted on request BASTIAN BROS. CO., 626 Bastian Bldg. Rochester, N. Y. Have you seen our pins and rings from BASTIANS? Old Clothes Are more valuable than you might imagine. To have them properly cleaned and repaired means they will last a longer time and we make them look like new ones. We sterilize them too; that helps to prolong their life. MAY WE CALL FOR SOME OF YOUR CLOTHES Hats cleaned and re-blocked Ross H. Miller Smoke New Love Cigars 6cExtract from a Senior exam paper: “The causes of the Revolutionary war were the secession of the states, slavery and also Spain’s treatment of Cuba.” Latin is a dead, dead language, As dead as it can be. It killed off all the Romans, And now it’s killing me. She: “There’s just two things that prevent you from being a good dancer.” He: “What are they?” She: “Both feet.” Marie E. (Eng. 4) : “The book said he walked eighty miles to college. Seems to me that's a long way to walk to school. Ruth Z. (locating the Suez Canal) : “It’s between Canada and the United States, around the Great Lakes I guess.” Miss P. (reading from a poem): “What hath night to do with sleep?” ‘‘That’s what some of you people think.” Wade L. (New Years morning): “Gee my arms ache.” (We wonder why.) Mr. Harsh (reading from board in room D.) : “Seniors should have a warm place in which to spend the last hour.” “Perhaps they will.” A SOPHOMORE CONCEPTION OF GEOMETRY Theorem: A poor lesson is better than a good lesson. Proof: 1. Nothing is better than a good lesson.-Faculty. 2. A poor lesson is better than a good lesson. - Sophomores. Therefore a poor lesson is better than a good lesson.--Q. E. D. Mr. Allman: “L. D., how do you pronounce Lacedaemon?” L. D. Crain: “Lak-a- de- mon’.” Edna Stetler (giving an oral composition) : “—and we were going to shovel some snow away so’s tuh make it more--a—a--er—well, slidable.” Harry H. (His. 4 discussing early colonists) : “These people ate off these other ones.” k ------------- Mr. Allman: “Robert, define government.” Robert Cole: “It’s some system.”You don’t need field glasses to see that KUPPENHEIMER STYLES For young men are far in the lead mmnsoisiMiss Powell: “What is a child called who reads and writes when very young?” Guy Bair: “I think it is called ‘‘ferocious.” Paul B. (At Harshman’s) : “I’ve got a date at 10:30 tonight.” Minard R.: “What? A parlor date?” Paul: “No, I've got to go after my girl. She’s at a five-hundred party.” Minard: “Well I’ve heard of four-hundred clubs in the city but I didn’t know that there were five hundred in one club in Angola.” Mr. Allman: “Some of my ancestors went to Huntington and Logansport, that’s where I came from.” Mr. Allman (His. 3 calls on Emmet P. who is sleeping). Emmet (waking up) : “What?” Mr. A.: “Oh, nothing, that’s what I’ll put down after your name.” Butzie’s Verse. I took Ruth riding in my new Ford car, In the seat right side of me I hit a bump at fifty-five And drove on Ruthlessly. Bruce’s Verse. Bruce kissed her on the cheek, It seemed a harmless frolic; He's been laid up for a week. They say, with painter”s colic. Louie’s Verse One hour a day to study, Five hours to go to school, Three hours in which to get some sleep, And fifteen hours for pool. The Freshmen saw a patch of green They thot it was the Senior class, But lo, they looked again and found It was a looking glass. Lives of Seniors all remind us. We can make our lives sublime And by asking foolish questions Take up recitation time. —The Freshmen.Mast "Br Meat Market Try Glover’s Treatment for Dandruff Adams Bender The Place that gives Satisfaction Light Machine Repairing Bicycles and Lawn Mowers a specialty New too’s and good work HEBER WOOD O. B. Galloway Bring that Car to the DENTIST Angola Garage at For Repairs Pleasant Lake, Ind. Phone 23 rrr-rr: at Price and Work Right Special treatment given to Pyorrhea Phone 479Wail of the Freshmen. Seniors were born for great things, Sophies were born for small, But it has never been recorded Why Freshmen were born at all. Poor Paul. Paulibus kissibus Ruthibus orum Ruthibus likebus, wanta somorum, Papibus hearibu ksissi somorrn, Kickibus Paulibus out de dorum. WANTS, LOST, FOUND, etc. WANTED—AT ONCE— A deaf gentleman with brass nerve, iron will, comprehensive ivory dome and a devoted soul, to manage the 1919 Spectator, said person also must have no heart and be willing to die for a lost cause. May begin work at once. Apply to the Juniors. None but those qualified need apply. WANTED—My life insured— Clyde Spade. WANTED— A smile from Miss Gilmore—Everybody. WANTED—A steady. May be either tall or short, dark or light and must have either a Packard or Ford. Apply at once. No Recommendations required. First applicant will receive the position. Pauline Hanselman. WANTED—Classes to listen to my lectures on “How, When and Why to laugh.” Also one class that does not bray. WANTED— A new brand ol credits.—Student body. NOTICE—Agony orchestra practice tonight at 7130. WANTED—Weight proportional to my height. — Florence Mast. LOST AND FOUND. FOUND—The girl of my dreams —Herman Mast. FOUND— Orris A.’s silk hand kerchief in my desk.— Alice Fackey. LOST OR STRAYED— My n. clination to study. — James Baker. LOST—A recitation period. Fred Gay. FOUND—A shoe string in Room E.— Eleanor Terry. LOST—An ounce of flesh. Reward. Ruth Zabst. FOUND— Esther Andres’ kid gloves in my coat pocket. Ronald Owens.If you have never had a bank account start one right now and gold pinions will soon wave over your head Look up and never down. A hopeful attitude will bring a new world to you. Angola Bank Trust Co.Kolb Bros. Next Door to Post Office DRUGS Base Ball Goods Tennis Goods Books and Stationery When in need of a HAIRCUT Remember Slade Porter 221 W. Maumee Samuel C. Wolle, D.D.S. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii Zipfel Block Angola - - Ind. Angola Monument Company Would appreciate any business you have in their line 20 W. Gilmore Street E. M. Hetzler Prop. All lettering done by compressed air tools J. D. Becker DENTIST Angola - - Ind Office over American Express Co. Phone 324 Celluloid Explodes Don’t wear Celluloid Collars they are dangerous Wear pure white Linen We keep it white ModernSteam Laundry10— Glad to see yer back? 11— Freshmen of ’17 get the medal for clumsiness. 12— Off for Old Settlers Day and Dedication of the monument. 13— Back again for a longer stay. 14— The Freshmen beat the Sophs, to the honor of having one of their members canned first. 17— The Freshmen are cross examined by Miss Powell. 18— There are a couple of funerals due. Mark S. and Arthur S. visited the girls cooking class. 19— Ofif early for a speech at the Court House. VVe were all there (?) 20— Miss Powell orders "that little paper, the Pathfinder” today. 21— Orris A. is a fast young fellow. He was late this morning. 24— Mr. Harsh thinks we have a very nervous bunch here by the way the feet pound. 25— James B. tries to kid Mrs. Barron but she is too old for that. 26— Address by Congressman Fairfield. 27— Chewing gum is forever banished from the A. R. 28— Baseball practice started. ft A ’ There are Two Reasons why Stafford Engravings are used in this Spectator and why they should be used in yours.... The first, of course, is quality. Through years of specializing, our organization has become unusually expert in half-tones, color plates, zinc etchings, and designs for college and school publications. We have the very best shop equipment and every facility for prompt production of quality work. The famous Levy Acid Blast process gives our half-tones a cleaner, deeper, sharper etching than the tub method most commonly used, and makes it easier for your printer to give you a first class job. The second is Stafford Co-operation. For the benefit of our customers in their dealing with us, we have prepared a valuable hand-book entitled "Engraving for College and School Publications,” containing 164 pages and over 300 illustrations, and giving complete information in regard to planning your publication, the preparation of the copy, and ordering of engravings. This book simplifies ordering, prevents costly mistakes, and means high quality engraving at lowest cost. We do not sell it—hut we lend a copy to the staff of each publication for which we make the engravings. Let Stafford make your commencement invitations, fraternity stationery, visiting cards, and auy other copper plate engraving or steel die embossing. We have a large department devoted exclusively to this class of work, and can give you both quality and service. Samples with prices on request. STAFFORD ENGRAVING CO. ARTISTS DESIGNERS ENGRAVERS This Book FREE We lend a copy of this Book to the Staff of every publication for which we make the Engravings. CENTURY BUILDING INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANAi to io—Fair. 8— Back again with a new music teacher and a new floor. 9— We are favored by a visit from Ham Jackson's dog. 10— Meeting of boys to see about military drill. 11— Mr. Allman (Hist 2.) reading from bible. “If a man cause a field or vineyard or water melon patch to be eaten, he shall make restoration or be prosecuted. 12— Athletic Association organized. 15—Freshmen think Mrs. Barron is a witch by the Gen. Sci. experiments she does. if)—a. a. memnersmp campaign started. 17—Mr. Allman (His. 3) Freed, how much of this chapter have you read? Freed : About thirty pages. Mr. Allman: There are only fifteen pages. .8—Mr. Harsh threatens to put “someone” in the “cooler.” 19—One of Wilma S. bright ones. (Hist. 3.) Matilda was old enough to be his father.” 22— -We know Mr. Allman is free from the farm but we do not think his agriculture class will learn much agriculture while listening to stories of his boyhood experiences. 23— Frank R. doesn’t think our teachers know very much because they ask so many questions. 24— Everybody is a dunce today. Oh yes, Lyman Howe last night. 25— Senior boys decide to conserve and wear corduroy trousers. 26— Mr. Allman: “If I should hand you a book of Latin, could you read it?” Herman M. (who has had Latin) : “I can’t read it anyway.” 29— Mr. Willis tells the future hosewives how to conserve food. 30— Miss Gilmore catches Richard P. whispering. “What did you say, Rich-aid?” Richard—“Nothing.” Miss G.—“Well, don’t say it so loud the next time.’ 31— Grade cards issued for the first time. OCTOBER.WHY NOT? When you want Drugs, you go to a Drug Store When you want Men’s Furnishings why not come to the only exclusive Men’s Furnishing Store la town. If it’s anything from a suit of clothes to a collar button, we always have it Dennis Triplett “Everything for men to Wear” ANGOLA, IND. Stationery Fountain Pens School Books Athletic Goods Toilet Articles KRATZ DRUG STORE Wall Paper Jap-a-lac Varnishes Stainsi to 5—Teachers’ Institute 5— “Did you forget your pencil again Frank?” “Yes.” “What would you think of a soldier who forgot his gun?” “That he was an officer.” 6— Rachel B. gave her hair its weekly combing this morning. 7— Frank T. is getting ready to enlist. He started training his feet this morning by wearing army shoes. 8— Mr. Harsh in Latin 2: “Clarence, what is the case of principibus?” Clarence: “Perfect, I think.” 9— Tag day for the Athletic Association. 12—A hair pulling match between two claimants for a T. S. C. pin was barely avoided today. 1?.—Big race last period between two Sophs with Miss Powell as judge. 14— Mr. Harsh was initiated into the R. O. S. P. tonight. 15— The goat must have given him a hard ride by his disposition. 16— Talks on Y. M. C. A. by E. D. Willis and Rev. Humfreys. 19— Ethel E. has either lost her powder puff or washed her neck again. 20— Clayton R. informs Miss Powell that her favorite expression, “Well for the dear sakes,” is slang. 21— Some seniors are studying so hard that they have to wear colored glasses. 22— Joan H.: “I should thing one would habitualize, ’er I mean commercialize him more—oh, you know, patronize him more.”’ 23— Once again we are favored by a few masterpieces on the Victrola. 26 to Dec. 10—Scarlet fever,College Inn Soda Parlor “Butter-Kist Popcorn” and Peanuts Fine line of Bulk and Box Candies You are always welcome E. J. HARSHMAN JACKSON’S Nyal Quality Drug Store The YELLOW FRONT Chas. E. Wells You can find what you want in Groceries Footwear Fruits Produce At ELSTON’S We Have the Goods Shoe Store20— Junior class benefit to-night. 21— School out for Christmas vacation. 22 to 30—Christmas vacation. 31—Back again. 10— Back again. 11— By the temperature in A. R. they are afraid we will spoil. 12— Ethel E. has a stiff neck. How about it, Fat? 13— A lone mouse reigns in Room C. 14— Mark C. and Mr. Harsh decide that the aisles should be widened. 17— Mr. Fox talks to the girls on Red Cross. 18— Mr. Seibel visits us. 19— In the absence of our regular yell leader, Wade L., Carlton S., the veteran of last year, gave us a rehearsal.Dodge Bros. Motor Cars BEST FOR THE MONEY C. A. CASEBEERJan. I, 1918—New Years and school! Oh, these war times. 2— How is Pleasant Lake, Wade L. and Bruce B.? 3— Martha —?— visits school. Freshmen all fall hard. 4— More seniors preparing for war. Hand grenade practice this time. 7—Big spiel (in length) by Superintendent Allman. (8—Sophs win banner for attendance at B. B. game. 19—The Sophs need a little class conscience, says Mr. Allman. 10— The bob-load got in early—early in the morning. 11— Catherine F. has got so used to being held that she can’t sit in a chair without falling out. 14— You would think this was a tuberculosis camp by the temperature in the A. R. 15— Juiors capture B. B. banner. 16— Miss Cooley must be snow bound somewhere. r 7—F. L. R.: “I'm afraid to tell it for fear of making a fool of myself!” (Ignorance is bliss.) 18—Miss Cooley is back at last. 21— Miss Powell: “Now stretch your imaginations for this: Suppose I wanted to marry a Catholic... .etc.” Some stretch. 22— Spectator staff has its picture taken. I23—We think our Freshman belle (you know who) must be a near relative to Sitting Bull by the noises in the A. R. 24— The Sophs find out that Bryant could read when three years old. Miss Powell: “How do you describe people like that?” Guy Bair: “Ferocious.” 25— Miss Cooley: “Name the different scales.’ Arthur S.: “Fish scales, scales to weigh things on, and music scales.” 28— The fatal days draw nigh. 29— Exams. 30— Exams. 31— Exams.If in our line Phone ninety-nine Wool Grain Seeds Onions Peppermint Oil Potatoes Beans Flour Feed Sheldon Co. Your First Thousand.... Have you earned and saved it yet? If not, you have something worth working and saving for. When you get it you will have a new interest in life and you can make it the foundation stone of larger success. Most persons with whom you come in contact in business are trying to coax some of your money away from you. On the other hand your banker is trying to help you save your money. Many FIRST THOUSANDS have been and are being saved at this bank. First National Bank Of Angola The College Book Store First Floor Administration Building Tri-State College Supplies for College and High School Students Technical Goods Drafting Supplies Drawing Paper Drawing Instruments Tracing Cloth Blue Print Paper Professional Advice Gratis Come in and see us. You are always welcome WM. A. PFEIFER Sole Owner and Manageri—A little vacation to recuperate in. 4— War Conference meeting at Christian church. 5— Tickets on sale for the big art exhibit. 6— Miss Sopha More and Mr. Geo. Metry announce their engagement. 7— Exam returns don’t look blue, but red. 8— Mr. Harsh: “Lucile, did I hear you whispering?” Lucile: ‘‘I don’t know whether you heard me or not.” ti—Bertan S. (Physics) : ”1 can't think, my feet are too cold.” Mr. Keep “Oh, I see, you think with your feet.” T2—W ade L. to Florence M.: “Hello, Tuesday.” 13— Chorus sings at Farmers’ Institute. 14— We finally get our grade cards. 15— The Sophs start Thanatopsis. 18— Address by a Red Cross nurse. 19— Orris A. opens another case. 20— Pauline M. is some bluffer—in her own estimation. 21— Our Junior B. B. star is getting childish—he walks out with the Freshmen. 22— Hurrah ! A. H. S. B. B. team beats P. L. H. S. B. B. team. 25— Mr. Harsh leaves school with the measles. 26— According to Ethel H. aereoplanes were in use in Hannibal’s time because he crossed the Alps in a fleet. 27— Lost: A powder puff. R. B. 28— Mr. Allman: “W7ho was Viriathus?” Pauline M.: “Commander of the Lusitania.”Angola Fruit Company All fancy fruit in season Sanitary Ice Cream Parlor Also fancy line of Candies Everything Neat Call and see us Tool Buying When you just buy “A Plane” what assurance have you of its quality? What will you do if its temper is poor, or if its adjustment proves defective? Buy mu mm Quality Tools and you are certain of perfect satisfaction . Each tool bears the trademark which guarantees it and k identifies it as the 9 best tool of t s d kind, Carpenter Floral Store Full line of cut flowers on hand Potted Plants of all kinds We make a specialty of Floral sprays and funeral design work Bucklin Block Phone 519 E Maumee St. Angola, Ind. In peace or in war F. E. Jackson’s is the cheapest place to trade in Steuben county We have a full line of not only the Keen Kufter Razors But we carry the Gillette, Auto-Strop, Ever-Ready, Enders, The Penn and Gem Razorsi—Rubbers are going up. Also some are coming down. 4— Mr. H. back again. 5— Mr. Seibel visits us. He hasn’t got rid of his nod yet. 6— Marbles have a tendency to drop out of even H. S. boys pockets. 7— B. B. team leaves for Kendallville. 8— What is the crepe for? 11— “Chollie” will be here tonight. 12— Where are the Seniors? 13— Emmet P. (Eng.) : “Well now this fellow died, so the girls had to hunt a new —er—companion.’” 14— Mrs. Barron treats those in the A. R. with a speech. 15— We get out a few minutes early. 18— Mr. H.: “How many of you have read Bill Nye’s history?” Joan H.: “Who wrote it?” 19— Speaker here from the State Council of Defense. 20— Senior class play tonight. 21— Spring is here. 22— The Juniors have a party. 25— Some of the Presides are getting real sporty. 26— Spring hats begin to appear. 27— Seniors B. B. team wins their third game making them champions. 28— Miss Powell and Oscar P. got real romantic the last period. 29— This finishes school—for this month.J. S. Ritter Dealer in Staple and Fancy Groceries, Fruits and Cigars Angola, Ind. Have you tried South Bend Tires They are good Stafford Lepley Bucklin Building The Old Shaver East Maumee Street JEWELRY BARBER SHOP The Gift of Gifts You’re NEXT H. N. Holderness L. J. CLAY Angola, Indiana Conservation Of All things raised in the garden should be taken care of by using the Vegetable crates manufactured by J. W. BUTZ Angola, Indiana1— Hindenburg reached Paris today—April Fool! 2— Clara Hirsch thinks old A. H. S. is good enough for her. 3— Mr. Allman wore another new tie today. This makes the eleventh in the last three weeks. 4— Mrs. Barron: “Now try this experiment on your cistern pump.” Freshman (misunderstanding) : “On your sister's pump did you say?” 5— Miss P. wears her new spring hat today. 8—Mrs. Barron: “Now ladies and gentlemen, study your diagram.” (The Freshmen object to being called children), g—This declamation question is getting on our nerves again. 10— Picture show in Hist. 4. 11— A little patriotic solo by James B. for the benefit of Esther Andres. 12— A Prohibition delegate was here today and cracked a few dry jokes. 13— 7130 o 12:30—SATURDAY SCHOOL. 15—Eng. 3 and 4 have their exam over English Literature this morning. u6—Mark S. has his semi-annual hair cut today. 17— What're yo pickin' on us for. Heyman? (Hist. 4) 18— A young lady from Purdue gave us a talk on food conservation today. 19— Fred G. (Hist. 4) : ‘‘The ambassadors to foreign countries look after the ‘triece peaties,’ etc.” 22— Chorus sang at the Prohibition meeting tonight. 23— Second day of last six weeks. 24— Grade cards issued today. 25— Mrs. Barron meets with the Senior girls. 26— The quartet is awfully disappointed because it didn’t get to sing at tfle Prohibition meeting. -9—It is well that this is the last six weeks by the looks of some grade cards. 30—The extra classes after school have quite an attendance.Hardware Furniture Implements Tin Shop Plumbing Pneumatic Water Systems Cream Seperators John 0. Matson Pleasant Lake, Ind. WM. SKINNER Cat Rate Repairing Shop First Class Repairing Best Materials Improved Methods Shoes repaired while you wait Prices reasonable S. W. Corner Public Square Angola, Indiana h. Menzenberger’s Metzgar Meizgar 5-10-25c Variety Store INSURANCE Phone 378 210 W. Maumee Street 169 W. Maumee St. Angola, Ind. Angola, Ind. Wood Creel Bratton Heckenlively Physicians and Surgeons Angola - - Ind. ATTORNEYS Office days: Wednesday and Saturdays. Angola - - Ind. Angola Geo. F. Stoner City The News Dairy and C. A. Redding Book Man 2—Mr. Harsh has decided that the Freshman Latin class is hopeless. 2— Carol W. snores so loud that he can't sleep. 3— Enos P. gives an excellent speech in Hist. 4. 4— Saturday school again. 6— Mrs. Barron: “Ned, what causes the image on the screen to be upside down?" Ned: “Well, I guess that's what we don’t know'.'’ 7— Miss Cooley must have quite a collection of marbles by this time. 8— The clock must have got tired of running an hour ahead because it was an hour behind this morning. 9— Paul Gay is too good for our Chemistry, so he goes to T. S. C. 10—Last day for boys who work on the farm. 13— Orris A. was the center of interest this morning. 14— We have chorus every day now. 15— Who ran off with Don Swift's Ford? 16— The Juniors' middle name is "More Parties." (They have one every other night now'.) 17— Mr. Keep decides that some of the Chem. students are utterly hopeless. 20— Polly Parrot sports a new $2.00 cap. 21— The new Freshman cops the beauty title. 22 —Cat peacefully matriculates in A. R. Hastily graduated in Less Peace. 23— Faculty reception. 24— Junior-Senior reception. 26— Baccalaureate address. 27— Seniors are thru. 28— Cram for exams. 29— Exams. 30— Exams. 31— Exams.Palace of Sweets The store that gives credit to Angola Where you can take your mother, sister or sweetheart Always clean; always nice No Smoking D. K. VLASTOS Prop. J. A. Shaughniss Co. Dealers in Harness and Buggies DISTRIBUTORS AUTOMOBILES REO MOTOR CARS and TRUCKS Angola, Indiana BURKETT The Barber Sterilized Tools Quick Service Good Work Give us a call The SHOP WITH THE WHITE FRONT C. A. Chadwick DENTIST Office over Angola Bank Trust Co. Phones 80 and 198 Office hours: 8:30-12: 1-4:30 L. N. Klink Funeral Director Motor Equipmenti _ Trinting Tleases Any Kind ... Any Time We’ll Treat You Right STEUBEN REPUBLICANALUMNI Married. ♦Keep, H. H................. Andrews, Frank ............ •Dickinson, Mate Carleton Avery Seth ................ ♦Mitchell, Della Chadwick Snyder, W. W................ ♦Chadwick, Will ............ ♦Marndon, Ruth Coe.......... ♦Perigo, Ella Ladue......... ♦Bigler, B. B............... ♦Branian, Jennie Sams . . . ♦Carpenter, Luna Dawson Chadwick, C. Alie.......... ♦Gilbert, Della Gale........ Kinney, Ethel Williams . . ♦Kinney, Freeman ........... ♦Gale Waldo ................ ♦Daum, Ncra Leas ........... ♦Mitchell. Ella Freeman . . . ♦Patterson, Leona Weaver Snyder, Mary .............. McConnel, Thomas .......... ♦Boozer. Ella Leas.......... ♦Brewer, Ida Weaver......... Cole, Nettie .............. ♦Dodge, Lizzie Cline ....... Eberly, Victor ............ ♦Eberly, Willis ............ ♦Lehman, Ethie Burlingame Owen, Bell................. ♦Sholtz, Louis ............. ♦Sheldon, Lizzie McConnel ♦Wells, Hattie Marrow . . . ♦Willet, Rose Weicht........ ♦Freligh, Nettie Fast....... Boon, Minnie .............. Chilson. Frank ............ ♦Crain, Z. A................ ♦Mann, Edessa Johnson . . . ♦Miller, Etta Leas .......... Beil, Frank ............... ♦Bollinger, Dora Plaster . . ♦Bcone, Acquilla............. Ettinger, zoe.............. ♦Lewis, Emily Kinney .... ♦Lewis, Grant K............. ♦Moody, Alice Sowle ........ Weiss, John ............... ♦Welch, Ada Phelps.......... ♦Gurtner, Emma Welch . . . Brown, Grace .............. ♦Crain, L. D................ ♦Emerson, Ina Craig......... Finch. Carrie ............. ♦Humphreys, Frank B. ♦Robinson, Alta Everhart . 1877 Teacher A. H. S.................Angola, Ind. 1878 1875) 1880 Wire Fence Agent 1881 1882 Dentist Bookkeeper 1883 1885 Banker 1880 R. R. Engineer Minister 1887 Physician ....... Jackson, Mich. . . Pleasant Lake, Ind. ............ Deceased. ............. Deceased. ........ Detroit, Mich. . Kansas City, Kansas. ......... Chicago, 111. St. Augustine, Florida. ....... Angola, Ind. ........ Elwood, Ind. .......... Angola, Ind. ............. Deceased. ..............Deceased. . . . . Vancouver, Wash. ............. Deceased. .......... Angola, Ind. .......... Angola, Ind. .......... Angola, Ind. ............. Deceased. . . . Washington, D. C. .......... Angola, Ind. ............. Deceased. ............... Deceased. .......... Angola, Ind. .....Lead, S. Dakota. ..... Waterloo, Ind. ..... Edwards, Miss. ............. Deceased. . . . Fort Wayne, Ind. .......... Angola, Ind. .......... Angola, Ind. ......... Bryan, Ohio. ...........Angola, Ind. ............... Deceased. ............... Deceased. . . Redfield, S. Dakota. ........St. Louis, Mo. ............. Deceased. ............. Deceased. ......... Angola. Ind. .........Chicago, 111. ............. Deceased. . . . . Cincinnati, Ohio. .....Cincinnati, Ohio. ........Fremont, Ind. ........Fremont, Ind. ........ Toledo, Ohio. ........ Toledo, Ohio. ........ Detroit, Mich. . . . . Ft. Collins, Col. ........ Angola. Ind. .....Columbus, Ohio. ......... Angola. Ind. ......... Chicago, 111.Tri-State College... Will do its utmost to prepare Teachers, Engineers, Chemists and Stenographers for the country at this lime of great need. The College will positively continue in operation as usual The demand for trained teachers and stenographers is greater than ever before. At the request of government officials it is giving a twelve weeks course in Stenography to prepare students for government positions. The Summer Quarter opens June 4, 1918 The Fall Quarter opens Oct. 1, 1918 TRI-STATE COLLEGE ANGOLA, INDIANA ♦Wickwire, Josie Barnes......................... ♦Wyandt, Mattie Purinton............. ........ 1888 ♦Bates, Georgia Kinney............................. ♦Brockway, Inez Button ......................... Crandall, Emma .....................Teacher . ♦Freeman Gula Weaver............................ ♦Lane, Millie Gates............................. ♦McCauley, Carrie Cole ......................... Williams, Nellie .............................. ♦Wood, Emma Ireland............................. 1885) ♦Gates, Fred C.................................. ♦Gilbert, Guy................................... ♦Miser, Mary Longabaugh ........................ ♦Morse, Wellington ............................. 185)0 ♦Bcbbit, Salena Carpenter....................... ♦Carpenter, Robt. H..................Editor . . . ♦Green, Elfie Freleigh Pickett ................. ♦Pattee, Chester ............................... Metzgar, Mary.................................. ♦Sheets, Jennie Slade........................... ♦Sowle, Charles......................Moulder . ♦Sowle, Irving.................................. ♦Williamson, Susie Sowle ....................... ♦Woodhull, Ray ................................. 185)1 ♦Dixon, R. L.........................Teacher . ♦Pattee, Frank ................................. ♦Robinson, Maude Watson......................... ♦Williams, Lell Richardson...................... 185)2 Benedict, Lillie .............................. Bodley, Leona ................................. ♦Craig, Ona Craig............................... ♦Laney, Etta Zipfel............................. 185):{ ♦Averill, Floyd ................................ Brooks, Anna .................................. ♦Hammond, Edna Brandeberry...................... ♦Hutchinson, Jennie Pugh........................ ♦Milhcff, Imo Gale.............................. ♦Wolf, Lena .............................Teacher ♦Wyrick, Basil.........................Editor . 185)4 ♦Allen, J. W...........................Banker ♦Allisen, Mamie Goodale ............................... ♦Brokaw, Nora Shank.................................... ♦Cook, Edith Lemmon ................................... ♦Jarrard, Bertha Sewell................................ ♦Roose, Nellie Day..................................... ♦Shearer. Mary Pugh.................................... Walls, Lunetta ......................Teacher....... 1805 ♦Brown, Harry ........................Salesman .... ♦Carpenter, Royal J...................Banker .......... ♦Evans, Tillie Stayner................................. ♦Field, Arthur ........................................ ♦Jarrard, Wm.......................... Clerk........ ♦Jeffery, Kate Ireland................Clerk ........... ♦Metzgar, Irvin ......................Insurance Pugh. Tillie ........................Clerk......... ♦Redding, Mamie Gale................................... ♦Roby, Dorothy Fisher ................................. ♦Shank, Emmet E.......................Lumber Dealer ♦Singler, Edna Hirst .................................. 1800 ♦Benedict, Della ...................................... ♦Brandeberry, H. K....................Farmer........ ......... Angola, Ind. ....... Bryan, Ohio. ....... Hiram, Ohio. . . . Camden, Mich. .......Rahway, N. J. ......... Angola, Ind. . . . Fort Wayne, Ind. Buckhannan, W. Va. ....... Lincoln, Neb. ........... Deceased. . . . . Cleveland, Ohio. . . . Fort Wayne, Ind. ..... Waterloo, Ind. . . Los Angeles, Cal. Sedro Wooley, Wash. ........El wood, Tnd. Bowling Green, Ohio. Mt. Pleasant, Mich. ...... Angola, Ind. ..... Fremont, Did. ...... Decatur, Ind. . Indianapolis, Ind. . . Fort Wayne, Ind. . . Fort Wayne, Ind. . . . . Lansing, Mich. .... Durand, Mich. ....... Angola, Ind. ...... Angola, Ind. .......... Deceased. ..... Toledo, Ohio. .....Detroit, Mich. ... Cleveland, Ohio. .....Portland, Ore. ...... Angola, Ind. ....... Ashley, Ind. .....Lebanon, Ind. Mountain View, Cal. . . Vancouver, Wash. ....... Chicago, 111. ....... Muncie, Ind. ....... Angola, Ind. ....... Angola, Ind. .......... Deceased. ...... Angola. Ind. ..... Topeka, Kan. ........Angola, Ind. ......Toledo, Ohio. , . . . Mansfield, Ohio. ...... Angola, Ind. Pleasant Lake, Ind. ....... Angola, Ind. ......Angola, Ind. .......Orland, Ind. ....... Angola, Ind. . . Kendallville, Ind. ....... Angola, Ind. . . . Hillsdale, Mich. ......Angola, Ind. ..... Dunkirk, Ind. . Los Angeles, Cal. ..........Metz, Ind,The Necessities of Life Board, Clothing, Education and Life Insurance You can be certain of not having lived in vain, financially, if you hold a Life Insurance Policy Ask us to explain our new 23-year endowment policy. It is without question the most modern policy sold in Indiana If ycu want the best for the money Buy of Adolph Seibel “The Lincoln Life Man” Kodak Finishing We do expert kodak finishing. Let us have a chance to prove it to you with your next film DEVELOPING PRINTING Vest pocket size rolls and smaller 10c per roll All other sizes 6 exposure rolls 15c per roll 10 and 12 exposure roll and all film packs 25c each Vest pocket size and smaller, 3c 2'AxB'A, 4 cents 2}4x4'4, 3 4x3 4 and 3Ax4A, 5c each 3Ax5h and post cards 6 cents Write your name on the film and bring or send it to us, send ing money enough to cover your order and postage We finish only the good ones, and for those not good we will reture the price of the prints Cline’s Photograph Gallery Angola, IndianaI ♦Clark, Sadie Robinson . . . Enzor, Freeman K........... ♦Goodale, Eva Morse.......... •Crail, Blanche Kemery . . fl♦Swartz, Anna Bogis ♦Love, Lula Slade ........... ♦McGrew, Lela More .......... ♦Richards, Lillie Oreweler . Townsend, Deborah ......... Westenhaver, Estella Post ♦Neihouse, Myrtle Shank . . ♦Philley, June Smiley .... ♦Willennar, Vera Field . . . ♦Williams, Lina Jacob ♦Estrick, Florence Moore . ♦Isenhower, Charles.......... ♦Luse, Clela Powers ......... ♦Ryan, Audra Orton .......... Somers, John .............. ♦Blass, Rlaph ............... ♦Dirrim, Blanche Garwrood . ♦Green, Ncla Butler ......... ♦Markham, Mabel Rose . . . ♦Miller, Maude .............. ♦McNaughton, Earl............ ♦McNaughton, Pearl Ford . Miller, Will J............. ♦Nyce, James It.............. ♦Shank, Erman ............... ♦Waller, Will F.............. ♦Gillis, Robt..................... ♦McIntyre, Etta Carey ♦Sheffcr, Sam E................... ♦Smith, L. C...................... ♦Stevens, Edith Hale . ♦Waller, Tina Elya . . . Zipfel, Glen ..................... ♦Gale, Louis ..................... ♦Gordon, Wava Poland ♦Janes, Vera Gilbert . ♦McGrew, Jennie Stahl ♦Neal, Paul ...................... ♦Puriton, Laura Kannel ♦Regan, Iva Morse . . . ♦Ritter, Clyde ................... ♦Torrence, Clela Kirk Beard, Mabel ............... Carey, Nellie .............. ♦Hickman, Vera Castell . . Crain, Grace ............... ♦Finley, Alice Sousley . . . French, Grace .............. ♦Gates, Louis ............... ♦Devine, Helen Gillis .... ♦Lemmon, Earl ............... ♦Campbell, Winifred Orton ♦Paddock, Amy Hartman . ♦Uhl, Willis................. ♦Wickwire, Esther ........... ♦Wickwire, Ethel ............ ♦Beard, Fern Brown . . . ♦Albaugh, Eva Beil ♦Berlin, Cynthia Kellogg Salesman Clerk 18 7 Clerk . . 185)8 . . . Toledo, Ohio. . . . Toledo, Ohio. .....Orland, Ind. Fort Wayne, Ind. Vancouver, Wash. . . . . Angola, Ind. .... Angola, Ind. . South Bend,Ind. ...... Deceased. Los Angeles, Cal. . . . . Angola, Ind. . Huntington, Ind. . . . Auburn, Ind. .... Angola, Ind. .....Edon, Ohio. .....U. S. Army. . . . . Angola, Ind. . . . Olaga, N. Dak. ...... Deceased. 185)5) Salesman Merchant Lawyer . . . Pharmacist Doctor . . . 1900 Dentist . . . Printer Florist 15)01 Lawyer 1902 Stenographer Teacher Teacher Teaching Farmer Teaching Northwestern Stenographer......... Teaching Columbia . . 1903 ...... Angola, Ind. ....... Angola, Ind. ....... Angola, Ind. ....... Angela, Ind. ......Eugene, Ore. ..........Ray, Ind. ..........Ray, Ind. ... Monument, Ore. ......Auburn, Ind. ...... Freeport, 111. ......... Metz, Ind. . . . . Hammond, Ind. . Indianapolis, Ind. . . South Bend, Ind. ...... Marion, Ind. .......Mongo, Ind. ......... Deceased. ......... Deceased. .....Phoenix, Ariz. . Indianapolis, Ind. .......Orland, Ind. Grand Rapids, Mich. . . Freshwater, Ore. ......... Deceased. ...... Tulsa, Okla. .....St. Louis, Mo. ...... Altoona, Pa. . Fort Wayne, Ind. ..........Gary, Ind. ............. Mass. .......Angola, Ind. .......Orland, Ind. ....Ovando, Mont. . . . Cleveland, Ohio. ....Athol, S. Dak. Pleasant Lake, Ind. Langdon, N. Dakota. ......... Deceased. .......Chicago, 111. .......Angola, Ind. . . New York, N. Y. ...... Angola, Ind. .... Somerset, Ind. ....... Elkhart, IndWhen you buy Plumbing or Heating Of any kind See G. N. BODLEY Phone 225 Service... Is what you want and what you get here. All the good things to eat at reasonable prices. Jess Thomas Tuttle’sRestaurant Ice Cream Parlor Fine Confectionery and Cigars Pleasant Lake, Ind. This reserved for Dr. Sutherland Angola, Indiana Have you picnics and outings at Junod Grocery Lake James Company The coolest spot in Amos Junod, Manager northern Indiana For car rates and other The Home of information call Quality Groceries Indiana Utilities Angola, Indiana Company Phone 260Cline, Carrie ............. ♦Fisher, Mack .............. ♦Fisher, Maude Brown . . ♦Fisher, Nellie Flint ______ ♦Freygang, Paul ............ ♦Goodale, Ralph ............ ♦Hagarty, Guy............... Hathaway, Pearl ........... Hathaway, Winifred ♦Jackson, Howard............ ♦Kreitzer, Harry............ Nichols, Nona ............. ♦Preston, Lula Bratton . . ♦Ritter, Edna Johnson . . . ♦Sheffer, laude Cowan . . ♦Beckholt, Vera Snyder . . ♦Burt, Walter .............. ♦Hall, Nellie Castell....... ♦Sanders, Dessa Crain . . . ♦Waller, Josephine Finch ♦Hall, Gay French .......... ♦Pilliod, Dorothy Gillis .. ♦Hall, James................ ♦Johnson, Berniece Boyers ♦Kratz, Melvin ............. ♦Lacey, Vera Hauver Lutcn, Mabel............... ♦May, Edith Gale ........... ♦Murphy, Florence Smith ♦Pugh, Herbert.............. ♦Shields, Vesta Flint....... ♦Sheffer, Waldo ............ ♦Sowle, Harry ................ ♦Snyder, Kenneth ........... ♦Van Horn, Jessie Morse . Bachelor, Olga............. Beil, Ana ................... ♦Butler, J. W............... Croxton, Fred ............. ♦Dickerson, Don ............ ♦Mills, Clara Emerson . . . ♦Fisher, G. A............... ♦Kyper, Guy................. Nichols, Vernon ........... ♦Purinton, Wallace ......... ♦Rowe, Adelia Stallman . ♦Thomas, Bessie Tuttle . . Weaver, Lulu .............. ♦Willennar, Marshall D. . ♦Woodhull, M. J.............. ♦Weaver, Ethel Bolan......... Davis, Clarence............. ♦Willennar, Mildred Hauver ♦Jackson, Vera Dickerson . ♦Kratz. Harold F............. ♦Hall, Hazel F. Lee.......... ♦McKinley, Hershall.......... Parsell, Oradell............ ♦Kratz, Evangeline Pilliod ♦Wicoff, Wier ................ ♦Freeland, Leta Carey . . . . Clay, Lloyd ................ ♦Black, Gay Hall............. ♦Hayward, Elsie H............ ♦Ludwig, Zula Ireland ♦Harris, Margaret Osborne ♦Hobbs, Mabel Pilliod ________ Butcher Electrician Teacher . . Printer Postal Clerk Druggist . . . I $ 04 Forestry Mail Carrier Druggist Teacher Salesman . Banker . Salesman 1905 , Stenographer Bookkeeper . Farmer .... Merchant Teacher . Salesman 1906 Farmre Mail Clerk Teacher . I $ 07 U. S. Service Angola, Ind. Angola, Ind. Angola, Ind. . San Francisco, Cal. ..........Hiram, Ohio. ......... U. S. Service ......... Angola, Ind. ...........Angola, Ind. ......... Angola, Ind. ..... Tacoma, Wash. ........ Danville, Ind. .... Sioux City, Iowa ......... Angola, Ind. ......... Angola, Ind. ..... Detroit, Mich. ........ Muncie, Ind. ........Angola, Ind. ........Angola, Ind. ........ Angola, Ind. ........Sturgis, Mich. .....Cleveland, Ohio. ..........Angola, Ind. ........ Robinson, 111. ........ Angola, Ind. ........ Chicago, 111. .........Angola, Ind. .....Phillips, S. Dak. ........ Denver, Colo. . . . . Kendallville, Ind. . . . Henrytown, Tenn. ........ Angola, Ind. .... Montpelier, Ind. .... Kansas City, Mo. . . . Kalamazoo, Mich. . . . . Fort Wayne, Ind. ........ Angola, Ind. ........ Angola, Ind. ....... U. S. Service. ........Toledo, Ohio. ..........Olathe, Col. ........ Auburn, Ind. .... Milwaukee, Wis. ....... Danville, Ind. ......... Olivet, 111. ...... Galesburg, 111. . . . Fort Wayne, Ind. . . . Montpelier, Ohio. ....Sanborn, S. Dak. ......... Angola, Ind. ......... Angola, Ind. ....... Boulder, Colo. .....Sanborn, S. Dak. ......... Angola, Ind. ......... Angola, Ind. ......... Auburn, Ind. .........Chicago, 111. ......... Angola, Ind. ..........Angola, Ind. ............. Florida. ..... Jackson, Mich. . . Camp Shelby, Miss. Tippecanoe Lake, Ind. ....... Chicago, 111. ....... Albion, Mich. ....... Auburn, Ind. ......New York, N. Y.S. S. Trazier ’ Physician and Surgeon Office and Residence 212 S. Wayne St. Professional calls answered promptly day or night Courteous treatment extended to everyone Braman, Pansy ............. Brewer, Elmira............. Carpenter, Lois............ ♦Dutter, Vieve.............. Crain, Faye ............... ♦Gibbons, Edwin Freygang ♦Purinton, Ollie Goodwin Hector .Joseph............. Honess, Charles............ ♦Johnson. Thomas ........... ♦Richter, Alta Junod .... ♦Kyper, Karl................ ♦Kratzer, Edith Eggleston Oberlin, Lloyd ........... ♦Parrot, Edna .............. ♦Kansburg, Dawson........... ♦Spangle, Pearl Braman . . Strayer, Margaret.......... Swift, Ola................. Waller, Virgil ............ Walsh, Madge .............. Bender. Lucy White .... Wisel, Sabrina ........... DOS Teacher Teacher Florist . Telephone Operator Aviation Salesman Clerk ...........Angola, Ind. . . . . St. Mary’s, Idaho. .......... Angola, Jnd. . . . Los Angeles, Cal. ...........Angola, Ind. ......Tacoma, Wash. .......... Olivet, 111. . San Antonia, Texas. ..........Norman, Okla. ......... Ashley, Ind. Vernon Center, Minn. ...... Pioneer, Ohio. .......... Angola, Ind. .......... Angola, Ind. . . . Continental, Ohio. Watertown, S. Dakota. . . . . Cleveland, Ohio. . . . . Fort Wayne, Ind. ............ Deceased. .....Cleveland, Ohio. .......... Angela, Ind. ........ Toledo, Ohio. ........ Helmer, Ind. 1 $ ) ♦Lambert, Imo Hayward ............ ♦Preston, Frederika Wambaugh Patterson, Robert .............. ♦Bakstad, Mildred Shank .......... ♦Kratzer, Flossie Zabst .......... ♦Kratz, Elsie Zabst............... Honess, Arthur ................. Mugg, Mabel .................... Manahan, Ruth .................. ♦Pocock, Thomas .................. Boyers, Byron .................. Peachey, Linda ................. Parsell, Florence .............. Lane, Altina ................... ♦Williamson, Maurice.............. Hendry, Louis................... ♦McKillen, Mildred Dole........... ♦Gibbs, Hazel Freleigh ........... ♦McKillen, Wayne.................. ♦Junod, Grace..................... ♦Lees, Fern Treese................ ♦Elya, Fred ...................... ♦Stayner, Blanche................. Mallory, Daisy.................. ♦Peachey, Achsa .................. Carpenter, Wilma ............... Shank, Charles ................. ♦Walters, Gladys Snyder........... Rakestraw, Elezan .............. Wyrick, Arlo ................... ♦Turner, Ila White................ ♦Hamlin, Don ..................... ♦Geiger, Velma Swift.............. Lash, Edna...................... ♦Boozer, Ralph ................... ♦Allman. Ethel Chard ............. Creel, Coleman ................. ♦Culver, John .................... ♦Robbins, Velma Deal.............. ♦Winans, Lisle Dilworth........... ♦Ellithrope, Dale ................ Ewan, Vera ..................... ♦Elston, Lynn .................... ♦Fast, Frank ..................... ♦Bryan, Reba French .............. ♦Goodwin, Warren ................. ........................... Brownsville, Ind. ................................ Chicago, 111. U. S. Service .... Camp Thomas Louisville, Ky. ............................ . . Detroit, Mich. Bookkeeper ...................... Angola, Ind. Clerk ........................... Angola, Ind. .............................. Princeton, N. J. ................................. Angola, Ind. ................................. Angola, Ind. ........................... Des Moines, Iowa. Navy ............................. Norfolk, Va. ................................. Angola, Ind. Art Institute.....................Chicago, 111. Teacher......................Fort Wayne, Ind. .............................. South America. ..................................... Deceased. ................................. Angola, Ind. ................................. Fresno, Cal. Clerk.............................Angola, Ind. ........................... Fort Wayne, Ind. ................................ Detroit, Mich. Salesman ....................... Pittsburg, Pa. . . . U. S. A. Service......... Washington, D. C. .................................. Fremont, Ind. ........................................ Deceased. . . . Northwestern University....... Chicago, 111. ....... Deceased. Fort Wayne, Ind. .........U. S. A. . . Canton, Ohio. .... Orland, Ind. Fort Wayne, Ind. Washington, D. C. Ann Arbor, Mich. .... Angola, Ind. Washington, D. C. . Camp Pike, Ark. . Allentown, N. J. . . . Auburn, Ind. ..... Paxton, 111. . Melbourne, Ohio. De3 Moines, Iowa. .....Edon, Ohio. .... Angola, Ind. . . . Fremont, Ind. Druggist DIO U. S. A. Jeweler PhysicianWeaver Dirrim BARBERS Fisher’s old stand N. E. Corner Public Square Kerneiy Fumtuie Company Every thingin high grade Furniture at the right PRICE Every man, woman and child is boosting Kellastone Stucco G. A. Hendry Homes furnished complete by DUCKWALL Furniture Store Angola, Indiana You are always Welcome Come and hear the latest music and records HOSACK’S Music House Everything in Music Ritter, Alda............................................................ Angola, Ind. Sickles, Burton ...................................................... Angola, Ind. Smith, Lucile ........................................................ Angola, Ind. Tasker, May .......................................................... Angola, Ind. Van Cleave, Ruth ............................................... Fort Wayne, Ind. ♦Walcott, Glen ......................................................... Hickman ,Col. 1011 ♦Legier, Faye Burt.............................................. Battle Creek, Mich. Brennan, Pearl ....................................................... Angola, Ind. Coy, Wilma ......... ................................................. Angola, Ind. ♦Eastburn, Joyce Creel ............................................ Indianapolis, Ind. Castell, Lois ......................Teacher ........................... Fremont, Ind. Dewey, Neva ... .................................................. Angola, Ind. Gilmore, Florence . . .... Teacher...........................Angola, Ind. Kirk, Hazel .......................................................... Bucyrus, Ohio. ♦Dickinson, Bess Hard'ng ..............................................Seattle, Wash. ♦Lutz, Mabel Fast ..................................................... Angola, Ind. ♦Hawkes, Arenda Lazenby............................................. Litchfield, Mich. Lazenby, Lotta .....................................................Montgomery, Mich. ♦Zimmerman, Muriel Watkins............................................... Angola, Ind. We r, Alda..........................Teaching .......................... Elkhart, Ind. ♦Woodring Warner.....................U. S. A. Service......................... France. Kolb, Lo’sMKtol..........................................................Angola, Ind. ♦Carey, Okel Mark.........................................................Auburn, Ind. ♦Ettinger, Ned..................................................... . Detroit, Mich. Gilmore, Alta ........................................................ Angola, Ind. Wells, Leighton....................................................... Chicago. 111. ♦Henny, Enola Hanselman ............................................... Angola, Ind. 4 Day, Mabel Rinehart ............................................... Hamilton, Ind. ♦Freleigh, Cl iff ton ....................................................... Angola, Ind. ♦Pfenning, Cleid Ometead ................................................ Stroh, Ind. ♦Rogers, Aria Pence........................................................... Helmer, Ind. ♦Bash, Enola Hendry...................................................... Angola, Ind. Phillips, W va..............................................................Deceased. 1912 Kunkle, Hul-u......................................................... Chicago, 111. Palfreyman, David ....................................................Detroit, Mich. Avery, Hazel .......................................................... Angola, Ind. ♦Zimmerman, Glen ....................................................... Angola, Ind. Woodring, Ruth ....................................................... Chicago, 111. Dellar, Frank.......................Farmer ............................ Angola, Ind. Sniff, Irma.........................Teacher ........................... Angola, Ind. Parsell, French ....................U. S. A. Service...........Camp Shelby, Miss ♦Boggs, Ruth Parsell................................................... Pittsburg, Pa. Hall, Burl ............................................................ Angola, Ind. Honess, Edith .........................................................Oberlin, Ohio. ♦Kidney, Charles .................................................... Cleveland, Ohio. Van Cleave, Helen........................................................... Atlanta, Ind. Walsh, Wade .......................................................... Angola, Ind. ♦Sparks, Zema Ettinger..........................................Pleasant Lake, Ind. Dygert, Ellen ...................................................... Culver, Don ........................U. S. A. Service ........ Camp Shelby, Miss. Robertson, Frances..................Teaching ........................ Hamilton, Ind. Bratton, Corneal ...................U. S. A. Service ........ Camp' Shelby, Miss. ♦Crews, Marjorie Burkhart .............................................. Angola, Ind. ♦Parr, Lloyd ......................................................Fort Wayne, Ind. Evans, Jessie ................................................. Aberdeen, S. Dak. ♦Hubbel, Ina Storey........................................................... Angola, Ind. Smith, Imo..........................U. S. A. Service.............. ♦Parsell, Muriel Spears ................................................ Helmer, Ind. ♦Kohl, Herman .......................U. S. A. Service ........ Camp Shelby, Miss, 1913 Abrams, Florence ..................................................... Fremont, Ind. nreel i imp ...........................Forest Grove, Ore. Brennan, Dari ........................................................ Chicago, 111. Dole, Pyrl .........................Deputy Auditor........................... Angola, Ind. ♦Ellison, Florence Martin ...................................... Grand Haven, Mich. Elliot, Heber.....................................................Indianapolis, Ind. ♦Brown, Helen Smith ...........................................Indianapolis, Ind. ♦Penn, Willa Morse........................................... ............Tulsa, Okla. Ettinger, Marlin ...................U. S. Service................Camp Sherman, Ohio. Noyes, Cleon .......................U. S. Service...................Helping to Win the War “Every little bit helps” is a common enough saying, but it's a true one too. You will probably do your share of the helping, whatever your share happens to be. We are doing ours by selling good goods and nothing else. Whatever you buy at this store is guaranteed to satisfy you. If you're not satisfied, we're not satisfied.♦Warring, Winfred Parsell . . Parsell, Louis ............ Parish. L. D............... ♦Lough, Martha Pollock Hummel, Hermione........... ♦Ritter, Wymond ............ ♦King, Glada Shumway Webb, Mildred ............. Webb, Rachel .............. ♦Snellenberger, Clyde....... Parsons, Maggie ........... Hayward, Berdena .......... ♦Gilmore, Harry ............ ♦Allwood, Florence Garrett Coy, Blanche......... Junod, Frances ...... Pence, Samuel ............. Crampton, Zema ............ Miller, Ruth .............. Pollock. Agnes ............ Wilson, Lloyd ............. Kohl, Rose................. Rummel, Helen ............. ♦Foraker Adabelle, Walcott Jeffery, Eber ............. Ramsay, Berniece........... Dygert, Florence........... Bixler, Genevra............ Sheldon, Donald ........... ♦('hard, Esther ............ Par-ell, Alan ............. Bair, Russel .............. Lein in ger. Mildred ...... Kunkle, Marjorie .......... Hammond, Floy ............. Orwig, Eva................. Zimmer, Ford .............. Bronson, Laura ............ Goodwin, Arline ........... Martin. Eva ............... ♦Koh!, Joyce Miller ........ ♦Foraker, Winifred Walcott Coleman, Bess ............. Stage, Ora ................ Gundrum, Lolabelle ........ Emerson, Thcmas ........... Redding, Lois ............. Moody, Berneice ........... Cline, Dean ............... Lehman. Lcis .............. Wolfe, Henry ................ ♦Somerlott, Ruth Masters . . McClellan, Sterling........ Ingalls, Gertrude ......... Castell. Stanley .......... ♦Whitlock. Elsie Rinehart . . Myers, Lois ............... Wilcox, Leo ............... Webb, Lucile .............. Ireland. Ana .............. Cain, Harold .............. Slade, Phyllis............. Webb, Jane ................ Clark, Glen ............... Goodale, Daphne ........... Metzgar, Gaylord .......... Pollock. Jeanette ......... Mast, Erwin ............... Moss, Ellen ............... Banker . Teaching . Teaching . . Teacher . . Teacher 11)14 . . Chemist Civil Service . . U. S. A. Service Teacher ......... Teacher ........... University of Phila U. 3. Service Teacher Aviation 11)15 Chemist Teacher Cashier U. S. Service 11)1(1 . U. S. Service . Stercgrapher , U. S. Service Stenographer U. S. Service Teacher Teacher Stenographer Clerk ........... U. S. Service . . . Angola, Ind. ..... Rochester, Ind. ......... Chicago, 111. ....... Fremont, Ind. .......... Angola, Ind. North Robinson, Ohio. ........... New Mexico. .................. Ohio. Mount Pleasant, Mich. .........Angola, Ind. ......... Detroit, Mich. ......... Detroit, Mich. ........lackson, Mich. .......... Angola, Ind. . . . Washington, D. C. . . Camp Shelby, Miss. .......... Orland, Ind. .......... Angola, Ind. ..... Alvordon, Ohio. .... Philadelphia. Pa. Angola, Ind. ...... Fremont, Ind. . Angola, Ind. . Angola, Ind. Waterloo, Ind. . Angola, Ind. . . U. S. A. Service Montpelier, Ohio. ...... Angola, Ind. ...... Angola, Ind. .......Ashley, Ind. Pleasant Lake, Ind. . . . . Detroit, Mich. ....... Butler, Ind. ...... Angola, Ind. ...... Angola, Ind. . Hattiesburg, Miss. ... Detroit, Mich. Camp Shelby, Miss. . . Fort Wayne, Ind. Camp Shelby, Miss. .......Angola, Ind. . . . Hamilton, Ind. Camp Shelby, Miss. . . . . Hiram, Ohio. ...... Angola, Ind. .......Angola, Ind. . Camp Shelby, Miss. ...... Angola, Ind. . . . Otsego township. ......... Erie, Pa. .............. Ohio. ...... Angola, Ind. ...... Angola, Ind. ....... Angola, Ind. .... Jackson, Mich. ...... Angola, Ind. White Pigeon, Mich. ...... Angola, Ind. . Camp Shelby, Miss. . . . Fort Wayne, Ind.This Bank was established 29 years ago. Many of its large accounts of today began as smah investments early in its history. Your small account has the same chance of be= coming a large one of the future. So why not begin now as a depositor with this bank, and put it’s influence back of your affairs. 3% Interest Paid on Certificates of Deposit STEUBEN COUNTY STATE BANKHowell, Harold ........ Morgan, Marjorie j. . . . Wambaugh, Anna......... Wolfe, Dono ........... Hanselnian, Mildred . . . Fairfield, Myra ....... Brooks, Samuel.......... Dygert, Newton ......... Reese, Claude .......... Ribb!et, Nina Ritter . . . Goodale, De Ross ....... Johnson, Wilma ......... Ogden, Mary ............ Smith, Carlton.......... ♦Emerson, Valta Garver Goodwin, Walter......... Spade, Edna ............ Seely, Wayland ......... Stayner, Alice ......... Neutz, Paul ............ Meyers, Lucile.......... Hendry, George ......... Fink, Hobart ........... Douglass, Robert ....... Johnson, Pearl.......... Rozell, Letha........... Griffith, Willa ........ Kankamp, Martha......... Van Auken, St. Clair . . Waugh, Emily............ Coy, Paul .............. Cline, Dorothea......... Bair, Leo L............. Weiss, Aubrey........... ...........U. S. Service U. S. Service Camp Shelby, Miss. . .Fort Wayne, Ind. . . Fort Wayne, Ind. Camp Shelby, Miss. ..... Angola, Ind. Washington, D. C. 11)17 ..........Assistant Bank Cashier ........... Angola, Ind. ..........U. S. Service.................. ..........T. S. C........................... Angola, Ind. ..........Clerk............................. Angola, Ind. ..........T. S. C........................... Angola, Ind. ..........Teacher ................................. DeKalb .........................................Fort Wayne, Ind. ..........T. S. C........................... Angola, Ind. ........................................... Detroit, Mich. ..........T. S. C........................... Angola, Ind. ..........Teacher ............................... Montana. ..........Farmer........................... Angola, Ind. ....................................... South Bend, Ind. ..........Teacher ....................... Bronson, Mich. ..........Teacher........................ York Township. ..........U. S. Service.................Camp Shelby, Miss. ..........Delco Light ...................... Angola, Ind. ..........T. S. C........................... Angola, Ind. ..........Teaching.......................... ..........Teaching ............................... Otsego. ............................................ Angola, Ind, . . ....................................Fort Wayne, Ind. ........................................ Seatttle, Wash. ...................................... Angola, Ind. u. S. Service................Camp Shelby, Miss. ............................................ Angola, Ind. ..........Teaching ............................... DeKalb. ..........Farmer ........................... Angola, Ind.Just suppose she should ask you You’ll be proud to answer JOE BROKAW Stand by the cow, the animal that is standing by our country by producing the food that makes the healthy chap. No substitute takes the place of milk or butter. We have the pure article. Ice Cream, Butter and Buttermilk Call phone 25-L ANGOLA ICE CREAM CO,


Suggestions in the Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) collection:

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1915 Edition, Page 1

1915

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1916 Edition, Page 1

1916

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

1917

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

1920

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

1921

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

1922

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.