Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN)

 - Class of 1905

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1905 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 158 of the 1905 volume:

THE SPECTATOR gEING THE FIRST ANNUAL OF THE ANGOLA HIGH SCHOOL M C M VTo the Angola High School and all its interests and endeavors, we dedicate this volume as a token of our respect and appreciation. —Class of Naughty-Fivf.. THE MAGNET PRESS ANGOLA. INI).Prefatory E SENIORS of Angola High School take pleasure in presenting to the public the first annual of the high school. It was no small task to find a suitable name, but after much thoughtful investigation and discussion we at last chose for our title, “The Spectator.” That we may not be accused of plagiarism we acknowledge the existence of a publication of the same name which made its appearance about two centuries ago. March 1, 1711, there appeared upon the breakfast tables of London a daily paper bearing the suggestive title, “The Spectator.” This paper contained a single essay upon some important topic of the day and soon enjoyed an immense popularity. Its editor, Richard Steele, and main contributor, Joseph Addison, made for the paper a lasting fame, and to-day there is not a high school in the United States but studies some of the essays of the little newspaper. Therefore in considering a title for our High School annual we chose for a title one that already is well known to the reading public. We trust that some measure of the popularity of its illustrious parent will be accorded to this, the first effort of the seniors of the Angola High School. While this work was done under the supervision of the seniors, yet every class of the High School, as well as the Eighth grade, has contributed to it. In addition to the help received from the pupils we wish to thank the Alumni and all those friends of the schools who have helped us in our efforts to make the Annual a success. THE STAFF.Spectator Staff Business Managers: Don Dickerson, ’05 Robert Carson, ’07 All Sorts Editor-in-Chief: Vernon Nichols, ’05 Associate Editors: Wallace Purinton, ’05 l Wier Wicoff, ’06 Assistants Leta Cary, '07 ( Karl Kyper, ’08 Literary Bessie Tuttle, ’05 I Elsie Sharitt, ’06 Assistants Gay Hall, ’07 Lena Conklin, ’08 Jokes Guy Kyper, ’05 I Herschel McKinley, '06 Assistants -J Donald Smith, ’07 1 Joseph Hector, ’08 Calendar Ana Beil, ’05 1 Evangeline Pilliod, '06 Assistants - Zellar Willennar, ’07 ( Margaret Strayer, ’08 Alumni Wm. Butler, ’05 Athletics Marshall Willennar, ’05 Subscription Manacer - Avery Fisher, ’05 | Vernon Nichols, ’05 | Earl Moss, ’06 Artists Wayne McKillen, ’09 | Evangeline Bankson Charles Shank, ’09Faculty E. V. SHOCKLEY, Principal H. L. ROCKWOOD English, Latin and Science Latin, Mathematics and History PROF. H. H. KEEP, Superintendent Science and German LUELLA REMPIS Eighth Grade EVANGELINE BANKSON Music, Penmanship and Drawing Our Teachers More than a score of teachers have labored with us these past twelve years, and there is not one of the whole number whom we do not cherish and remember with the kindest feelings. We realize now, better than ever before, that they knew what was best for us. The many times that we have caused them trouble come back to us and we would fain ask forgiveness for all our little childish sins. But we know that is not necessary—they were all forgiven as fast as we committed them. We take this, our last opportunity, to thank all the teachers who have come into our lives, and assure them that they have our warmest appreciation and love. fA Toast Four years we’ve been in the High School. For four years this building has been the scene of our toil and tribulation. We now go forth to battle with the world, the better armed and equipped for having spent thus much time in the High School. We know not what the future may hold in store for us, we know not of the success or failures that may come to us. But we will never forget the institution that has done thus much for us—this our own beloved High School. Here’s to Angola High School !Senior ("lass Organization President Secretary Treasurer Poet Orator Historian Prophet Sergeant-at-Arms Guy Kyper William Butler Wallace Purinton Avery Fisher Vernon Nichols Ana Beil Don Dickerson Mark Woodhull Motto “Reward Crowns Duty” Colors Yalf. Blue and White Yell Rah ! Rah ! Boom ! Boom ! Rah ! Rive ! Angola High School ! Nineteen-Five ! Flower American Beauty Rose 15"I' he Seniors Ola Bachelor began her earthly career on the banks of Lake Gage. Although born in the country, she has nearly outgrown all her rural characteristics. She is the particular musical star of our class. Joseph William Butler. Angola also claims Billy, although several other places have known him as a resident. His name may be found enrolled on the old school registers of Flint, Lake Gage, Nevada Mills, Orland and Angola. Ana Charlotte Beil was born and bred in Angola, being one of the three of the class that started with Miss Parish. She has been an active worker on the Spectator staff and most of the calendar is due to her untiring zeal. 16Fred H. Croxton claims Angola as his birthplace. His first five years were spent at the West Ward, and the remainder of his school days at the Central building. He is noted for his remarkable memory and mischievous propensities. The most eventful day of his life was the day he spent in Washington D. C., March 4.1905. Don D. Dickerson. The autumn of 1888 was made famous by the arrival of “Dick,” the torment and delight of every teacher to whom he has gone. As business manager of The Spectator he has made a great success. He has been one of our best athletes, a star on the base ball field, foot ball gridiron and on the track. He is president of the Red Hair Club. Clara Elizabeth Emerson. Clara is our only representative from the “wild and wooly West,” having begun the battle of life in Leadville, Colorado. She spent her common school days in the country, and is best known because of her intimate knowledge of all things agricultural. 17Glf.nn Avery Fisher. ‘ Ave” ought to have been a Knight of the Middle Ages so well does he en joy the presence of ladies. He is one of our soldier boys belonging to the National Guard. He is captain of the H. S. militia and has seen service on the baseball, football and track teams. He is the hustling subscription manager of the Spectator. Guy 1). Kyper began his noisy career in Swanton, Ohio, and being driven from the state for his tumultuous proclivities, sought a refuge in Angola. So far he has succeeded in confining himself within the limits of civilized life. Born a Buckeye he has had a hard time to live it down. He is our class president, High School orator, and best all around athlete. Mark Vernon Nichols came to us from Knox, lnd., and installed himself among us in the sophomore year. He is the only one of the senior class who is never out of money. There has never been a time that he did not have nickels with him. He is our able editor-in-chief, our chief cartoonist, our wit, and—so we have heard—the only boy of the class who is afraid of a girl. He has a calf. 18Wallace Steves Purinton. “Wally” began his ponderous existence in Angola, and has filled it with sunshine ever since. He is known as the hardest working boy in the class. Some call it “push;” others call it “pull;” while there are others who insist it is “bluff” or even “graft.” Aclelia Adele Stallman emerged from the forests of York township more than a score of years ago and has spent the greater part of three years in our midst. Dame Rumor says she is the only girl in our class that has met Hvmen. Bessie Ophelia Tuttle. “Bess”says that she has found her Hamlet and that he is as great as William the Conqueror. She first saw the light of day on a farm in Scott township and the nation celebrated her coming with joyous acclamation. It was July 4, 1886. She is the literary ediror, and great credit is due her for the work she has put on the history of the senior class. 19Lulu Ray Weaver. The name and fame of A. H. S. has penetrated to Bryan, Ohio, and from this town comes Lulu to gladden our hearts. Born a poet, she has just begun to come into her own. While “the wide w'orld is still ignorant of her worth’’ ’twill not always be so. Marshall David Willennar. From the swamps of Otsego township comes “Marsh,” and right glad are we that we have him. HE is the Nestor of the class, the sedative part of the whole school. Whether in the class room or on the playground he is always found near the top. His motto is “Love thy neighbor as thyself.” Mark Jordan Woodhull. “He’s six foot one way,” but only one the other. Angola claims the honor of being his birthplace. His whole schcxjl life has been spent in Angola. He is president of the Athletic Association, captain of 1904 football team, and captain of 1905 track team. 20t Senior Class Poem We are the Class of Nineteen-Five, We’re here at last, we’re still alive. We had to work, our grades will tell, But really, I think we’ve done quite well. Yes we’ve been here for four short years, We’ve struggled hard, forgetting fears. And now we're here, we’re here to stay, At least till graduation day. We entered Freshmen in Naughty-one, Then our work was always jyell done. Couldn’t finish till Naughty-two, Then, if ever, you'd find us blue. Sophomores next in Naughty-three, Busier than the bumble bee. Juniors we were in Naughty-four, Then we worked as never before. Now as Seniors we’ll do our best To graduate like all the rest. We hope and fear, we shed a tear, We think of this as our last year. DEDICATION Now A. H. S. of blue and gold, We hate to leave your walls so old; But as we bid farewell to thee, We wish you great prosperity. —Guy D. Kyper.Junior CI a s s Organization President Vice-President Elsie Sharitt Hazelle Lee Secretary Treasurer Sergeant-at-arms Herschel McKinley Clarence Davis Earle Moss Motto “As the Work, So the Reward” Colors Cream and Wine Yell Rah ! Rah ! Juniors ! Rah ! Roar ! Rix ! Wf. are the Class of Nineteen-Six Flower Ch R Y S AN TH E MUM 22« Junior Class Poem O; Juniors we are eight times two, A laughing, jolly, merry crew. We dearly love to go to school And obey nearly every rule. There’s musicians of a variety— Pianists and soloists of every degree. We can entertain you for a while With the latest music of every style. But musicians are not all we boast, Of artists and poets there’s an awful host. The artists love to exhibit their art, And the poets certainly do their part. Of mottoes we think we’ve the best, A motto that to our work gives zest; It is one that makes us look forward, For it’s “As the work, so the reward.” Oh ! we are Juniors of the A. H. S., The most noted high school in all the West; And next year we hope to be seen In the senior class and still sixteen. —Elsie Sharitt. 25Junior Class History In introducing the Juniors we introduce the pride of the High School. Ever since our entrance into the High School three years ago we have taken a prominent part in all school work,as well as athletics. In our Freshman year, we were rather wild and followed the example set by the other classes, in having a great number of class parties. We were fortunate in having a teacher who did his best to help us along the stony paths of the Freshman year. In the Sophomore year we had no class parties, but settled down to work. Our class was notable in the fact that we boasted of three distinct crowds and one club. We furnished a number of girls for the Basket Ball team. This year was certainly a great year for the most of us. We are proud of our athletic sons, Moss and McKinley, who take prominent parts in all athletics. Moss also represents our artistic talent. The class, for one of its size, can be said to have the largest number of musicians of any class that ever passed the Junior year. Our musical talent is represented by the Misses Mugg, Hauver, Weicht, Lee, Dickerson and Bolan. Kratz is our violinist, and Moss plays the guitar. In the social life of the High School we have taken a prominent part. At the present time we have sixteen on our roll of honor, and we can most happily S3y that the majority are trying to live up to our motto, “As the work, so the reward,” in both deed and word. 26 —Elsie Sharitt, ’06.Sophomore ("lass Organization President Vice-President Zhl.LAR W1LLENNAR Elsie Hayward Robert Carson Hazel Purinton Secretary Treasurer Sergeant-at-Arms and Poet Paul Sowle Motto “Wer Wagt Nichts, Gewiunt Nichts.” BING-A-WH ACK-A-CHING-A-WH ACK-A ! Wah 1 Who ! Wah ! Sophomores! Sophomores ! Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! Flower White Carnation Colors Green and White Yell 29o p h omore Class Poem Of all the classes of the A. H. S., Ours is the one that is the best. To do our duty we are bound, For we help make the world go round. And in the future it appears We hear the storm of coming years. It is a storm that all must face, And in this storm we have a place. We named this place, well you can't guess, For it is just—just plain Success. And now our colors, here I might Say that they are green and white. Some say we cannot make a show As through the High School we do go. But we will show them they can’t bluff, For we are diamonds in the rough. True to our motto we abide, We look on it with honest pride. Here is our motto all explained, “Nothing ventured, nothing gained.” And now when our trials and troubles are o’er, I trust that we meet on the other shore. And if you wish to go to heaven Just follow the Class of Nineteen-seven. 30 —Paul Sowle, ’07.i Sophomore Class History The Sophomore class consists of seventeen earnest, steadfast pupils, who have entered school at various times from the primary grade to the High School. In the primary grade there was a large class of boys and girls, but many have gone from the original class and new ones entered. Only two of the original class remain now. In the second room another was added, and others taken away. The class then with but few changes reached the fourth room, when it received four permanent members; and in the fifth, seven more. The next year, with an addition of one more, we finished the common branches and organized the class. We entered High School as “Freshies,” as our wiser elders called us, when our number was increased by four. Struggling onward through our first year, and seeing the worth of our work, we ceased to be Freshmen, and took a higher step, Sophomores of 1905, where we now stand seventeen in the class. We have always been a class to accomplish our aims, and with that end in view we all have a bright prospect of graduating in two years. Then the world will see what the Sophomores can do. —Historian. 31Freshman Class Organization President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Poet Dawson Ransburg Lois Carpenter Ola Swift Charles Honess Joseph Hector Motto “Labor Conquers All Things” Colors Olive Green andCherry Red Yell Hf.ike ! Yhike ! Zeike ! Zum ! We’rf. the Class that works for fun ! Watch and wait ! We’ll graduate ! In nineteen hundred and eight ! Flower Blue Violet 32f reshman Class Poem Of the Freshman Class are we; Our number is thirty-three. VVe shall be the senior class of ’08 If we keep on learning at the present rate. Our class is ever true To the violet which is blue. “Labor conquers all things,” Is our motto which rings. We have spent the year with much toil, Which has not been in the soil; It has been in different books, And now they show it by their looks. Our colors are red and green, As the other classes have seen. The tree that we have is maple, And it will make a shady temple. We are starting on the highway of life To meet with many a strife. But if you want to meet good fate, You must join the Class of Nineteen Eight. —Poet. 35Freshman Class History In writing the history of the Freshman Class it is difficult to determine where to begin, what to say, and where to end. Of this class, but three were together in the first room, but by adding to the class from time to time, we now number twenty-nine. We labored for eight long years to complete the work as outlined for the common schools of the State, and now we feel a just pride in having satisfactorily reached the longed-for goal. In all that goes to make school life pleasant, the Freshman class takes a leading part. The class has been very popular, helping with the music and furnishing other selections for the entertainments. And we can say with pride that we have done our work well. We hope that at the commen ement of 1908 we will all be present well and happy, and prepared to face the unknown future. 36Eighth Grade Organization FernTreese Louie Hendry Harry Dunlap Charlie Shank Dessa Harmon Motto “Be Second to None” Colors Rose and Gray Yell Whiz ! Whiz ! Hickety ! Sizz ! Flippity ! Floppity Flippity ! Whiz ! Rickety ! Raw ! Rickety ! Russ ! Angola ! Naught Nine ! That’s Us ! Flower Rose President Vice-President Secretary Poet Historian 39Eighth Grade Poem “The fellow that invented letters Never dreamed of a combine like this; And a mixture in such a fashion Is surely just a little amiss.’’ I. We’re a’goin to have an Annual, An’ a mighty good one, too. They’ve let the Eighth Grade have a place. An’ we’ll show what we kin do. II. We’ve got singers and an orator, We’ve got artists, too, galore; An’ a school-house ’at beats ’em all; Oh ! the Eighth Grade’s bound to soar. III. A giggling girl, an’ a sober judge, An’ a girl who will never protest; This bright young girl won a medal At the Interscholastic Contest. IV. The Eighth Grade’s leading spirit Is a boy whose name is Fred. He keeps “just fine’’ deportment, So our teacher, Miss Rempis, said. V. In glancin’ over the Eighth Grade roll, I find we’re forty-nine. According to the grades and rank Our Grade is doing fine. VI. Some days our lessons seem mighty hard. But what’s the use of pining, If we seem down-cast, let’s think that— “Every cloud has a silver lining.’’ VII. Now it’s spring and the sun is shining. An’ the grass is beginning to grow, Let’s each make a new resolution An’ try to each “Hoe his own row.” VIII. Let us think of the old time pioneer. Of his sorrows an’ his cares, Then, have we any right to say Our troubles are worse than theirs ? IX. The fellow who invented mathematics, Never dreamed we would reach a stage Where we couldn’t work a problem When we reached the eighth grade age, X. So now, my Eighth Grade friends, Let’s try and “be good jes’ for fun,” An’ always live up to our motto, Which is, “Be second to none.” —Charlie Shank, (Esq.) 40Eighth Grade History While we are not yet in the High School, we hope that next year will find us enrolled among the High School students. We have been working to that end for eight years, and now we begin to feel as if our work was about done and our reward near at hand. But few of us started in together with Miss Parish eight years ago, and the great majority of our classmates of our first year have either moved away or quit school. Our class, nevertheless, has grown from year to year and now numbers forty-three. The past year has been the most fruitful, and, likewise, the happiest of all our school days. Two Literary Societies were organized early in the fall, and interesting programs have been given by each, alternately, every two weeks. The “Excelsiors” organized with the following officers: President, Fern Treese; Vice-President, Harry Dunlap; Secretary, Mildred Shank; Critic, Miss Rempis. The “Progressives” organized with the following officers: President, Ned Lacey; Vice-President,CarylCroxton, Secretary, Hazel Freligh;Critic, Miss Rempis. The pupils of this grade purchased an organ last fall, which was paid for in part by voluntary subscriptions, and on the afternoon of March 31, beginning at 2 o’clock, the boys of the grade gave an entertainment, the proceeds of which went to help pay the remainder of the organ debt. A cartoon announced the exercises, and a very interesting program consisting of choruses, solos, recitations and two plays, given in costume, was carried out. On the afternoon of May 5, the girls of the grade had in charge the exercises, and gave a very unique program, “The Peak Sisters.” The proceeds of this entertainment paid the balance of the organ debt. On I riday evening, April 21, 1905, Imo Hayward entertained twenty-five friends very pleasantly, the occasion being her birthday anniversary. Games were played, and prizes won, and a general good time was had. During the sleighing season the boys and girls enjoyed several sleigh-ride parties. At one time thev drove to Salem, the party being given by Imo Hayward, and at another time they were guests of Shirley Waller at his Lake James home. I he silence that pervades the school-room has had such a soothing effect upon the pupils that occasionally one journeys to the “land of Nod” and three calls are not sufficient to restore them to a state of wakefulness. Commencement exercises for the Eighth Grade were held during the last week of May. 41Original Eighth Grade Theories Teacher (holding a skull before the class in Physiology):—“Do you see those small perforations through the bone on various parts of the skull ? What are they for ?” Class:—“So the brain may be nourished.” Fred Elya:—“Is that the reason people put water on their heads ?” —o— What is Hygiene ? “Hygiene is the liquid in the air we breathe.” —o— Why should we sit erect ? “If we do not sit erect our back bone will nor be straight, and we can not have free use of our voice.” —O— What is the use of the human skeleton ? “The useot the human skeleton is to protect the brain.” —o- What advantage is gained by having certain muscles act involuntarily ? “If all the muscles were voluntary, they would all move at the same time, and for that reason some have to be immovable. 1 he bones of the skull are involuntary. These bones are not to be moved, so it is a great advantage to us that they don’t.” —o— For what is Gosnold noted ? “Gosnold plowed a furrow around Virginia.” —o— What motives prompted Columbus to make the voyage that resulted in the discovery of America ? “In trying to reach the Indies, Columbus ran into America.” —o— When, where, and by whom, were the first negro slaves brought to America ? “In 1619, a gentleman from Holland brought 20 negro slaves to America.” “In 1619, the first slaves were brought to America by Benjamin Franklin from New Hampshire.” 42ANGOLA PUBLIC SCHOOL BUILDING 1866-1883The Angola Public Schools “The tree of life lias been shaken And but few of us linger now; Like the prophet’s two or three berries In the top of the uppermost bough.” Like the “prophet's two or three berries,” there are but few, a very few. who can remember the first school house in Angola It was a rudely constructed log house, located where Joseph Sowles’ residence now stands. School was held in this building for several years, when a two-room frame building was built, which stood on the corner now occupied by Waugh Carver’s planing mill. This building burned down in May, 1864. In 1862 the first school above the common school was organized by the school trustees—George McConnell. A. W. Hendry and Thomas Morse. The first term of this high school opened in December. 1862. with Professor Cowan and (Mrs.) Mary Cooley Clinton as teachers, in the building known as the Ree Hive. This building stood on the corner now occupied by the Hendry Hotel, but was later moved back and across the street, where it is now used as a dwelling. After the burning of the frame building in 1864, school was held in several places while a new building was being erected. Among these places were the Court House, where Miss Lydia Morse taught, and the second story of the Carpenter building. Within two years the Trustees had ready for occupancy a three-story brick building, on the site now occupied by the Central High School building. At first there were four recitation rooms on the first two floors and a iarge hall on the third. In this hall all the social, literary and theatrical performances of the town were held. The janitors of this building were pupils from the country, who did 45the work for their tuition. These boys roomed in the dressing rooms on the third floor. A school bell was purchased in New York city in the spring of 1866, immediately after the completion of the building, but was not ready for use for about a month. Until it arrived and was hung, Professor Carlin used an old cracked hand bell. When the bell arrived, much difficulty ensued. It was very large, weighing about 750 pounds. Finally W. W. Squires, with an assistant, undertook the job for $25, and at last got the bell hung properly. In the fall of 1881 it became cracked, and the following winter was taken down and sold. The new school entered upon its duties under the principalship of Professor Carlin, assisted by Mrs. Carlin and Miss Battia. In 1869 Professor Williams became associated with Professor Carlin as assistant, and so continued until 1871. when he succeeded to the principalship, with A. W. Long as his assistant. They held their respective places until 1880. when Professor Carlin again assumed control and remained until the building was torn down in 1883. The old students of the '6o's and '70’s will remember these faithful workers, as the old bell called them regularly to their duties. From 1866 until 1876. the school was known and advertised as the Angola Academy. In 1876 it passed under the exclusive control of the corporation and has been known as the Angola High School ever since. In 1883 the school building was condemned as unsafe and torn down. Much of the old material, even to the foundation stones, was used in the present building. The new building was built upon the spot occupied by the old and is the building in use at the present day. The pictures in the old building were carefully saved and may be seen to this day on the wal-s of the high school room. During the years ’83 and '84, school was held in the old Court House, until February of 1884, when the present building was ready for use. In 1884 school was opened in the new building, with Prof. A. B. Stevens as Superintendent and William Phelps as janitor. In 1888 Prof. A. B. Stevens resigned and was succeeded by Professor Knopf, who only taught one year (1888-1889). Prof. W. O. Bailey was Superintendent the next four years (1889-1893); and during the next ten years (1893-1903), Prof. J. W. Wyandt assumed the duties of Superintendent. During the past two years 46(l903-i9°5) Pf°f- H- H. Keep lias been our Superintendent. The record of janitors is not so varied as that of teachers. William Phelps, whom you have seen was janitor in 1884, filled that position for about ten years, when he was succeeded by his son, Baldwin Phelps, who has been our janitor until the present day, excepting three months of the winter of 1903-1904. Gustin Flint and Daniel Orewiler were janitors in the intervening time. There are, besides the main High School building, two other buildings, the West Ward school, which entered the corporation in 1876, and the North Ward, which entered in 1900. The schools enrolled 447 pupils the past year, with an enrollment of 88 in the High school. In conclusion, we wish to say something of our present janitor, who has served us faithfully and well for the past twelve years. Baldwin Phelps, together with his father before him, have done the janitor work of the main building ever since the present structure was erected. BALDWIN PHELPS 47Teachers of Angola Public Schools HIGH SCHOOL. H. H. Keep.................................Superintendent. Ernest V. Shockley..............................Principal. H. L. Rockwood.........................Asistant Principal. GRADES. Luella Rempis................. Alice Nungester............... Sarah Wicoff.................. Etta Cary..................... Allie Matthews................ Felia Parish.................. Clela Kirk.................... Agnes McWhirt................. Evangeline Banksoti........... ..Supervisor of Music, .........8th Grade .........7th Grade. 5th and fitji Grades. . ?rd and 4th Grades. .........2nd Grade. .........1st Grade. .........West Ward. ........North Ward. Drawing and Penmanship. 48Our High School Course During the past year our High School commission was received, which means that the school is up to the state requirements for a commissioned high school. Our course of study covers four years of nine months each, and includes the following subjects in its curriculum: HISTORY. The first year is devoted to Ancient History. Greek and Roman, down to the time of Charlemagne. The second year covers Mediaeval and Modern, giving special attention to the growth of the Anglo-Saxon institutions as shown in the growth of England. The fourth year spends the first semester on United States history and Civics, doing intensive work. Each Senior is given a special topic to investigate and must submit a satisfactory monograph on his subject before a credit is allowed. ENGLISH. The subject of English covers the full four years, and intends to put the pupil at the end of that time in possession of a good reading, writing and speaking vocabulary and the ability to express himself in good English. both oral and written; and a knowledge of the best books, both prose and poetry. The State has outlined a course of study which aims to do th ese things, and a strict adherence to this course brings about most excellent results. The course consists of two years’ work in Rhetoric and Composition, one year each of American and English literature, as given in any good manual, and the reading and studying of eighteen of the best hooks in English literature. 51SCIENCE. ’ The science work begins in the third year with Physics, a whole year being put on the subject. Chemistry is given throughout the Senior year, the latter part being devoted to Mineralogy. Laboratory work is required in both Physics and Chemistry, and a drill in Qualitative Analysis is given. The second semester of the last year is devoted to Physiography, with about a month's work in general biological problems and the classification of the spring flowers. LANGUAGE. The entering student is given the choice of Latin or German, three years in either language being required. In Latin a beginning text is used the first year, followed by Cresar in the second year and Cicero in the third year. The German completes an elementary text the first year and then follows the reading of German stories, poems, plays, and a careful study of the Grammar of the language. MATHEMATICS. In Mathematics the first year and a half is devoted to Algebra, the next year and a half to Geometry, while the fourth year is spent on Bookkeeping, Commercial Law and Business Arithmetic. MUSIC. Within the past year a special instructor has been engaged to teach Music. The music work started out with a thorough drill in the rudiments, and was followed by exercises in melody, ear training, and a number of selections in classical music in the shape of codas. Most of these selections were in part work. Each month some class arranged a program in which new music was provided for a chorus. This was in addition to the regular music work, but served to further the pupils’ knowledge of the best music. There being but two thirty-minute periods per week in music, the work and time were limited to the most important and attractive work, in order to keep all interested. 52The finale of the music season was a May Festival of song at the Opera House, May io, in which our talent in music, both vocal and instrumental, appeared. DRAWING. Drawing was introduced for the first time this year. The first studies were mostly from nature, in fruits, flowers and leaves, seeking to truthfully portray the object and accenting the dark, strong and most important details. Study from still life, using models, faces, etc., next followed. Then the perspective, silhouette, and landscape and seascape work was briefly noticed. Composition and design were also touched upon; borders, wall paper designs, curtains, rugs and calicoes, the motifs all being very simple. Altogether this work has been very satisfactory in revealing a number of coming artists and awakening the love of the beautiful and the desire to create it. A class in mechanical drawing has been conducted the last semester. PENMANSHIP. Penmanship, though given but once a week, has given the child a very good idea of the shape and forms of letters, and great improvement has been noticed, especially among the lower grades. S3HIGH SCHOOL COURSE 1905-1906 FRESHMAN YEAR Algebra Beginning Latin and German Comp, and Rhetoric Last of the Mohicans Vicar of Wakefield Merchant of Venice Vision ot Sir Launfal Greece and the East Rome and the West SOPHOMORE YEAR Algebra Geometry Caesar and German Gr. and Easy Readings Comp, and Rhetoric Ivanhoe Julius Caesar Burke’s Speech Ancient Mariner Pope's I Iliad Mediaeval History Modern History JUNIOR YEAR Geometry Cicero and William 'Fell Joan of Arc-Marie Stewart American Literature Idylls of the King Palamon and Arcite Macbeth Silas Marner Life of Goldsmith Physics SENIOR YEAR Bookkeeping Botany American History Physiography English Literature Milton’s Poems Milton and Addison Hamlet Life of Johnson DeCoverly Papers Chemistry TEXTS Algebra—(not selected) Geometry—Sanders Bookkeeping—Monfgomery Botany—Andrews Latin—Bennet Series Beg. Ger.—(not selected) German Gr.—Thomas Ger. Reading—Var. Texts Am. Hist. —Different Texts Physiography—Dryer Rhet.—Lock wood Emerson Am. Lit.—Newcomer English Literature—Halleck Classics—Besf editions History—West Physics—Hoadly Chemistry—Not se 1 ectedThe Course of Study 1 lie course of study, as outlined on the foregoing pages, meets all the requirements of a commissioned high schol. The year is divided into two semesters of four and a half months each. There are four credits to he made each semester, eight for the year, and thirty-two for graduation. CONDITIONS FOR PROMOTION AND GRADUATION. In order to pass from one year to another, a general average of 80 per cent., with no subject less than h o per cent., must be obtained. If a pupil fails in one subject, it does not mean that he has to take the whole year's work over, but only that particular subject. In order to graduate, a student must, in addition to securing thirty-two credits, prepare a satisfactory thesis. CALENDAR, 1905-06. School opens................................Monday, September 4, Thanksgiving vacation.....................Thursday, November 23, Holiday vacation.................December 23, 1905, to January 3, Spring vacation.............................. March 31 to April 8, School closes..............................................June 1, 1905 i9°5 1906 1906 1906 55The Library The present library of the Angola schools consists of about one hundred volumes, together with an equal number of government reports The High school is furnished with two sets of the Encyclopedia Brit-tanica. Library of Universal History, two dictionaries, and a few miscellaneous reference texts. There are 220 music books for the grades and 60 chorus books for the High school. In addition to the books, there is a full set of music charts and several geographical and physiological charts Most of the money in the past has gone for the regular Reading Circle books, and while there is a fairly good line of juvenile reading, there are practically no reference books outside of the encyclopedias. In History and English all the reference texts have been furnished by the teachers themselves from their own private libraries. It is impossible to do the best work without the necessary apparatus, and it is hoped that another year will see our library equipped with the necessary reference books. During the past year doors have been placed on the old shelves, thereby helping the appearance of the library room, as well as keeping the books in better condition. An addition in the shape of new shelves is badly needed, since the books now have to be piled and stacked up over each other. The addition of the music books makes this absolutely necessary. 56BOARD OF EDUCATIONLiterary At the beginning of the school year the faculty arranged a series of programs to given monthly. The interest in the old Clio and Amphictyon societies had for some reason so declined that it was thought best to formulate a new plan for rhetoricals. After much deliberation the following program was announced and successfully carried out: Seniors........................October....................Arbor Day Juniors....................... November Thanksgiving Sophomores.................... December Christmas Freshmen.......................January..............General Program Boys.......................... February Washington’s Birthday Girls.......................... March Musical Program Faculty........................ April Lectures Whole School.................... May Reception 60The School Entertainment “Well, sir. if yer want ter hyar ’bout it, come right ’round on the hack stoop, an’ I’ll tell yer all ’bout it,” said Mrs. Biliker to a neighbor, who had come over to hear about the entertainment. “Xeow. in the fust place, they decided to have it in Monger’s school house, bein' that ole Monger’s a school trustee. It wuz the ‘Last Day of School' exercises, an’ not having ’nough money to pay off the’ organ rent, they charged ten cents admission. I went airly, so’s I could get a good seat. The teacher was at the door with a tin cup, wherein I put my ten cents. I jes’ wish you could a saw that there schoolroom. They lied got some evergreen an' made strings on it, and strung it up all over the room, an' the winders had new blinds up to ’em, green in color, and in front was a rug whereon they stood when they was a-speakin’. “Well. I weren’t there more’n fifteen minutes, when hyar come the Mullenses. the hul 'kit an’ posse,’ with Mullen’s baby to boot. Then purty soon some more people come, an' good land! if they didn’t keep on a-com-in’. 'til the floor purty nigh busted through. Well, when they got kind o’ quieted down, the teacher riz up an’ sez, ‘I’m glad,’ sez she, ‘to see so many of the parents an’ friends out this evening.’ sez she. ‘an’ now,’ sez she, ‘we ll listen to a song by the school,’ sez she. “Then them children marched np thar and sang right smart. “The next was a recitation by one of them Mullens voung’nns that was purty good. An' say. Mrs. Babbit, you won’t believe me. but when the teacher called out for a song that was to be sung bv four girls, why, them voung’uns jes’ took on awful. Why, first one ’ed sing and the others 'ed jes' keep still: then when they took a notion, they would sing all to once. Good land! if my Serintha took on that way. I’d lam her 'til she’d be glad to sing smart. “Well, that was followed by more songs and speakin’, 'til finally they fit marched up and sung somethin’ ’bout ‘Good-night, good-night,’ then that was all. Then the teacher counted out the money and whispered something to 'Squire Butterly; then sez she. ‘The ’Squire will favor us with a speech.’ says she. Then the ’Squire riz up and walked up in front and sez: “‘Ladies and Gentlemen: I have been requested to speak to this hyar meetin’ this evenin’, by our disinguished schewl ma’m, who has took on herself the yoke of schewl teachin’. Neouw, all these hyar children that’s hyar this evenin’ hev done good in every way. The singin’ was good, and the speakin’ wuz also. I am glad to many on yer hev come hyar this evenin’. e hev made five dollars,’ sez he, ‘which will more’n cover the orging.’ sez he. Then he sot himself down, after bidding us ail an’ every one a good-night. “Oh. ye don’t hev to go so soon, do ye? Well, drop in again, when ye kin find spare time, an’ we'll hev another little friendly chat.” CHARLES SHANK, ’09. 63An Old Man’s Story Within a grocery in a qniet. sleepy little village among the New England hills, three or four men were discussing their past lives. As they were telling of the things they had done, another man stepped into the store, and was greeted by a chorus of hellos and asked to join the circle. This man's name was Abram Brown, but he had been nicknamed “Abe.” He was tall and heavy set. His features were sharp, his eyes keen and he always had a smile for every one. He had on a hunting skirt and leather coat and leggings which reached above the knees. He took a chair to the back of the stove, tilted it back against a barrel and asked the man nearest him what they were talking about. After awhile some one asked him to tell an incident of his life. He settled himself in his chair and began the following narrative: “When I was about twenty-one 1 acted as gride for a party of men in the Maine woods. We started one bright day in winter to track moose. We tracked him until late in the afternoon, when one of the men and myself started in another direction and after wandering around a long-time discovered we were lost. Great black clouds began piling themselves up in the north and 1 knew we were going to have a snow-storm. e went on thinking we would hear or see our companions. After a while it began to snow and kept on snowing harder and harder until we could not see very far away from us. We were standing under a tree thinking what we could do. I proposed to build a roof over us of sticks, so we dug what few sticks we could from under the snow and made a sort of roof and got under it. Within about five or six hours we were completely hidden with the snow. “My companion was sleeping when I heard a grumbling sound. I paid no attention to it at first, but after a while it sounded nearer. My companion awoke and heard the noise and asked what it was. I told him ( 4- I didn’t know. In a little while we could hear the tramp of hoofs and it seemed as if the hoofs were going to trample us to death, but we were left unhurt. We dug our way out of the hole and looked around us and there was the path the deer had left when they went north. “We started toward the little village we left the day before and reached there tired and hungry. We found our companions and they were glad we were alive. “We related our experience and then one old man told us a legend of why the deer go north when the hunters come in the fall and early winter to hunt. This is why the deer made the path we traveled and in this way we were saved from a death of starvation or being frozen.” VI EVE DUTTER, ’08. For -the VluYvT.How a Kind Invitation Cheered Her One bright summer day, Lilian Elliot and her sister, Bertha, were sitting on the veranda planning for a party. They had not been there but a few minutes when they heard footsteps which sounded familiar to them. “Listen," said Lilian to Bertha. “I hear familiar footsteps and I believe it is brother Charles.” Their brother had been away from home for a long time and was just returning from a vacation on account of illness. “Oh, Lilian! can it he possible that it is he! How nice it will be! He can be here for our party." In a moment their eyes were turned towards the person whom they believed to be their brother. As they glanced at him Bertha said. “Oh. it is Charles whom we have longed to see for months and months!” In a moment they were beside him. laughing and talking in the way they used to do before he left home; but this time Charles was not as happy as they expected to find him. Lilian soon exclaimed. “Why. Charles, why do you not say more to us? We are going to have a party and you will be here to enjoy it with us." This did not cheer him up one bit. lie w.as thinking of his sickness and the good position he had left. They bothered him no more and walked slowly away toward the house. Charles suddenly burst out weeping and said,“Sisters, perhaps you are wondering why I am so sad—" and before be could finish the sentence, Lilian exclaimed, “Oh. tell us. Charles, the reason for this sadness.” He told them of his sickness and that he had been forbidden to work for a year and of his plans of sending them to school; but now could not for be must use his money for doctor bills. “Oh. brother." exclaimed Bertha, “do you think we would take your money away from you and spend it to go to school when papa is per- fit;fectly able to send us?” “Well, I thought it would save father that much if I could furnish the money,” he replied. The girls then began telling him about the party they were planning. Charles told the girls that they should go on and have their party and not mind about him and added. “I would like to mention one thing to you.” “All right. Charles,” said Lilian, “tell us what it is.” Charles told them how he had been corresponding with a poor girl who worked so hard to support herself and mother, and asked them if they would not write and ask her too. “Oh. who is it?” asked Bertha. “Her name,” lie continued, “is Vesta Wayworth and she is certainly the best young lady in this town.” “ es, but where does she live and will you not tell us all about her?” said Lilian, “we will do anything you want us to do, for your sake.” The next day the girls wrote invitations, but resolved to call at this particular girl’s home. After dinner the girls called on Miss Wayworth, but on knocking at the door, no answer came. They knocked again and still no answer. Finally the third time a beautiful young lady came to the door. Her eyes were red with weeping. She asked them to step in and they soon made known their errand. “Oh,” she exclaimed, “Who would think of inviting me to such a stylish party as that will be,” and straightway burst out weeping. Bertha gently arose from her chair and went around and sat beside her and began talking to her. “Vesta." said she. “it was my brother’s request that we invite you to our party. He told us about you when he came home last night.” “Oh! Oh! she exclaimed, “one kind word is worth any number of harsh ones. And. oh, Bertha, is he at home?” “Yes. he came home last evening, because he has been very ill and could not work, and thought it best to come home and rest.” Vesta sank back in her chair and buried her face in her hands. She was thinking of the party and whether she had better accept the invitation. But in a moment she wiped the tears from her eyes and said, “Bertha. I will be present at your party.” The next night was to be the party. The two girls and their mother 67worked hard all day, arranging for the occasion. When the time came for the party, the girls wondered whether Vesta would he there. They knew it would please their brother so well. In a short time a knocK came and the door was opened. There stood Vesta and Charles. After all guests but Vesta had departed to their several homes, she came to Lilian and said, “I have never enjoyed myself as much as I have this evening. I will never forget this occasion,” and she quoted these few lines, “Kind words can never die. Never die. never die. Kind words can never die. No. never die." Ever afterwards Vesta was always invited to all the parties, and Lilian. Charles and Bertha were her best friends. Many a time Vesta thought of these words. “A friend in need is a frimd indeed." and many times said to herself. “1 have certainly found true ores in these few of mine." That night at a late hour Vesta and Charles returned to her home. A few weeks later a wedding was prepared ar.d on that particular day at high noon, Vesta Wayworth was no longer a poor man's daughter, but a man's loving wife. Never was there a home as happy as this one and esta s mother did not have to work hard for a living, but came to live happy in her old age with Vesta and Charles. In this home, as in many other homes, there was always sunshine within, if not without, and the life of the aged mothc and the two young lives were linked together as the link in the golden chain of friendship. VIVIAN SWIFT. '07. 68The Other Girl “I'll tell you what," said Eleanor, coming out of the Assembly Room with a couple of books under her arm, “ I tell you what, girls, if we don’t show them a jolly old time at that party to-night—well, all I’ve got to say, we needn’t even mention high school party again.” “Don't worry we’ll do it,’’ came from half a dozen girls at once. “Oh. I say,’’ said one of the girls with a hatpin between her teeth, “girls, what will we wear?” “Clothes,” called up one of the girls who had started down the stairs. “I’ll tell you what lets do." said Lillian, “let's wear our shirtwaists.” “All right, we'll do it," chorused the girls, “Eeverybody remember." “Oh. the superintendent’s coming, girls," and a dozen skirts were frantically siezed and a dozen pairs of feet scudded down the stairs and into the open air. Here they divided off into pairs, Eleanor going with her bosom friend, Sara. The girls walked a short distance before anything was said and then Eleanor broke the silence. ‘I’ve made up my mind what cards to play tonight. I have settled one point to my satisfaction, and that is this: if Jack Bayeton wants to go home with me to-night, he can, and what's more. I’d let him go a dozen times over before I’d let that horrid Persis Gibson have him. I hate her— the stuck up thing.” “You’ll have to watch vour cards close if you catch him,” said her friend, “she has some wily ways.” “I really think," said Eleanor, “that some of those Sophomores are getting dreadfully affected. I wish some of them would look up the word “sophomore" and probably they would see what fools they are getting to be.” The two girls soon parted. Eleanor stopping at her father’s store and Sara going on down the street. If Eleanor had watched, she would have 69seen Jack Bayeton hurriedly cross the street and walk with Sara. They had gone but a short way when Jack broke into the middle of his subject by asking Sara if she had any idea Eleanor would let him go home with her after the party. “I believe you would be given a fair trial. I would ask her if I were you.” Sara said. “I intend to.” said Jack, and with an, “I wish you good luck,” Sara turned the corner and left Jack to his own thoughts. “Consarn it all! its hard on a fellow to have to be sweet on a dozen girls at once. I am going to cut a half-a-dozen of them, and what’s more, I will get rid of that Persis Gibson if I have to take her home to get her out of the way. Blame it! I'll lose half the fun. It’s for Eleanor’s sake, so 1 don't care anything.” Precisely at half past seven, Eleanor donned her wraps and started for Sara’s. Sara was not quite ready and it was eight before they started for the Hall. When they arrived at the Hall they went to the dressing room where they found some of the other girls. While they were arranging their hair, Lilian and Persis came in. Lilian had on a white shirtwaist and a pink tie, butPersis was all decked out in her very best party dress. “It’s mean.” said Sara, “when she knew we were going to wear our shirt-waists, she did it purposely and I know it.” As the girls passed into the reception room they met Bob Chandlers and Dick Grant, who immediately secured them as partners for the promenade. They were walking around the room, when Dick suddenly turned to Eleanor and said, “Don't you want an introduction to Jack Bayeton ?” “Oh, yes, 1 suppose I can endure one, if you are tired of me,” said Eleanor, with a merry laugh. The introduction over. Jack proposed they take seats, and Eleanor readily assented. There was a few moments’ silence and then lack said with a smile, “How does it happen that you girls have on your shirt-waists and Persis is so decked out ?” “I don’t know,” said Eleanor, “unless she did it just for meanness. She looks quite sweet though.” “Quite,” said Jack. 71Further conversation was stopped by one of the hoys introducing a Freshman girl to Jack. Eleanor, left to herself, wandered about the room talking to this one and that on various topics interesting to high school girls. Finding a cozy corner she sat down to rest. She had not been sitting very long when she espied Jack and Persis talking together. She wondered how on earth she got an introduction to him. and added half aloud. “I'll bet she pounced on one of the boys to do it." “What that you are talking about?” broke in Dick, as he came up and sat down beside her. “Come on Eleanor, don’t sit here. Come and play for me.” She had hardly begun to play when Persis came up and asked her to play a two-step, as they wanted to dance. In a moment her lingers were living over the kevs rattling off a popular two-step She knew 1 ei -sis and lack were dancing. Once she caught herself thinking that she wished she were dancing. She grew tired of playing and wandered oil by herself. Boh left to himself went into the other room where he found Sara perched on a table, her feet swinging hack and forth under the table and her hands in her lap. She was surrounded by half-a-dozen to whom she had been telling some of her many funny stories. Bob immediately became one of her enchanted followers. Most of the boys left their posts to Boh. “Boh." said Sara. “Where is Eleanor?" “She has been playing the piano. I guess she is talking to some girls now. but—why do you ask?” “Oh. I just wondered if she had seen Jack and Persis? 1 hey have been together and look as if they were wrapped up in each other." “By George!" cried Bob, “What's come over Jack, and how—I didn't think he thought anything of Persis." “There’s Eleanor now. watching them from the other door. Good thing she has a position where they can't see her." added Sara. Eleanor was taking in the whole situation. “1 don’t care,” she was saying to herself, “I’ll show her she is not the only one that’s smooth— there’s Dick—I'll go and jolly him—she thinks a sight of Dick anyhow." Once she and Dick passed near Jack and Persis. They heard Persis complain of being tired and heard Jack ask her to set down. After aim- 72lessly wandering around with Dick awhile she slipped away from him and started toward the refreshment room. She passd by the cloak room and could not help but see Jack helping Persis on with her wraps. How she wanted to cry! After getting a drink she went back into the reception room and was soon surrounded by a number of boys with petitions to start some games. But she pleaded to be excused saying that she was tired, so they urged her no more. She wandered back to the cloak room and who should she find then but Jack. “Eleanor,” he broke in hurriedly, “I came back for you. I took Persis home, came back, and now I want to take you home. Now, don’t say I can't.’ Eleanor looked at him with her big blue eyes full of surprise. “Why, Jack, what do you mean? Don’t you realize that you are doing something rather queer?" But it did not take long for Jack to coax her to accompany him. Once out of the house, he told her why be had taken Persis home. He said he had promised his mothei that he would take her home, but lie wanted to take Eleanor, and that as soon as he had seen Persis safely home, he had come back for her. A light pressure of her hand on his arm told him that she was glad he had come back. And two more souis were made happy. ELSIE SHARITT, ’06.Prophecy of Boys In “A,” a man of thought you’ll find. Who has his own ideas of life and mind. “B” is a Senior so tall and slim, Who is given to one very great sin. “C” is the Junior who gets rank one. But he is sometimes known to he chewing gum. “D” is a Senior hoy—you know who I mean. For he is always heard wherever he’s seen. “E” is an athlete wise and grand, Thro’ right and wrong he’ll keep his stand. “F”, as you will readily see. Will sometime a man of leisure he. “G." who often changes his seat. Will next he seen in the great track meet. “H”, the dark eyed prince of the school. Will some day a spacious farm house rule. “Of all the sad words that we could pen, The saddest are these. “It might have been.” “J”, so bashful, ’tis plain to see, In future times an architect will be. “K”, a boy with very sweet smile, Who charms all the girls within a mile. “L" is a boy with a genial face, Who will some flay win in life’s great race. 74“M”. so tall, imposing and grand, Will some day in the Senate stand. “M" also stands for a Senior, Who can say with a laugh, I have taken care of a Junior For two years and a half. “N” will not tFe you very long With this silly babble of verse and song. “O” is quite a jolly lad. He never will he very sad. “P" is a Sophomore large and strong, Who will hand you gravel ere the summer is gone. “Q” uestions and quizzes we all need fear. Until the last day of the present school year. “R" is a Sophomore with a very wise head, Will sometime a business man be. “S” among the absent we will place. For it will be a year ere you see his face. There are others, so don’t he sure. Ere we stop we will name some more. “U" know we always do the best. So don’t feel slighted if you are not with the rest. “V” a noted violinist will be. And lead great orchestras over the sea. “W” an actor aspires to be. Who will star in many a company. “X”. a professor as you already see. Does all his adding—X plus Y equal Z. “Y”, a man with mathematical tastes. Who teaches geometry without a grimace. “Z” is the man who superintends us all. He will one day have a chair in College Hall. 75A History of the Boys A History! Well, I declare. There's something doing among the Fair. We’ll own up we’ve done our best To find out all about the rest. To begin with, there’s Avery, the Senior. Who hasn't been perfect in demeanor. There’s Billy, another who's a good lad. But he is likewise sometimes bad. Then Clarence, who thinks he's so bright Whose past life hasn’t always been right. Don has been a most happy-go-lucky chap But we're sad to say has had one mishap. Farle. the swellest boy in school, We’re sad to say, ofttimes acts the fool. Fred, a very conspicuous light, Has often been seen smoking a pipe. There’s another Senior, his name is Guv, Who was never known to tell a lie. And Harold, he is surely a pearl. And is very popular with a certain girl. Jay is the bashful boy of the crowd, Ami always seems to be very proud. 76A bright, happy boy is Loyd R. Clay, About bis work or at play. Marshall, a Senior, can say with a laugh, “I’ve taken care of a Junior two years and a half, “N”, the absent one of the school. You all agree be was no fool. Orville is a most charming lad, W hom Rockwood says is not very bad. Paul is a very witty Sophomore. Who thinks he knows all. but might know more. “K” for Karl, the boy with glasses. Who is near the head in all his classes. “Q” stands for many things in schoolroom lore Quizzes and questions and slamming the door. “S” is for Shockley, our teacher so dear. Whom we all mind and yet never fear. Vernon, the Senior and Arlist you know. Can sketch most anything you to him show. Weir, the hov who has Junior ties. Always makes it a point to he very wise. X. Y. 7, are three teachers of ours. Who have helped us through the weary hours. In all we've said, there's nothing to rue. For you know its all, oh all, very true. To you all we greeting send. God bless the bovs, and us all.—AMFX. A. H. S. GIRLS. 77Last Will and Testament Of the A. H. S. Girls To the A. H. S. Boys To Don Dickerson we will give Zulu Ireland’s broken sieve. To Guy Kyper, the little saint, Clara Emerson’s box of paint. To Vernon Nichols, Ola’s pilot. She will give a blue violet. From Mildred Hauver it is written Marshall Willennar gets the mitten. To Harold Kratz very soon Hazel Lee will give a spoon. To Paul Sowle (it is a sin) We will send a bone hair pin. To Billie Butler, we shall “holler,” From Hazel Purinton gets a collar. Aclelia Stallman with golden locks, Gives Wallace Purinton a rattle box. To Rob Carson, for his pocket, Mable Stayner wills her locket. To Avery Fisher, who thinks he’s smart, Susan Gochenaur wills her heart. Mr. Keep in his cosy nook Will find a big outline book. To Clarence Davis, good and true, Pansy Brattian wills her shoe. Grover Blayney, just keep cool, You shall have a little stool. To Percy Alspach, who is simple, Edwina Freygang gives her dimple. To Weir Wicoflf, who is a sage, Ethel Bolan wills her cage. Mark Woodhull without fail Will receive the east end of the jail. To Charles Honess, ’tis quite clear, Ola Swift will will a tear. To Zellar Willennar, if he is good, We will give our winter hood. To Mr. Shockley, who likes to talk, We will our last little piece of chalk. To Earl Moss, who has brass, We will send a blade of grass. To Lloyd Clay, “May his tribe increase,” We leave a box of good hair grease. Bessie Tuttle, just for fun, Send Hershell a stick of gum. Miss Bankson’s baton, which in singing helps, She will give to Baldwin Phelps. Mr. Rockvvood by degrees Will receive our algebrees. Now as contentment fills our heart We will bid you good-by and part. A. H. S. Girls- 78t Musi c The High School is very fortunate in having so many musicians oi different kinds. In addition to the many good voices found in the High School, there are a number of pianists and violinists. Hazelle Lee. Leona Weicht. Vera Dickerson, Ola Bachelor, Edwina Freygang, Vieve Dutter, OUR PIANISTS. Mabel Stayner, Elsie Hayward, Mildred Hauver, Lola Mugg, Ana Beil, Elsie Sharitt, Hazel Purinton. Mark Rinehart. Marshall Willennar, Zellar Willennar. OUR VIOLINISTS. Vernon Nichols, Joseph Hecto , Donald Smith Harold Kratz, Llovd Clay. Harry Dunlap, soThe Old Piano and the New For more than ten years the high school has been trying to get a piano and up to the present year had collected about fifteen dollars in various ways. At the beginning of the school year. Miss Bankson inaugurated a vigorous crusade for a new piano. Many plans for raising money discussed and finally a Fair was decided upon Under the management of Miss Bankson the Armory Hall was secured, donations from the merchants of town were obtained, and the sale of these articles together with the commissions on subscriptions for the Ladies’ Home Journal, netted $62.75. With this much money on hand the committee in charge decided to purchase a piano. After much investigation and deliberation a piano was selected and a payment made upon it. The school has two years in which to finish paying for it and there is no doubt but that it will he paid for by that time. There has been much discussion as to the age of the old square piano at the high school and after a careful investigation of the facts in the case, we find the following to be true. The piano was purchased new in 1875 for $500. hen the old building was condemned, it was removed to the residence of Geo. McConnell, where it remained until the present building was ready for occupancy. Hence the erroneous idea was spread that the piano was purchased second handed. The piano was a good one but thirty years of hard usage has left it but an echo of its former self. When the new piano was installed, the old one was put in the fifth room, where it is still doing daily service. 81A Stroll It was the second day of spring, The breeze was gently blowing, The robins made the hills ring With songs of pleasant cheering. Then Billy spread the news about, That we would take a tramp; We girls without much thought or doubt Went, although it was pretty damp. So quickly to our homes we sped To get our caps and rubbers; For the ground was but a muddy bed. Without much grass and clovers. Pr rfessor Shockley went along To teach us of erosion, So we the terms would not get wrong, Or otherwise get imposed on. We climbed a fence and crossed a dell, And down the hill we ran; But to Ana, misfortune fell — Fell, as only misfortune can. For like Jill she tumbled down, The rest came running after; But when we nothing serious found We all broke out with laughter. We crossed a black and muddy marsh, We were a lovely sight, For every step in that mad march, Brought mud to greater height. At last we tired of sius'i and mud, And turned our steps toward town; We got there as soon as we could, Although the sun was nearly down. Perhaps at home you think we’ll stay, And not again go tramping. But on the next bright pleasant day We will again go rambling. 82 Lui.u Weaver ’OS.♦ 83 Receptions and Parties The social side of the school year has been very pleasant and the many little class parties have made many a long day pass quickly. We can not tell of each and every party, but the several classes have handed in a schedule of their social functions of the year, which we are glad to give space in our Annual. Seniors with— Ola Bachelor, Clara Emerson, Jos. W. Butler, Lulu Weaver. Juniors with— Elsie Sharitt. Leona Weicht. Clarence Davis, Ora Parsed. Sophomores with— Freshmen with— Elsie Hayward, Mark Reinhart, Zulah Ireland. Vieve Dutter, Chas. Honess, H. L. Rockwood. Bov’s reception to girls. . Girl’s reception to bovs. . February 24. Reception given by Angola Schools to the Public June I. 84The Merchant of Venice The students of the high school, assisted by the faculty and Miss Elsie McCrory, gave “The Merchant of Vencie Up-to-Date” on the evening of April 18th. The play proved to be very successful, despite the fact that les than a week was spent in practicing. The proceeds, about $20.00, were for the high school cadets. CAST OF CHARACTERS. Duke.................................................Jos. W. Butler Antonio..................................................Guy D. Kyper Bassanio...........................................Ernest V. Shockley Gratiano................................................. Wier Wicoff Launcelot Gobbo.......................................Zellar Willennar Shylock ............................................H. L. Rockwood Tubal..................................................M. J. Woodhull Portia ..........................................Elsie E. McCrory Nerissa .........................................................Vieve Dutter Jessica..........................................................Elsie Sharitt Mrs. Gobbo ...................................................Margaret Strayer Antonio’s Mother.................................................Clara Emerson Policeman..................... ......................Wallace Purinton Foot ball players...................Prof. Sweigenheimer, H. H. Keep 85The Sketch Club The Sketch Club was organized the first week of school. The object of the Club was to do landscape work from nature as long as the weather permitted, and then do indoor work copying landscapes, seascapes, buildings, etc. The trips in the fall were taken after school and the Club was often out for more than two hours at a time. The tints of the sky. leaves and road were discussed, and more than one embryo artist was made in watching the beautiful in nature rnd trying to create as beautiful. Two trios were taken each week until cold weather compelled the Club to seek warmer quarters. During the winter months they met at MissBankson’s Studio and continued their work, drawing from pictures and models. The work was eminently satisfactory to both pupil and teacher and the beginning being made, much work along this line may be expected in the future. Wayne McKillen. Altina Lane. Caryl Croxton. Margaret Perfect. Fred Elya. Lewis Hendry. Harry Dunlap. Jessie Carr Maurice Williamson. Harry Ritter. Shirley Waller. Lisle Dilworth. Hazel Kirk. Lucile Smith. Ned Lacey. Robert Patterson. Sylvester Stambaugh. Esther Orton. Bessie Wood. Mad e Walsh. Elmira Brewer. Fredrika Wambaugh. 86Athletic Association Athletics in the high school are under the control of the faculty and strict supervision is maintained over all forms of physical exercise. The high school follows the rules laid down by the State High School Association in regard to the eligibility of contestants and participants in any and all forms of athletic sports. The officers of the association for the past year were as follows: President. Mark Woodhull: Secretary. Avery Fisher; Treasurer., Wallace Purinton; Manager, Ernest V. Shockley. 88Foot Ball Coach and Manager Captain McKinley Dole Purinton Battershaw Dunlap, Nichols Sowle, Moss Fisher Willennar Kyper Woodhull Dickerson Smith, Carson Ernest V. Shockley M. J. Woodhull Left End Left Tackle Left Guard Center Right Guard Right Tackle Right End Right Half-back Full-back Left Half-back Quarter-back Substitutes FOOT BALL SCHEDLLE 1904 October 1—Angola vs. T. S. N. C. 2ds....22- 0 October 8—Angola vs. Auburn............. 0-11 October 15—Angola vs. Lagrange........... 0-6 November 5—Angola vs. Auburn............ 0-22 November 19—Angola vs. Ashley............ 6-6 November 19—Angola 2ds vs. Fremont ...... 6-6 91 Base Ball Captain Fish hr Manager - Ernest V. Shockley Catcher - Kyper Pitchers - Collins, Fisher First Base - Willennar Second Base - Dickerson Short Stop - Carson Third Base - Fisher Left Field - Nichols Center Field - ' Smith Right Field - Dole Substitutes - Woodhull, Sovvle, Dunlap BASE BALL SCHEDULE 1905 April 1—Angola vs. Fremont...............12- 8 April 22—Angola vs. Fremont.............. 7-14 92 t 95Track Team Ernest V. Shockley - Coach and Manager M.J.Woodhull Captain Woodhull Sprinters: McKinley Dickerson Fisher Middle Distance Runners: Willennar Kyper Woodhull Cole Long Distance Runners: lioness Willennar Woodhull Kyper Hurdlers: McKinley Willennar Weight Events: McKinley Willennar Woodhull Broad Jump: McKinley Dickerson Pole Vault: Kyper Brothers Nichols Brothers High Jump: Fisher Sowle Nichols TRACK AND FIELD GAMES 1905 May 13—Angola vs. Auburn May 20—Angola vs. Fremont May 26—Steuben County Interscholastic League 96Steuben County Interscholastic Meet At the Steuben County Interscholastic League Track and Field games held May 28, 1904, the high school carried off the honors as seen by the following table: EVENT FIRST SECOND THIRD .50 yard dash Burt, A Johnson, F 880 yard run Willennar, A Dickerson, A Standing high jump . . . Nichols, A Burt, A Moss, A Runninghop, skip, jump. Johnson, F Sheffer, A 120 yard hurdle. . Kyper, A Willennar, A Hall, A 440 yard dash Woodhull. A Benninghoof.Fl Standing hop. skip, jump, . . Sowle, A Sheffer, A Nichols, A 220 yard hurdle . . Kyper, A Willennar, A Johnson, F Pole vault Sowle, A McNaughton, F Shot put Sheffer, A Woodhull, A 220 yard dash Woodhull, A Sowle, A Benninghoof.Fl Standing broad jump . . . Nichols, A Burt, A Sheffer, A Running broad jump.. ShefTer, A Johnson, F Running high jump Burt, A Moss, A TOTALS Angola Flint Fremont 99The Militia Early in the year the question of organizing the boys into a cadei corps was brought forward and after much discussion it was finally decided to organize. It was decided to purchase suits and guns, but as this goes to press the boys are not fully equipped, and therefore did not want a picture taken. The officers and members of the corps are as follows: MILITIA OFFICERS. Captain First Lieutenant. . . Carpenter. Wayne Cole, Don Collins, Wren Croxton. Galen Culver, John Dole, Jay Dunlap. Harry Elya. Fred Ettinger, Xed Fairfield. Almond Hamlin. Don Hall, George Hector, Jos. Hendry, Lewis Jackman, Ralph Johnston, Fred Lee, Wayne Lacey. Ned McClellan. Stanley McKinley. Wayne Myrtle. Edward Patterson, Rob’t Pocock, Tom Ramsey, Carl Ransburg, Dawson Tarr. Forrest Wells Leighton Wicoff. Wier Williamson, Maurice GIRLS’ MILITIA Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Bolan. Ethel Braman, Pansy Braman, Pearl Brewer. Elmira Carv. Leta Conklin. Lena Crain. Fay DeLancey. Yerle Dutter, Vieve Eggleston. Edith Hall. Gay Hauver. Mildred Ireland. Zulah Junod. Alta Lee. Hazelle Mugg. Lola Osborn. Margaret Pilliod. Mabel Purinton. Hazel Sharitt. Elsie Stallman. Aclelia Stayner. Mabel Straver. Margaret Swift. Ola Tasker. Mina White. Lucy 100A1 u m n i It has been no small task to write up a history of the Alumni, and, although we have taken much time, pains, and no small expense, yet there may he some mistakes in the following list. It is remarkable that there have been but eleven deaths in thirty-eight years. A careful study of the list reveals some very interesting facts. The officers of the Alumni, are as follows: President, Mack Fisher; Vice-President, Grace French; Secretary, Clela Kirk; Treasurer. Lora Kannel. The Alumni hold an annual banquet during commencement week which is always a most interesting meeting. ALUMNI. The following list is corrected to June i, 1905: Married. H. H. Keep 1887. Frank Andrews 1878. Mate Carelton Dickinson. . . 1879. Seth Avery 1880. W. W. Snyder Della Chadwick Mitchell.... Ruth Coe Harnden 1881. E11a La Due Perigo Vill C. Chadwick 102188 2, Della Gale Gilbert...... Nora Leas............... Mary Snyder............. ♦Luna Dawson Carpenter. ♦Leona Weaver Patterson ♦Ella Freeman Mitchell. . . ♦Jennie Sams Braman. .. . F. W. Kinney............ Ethel Williams Kinney. . C. AHie Chadwick........ B B. Bigler............. ..................................... Dead. .......Dressmaker..................Angola, Ind. .....................................Dead. ..............................Elwood, Ind. ..............................Angola, Ind. ............................ Angola, Ind. ............................ Angola, Ind. .........................Vancouver, Wash. ......................................Dead .......Dentist.................Angola, Ind Minister, Law Student.... Indianapolis. Ind ♦Ida Weaver Brewer........ ♦Lizzie Cline Dodge....... ♦Hattie Morrow Wells....... ♦Lizzie McConnell Sheldon. Nettie Cole.............. ♦I A Melendy.............. ♦Rose Weicht Willet....... ♦Ella Leas Boozer......... ♦Willis Eberly,..,........ Victor Eberly............ Belle Owen............... ♦Louis Sholtz............. ♦Nettie Fast Freligh...... ♦Ethie Burlingame Lehman Z. A. Crain.............. Frank Chilsori........... ♦Edessa Tohnson Munn.... ♦Etta Leas Miller......... Minnie Boon............... Emma Welch............. ♦Ada Phelps Welch... ♦Dora Plaster Bollinger Zoe Ettinger........... ♦Alice V. Sowle Moody Frank Beil.............. 18S3. .........................Angola, Ind. .........................Angola, Tnd. .........................Angola, Ind .........................Angola, Ind. .........................Angola, Ind. . Teacher................Angola, Ind. .....................Montpelier, Ohio. .......................Waterloo, Ind. ..Mail Agent...........Waterloo. Ind. ..Mining Blacksmith.......Leeds. S. D. .................................Dead. ..Traveling Salesman.Ft. Wayne. Ind. .........................Angola, Ind. ..Teacher...............Edwards, Miss. 1885 .. Druggist..............Doland. S. D. . - ........................... Dead. .....................St. Louis, Mo. •. ......................Angola, Ind. ............................... Dead. 1886 ..Teacher.............La Grange, Ind. .........................Toledo, Ohio. .. Stenographer....Huntington, Ind. .................................Dead. .........................Ashley, Ind. .................................Dead. 103♦Acquilla Boone...................R. R. Engineer. ♦Grant K. Lewis...................Minister...... ♦Emily Kinney Lewis............................. John Weiss..................................... 1887. ♦Mattie Purinton Wyandt......................... ♦Josie Barnes Wickwire.......................... ♦Alta Everhart Robinson......................... ♦Ina Craig Emerson.............................. L. D. Crain......................Druggist...... Grace Brown............Teacher in Blind Asylum Carrie Finch.....................Bookkeeper. . . . ♦Frank Humphreys..................Physician..... 1888. . .. . Boone, Iowa. Long Beach, Cal. Long Beach. Cal. ...........Dead. .... Bryan, Ohio . .. .Angola. Ind. .Ft. Wayne, Ind. .... Angola, Ind. . . . Doland, S. D. . . Lansing, Mich. .... Pierre. S. D. .... Angola, Ind. ♦Inez Button Brockway. . . ♦Milla Gates Lane......... Nellie Williams.......... ♦Gula Weaver Freeman... ♦Georgia Kinney Bates.... Emma Crandall........... ♦Carrie Cole Me Cauley... Della Ireland Crain...... ♦Mary Longabaugh Miser. ♦Fred C. Gates............ ♦Guy Gilbert.............. ♦Wellington Morse......... ♦Salena Carpenter Bobbins ♦Jennie Slade Sheets...... Mary Metzgar............. ♦Susie Sowle Williamson.. . Chester Patte............ Irving Sowle............. ♦Robert Carpenter......... ♦Ray Woodhull............. ♦Effie Freligh Pickett... ♦Charles Sowle............ ......................Litchfield, Mich. .........................Angola. Ind. .........................Geneva, Neb. .........................Angola. Ind. ..................East Orange, N. T. .. Teacher.....................Denver, Colo. ........................West Virginia. .........................'.. .. Dead. 1889 .......................Waterloo, Ind. . .R. R. Contractor. . .Cleveland, Ohio. .. P. O. Clerk........Ft. Wayne, Ind. ..Lumber Dealer.......Saginaw. Mich. 1890 .........................Angola, Ind. ........................Fremont, Ind. ...Clerk.................Angola, Ind. ....................T. .. Angola, Ind. .. Electrician....Mt. Peasant, Mich. .. Clerk.................Angola, Ind. ... Editor...............Elwood, Ind. ...Electrician........Ft. Wayne, Ind. .........................Angola, Ind. .. Foundryman............Angola, Ind. 1891 .. Medical Student. . Ann Arbor. Mich. 104 R. L. Dixon♦Frank Pattee...............Telephone Lineman..........Jaurez, Mex. ♦Lell Richardson Williams.................................Angola,'■lnd. Maud Watson......................Clerk..................Angola, lnd. ♦Etta Zipfel Laney........... ♦Ona Craig Craig............. Leona Bodley................ Lillie Benedict. •.......... Jennie Pugh................. ♦Floyd Averill................ Lena Wolf................... ♦Imo Gale Millhoff........... ♦Edna Brandeberry Hammond Anna Brooks................. ♦Basil Wyrick................ ♦Marv Pugh Shearer........... ♦Nellie Day Roose............ ♦Mamie Goodale Allison....... T. W. Allen................. T.unetfa Walls.............. ♦Edith Lemon Cook............ ♦Nora Shank Brokaw........... ♦Bertha Sewell Jarrard....... R. T. Carpenter............. ♦E. E. Shank................. ♦Will Jarrard................ ♦Arthur Field................ ♦Trving Metzgar.............. Harry Brown................. ♦Kate Ireland Jeffrey........ Tillie Pugh................. ♦Tillie Stayner Evans........ ♦Edna Hirst Singler.......... ♦Dorothy Fisher Roby......... ♦Mamie Gale Redding.......... Della Benedict.............. H. K. Brandeberry........... 1892 ................... . Findlay. Ohio. ........................Detroit, Mich. .. Stenographer.........Toledo, Ohio. ..Teacher...............Angola, lnd. 1 93 ..Teacher...............Marion, lnd. ...Electrician....Baker City. Oregon. ..Teacher...............Hobart, lnd. ..................... Douglass, N. M. ..................Salem Centre, lnd. ........................Angola, lnd. ..Editor................Chicago, 111. 1894- . ......................Angola, lnd. ........................Topeka, Kan. ........................Angola, lnd. ..Bookkeeper............Munice, lnd. ..Teacher...............Toledo. Ohio. .................. . . Fremont, lnd. ........................Angola, lnd. ........................Angola, lnd. iS95 ..Banker................Angola, lnd. . . Lumber Dealer.......Angola,, lnd. ..Clerk.................Angola, lnd. . . Lawyer..............Denver, Colo. ..Milk Dealer...........Angola, lnd. ........................Angola, lnd. ........................Orland, lnd. ..Clerk.................Angola, lnd. ..................Pleasant Lake, lnd. ........................Dunkirk, lnd. .....................Hillsdale. Mich. ........................Angola, lnd. 1896 . .Seamstress.............California. ..Farmer................Angola, lnd. 10sBlanche Kemery........... Eva C. Morse Goodale..... ♦Mabel E. Post Westenhaver “Lula Slade Williams...... ♦Anna Boggis Kinney........ F. K. Enzor............... Lela L. Morse McGrevv. . . . ♦Lillian Orewiler Richards... ♦Sadie Robinson Clark...... Deborah Townsend.......... Lina B. Jacob............. ♦Vera L. Field Willennar.. .. ♦June I. Smiley Philly..... Myrtle P. Shank........... Charles Isenhour.......... John Somers............... Clela Powers............. Audra Orton Ryan.......... ♦Florence Moore Estrich... Erman Shank.............. James R. Nyce............. Ralph Blass.............. Will F. Waller........... Will J. Miller............ Earl McNaughton.......... Pearle Ford.............. Maude Miller............. ♦Blanche Garwood Dirrim. .. ♦Nola Butler Green........ Mabel Rose............... Etta Cary................ ♦Edith Hall Stevens....... Tina Elya ................ ♦Robert Gillis............. Samuel Sheffer........... Glen 7iofel.............. L. C. Smith............... .....Clerk..................Angola, Ind. ...........................Buffalo, N. Y. ...........................Detroit, Mich. . ... Milliner..............Anoxia, Ind. .....Clairvoyant.......Vancouver, Wash. .....Hardware...............Toledo, Ohio. ............................Angola, Ind. .......................South Bend, Ind. ............................Toledo, Ohio. .....Trimmer...........North Plate, Neb. 1897 .....Clerk..................Angola, Ind. ...........................Auburn, Ind. ............................Angola, Ind. .....Dressmaker.............Angola, Ind. 1898 .....U. S. Army.................New York. ....................................Dead. ............................Angola, Ind. ........................Huntington, Ind. .......................Ann Arbor, Mich 1899 .....Clerk..................Angola, Ind. .....Private Sec'y..... Mansfield, Ohio. .....Trav. Salesman.. Clarksburg. W.Va. ..Medical Student.......Toledo, Ohio. ..Merchant..........Eugene, Oregon. ..Merchant..................Ray, Ind. ............................Ray, Ind. ..Teacher...........Eugene, Oregon. ......................Edgerton, Ohio. .........................Urbana. 111. ..Dept. P. M.............Angola, Ind. 1900 ...Teacher...............Angola, Ind. .........................Angola, Ind. ..Teacher................Angola, Ind. . . Dentist.............Hammond, Ind. ..Printer................Angola, Ind. ..Electrical Eng.........Angola. Ind. ..Real Estate.......Spokane. Wash. 106Clela Kirk........... Clyde Ritter......... Edna Cowan........... Iva Morse............ ’•‘Jennie Stahl McGrew. Lora Kannel.......... Paul Neal............ Vera Gilbert Janes. .. . Wava Poland Gordon Louis Gale........... Mabel Beard.......... Veva Castell......... Nellie Cary.......... Grace Crain.......... Grace French......... Louis Gates.......... Helen Gillis......... Amy Hartman.......... Earl Lemmon.......... Winnie Orton.......... Alvse Sousley Findlav, Willis Uhl.......... Esther Wickwire...... Ethel Wickwire........ Lulu Bratton......... Maud Braun............ Fern Brown............ Carrie Cline......... Eva Bell.............. Nellie Flint......... Paul Frevgang......... Mack Fisher........... Ralph Goodale........ Pearl Hathaway....... Winnie Hathaway. .. . Howard Jackson....... Edna Johnson......... Cynthia Kellogg...... 1901 .. Teacher..............Angola. Ind. .. Druggist..................Orland, Ind. . Stenographer...............Angola, Ind. ........................Angola, Ind. ........................Angola, Ind. ..Teacher....................Angola, Ind. ..Student, DePamv. ..Alexandria, Ind. ...................St. Mary’s, Ohio. ........................Angola, Ind. . . R. R. Employe..Spokane, Wash. 1902 .. Stenographer. . .Teacher..... .. Teacher..... . .Teacher..... .. .Teacher..... ..Stenographer. .. .Teacher..... .. Farmer...... . .Trained Nurse Teacher..... Stenographer Clerk"...... .Warsaw, Ind. .Angola, Ind. . Angola, Ind. . .Angola, Ind. .. Angola, Ind. Portland, Ore. . .Angola, Ind. ..Angola, Ind. .. Angola, Ind. .. Chicago, III. .Whiting, Ind. Fremont, Ind. .. Angola, Ind. ..Angola, Ind. 1903 .. Tcacher..............Angola, Ind. ........................Angola, Ind. ............................Angola, Ind. ........................Angola, Ind. ..Teacher...............Angola, Ind. ........................Angola, Ind. ..Electrician........Chicago. 111. .. Barber...............Angola, Ind. . Teacher..............Edwards, Miss ..Compositor............Angola, Ind. ..Clerk, P. O...........Angola, Ind. ..Pharmacy Student......Angola, Ind. ..Milliner..............Angola, Ind. .. Compositor...........Angola, Ind. 107Harry Kreitzer. Vera Snyder.... Nona Nichols... Guy Haggerty.. Maud Cowan. .. Waldo Sheffer. . Walter Burt.. . . Herb Pugh Kenneth Snyder Josephine Finch Dessie Crain... Vera Hauver... Bernice Boyer. . Gay French.... James Hall...... Melvin Kratz... Harry Sowle. Dorothy Gillis. . Jessie Morse... Mabel Luton. . . Vesta Flint.... Edith Gale..... Nellie Castell. .. Florence Smith. .Mech. Draughtsman. ..Pierre, S. D. .Student T. S. N, C.. . .Angola, Ind. .Teacher.....................Angola, Ind. .Clerk.................Chicago, 111. .Nurse.......................Angola, Ind. 1904 ...Clerk..................Angola, Ind. .. .Clerk. . .............Angola, Ind. ..Clerk...................Angola, Ind. ...Clerk..................Angola, Ind. ........................ Angola, Ind. ...Teacher................Angola, Ind. ...Clerk................. Angola, Ind. ... Student. .............Angola, Ind. ...Clerk..................Angola, Ind. ... Student...............Angola. Ind. ..Clerk...................Angola, Ind. ...Clerk..................Angola, Ind. .. Student................Angola, Ind. .. Compositor.............Angola, Ind. ..................................Angola. Ind. . Clerk. . . Angola, Ind. ...Teacher............Tonesville. Mich. ..........................Angola. Ind. ..........................Angola, Ind. 108The 1886 Reunion Hon. Stephen A. Powers, of Angola, has contributed to the interest of the alumni in the “Spectator,” by furnishing a copy of the invitation and programme of a reunion of the students who attended the Angola High School from 1866 to 1876, held August 12,1886, on the Angola High School grounds. Those who were present, as well as the older alumni will be interested in the program of that occasion, which follows. PROGRAMME: Call to Order by the President. Invocation.................Rev. M. M. Gleason Address of Welcome..........Prof. R. V. Carlin Response.......................Stephen Powers Music—Piano Solo..............Miss May Weicht Toast—The Old School_______Frank B. VanAuken Toast—The New School......Prof. A. B. Stevens Music—Vocal Solo............Mrs. Laura Linder Address ................ Prof. L. R. Williams Essay—Our Dead.................Lizzie Dickinson History.......................Jay J. VanAuken Music—Quartette I'oast—The Old School Bell........Cyrus Cline Toast—The Spartan Society...... Emmet A. Bratton Music—Vocal Solo...........Miss Jennie Stealy Prophecy...................Mrs. Salena Butler Roll Call....................Prof. A. W. Long Response by Students Lunch, Lemonade and lea Cream Reunion COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMME: F. B. VanAuken Mrs. Belle Saunders Mrs. L. H. Linder Josie Jackson Cora Woodhull Stephen Powers COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS: Warren Moss Prof. A. B. Stevens Angie Hendry Jerry Dutter Mary Squier John C. Gale Lillie Macartney Greenwood Bod ley COMMITTEE OF RECEPTION: Orville Goodale Dr. W. H. Waller Dr. Sol A. Wood Mrs. Vella Lewis Miss Jennie Balding Miss Josie Sowle Dr. J. F. Cameron W. W. Snyder Mrs. Elva Bod ley M iss May Weicht Don C. Wood Cyrus Cline COMMITTEE OF INVITATION: Prof. R. V.Carl o, Prof. A. H. Day- Angola InJ., Areata, Cal. Prof. L. R. Williams, Prof. L. B. Langworthy, Angola, Ind., Bristol, Ind., Prof. A. W. Long, Prof. A. E. Davis, Angola, Ind., Edon, Ohio, Prof. A. B. Stevens, Prof. N. W. Gilbert, Angola, Ind., Upper Alton, III., Prof. H. H. Keep, Judge B. F. Smith, Angola, Ind., Hastings, Neb., Prof. J. W. Cowen, Judge W.B. McConnell, Valley City, Dak., Fargo, Dak., Prof. C. A. Segur, Judge A. 1'. Bratton, Hamilton, Ind. » Hastings, Neb., Prof. E. B. Smith, Judge Edgar Spangle, South Carrollton, Ky., Garnet, Kans. 110Ladies:—Skip this paragraph please. X3—'peaq jaq uo puEjs oj psq aqs j| Moqauios jj je ja3 paqs Mauq a peaj (pEaa|E sEq aqs tuaod siq j JE||op e oj sjuaa uaj jaSEM ||(3M Mojq •Moqs e jo pui j jSEaj aqj sjaS aqs j| Moq (ue jno puij ||,aqs jaq noX jnq ‘Mouq pj jou jqSno aqs rfuiqjauioss(j| uEiuoM e saujoM SuiqjAUE si ajaqj jj __ 3 L) rr 0 « g - be JO «■ -a p -= w r5 - 2Z z O r U s l bo u CTJ J-J 9 'E o S 3 -a c3 U ) v ci SI D a o — c — u c ) L o u- o o — a 050 = 3 = n o 3 Walking sticks are of most ancient origin, Eve’n Adam had a Cain. g u ji - •- c-o « She:—Oh, darling, I’m so afraid you’ll change. Freddy:—Never mind, dear, you’ll never find any change about me. Small Boy:—“Mamma, my nick name is Corns.” Mother (anxiously):—“Corns, why do they call my little boy such bad names? Boy: “Cause, ma, I’m always at the foot of the class,” First a signal then a thud, And your face is in the mud: Someone ju r psupon vourback And your ribs begin to crack: I f ear a w histle,down,that’s all, ’I is the way to play foot ball. —M. W. E - 3 If) 1- 3 o JZ .t= bC — .— 1 5 p % u - £ - c§ 00 3 Mhn :—Skip this, xq- saasaqsSuiqjXjaAasjue Avouq | jeqj ueuiom aj3A3 jnq ‘asEajd oj pjeq jou s; puy MOjaq ajaqajjjq jnq sjuem ueiv Did you ever wonder where Miss Bankson got her baton. Leona.—Do you like Tea? Mark:—Yes. but I like the next letter after it better. 111Mirth Provokers A joke is a form of humor enjoyed by some, but misunderstood by most. The Joker has more fun out of them than any one else. Don’t tell everything you know, and especially keep still while around poodle dogs. They carry t-a-l-e-s. It's nothing when a spider runs up your arm. But look out for the sewing machine when it runs up the seam of your pants. “They say his folks are well to do.” “No! Your wrong. They’re hard to do.” Customer—“Can you supply me with a yard of pork?” Pat (to his assistant)—“Give this man three pig’s feet." The first woman who complained of her Lot was changed to salt, and her husband declined to take a fresh one. Professor—“Is a miss as good as a mile?" Percy—“Yes, and a great deal better; for one can kiss a miss when you couldn’t kiss a mile, (lonelier know." Young lover—“Edison’s a wonder, isn’t he?" An Old Girl—“I don’t think so; you can’t turn electric lights down low.” If T were you. John. I'd never marry that widow. Well. I don’t know. I’d rather be a widow's second husband that her first. Pat (blusteringlv)—“Show me the man that struck my partner.” Large Man—“I struck your pard.” Pat—“In faith, sir. and you struck him a devil of a blow, too.” A haughty lady having bought a postage stamp—“Must I put it on myself?" P. O. Clerk—“Not necessarily, madam. It would accomplish more if you put it on the letter.” 112 113“Good gracious,” said the hen when she saw a porcelain egg in her nest. “I'll he a brick-layer next.” He—“This is a dogwood tree, dear." “She—“Now. how do you tell, please?" He—“Oh, by the hark. I guess!” Shockley—“Fred, in which battle did Stonewall Jackson get killed?" Fred—“I don't know; but I think it was his last.” Vernon says—“It was almost a shame to take the money.” Aclelia—“How dare you!” Poor Hot’s wife turner to salt! Alas! Her fate was most unkind; No doubt she only wished to see How hung her skirt behind. Mow’d you like to hear Miss Bankson sing "The Stars and Stripes Forever.” If you used onions for pin cushions the needles would always have tears in their eyes. “Yes, I’ve been married well nigh six year and I’ve got a bushel of children.” “A bushel of kids; well, how's that?” “Wall, my name’s Peck, and I’ve got four children. Now don’t four pecks make a bushel?” Wallace has often heard of that place down toward Rhinehart’s, but during last few months has been frequenting that place. Bessie says she would rather live at P—lake than Silver. Shockley—“What is the plural of man?" Freshman—“Men. sir!" Shockley—“Correct; and what is the plural of child?” Freshv—“Twins, sir." Don—“If the devil lost his tail, where would he get another one?” Shockley—“To a saloon where they retail spirits.” 114DePauw University HEALTHFUL LOCATION HIGH ESI EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS CHRISTIAN INFLUENCES T he Test of an Institution is the Man it Produces DePauw University’s 2,000 Alumni have furnished 654 Teachers, 510 Lawyers, 389 Ministers and Missionaries, and the following holders of public positions: Governors 3 Congressmen . ... 10 Lieutenant Governors. . . . 2 State Senators ....21 Cabinet Officers 2 Federal and State Supreme Ju’ges 23 foreign Ministers 5 State Representatives ....59 Attaches and Consuls 5 College Presidents ....51 United States Senators. . . 5 College Professors, etc . .129 For catalogue or special information, address the President, EDWIN H. HUGHES, Greencastle, Indiana. 1820 1905 Indiana University BLOOMINGTON Attendance 1500 1000 Men, 500 Women FACULTY OF SEVENTY-ONE MEMBERS TWENTY DEPARTMENTS ACTIVE Y: M. AND Y. W. C. A. Graduates of commissioned High Schools enter Freshman class without examination. For catalog or special announcements, address I HE REGISTRAR, or W. L. Bryan, Pres. 115Dewey has been lowered in rank from Admiral to Mrs. Dewey 3 second mate. Mark Woodhull is suffering from hay fever. Beware, hoys, how you dance with grass widows. Landlord—“I’m afraid the bed will not he long enough for you.” Davis—“Never mind, I’ll add two feet to it when I go to bed.” Parson (to our editor)—“Cheer up, friend; you have a bright future before you.” Editor Nichols—“Yes; that’s what’s bothering me. I see it blazing.’ What do you think of Don ?” “He is like a river.” “How’s that?” “The biggest part of him is his mouth.” Don Dickerson is a butter, but we don’t often mention that. He got all our advertisements. Gee. whiz! Ana Beil is a successful gambler. Won $10.00 from a 25c piece. God bless our wives That fill our hives With litle bees and honey. Who mend our socks. And wind our clocks. And help us spend our money.—Ex. Who said “Human Faced" chicken?—Mark Woodhull. “I have all gaul to Caesar when it comes to a show-down—E. V. Shockley. Saviours of Carthage will be awarded with a gold medal. Ain’t girls the wretches! But some of the boys would like to have at least one. The first kiss only comes once in a life-time. 116Tri-State Normal College at your door DEPARTMENTS: 1. Literary, four courses. 2. Commercial, two courses. 3. Civil Engineering, one course. 4. Pharmacy, two courses. 5. Music, two courses. 6. Oratory, one course. 7. Law, one course. 8. Preparatory 9. Art, two courses Regular expenses—$2.95 per week for board, furnished room, tuition and use of reading room and library. Hy paying in advance this can be reduced to $2.65 per week. If you are a common school teacher, you can take our classical course in three years—many of our classical graduates have finished University courses in from 52 to 60 weeks. Take especial note of our Commercial, Pharmacy, and Engineering departments. Be free to ask questions. Address, L. M. Sniff, A. M., Pres., Angola, Indiana. Tri-State Normal Col lege SCHOOL OF MUSIC A. G. HARSHMAN, Director Piano and Voice Culture MISS BERTHA ANDERSCH Piano MR. CHARLES KANE Violin, Clarinet and Cornet For further particulars, address A. G. Harshman, Angola, lnd. Are you going to purchase a Piano} If so, let us show you an Attain S’dtaaf $250 $350 It is the purchase of a life time, so be sure to get the best on the market 44 I consider the Adam Schaaf one of the best on the market."—Leonard Dougherty, Musical Director, Louisville, Ky. Ask our satisfied patrons. Lacey Son. THE FORT WAYNE sch°ol;; TELEGRAPHY Third Floor Tri-State Building Graduates promptly placed in good positions. Send for our prospectus. Leroy Hartzler, Pres., Fort Wayne, lnd. 117Why is it that Don makes so much fuss over any thing funny ? Avery says his kids will he bald headed. How I pity the future fishers. Molly said to her mamma: “I didn’t go, but Katydid.” Who said Melvin Kratz had been with Martha Miller lately? Shock-ley had better find out if Martha is at home before he goes down to see her. Love; a tickling sensation of the heart you can't scratch.—Ex. A stitch in time will save embarrassing exposure.—Ex. Applied Literature Gallery of authors from the English classes: Mr. Keep’s author.................................. Mr. Shockley’s author.............................. Miss Bankson’s author.............................. Win. Butler’s author............................... Robert Carson’s author................................ The Girls in General............................... The Bather’s author................................ The Burglar’s author............................... Base Ball Player’s author.......................... Farmer’s author.................................... Most Greedy author................................. Cook’s authors..................................... Angler’s author.................................... ............Sterne. ............Stubbs. ...........Sweete. ........Longfellow. ..............Hunt. ..........Lovelace. .............Wade. ...........Steele. .........Suckling. .........John Hay. .............Hogg. . . . Peel and Burns. Fisher (Not G. A.) 118H. E. KRATZ THE OLD RELIABLE BOOK and DRUG STORE SCHOOL AND COLLEGE SUPPLIES OUR SPECIALTY WALL PAPER, WINDOW SHADES, PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES. DRUGS AND DRUGGISTS SUNDRIES THE BIGGEST STOCK OF ANY STORE IN STEUBEN COUNTY H. E. KRATZ ANGOLA,ind. 119Student Organizations Legion of Cheerful Idiots. imperator..................................Earle Moss Praetor.........................Aclelia Stallman Quaestor...........................Paul Sowle Centurio...........................Percy Alspach Tribune Militum..........................Francis Crain Milites...........Bessie Tuttle, Elsie Sharritt, Donald Smith,MableStayner Girls’ Track Team. Sprinters........................Hayward and Lee High jump..................................Elsie Sharitt Weights....................Braman, Ireland, Steury Hurdles.................... Dutter and Freygang Distance runs.................Stallman and Crain Pole Vault.....................Bolin and Conklin Bicycles....................Weicht and Dickerson Broad jump....................Emerson and Hauver Red Headed Club. President and Secretary............Don Dickerson Treasurer..........................Robert Carson Simple beauty with rustic health...Hazelle Lee Honorary member....................May Sunday Mascot...............Blythe Rockwood (doubtful) Pre.eptor ........................E. V. Shockley Senior National Bank Founded Sept. 20, 1904. Capital 19 cents, a pants button, and personal propertv amounting to two bits. OFFICERS: President...................................Don Dickerson Vice-President.........................Marshall Willennar Cashier.........................Vernon Nichols Pipe dreamer and janitor...........Billy Butler Bank directors.....................Senior Boys Office: Opposite Hank Drinkum’s cabbage patch Office hours............................Recesses 1209 WALK-OVER SHOES FLORSHEIM SHOES The two leaders in men s fine footwear A Iways KELLEY’S Fine Shoes for the Women Comfort and Wear combined. You can find what you want at. A. E. Elston’s, the Shoe Ma?i Angola, .... Indiana m H. B. WEICHT |P .. Licensed Embalmer.. ..ani Funeral Director.. ESTABLISHED 1870 Manufacturer of Cloth Covered Caskets, Linings, and Burial Robes; Jobber of Embalming Fluids, and Embalmers’ Supplies................... Farmers’ Phone 5 Office and factory, one block Taylor Phone 6 No. M. E. Church, brick bl’g 121122tl?e Jackson Drug Store j Z? School Books and Supplies Blank Books and Stationery Books of Fiction (Plain and Fancy Bound) Gold Pens, Fountain Pens Wall Paper, Window Shades, Paints, Oils, Etc. Fine Perfumes and Toilet Articles Pure Drugs and Chemicals Patent Medicines Cigars Successor to O. Carver C. H. JACKSON •S0 The Post-office News Stand CHAS. J. PILLIOD, Jr., Proprietor PAPERS DELIVERED TO ANY PART OF THE CITY PAPERS MAGAZINES Chicago— American Record-Herald Tribune Daily News Examiner Chronicle Inter Ocean Indianapolis— News Star Sun Cincinnati— Enquirer Detroit— Free Press Journal T ribune Fort Wayne— Journal-Gazette News Cleveland— Plain Dealer Angola— Magnet Republican Herald Scribner Four Track News Technical World Harpers’ Outlook Rev. of Review World’s Work Literary Digest McClure Leslie Cosmopolitan Ainslee Munsey Outing Argosy Everybody’s World To-day Smith Grrnd Red Book Tom Watson’s Strand Recreation Smart Set Black Cat Young Wide World Collier Sat. Eve. Post Popular American Boy Pearson Gunter’s Etude Burr McIntosh Lad.Home Jour. LeCostume Roy. Toilettes Pictorial Review Designer Delineator 123Gems from the Classes (Credit given where known.) The one thing that Marshal does not dread, is M-i-l-d-r-e-d. Mr. Shockley (In Physical Geography):—“Yes, the Hoangho river jumped its case and flew into the Yellow sea.” Shockley:—“How many voyages did Columbus make?” Don:—“Four.” Shockley:—“And after which one did he die?” Shockley (In English):—“What is meant by ‘roes?’” L. W.:—“It means rows of fish eggs.” (Applause.) Miss B. (In drawing class):—“How does a cat go up a tree?” Sophomore :—“On its feet.” Time:—Between 9 and 10 o’clock P. M. Place:—On a step ladder in the High School room. Persons:—Two Seniors. 1st Senior:—“Hand me just one more tack and I will be through.” 2nd Senior:—Won't the Juniors he mad?" 1st Senior:—“Hist! Someone is coming; put out that lantern!” (Exit on tiptoe.) Prof. S.:—“What is meant by the ‘nine days’?” D. D.:—It takes nine days to get the measles after being exposed.” Fred (In Business Law):—“What’s the difference between a married woman and one that is’nt?' Just wait 'til you are older. Fred, and you will understand. Prof. K.:—“Fred, spell Connecticut.” Fred:—‘I can spell the ahhieviation of it.” Shockley:—“Can you hear hack there?” F.:—Yes.” S.:—“All right; who was Solomon ?” F.:—“What?” . T 124f Great Books as Life Teachers IT is often said that Literature is the greatest ■ of the fine arts, and certainly it is of all the arts the wisest and most inspiring, serving at once as tutor, guide and friend. In this era, when books and magazines are increasingly the medium of amusement and instruction, and when the great poets and essayists are becoming the prophets of a new social order.it seems important to remember that the great novelists are consciously or unconsciously teachers of morals, while the most fascinating essays and poems are essentially books of inspiration and spiritual culture Our stock of books,—numbering eight to ten thousand volumes—consists of the best works of the greatest authors American, English and Continental. In ’Poetry and Song we present Bryant, Emerson, Holmes, Longfellow, Poe and Whittier; Arnold, Browning, Burns, Byron, Kipling, Moore, Meredith, Milton, Scott, Shakespeare, Stevenson and Tennyson. In Current Fiction and Romance we offer Alexander, Braddon, Corelli, Eliot, Fothergill, Havergal, Mulock, Wood and Yonge; Alcott, Clay, Cummins, Evans, Mary Jane Holmes, Southworth, Stowe and Warner; Abbott, Hawthorne, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Ingraham; Mitchell and Optic; Barrie, Blackmore, Conway, Doyle, Haggard, Hardy, Jerome, Kipling, Moore, Reade and Weyman. In Classic Fiction Bulwer, Cooper, Dickens, Hughes, Irving, Kingsley, Lamb, Scott and others. In Continental Fiction we give Auerbach, Balzac, Dumas, Feuillet, Gautier, Hugo, Halevy, Maupassant, Sardou and Sue. In the heavier Philosophies you will find Arnold, Bacon, Carlyle, Darwin, Emerson, Lubbock, Ruskin, Brooks and Drummond. And for Lighter Reading we have Aesop, Anderson, Grimm, Mulock, Swift and Lewis Carroll. If you are looking for amusement and wish '-'Books of Humor, we have the largest list in the country; Brown, Holley, Nye, Peck, Perkins, M. Quad and others. And for the serious-minded, we have an exceedingly handsome line of books devoted to Divine praise and Spiritual meditation, comprising some of the best writings by Brooks, Bunyan, Drummond, Ingraham, Keble, Kempis and Yonge. Provision has been made for every member of the family—every intellectual taste is catered to. Every Book Beautiful in its Production Every Book a Literary Treasure Every Book a Marvel of Cheapness Mail orders promptly filled. We will order any book or magazine published, if not in stock. We earnestly invite people to come to our store, handle our books, and buy if pleased. Shank Frysinger Angola, Indiana 125Bessie:—“I’ve a notion to give him a piece of my mind.” Don:—“Don’t, Bess; you can't spare it.” Shocklev:—“After a time a river will keep its own mouth cleaned out.” Leona has been taking private lessons of Circe. Shockley:—“You can sometimes hear lightning twelve miles.” Mr. Kratz (At 10:30 every other night):—“Hello! Is this Pilliod’s residence?” E. P.:—“Yes, sir.” Mr. K.:—“Well, please send Harold home right away.” Isn’t It Curious ? That Don hasn't bought a tablet this year? That Mark’s hand always gets sore just before a test? How the Business Law books disappeared? How happy H. L. R. looks these days? That Bessie’s flower is “Sweet William?” That Percy A. and Grover B. wanted track suits? How rosy Miss B.’s cheeks are (at times)? That Vernon won’t wear his track suit? That Shockley wanted to play Bassanio? That Baldwin put a padlock on the cellar door? That Guy wanted to pose as Apollo? 126Cleanliness is Godliness THE WATSON cA Fine 1890 1905 Ice Cream Soda For Fifteen years W. H. Watson has fed more people than from a clean up-to-date all the other restaurants in Steuben county put together place The only Ice Cream Parlor in Northern Indiana ICE CREAM SODAS ALL KINDS OF SOFT DRINKS A FINEST LINE OF Fancy Candies CONFECTIONERY AND CIGARS IN THE CITY Fresh Baked Goods HEADQUARTERS FOR E. CD. L EAS - Angola HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE STUDENTS J. F. GRASS ... T. L. GILL IS Popular We Grocer Groceryman It THE PLACE TO BUY YOUR SUPPLIES F ULL LINE OF CHINA AND NOTHING HANDLED BUT THE BEST OF EARTHENWARE FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES EVERYTHING UP-TO-DATE. PRICES RIGHT ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY. PhONE 25 127Some Familiar Quotations “Sweet babe! True portrait of thy father's face."—Zulah Ireland. “Maiden! with meek brown eyes."—Vivian Swift. “Blessings on thee, little man."—Mark Rinehart. “Frailty, thy name is woman!'’—Vera Steury. “Thou whose locks outshine the sun."—Hazelle Lee. “He hath his belly full of fighting.’—Kenneth Miller. “Neither a borrower nor a lender be."—Mark Woodhull. “Pooh! You speak like a green girl."—Francis Crane. “Let me play the fool.”—Rob. Carson. “Daughter of the Gods, divinely tall."—Ethel Bolan. “Oh. he sits high in all people's hearts."—Baldwin. “But. John, fer all his quietitude. Would sometimes drap a word 'er so."—Jay Dole. “Laugh, and the world laughs with you."—Louis Hendry. “Weep, and you weep alone."—Lola Mugg. “Of stature fair and slender frame."—Lena Conklin. “His flaxen hair of sunny hue."—Grover Blaney. “Hush-a-bye! Father will come to thee soon."—H. L. Rockwood. “Faint heart ne'er won fair lady.”—G. A. Fisher. “Don’t put up yer tobaccer 'till yer give a man a chew."—Fred Croxton. “His limbs were bowed, but not with toil. — ren Collins. “The grating songs a listening crowd endures Rasped from the throats of bellowing amateurs." —Quartette. “Oh, Lord, how long!"—Billie Butler. “Will somebody please explain. Why 1 have’nt got no brain?"—G. A. Kyper. “God hath given her one face and she hath made it another.”— A. E. B. “A lovely specimen "—Percy Alspach. “Ma says I may have long pants next summer."—Joe Hector. 128L. N. KLINK Hardware A good large stock to select from. We are the oldest firm and the largest general hardware store in Steuben County. When in need of anything in the Hardware line be sure to get our prices. We can save you money. :o:o:o:o: WILLIAMSON and . Company !'Practical Embalmer, Funeral Director You will find at the Callender Hardware Store the largest and best line of fishing tackle guns, ammunition, etc., that there is in Angola. Call and look crver our line before starting to the lakes. Both Fhones. Office southeast Corner Public Square I2y 130If You Buy it gf It is Olll Right The Big Depart- ment Store of Angola. The only strictly one- price Store in Steuben county. Everyone treated alike— rich or poor. 4? mm wmg Copyright 1905 hv Hart Schaffner £ff Marx This Big Department Store can furnish your wants from head to foot for Male or Female. Nothing but up-to-date goods. Popular prices. A call is all we ask. 131Gleanings from the Olympic Journal Orpheus will give a musicale at the opera house next week. Mercury has been arrested as an accomplice of Cassie Chadwick. For garden seeds go to Ceres.—Adv. M. C. Pollock has ordered a new fleece for Jason. Polygnotus will take painting lessons of Miss Bankson this summer. Bacchus for fresh bottled wines; also Moxie—nothing like it.—Adv. Phoebus Apollo has discarded his chariot and now uses an airship. Aurora is taking little “Early Risers.” Mars has ordered muzzles for the dogs of war because dog-days are near at hand. Atlanta has entered for the hundred yard dash, and Thor expects to take the hammer throw, field-day. Diana has gone hunting this week. Cheer up. Niobe, it might be worse. Get your horses shod at Vulcan’s.—Adv. Somebody has been purloining apples from the Hesperides orchard. Cut it out, boys. Leander swam the Hellespont to see his best girl last night. What a lover won’t do is a caution. Euclid and Rockwood will soon publish a new Geometry. Achilles has ordered a package of heel plates. Drink Nectarine. Looks like nectar and costs less.—Adv. Miss B. has bargained to trade her baton to Comus for his wand. Zeuxis is taking lessons in wall paper and gingham designing under Miss Bankson. Don’t forget Pan's recital. On the Mount, tonight. A pleasant time assured to all.—Adv. Neptune has been arrested for watering stock. Cupid is using a six-shooter at the high-school with good results. Charon has ordered a naptha launch. Shockley has challenged Phidippides to a foot-race. 132F. E. BURT Jeweler Optician Bookseller Headquarters for SCHOOL and COLLEGE SUPPLIES ATHLETIC GOODS KODAKS AND PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES Our Line of Books Is the best selected to be found anywhere. The latest works always on hand. {ff In Jewelry We carry everything usually found in a first-class store. Souvenir spoons and graduating gifts a specialty. 133 Southeast Corner of Square. Angola, IndianaSTEPHEN A'. POWERS Entered the Angola Academy in the spring of 1866, and had for his teachers, Carlin, Williams, Cowen and Long. Attended the U. S. Naval Academy and Chicago Law School. Was elected Circuit Judge in 1888, held the office six years, and is now practicing Law in Angola. 134135Sept. 5. School opened. Sept. 6. Freshmen get lost. Sept. 7. Zulah issues call for basket ball candidates. Sept. 8. First lesson in drawing. We draw the milkweed. Sept. 9. Writing. Sept. 12. Football team organized. Sept. 13. We design wall paper. Sept. 14. Scale singing. Miss Bankson says it was “scaly.” Sept. 15. Leta eats of the forbidden fruit and suffers the fate of her famous ancestor. Sept. 16. Penmanship. Sept. 19. Sept. 20. Sept. 21. of principal. Sept. 22. Sept. 23. Sept. 26. Sept. 27. Miss Bankson puts us on the music chart. We draw a bunch of grapes. Spectator Business Manager takes front seat at request Paul Sowle loses his book. Chirography. Elmira and Kenneth have a domestic difficulty. Leona sits with Don—as usual. Earl looks on from a distance; also Mark; also Avery. Sept. 28. Juniors have class party. Leona and Vera refused to allow the Junior boys to take them home. We wonder why? Sept. 29. Zulah organizes a basket ball team. Sept. 30. We get our grade cards. 136 • DR. A. D. SMITH W. II. LANE, M. D. HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN ANGOLA, IND. Office at residence, N. Wayne Street. Taylor Phone 145 Office rooms 3 and 4 Gillis block Residence corner S. Wayne and S. streets Taylor and Farmer Phones • I)R. F. B. HUMPHREYS DR. P. N. SUTHERLAND PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON Office and residence W. Maumee st. Phones—Taylor 128; Farmer 32 Office S. W. corner of square Residence S. Main Street Both Phones DR. T. B. WILLIAMS DRS. WALLER RITTER PHYSICIAN and SURGEON Angola, Indiana Office over Angola Bank Taylor phone 83; Farmers 26 Office W. Maumee street Taylor phone 31; Farmers 23 H. D. WOOD, M. D. W. W. WOOD, M. D. DRS. WOOD CREEL Angola, Indiana Angola, Ind. Office E. Maumee street Both phones Office 1st door west Hotel Hendry Both Phones 137Oct. 3. We all resolve to he good. Oct. 4. By means of the charcoal, we transfer a visual perception }f the lilac to a sheet of paper. Oct. 5. The Freshmen take voice culture. Paul Sovvle loses another hook. Longhand. We learn to heat time. Fred practices on the hack of Wal- 12. 13- 14. 17- Oct. 19. Oct. 20. We draw the hoy. Fair. We all go. Fair. We all go. Principal reported dead. Principal comes to life. Bov recovers from the ordeal. He seems to he somewhat af- Oct. 6. Oct. 7. Oct. 10. lace’s head. Oct. 11. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. fected. Had to quit. Oct. 18. Mr. Estrich becomes our principal. We still have him. We get our trees for Arhor Day. The Senior girls and Junior hoys have a disagreement. Oct. 21. Seniors give Arhor Day program. The various classes, together with the 8th year, plant trees. Senior colors stolen. Oct. 24. Principal divorces Robert and Mabel. Cause? Too much domesticity and too little study. Oct. 25. Senior girls call a meeting of Junior hoys. War declared between Seniors and Juniors. Hostilities begun.. We get our grades: that is. most of us do. Foot ball; Angola vs. Lagrange. Liabilities exceed Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. assets. Oct. 26. 27. 28. 29. 31. General changing of seats. the 138 D. R. Best C. A. Yotter WOODHULL YEAGLEY BEST YOTTER LAWYERS AT TO R N E YS-AT- LA W Phones ] .'aylor5 ( r armers 55 Office over Angola Bank. Telephone No. 64. BROWN CARLIN FRANK M. POWERS LAWYERS LAWYER Notary’ and Stenographer in Office First Floor, Opera House Block Telephone No. 1 CYRUS CLINE CLAY LEMMON (Post-Graduate) LAWYER OPTICIAN t, I Taylor 225 Phones| Farmers 51 Office days: Wednesday and Saturday Office over Jackson’s Store Macartney Goodale DON’T Experiment with your doctor, lawyer, banker or Insurance A B ST ACTORS AND CONVEYANCERS GET THE BEST Angola, Ind. You are absolutely protected when your Insurance is placed with me. The fourteen most reliable companies licensed to do business Complete Abstracts of Title to all Lands in Steuben county. in the U. S. represented. We take care of all classes of Insurance. “Do it today. To-morrow may be too late.’’ Office over Burt’s Store Phone 151 C. G. Heckenlively, Agent ANGOLA, INDIANA 139Nov. i. Nov. 2. Nov. 3- Nov. 4- Nov. 4- Nov. 7- Nov. 8. Nov. 9- Nov. io. Nov. 11. Nov. 14. Nov. i5- Nov. 16. Nov. •7- Nov. 18. Nov. 21. Nov. 22. Nov. 23- Nov. 24- Nov. 25- Nov. 28. Nov. 29. Nov. 30- Republican Rally Day. School dismissed. We all buy three cents worth of notes. Editor-in-chief wants his credits back. Edvvina and Vergil form a partnership. Junior class party at Clarence Davis’. Kyper urges all the voters to vote the Prohibition ticket. Election day. Democrats appear with red eyes; also Mr. Keep. Baldwin swept the room for the first time in two weeks Zulah falls down stairs. Clock stops. Bell rings. Aclilia carries eleven (11) histories home. Paul loses another book. Dale recites. Members of annual staff appointed. Clarence appointed guardian of Edwina. Miss B.’s do (dough) is on a B-line. First new piano put in. Junior program. Motto raised. We pay our respects to the turkey. Hazel I ee sits with Clarence. He does not se vn to object. Sermon delivered by Prof. Keep on ‘‘Three Apples.” Foot ball picture taken.' Billy leaves for St. Louis. Sophomores have their pictures taken. 140S. B. Collins Barber Shop and Bath Room Five baths for $1.00 First shop west of Hendry Hotel. Wm. Burkett Barber Shop South Wayne Street Albert Leas. TonsoriaParlor Northwest Corner Public Square Yhree chairs in full operation Call and be convinced 141Dec. I. Billy has returned from St. Louis and has a new “smoke consumer.” Dec. 2. Seniors and Freshmen have class parties. Dec. 5. Percey fell down stairs; also his pipe. Fred comes late to school. “Resolution Day.” Three curtain lectures by Mr. Shockley. Dec. 6. Rockwood organizes Cadet corps. Dec. 7. A High School Fair decided upon. Mr. Shockley likes “donuts.” Dec. 8. Susan finds a ring. Avery says it is his, if Susan goes with it. Dec. 9. McKinley purchases a hair cut. Ethel says he looks much better. Dec. 12. Mr. Shockley: “Now, these two people get married on page 208.” Dec. 13. Bess Tuttle tries the ordinance of foot washing in the laboratory. Pail too small. Dec. 14. Big preparations for fair. Dec. 15. Examination. Dec. 16. The first H. S. fair. Proceeds for benefit of piano. Miss Bankson scores a big success. Nearly $100 taken in. Dec. 19. Examinations. Dec. 20. More examinations. Dec. 21. Still more examinations. Dec. 22. Sophomores give program. School adjourn for holidays. 142Notice! YOU WILL FIND THE BEST... CONFECTIONERY BAKED GOODS AT THE Opera House 'Bakery C. E. B e atty, Prop. f-ri — When in toiun Vacation don ft fail to stop with George at and Bargains Please Everyone Hotel Hendry Y° G. D. Oberholtzer Proprietor School Gives you Vacations Leinmger Gives you Bargains J. Leininger 143 LOWEST PRICES West Maumee Street pHu tvwo Kcotded ITarv-u.S ( 7 atu_rc. katl . 'j'ko.-me.d. S VQkTv e elXou»s '-tv Iwti-me ." xa-OJVA . |an 2- School reopens. Mr. Shockley reported married to a widow with four children. Hazel says she doesn't—can't believe it. Jan. 3- Bill and Ola divorced by principal. Tan. 4- McKinley an hour late. Cause? Hair cut. jan. 5. Mechanical drawing begins. jan. 6. Don goes back to Juniors. Leona glad. jan. 9. Pianos to right of us. Tan. 10. Pianos to left of us. jan. 11. Pianos in front of 11s. Jan. 12. N—orgon all around us. Jan. 13. We buy a piano. The agony is all over. The work of ten years is finally concluded. Jan. 16. Mr. Shockley: “And then you pump the air out of the vacuum and there is nothing left.” We wonder if he ever took physics? Jan. 17. Mabel Stayner wants to know if the Monroe Doctrine ever wears out. Jan. 18. Dame Rumor says that our principal was shot last week by Cupid. We have suspected that he had been shot before, but then w«. will not say anything about it. Jan. 19. Vangie doesn’t giggle. Jan. 20. Neither does Susie. Jan. 23. Mr. Keep: The plural of God is Goddess. Jan. 24. Mark Rinhart was seen to laugh today. Tan. 25. Ned Lacey sits still a whole day. Jan. 26. It was all a mistake. Miss Rempis said she dreamed Ned sat still. Jan. 27. Mr. Shockley found five pieces of Longfellow in the fifth reader. We wonder if that is all? Jan. 30. Many thousand resolutions made. Cause? Report 144 cards.Get the Habit Trade with the Patterson Depart= ment Store. The home of quality and low prices. Angola, Ind. 145Feb. i. ('.round hogs are getting ready for their annual appearance. Feb. 2. Sausage day. Feb. 3. Wallace gets up the aisle once without Fred getting hold of his coat tail. Later—After careful investigation we find this item to be false. We apologize for the erroi. Feb. 6. Wayne missed the midnight train at Pleasant Lake. Feb. 7. Seniors go to Billie Butler’s. Feb. 8. Miss B. sings one morning without getting mad. Feb. 9. Lulu entertains the Seniors. The Dompy Triumvirate present. Feb. 10. We take a lesson in Arabic. 1. 2. 3. 4, 5, 6, 7. 8. 9, o. Feb. 13. Heart medicine in demand. Feb. 14. Cupid runs amuck in the high school. Captured by the principal after a hard struggle. Feb. 15. “O. love! How long!" Feb. 16. Aclelia floods the assembly room with ink. Feb. 17. Sophomores debate day and night. Feb. 20. Lulu gets Hamlet mixed with the Seniors—she speaks of the “fair Aclelia.” Feb. 21. Guy sends a lamp skyward in the laboratory. Feb. 22. Fred C. goes to Washington. 1). C. Feb. 23. Mr. Keep delivers his weekly homily. Feb. 24. Bovs give program. Girls give boys a reception. Big time. Feb. 27. Herschell is on time; also Fred. Feb. 28. Paul Sowle loses a book. 146Competitors oMarvel.... at the ever increasing sale of the Angola iRatlt It is no secret— The best quality ever sold in this section for the money. It is soon recognized by smokers. Willis W. Love Sole Manufacturer T. R. GILBERT OPPOSITE RjUSSELL HOUSE BEST GRADES OF F LOU Rj Buckwheat Midlings Corn Bran Oats Chop Millett Everything in the line of feed for stock. International Stock Food Heave Cure, Worm Powders, Oyster Shells, etc. CEMENT PULP PLANTER Phone 99 CA. E. WELLS The Old Reliable Tobacco Dealer Always the best and freshest in the market at the lowest price possible. ......Northwest Corner Public Square Tailoring and Pressing.. Join the Pressing Club and get your clothes Pressed and Cleaned .... for ... . only 25c a week Specialty of Ladies' Clothes I. J. BAILEY Rear of Leas’ 'Barber Shop 147March i. Elsie Hayward entertains the Sophmores. March 2. Mark W. stays in. March 3. Mark W. gets his bookkeeping—under pressure. March 6. Longer noons. McKinley can get here on time now; also Fred; also Earl. March 7. Solution No. 20 worked out. March 8. Girls meet to practice for their program. March 9. Mark Y. cuts his finger; can't write. (Eater—he will live.) March 10. March 13. March 14. March 15. March 17. March 18. March 20. March 21. March 22. March 23. March 24. March 27. Vangie. March 28. March 29. March 30. March 31. Seniors bury Hamlet and the Ghost. Bill gets his picture. W ears a collar. Acledie on time. Wallace is taking anti-lean. St. Patrick. We are all Freshmen today. Boh. Carson and Zulah spat. Editor ruins $15 worth of books with 5c worth of ink. Fred "ets picture taken. Harold and Hazel. Harold and Vangie. Vangie. Harold and Hazel. By a process of elimination it finally becomes Harold and Karl gets his hose mixed. Senior law students become obstreperous. Baldwin and “Lady B.’’ have a fight. Girls’ program. Boys give the girls a reception. 148 • cMast brothers proprietors of Central Market Dealers in Fresh, Salted and Smoked cTWeats Lard and Sausage Poultry" and Game in Season Carpenter 8 Co. ♦♦♦♦ Meat cTVlarket Dealers in all kinds of Fresh and Salted Meats Game and Fish in season Highest Prices paid for Hides, Pelts and Tallow equipments for modem Bathrooms may be supplied for comparatively small sums. Nothing adds to the health and comfort of the family like a thoroughly fine sanitary Bathroom. ALL PLUMBING attended to promptly. New and second hand bicycles for sale. Bicycle repairing a specialty. 5. B. MAXFIELD ANGOLA - INDIANA 149April 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Vacation. Teachers go to Chicagro. Rockwood has a daughter. April 10. Rockwood sleepy. April 11. Rockwood still sleepy. April 12. The baby has a tooth. April 3. Mr. Shockley also has a tooth. April 14. The baby is finally named Blythe. April 17. Where was Ernest and Elsie when the lights went out? April 18. High School Dramatic Co. presents Merchant of Venice. April 19. Senior law books disappear. April 21. The No. class will pass. April 22. Base ball—Angola vs. Fremont. Never mind the score. April 24. Portia and Bassaino were reported out walking last evening, and the lights were out. April 25. Aclelia brings a kissing bug to school. April 26. Zulah has a black eye ; also Wier. April 27. Work on Annual. Editor draws all (lay long. April 28. Facultv oroorarr Thanks to Mr. Dilworth, Dr. Wood and Mr. Frysinger. We have a good program . 150 « C. A. CHADWICK DR. S. C. WOLFE DENTIST THE DENTIST Office over Angola Hank Phones: Taylor 80; Farmers 31 ZIPFEL BLOCK .STEUBEN COUNTY BANK. ESTABLISHED JULY 1, 1889 Incorporated under State Banking Laws October 30, 1903 C. E. EWING Paid up Capital - $40,000.(X) Additional Liability ... 40,000.00 Depositors’ Security - - - $80,000.00 DENTIST Phone No. 90 Office over Wyrick’s Restaurant O. CARVER. Vice-President H. K. SCOTT. Cashier R. J. CARPENTER. Ass t Cashier DIRECTORS: Orville Carver. Daniel Shank. John A. Croxton, Heman F. Carpenter and Harry K. Scott. WE SOLICIT YOUR BUSINESS Loans made at low rate of interest. Interest paid on time deposits. THAT PERFUME at the Whysong Drug Store Always puts you in good humor with yourself. If you use our STATIONERY you are sure to have the right style. Our line of TOILET''ARTICLES is complete and we can furnish you almost anything you want. PURE DRUGS PATENT MEDICINES 151May 1. Mr. Rockwood says the senior girls are too ambitious. Aclelia faints. May 2. At last we have found the person who resembles The Great Stone Face. The Principal told us in English IV this morning. May 4. Mark’s aristocratic dog visits school. We did not know dog days were so near. May 5. Senior girls organize the S. G. C. S. S. May 8. Prof. Rockwood comes to school with his hair parted on the side. May 9. Harold and Vangie bolted this afternoon. We wonder how their excuses read. May 10. May Festival. Huge success. Big crowd. Everybody pleasd. May 11. A Forge for sale. Enquire of Miss Bankson. Also a baton. May 12. “Water, water everywhere.” “Be still sad heart and cease repining”. May 13. Track Meet with Auburn. “Not to the swiftest is the race.” May 13. Surprise prrty on Hazel Purinton. All reported a good time. May 16. Frof. Sho k!ey sits with the girls. They say they get their Algebra better. May 17. Prof. Fio kwood sits with the girls. He tries the same plan. May 18. It rained to-day for the first time in an hour. May 19. We finished our Law Course to-day. Freshman study the Chicago American. May 22. Don discovered what the notch in Miss B.’s baton is used for. May 23. To-day we finished our year’s course in Music and Drawing. We thank Miss B. fora pleasant and most profitable year in the two subjects. May 24. Seniors w-ork daytime on their theses. May 23. I he seniors work day and night on their theses. May 26. Big County Track Meet. Angola victorious. 152 You can ride that For any “Pony” easier and everything if you write it on that goes to Cuffs that were washed Build or heat at the a house cAngola Steam Laundry go to Try it— the Laundry, not the pony. Sheldon Co. Shank Lumber 8 Coal Co. Angola, Indiana Near Lake Shore Depot. This space is only a quarter page, but here we advertise the J. A. Shaughness Co. Page Fence Dealers in Buggies Surries Phaetons Driving Wagons Team and Driving Harness Blankets, Robes Whips, etc. Angola, Indiana Taylor Phone 237 South Public Square A If we mentioned the half of its manifold good qualities all the pages of this book would not suffice. See the man— M. H. FISK, Agent 153


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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1906 Edition, Page 1

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1907 Edition, Page 1

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1908 Edition, Page 1

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Angola High School - Key Yearbook (Angola, IN) online yearbook collection, 1909 Edition, Page 1

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