Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN)

 - Class of 1910

Page 1 of 242

 

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1910 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 242 of the 1910 volume:

r £h ith L iNi J ,ill9 1 t i , 1 f J .T Y . ' ; uBl - lc LIBRARY 3 1833 02463 4070 Gc 977.202 An4s 1910 Spec: tat. or . S r r • J$jMWy ) 7 (3 4 A v 5 J ■ Tfnagtfl fJI j 1 ro, 30i£ ilOb :•;.; xodIiW .V it id I OIQI ioWf o Albert W. Wilcox Friend of us all this little book is dedicated by the Class of 1910 The Spectator Staff Editor-in-Chief. - John Culver Business Managers. J. Dale Ellithorp, ' to Leighton W r ells, ' 11 Alumni. Mae Tasker, ' io Lisle Dilworth, ' 10 Athletics. Glenn Walcott, ' io Clifton Mugg, i _ Society. Rheha French, ' io Helen Kunkle, ' i _ ' Joyce ( " reel, n Barhara Dodge, ' 13 Jokes. Velma 1 )eal. ' 1 1 ilma Coy, 11 Edward McNelly, ' n Dorothv Rakestraw, ' 13 Music. Faye Burt, ' 11 Helen Smith. ' 13 Dramatics. Burton Sickles. 10 Marjorie Burkhart, ' 12 Calendar. Ruth VanCleave, ' 10 Corneal Bratton, ' 12 Lois McCool, 11 Marie Rundell. 13 Literary. Vera Ewan, ' 10 Esther Williamson, ' ti Alda Ritter, ' 10 Warner VYoodring, ' u Leland Ewers, ' 13 Edith Honess. ' 12 Doris Wilson. ' 13 (hark- Kidney. Artists. VVilma Coy. ' 11 imo Smith. ' 12 Clifton Freligh, 11 Lee Hirsch, " 12 Pan! Swift, ' 14 Pyrl I ole. ' 13 ) iictg ici£ 35 q2 3rfT .373 sen , .■■- - ' - »3haJ i riHH oIkG J ■i;»i?!fiT 3bM f1 »oIk7 rtrra u , | . ;: [ v ... n ' -l fictarOl i i. .iti-jf ' j Doy . ; ,fjio( i u(:. r lo Tl- ' l .sr. ' rtsrrrs ' tCI : .ifibnalsD •Jli ' IBl DnsV dinM ooDdM aioJ ,fIJ 7 vf B13 " ,-r-, ;bIA pw3 bmsidJ oaliW git ■ ■ t j . . ' 1 ) : • " ■ ' ilj-r ' I nolli . .ni -. [fj : • 3 d - ■■ ■ I - ' : I • " • i . ' !n;r1 i i - - Senior Sonnet School days, alas, for us are o ' er. For twelve long years we have stayed. That due remembrance be us paid. We, as Seniors, do implore. Within the hold of wall and door And the old scene ' s familiar aid. We think of fortunes to be made When we leave school to come no more. W r e think of joys shared by each. As the faculty faithfully us did teach. And now to you. Old A. H. S., There fall many years of great success, When each brave Senior, bold and strong, Helps this busy, old world along. — Lisle Dilworth. • " ■ ■ - ' ■. ■ I I I ■ ' I - i r jrr " 9 I ss President - - John Culver Vice-President - Litcile Smith Treasurer - - - Glenn Walcott Literary Manager Warren Goodwin Historian - - Lynn Elston Poet - - Lisle Dilworth Class Colors: Class Flower: Old Rose and White. Pink Rose. Motto : Energy Wins the Way. Class Yell: Watch us now ! Watch us then ! We ' re the Class of Nineteen Ten ! We will finish. Finish when? We will finish in Nineteen Ten ! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah!! Ren!!! A. H. S. NINETEEN TEN! RALPH BOOZER July 5. 1 89 1 Ralph is a native of the Buckeye State. His early schooling was received at Waterloo, End. He entered the High School at Reading, Mich., in his Sophomore year and graduated From there in [909. In January, 1910, he enrolled as a member of the Senior slass of the A. H. S. Although being with us but a few months, we have found him a bright and ready student. Ralph took great interest in Basket I ' all and l- regi- men. Latelv we have discovered that he sings, also. VITA BUTCHER August 24, 1891 Vita was born at Ridgedale, Term. She attended school at Mt. Vernon, Indiana; Edinburgh Illinois; Pana, Illinois. The first of this year she entered the A. H. S. as a Senior. Vita is the only quiet and timid member of the class. Nevertheless she has won the hearts of all by her good nature and cheerfulness. She is a special favorite of Jonas. ETHEL CHARD March 2, 1892 Ethel was born four miles southeast of Angola. She entered our class and hearts in the Freshman year. She is a member of the Senior Club and Glee Club. Her favorite expression 11s " Mercy Me! " Her favorite occupations are climbing fences when there is a gate near by, and showing Mr. Weldy where to rind dogwood. Ethel is also very fond of jewelrv and jewelers. COLEMAN CREEL June 24, 1891 Coleman Creel was born at Parkersburg, West Virginia, and entered the Angola Public Schools in the third grade. JOHN CULVER John attended school at Auburn Junction, Indiana, and Findlay, Ohio, before coming- to Angola. He entered school here in the fifth grade. John is a good reader, having won both silver and gold metals last year. He has twice been President of our class, is Editor-in-Chief of the Spectator, President of the Athletic Association, Base Ball Captain, and played well on the Basket Ball team. VELMA DEAL September 4, 1891 Velma came to us in the Sophomore } ear from Brushy Prairie, LaGrange county. Slie has great musical qualities, as Angola at large has already observed. She is a member of the Senior Club. Her favor- ite occupation is playing the piano. LISLE DILWORTH August 8, 1892 Lisle started in the first grade with Miss Parish as teacher. She has written one of our class poems and our class song. She is a member of the Senior Club and Glee Club, and her favorite expression is " Great Scott! " Lisle ' s fear is the poor-house and her favorite boy ' s nickname is " Dr Rexall. " DALE ELLITHORP September 8, 1890 Dale was born in Salem, where he received his early schooling before coming to Angola. He has already become a jeweler and his highest am- bition is to become an expert engraver. Besides all this he has a fondness for Ethel. LYNN ELSTON April g, 1893 Lynn is the tallest and youngest member of the Senior Class. He is noted for mixing dopes in chemistry and making faces at Rheba. VERA EWAN June 16, 1892 Vera first opened her blue eyes near Williams Center, Ohio- She has attended school in Bryan, Ohio; Renton, Washington; Tri- State College, and Angola High School. She is a member of the Senior Club. Her favorite expression is " Oh ! " and her occupation is making fruit salad. Vera ' s specialty is Latin. (at vJ) FRANK FAST February 23, 1893 Franklin Jonas was born in Polk, hio. He attended school at Polk until 1908. when he entered our class in the Junior year. Frank is the funny boy of the class, as some of the teachers have found out. RHEBA FRENCH January 22, 1892 ' Rheba Marie was born at Corunna, Indiana. She started to school in Angola. Her highest ambition is to become a school teacher. Rheba is a great favorite of Ralph. WARREN GOODWIN Warren came to us in the Freshman year from Pleasant Lake. He has had the honor this year of being manager of the Basket Ball team. Warren is a great dreamer and builder of air castles, and one oi his great- est desires is to go to Hell ' s Point, Lake James. He lias made his mark in mathematics and will become an electrical engineer. 1 fas great fondness for Freshmen. Warren is also a great Basket Ball player. x i r j.j " « 3jj2y sAjJ- - - T Bf- - i Ail jH -— jfl - ft WA 4G £ - :; S fte " Jy ' Ahwt % Pi JJwMk fc | isiW. pl )? I jjBi V rJ | [lift £ V --- " ' Lvp A v | i Nir Jy§ IPS §1| tfpp 3 J Va2s ALDA RITTER March 20, 1892 Alda was born in Waterloo, Indiana, in the lionlike month of March. She started to school in Angola at the West Ward, coming from there ( " SuitjSnBi„ pun SIUU3} 3.TH sjaods aiuoABj .iajj " Joiiipjinq p j ua 9tj; 01 She is a member of the Senior Club and Glee Club. Her favorite ex- pression is unknown. For a while Alda was much interested in Civil Engineering, etc., but Ave are glad to say she has given up that study entirely, and is devoting her time exclusively to painting and a few out- side amusements. ' BURTON SICKLES May 30, 1892 Burton is one of the few who started in the first grade at the A. H. S. She is our class musician and also secretary ol our Athletic Association. She is a member of the Senior Club and (dec Club. Burton is a great lover of sombre colors, of which her favorite is (.raw LUCILE SMITH July 4, 1892 Lucile started in the first grade at the Angola High School with Miss Parish as a teacher, as did five other members of the Senior Class. We are proud to have a Daughter of Independence for our class mathe- matician. She is a member of the Glee Club and also the Senion Club. Her favorite occupation is baking cake for the Senior Club ' s six o ' clock dinners, and her favorite expression is " Well ! " Lucile dislikes very much to pare potatoes, but her highest ambition is to be cheerful. MAY TASKER September 7, 1891 May was born four and one-half miles northeast of Angola. She at- tended school for a time in Scott township. Entered school in Angola in the third grade. She is a member of the Senior Club and (dee Club. May is great in the newspaper business and her favorite occupation is setting type. Tier specialty is German. RUTH VAN CLEAVE July 3, 1891 Ruth was born at Wichita, Kansas. She spent most of her school days at Atlanta, Indiana, with the exception of one year spent in Okla- homa City, Oklahoma. She entered our High School in her Sophomore year. She is the shortest member of the class. GLEN WALCOTT October 21, 1890 Glen was a Freshman in the Ridgeville High School. The next two years he attended the Oberlin High School, and from there came to Angola and enrolled as a member ol the Senior Class. From the first we have found him invaluable. He is a great Basket Ball player and is verv fond of tennis. Besides being treasurer oi the Class oi [910, he is also a member of the High School Boys ' Quartette, for which he de- serves special praise. He took a prominent pari in the Boys ' Minstrels. Glen is destined to become a Civil Engineer and his highest ambition in life is to " be a man among men. " The first ol the year he developed a certain fondness for Freshmen, but we hope that is a thing of the past. iiis Reward The sweet girl Graduate is here. The sweet boy- Graduate this year Cuts no whit Bigger figure than He did last Year, dear little man. The sweet girl Grad. gets all the praise, The homage and The big bouquets. The boy gets Nit at all, no space In the news- Papers, and his face Adorns no Columns, knows no boost: Things this year Are just as they used To be, and All along the line The girl will Coruscate and shine; She gets all Good things in the whirl. But, after All, he ' ll get the girl E. O. MAPLE. Superintendent - Maii.emalic; H. W. PETERS, High School Principal, Eng ' ish, J. H WELDY, Science ELIZABETH NOTTINGHAM, Latin E. G. KNEPPER. History MABEL C. FERTIC, German Supervisor of Music MRS. L. W. FAIRFIELD, Supervisor of Drawing Jin fHrmnriam fifes 9atsy SSurferit Born Feb. 14, 1885 Died Mav 8, 1 9 1 A teacher in the An-ola schools in 1906-1907 and 1907-1908. Grade Teachers From left to right, top row- M1NNIE TINKHAM 1 A and 1 B KARL KYPER 4 A and 4 B RUTH KEEP 2 A and 2 B GRACE FRENCH 5 A and 5 B ROSE LITTLE 7 A and 7 B LUELLA REMPIS 8th grade Bottom Row MAUDE SCHOVILLE 3 A and 3 B SARAH WICOFF 6 A and 6 B GRACE KEELER West Ward, 1,2, 3, 4, 5 EVA BEIL I, 2, 3, 4 grades ,3012 Board of Education U. L. WAMBAUGH, President F. B HUMPHREYS, Treasurer CHAS. A. YOTTER, Sec retary | ' • j ■ 2 c 3 5 ' 3 1 1 3 3 rt ' J H -3 — — = — = — i = — SEM of o5 ! 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Inq of I f ' jufin 6 oj rrib i ■ . ■ ) n ] . , ! " Oflj 1 ■ ' ' [ ' . ' n. . ! THE. COURSE, OE STUDY The course of study in any school exists as a variable entity con stantly changing- to meet the unstable needs of the pupil. It is impos- sible to prepare a course of study to meet all the legitimate requirements of any particular pupil, but an effort has been made to meet the needs of the greatest number. While the public school system should be considered as one con- nected whole, it naturally falls into three divisons, viz : the primary school where the pupil receives the tools for learning; the grammar school where he is trained in their use ; the high school where he uses them in the acquisition of knowledge. It is an irreparable blunder to develope one part of a school system without due considera- tion given to the other divisions. The primary aim in all teaching is to assist the pupil to become a more efficient citizen, to prepare him to contribute his part to the world ' s good, to take his part in the ranks of men, and to live by the fruits of his own labor. In so far as possible without neglecting the primary aim of education, the work in the grades is intended to lay a foundation for future education. The work in the high school is a continuation of the work in the grades. The course is so arranged that the high school work begins where the grade work ends rather than that the grade work ends where the high school work begins. The high school on account of its position in our educational system, its close relation with the work in the grades on the one hand, and either the college work or the actual duties of life on the other, has become an arena of endless experimentation. In arranging the course for the Angfola High School, a conservative view has been taken. If the student wishes to enter college, he has the privilege of electing a course especially arranged to meet this need. If he expects to enter at once upon the active duties of life, he may elect a course so arranged as to give him a more practical knowledge. Complete outlines of the work done in the high school and in the grades are kept on file in the superintendent ' s office, as permanent records. The Training School. Angola is especially fortunate in having the Training School of the Tri-State college connected with the public schools. This is an advan- tage peculiar to college towns. According to a contract between the City Board of Education and the trustees of the Tri-State College, three teachers accepted by the State Board of Education are selected as critic teachers. These are especially trained teachers who conduct model recitations to be observed bv college students. summer training school is conducted by the Tri-State ( ollege for a period of eight weeks. Pupils of all grades are admitted to this school free. By attending this summer school, strong pupils are enabled to finish the eight grades in less than the usual required time, and the weaker pupils have an opportunity to regain their standing in the classes. IV anual Training; The l eardslev System of Manual Training was introduced into the Angola Public Schools in September, [909. Thirty-eight boys from the seventh and eighth grades have enrolled in the bench work classes and thirtv-nine girls from the seventh and eighth grades have enrolled in the sewing classes. All work is done systematically and develops important principles of handicraft. The interest in this work has Keen constantly increasing. Pupils ask to work after the regular school hours and on Saturdays. Among the articles made in the shop by the boys are strops, calendar mounts, picture frames, whisk- broom holders, hand mirrors and book racks. Each piece of work " introduces new principles oi wood work and new tools for their development. Staining, varnishing and waxing are taught. Neatness and accuracy are insisted upon and all articles must carefully finished. The course in sewing has developed splendid possibilities among the girls. The models worked out are along practical lines and require ac- curacy and neatness. The girls have learned bv actual practice the correct use of various tools and materials together with the different stitches and seams, and their application to ordinary work. The results obtained from these classes, indorsed by teacher- and patrons will justify the continuation oi this work into the High School courses. Jhzxnjors STamirfe ID lo ' mis : ■ • i . : ir. " : fVii »f, - •in rilfi ■ ■ nj. ■ ■ i l . ' . ii --•: ■ t- ii i ' .isvroY L z r f - gno ) ' Jjifl ' : ■ ■ i- ' ■ " ' ' ' ■ _: ; T ' rjf|?. f ) H - . . ;;. [j ( fT . : ■; tf) : . rrl-oj ,x iIh ij . ■ . rtrjj : - :■ ii ' rf ; ' l ! H 22; k(i stg. ' ■ ' I . ' ' I ■ i rn I lb - I I I B i id i ; I : [-ti .• : ' • ' ■ • . , • .. i i I l • , ■. - in 1 ' ■ u ► rifi ; ; - . , . : ' Junior Class President - - Bess Harding Vice-President Esther Williamson Secretary-Treasurer Warner Woodring Historian - - Clifton Freligh Poet - - Muriel Watkins Class Colors: Class Flower: Cream and Crimson. Red and White Carnations Motto : Impossible is un-American. Class Yell: Rat-a-to-thrat, To-thrat, To-thrat. Terra to-lix, to-lix, to-lix. Kick-a-Bah-Bah, Kick-a-Bah-Bah. Juniors ! juniors ! Rah ! Rah ! ! Rah ! ! ! Class Roll Faye P. Burt Pottie Mae Pazenby Pearl Brennan Orinda B. Pazenby Pois Castell Okel Mark i Wilma Coy Pois McCool Joyce Creel Edward- McNelly Xeva Dewey Clela Omstead Xed D. Ettinger Aria P. Pence Mabel Past Mabel Rinehart Clifton W. Freligh Mabel Somerlott Alta Gilmore Muriel Watkins Florence Gilmore Alda Weir Bess M. Harding Peighton B. Wells Nola Hanselman Maud Wheeler Enola Hendry Esther B. Williamson Hazel Kirk Warner F. Woodring Junior Class Poem We ' re the Class of Nineteen ' Leven, Ir the A. H. S. We, n Nineteen Hundred Seven. Fumed the Freshman Class. Vow, liiree years of cloud ami sunshine, We have journeyed thru, Just another year from this time. Wo ' ii be Seniors true. Cream and Crimson are the colors We so proudly wear And defend — I here are no others Half so worthy, half so fair. " Impossible is tin American " This is our slog;tn true: With this motto all we plan, We will hope to do So that on the scroll of ages, Some perchance may trace Names that from toml inem ' ry ' s pages We would ne ' er erase. Names of thirty in our si :. ol band In the A. H. S. There ' s no equal in the wh ' " e land, We ' re the Junior Class. —A. M. W. Junior Class History Although the Junior Class has had much experience under different teachers and now holds an honorable position in the school, it has not yet begun to make real history. A popular definition of history says that history is made up of the biographies of great men. If this definition of history is true, much real history is to come after our graduation in [911. This class had the honor, when it presented itself for admission, of being the largest Freshman Class ever entered into the Angola High School. Most of those of our number who turned their backs on the joys of high school life, did so in the first year. A few " quituated " in the Soph- omore year: but none, we are proud t » say, have done so during the past rear. A few. on the contrary, have joined us to complete the course as members of the Class of ' 11. Our class now consists i five boys and twenty-five girls, making a total of thirty members. — Clifton Freligh. Junior Class Song The Junior Class it is all right. The teachers praise us out of sight. We do our work well every day, For we know that will always pay. We have a little fun, that ' s true. But we don ' t think that ' s wrong, do you? We think it ' s very nice to be The Juniors, as we are you see. CHORUS: We are the Juniors, Juniors, Juniors, That ' s the name we love to say — If we sometimes have a little fun, It ' s never till our work is done. We are the Juniors, Juniors, Juniors, And we work with all our might. Just ask the teachers and they ' ll say That the Juniors are all right. The A. H. S. is best of all, And while we ' re here it ne ' er will fall, The Juniors they will all be true And always cheer the Yellow and Blue. No better teachers could be found, If we should search the world around. Old A. H. S. we ' ll always cheer. And keep for her rich mem ' ries dear. BiD a -omoffqoS M • :■ ■ ■rl }79cl ri • ■ , ■ — ■ ■ ■ „, ' | : aioloD aa f I i l [ ni; i : i j--:i [I Sophomore Class President Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer Historian Poet Lee Hirsch David Palfrey man Helen Kunkle Don Culver Edith Honess Class Colors: Pdack and Gold. Class Flower Tea Rose Motto : No Crown without the Dust of Labor. Class Yell: Chick-a-lack-a, Boom-a-lack-a, Wah! Wah!! Wah ! ! ! Sophomore, Sophomore, Rah! Rah!! Rah!!! Hazel M. Avery Lottie Butz Marjorie Burkhart Corneal Bratton Mary Cole Elsie Covell Don Culver Ellen Dygert Frank H. Deller Edith Honess Lee Hirsch Charles Kidney Herman Kohl Edna Kundard Helen W. Kunkle Dora E. Lazenby Verlie Mountz Class Roll Vera Gladys Mundy Clifton Muo-gr Nellie Kathleen Nedele French Parsell Ruth Parsell David H. Palfreyman Emma Luella Prickett Earl Rinehart Frances R. Robertson Imo Smith Irma Sniff Muriel Spears Ina Storev Wade B. " Walsh June Wells Marjorie Wilson Ruth Woodring - Glenn Zimmerman Sophomore Class Poem Here ' s to the classmates of Nineteen Twelve — The Sophomores of Nineteen Ten! 11 oft in the High School records you delve Their worth will appear to you then. In numbers we ' re counted among the most blest.. For thirty and two is our score; In beauty and wisdom — for peace if were best Not to name our advantages more. :- Except in the matter of colors, for " Black and Gold " are the noblest, we know. And high they shall wave o ' er campus and track In praise of the victors below. While fondly the fragrance and " Pink of the Rose " Shall mark the festivities fair Of the old A. H. S. in due honor to those Who our glory as classmates shall share. " Without Dust of Labor. No Crown " is secured, Without badge of effort, no praise— With labor, our watchword, thru trial endured. We ' ll crown with sweet glory our days. Ilio to old A. H. S. highest honors are due. A close second are Sophomores of ' 10- Coming days, coming victories will prove it to you: We ' ll rest on our laurels till then. — (Mass Poet. in3of 22iiO yiomodqoZ — ©vfewT a99i9tiiH jo asJficnaaiif;) 9dJ 01 a 9?9H IfleT cte9J9niVI " lo asiooxo ri jo3 9dT 9Vl9fi 1 07. aftlOOSl I(H ii ' iS ' is.iji -ui 1 m ilo II .ri9fiT uov .-,■■■ tB9qqfi Hiw rfffo ' tisrfT Id jaorn 9xfJ sxioraa botuno-j 9i ' 9w ai9 fjca»0 a ;91098 " II O 81 ' . I iui ; vflifil mo ' H jH-iJ vp .7 jr 90jS9q tol — mobaiw brt ' jjimod ni .91001 89§JSJflsvbj3 ino eui i! ' oJ foM lOl 3 " j:OlQ 1 I 3 ! IjSXa ' ■:. iii : [99X3 • nji m ; Jaafcfofl -arf J yus " MoO bxus bIS " jfojsij bens Bijqmeo i9 " o v...- ' •],. ' ■- vm.M tfsid bnA .• ■ .. ' 8fOi3iv - ft J ' to 98I£iq ol " 980fl 9rfj to ;J.a H " bint 90flS1§J3 ll 9£fi v ' iiffr. ' t oli ' iV •nv.i aaitiviJaei 9ifj Ji ' -t iffi IhidS 9aoflJ qj ioaod 9Jjfi ni .8 .11 .. ' . bio 9di JO .9 ' iBila Iliul- a9Jfima8Blo bj nof§ mo odW .i ' M ro9S ai " t0 V. .tocIbJ to teuQ JuoriJiV " qj o agj id fuodJiW ,69 ' iabi ■ [i;i ' ij :i t( t£W •sno .-tor;;: rfJfW ' .. . iu n - - if j 1 v. ' n wo i-i Fi ' eV ,9U . -, ' Ig .(f,:i:! .3 .V! .A bfo Ol OF ' to 3910fH0rfqt S JIB E flO: j to .-. : uov oj ti 9voiq [Itw se ' n ' ioil guiffloo ,3veb gnhaoO ■ - ' i [lii ?A$iual •nil ' a i 1391 H ' sW .t90 3 38BI3— ■ ' ' - ' ' j 3ion ,2 : ' iij ; ft , .■•. :-).■.. .--k! ' ) ■) ■-: ■- u tib ;, f : ' -) ' rfo ■ ; ■ ■ ' ;, ' -. I . • c ■ •jr! I : -[i . -;. i ■ ' i : " f; ; ■ . ■■■■ ■ i .■ ■• ii . • - . | grj " K ... oniric - ) . ■ • ' -:■■■•. ' . ' • - •[ -.;; r j ;. irrl i; - ' : ' ; : ■ ■ . i. i if: ' I Sophomore Class History The Sophomore Class, known in past periods to be one of the largest ever seen to enter the Angola High School, has greatly diminished dur- ing the past year. This diminishing in number was due either to the failure of the pupils to make the required number of credits or to their leaving school to take work in college. However, the remainder of the class still persists in holding together as the men of the -Swiss Guards, " and in following the shining colors.. Black and Gold. Although the " Sophs " are as busy at study as any one, they have made themselves shine also in the athletic world ; the class has produced four of the players of the A. H. S. Basket Ball Teams. In future days when the class arrives to its senior year, it hopes to set a star in the sky of future school life— a star which every pupil will stare at in wonder. Thus in those days and the days to follow, every pupil in the Angola High School will make it his aim to live as did the Class of 1912. — Don Culver, 1 8s s ' v V - - ,t- ft J- - m ' 1 - v )V u lid the «k13 : tsrrflf . ' •■ sslD . i . I I [ ftgsIC) b i Freshman Class President - - Heber Elliott Vice-Pres. Dorothy Barbara Rakestraw Treasurer - Birdena Hayward Historian - Milton M. Damlos Poet - Louise Powers Class Colors : Old Rose and Cream. Class Flower: Pink Rose Motto : Good, better, best, never let it rest Till your srood is better, and vour better, best. Class Yell: Pipty, Ripty, Ripty, Rus! Freshmen! Freshmen! That ' s for Us! Florence Abrams Mildred Austin Blanche L. Baker Darl Brennan Ruth Bryan Mabel E. Coe Crate Cope Milton Damlos Barbara Dodge Pyrl Dole Russell Doudt Heber O. Elliott Lei and Ewers Paul A. Fast Helen H. Hamlin Robert B. Hanselman Millie Edith Harman George William Harman Birdena Hayward Mina Johnson Enola Kreuder Eva Kundard Ivah Mallory Florence C. Martin Roy Miller Willa Morse Esther Mullennix Cleon Noves Class Roll Esther H. Orton Vera Orewiler ( ieorge L. D. Parrish Lewis Parsell Winifred Parsell Martha Pollock Sarah Porter Mildred Potter Louise Powers Dorothy Rakestraw Wymond L. C. Ritter Sylvia Robbins Marie Adele Rundell Mary Ethel Sheffer Glad a S hum way Helen G. Smith Clyde Snelenberger Clarence Swanger Ruth Waller Parepa Hope Walker Mildred Webb Rachel Webb Fred Wilcox Florence W ' hite Doris G. Wilson Charley Young Vera Young Thad K. Mabie Freshman Class Poem Twas in the fall of Nineteen Nine. We Freshmen first were seen Timidly entering the door, Scared stiff lest we look green. The bashfulness of that first day Did not frustrate us long: We all soon felt ourselves at home. And gazed down on the throng. The Soph ' mores glanced at us with awe. While jealous were their eyes; For they had met their Waterloo — And met if with surprise. The Juniors and the Seniors, too, Looked up at us with pride, And grieved to think the time so short When they should leave our side. We ' ve staid eight months, and short the time Has been to us this year. We hope in four more months, at least. To see you all back here. For we ' ll all be here, every one. To finish school we ' re bound: A truer, brighter class than we Can nowhere else be found. We ' re bound to win, with honors, too, Our hearts are in our work. When in Nineteen Thirteen we ' ll prove It does not pay to shirk. —Louise Powers. .eatZ ns lBaWi to UsH 9 tr rri sjswT ' XX9S - 979W Taiii ri9fXIff39 ' I f, I 7 ..oof) sill §nn9in9 vtbimiT .nesfj; ?foof 9w J39I Bite betsoB ift ifwi ' i xo 339filuix;8j3d :§noi ■r ' .n 9jB ft3U ' iT loir 1)1(1 ; 39vl :; o tfe ' t xxooa ' Ik sW . " uo- ' -fit ysij etc av oT: b9SBg bfrA U ' jrv HI! j :. V-MiiJig 39 - xoxxx ' dqo3 9dT :- ' . ' -. t ' sedi ' I9W 3ifoIfi9i 9ifrf7 — oof t :■• tb7 -jiedj 19xxi bsxf vorl, 1 ioTI .98nci ' !us dm ti !9rn bxxA ,ooj ,310X1193 9fli has R-. ' oiniil. 9dT ■ bnq rfjrw 3ix 7 ft qo neii ' ooJ 7-;orIs 08 grxxfl sr.M Anidl oJ b9V9i rg !iaA .©bis xxxo svB9l blaorlg 9rfj a9ifV7 9mn -3 r r ; nods bi. ■ a Jffgxs idei? 9V9W , l£9y siilJ 3if oj .:- ' h ' 5H ..-»[ jfi . ' fiiiruui 9iotn tjjo ' 1 ni 9qoxf 9W .919(1 j[OKCf He ffOV 993 oT .gn . 9 .9 ' i9r[ 9 f Us if ' 97 " [1 ;bnuod 9i ' 9w fooif ' - xisinil oT 9W x udr 33£[? •f9;ri§iid .tginJ A .bnrxot ed 93(9 9i9dwofl nrsO ,00 noxiod tiJiw ,nxw oj bauo6 9i ' 9W . I ' lov ruo rri eix a rjised -niO 97Gi | ;! " ' 0 ' iirfT n99i9aiH ax n9rfW .sfixxfs oJ vsq joa 3901) (I . •I97 O c i 98:rjo.I- I J j ' d ' h ... • i i • ■ ru ■ - . ■ •• I Km f ' no ■ : rfl i ; - ■ i ;rij • ■ " — Freshman Class History The Freshman Class, though scarcely recognized by the rest of the High School, consists of fifty-six members. It is true that some of our number have left during the year, yet these should not be regarded as typical of our grit. Some of those who left us did so after losing time on account of sickness, some moved from the city, and only a few indeed for seeming insufficient reasons quit our ranks. Our class has contributed its share toward athletic games: it fur- nished some of the members for the boys ' second basket ball team, and our girls were among the best on the girls ' team. In base ball, too. we filled our place— one catcher was chosen from our boys, while a fielder from the Class of " 13 has held his place against all competitors. ( ur ability in the class room may best be represented by the results of our semester grades. At the close of the first half-year, twenty-six out of fifty then in the class were exempted from the term examinations on account of high grades. But it would take too much space to tell more of our merits either as • a class or as individuals. Let it be sufficient, therefore, when we say that there is not a one of our present number in these closing days of the term who will not try very hard throughout the coming weeks, months, and years until he graduates in 1913. — Milton Damlos. 3f)£iD rflifeiJT " i . • . . I • I. I I ■ f Eighth Grade President Vice-President Secretary - Treasurer Historian Poet Edwin Carver Harry Gilmore Mildred Heckenlively Ford Zimmer Blanche Coy Donald Sheldon Class Colors : Gold and Blue. Class Flower: The Rose Motto : Find a Way or Make One. Class Yell: Watch out there, you allwise Profs., Freshmen, Juniors, Seniors, Sophs. Watch the Eighth Grade ' s Gold and Blue, We ' ll show you a thing or two. Soda water, soda water, ginger ale and pop ! Eighth Grade! Eighth Grade! we shall reach the top!! Class Roll Harry Kankamp Zema Moughler Ruth Miller Acnes Pollock Alan Parsell Samuel Pence Burton Richardson Berneice Ramsay Arminellah Ramsay Charlotte Stiefel Edna Segur Eva Lowther Donald Sheldon Paul Swift Cecil Swift Paul Theobald Adabelle Walcott Svlvester Wisman Ford Ginevra Bixler Nora Carpenter Tressie Culver Blanche Coy Zema Crampton Edwin Carver Lewis Carver Adah Doyle Kenton Emerson Thomas Fairfield Mark Frisbie Harry Gilmore Florence Grass Ruth Goodrich Gertrude Greenlee Mildred Heckenlively Roy Hagerty Eber JefFery Zimmer Eighth Grade Poem Stop! Look! and then listen To the Eighth Grade ' s little rhyme. We ' re the class that does things, And gets them done in time. We started in together. In the fall of nineteen two; Miss Parish was our teacher, And our lessons very few. But now we ' ve reached the Eighth Grade And they are piling up high. Still we ' ll struggle and be victors Before we ' ll pass them hy. Miss Rempis is our teacher The " Best on Earth, " you know oWhen she says a thing she means it. And we all know it ' s so. We hardly ever whisper Except — well, we ' ll not say. But we try to do our duty, And do what comes each day. We talk too much our teachers say, But then of course we ' re young, We like to know just how things go And we can ' t hold our tongue. Now look up at our colors, The grand old Gold and Blue, And we ' ve got the finest motto And we ' re going to keep it, too. ' Tis " Find a Way or Make One, " The grandest and the best. Oh! the Eighth Grade has just started To be ahead of all the rest. There are thirty-seven of us That will take a three months rest, And then we ' ll be the Freshmen In the A. H. S. Then here ' s to the Eighth Grade ' s future, The class of the Gold and Blue, May they stand in honor forever And live in prosperity, too. — Donald Sheldon. Eighth Grade History Our class numbers thirty-seven studious boys and girls. Onl of this number most of us started together in the first grade with Miss Parish as teacher. As we passed from grade to grade some dropped (.m and others came in. Adabelle Walcott, Florence Dygert and Pan The. .bald joined us last year, and Zema Crampton tin- year. This has been a very busy year, but we have found time to give three o-ood programs. Our class contain- two good violinist-, a large number of pianists, and considerable talent in vocal music, besides a number who have much oratorical power. Next year, as Freshmen, we expect to do -real thin--, and hope it may be said about us that there has never been a brighter and better Freshman Class. -Hlanche Coy. - i 7 9bfi " ig (g7.fi ,rij fti ■[■jiii-y r . i ■ .; b j ;-rj;i gu ;• irn is-drrmn aifj baqq tl 3-mog . Kgg o 9bfi 7jg r ■ : » basasq 3 .larbfioi gjs rlghB 1 - -•■„■■_(.! aonoioH .in ' Mk ' afiadfibA - rr i 9rri£3 ai rllo briB tu .IB i m ' r;jrr ' i • . r r - X briB iVksy JgBt gn J o r. f « • ; blficfosff oi srrril r , ,;j • . .: nay b rraacl r,d errfT tfainrloxy bjctp, " ■ ' - " ' • ' ? ■■ ' rrj( ' .afnBigoicj boo g 39ifi ji obi ad r oi?.rjrn Ibdov rii irtalBJ afdBiabi rioa briB ,alainBiq :■■ ' tnu .-:- ; Iso ' n ' d ' jnm 3 Brl orfw isdrrmj briB .fi nrVI .; 3 • fri J-j-jq .v jv jrsrndas ' rl 8B t ifi9Y ! ' . latisd briB i mjshcf k usod laivon efid 3 9 rtj ii rfj gxx fxjods biBg ad yBm - r srbfifili-l — .33bO rrBfrtfiaai ' ' ' I ' ' ' ' ' ' I - [I if ;. ■; | ' : -f[ - ;l - .-I, . I i ■ - Mental Gymnastics of the ILighth Grade Blanche — ' ' The principal parts of sit are : sit, sat, sitten. " Tressie — (paraphrasing) " Little Ellie sat by the edge of the streamlet. She had thrown her bonnet by and was dipping her feet in it. " Miss R — " A polygon bonnded by six straight lines is a — Class — A hexagon. " Miss R — " One bonnded by eight straight lines is a — Kenton — An Oxygen.,, Edwin, in History Class — ' ' General Grant had an accident while at Vicksbnrg. He fell from his horse and injured his leg so that it swelled up as far as his neck. " In Reading Class — " Now Mistress Gilpin, when she saw Her husband posting down Into the country far away. She pulled out half a crown ; And thus unto the youth she said. That drove them to the Bell, This shall be yours when you bring My husband safe and well. " Donald — " Why did Mistress Gilpin tear out her hair? " " j?M A i i ' . .... . owl ■ - ■ • ■ • - Ft ij - i ij - ■ . •_ ■ , . .. : . - I ■ . Athletics High School Athletic Association. John Culver President Ned Et-tinger Vice-President Burton Sickles Treasurer Warren O. Goodwin Manager As a whole, athletics in the High School this year, considering the means and the material at hand, were very successful. One must remember that success in High School athletics does not depend so much on the percentage of games won as on the spirit shown and the interest manifested. A goodly squad of boys responded at the first call for basketball can- didates. At a meeting of the squad, Warren O. Goodwin was elected captain of the team. Practice was first held on the court just east of the school build- ing, one game was also played there. At the beginning of col d weather the new college gymnasium was rented and practice was pursued there each day between the hours of four and six. The schedule and results of the games are as follows : At Angola Sept. 9 — A. H. S. vs Alumni, 28-18 favor A. H. S. At Angola Nov. 20 — T. S. C. vs A. H. S., 26-25 favor T. S. C. At Angola Nov. 26 — Columbia City H. S. vs A. H. S., 25-22 favor C. C. At Angola Dec. it — T. S. C. vs A. H. S.. 33-20 favor T. S. C. At Angola Dec. 18— A. H. S. vs Co. B., 31-25 favor A. H. S. At Angola Jan. t — T. S. C. vs A. H. S., 31-21 favor T. S. C. At Angola Jan. 7 — A. H. S. vs Auburn PL S., 23-21 favor A. H. S. At Auburn Jan. 22 — Auburn H. S. vs A. H. S., 29-15 favor Auburn. At Coldwater Jan. 28 — Coldwater H.S. vs A.H.S., 41-23 favor Coldwater At Angola Feb. 5— A. H. S. vs Hillsdale H. S., 24-15 favor A. H. S. At Columbia City Feb. it — Columbia City vs A.H.S.. 35-30 favor C.C.H.S. At Angola Feb. 18 — Coldwater H. S. vs A. H. S., 27-27 At Hillsdale Feb. 25— Hillsdale vs A. H. S., 38-23 favor Hillsdale. At Reading March 4 — Reading vs A. H. S., 28-20 favor Reading. Team Forwards — Clifton Mugg, Warren Goodwin. Guards — Xed Ettinger, John Culver, Lee Hirsch. Outers — Ralph Boozer, Glenn Walcott. Girls ' Basketball The girls also manifested much interest in basketball and at the first call of the coach, Miss Nottingham, about twenty girls responded. Team The team which played mosl of the games consisted of the following: Outers — Marie Rundell, Winifred Parsell. Guards — Ellen Dygert, Parepa Walker, Neva Dewey. Forwards — Lois Castell, Helen Kunkle, Helen Smith. Sub. Center — Millie Ilarman. Substitutes — Martha Pollock, Sylvia Robbins. Too much cannot be said of the able working and help tendered by Mr. Maple and Mr. Weldy to the hoys ' team, and by Miss Nottingham and Mr. Karl Kyper to the girls ' team. Base Ball Owing to the carl} " spring,, base ball was pursued very diligently for several weeks. As yet but two games have been played, both with Hamilton High School. Team Catchers — Cope, Ettinger, Culver. Pitchers — Walcott, Fast. First Base — Smith. Second Base — J. Culver. Third Base — T). Culver, Schnelenberger. Short Stop— C. Mugg. Left Field — Schnelenberger. Center Field — Zimmerman. Right Field — Goodwin. Substitutes — Hirsch. S wanger. I . " ' vi ■ ■ . • ft ■ ... JclAI - = =- ii Li : ■■■, ' ■. ■ I | . . ■ ■ Dramatics Two especially good examples of the dramatic side of our school lif this year were portrayed in the Hoys ' Minstrels, given Jan. 14, 1910, am the play. " One of the Might. " given during the closing days of school. William Owen, a great Shakesperian actor, who gave a lecture at the High School in 1907, was again listened to this year, and his lecture vas greatly enjoyed by all. The substance of his lecture was, " The Drama, its origin, its growth; and what a play should mean to us. " More dramatic work had been contemplated, but on account of th lack of time in which to prepare it, the work was given up. Following are the programs of the plays given this winter: e HIGH SCHOOL MINSTRELS Characters Ralph Boozer, Interlocutor " THE MERRY JESTERS " " Cully " Culver " Tucket " ' Mc Nell) " Red " Hirsch " ' Rube " Smith GRAND CH )RUS Lynn Elston Clifton Mugg Don Culver Frank Fast Clyde Snelenberger Xed Ettinger Corneal Bratton Clen Walcott Opening Chorus bv the entire Company, containing such old-time favorites as the following: " Tlie Girl T left Behind Me ' " In Splendor Bright " " Anvil Chorus " " Sweet Marie " " Here ' s to Good Old Brown " " Drink I ] Boys " My Dainty Cigarette " " Sleighing Son- " ' ' Whistling Chorus " " Luanda " " Brother Noah Cave Out Checks for Rain " Eddie " McNelly Someone Looks Good to Someone and Someone Looks Good to Me Glen Walcott " Foolish Questions • John ( " ulver ! Wonder How the Old Folks are at Home Frank Fast Red Head ' -ce I [irsch 1 Wonder if Ever the Rose N ' ed Ettinger Don ' t Take Me Home Lno Smith Save Tt for Me Lynn Elston Quartette Lee, I mo. Glen, N T ed Grand Finale Entire Company Warren O. Goodwin, Electrician Burton Sickles. Pianist 8J3HT8HIM JOOH38 HOIH • • : :! ,i3soo3 flqii ' I ■ ; •! ;•!!. Y5I I3 : 3HT ' Ho ' jU ' :K»brj ' vllrr ' r ' ( | ; , , K |,; |- rfoaii-H " i.-jM " ogul rrorti noJaFS ririvJ - : ' •! |frj-rrl -r-»v!;: ' J rio ] ;-i |) ' j -I-, • . ' ' ab H v : [• ■;;■;;:; [fi ►rnoO - ; rjri ... to-j .ynuqmoO -jtiltrs arfj d surtorfO grrirraqO ■ - r ■•;; ' -..■; r i . i ' ' • ' ;7 " ' WfrttitfO ii ) . " ri ' ' ■■ " :. ' I I ' i ' . » : -i ii ' i • r - ' ■ ,-.) - " ■ ' j-.-r.v-f ) yjrriMl (fitf [ " I : ) ,r;i: .! ' ' ' " niB% 6 :0 foi ' -,, ' !.: i i rrrtP ;,-,r. an ' . tff boi I -,[ i .. 1 •jno rrp - ; j . 1 p.ifejfo mK ' rteikx R amo] ! r. stjs ft I :.:■ ' vrit w)H isbnoV 1 : bfioH ba jk-oJI sih -tovJI ii rebnoW I 9moH ?U rJsT t ' nbG 9M lOl il 9Vi 2 ■mJ •.i rt,.-; ' | ' " ,l,l,:! Srffifliq l)f. 1 : rifibrdoafJ] ,«twboor) . ) rr ■■ . rrj. ' l " THOia 3HT ffO (ElfirfD - fcjfc.VJ I :, , . ' | r-jl , ' j ' .; . ; - i ; Qimft " ■■ i ] - - • - ■ i ■ ■ . ' • : ' . ■ j - ■ - , ■ 1 I Rii ' l ■.; ... ■ ■ i ' -■•■■• . ;.... ' .....I - ■ ■- : .. •- ro ' Hn-3 ' -• i ' " ONE OF THE EIGHT " Characters Henry I ' .rooks Ralph Boozer Mr. Brooks, his father Frank Fast I.o l Chillingworth Imo Smith Peter, his valet Lynn Elston I rity Marks. I. 1).. a Hypnotist John Culver Caleb Weston, Davenport College Glen Walcott N T ed Andrews, of Bookworth Dale Ellithorp " Mollie Runskool " Eddie McNelly Bill Carter Ned Ettinger ! ' r »f. Dixon David Palfreymay Mrs. Brooks, Henry ' s mother Mae Tasker i Men Baldwin Esther Williamson Bob Burton Sickles Amy, the Professor ' s Daughter Alda Ritter SYNOPSIS Acl I — Parlor in Henry ' s Home at Redville, New Year ' s Night. Act II — Curiosity Room in Delta Sigma Fraternity House — A Morning in June. Acl III — Same as Act 2 — Afternoon. Act IV — Same as Act 2 — Evening. ►W L h s ! ; ; ! p titles ,.i " _ U ' l ' . , Ku • - • - ■ ■ ■ I Society of the Angola tligh School The social events of the High School have not been numerous this year, owing to the many social functions and public entertainments that have occurred outside of the school activities. It is the experience of public schools everywhere that too many clubs and social organiza- tions among school pupils are detrimental to the best interests of the pupil and demoralizing to the school. The first Senior class party was given at the home of Vera Ewan. All those present will long remember the events of that evening as be- ing the last time the Seniors were gathered together. Many other social events have been enjoyed by the different members of the class. The Junior class thus far has had no class parties, but has had many informal functions given by the members of the class and a few invited friends. The Sophomores and Freshmen are just now — near the close of the year— getting acquainted with one another, but we expect to hear from them during their few remaining years in school. — Rheba French. Department of Music The course in music has for its purpose the development in pupils of the power to understand and appreciate music both as an art and a science, and to train them to express ideas and feelings in s The work, as outlined by grades, consists in Voice Training. (Vocal Drills.) Ear Training, (Oral and Written Dictation.) Eye Training, (Reading from Charts and Uooks.) and Rote Songs. The work in the High School consists of Chorus Work, Advanced Theory. Elementary Harmony, Melodv Writing. Musical Forms and Instruments, and Bi- ography. In special organizations the High School has a band, a girls ' glee club, a girls ' quartette, and a male quartette. % , • . ' - ll ■--- - -— - , : I - ! : fi 8YO(l • ' f I -o J f | .. - . , - - ■ m oj = ■ ■ i ■ ' ' :- -;_..,.■■,-. I .- Department of. Drawing The outlines in drawing and handwork in the lower grades are based upon the work in history and geography. In the grammar grades, the work in drawing correlates with the wood work for the boys and with the sewing for the girls Drawing is made elective throughout the High School course. After learning the fundamental principles of draw- ing in the grades, a pupil is able to become proficient in drawing by electing the advanced courses in the High School. Our aim is to meet the needs o| the student who wishes to become a teacher of drawing in he public schools, to lay the foundation for commercial drawing and cartooning, to give skill and accuracy in the botanical and physical lab- oratory note books, and to awaken in the mind of the student an ap- preciation of the beautiful in both nature and art. The careful udent will have an opportunity to begin, what may finally be a liberal education in art. literary. .yvsuitj , .% ■ ' ■ - r! H : • 1 I ' i • i . ■■.. - . ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ r ■; ' I ! ■ His Vacation It was a sultry night in early August. Brain Anderson, Detective, Cew York, sat on a country hotel porch lazily smoking- his cigar. He had just this afternoon arrived in Bellaire. a quiet, little country town of hut a few hundred inhabitants. Anderson was seeking a much needed Wearied in both mind and body, he had chosen this out-of-the- way place, thinking he would escape the cases of mystery which had be- ci line S( ' tiresome to him. The hotel, the only one which the town afforded, was situated on an elevation which gave a good view of the town lying below. Lying there in the moonlight so quiet and peaceful, with here and there lights glimmering in the homes, it brought a sense of rest to the overwrought nerves of Anderson. Just across the street from the hotel, he noted an old house, colonial style, surrounded by evergreens. What a place for a mystery. " thought Anderson, " but I ' m not going to bother about mys- teries. I ' m going to rest, rest, rest. " He still continued to gaze across when suddenly he sat bolt upright. What was the white object moving slowly about under the trees? It took no definite direction but seemed 1 " he rirst one place then, another. Soon it disappeared. " Well, " he ejaculated, that ' s strange. " It was now late but Anderson waited longer to see if the object would again appear. He retired to his room hut not to sleep, for he could not get the thing off his mind. I oward morning the detective fell into a fitful sleep but was aroused arly by the hustle and hurry down stairs. He arose, dressed and went vlown to breakfast, and had just finished when the landlord entered with ;i pleasant " Morning, Mister, put over a good night? " ' No, I can ' t say I did, " returned Anderson. ' A hat ' s the matter? " inquired the landlord. " h. a case of nerves, I guess, " said Anderson carelesslv. Say. Mister, aim ye a detective? " asked the landlord. " If ye air v e ' ve got a case fer ye. " N i es, I am a detective. " returned Anderson, " what ' s the case you speak of? " " Well, ye noticed that house across the street, didn ' t ye? Well, ? ha ' nted or something, so they say. Old man Jones, a rich old feller thai used to have a drug store lived there some fifty vears ago. He had a son that was a little off and he killed himself in that house. So the spirit comes hack and ha ' nts the place. The funnv part of it is that it ' s never been seen till in the last six months or so. " ' " W ell that ' s a mystery certain, isn ' t it? " said Anderson: " I ' ll have to look into this. Although 1 came here to rest, I ' ll never rest until this lias been solved. ' ' With this the matter dropped. Anderson spenl the day tal i the town, reading and planning the best way to get at this myster Just at dusk that evening, he crossed over to the house, climbed a n under which the night before he had seen the " object. " and prepared Inn- self tor a long wait. The hands oj his watch ere pi around oh!-,, slo Ten-thirty, then ten-forty-five, the time which it appeared last night. Breathlessly and eagerly he watched. Ah! he heard a step and muttei ings. A tall white form came into view. Nearer and nearer il came, un- til it stood under him. Why! it looked like a human being. He jumped down from the tree and approached it. ft looked neither to the ri nor left. He reached for it and seized the object by the arm. dra •■ i across the road, up the steps of the hotel and into the office to the acc m paniment of its shrieks. In the light it proved to be a somnambulist— but now a very wide-awake and much frightened bo v. " Mere is vour Mr. Landlord, " said Anderson. The mystery was solved. The remainder of Anderson ' s vacation was a quiet, restful one. — era Kwan. ' ! i The Night Watches and Watchers At 12:04 sharp, Billson entered Papa Harnell ' s den and began ' on Papa ' s safe. " Ought to be some coin here 1 claim. " remarked Billson in a which could be heard a yard away and thus proved his youth and lessness, " Old Tightwad aim going to give itt away for charity. Billson is ahead i the story, but then Billson was rather last. - for a young man. As for the story this is it: At 11 130 Alice Marie finished her plea for a little mone and had answered. " Every cent you have left me is in that safe. ; d locked, thank Heaven! Get your fifty and it ' s yours: don ' t ask again : g id-night ! " For nearly seven minutes Alice Marie wept and vowed self-destru tion, for twenty minutes she sulked. Twelve o ' clock found her belore the safe: " Papa is a dear and a sport if he is a little hard-hearted. He said I should get it if 1 could and — Oh! this horrid combination ' . my! hear that board creak! It ' s Papa " — and she snapped ofi " the 1 and slipped behind the curtains in the bay window. Of course it was Billson. He laid a revolver on the floor not feet from Alice Marie, swung: the beam from his dark-lantern on the ' iitir j ■■ n IIT , YP.51 6j aiarT arriso i r ' " ■.:;;■ rf}17 .air] ; otrri fi n .J ri , ' f. Ig ri ; ,,!. jiii fnaqs rroa ' iabtrA .boqqonb laJtcm arlJ • i ;r7 ij K ' fascf arli gntnirislcj bit A gni b i . . " -j »rfj d rl • ■ iwofl orfi oj is vo i " j 2 ' biD srl rmtavo " juj f£ tp r jVq ' hrt£ ' ' .JoDfcfo " 9rr rr ' jo?. bfirl orl 9-roi9c! h irr 9f|j rb rh 7vbrn ti . ■ ; ■ : 1 j : i -.■!)■. arrj ro HbuRtl 9rf ' I . )■. , u ■.■ ' ' ..■ - " l i 3 •: • ,- fqjs ff rlorrfv -j r r r j j • ; l T .9Yrf-vj T-ri I ..vr. ' ,-j- : ; -- [Vfij [31 b ' In so rl f ! rl .bob fsw o ' ri (flo i ,-:,- [f| r.- v - .. rt bras -vjmvj ' . 9r oJm arriso rrnoi abriyv :n; ; . ' .- in .• niocf rrsmbrl s 3 I ' il bbjfool b ! vrfW .mid -i r y o»i ri ' i iritrori do -fool n Si b i- brtB m, arlj en r] m R ■ rTl ;d t-j Hjxto rli basioa bn ri ; . 3] f3aj 1 :•■: offl69rfi " f)tm bns l9JOfI ocMTi -jj ,, ' • ; rj ;J rrn 1 b »d oi bov(hq ft jrf-oH jrb n ; l .; i 1 • - h .yocI bsWrtahl rbr rri brrs 3 I .bsvlo . ' asw -najgyfrn aril .noa ' tobi f - r . . - ' biolbnj d f)i 1 g$ ifix rrob p ' ftarnsf] sqs bofotrra rroaffjtl . v . 1 : isrrrin jmsta i 979rl rii o ■:■ - ■. ■ . ,- . _.,-.- ' ' « ' " ' " I " " U brrs YSV Irr,,- r In, ' , f | «f f,J " ' ' »s lb avi-6 f) } o n i t )o trr ' ffi bswtd-iT bl " riw ' ' r.€)«Hifl rre-Ffl !;k] , r r rb , f n io r )j: ' , (f . fti i( M ; ;| :b ai girl -noi» 3r {j - ro ] , , 4 -,,, r ov , . " " - W.H J " K)| sofq wl b9rlairt.fi OT£ ]i ■,-■ ' ,r- ,, ri 1 « .«i n jb f ,vsd rrov rno, v-tov I ,ow 8 n £ hs B ' ' ,! " ' - ; -W- B brt.S u i, K 3J .■,:,; ' ! ' • : 3 iffiR 1 ' ' SfrI moil rnsocf orlt -gnrrwa ,ohsM vAU rrro 1 _ ■ [JB ■ . t 1 ' " i Jrrro ■r, yrlj ■ , : . ,, • • .• • 1 , ■ I ■ ■ i i oj ii ,.-, " ' -- I J I ' i . , , _ : ■ ■ . ■ ■ • | " I !? £ I : and as we have said began work with the remark we have before quoted. Next minute lie was looking- at a very indignant face, not as approv- ing! v as he sh.add— but then allowance must be made for his revolver, hich was between him and the face and was pointed with alarming steadiness. •Please take that right back; he isn ' t an old tightwad, only a little But yon don ' t look like a burglar. Why you have real nice — " she checked herself in some confusion. " What are you doing here? " Rillson was quick to note the weak point in her armor. " Oh, Miss! " he said pleadingly, " don ' t fer anything hand me over to the cops. It would break mother ' s heart sure. That ' s the reason why I ' m here, i can ' t see her starve. " .p v Billson had no mother, but as proofs were not demanded, the story served. " Oh. I sec: I ' m so sorry-. But what can I do with you? Will you promise to reform? Oh, I ' m so glad! " Billson had answered readily, promising reform and suggesting that he be allowed to go free. Alice Marie was thinking of doing this, and ? also mentally surveying a very bright star in her crown which is to say, the reclamation of this good looking young burglar from a life of lishoncstv, when into her brain flashed a thought which conclusively roves her to be a most original young lady. Acting upon this thought or more properly inspiration she asked, " Can you open that safe? " " Sure, that ' s my biz. " replied Billson, " or rather was until you re- formed me, " and with a glance at the lock, " This here was cast about the year one, I guess: no dynamite fer this. But what did you want to know fer? " Me had such nice eyes and looked so perfectly nice that Alice Marie responded with a burst of confidence. A nn see I wanted a little money and Papa wouldn ' t give it to me. he said I could have it if I could get it from the safe. I suppose he vas only joking but h e said it and— well don ' t you think it would be all • " ' . ' In to take it ? " nre. " answered Billson, " and I ' ll just yank her right open fer vou. be the last un fer me and the first what I didn ' t open fer tin. " ' He winked mightily toward the darkest part of the room. safe was old, Billson showed that he would not retire from the ion without some technical knowledge thereof, and in a very brief ice the ate stood open. A reasonably good skeleton key unlocked the fashioned cash box and the burglar solemnly counted out to Alice y dollars. A close observer of Billson ' s movements would have that Billson did not retire from business without a slight proviJ " " old age ( I ' apa Harnell swore next morning that he had lost fif- teen hundred dollars.) " We ' ll fool ' em proper, " remarked Billson cheerfully, upscLLin • chair and strewing the floor with papers from the safe. " Now if peaceable like. " give me my gun I ' ll give my word not fer to do no damage, but n mi " Mere it is, " said Alice Marie, passing over the weapon, " and hen five dollars to pay you for being so perfectly lovely about everything and here is as much more for your poor mother. Come round tomorrow and I ' ll try to persuade Papa to give you work. Won ' t von coi i She said it so earnestly that Billy Rawdon would have worried in ly gray had he heard it. but then he didn ' t hear. " Why you see. Miss, " said Billson, " I can ' t just explain win. but vol see, if your dad seen me here right in the morning he ' d be plumb sun lay everything up to me, so don ' t look fer me. But say, why in pla_ don ' t you take some more while the safe ' s open r " " Oh, mercy! that would be stealing. Papa only said 1 might havi fifty dollars. I couldn ' t think of such a thing! Didn ' t you know bu then I forgot — now that you have reformed vou must eo to church and learn to be good. Only there are so many hats and things to look ai newer hear much of the service, but you are a man and that ' s different. " Billson quietly let himself out of the window and once outside hugged himself and chuckled. Alice Marie heard a faint sound from oul side: she listened and concluded that her burglar was laughing for joy at beerinnigf a life of honesty. As she fell asleep she murmured, " I got the money and he had lovely eyes and — . " Alice Marie gave a little sm n — Warner Woodriner. ' n. An Assembly Room Dose On Friday mornings it is the custom of the High School to have lecture given in the Assembly Room, by some well known person. Mw in a while the order is changed, but when other plans fail, some speaker is secured. One morning early in February, while listening to a lectun given bv a citizen of Angola, my mind began to take a rapid review oi the things other speakers had said. I first thought of Mr. Stauffer and what he had said about the daily work which counts for so much in our lives. Then my mind took its position on a very fast train bound for Germany. 1 traveled for several minutes with Professor Starr and saw many strange sights. ( )f course it was " As You Like It, " and I thought it was fine. While in England on my way home I met Mr. Owen and with him I learned much of the home of Shakespeare. -- qj . " -■:..■! - i . pj I irfj -fjvo -gj hus] -:■■•;■ ■. . . ' ■ . ..: ' .■■ 1 " _-■- - ■,.. - • ■. .- -.■;•.; ' ,: j ■: ; ' _ ■ ■ ■■_ 03 , ' • .■ ■ I " : ' ,;■■ rf ' bl , ' ■ -j - ' " ' ,-•.; ' ■ M ' : ' ' I rj I {J ._ ' : •: | . | f ' nj . : " ,fii ' lli ' i bjj " . ;-:! • ' . ,39 fj ; • ri i .» iuo li . ' ■■- ' . ' i .; " ■ ■-.•..■!,■■.:,-,! " ■ ■ ,• [ : ' .- ■. ; ilirfv om nrtoa -• !• : I I i£ - : . , •_ ' .;■ ugj • , ■ ., I . rrirlj s.rl [rtkfj t ' r ' ■ ■ ■ .hirII b m . ■■ barri ' ■..-.•■■. ,- j | ■■ ■ - ' " ■- - - s _aorli . , ' ' »,■;..■ 37fi {JOY J lJ ■ . - ■: ' ; ' -• rt ' ft - ' .. " : r «ii ■ - ■. si -. ■ . . ■G mmM yl msmA hA • - • • • r • - , si. J - ' -■■ nsfen I : i I ' " • ■-■ " ■ - I Hiicm a ■ •■;. .,i - ' • -,m.-- . n rfw lud .bo-, , ; VTO 9ri , 9lfaiv , B ni ' ■ 10 fvn: V ' • ■ -- T. b, , , • , - f, Q gnirfJ rfj ' " " " - ' • " — ' ,-■ ' n f H - io stiiori arfj }.-, ffvrrrrr born ij - ' ' ' I i I ) • | f J I ' : ' ■■ ■ ■ . : — ; I ' , ' • ■ ' - i ; " i j!t! r J riui n ■ . - ' rrorfj ] ' ■ ■-•■,!., i f I J - - - d ' yr .n ■ •r;, ■ • v ' ■ rjj - ■ The first thing I wished to do on returning home was to visit the old time school of which Mr. Long- was the teacher, in order that I might learn more of that wonderful " Sparkin ' Society. " i remembered what Mr. Knepper had said about smiling and I laughed outright, when I was traveling- along the road and met a deaf man culling wood. This called to my mind the beatitude, " ' Blessed is man who can tell himself a funny story. ' At another time I had occasion to laugh at Professor Fairfield when he threw a pailful of water n hi- uncle. Rut I immediately became grave when I remembered that Halley ' s comet was coming and might at any time strike me. Suddenly I awoke to realize that the lecture was over and that I had not heard a word that had been said. —Hazel M. Avery. ' 12. — Helen W. Kunkle, ' 12. A Ride in an Engine Cab " All aboard ! " " Little Joe. " the 250 pound engineer of No. 525, swung me into the :■■ }) where 1 was to stay during the two hundred mile ride across the prairie from Areola, Texas, to the reservation in Oklahoma. I seated myself on one of the high leather-covered boxes by one of the windows and looked about me. The smell of hot oil was very strong for ' Little Joe ' never allowed his mchinery to " touch. " The levers and gauges were polished to a finish, and what little glass there was in the cab would have done credit to any housewife. All this showed that ' Little Joe ' loved his engine and that his heart was in his work. 1 then turned my attention to the outside. The telegraph poles whizzed by at a rate to make one dizzy, for we were going at a speed of fifty miles an hour. We had a clear track since we were taking a dispatch from Areola to the commander of the garrison at the Reservation, where we had news of trouble with the Indians. As I was looking out of the window, I felt something whiz past my ear and strike in the other side of the cab. A moment later a bunch of some twenty Indians burst from a clump of bushes by the track and a volley of bullets pattered against the sides and window of the cab. Shout- ing to me to get down from the window, Joe threw the throttle wide open— the engine bounded ahead at nearly the rate of a mile a minute. The fireman kept a stream of coal pouring into the fire-box. " There ' ll be another bunch down the track a bit, " Joe shouted to me above the din of the machinery. Sure enough about five miles farther down, another and larger band fired on us. A shot struck an artery in Joe ' s arm just above the elbow, but he gave no sign of pain. The blood streamed from the wound and T saw that he would soon faint, so 1 managed to slip a rough tourniquet on his arm. Me succeeded in turning on the breaks when wc came in sight of the garrison. We saw a bod}- of soldiers lined up to receive us. After the intense strain was relieved and Joe was being lilted from the cab. he swooned from loss of blood, lie revived, however, in time to see a body of troops set out to punish the Indians. Looking up at me with a weak smile, he said: " Well. Old 52 brought us through that time all right, didn ' t she? " — Clifton Freligh. The Little Green Man The night was stormy and dark. Indeed it was so foggy that even tlie nearest street lamps looked like tiny stars alar off. 1 sat in my study alone by the fireside and listened to the wind as it came whistling and shrieking around the corner of the house. Lnere was no light in the room, but the blaze from the fireplace cast rather a singular glow over the entire room and made me feel sleepy. Drawing a large, roomy chair near the fire — yet but half way from the shadow — I threw mvself into it and gave myself up to the fancies oi the room. 1 know not how long I had sat there when 1 heard a slight noise. I looked up. The room seemed changed, but in such away that it was hard to describe. It was still the same except that there were no walls. Where walls had been, all was blank space. This seemed strange to me ami I could hardly account for it. 1 then looked toward the center oi the room and saw a small man calmly seated in one of my chairs. Lhis little man was dressed in green and wore a small green cap. While 1 was wondering how he came to lie there, where lie came from, and what he wanted, he began to speak, asking me it 1 ever looked into the future. Now one i my greatest hobbies had always been to have mv fortune told. Thinking this was what he meant am! that possibly he was a fortune teller. 1 replied in the affirmative and that T would like to look into the future again. 1 now supposed that he would eagerly demand money ami then pro- ceed with -the usual lingo of fortune telling. To my utmost surprise he did nothing of the sort but merely waved his hand toward the plac where the walls had been. I looked and saw in succession a number of curious pictures. g . ■ - . - ; htm tfj -[■ ■■■■ ' ■ ' m$M , .;■ m; sforrrta torfg . .-1 no bail ■ - - . ' .-.- ■ ■ ' . I, ({ ' ..- ..-,■... . , . , a ■. ;;■ ' « ■ - ' I ' tricn ' l (wj ■ . J :,,,:, - ■ : - .; ; 7f)fl ,5 ' ' ' ■-■•[] ioid • - • ' (TlO-tl ! •; - ,.,: ' , .,,.:. 1 :■-. ■■- jj v jilM H33T.0 sittiJ 3llT . ; .jbrtl . hi;f brn . ' ;. ' ' ;n toof «qrrrfil -m ' . ' •■■■ ' - brri ■ ■ frmrrrd ■ - ■ ' - rlT ' •! r l ' ■ i . .:- .•; 1 rtb I : . ! ,] I i ' I •I • . : ' ■■■ ' ■•■■ ; ' ,-.-■-. -. ,, .,.! |; r ;; . f -, ' - - ' ; 1 1 A ■ : ■■ b ■ ' r. I • - .eTrrjJorq ro h ' .Ml • ■- - ' ■ ' ■ ' -.■ ■ ■ ' rl i lin rn } ■ : ■ " ■ i ! ■ i - , r)I- • ' :-:,- ' - ' •■;■;■ fn : ■_■■.■■■■ : yt i ' ■ - - - j ' ■ ■ , ;. ' ' ' . " - ■ ■ - ■■ ' i ' Jfi ' l ' I : The first picture was the inside of a large building. I could scarcely distinguish anything- at first, but on looking closer. T found it ' . a- the interior of cue of the most beautiful and noted theatres in Europe. lanced at the actors. Surely, I thought, some at least looked familiar. there is one. John Culver — and playing- the title role, too. I was greatlv surprised to find that the pianist was Yelma Deal. I looked ain. but saw no familiar faces. The next picture was that of the Angola High School. The school seemed changed in some ways. I soon discovered that another large building had been built just across the street from the old building, while the ground south of the old A. H. S. was laid off in tennis courts — those which had long been the dream of Mr. Maple. Thinking I might know some of the players. I looked closer. Yes, there were several that 1 knew Ned Ettinger and Lois McCool were playing against Vera Rvvan and Warren Goodwin. I could not watch the game out for the picture began to fade, but I am sure that the members of the class ot loio w in the game. I he next picture was the inside of the school building. T looked in the Assembly Room and saw one of my old friends seated in the principal ' s chair — it was Lisle Dilworth. Down in the grades 1 found Vita Butcher and Mae Tasker still at heir old maid work — teaching. As this picture slowly faded away, T lw the next one was a large corn field. And yes, surely that was Frank Fast at his favorite occupation — cutting corn. Tin- next was a home picture; it looked to me like a happy home, oo. in the center of which I saw another old friend of mine, Lucile Smith. rile scene changed suddenly, and at first I could scarcely dis- ish the next picture. After looking a few minutes, however. I to he tlie interior of a large and splendidly equipped jewelry •lishment. Upon closer observation. I found in the fore-part of the tore a member of the class of 1910— Dale Ellithorp. His occupation - thai ot mending watches. All the while Dale kept his eve on some the main part of the store. Wondering at this unusual conduct I glanced around the room to see if I could find out what so much o, his time from his work. This was what I saw Near • ' case stood Ethel Chard ( ?) and I was much surprised to find her «PO " a number of persons just as if she owned the place. After tins picture began to look blurred and was almost indistinguish- I- he or not to be; that was the question. " ire finally vanished and another took its place immediately. 1 a little old school house on a hill. It seemed such a lonesome t I wondered who that I knew could be teaching there. Since 1 Picture proved to be the interior of the school house. I thought ! would soon find the answer to my question. Eagerly 1 looked inward the teacher ' s desk and to my surprise saw Rheba French, f could have imagined anyone else but Rheba in that out-of-the-way place. She was hearing a recitation, and 1 noticed that she held a grammar in her hand. It looked to me as if she were having a little trouble with her explana tion of the lesson. This difficulty on her part reminded me oi our Senior Review Class; and I wondered if Rheba, in her school teaching, ever had any experience as she did when Mr. Weldy asked her to parse the word " bluff. " This picture faded away and 1 waited for the next one. Surely this was not the end. 1 hoped, for I had been enjoying myself immensely. But no pictures appeared. Instead I seemed to hear soft music. I listened awhile and the music became more distinct. I looked toward the piano ' and saw some one seated there who very much resembled Burton Sickles. Yes, I was not mistaken, it was Burton and she was playing our class song, too, " ' Memories. Dear. ' , When the music ended, T heard a heavy thud which startled nu I arose from my chair, looked around and observed that ! was alone. The little man dressed in green was no more, the fire was still burning brightly, the room was exactly as it had been before. hat, then, had T heard? Could the little man in green have made so much noise; Or had I been dreaming Alda Ritter. I ■ [•i ' J -j;;i .rroit«9up . ri ; fli - r rr ft rto - I •wsa 9? nq W2 vm oi b A g ' lsrfttat ri 3j z :r . ;-)(! I .. . ; ' [ ' folil ,::.: - ' N arte 1} -.. ■ : (] ,• - ■ i9rf no J ' -vr+tif) - ; r?T . --ji ■ i ' ■ :• ,rftf 1i ■ -i ■ ' ■ ■ : ] hifR ; -■ l ■ ' : -; | ■;ti ' I i ' -rl ; rtarfvy f r[ rlft 3jei - .■_:•■• I « rf. v r " . ' fUnd " bi • jfli 3JIBW f hll£ ■ " ■ ; if XI ; " l J ! ' ! ' • I ■ .- ' " ■.-. ■■ ■ I. ' {9 ?J [ ■ ■ i J ij-] torn S39cJ r . off v ,9 1 3 rj j b „r - i ' •■ . ' . ] ;: ' i b r i i ' , ' j . i : ris kI ir i) ;m •■ rf - ■ OH ■ ' . ...» .... . H. ...... . ■.■■;•! . . . . dro ■. .... . . ... ! . . . . . . . . . . . .. .... ■ - filQSJ ■■■ i The Alumni 1ST 7 Teacher Fremont, Incl. Carleton Jackson, Mich. • " Keep H. H. 1878 -Andrews, Frank Capt. U. S. Army 1879 ♦Dickson, Mate 1880 i very Serb Wire Fence Agent Angola ♦Mitchell, Delia Chadwick Anderson, Ind. Snyder. W. W Dead 1881 ♦Chadwick, Will C Lawyer Hillsdale, Mich. -Harnden. Ruth Coe Kansas City, Kan. -Perigo, Ella LaDue Chicago, 111. 1882 -Bigler, B. B Minister Logansport, Ind. Braman, Jennie Sams Angola, Ind. -Carpenter, Luna Dawson Elwood, Ind. Chadwick. C. Allie Dentist Angola -Gilbert, Delia Gale Dead -Kinney. Ethel Williams Dead -Kinney, Freeman W Bookkeeper Fredericktown, Mo. Leas, Nora Dressmaker Angola -Mitchell, Ella Freeman Angola -Patterson, Leona Weaver Angola Snyder, Mary Dead 1883 ' Boozer, Ella Leas Dressmaker Angola -Brewer, Ida Weaver Angola Cole, Nettie Dead -Dodge, Lizzie Cline Angola Eberly, Victor Mechanic Lead, S. D. -Eberly, Willis Mail Agent Waterloo, Ind. Lehman, Ethie Burlingame, Teacher Edwards, Miss. Owen, Belle Dea d -Scholtz, Louis Traveling Salesman. .Fort Wayne, Ind. Sheldon, Lizzie McConnell Angola Wells, Hattie Morrow Angola Willet, Rose Weicht Montpelier, Ohio 1 HH.-y Boon, .Minnie Dead Chilson, Frank Dead Crain, %. A Banker Redfield. S. D. :: Mann, Edessa Johnson St. Louis, Mo. -Miller. Etta Leas Dead 1880 Beil, Frank Dead ' ' Bollinger, Dora Plaster South Whitley, Ind. " Boone. Aequilla Railroad Engineer Chicago, 111. Ettinger. Zoe Dead ::: Le vis. Emily Kinney Bong Beach, Cal. ;:: Le vis, Frank K .Minister Long Beach, Cal. :: Moody. Alice Sowle Newark. Ohio Weiss, John Dead ' Welsh, Ada Phelps Toledo, Ohio Welsh, Emma Pharmacist Toledo. Ohio 18S7 Brown, Grace Teacher Lansing, Mich. Crain, L. D Merchant Ft. Collins, Colo. ' " Emerson, Ina Craig Angola Finch, Carrie Bookkeeper Columbus. Ohio - Humphreys, Frank Physician Angola Robinson, Alta Everheart Chicago, 111. : Wickwire, Josie Barnes Angola ■ Wyandi, Mattie Purinton Bryan. Ohio 18S8 Bales, Georgia Kinney Hiram. Ohio -Brockway. Inez Button Allen. Micl C-randell, Emma Cornell University Ithaca, X. V. ::: Freeman, Gula Weaver Angola -Lane. Milla Gates Angola McCauley, Carrie Cole Buckhannon, W. Va. Williams. Nellie Geneva. Neb Wood, Emma Ireland Dead 18S1) Gates, Fred C Railroad Contractor .Cleveland, Ohio -Gilbert, Guy Postoffice Clerk. . .Fort Wayne. In.!. -.Miser, Mary Longabaugh Waterloo, In i. Mcrse, Wellington Lumber Dealer. . . .Los Angeles, Cal. 1890 " Bobbit. Salena Carpenter Denver, Col. -Carpenter. Robert H Editor Elwood, Ind. Green, Elfie Pickett Bluffton, Ohir. Metzgar, Mary Stenographer Angola Pat tee. Chester Electrician Mr. Pleasant. Mich " Sheets, Jennie Slade Fremont, In. 1 . Sowle, Chas -Sowle. Irving Clerk Angola Williamson, Susie Sowle Angola •Woodhull. Ray Electrician Fort Wayne, Ind. 1891 I , ixon R . l Teacher U. of M . . .Ann Arbor, Mich. ■ Pattee Frank Telephone Lineman. .Durand, Mich. Watson. Maude Clerk Angola Williams, Lell Richardson Angola 1802 Benedict, Lillie Dead Bodley. Leona Stenographer Toledo, Ohio Craig, Ona Craig Detroit, Mich. -Laney. Etta Zipfel Bowling Green, Ohio 1893 Averill. Floyd Electrician Portland, Ore. Brooks. Anna Angola ' Hammond, Edna Brandeberry Salem Center, Ind. " Hutchinson, Jennie Pugh Lebanon, Ind. ,:: Milhoit " , lino Gale Mountain View, Cal. Wolf, Lena Teacher Fairbury, 111. ;; Wyrick, Basil Editor ' . Chicago, 111. 1891 Allen, J. W Bookkeeper Muncie, Ind. :: Allison, Mamie Goodale Angola ' -Brokaw, Nora Shank Angola :: Cook, Edith Lemmon Fremont, Ind. Jarrard. Bertha Sewell Angola : Roose, Nellie Day Topeka, Kan. Shearer, Mary Pugh , Angola Walls, Lunetta Teacher of Blind Toledo, Ohio 1895 ■Brown. Harry Clerk Angola -Carpenter. Royal J Banker Angola •Evans, Tillie Stayner Pleasant Lake, Ind. : Field, Arthur Traveling Salesman Angola Jarrard ' Wil1 Clerk Angola Jeffrey. Kate Ireland Shipshewana, Ind. " Metzgar, Irvin Milk Dea ier Angola Z USh - THlie ■ Angola : Redding, Mamie Gale Angola ;;Roby. Dorothy Fisher ' . ' . ' . ' . ' . ' . ' .. ' . Hillsdale. Mich. -Shank, Emmet E Lumber Dealer Angola " Single Edna Hirst Dunkirk, Ind. 1896 Benedict, Delia g 6 Farmer Metz. Ind. • seamstress Los Angeles, Cal. Brandebury. H. K ' Clark. Sadie Robinson..::::;;.... Enzor Freeman K Traveling Salesman. . . .Auburn. Ind. Goodale. Eva Morse 0rland Ind. Kemery. Blanche n lpr k ' ™ ' V , T . l lei k Fort YV ayne, Kinney, Anna Bogis Stenographer Portland, Ore. Lovee, Lulu Slade Angola McGrew, Lela Morse Angola Richards, Lillian Orewiler South Bend, I ml. Townshend, Deborah Dead Westenhaver, Mabel Post Vancouver, B. C. 1807 Niehous, Myrtle Shank Angola Philley, June Smiley Huntington, 1ml. Willennar, Vera Field Auburn, Ind. Williams, Lina Jacob Angola 1898 Estrich, Florence Moore Ann Arbor. Mich. Isenhour, Chas I , s. Army Luce, Clela Powers Des Moines, Iowa Ryan, Audrey Orton Huntington, Ind. Somers, John Dead 1809 Blass, Ralph Traveling Salesman, Clarksburg, W.V. Dirrim, Blanche Garwood Pleasant Lake. [nd. ' " Green, Nora Butler Tacoma, Wash. Markham, Mabel Rose Phoenix. Arizona Miller. Maud Eugene, Ore. McNaughton, Earl Merchant Ray. 1ml. McNaughton, Pearl Ford Ray. Ind. Miller, Will .1 Teacher .Monument . Ore. Nyce, James R Lawyer Angola Shank, Erman Druggist Hamilton, [nd Waller, Will F Physician Frontier. Mich. 1900 Gillis, Robert Dentist Hammond. Ind. ' Mclntyre. Etta Cary Orland, Ind. Sheffer. Samuel Printer South Bend. Ind. Smith, L. C Florist Marion. Ind. Stevens, Edith Hall Angola Waller, Tina Elya Frontier, Mich. Zipfel. Glen Dead 1901 Gale. Louis Tacoma. Wash. Gordon, Wava Poland Detroit. Mich. Janes, Vera Gilbert Newton Falls. Ohio McGrew, Jennie Stahl Telegraph Operator Angola Neal, Paul Attorney Freshwater. Ore. Purinton. Laura Kennel Whiting, Ind. Regan, Iva Morse Lima, Ohio Ritter. Clyde Druggist Pleasant Lake, Ind. Torrance, Clela Kirk Carnegie. Pa. 1902 Beard. Mabel Stenographer Auburn, Ind. Cary, Nellie Teacher Garrett, Ind. iluro ' . : 1 1 i. bBl3 [iJuJ .947. 9VlO] l fifoJ .V 9-lO .79 iO HBllliJ . ' i .... ifs (odsQ I .-I9Vi;r [fl - !8I . ■ : ■ . . 9firaS 9nu : j j I . .519 ' ■ : f ' • oobT. BfliJ ■ ji • 1 - i ■■ ' " ' iioi :■ aiioT, ,ai! . ' ■ ■ g ' " • ' I9l 930J ' IJfljl . ' . ■■ ■: i I:. ' I bio i I ' i ' " : ' ■ ' T sJ ...... JS ... . • - ■■in;- ... .: ' -. ... : ■ | ! . - " . . - . ■ - .J .ill .HbI ' - ..- . -■ .. .; uw.i ■ • • • ■ s ' m . ■■■ •■ . . . ... ■ iF. . .3u A 8I9IO ■ ' - I . . . - ' 3 . . i ,9ll i - . . . . . . ... .hl(I . . . . . . M ... ' - - ■ ■ ■ ■ . - ■ ■ 1 III • . Castell, Vera U. of M Ann Arbor, Mich. Crain, Grace Teacher Angola •Tinley, Alice Souseley Orland, Ind. French, Grace Teacher Angola " Gates, Louis Bookkeeper San Francisco, Cal. Gillis, Helen Trained Nurse Chicago, 111. Lemmon, Earl Farmer Angola Orton, Winnie Trained Nurse Chicago, 111. Paddock, Amy Hartman Leadville, Col. I ' hi. Willis Teacher of Music Angola Wickwire, Esther Teasher of Physical Culture, Seattle Wickwire, Ethel Angola Beard, Fern Brown Angola Beil, Eva Teacher Angola ' Berlin. Cynthia Kellogg Elkhart, Ind. Cline. Carrie Washington, D. C. Fisher, .Mack Barber Angola Fisher. Maude Braun Angola Flint. Nellie Henryville, Tenn. Freygang. Paul Electrician Chicago Heights, 111. Goodale, Ralph U. of M Ann Arbor, Mich. Haggerty, Guy Clerk North Manchester, Ind. Hathaway, Pearl Compositor Angola Hathaway. Winnie p. O. Clerk Angola " Jackson, Howard Druggist Angola Kreitzer, Harry Draughtsman Spokane, Wash Nichols, Nona Teacher Danville, 111 ' Preston. Lulu Bratton Angola ' Ritter, Edna Johnson Angola Sheffer, Maud Cowan Angola Snyder. Vera Angola 1904 Burt. Walter Draughtsman Muncie, Ind Casile. Nellie Stenographer Angola Crain, Dessa Teacher Angola Finch. Josephine Clerk Angola French. Gay Teacher Angola Gillis, Dorothy Milliner Angola ,? a " ' James Angola Johnson, Bernice Boyers Angola ;; ratz - MeIvin Clerk . . " . ' . ' . ' . ' .v. . ' . ' . ' . " . ' . ' . ' . ' . ' . ' Angola ' Lacey, Vera Hauver Holland. Mich .. . ; u,on - Mabel Teacher Angola ay. Edith Gale Ash Crete, S. D. Murphy. Florence Smith Memphis, Tenn Hugh Herbert Stenographer Chicago, 111 ttT ' ZT FUnt Henryville Tenn S h e ft er. Waldo Freight C]erk Snyder. Kenneth Clerk M 1 i ' £k %r! lo ytnoi ' B ' M 9t . J -J iO .J s ' • » 9129: oO ritBfncliii be : ■ .,. I I J ' 89 v " 39 £ - j ■ - The Majority of the Graduates Of the Tri-State College Have been members uf the Philomathean Literary Society and thev o ve their positions of eminence in the professional and business world to the training received in this society. When entering Tri-State College ally yourself with the I. st— with the PHILOS I am fishing for your business. I have the most complete line of Tobaccos, Cigars, Pipes and Smokers ' Articles ever shown in the county. I would be thankful for a share of your patronage in this line. The A. E. Wells Tobacco Store :: So ie, Harry Stenographer Chicago, 11! -VanHorn. Jessie Morse Kalamazoo. .Mich 191). " , Bachelor, Ola Stenographer Furl Wayne, Ind Beil. Ana Teacher .ngoli Butler, J. W Farmer Angola Croxton, Fred T. S. C Angola Dirkerson, Don Stenographer Toledo, Ohio Emerson, Clara Teacher Angola :: Fisher. G. A Machinist Auburn. Ind Kyper. Guy D T. S. C Angola Nichols, Vera Illustrator Danville, Ind ' Purinton, Wallace Clerk Chicago, 111 : Ro ve, Aclelia Stallman Galesburg. Ill Thomas, Bessie Tuttle Ft. Wayne, ind Weaver, Lulu Ingola W ' illennar, Marshall D Teacher Lechville, X. D. Woodhull, M. J Clerk Chicago, 111 1906 Bolan, Ethel • • Angola Davis, G. Clarence Teacher ngola Hauver, Mildred Compositor Angola Jackson, Vera Dickerson Angola :: Kratz, Harold F Farmer Angola Lee, Hazel F Teacher New Bremen. Ohio McKinley. Herschell Teacher Mongo. Ind Parsell, Oradell Teacher Fremont, Ind ;: Kratz, Evangeline Pilliod Al! Wicoff. Weir Purdue University. . . .Lafayette, Ind 1907 Gary, Leta Compositor Angola Clay, Lloyd Barber Angola Hall Gay Teacher S. D. Hayward. Elsie Teacher Litchville, X. D. Ireland, Zulah Vm Osborne, Margaret Montpelier, Ohic Pilliod. Mabel New York Ci Purinton, Hazel Angola Rinehart, Mark Teacher Vn_ Sowle. Paul D R. R- Breakman .... • ■ ■ An- -Harriman, Mabel Stayner Chicago, Willennar, Zellar Teacher Waterloo. Ind 1908 Braman, Pansy Teacher Angola Brewer, Elmira Teacher Hepner. Ore Carpenter, Lois Teacher Hudson. Ind Cole, Don Teacher Angola Grain. Fay Telephone Operator Angola Dutter, Genevieve Clerk Angola Freygang, Edwina Teacher Alice. X. D. c lei .... . . . . aJ • fori] .3 i xoJj " - .... ' . -ifisH ,9lwoS ' . . . . I I ) . . ■ BffA ,1193 7 .1. .lalnKI . . . b9l [ ,flO ' ■: . nod .ii ' l . . . .a .a ,i9j . . . .: ' A ... . • ■ . ' ,8 ellsV .noiflitD ... : •■ . - .i 1 . rrJ «MK X ' . . IB I Mia] ieim " »a . . - Ik ' .. ' I :v 3 , sd | . . 19dlJ3 ■I9fi B9T . ' 17 ■ ■ . . . b [BIO -. ■ I • j fjfc9T ■ H -S • • • • o.j uj , ,:,Jj. .asmiiisH • ' eat il 80GJ ' J9 Hf9T. . r . . i; uik c .aiAU- ■ ■ ■ ■ BlfffiiQI , ' i roJ . . ' 9fl [9f9l ■ ■ " . ' t ' i. tu ! D69T. Bfiiwbtf ,§c ;sv;-n ' ' ! - - ■ 1 i - -.■ . . j£li T 9 " ! v - ■ _ ijs oj §nio . aril ynrjO ' . : 1MB ' D I Copyright 1910 , I ne House of Kuppenheimer Chicago You may have noticed that some young high school fellows now-a-days do some prettv daring things in clothes wearing. The col- ors they want, the smart, swagger cut of the gar- ments, the fashions new ideas expressed; all these things are tvpical of he young er crowd. We don ' t believe in going too far in these matters; but we believe in meeting the re- quirements of these dressy vouug fellows within rea- son. We ' ve got a lot of clothes here that do that; and judging by the enthusiasm of our voung custom- ers in the styles from The House of Kuppenheimer, Michael, Stern Co. and Ederheimer, Stein Co., they do it well; $10, $12 50, $15. $18, $20, up to $30. hoik over and 1 L Douglas Shoes HQW88 13.00 HQtS ■ ' - ' ■■ • ' -ITll Purinton, Ollie Goodwin Chicago, 111 Hector, Joseph Angola Honess, Charles Oberlin College I berlin, Ohio Johnson, Thomas T. s. C Angola Junod, Alta Teacher hid. X. D. Kratzer, Edith Eggleston Angola Kyper, Karl Teacher Angola Oberlin, Lloyd Teacher Hamilton, hid Parrot, Edna readier Continental, Ohio Ransburg. Dawson T. S. ( ' Vngola Spangle, Pearle Braman Angola Strayer. Margaret T. S. C Angola Swift, Ola Teacher Angola Waller. Vergil T. S. C Angola Walsh, Madge T. S. ( ' Angola White, Lucy Teacher Dixon. S. D. Wise]. Sabrina Teacher Auburn, Ind Hay ward, lino T acher Angola Preston, Frederika Wambaugh St. Paul, Minn. Patterson. Robert Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind Shank, Mildred Angola Butz, Flossie Cashier : Kratz, Elsie Zabst Angola Honess, Arthur Teacher n Mugg, Mabel T. S. C Angola Manahan, Ruth Angola Pocock, Thomas Clerk Angola Boyers, Byron Teacher Metz. Ind Shockley, Linda Peachey Pleasant, Lake. Ind Parsell, Florence Teacher Hamilton, Ind Lane. Altina Oxford College Oxford, »hio Williamson, Maurice Purdue University. . . .Lafayette, Ind Hendry. Louis T. S. C Angola Dole, Mildred Angola Freligh. Hazel Teacher hid. X. D. McKillen, Wayne ngola Junod, Grace Teacher hid. X. D. Treese, Fern Teacher Edon, Ohio Elya, Fred Angola Stayner, Blanche Flint. Ind Mallory. Daisy Teacher Jud, N. D. Peachey. Achse Milliner Angola Carpenter. Wilma Teacher Angola Shank. Charles University of Mich., Ann Arbor. Mich Snyder. Gladys Milliner Angola Rakestraw, Elezan T. S. C Angola Wyrick, Arlo Teacher ramestown, Ind White, Ila Teacher Dixon. S. D. Hamlin. Don T. S. C Angola Swift. Velma T. S. C Hamilton. Ind Lash, Edna T. S. C Angola £ti iiiiO t l ' . ' iqs oX ... . .... I fO 39lTfirfO ,S89( ,, ' _. • .T asmodT ,noani G • 9T kjIA .bonii OOt39fg§ Mb® ,19SJ ' • f t o T . ' !• ., . ' i9fi T i voiJ .;ri!-to ■ ' ' I " " ■■ ' ) . ' ' . , ftesxTsQ .g-ii ' i ' - 1 , ; tisfl ; ; - : 9 . ' ' :.. ■ ' •- " T .qf riBcf . 1 ' ) . ' - T 19-; ;i :. ! ' , ' 1 9 £ S ' l } 3S s r O .fliwSJ . . fi;2-[ ' . .11. -- : . - : bfil I t il@[j J I ' ' .....,!. ; . . . . . . ;flf-i(lB3 ,l9gi ■ . .-•- " r . . .... • : .b-iRvr . i. ■.■-,. ' .. ; he r t ,noJa :. ■ . . . ; ,fi .host . . .- : i .■ M,C .jfa j ?n - •-! . itj a I- • • ■ ::■,-- ' u • . . -n rl ■ . ■ :9fl » 3T fedsM siiul .- diaSi .ni ■ «fl r ,a o ■ no-i ' J--B9S bj I ,V9i7[ 1 3 " ' ' ...-■■ :. ' i MKft ,9 - ' ' - ' m » Huj . tSfi ill ' •■ . W !ij . , i: toiDdl I . , : . .. : a " . " . f onrjl. J 9tT; ' i ,b ,-. . ,7 ; .... - ■• : • • ;. .. ; i I : Dfi9l [J . ' IS ' ) " ■ ' ' - ! I --; r-i .. .i- rvr 1 •. ! .9jf-l fi . f fM .■; ' • • • ■ r ni ■ . 6-nV 1AA0A og«£ 4 i v •-• i • - 9w o ! 161 Tri- State C _J JL J J angola ' s Greatest Brings into Angola annually thousands of dollars, ff Adds beauty to the city ??T Improves its moral- intellectual, and financial reputation. Raises the standard of public school teachers. Model School During; Summer Eight Weeks --Tuition Free This affords an excellent opportunity for pupils to gain advanced standing in their classes. Expert teachers will have charge of the Summer School. Undergraduate, Graduate, and Teachers ' Training Course The young people of Angola can receive a college edu- cation and live at home. The work is unexcelled by any other school and the expenses are less. .wwmmMTairap zsBB O }q o. ; rf r 9i ! -V 10 9i£; C 8 i rlo noi-Dnl m i i: H bi ■ •? c noc.b ' v ' i ( i el i For everything from head to foot for male or female it E KR A X Z Drug ao d Book y tore HEADQUARTERS FOR School Books School Supplies Wall Paper, Paint and Var- nish, Complete line of Athletic and Holiday Goods in Season And Some Goods all Seasons Jokes and Grinds Miss Nottingham, in Latin III — ' -Now take tfiis assignment. Pupil — " Shall we write it down? " Miss X. — " Xo, keei i it in your ' noggin:. ' " Coleman — " May I speak, please? " Mr. Weldy — " Why do you ask. that is what you have been doinj all alone. " Ethel ( ' ., reading in English IV — " My Lord — " Trying again. " My Lord! Well, I can ' t read it. " Photographer, addressing Dale L.. who is posing for the Spectator: " Did you want your trousers rolled tip? " Dale, beginning to get nervous, " ' Well, ef-no, I ' ll put ' em under tin table. " Miss X ., in Latin IV, asks Velma to scan. Velma. starting to scan— " Wait a minute. I have mv feel mixed up. ' Doris — " Where is that Maud Rogers that you used to know .- Xed, blushing— " Who? Oh. yes! Pshaw! O, well I like yon better than 1 did her anyway. " Mr. Maple — " The Romans used the length of the ordinary foot for the unit of measure. " (He suddenly thinks and draws back his foot. " I said irdinarv f m it. " Xed had been playing for some time. Mr. Weldy — " Well, Ned, if you mnst play you may go outside and plav in the snow. " Faye Burt reading in Latin TIT — " You liberate me from great fear. ' While reading the class bell rings. Frank Fast — " We use our feet in scanning. " zbrihD bin; zsAoX ;■ ■■■■■ " ■■ ' ■- ! | - ■ ., ; ■ . ■ j ■ i t ; i gi] ' • • re 2 1 ' , I 1 .|rj c T ;l ' — rifi i sIqD - . I :. ; }] - . I r nii3 ■ ' i i -.) 1! ,IbV lb d ... ' ! ;i s 1 v " f! Jrfqfi-i otorl ] S . q ,,■■■■ - , f j j ; . . ,.. ' ;■..,!. ' 6 I j :■ ;riVI ! ,-.,., rf ' i - ' •:.!:; J.-|, i ! ■ : i . . ■ ■ : I - 3 . ' I ' ■ r fill ri- [I ■ -- -. . on] . , .,17 . 1 n i ( - • 8ShSQ ■ i ■ ! n ■ ■ ) - Dole Bro . Jp-to-Da,te jVet s- " tcind Good things to eat and Drink. Staple Groceries Try our Golden Sun Co-free 20, 25, 30 and 35 cents WINNERS Of every annua! contest of recent years LEADERS In every college or public enterprise MEN Who .ire contributing a man ' s share to life are the CRESCENTS Of TRI-STATE COLLEGE We are lad to welcome those eajjer to become Winners, leaders, Men— Crescents Miss X. to Florence White in Latin I - " How man) tenses in the In- dicative M ! k1 ? " I ' ll rence — " Three. " Miss X. — " Don ' t we have the perfect tense of Amo — 1 have lovi isn ' t it a Fact ? " Mr. ECnepper in History I- " Pyrl what is meant bv artillery Pvrl — " Hordes, cattle, and such as that. " Bess IT. — " Oh, it ' s raining, did yon bring a parasol? " Florence G. — ' " No, 1 wore mv hat. " Ellithorp — " Flow did yon like thai cigar I gave you? " Walcott — " Oh, I have smoked worse cigars. " Rllithorp — " Yon have, if you smoked those like the one yon gave me the other day. " For ten minutes they had been sitting in the parlor in deep silence. " What are yon thinking about, dear? " ventured Xed 1 ' ... " The coming spring: " Yes, " responded 1 ' oris Y.. solomny, " I ' m thinking about the spring that is coming through this sofa. Had says young men thai conn girls every night ought to furnish their own sofas. " There was no way of backing out, so then he popped the question. Miss X. in Latin IV — " Xow the cavalry must dismount so we can get a few constructions. " Mr. Maple in Geometry II!- " Who has a different way that problem? " Fl irence . — " I have. " Mr. M. — " How did yon solve it? " Florence — " T worked it by degrees. " s dvino In the passing year of Xineteen naught nine. It ' s the great Art Exhibit that takes up our time. But the latest desire we are asked to bestow- We are told in plain English, " The Rat. it must go. " —A. H. S. Girls. Miss X. in Latin 111 — " Leighton, where were you a little while agi Leiehton — " Whv, er, 1 guess so. " j y i n •. srsrft ' " ibooM svij . -rfT " — ' j-jcrenoFl . " : toKl 6 if ftti 4 -- 7 ¥t- fund j ;ri • ' ! " — i ytoteiH n -■ ,■ -;rr [ . ri . 5tM riij ' .:. ' ' .£? ?J: i r: V7 " ! ' . • " ■ ' | , ' OTnfn voH " — qiorfril i : ■ ' • ■ - •■ v., : ] r(j • " -- : ; ; oIsW ■ -. :■ ■ ' ;rf rj V " — i pt f[}rl[ l ffi — ■ : - ■ [)fid -;ri ■ r. ' .rri r: rt ' J ii " [muJnav " c .t£3h ,iuod£ artisfrrfrld rjov i n; ten ; ni. ■ ■ ■,, 7 -■ • • bsbrn - " .-• T " c - ■ ' - : ' : ' ( j ' i -.! tsrll grth ■• -.bx • ' ■ gni fofi l io {bv - ■ vnr ' T " | nti . . sail i :i , I , | | , 3 Q rr:i . .iM " r ' nofdi n br! H ' — M .tM r . . ' - • rfi rrT . -. - ... g ' I • -4. I n.,; . - - f I .{if ' " — noldaLa (jmqmoD fasrrG 000 08$ hiiqsD .qtr Ms? ooo e O 18$ rscro asowoaofl fefoC .2t:: mo io ' ni i ' oad l)oQ .J . ' " 3 -itOW TtR 3W ifinv - lid A asjsabT q • ' .. . . od Jam • :■ bn rioism d rial oi .1. io .a sources o et §? %0,ooo Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent. Interest paid on deposits. Investigate our Savings Department. We would be pleased to have you as a patron in one or all of our departments. G. It. Viek vire, Pres. C. L, Dodge, Sec ' y D, U. Best, Vice Pres. i . H. Douglass, Clerk Growing Better Every T)ay ABETTER Store and a bigger business. That is what we are work- ing for. The standard that we are working to is high enough to lift this business from the ordinary. We aim t o make it your ideal of what a store should be. Every mercantile force and power we control is centered in bring- ing you the world ' s best merchandise at prices that prove a happy release from extravagance. Tomorrow shall be ahead of yesterday ' s shopping plcae Each day will prove a stepping stone in the onward march. Our agreement with you is: To apply liberal methods; to supply courteous service; to show complete stocks; to furnish reliable merchandise; to guarantee the lowest prices; and our chief study, your satisfaction. We accept and abide by that contract. r The WtwW|— • The Growing « pffatebwiQ Rel,abie Store BsmmSS store Mr. Welch in History Ml — " Alda. where on the map is Brittania? " Alda — " Why. its just east of that big pink spot. " Mr. EChepper in History 111 — " Name soriie indirect taxes. " Edward McNelly — " Carpet tacks. ' Heber E. to his mother — " Say, if I was old enough to get married do you know whom I would choose tor my wife? " Mrs. E. — " No, whom would you choose? " Heber — " Birdena Havward. She is an awfully nice girl. " Miss N. in Latin I 1- — " Alda. what is your translation? " Alda W. — " Why, you spoiled it all by having her read the literal. " Mr. Weld} " in History III — " She was a foreign prince. " Miss X. to junior Latin student — " You have missed the point in thai last line yon were reading. " Student — " Well, that wasn ' t a Very big thing to miss. " Mr. Knepper in History HI — " Alta, what did Napoleon do next? " Aha i. — " Well, he gathered up a big army and tried to conquer the English Channel. " Knowledge Unseen. ' Twas on the homeward journey from rankling when Mr. Kyper said to Parepa and Winnie. " Now if yon notice carefully when we cross the state line you will see a white line about a foot wide separating the two states. " The girls laboriously strained their eves for a while in looking through the car window, and then exclaimed, " We can ' t see any. " Mr. K. answered. " Why, didn ' t you see it? W r e just passed it. " The girls will look more carefullv next time. Fare B. — " What is a township? " Muriel W. — " Don ' t you know what a township is? " Fave — " No, I guess we don ' t have them in town. " .fifolA " — J ■ teil l rti -mm- .ii - -fMir-r -v •: ' " — ill nrotaiH rci tsqqsa] bio ?,bw I if ,yb2 " — larilom girl crt .3 rectaH uov J- l(it 7 rti fl ■■• , ' . i -: ■■■ ' ■ ' mofh ' iQ ■■ iM r fifty 7 3t9W r.ro y 3fii — i [] ■ •!■ j-if! rti -; q ,-i ,iM Fl ■ • : . ' :-.!;,; - ' .-■■. ' . ten ■ . J its .nsaanU sgbalwonl ■■ ' ' ' ■ ' ' . ' : " ■:• ■..-.- - .- mil ,:.:-. 4f: u tJ ■- ■ ' - ;oi.;i • fsJ : - ■ r f l£i .■ ' ,; ' ■■: I .- ' ( " ■■---■ rr ■■ ' --. r " ! i -. ATI . -iiti --,,. i cp— .w wnuv swldgirrd V w ' V . 1 G ,- -..■ ( v r e • —Til i£ J A ; - V . 1 i ' . ' 3 " lhii. . Sells all the little o ' vvd 3 r kVes awa Hccessorves That gives you that dainty finish. Try our " NtaxsWaVW Cream Best for th skin at all times Dt s awa a cmer§ Geo.H.Overliolz H Proprietor of The Hendry House Always on Time (1 Livery and Feed Barn in connection Is the boy or man who carries one of our watches. They are as well known for their accuracy as for their beauty and durability. VVe have a full line of Jewelry of the finest grade. Chains, Rings, plain and fancy Charms, Lockets, Brooches, Bracelets, Bangles, Hat Pins, Studs, Sleeve-Links, etc all of the very newest designs, best makes, and at most reasonable prices. First class Repairing. RE. McGARITY, West side Jeweler OVJ «t i i e ■ IV X)2 JOOH02 ■■ IT aocq2 tlnsvooS • . .ai ■ Yjm iwu AWAiavu ■ i i ;. • ... ■ . . . ... : i . ■ I .. ' ■■ ' I • • ' rbS • iti ,. , • . ' .• • . meil - • ' l r ' . ' ' Have you seen our line of beautiful SCHOOL SOUVENIRS They are up-to-date and nobby and you want a memento of school days, We have also the finest line of Souvenir Spoons, Pins and Rings in the county. You can get what vou want at " THE STORE OF QUALITY " F. S. DAY JEWELER ANGOLA, IND. 1820 1910 INDIANA UNIVERSITY Bloomington The growth of Indiana University during the last fif- teen years is shown by the following five-year table. 1894 633 1899 1050 1904 1411 1909 2470 Graduates of Commissioned High Schools enter the Freshman Class without examination Publications: Catalog, Register of Graduates, Bulle- tins of the Graduate School, the School of Law. the School of Medicine, the School of Education, the Spring and Sum- mer Terms, the Course in Commerce and the Course in Journalism. Any ot these will be sent on application to the Registrar, or to William L Bryan, President. Sept. kept. Sept. gept. Sept. Sept. hept. j ept. ept. sept, bept. Sept. ept. sept, sept. ept. " •ept. 6- 8- 9- 10 [3 15 [6 1 20 21 22 2 3 2 4 - 28 29 3« EPTEMBER -School opens with much rejoicing ' . -The green crop on the east side oi the Assembly Room is in- creased by the addition oi several new students. -The dignified Seniors are also increased by several new students. — Mr. Maple gives us his first talk. —An Athletic Association is organized. Juniors organize. No Senior program this month. — Mr. Peters gives us a very interesting talk. Airs. Fairfield organized a girls ' gymnasium class. The Freshman Class finally organized. —School is small on account ol the fair. — All attend the fair. — Fair, more Fair, most Fair. — We all begin to work in earnest. —A certain Senior seems to like automobile rides. Lottie Butz gets the laughing disease. —Suits are ordered for the Basket Ball team. — French and Wade plan an aeroplane. " ' Curly " Deller falls down the stairs. ; .■yri ' jf ' j _j " ; rfsjjfn rtttv efi q I . - .rq -ni - ; rnooisl Hcfrna eA srfi to e bte rir -i rro qoio i 31 arl -- - .hi " okit . -■ ' ■ ' :. i ift -: .• t-j fqjsM .-r! ' ' .-- i Ifq b i irt i - : -:• ; : ;h --•, ' oh i r-ii Uf —i i Jiq ■ . I h IfH -id : i. " ■ | v ■ ' _, il 1 i " • ■Jl ' Jil:} t9 I - i |S ■--.■ ; V ' I .1 I ' ' . — TJ - ' ' ' i ; ■: bt xi) : r i ' i [jj u A . ■ . ' .----■ £ basii t I H --• j l : " ,:;:; ri I d : ' —is .1 arfj V i I rant cj.ob rr - rn -r tax trio ' — ££ .-itr. ' t arfo bxraJ s II .— ££ Jq: .V ; ' ! r.-o;rr . " ; , ;.,,.:. g . Kf i« d He ■» ' — -s. Jq: t83 ' lttJ3S3 IOW .-■ ' br- jii ' i ■:-. - ;;: v,;il " of 3f03$3 i ' r ' j- ' ;n;ny:, h --He. r ( - .!.:. •■, : ■ ■■ -v.; ' ■ ■ . - i | ' ■. - [| ■; .-: ■ ' -.;-]• ♦ I uiC 8 H STiC ;$ rlj to :9 I , ,0c ' - ; ; .00 r ■ ■ , I40T8J3 .3 .A rusM 9orl8 9rlT 3: N .SB ■ } T OJ OO 1219DIKJ T 7 Ln T .3 H AWa HA H .ssvcxtS 39BHBH tOOiq 3l0£ Groceries and Fruits That ' s All Chas. E B Wells Geo F Stoner Druggist Perfumes, Toilet Article, Confec- tions, Soda Water, Paints Oils and Wall Paper 1st door east of Postoffice Opera House Block Go to Callenders For Fishing Tackle H AR DWARE, Stoves, Ranges Sole Proof Floor Coating For the Man or woman who Cares You find the correct MODELS in Shoes in Florsheim Shoe, King- Quality and Ralston, and John Kellev make All kinds and stvles $2 50, $3 00, $4.00 and $5 00. A. E. ELSTON The Shoe Man yi )ct. )ct. )ct. )ct. )ct. Dct. Dct. )ct. Dct. bet. )ct. )ct, C1 )ct )ct )ct ct )ct )ct )d )ct )ct. )ct i — Dorothy looks at Glenn. 2 — Glenn looks at Dorothy. ... 3 — Mr. Weldy finds disturbance among juniors. Proves to be poor little worm. Worm carefully tossed out oi doors. 4 — Ned hee-ha-haws. 5 — French and Wade have a quarrel and Mr. Peters set tle- it. () — Glenn Walcott (Senior) ets a card from Freshman girl. 7 — Neva talked in class. Miss Nottingham also talked,. 8 — The Sophomores gel a reputation as being very noisy, n — Frank Deller , ' oes to sleep and disturbs the class by snoring. 12 — Earl R. has a talk with Mis- Nottingham. 13 — Marjorie Wilson keeps bus}- writing note-. 14 — Mr. Peters, calling the class for recitation, " Sophomores. A number of Juniors, thinking they were young again, arose and went with the second year class. 15 — Helen Hamlin loses her switch. Much laughter. r8 — Glenn .. seems very sober this morning. kj — Mr. Peters (in English class) " Doris, what is a romance? Moris, (hanging her head) Why, romance pertains to love or something like that. 20 — William H. Owen speaks to us. " The Merchant of Venice. " 2i — Glenn Walcott went to sleep in Latin class. 22 — Lottie Butz is given a front seat. 2 — French gets lost in English. 26 — Herman K. tries to be a comedian. 27 — Lee and Marjorie W. are watching each other carefully. 28 — Miss Fertich organizes a Girls " Glee Club. 2i) — Lee has a Eiollowe ' een party tomorrow night. [OOJ 7fll ' ' ! ' ' - I - in i fin-jli )- I A ' ) ■■ ' . I [It JJ | ' J : ■ : ill I fi9«f!i } [j oafj - 13 U ifJti iflQi - TjfrrH ' ffio rnto .frn tlJii r »w ri rrl rl b i- .iv ' ' ■■ n .;•. ' )-. •■■•■ l sV) !» rr ; rl n rrl — ? . ' ■• , ;. - . • . .. 1 ;., ! I h ■ . .1; ■ .. ' : . - ■ 1 | ■ : ' 3fIT— ! • ])f i i - . " rj ' it fh ' ' i vifjrr! — ii ; ' ■■ 7. rlM ' A .- . •:■ -■ " bftJ- 380TJ3 . ' Hi ' ' ' ' " ; b ' Ji ' I ' " I R 8f B ■ f ' ' -• ' rfnjT-i .r -tour; ■ r rr .rfoJiv s i m p,3?.61 riifrnBr! nafaH — j=i 1 ' (ftasfa rf«il£n3 ni) -rt Jy ' I ziU — y] jf ' • JBrh rt 1 ' ■■■■ " ■- " " " n it ?. lB5 q rrsw ' ! rnfiHIiW — os r |{; rrilfiJ m q afa crt tnaw ftODifiW cinalO .. ' [ • ' . ' I i ■ ■ •■ - r ' . ' ' T MS. h kno-i B i-r—v_ rid p ' - ' bs ■• " ' Ji. trrB .7 s ho(iBM brrfi aaJ — " i .fraj •fTOmOJ ; f| rofloH K KBfl 99vl OS " •. ' — nor • : H • ■ f v , A J b n n I ■ mtr ■ M ■ i. rr [D f I vi a • i A 3 AVI ' ■ r . r ■ : f bno ' J Mr. i IT ' S AN Angola Maid Absolute Perfection in Qual- ity, Burn and Workmanship Mnfd. by JV. JV. Love A i n n g d ola R G Cameron PURE DRUGS Fine Toilet Articles V all Paper and Paints BOOKS Copyrighted Books and School Supplies Chinaware and Cut Glass Fremont, Ind, Call At J. S. Ritter ' s For Fresh Groceries R oyal Garden Tea and Coffee Our Platform SAFETY first, liberality next. Both ore essen- tial to successful banking If y o u are satisfied with our platform come and see us. ff STEUBEN COUNTY BANK ANGOLA - INDIANA BUHfc EC JgJ WIi ' ! TU» Nov. 2 — French gets busy eating apples. Nov. 3 — Quite a commotion today — Mabel Coe took a tumble. Nov. 8 — Alcohol lain]) explodes. No one hurt. Nov. () — Don Culver gets a chance to keep still it get nut. Nov. io — Aha Gilmore loses a tooth. Nov. it — Marjorie B. " smiles " at Lee Hirsch. Imo S. blue today — certain Freshman not present. Nov. 12- — Mr. Long gave us a very interesting talk on the early history i if the Angi ' la Sch » »ls. Nov. 15 — Florence Elizabeth Maple. Mr. Maple wears broad smile. Nov. l ' — Xed E. in Eng. Ill: " I agree with Maude. " Nov. 22 — fohn Culver in History class this morning startled us by saying: " Why. Patrick Henry ' s dead, isn ' t he? " Nov. 24 — School dismisses for Thanksgiving. Nov. 2(; — Mr. Peters, in the most solemn tones. asks in History class il any one knows whether or not Mr. Wilcox is busy. It develops that Mr. Wilcox is wanted to make a bed for Coleman. Nov. }o — Fire 1 rill. mmmn : MM Ma B fooJ oO .irj i Jag to [lb?; | jv f ' red dtH --- ;;!■ ■ Pi -; r . - - 3-IOfftlli) SJJA OJ -•!-. -jig i .-• iffini- .;i -jn--, ; ■■ . -rrf •• .OliffP YCf ii .... , py r, fin av rg ,2rioJ . iM— ■ .aloofbc fiu ml to wavy a Iff fil . 1 B|qfii rfJaiinsiiM ' jono-roPl— - .abrifil tii ....; 1 " :!.]] . rr3 rfi JrbaVl — ■ ■■ ■ rr-;. rn nil I •■-.; - " I- K -rri | .■!?; ' rrg ■ - -:. ' - : orf t ' r i ,i)Jijf) k ' -rmh -A ' j ' nts°k .-;r! { .•_ irti ' -- ' i;;n ' f in] y«g$jfn£fb I. (,1 - - i _ .■- ; • ' .- I n ! ' i n T ■■-. ' ' ' ■■ hJ - ' v.- ' ,i ! .— ; »s r ab jI ygjid r xoaliW .t| lorr 10 rariiarfw 8won J • l • ' . • ■ Iff-tn M-ri ' I Of ' . i , ' ' .• .- ■ " • .70 .Vi ' . ' ' ■ .• (.; .-. ' ! " () ' £ tilfiuO ■ ' lltfUillt 1 t ' Ai ' l z £ r. r . ;8 B J£3h Ubr2 . ywYX nCY? ' i mi v JO Vs A ■ . v .A AVIAIdVJ] ,AJOO ' » Quality Not Quantity Opera House Bakery Best Yotter ATTORNEYS P ngola, Ind. Just Plumbing and Heating Steam Heat a Specialty G. N. Bodley Co. Angola - - Indiana U. 7v welcome to J. M. Fisher ' s Barber Shop N. IV. Cor. Public Square Fry singer ' s Drug Store THREE ENTRANCES ANGOLA IND. Exclusive Lines- Rex all Remedies National Cigars Eastman Kodaks Sherwin-Williams Paints A. FRYSINGER ANGOLA, INDIANA I Vc. [—.-Vita Gilmore has a birthday. She says she is sweet sixteen and Dec. 2 — Mr. Weldy is very polite: stumbles over desk ami says. ' ex- Dec 3 — Potessor Fairfield speaks. Dec. ( — Mr. Weldy asks Milton Damlos to go to Library. Milton nocently) " Where is the Library ' : " cuse me, please. " Dec. —Hush! You will awaken Colema n. Dec. 8 — (rirls receive a free lecture on hair dressing " . Dee. 9 — Turner Art Exhibit. Dee. id — More exhibit. Freshmen stampede. Dec. 13 — Leighton W. wears his overshoes in classes. Dee. 14 — Eddie Me. laughs out loud. Dee. 15 — Wade is advanced to the front row i -eat-. Dee. i( — Mi s ( ' line visits the school. Dee. 17 — Christmas exercises. 01 1 Y. . r: - .tj — 1 ■ r ■ • . -jrri -j ' .rj-j Y : rl- rr h ' -- .• - ■ ■ ■ • ' ' • )i • • • " ; -. isrrtoT- rj 9 t " H M — OI . ' » n T w rioJrfgi rY ! iw i ail • — |-i bsDriBvl - ; :! : — gi .o Cf -nc w0 - rfliv. nimj ;-: o; B no mmr r f ' 0,O .A ,8ioJ ei ,89rfaj ilio in 2t; ..J bru iTif- vtnoo2 3rii ni 2t3f£3Q sic •4. i, U " i ■ 3t£upz i; ' ■ J6n£ibnl .fiio nA If you get it here yozi are lxxcK_y: 4f No matter what, no matter when, because if it looks different when you get home bring; it back and exchange. For presents we have any- thing in Watches, Neck Chains, Lockets, Bracelets, Back Combs, Umbrel- las, China and various other articles too numerous to mention. ¥f If something is wrong with your eyes you ought to find out about it right away. If neglected they grow worse. Come in and let us examine them. We make no charge for examinations. Prices reasonable. F. E. S VR7 Jeweler and Optician Williamson Co PHONE 168 ANGOLA IND. Hardware, stoves, building material fishing tackle, guns, and ammunition Paints, oils, varnishes, refrigerators, I ice cream freezers and Lawn Mowers The Oldest and Largest General Hardware Dealers in the county f Agents for Oliver Chilled Walking and Riding Plows J J. r. GRASS Home Sweet Home Groceries The dearest place on earth. J. ZIPFEL ensible hoes Northwest corner square Angola, Indiana w. : L. — Jan. - 6 Jan. 4— Jan. 5 — Jan. 6 — Jan. Jan. TO— Jan. 12- Jan. 14- Jan. 17- Jan. [8- Jan. 19- Jan. 20-. Jan. 24- Jan. 25- Jan. 26- Jan. 31 All return. Everybody happy. Hungry mice cause excitement in class rooms. Lee ears a li ng face. Marjorie . will be absenl several days. Prof. Starr takes us to Gcrmanv. -Dorothv smiles at l»oozer. -Girls wear hair-ribbon wings. -Seniors grouchv — Minstrel stage is placed on seats. -Girls get in hurry and run up stairs; Miss Nottingham informs their, never t d it again. —To be exempt or noi exempt. -( )h. vi in cxeni] it smart v. Mr. Maple inexorable to pleading tear- • » " imt-e: empts. 21 — Exams. -Mr. Knepper. the new teacher, arrives. -New Turner pictures are hung. -Much gum chewing in Senior Latin class. throw said gum in waste baskel presto! No p " Tis g ne. ). where. -In English class while Dale is reciting. Lisle says Mr. Peters asks: " To whom were you speaking. L E ■ ' ' ■ ' . . it ' ;- , i t B ' J t ' Jffi Ti ' - ' ! ■ : - .flfi BEETIi " ioV - ■ i • g [Jji ■ , ■- ::■-■ ' :; fflVV • ' I j • i ' .13-SOl tj V .:fff r vtIjoioG — 01 ' .n£| i glliw f r ftl-liBJ t£9 V r ' " ti. • ■j : r rn iTg - r »n 5 -£] .rrf; it qu yi I n£ • rn rj i i fajj 8-hij - ; .ftXK ' gfi fi ' • ' ' 19V ifl CfJ3 I .- 1 »■ : ■ ■ - •. [I ..; I . : .Ynfvftff i l ( ' ■■ ' : .31 rlw . . ••, -j siT ' " .tj; [ ,r[( v ' ; gy Bg oiV.f.-F . ' -: i : . ' •.;(. ' ; ' ' ! - ! - -. . ! " - ' . A-.U ,- arAe rnerfw oT " ■ x tjt .- ' 1 : : ) . ' yd ba: U ■ i 191 C I Qoni ■ ■■ i I [ : ■ 91 If • ■ 1 ! ■ Your Bosom Friends Burkhart Ritter Agents For First Class RUG FACTORY RUG AND CARPET CLEANING IN SEASON PHONE 422 Dr. Mary Ritter 208 W. Maumee St. Angola, Ind. Farmers ' Phone 145A Home Phone 31 Hay, Straw, Clover Seed, Wool, Grain, Flour, Feed, Salt and Seeds Sheldon Co. This book was printed by the Steuben Republican Your work will have the same careful attention. Dr. C. C. Wright DENTIST All Work Guaranteed Angola, Ind. Both Phones Northwest Cor. Square W. K. Sheffer Sells Real Estate Writes Insurance Negotiates Loans N E. Cor. Public Square Angola, Ind. F. A. JB ollett JEWELER and OPTICIAN The Store of Quality Fremont, Ind. Follett Block Dr. S. C. Wolfe DENTIST Angola, Ind. ZIPFEL BLOCK Taylor Phone 71 Farmer Phone 35 j |b. i el . el.. eh. el), eh. el . eb. 4- 8— 9— lO- .1 : " De; ■;ir eh. el». eb. el». el.. el». eb. eb. eh. eh. [6 ' 7 1 8 2 I 22 23 24 28 Mr. Knepper places his eyes on Wade. Juniors begin Solid Geometry. Seniors decide on class pin. Shadow day. Freshmen have another stampede. Senior Class gives program. Report on basket ball game with Columbia City. Aha Gilmore keeps borrowing Clifton ' s knife. Mystery solved — Leighton sits behind Clifton. -Marjorie ' .. while dreaming in school, exclaims alou Lee. " ' -High school parades to advertise basket ball game. -Dora L. sees some attraction in the Freshman L lass -Wade and Mr. Peters disagree about the word order -Scarlet fever scare. -Sophomores give program. -Muriel Spears 10ms ranks oi Sophomores. -Lee has a bad nose — result oi basket ball. — Letters to parents. " Curly " falls and breaks a desk. Seniors display class pins. e thi ' ' - - --, ■■■-■■) ■ n ■ ' ' . — i ' [I ... ' : [ .rrun goiq as r eIJ torrid — jd rilo ' J fi. ' i • n I. ' ,- ■: • ' nutp ' A — d .otrrrvl a ' rn iiJ ■- -■••■:• ' atprrtjiO bJIA — 8 .ri( MQ HMtfod lVt iMtrr. ' . rro. vU » . " •- ' :: ' . . . - ;: " I I 7 . ' - ' ' =Q1 3 J . ;[ [ ' ,.-r ' i- i -■,:-■ ' .■. l - ' ' -I : tj -yr yrfj pi r ir.nj.t; wrioa sat .. ' . ■■ • i — £1 ■. if|j r ■.;■■■,.-■. ' . .rriBi goiq avi . -, ' - :J ft)S io « l - ) ' - vAJ. — is -,; ' } • jffJe " ■ • ' ■■ 8JBff ' J ' J- I — SS .aJnaisq •i-. ' - .. -An-rid bns . i • " -- - ■ . . ' .03 i32nini9J .1 9oH8 eaoiQ saar-o. ' l -gait-asT ■ ■ r .)D0I ,• -„■■(( .W5:l :d) o ' r- 3 - ■ ' -, ' 2100H -in; vt4 ji ji • jT ■ ( u a h i , 4|;]ACQUERET For Floors Furni- ture Wood- work Etc. LACQUERETT Works Fine Wears Fine Is Fine JOHN O. MATSON Hardware and Furniture Pleasant Lake J. Leininger Co. Angola Agents for the Reel Cross Shoe The Red Cross Tanning Process The ordinary sole is tanned in six weeks; acids used to hurry the tanning parch and burn the leather. This is -why ordinary shoes fee! hot and heavy, why they draw your feet. The Red Cross sole is tanned by a special pro- ms that takes si months— you can bend it double when new. Loos fob this Traps Mark ANGOLA MONUMENT CO. Would appreciate any business you |have in their line. Come in. ANGOLA, INDIANA Go to the 5 and 10 cent STORE For China. Queens ware and Notions EBERHARD East side ANGOLA, INDIANA .March i — Warren and John tr to eat apples. March 2 — Beautiful weather. Dutch collars, short sleeves, spring fever. March 3 — Ned gets tangled in rubber matting in hall — matting finally gets Xcd down. March 4 — Freshmen give program. March 7 — Sarah Porter (Freshman) spills tin box of tovs. March 8 — Grade cards. Tough hick. March 9 — Mrs. Maple visits school. March 10 — Mr. Weldy ' s assignment for chemistry: " Put special agon) on Chapter XV. " March 11 — College students visit Senior classes in Chemistry and Latin. March 14 — Dale had close call from explosion oi alcohol lamp. March 15 — Seniors plan a party. March 16 — Wade and Sarah Porter are getting acquainted March 17 — Everybody is green today. March 18 — Senior class party a great success. March 21 — " Bill ' ' and Merman have a wrestling match at the drinking fountain. March 22 — Too bad there are w 1 Senior girls pretty enough to play leading lady in the class play. March 23 — A few of the persons who have been passing notes for Emma resign. March 24 — Helen Hamlin spills ink. March 2$ — Mr. Maple talks astronomy. March 28 — Result of Hamilton base hall game. 7 — 1 ! ! March 29 — Mr. Knepper draws the line on whispering. March 30 — Wade gets excited: sits down very rapidly — broken seat to trade to Mr. Wilcox. March 31 — Girls go to Paulding, Ohio. J wirW — i rfoifil. ■- - ' j. ftorfa .- rA n-j rbin 1 .-wrbfiaw [u)(iutvjl — s. rlnsl Yllnrrh gnrfism — IIktI ni , ; ' - ' baX — plrfoifift! .fTUST O " UJ j i n-»ri[. ' f- " j-i ' h I — 4, ibifil - • ' t ., y.od nit | -- ■ v . flfi-M - ' -- - fl ' j-ifih . br;i rf gfjol . r v;i;-i afwstO — 8 rb-ri;l .[ " -- ' -il . — 1.. r r ' HKl qg • ' : viJaimarfa iol tn mn J - ' . ' :i f. — 01 jrbifift • ' _ riqfifD no • £ rxreim riO ni - -- : j loin-. ' - - - -jalkO — n rbiBll ifej fbiftPjffi k. no olqxd moil Hbd aaolo i»;rf jIb(! — p A ' jibIj aioinaS— gi flrtBl b£ xjrtim 3i£ fetto ■ -. flftl yf-.fi • ' — ft] rbis! .v;;|) ij if, j - " • ' ■■ id ■ •!•;• B 1 rfc " - ' To; )i ■ ' - " v i gafib loinaS — 8r f ' ■ 1 ; j nbli - ' . : ::: rfoJBm nifa i ! ■ ! " jslq ' ' ■■■ ' • " ftirtq i ' ;i;2 loin S on -jth larfJ bfid 00T — ll HdtbIV BfnmH to : •■ gniaeBq rr- d pvfiri oriw anoaiaq arfi . A — ££ dnsl .:-ini Ci ' Irq- aiku EI nafaH — (-£. ' birJ rnonotJgB IffiJ t fqi f£ .i! . — s fbis] ' ! ! r 3fll£g ifK(i 33fid HOjlifflKlI lo ;itJr! ' j f 8S ff ' j-IJii . nrraqairfw no ynil srfj awsib -r-jqcf rr .iM — p£ r!-j " u;l t - »-«_. - riUl r, I . +1 ' , • f St + i . I k- l a f -M ' " W ■ t r I : r , 1 . 11 h ' • i . ■ ■ | .n " r vbYHnsDn H " ?TI J ■ [( 1 i r 1 I j .. - . ' ■ ■ : 3q " i 8£p t ! . ' .7 ! - 1 1 r T , ■ .03 R38MUJ IH NHO .GVII .AJOGVIA lo llOT. £• H 13W Uj bi ! 3 J . ' nt;nsmA . " ?b lo tscffriun srfj ta bucnq ' io! uo7 avis nsj 3ii bs.f ' : lo zbnucq sitrgit ns troy naHT . ncm srli yd uoy 72cc Hiw x ta till terfw - aohq sn s-iqmo; bn. I " viJ Js -tern srfi ao snsi »filo ym b H t2M? sHt -:bn£ri o2lfi W isdi JE3 3 1 2i smh ycf s srfT .OVIHOOfl CHOflA — ?.I!st .03 H30MUJ lH MM oS jnoxi T smoK AJOOVIA -j;; 91U6 b noij j a a a T A 3 ] T 3 J fl A M WOODHULL BECKHOLT ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW ANGOLA, INDIANA PHONE 44 INSURANCE THAT INSURES Very Important Business — enables us to care for your interests in a most satisfac- tory manner — Let us show you. [All kinds written.] Curtis 6. Heckenlively CLAY LEMMON OPTICIAN 114£ West Maumee St. ANGOLA, IND. D. J. HARDING Tin and Galvanized Roofing Furnace work, Gas Pipe and fittings, brass goods Sinks, Pumps and Wind Mills. You are always sure of satisfac- tion and a square DEAL By trading at MAST BROS. MEAT MARKET DAN SHANK LUMBER GO. of ANGOLA, IND. will be glad to weigh a roll of American Fence for you because every dealer handling: American Fence is proud of the number of pounds of steel he can give you for the money. Then you can figure out what this fence will cost you by the pound and compare the price with any other fence on the market We also handle the best Red Cedar Posts for fencing. The test by time is the test that tells— PAROID ROOFING. DAN SHANK LUMBER GO. ANGOLA Home Phone 26 APRI12 April i — We get read} ' lor spring vacation April ii — Miss Nottingham is wearing a diamond ring. April 12 — Corneal gets " called. " Ditto Marjorie VV. April 13 — Seniors sit for Spestator pictures. April 14 — Warren takes the rat medicine. April 15 — Special music under direction of Miss Fertich. April 18 — Hot debates of Seniors concerning arrangements for Com- mencement. April 10 — Senior play started April 20 — Good fishing weather. April 21 — -Rheba French angry in Chemistn class. April 22 — Mr. VanAi.ken speaks at morning exercises. April 25 — Snow. April 26 — Ditto. April 27 — Mrs. Fairfield gives Spectator artist- good work-out. April 28— Ditto. April 2C) — Spectator goes to pre--. April 30 — P.ase ball at Waterloo. mttA m i t satih us sh I - - - : ' fib " .ballBD " ■. i i .jnorn oitom ' •■ i bi % lq ■■. tin ■ ' -,. .; [ ■ . tf .— -£. IhqA ., ; KI— ds Ihq B8B13 tl3fO -•■-:• ' jnunom jj; f A S qua 5T BUG : • ■-, ' ' is h -■-.■:■ • h - . Then yc jure I ; the price nee on the isarket ■ PER GO. Home Phone 26 u r 2332Dlt " . ! J J !G .J 3 ! Jgir? B3HCHS HTOS .zafl bne saittO 30R HO ew .n rrr .ti i - .r.jori ' f ll noirfasl rri .U .H j •mov a orfw to 9JnW 1 ' nc WA 301 89; . 89fiiof0 19V9I0 ! IJAT ioIibT reieooH I 9 norfq9l9l H SEPIA Eye, Ear, Nose, and PHO TOS Have your photos taken and finished in sepia; they are all the rage, $2 per dozen. We have them from two dollars up. Throat Glasses Adjusted Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays 8 to 12 DR. L. L. DILL T. B. Tree man N. Wayne St. Homeopathic Physician and Sur- geon.df ff 4T ff Angola, Ind. All calls answered promptly day or night, city or country. ANGOL I, - IND. OFFICE BOTH PHONES 111 N. Wayne st. Office and Res. Don ' t Write R. U. in fashion--If not who ' s your TALK! Tailor ? JOE BROKAW makes Clever clothes Home Telephone Hoosier Tailor May y — Auburn base ball at Angola. Mav 14 — I ' ase ball at Auburn. May 20 — lia c b-all at Reading. Mav —Base ball, T. S. 1 . ■ ' 1 : CI PI JX - ! os. f ' [fj i . j 1 IGS V • ■ , v 1 I . . Angola City Dairy FOR High Class Milk and Cream Home Phone 113 C. A. REDDING Get your High School education at the A. H. S. There can be none better U. L. Wambaugh Angola, Ind. General Agent for UNION CENTRAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. Cincinnati, O. ALVIN A. GOODWIN Is a wonderful sleeper And seldom loses any slumber But before buying a single sleeper Get his prices on lumber. THE LUMBER MAN Pleasant Lake : : : : Indiana N. B. — The Spectator surmises That Goodwin sells so much Because he advertises To beat the very Dutch. i une 3-4 — hxaminatu ns. June 5 — l accalaureate sermon. 1 1 ' mc n — School closes. Time 7 — Commencement. ■Z Sfefc- J?¥- .. mm « O , -. - ' ■ niVlN T, ' _ - k— ! ' — i J • C — • ■ • - 5 p ■ s I Yi " . ( )■« If You want INSURANCE that insures get a policy in the old reliable German Amer ican Insurance Co. of A. Y. Lauren E. Smith, Agent C. A. Moore PHYSICIAN and SURGEON Fremont - Indiana Skin Diseases a Specialty C. A. Chadwick DENTIST 102 W. Maumee Both Phones Dirrim Burkett BARBERS N. E. Corner Public Square Angola. Indiana High School Students When you want GRAVEL buy it from the East Pit Prompt Delivery Always Powers Yeagley ATTORNEYS- AT-LAW Angola Indiana For The Best Ice Cream Soda Baked Goods and Candies — See — PAUL BROOKS 102 West Maumee Frank B. Rowlev INSURANCE REAL ESTATE and LOANS HOME PHONE 7 and 89 107 E. MAIMER ST. Dr. F. B. Humphreys 223 Y. Maumee St. Calls Answered Promptly Angola, Indiana ... i Tii ) .A B , l-.fii J ■ ' iCI -: JLV. 7 20i ! j .A D . JoriH H)o8 nornsx ' ! ■ — ._ looifoS rl ' giH ?i4 jgfiS rfj rno ' ti :;cf vbwIA yi3vih.(I jqrnoi4 MitflAe rnjjpc aildi J - ' 3nioJ .3 .VI! sfo ' snA - J89S 9liT .lO ' l t.ihoc m£3ll) ' JO I febuoJ ba - - S IJA I V ■ - NJ v- ' -Z. -lewc TA fi-TA- - P " «l r nrr j fiio§n J a ve f MqrnrjH .9 . viCI -i _ m roc 3 ' J IA IU«8 I vfaqrnoi4 baiswenA sthQ SV1AOJ bnt : iitaf (,u.; ' fA . . 3 " 01 . REPUBLICAN f «ESS AN G O l_A. INDIANA -. ' I . ' _(_-:,.■ l ! ■ v ,■ SIS!


Suggestions in the Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) collection:

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1907 Edition, Page 1

1907

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1908 Edition, Page 1

1908

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1909 Edition, Page 1

1909

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1911 Edition, Page 1

1911

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1914 Edition, Page 1

1914

Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1915 Edition, Page 1

1915

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.