Amherst Regional High School - Goldbug Yearbook (Amherst, MA)

 - Class of 1939

Page 1 of 80

 

Amherst Regional High School - Goldbug Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 80 of the 1939 volume:

I 6 ' 0 . fu. , , v v , .A 1' I J x 4 1 1. 4+ . m 1 1 ' r v ' 9 A, . f X ' v ' fa . 6 . 5 , v 4 gl 'W f v . . 4' f 4 . i I vu . 1 Q e f f .l . . 1 ' .. 9 A . 1 4 + 1. 4' .- , s f .4 1 Ak , , 5 ' Q N n . ' 4 L. ,- A . L , , v -. " . 1 ' . . ' , S ut . 4 . - r ' u 5. Q -ta V f xi. . , ' A W .1 , L 11.5 'r . r ' n 'Q 1 1 n ' 1: .L ' f V. I u'. . I. n I V, A 1 I 11' . v , . f'- xv 4- kv, Q Xl xxx . ,H V f N, gy V5 Q qx km B N K 3' W QQQKO 'H 261 . I I I I I I I I I ' I 4- ,, If .1 ' I A -I ' I I I 1 . 2 ' I I .i I n I - ' . I T 1 .' I 'r Y I , 5 I 2 . M A 1 X Q . V X- I-I ' ,, . .U p . it x g , I N 1 I' ' IA 1 5 ., I r ' , I gia A ., .1 1 I . I' .. I .A 'S v ' I I I .'. I' 1 , 4 . , s I I' 4 w . I u s E . hh A , n I . u . Q' 1. , ,, . , , , . I ' I , ' J N ' 9 u , - I . .4 1 . - . . I - " 1 . I I 0 sw- ' f. 1 5, J , if ' I,'. 1 I I L ix .ll v 1 L VI' . . n . , K 1, , I " . 1 1 ' r . J , 'v. ' r J ' I 4 . ' 'Z' , - I , I -. s ' 1 . A I I , , , . 17 1 v ' 1 - B w I .. -. , , I , A Q l I . . q- ' Q ' . 4 F x -in s . 1 ' 'V I x 0 . ' V A ' I ' , I 1 I .f".- 'I ' I -' ' 1 ' l,' 'O I ., , . , . .1 V ' x I I ' I '. l 5 'GJ ' K AH . I I 'I , 1" , , I I ' 4' A , I V ' If ' , ' I lay I A ,I 1 I ' A ., I I I ,I ' I . I , , I 64 I I t . I I I: I I I -I I I . I , f I I I I gm 1 1 U ' Q Q 1 1 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I H 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I 'I YZe old ug of1939 ZLLLWZ .USMLE Published bq the SENIOR CLASS of AMHERST HIGH SCHOOL Jlmherst, massachusetts - 1 'Q 3? M " Il 5- Il If II Il Il II II I II II IL-I1 II II Il II Il Il II II II II -II II I. OVQWOV An album of pictures, a book of memories, a record of some of the things We have done, with a prophecy of what we may do, all this has occupied our thought this year in creating our Gold Bug. The worry, disagreement, and fun We have had in the preparation of the book We keep for ourselvesg but We offer the results of our Work for you. After you have perused the book, admiring your accom- plishments of the past four years, shelve it among the dig- nitaries of your album collection. Allow it to gather, Within the covers, as much dust as possible. Only in this way will it acquire the prestige of the neighboring, stately volumes. On rainy days, your grandchildren may entertain themselves by looking at the quaint pictures and laughing at the archaic vocabulary. But only in the memories of our classmates can the true humor and spirit of our class be preserved. -THE EDITORS. GDO1fltQ1flfS SENIORS S ,, ,, CQASS DAY ,, CLASS HISTQRY ,, ,, CLASS PRQPHECY ,, ,, CLASS WILL 77 ,, I SALUTATORIAN ESSAY VALEDICTQRIAN ESSAY ACTIVITIES PP S ,, ,, ,, ADVERTISING ,, MQCl1.CClfiO 11 Who will teach French A, and Whatever subjects are left over? Wfho will direct club activities this year? XVho will be adviser for the Prom Committee? The inevitable answer-Miss Prendergast. When we were in the eighth grade, We knew her only as a very efhcient teacher, who made us learn our vocabula- ries so that We Would "never forget them in high schooln. She predicted that We would have to Work very hard "over there". Whether We have or not is beside the point. But we know now that Miss Prendergast certainly Works "there". To teach French, Latin, and English Well is a full time job, but it never prevents "Prendy,' from directing che activities of study halls, dance committees, Pro-Merito, and Dramatics Club in "latest stylev. To our eflicient teacher and director of activities, to the fun-loving friend of every class, Lillian M. Prendergast, We dedicate this book. LILLIAN M. PRENDERGAST rfncfpaf is Q7QQHQV To THE CLASS OF 1939: f turbulence, of anxiety, We are in a time of unrest, of change, o of fear. The brutality and lawlessness of some of the world s govern- ' ' ' ' ' 11 ' 'ous divisions ments, the political corruptions exposed periodica y in vari of our own, the low calibre of the motives activating many of our oflicials and leaders, the perplexing complexity of our social, economic, ' ' k f l insecure, un- d olitical problems' all combine to try to ma e us ee an p , certain, fearful, hopeless. It is in such a time that we most need to think down underneath to certain fundamentals, to examine history at long ' ' ' l ce here for ran e to deduce basic truths. There is neither space nor p a S a proofs. Nor would I try to hurry any truths so fundamental upon you. Th are ideas in the vicinity of which you will need to arrive after long ese and serious thought. I do urge your consideration of the possible truth of these statements with which I conclude. hoose and direct his thoughts, his deeds, 9 his moral standards. The village, the state, the nation, these are the sum of many individuals. Therefore, these groups can choose-their choice guided and influenced by that of each individual. Political honor, sin- cerity, honesty, idealism, are the sum of the self-respect, sincerity, hon- esty, ideals of the whole number of individuals, the whole people. Social progress achieved is the result of the sum of individual social aspirations. Economic hopefulness and prosperity are the sum of individual economic effort. Therefore, establish the best in your own life. When possible, spread the influence of the best to others. Make no concession involving fundamental idealistic principles. Think. Man the individual, can c You go with our best wishes and highest hopes. -RALPH W. HASKINS. U I -.Cin izx-fu , Qtr: S "- " N-'.S,x,k"x ... , 4-1 .. U.: tk -.,, ,, Xs...n. ..:. ' - , .L ' -f ...JA . .. , , ' 4. .Jig -. , . rs. ..C.L' , f -l:x"f31f'L. ...',, '... 4.... 5s ,. ff.v-. .. ., ...... ff , 4.v'i . unsu- ,,,It .vn- 4 S .... S,... . 1 -'- 'F 1 . s.-4 3' . I xp. , -.i fir: Q' fi 4w?,fA--2"' flftls 5, ,na 'NGN-J' v ' Q Y A. um .Q ' .u.., MR. RALPH W. HASKINS 1 L 1 acuity 1939 DORIC J. ALVIANI .A....Q.. ELEANOR F. BATCHELDER MILDRED S. BROXVN ....., ALICE W. CHURCHILL .... LAURA G. COOLEY ,...,. GENEVIEVE I-I. DWYER MARJORIE M. EBERHARDT RUTJH E. FEGLEY ,..,.. ISABEL FIELD ,....,... CHARLES E. FOTH ...,... IRENE E. HALE .....,., DONALD S. LACROIX ....., DOROTHY LEE .......... HOLLIS W. MOORE .,.... JOSEPH A. MOORE ,.... NORMAN MYRICR ,,.. EDITH L. PINNIOR .,.,.,. EDXVARD POMEROY ...,....... LILLIAN M. PRENDERGAST GILNIAN A. RANDALL ,,.. JOSEPH E. RUSH .,.... STENVART SEASS ..... ARTHUR L. SWIFT ,... MILDRED A. WEEKS ..... GEORGE E. WILLIAMS .,... RAYMOND I-I. WOODMAN ANNE U. ROGERS ..............,... ..,...,...Music Mathematics English French Household Arts C0l7'l7IZC'1'Citll Subjects M... Physical Education Household Arts Social Studies Social Studies, English Coinnzercial Subjects Science Coininercial Subjects Industrial Arts English Social Studies Social Studies, Physical Education ., .............,...............,..,.................. Art French, English, Latin Music, Science, Mathematics Industrial Arts , ..........,...,.,... Science Science, Mathematics English ..... Physical Education Latin, English Secretary ALEXANDER DI GIANANTONIO ..... , ...... Music ff I ass Cmlem AMHERST TOWN is a fair old town, Where currents of life flow up and down, Up and down through quiet Ways Year after year of cheerful days. A dim blue coronal of hills All her Wide horizon ills, But the central pulse of her being beats At the corner of Pleasant and Amity Streets. Pleasant Street is known to fame, Everybody has heard its name. Many a fine sight there is seen: The City Hall and the shady Green, Lord Jeffery,s Inn, and Fraternity Halls, Qflices, stores, and luncheon stalls. From north to south its smooth Ways bend, With a College astride at either end, And Work and play and business meet On the pleasant Walks of Pleasant Street. -GEORGE MEASON WHICHER SENIQRS USS JACQVS ANNA E. SULLIVAN , S6C1'6'f6l7'jl-T1fN6dS1L'l'CIf FREDERICK A, MCLAUGHLIN, JR., P1fesicle11t ARTHU'R L. SWIFT Class Adviser JOHN H. VONDELL, JR., Vice-Presidezzt HENRY R. ADAMS DORIS M. AMENDA URSULA BAKER CONSTANCE E. BERGMAN GCLD BUG 1939 ,f y , V I ' f'-,,Q,:a- If E. ANN BERGMAN MARGARET M. BOGUSLAWSKI ROBERT W. BRITT MARGARET M. BURROWS THE Album Issue SOPI-IIE E. COUCH DORIS L. COWLES DAISY E. CAPEN HOWARD R. COOKE, JR. " 1521 ...M It N 'al A X ' 4 I .4 V 5 " f If Il' 'I I I I I I 23 Fm I: I I n 117, ' 'I I .Ajay II I I 4 I Hg iff f I J V? , , ff' 3- gi I ' 4- 321 if: A fi gif 3 I gl 'I IEI EE ,Ly. : I , I -I-I fi I-I I A 3 'AQ I 'I If Il me I I If I-3 A N. .I JI 1 -4 Q4 I 3 I I I 2. I6 I 4 I I RICHARD J. CRAMER ROBERT XV. CROSSMA MAE A. DAMERST ELLEN A. DANAHEY N CLD B G 1939 Q JAMES W. DAYTON, JR wvf"""" SUZANNE V. DESMOND fm I SARAH S. DICKINSON f lf , . 0' X I 5-1 f 9 X i ,sv A 3, . wif ff Q X V: . RUTH B. DIXON CHRISTINE M. DOLEVA LAURENCE L. DONAHUE, -IR THE Album Issue MARY A. DROSDAL RICHARD S. FAWCETT X X 2 0 M3501 R X THERESA H. FINN EVAN FOTOS CARLOS F. FRAKER JAMES W. FULTON .,.....- LZ, .4 W , W, .W!.::' .l ' wif Q Xi I . LN, i 4 2 R 7 3 M X X 1 f Q mf, x Z 2 4 f J .Sv N f i , Q X XB . Z OLD BUG 1939 BARBARA E. GLAZIER MARION A. GREEN I X X ix Aggx ya g X x ' f Wm Ky fy fm ' MARGARET R. GRIFFIN STACIA A. GWOSCH RUTH C. I-IAMLIN RICHARD R. HARDAKER THE Album Issue LORRAINE I-IIRE ALDliN M. HOISART W J ' 4 2:s:' 4 I f f , " " I-Q? ,N ' is , :RZ 'ffm JANE H. I-IOM AN XVILLIAM S. HOSFORD WAYNE A. HOWARD JOHN H. F. I-IOWKINS if .X " 1 W, , Q . 5 .V A W. ,,.. - 37" f 'ww f iff' 45' OLD BUG 1939 WILLIAM A. JANSE DORO PHY M. JOHNSON f 1 R THOMAS H. KELLEY MARY J. KENNEDY JOSEPHINE B. KISELEWSKI HELEN E. KOSAKOWSKI THE Album Issue HELEN KOWBA HAROLD J. LEHANE MARGARET E. MADDEN FREDERICK A. MCLAUGHLIN, JR. RITA C. MERCIER ETHEL I-I. MESSIER ,-'MQ'-' X . ,Wx OLD BUG 1939 HENRY J MESSIER HELEN L. MIENTKA Y ' XI ., ' ., -,. . A .f X .3 X 4, fl N . Q-, Q V - X A I ,I f ,yn Af X, .f, S xg Vi x Y. X -.WW-ny' THE Album SABINA T. MOSAKEWICZ I S, . 1 S ALICE M. NIYIEDHAM v XZ X STELLA M. MIENTKA DONALD W. MILLER JOSEPH H. MITCHELL PHYLLIS E. MORGAN Issue lY"'1"x L., Lx L ,A x V CHARLES XV. NEXVKIRK TESSIE M. OLEKSIW C. LEONARD PAGE MARGARET E. PAGE X 2 .gn 1 ,qw-f CLD BUG 1939 - :- A 1 f ,, "" ' ' 3 , 4 , .. . X .zzz -wins Q ., I 2-..- ' " T R Ig QA- , VIRGINIA A. PHILLIPS I-IARRIETT P. PUFFER wwf f W? A Rs 1 , GEORGE F. PUSHEE, JR VVILLIAM T. RABINSKI FRANK E. RAY, JR. MARY M. ROGERS THE Album Issue MILTON J. SCARBOROUGH WILLIAM G. SEREX GERALD SHAMPO ,WWW ' 4352 JOSEPI-IINE M. SHEERMAN MARGUERITE SHEPARD DONALD P. SMART 4 : ' f f .. -V -ff . .M , , .,,. . 1 V f .. k I f ,. 4:. 5gg,ff ' , WW H """ 1 i Z ig , f ' 1 Aff 0 j ,K Af A". W To ' x A ,t f Q, .f Q. ,. ,.:-,., 4 f PAAA W 3 ff iw:- ,h Q, .G 6J,2,f'wwfx '- 2: ,fy '- QQ Q. 'gaxyyw 5 4gjf"Z,.4, . , " H 134 f f gf A f 'ff ffm '21 . ' " fgfif' N V I 4 " 1 CLD BUG 1939 E, X SN xx Q A if X QQM Rx., Ex X! 1 X Q 4' V f J N WS xy J , XnwiX1, g," N Avi X 5 FX X A . Q X X ' x SXN X Q , W X X X , N WN X N X W w ww ...Q ,Q ' ww pw GW' 112 m HILDA G SMI FH wld' AS? MARY T. SMI11-I .K : W. , " , If . V.. ff Q Z K 1 1 I X Q 8 7 I 1 0, X 4 -. W f -. :::f.4afl 5 2 NANCY T. STEDM AN PETER P. STELMOKAS BARBARA A. STEWART EDWARD G. STILILS THE Album Issue ANNA SULLIVAN LOCARDIA TARASKA 'W . ' fb., .... MRL V I X X 1 W Q X X 1 28 29 EVELYN J. THAYER . W- W, ,W . EUGENE TOCZYDLOWSKI JOSEPH A. TOCZYDLONWSKI ' HOWARD B. TURNER GOLD BUG 1939 . 'Q 3 J.: 'WYPYW ' 4 , LILLIAN I. TURNER HELEN L. VAN METER Aim.. A ROLAND H. VERBECK, JR JOHN H. VONDELL, JR. EDWARD C. WARNER ROBERT WATSON THE Album Issue C. NELSON WATTS, JR. ROBERT T. WEBBER ,., Jw" 4940? , 1 N :gm ' .:,.1 R A ju- ,, 4 30 NK f 6 , S A N .A 'W E Lf NW if .' AZ PATRICIA H. WELLINGTON MARION L. WENTWORTH J'.i':' e..5 X 17' ' '-A 1-nn: A "Q 'NZ f iz f 45.772 jwf fffWf X , i 11:4 f 1 U you ,ydnf f f 4 .ZX a if Z I 4,4 I f f 1 ' ,V XZ f IW! ,, ,M Q, ' :sxxgg X . . , .44 I v f cf M 4 , f Z 1 X 7 N XX XV ,V f ,f , f Z X If fi? f f S f X f 9 W A f Z,:4Zw-f. KRW f 'P N f A 11,- .::.- X X WZ X ,X ny, M f Ifwdfy yy f K , is x to 2-'IQ X f Z ' , ' f xf A Q PHYLLIS G. WHITNEY ANN XVOODARD STANLEY XVZIONTKA As They Should Be As They Are Always Specialties Rhythms Ambitions HENRY R. ADAMS ...... ....,,.,. P ete ......,....,...,...... "Sleepy', ...,... Dance Committees .......... "It,s The Dreamer In Mel' .......... ............ D octor DORIS M. AMENDA ,.......... ......... D ot ........, .,........ S tudying .......... ........ .Dancing Class ................ "Dark Eyes" ....................................,... ----..-4 C affoomsf URSULA BAKER .................,.............. Ursula ..... .......... T rying hard ,............,...... ......,.. H orseback Riding ...,...... "Some Day My Prince Will Come" -------"--A- Artist CONSTANCE E. BERGMAN ,............. Connie ,.... ,...... G etting around ....................,..... Outing Club .......... ..... ' 'Laugh and Call It Love" ................ ............. G ood Wife E. ANN BERGMAN ,,........,.............,... Annie .. ,..... Keeping up with Connie ..,....,.... Orchestra .,....... ..... I 'Day Dreaming" ,,.,.......................... ................. O Pefa Star MARGARET M. BOGUSLAWSKI ...... Peg ........, ,......... W ith Doris ,,...........................,.,.. Dancing Class ........ ..... I 'Margien .....,.................................................. .......... P rivate SecretarY ROBERT W. BRITT ............................ Britty ................., At the "Greeks" .......,.... .Dancing Class ................ "Curly Topv ..,.............................,................... .......-.....A-----A-- A fchifecf MARGARET M. BURROWS ......,....... Just Margaret ...... Tearing around .... Q'Gold Bug" Editor ........ "There,s A Far Away Look In Your Eyeu ......... Editor of "Poetry" DAISY E. CAPEN ................,, ......... R ed ........,,............ Jocund ..,.,...,,........... ......., . Swimming .,...................... uOne In A Million" .......................... . .,.......,.... .................... S ecretarY HOXVARD R. COOKE, JR. .............. Dusty ..... .......... R eady and willing ....... ..,,..,. . Skating ...,..,............. ..... ' 'Lookie! Here Comes Cookie!" ............,.... -..-.-,.--A4 P flinfef SOPHIE E. COUCH ...........,, ......... B unny ,.... .......... E nvied ,..................,... ..,..... . Dancing Class ....... ...,. ' 'Smilesn .......................................... -------v S FCUOSYT'-Phef DORIS L. COXVLES .......... RICHARD J. CRAMER ....... ROBERT XV. CROSSMAN . MAE A. DAMERST ............. ELLEN A. JAMES W. DAYTON, JR. . SUZANNE V. DESMOND SARAH S. DICKINSON ..... RUTH B. DIXON .........,,...... CHRISTINE M. DOLEVA . LAURENCE L. DONAHUE, MARY A. DROSDAL ...... RICHARD S. FAWCETT THERESA H. FINN .....,.... EVAN FOTOS . ...,....... . CARLOS F. FRAKER ...... JAMES W. FULTON ' ..,.... . BARBARA E. GLAZIER ..... DANAHEY ....... .Dee ............ ..... .Introspective .............. .Ferdinand ............ I'Prince Charming" ..... ......... Bob .....,... ....... B orrowing ............. .....,...Mae .. ......In demand .........Persevering .....,,.. Jim ...... ...... U nder water ..,..,........ .Chemistry .....,. ,.... Dramatics . ..... ..... .Track .........,......... ..... .Tri-S President ....,. ..... ' 'You Couldn't Be Cuter" ..... Basketball ............. ..... .Hi-Y ...........,.. ......... Sue ,....... ....... Q uite cute and quiet .. .Basketball ..... . ....,,,.Sally ......."La donna e mobile" .........Swimming ..........,....Ruthie ......In the objective case English JR. ....,. Larry ....... ......... . Dick .,., .....,... ,.......Finny ........Chopin Barb ....... ...... In the thick of it ....... A bit O,Blarney ........,,.. Passive .... , .....,.,,........,.. . Forgetting that period .........,,... Has the right angle ...... Sincere .,...,.................... Quibbling .........,....... Stirring sodas ............ Buying wholesale ....... Immaculately dressed ..,. A new coiffure ............. One of us ...... Infallible .....,............................... Hanging on ................,............. MARION A. GREEN ...,......... ......,, M arion ..............., MARGARET R. GRIFFIN ..... ........ P eg ......,... ......... STACIA A. GWOSCH ......... ..... S tase ......., ....,.... RUTH C. HAMLIN ..........,.... ........ W oofus ................ RICHARD R. HARDAKER ............ Dick .,...... ........, . LORRAINE HIRE ......,..........,. ......,. L orraine .,............ ALDEN M. HOBART ,,..., JANE H. HOMAN .,.., WILLIAM S. HOSFORD ...... WAYNE A. HOWARD ,,.. JOHN H. F. HOWKINS ...,.. WILLIAM A. JANSE .......................... DOROTHY M. JOHNSON THOMAS H. KELLEY .......... Puddy .... ......... Janie .... ..... , B111 ....... ......... Wayne .,.... ........ Jack .... ...,..... ..............Dotty Kell ...... ......... MARY J. KENNEDY ,,....,...,.... ........ S andy JOSEPHINE B. KISELEWSKI HELEN E. KOSAKOWSKI .... HELEN KOWBA ................. HAROLD J. LEHANE ........., MARGARET E. MADDEN ., FREDERICK A. MC LAUGHLIN, RITA C. MERCIER ,, ..,.,..,.................. Reet --4 As They S'10U'd Be Tum. H. Mfassuak .,.. . ............Joe . ........ Helen ........Ko . ...Peggy Bill ...... ......... High, wide and handsome ...... , Among those present ............... Writing poetry .......... The philosopher ...... .Retiring ............... Everywhere ...... Absent .....,... Prepared ................ Etching ......................... An Olympic bid ...,... Camouflaged .......... In vogue ........ Exclusive ...,....... Somewhere else .... Dependable ......... JR.Neddy .... ......... C arefree ...... .........Improving As They Are AlWaYs H ,,,, ..Opti.mistic .Tri-S ........,............... ..... "Graphic" Editor .......... Basketball ................ ..... Swimming ........................ " .Basketball ........................ Vice President of H1-Y .... The Arts ........................ H1-Y ..................,,.,......... ."Gold Bug" Typist ......,. .Tri-S ....................... ..,.. Art ................ ..... Basketball ..,.,,....... ..... .Nature Study .... ...,. ..Football .......... . Outing Club ....,..... ..... .Football ................ ."Gold Bug" Typist ..... ...' .Photography .,.......,....,..... .Baseball .......... ..... .Hi-Y ........... ..... .Track ............ ..,.. .Girl Scouts ....... .,... u Art ...,......... ..... 'ISometimes I'm Happy" .....,.......... Q'All God's Chillun Got Rhythm" "This Is The Lifen ,,..,.......,.,....... "Ain,t Misbehavinn' ,.............. "A Sailboat In The Moonlight" t'Sweet Sue" ...............,........,....., "Horses, Silly Old Horses" "Sweet As A Song" ..,.................................. "Sweet Someonev ............................................ as 'IStop Beatin' Round The Mulberry Bush Mariev ...., ........................,.......................,... You Rascal, You!" ...,..,............. "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" t'Music, Maestro, Please" ......,.......,.., "It's The Little Things That Count" "You,re A Naturaln .,..................... "Lovely To Look At" ....... "You're Lovely, Madamei' ..... "All You Want Is To Dance" ......,...... My First Impression of You" .....,....,. "You're An Education In Yourself" "Lost In The Shuffle" .........,.,................ . 'QA11 Of Me" .......... "Runnin' Wild" ..... ...... N . . It's Easier Said Than Done" ....... .. ..................... .. u 1 z u 'Billy The Kid" ................................... ...... "Dinah" .................... ............,............. Lost In A Fogn ...............,............ ........ .Swimming .... ...... ' 'She's Tall, She's Tan, She's Terrific" .'tGraphic" .... ..... ' 'Wouldn't I Be A Wondern .... .Dramatics ...... ..... , "Getting Some Fun Out Of Life" .Basketball ...... ...... ' 'So Rare" .,........................................ Basketball ......,.. ...... ' 'Foggy Day" .............................. .English ................ ...... ' 'Confidentiallyn .......,......,.......,.......,. Class President .............. "Nice Work If You Can Get It" .... Commercial Studies ,..... "I've Got A Date With A Dream" .... Specialties Rhythms ,lt M Jody 'Oh, Ma-Mas" ........................... .......................... l "IHS" A Shui I HLLUILI M.iII.Strca111" ......... 2-1- Ullnskctbal ..14 A- UW"Skatii1g Duwn T W Wlmercvcr You Arc Skating ---'-'- ""' . .k-mug Qjlll, Conte CTU!- llilinskctbnll The Sentimental Sidi!" I' " I Nurse Dancer Aeronautics ,,.....Style Shop Owner Amateur Wayne The Moon Comes Over The Mountainn 'You Must Have Been A Beautiful Baby" ........... Secretary Sailor Nurse Psychiatrist . ........ Aviatrix ....,...Bookkeeper Lawyer Secretary .Commercial Artist Mathematician Business ....,...Concert Pianist . .....,......... Doctor Secretary ..........Florist . Nurse .......Stewardess Scientist Radio Station Owner Nurse .,..,......Sports Coach ........Private Secretary Minister , ....... Charcoal Business .........Medical School .. ....,.......,..... Artist Journalist Cartoonist .Swimming Instructor ........,.....,...,.Stenographer Florist ....,...........Teacher ....,....I-Iorticulturist ........Air Hostess Botanist Bookkeeper .-...,...1.-,..-4 ArnbXtXons ,,..,l lfhxir dresser .......SkM an R QM :unpiun A I Dietitian Su: nu gr aphs: f N Q Ag runauxic xxxxaxuxaxxxcxt if MC - N . uxuc - xnxx ix c-. xvxx:.RQ,m.s .4. --X-axxxr. L L- NlAx3l3x:'N i As They Should Be . ,,,,,! - Nam' x Jvmlxluxlsly I .........Il1:eL As They Are ..5uxxxvwlxcr ll c else: ., 'flWuxxv.l.xlxlc x,., Caxrcfrcc ,,4,..,. Ixxxpruvixxg Always --.unvxlmll .lI.lsk0gl-,AH H X lilxglislx ,,4,,, ,,,.! A X V C 'I-'V Pl't'NltllfIll Cfnnxnxcrcrll 'Sl l' - . ul. lc Specialties -U50 K.arv" rn imc " "lf',,RHy Ugly.. ' . ll I 1 , .'-- H.-QInrilitlq,-nlidny., H ' " " ll llc.: In r l " -- .. ,, urn Hn?JJz1.c?Vu1k If Yun Klan fi.,-I ll-. I N Air Lili' n .ut A IJnxc Will: A IJrv.1n lg , I " ll J Rhythms lluulukvs. Ambitions ETHEL H. MESSIER ..... HENRY J. MESSIER ...,....... ........Shorty . ...... Henry ...... ....... ......Meek ..Optimistic , ...... . ........Basketball ........Skat1ng 1 1 1 1 1 1 u 1 xc u u 1 u Qt u U 'Just A Simple Melody" .....,.........,.... ...... 'Skating Down The Old Mill Stream" ......... 'Come Out, Come Out, Wherever You Are" 'On The Sentimental Side" ............,.....,......,... "Prairie Skies and Two Blue Eyes" .... 'Oh, Joseph, Joseph" ...........,..,,....... 'Try To See It My Wayu .......,.. "Start The Day With A Smile" It Ain't Necessarily So" ..,....... .. 'Heigh Ho, Heigh Ho" ..... .. 'In My Own Little Way" ........,.... .. Take Me Out To The Ball Game" "Long About Midnight" ................,..,...... "Be Optimistic" ............,.......,,.. ,...,...,.......... . . The Week End Of A Private Secretaryn S Good Enough For Me" ..,................., .. Who Am I?" . .,......,.... I Double Dare Youn ......,..,...... A Twinkle In Your Eye" .,........ .. Oh Mama, The Butcher Boy" .,.. HELEN L. MIENTKA ....... ........ M inka ......... Mild ............. .Basketball STELLA M. MIENTKA ..... ......., S tell .. .. ........, Dimpled .......... ........ . Dancing .... DONALD XV. MILLER .,... ........ D on ...., ....,.... P opular ........,.......... .Basketball ..,... JOSEPH H. MITCHELL ...... ......., J oe ,,..... ......... O ut of sight ......,,.. ........ .Sports ..,..... PHYLLIS E. MORGAN ...... ....,.,, P hleese .... ......... P ositively charged ..............,...,... Basketball ..,..,. SABINA T. MOSAKEWICZ ..... ....... S ub ..,.... ......... B ehind the baby carriage .Foreign Letters ALICE M. NEEDHAM ........ .....,. S nooks ..,.,, .,,...... I n the baby carriage ................,. Girls' Club ....,., CHARLES W. NEWKIRK ..... .....,.. C lxarlie .... ...... Up at Louis' .,................ ......... T rack ....... TESSIE M. OLEKSIW ..,.... ........ T ess ....... .,....... T imid ......... ........ D ancing ..... C. LEONARD PAGE ..... ......., L en ,,..... .......,, S omewhere Baseball MARGARET E. PAGE ...,..,... ........ P eg .....,. .....,... P etite ..,..........,. Reading .,..,............ VIRGINIA A. PHILLIPS ..,... ........ G ina ......... Two of us ..,,.....,.. Dancing ,.,...,..... HARRIETT P. PUFFER ........... ........ P uffer ...... ......... B elle of the ball ...... .Dance Committees . GEORGE F. PUSHEE, JR. ..... ....... J oe ......... ......... T he caveman ...... .Football .................. . WILLIAM T. RABINSKI ,..... ...,..,, W eeny ..... ...."Teeny weeny" .,... ........ S ports ......,.......,..,.. . ...." FRANK E. RAY, JR. ......,........ ........ R ussian ............... A new one .................... .Dramatics .....,...... . MARY M. ROGERS ...................,...... Lee ........,. ,........ . Bringing in the notices ....... Commercial Studies MILTON J. SCARBOROUGH .......... Middie ...... ......, .,.. A g ood kid ...........,..... .Bicycling .....,........... NVILLIAM G. SEREX ...................,...... Bill .... .. .....,... Bashful ....,..... ........ P hotography .. GERALD E. SHAMPO .....,.................. Jerry ..... ...,..... P eddling papers . ....... .Hi-Y ............,,... . JOSEPHINE M. SHEERMAN ..........,. Joe ......... A good bet ....... ........ . Dancing Class MARGUERITE SHEPARD ......,,..,.. DONALD F. SMART ....... HILDA G. SMITH ......... MARY T. SMITH .............,. NANCY T. STEDMAN ,.... PETER P. STELMOKAS ......... BARBARA A. STEWART ,....., EDWARD G. STILES ......... ANNA E. SULLIVAN ....... LOCARDIA TARASKA ........ Dee .... ........Red ........Smitty ........Smitty ........Nan ........Pete ........Bobb1e ........Sully ........Lou .. ...A Pelhamite ,... .. "Dopey', ...,................ ............ . . Playing basketball ....,, ..... . ...Petite, pretty and pleasing ...Congenial ,. ............................ ...Calm and collected ...., .. ..."C'est l'amour" ...The answer ........ ..."Snow White" ...Comparing notes EVELYN J. THAYER ........................ Evie .......... ......... D emure and dainty ..... EUGENE TOCZYDLOWSKI ............. Butch ...... .......... O ne of the boys ...... JOSEPH A. TOCZYDLOWSKI ....,..... Toczy .,,... .......... O ur hero ............... HOWARD B. TURNER .................... Tuffy ........ ......... . Getting hooked ..... LILLIAN I. TURNER ....,.,...... ........ S hrimp ................. On the lookout ........,,. HELEN L. VAN METER .....,. ......,, O ur Willie ........... Behind the piccolo ..... ROLAND H. VERBECK, JR. ............ Genesis JOHN H. VONDELL, JR. ,... . EDXVARD C. WARNER ...... ROBERT E. WATSON ........ C. NELSON WATTS, JR. ................. . ROBERT T. WEBBER ........................ PATRICIA H. WELLINGTON MARION L. WENTWORTH PHYLLIS G. WHITNEY ....... ANN E. WOODARD ........ STANLEY WZIONTKA ..... ........Jack ........Buster ........Bob ........Duchess ..........Marn Nellie ,..... ....... Bob .......... ....... ..."Sneezy" ................. ..."Grumpy', ...Figuring .,.. ...Debonair .......... ...Cleaning up .... ...On the rostrum ...At the piano ...... ...Reticent .......... Eflicient .,.................. .........Puppy ..........Too far away ........Stan ...The stalwart warri OX' ..... Crafts .........,......... Band .. .............,.... .. Home Economics . Skating .............. Dramatics .,.... ........Sports Swimming ...... ........Sw1mm1ng .Orchestra ............... ........Commercial Studies Basketball ....................,. "Let ........Baseball .. ........Football Fishing ................... ........Home Economics Glee Club ............. ........Junior Play ........Dramatics Football ....,.......... ........Cheer Leading Captain of Football President of Hi-Y Dramatics ...................... " ........Studying Ball .......... ........Da1ncing .Football ...... zz u u it U it u u mc cc "You,re The Only Star" ............ "The 'KThe "The Latin Quarter" ......... ll rx u cz u me u Be A Good Scout" .............,....,.. .. "Too Late" ................................,......... I'm Hatin' This Waitin' Around" "Making Wfhoopeei' ............ ........... . ,. Don't Give A Good Gosh Darn" Out NVhere The Trail Begins" I Live The Life I Lovel' .......... .. How To Win Friends" ............ .. A-Hunting I Will GOD .... .. Am I In Another World?" I Can't Be Bothered Now" ......... .. Iive Got a Pocketful of Dreams" .. When You Dream About Hawaii" . Me Whisperl' .............................. Ten Little Miles From Town" .... Story of the Marines" .. Stamp Collectorv ..... Floating On A Bubble" .... That Certain Age" ........... U . . So Little Time" ...,,.................... u- Little Drummer Boy" ............. You Gotta Be A Football Hero" .... Naturally" ..............,..........,..............,,.............. I'm Bubbling Over" ........................ Old Straw Hat" ........ ................Hairdresser ......,Skating Champion Dietitian Stenographer Aeronautics .........Mechanic Chemist Stenographer .........Ambassador to France ,...........Electrical Engineer .......,Private Secretary Politician ........Commercial Work Secretary Stenographer Doctor Carpenter ......Nightclub Owner ...........Bookkeeper Electrician .....,,Chemist ...................,Teacher . ........ Q .......... Secretary ........Commercial Artist Senato S. Marines Nurse ..........Singer Nurse Electrician ........History Teacher ...............,........Navy ...,...Concert Violinist ..,...............,Travel ........Stenographer ,......Sports Coach Mechanic ......Coast Guard ........English Teacher ...................,Actor Engineer ..........Hotel Manager Coach r from Massachusetts I Love Life" ...................................................... ...............................,,......... A rtist Can This Be The End Of The Rainbow?" It Never Rains But What It Pours" ................ cr - . ....... Waitress ........Designer .......,Travel .......Navy l I I , ,iw , fwfr , VO - Wzerifo President ...,A.,.., ROBERT WEBBER Secrefary .........,.... HELEN VAN METER Adviser ..,.A...A.....,,.,A..A.. ..A.. M ISS RUTH FEGLEY The hours the Pro-Merito members had together were few but memorable ones. Conven- tions, spring and fall, were educational and riotous times. Not very long after election, Robert Webber, President of the society, and Helen Van Meter, Secretary, led the group to their first con- vention, typical of them all. The honorable group jolted in the school bus to Williamsburg High School. Having pinned on identification tags, and initiated Miss Fegley, the new faculty adviser, the group attended the business meeting. Laurence Donahue was elected Vice-President of the state society. After a dinner, made more digestible by enthusiastic songs and cheers-Pro-Merito members are noisy-came a speaker from Smith College, Last of all, an ancient tradition of the Amherst delegation, a tradition which most of the members were too superstitious to break, was a trip to the movies. The picture was not very good. The spring convention in Wfestfield was not very different. After a substantial luncheon at the school, an ueducationalv movie was the last "number', of a good day. The society was not disappointed in its quest for knowledge. A comfortable ride home in the "Golden Chariotn completed a day for the Pro-Merito members, and a successful year for the society. y 4 Ven- Pbfff IOD- iigh iser, the :rito the was tCOH RUS n ,Ot CLASS DA g6Sl'O1f'y Offlw USS THE EPIC OF A HURRICANE We are a hurricane. No one can remember a class like us. No one presumes to predict one. Gaily blowing through high school, we whirled the teachers off their feet with great gusts of our hot air. The first day of our Freshman year, we must admit, we were a timid inoffensive breeze, pushed around by the upper classmen. Lost in the vast institution of learning, we allowed our- selves to be led from class to class, while we remained dumb with amazement at all the confus- ing efficiency. Impressions of strange creatures, high school instructors, and "pillars of man- kindn, tall upperclassmen who jostled us in the mad scramble in the halls, crowded our minds. We were glad, however, to realize that our fearful expectation of month-long assignments and rigid discipline was all a fantasy. High school was not so bad, after all. As soon as the routine of classes became habit, we elected our officers: President, Fred McLaughlin, Vice-President, Harriett Pufferg and Secretary-Treasurer, Mae Damerst. Though some of us never felt quite right about being taught health, our zephyr gained so much speed and assurance that we essayed everything: we made a collection of anecdotes from Ancient History class, into which we put such gems as "The races of the world are Mongoloid, Negroid, and Celluloidn and "One of the causes of the downfall of the Roman Empire was infant suiciden. We also made a shy trial of the social pleasures of the Freshman Reception and the Tri-S Dance, orchestra, glee club, foot- ball, baseball, dramatics, everything else that already existed, and much that did not. During those good old days, which we recall fondly, we were Qin our opinionj very successful. With half the honors in Prize Speaking and a good reputation in many fields, we were a close second in the Stowell Cup Competition. Moreover, when exams came, we considered them nothing. Our wind was growing in force. As Sophomores, wise and sedate, we realized that any sensible gale with hurricane ambi- tions must concentrate. Attempting fewer activities, we performed them better. Vfe gained prominence because of our prizewinning Interclass Play, "Sunset by Slansky" and by our ex- 3 pert assistance to the orchestra, which took first place at the Exposition. As a result of our abilities in these and other lines, we won the Stowell Cup. Fred McLaughlin as President Laurence Donahue, as Vice-President, and Mae Damerst, as Secretary-Treasurer directed our C1355 3 business. Rather proud of ourselves, we thought that the faculty must be overwhelmed by our magnitude, scholarship and lung power. Finally, during that spring, realizing that a wind of our size and force could no longer be confined within the crowded rooms of the old building, the town agreed to build an addition in which we might expand during the remaining two years. Junior year, we realized our growing power, and used it. Though the efficient new system regulating the arteries of high school transportation was slightly disconcerting, we soon made adjustments. Our perpetual president, Fred McLaughlin, again officiated with Laurence Don- ahue and Harriett Puffer. Though completing our studies to our own satisfaction consumed much time Q-There were thirteen members in the exclusive Junior Pro Merito Society-Q, we did have a few hours free. Sorry to find Mr. Tarlow gone, the orchestra, all the same, carried away first prize at the Exposition under the direction of Mr. Alviani. For our Junior Play, we produced a dramatic success, Booth Tarkington's "Seventeen", which the cast remembers with fondness and the audience with chuckles. After gingerly testing the slippery floors and strange showers of the new gymnasium, we helped stage, as a christening for our new possession, the hilarious, colorful circus, full of clowns, fierce animals, and astonishing feats. After a victory in the Interclass Play Contest with t'The Old Pinter Place", and a complete success in Prize Speaking, we took part in "Pinafore,',-for us, the Hnal event of the year. Then we stopped to ponder our hurricane,s accomplishments. Rightly conident that our qualities had secured the Stowell Cup for the second successive year, we were content. On September twenty-first of our Senior year, our amateur hurricane was dwarfed by the events of a few hours,-hours which we shall always remember. Wind and rain destroyed our town's beauty, a century,s patient growth. In the following days, full of candle-grease, sooty dishes, and strenuous chopping, we slowly came to understand the grandeur of the storm's dam- age. While helping to restore the comforts and neatness of usual life, we joined in spreading rumors of damage elsewhere, stories seemingly fantastic, but far less horrible than reality. Sobered, we returned to school to continue the work of our own inspired hurricane by day, and to study with candles by night. We firmly believe that no one could be busier than we were. The football team, mostly Seniors, fought triumphantly, never defeated. With cold logic, and careful research, the debating team argued effectively. The members of the "Gold Bug" society were, occasionally, at peace with one another and the world. Our officers were Qand did they work this year!J:-President, Fred McLaughlin, Vice-President, John Vondellg and Secretary-Treasurer, Anna Sullivan. During a rare lull in the social and educational whirl, we paused to ponder how near we were to an end, and a beginning. Our energy, accomplishing much in many fields, had been so overwhelming that nineteen teachers, exhausted, we suppose, had 37 i left the high school during our "blow". A higher percentage of the class than customary were in Pro Merito. We thought we were wonderful. We remembered, however, that, as idealistic beginners in the world, or "razzed,' Freshmen in college, we must make a new reputation. Our meditation on the future was not long. We soon returned to the actual world of dances, bas- ketball, baseball and even more movies than usual because of a marvelous feature of the Graphic. In March, the town actually voted la playground for the school,-a playground! That was hard for us to imagine who never had had a respectable one of our own. We hoped future classes would not be spoiled. The honors of the Interclass Play Contest again went to us for the intense tragedy, "Auf Wiedersehnn. As the end of high school approached, our whirl- wind blew itself dizzy, gathering up loose ends, studying in the shadow of college boards, and having a last good time with those whom we might never meet again. With pent-up energy, our hurricane, now at the height of its power, tried to be serious at graduation. Next week, with our minds Hlled with pictures drawn by our ideals, we set out to storm the world. Historian: RUTH HAMLIN Committee: DOROTHY JOHNSON ALICE NEEDHAM ROBERT WEBBEII "Vale" To A Small Black Dog I miss you. The foolish tail that really talked. You always knew the time we walked. What jumps and silly yelps of glee, What bitings of your leash-and me! What impatient bouncing in the hall, You were so swaggering and small! And oh, those walks! You scuffled in October,s gold, Defied the whirling leaves so bold, Rusty leaves against the blackness of yourself, A bounding, joyous canine elf. Now when I walk, I never go Along the ways that pleased you so. -PATRICIA WELLINGTON. USS C. VO AQCZV October 9, 3039 As I looked out of the window of the small archaeological building, I saw the departing sun come to a rest on the broad dunes of the Connecticut Valley Desert. Across the sky, great ribbons of color were spreading softening shadows, which fell here and there on the great desert like opalescent carpets. Along one of these paths of light, a small group of workers was return- ing after a day of excavating. Lazily realizing that I should investigate the results of the work, I called my secretary. Suddenly the door burst open, sweeping in a tiny old man with an endless piece of crumpled yellow paper. "I've found it! I've found it!,' When I naively asked what he had found, he glared at me with glassy eyes, and fairly scream- ed, "A newspaper of the twentieth century- evidence that this valley has been inhabited." Without stopping for my consent, he thrust the paper before me, and pointed out the im- portant items of the newspaper, edited by a person named Gerald Edwin Shampo. "See the head- lines, 'Cooke murders cook for publicity. Howard Cooke, wealthy banker, today confessed that he murdered the cook of a nearby restaurant merely to see his picture on the front page. The confession came at the end of a gruelling cross-examination by "G-Man", Alden Hobart,." There was also an account of the activities of Edward Stiles, notorious safe-cracker, which were being investigated by Doris Amenda, famous "G-Woman". Deciding that the century must have been one filled with crime, we turned to the political news. "Frederick McLaughlin enters upon his fifth term as President of the United States, after defeating Phyllis Morgan, international anarchist. Doris Cowles will again be Vice-President. It has been rumored that Mr. McLaughlin is having difHculty in choosing between Ann Wood- ard and Ruth Dixon for Secretary of the Interior. But it is certain that the social worker, Phyllis Whitney, will be his choice for Secretary of Labor." Pleased by these bits of historical data, we turned eagerly to a report of a lecture. "Orson XVelles, prominent actor, fails to appear at an important lecture while arguing with his secretary, Margaret Burrows, on whether or not, 'the intellect is a speck afloat on the sea of emotions'." Near this article was a short note from the Scilly Islands by the foreign correspondent, Suzanne Des- mond. "Howard Turner, British painter of international fame, set sail today for the South Sea Islands. The result of the trip is to be a series of maritime sketches." Beneath this announce- ment, we read a less pleasant article about the famous Bellefemme Hospital. "Richard Fawcett, statistician who has been suffering from a nervous breakdown, as a result of overwork, escaped , yesterday from the Bellefemme Hospital." Under the announcement of "Novelties", we found that a dentist, Donald Smart, was dis- cussing the possibilities of his new chair, which, instead of raising the patient, brings him down to Dr. Smart's own level. The most noteworthy article, however, was from Washington. "Robert Webber, Massachu- setts Senator, residing with the 'Last Puritans' on Beacon Hill, is the most sought-after man in the country's capital today. His attractive secretary, Barbara Glazier, has been snowed under piles of letters from Sally Dickinson, and her committee of the Boston Junior League. The com- plaint is that the benches on the new national highway through Boston face the wrong way." My attention was immediately attracted by an insignificant note in the lower corner of the page. "john H. Vondell, Jr., public enemy No. 1, when contacted last by civil authorities, made but one remark, 'I am very unhappyl' " A warm breeze blew over a page. A vivid picture caught our eye-Marion Wentworth, most photographed debutante of Park Avenue, snapped as she entered the Lehane Cafe, escorted by William Serex, Glamor Boy of Hollywood. Also in the society column, we noted that Mary Kennedy, wealthy matron of the "400", had endowed Joseph Mitchell's Old Ladies' Home. On the same page we found the "Whispers Column", edited by Barbara Stewart. "It is rumored that Dorothy Johnson is now employed as a pearl diver. Harriett Puffer eloped last night with her employer, the president of Consolidated Steel. john Howkins, young crooner, was last seen doing duty as a bubble-scooper in Rockefeller Center. It is obvious that Edward C. Warner, engineer, forgot to move his decimal point. Your editor has reason to believe that Mae Damerst, star 'board- er' at the Bellefemme Hospital, is a Christian Science practitioner. Orchids to Nancy Stedman, head nurse at the Bellefemme, for not letting society doctor, George Pushee, go out without his rubbers." At the bottom of the page was an artistic advertisement announcing a fall showing of gowns, modeled by Margaret Boguslawski, at James Fulton's salon. Finding the society notes of little importance to history, we turned eagerly to the Radio News with the remark, "Hmm, so they had them in those days". "At ten this morning, the Toczydlowski and Wziontka Alphabet Soup Company will pre- sent a new program,-Constance E. Bergman's 'Advice to the Lovelorn'. At four o'clock this afternoon, the news of the stock market will be broadcast direct from the Newkirk Brokerage Office. An hour and a half later, on the same station, Evelyn Thayer, the 'Singing Lady', will be heard. At exactly six this evening, the 'Lone Ranger', starring Donald Miller, with Lor- raine Hire supplying the sound effects, will reach the radio audience. At seven thirty, William Janse, as Master of Ceremonies, will present the Cuckoo Hour, with Ellen Danahey as Mrs. Penny- feather, and Wayne Howard, as the leader of the swing band. The script for the program is written by the celebrated humorist, Mary Drosdal. In a special broadcast from Hollywood at wen, Clpql W dis- rn :chu- -lfl in under com- way," icr of irities, most ed by Mary . On 1 that h her doing gineer. moard- jnmn. it his OWHS, Radio pre- this 'erage , will Lor- illiarn -nny- m is ad if nine, fl1C CXOUC SURF, Daisy Capen, will present a scene from her latest production, 'The After- math', in which she is supported by L. Leigh Donahue, young aspirant, as the dumb waiter. In the case of Mr. Donahuels illness, his part will be taken by his stand-in, Sabina Mosakewiczf' In the book-reviews which followed, the latest publication of fiction was Jane Homan's novel, "Reader, Promise You Wonlt Marry Mew. The book of the month was Tessie Oleksiw's biography of atom-smasher Locardia Taraska. Among the childrenis books, the best seller was "Gertrude, the Goose" by Mary Rogers. On the same page we were confronted by the startling sign: "How do you know you can't reason? Send for my course in Logic in six easy lessons. Address Dr. Alice M. Needham, Professor of Logic, University of California." There was but one other advertisement on the page. "Employ the Van Meter Trot, Latest Translations from Virgil, Cicero, and Woodman". With a casual "Requiescat in pacen at the mention of the latter name, my companion turned to the "Church Notes", edited by Richard Cramer, abbot in a monastery. The principal discussion of the day, "What shall we do with the past?" was written by Sister Helen Kosakowski. The announcement of a missionary expedition also appeared among Brother Cramer,s notes. The trip was to be supervised by the Reverend Richard Hardaker, aided by Hilda Smith and Josephine Sheerman, singing and cooking instructors respectively. Beside this notice was an ad- vertisement quoting Bishop Hosford. "I always use Stelmokas' Stainless Steel Safety Pins. They stick." The final section, we discovered, was the inevitable "Woman's Page", edited by William Rab- inski. In an essay, "Bring Back the Bustle', Marion Green predicted the fall fashions as seen in Paris. Following the fashions came the recipes in a brief column, "Racy Recipes by Roberten, written by the Waldorf's French chef, Robert Crossman. Robert guaranteed that all the recipes had been sampled by Ethel Messier, his pastry cook. Between these notes and a column of reduc- ing exercises prescribed by Dr. U. Violet Baker, M. D., Quack D., and D. D. D., was an announce- ment by Bonwit-Teller. "Visit our newly decorated salon. Our staff, internationally known, consists of: Robert Britt, make-up expert, Margaret Griffin, coiffeur expert, and Robert Wat- son, manicurist. Let us redecorate you at moderate cost." At the bottom of the last page ap- peared a variation of the old adage: "The way to a man's heart is through his stomach-by means of the Gwosch squash". So great was my friend's interest that he scarcely realized that he was reading this dusty bit of history in a dark room. For the sun had set. Darkness, like death, had settled over the great desert. . . . . - ' ' ' th Now only the slowly flowing river stirred in the quiet vastness. Carrying ln 1tS Shadows C silver of the lowly-hung moon, the never ending ribbon disappeared I0 be l0St in another world-a world replacing a page of its eternal history. Prophet: MARGARET BURRows Committee: RUTH HAMLIN ALICE NEEDHAM ROBERT WEBBER USS We, the class of 1939, with a tear in our eye, bequeath, in our last various precious possessions, and mournfully say farewell. Be it understood that, in spite of our sorrow, we are utterly of sound mind and body. THE LATIN CLASS ,... THE P. O. D. CLASS ,...... MARGARET MADDEN ...... THOMAS KELLEY ,..... ANNA SULLIVAN .,,.. "LENS PAGE .... . ANN WOODARD .... ALICE NEEDHAM ....... HENRY ADAMS .......,.., CHRISTINE DOLEVA ..... , LORRAINE HIRE ..,, ANN BERGMAN ,,.... HELEN KOWBA ...... RUTH HAMLIN ..... HENRY MESSIER ,.,...... STANLEY WZIONTKA ...., "BOB" WEBBER .... MARGUERITE SHEPARD SOPHIE COUCH ...,........ CARLOS FRAKER ....... THERESA FINN ,........ CHARLES NEWKIRK .,..... "JOE" TOCZYDLOWSKI .4 ..... ..... leaves a primer of philosophy to leaves peaee and quiet to ...... leaves her gym suit io leaves his "rloorlling" to leaves her French accent to .. leaves his baseball bat to ...... . ffor study hall disciplinej leaves that sweet smile to ..,......... leaves her paper airplanes and spitballs to ........ leaves his personality to leaves in a glory of eloufliness leaves her "differential" to leaves her "linen to leaves inronspienonsly .. leaves her strapless evening gown to leaves his best suit to leaves his eferveseenee lo leaves the rostrum to ffor study hall speeches, leaves her Ford and the speedometer to leaves "them dancing feetl' to leaves his Benny Goodman reeorrls to . leaves her Irish brogue to leaves his place in "Louis"' to leaves his sloping shoulders to combined utterance, our MR. WOODMAN MR. FOTH MISS CHURCHILL MR. SEASS MR. HASKINS MISS PRENDERGAST MR. HOLLIS MOORE MR. RUSH "POPSY" NESTLE DOROTHY BARRETT KASHA THAYER "MITCH" DORIS ABRAMSON "BRECK" DAYTON MR. RANDALL MARY MARTIN DONALD MC CULLOUGH "BUD" KNEELAND CONSTANCE RZECKOWSKI DEWEY JACQUE -'DAVE' MEAD -ur iv. IN TH LL .SS YS ST LE LH -E 'T IR V. N N ,L N H D LI E D JAMES DAYTON ,,..., STELLA MIENTKA ....,.... MARION WENTWORTH "PATH WELLINGTON .. ROLAND VERBECK .. RITA MERCIER ,....... PHYLLIS MORGAN ..... FRANK RAY ........... JOHN VONDELL ...... "NELLIE" WATTS ..,.. .. MARY SMITH .......,.... GEORGE PUSHEE ...... MARGARET PAGE ...... VIRGINIA PHILLIPS .,... LILLIAN TURNER ..,. HELEN MIENTKA ..,..... leaves a few "shells" to ....... leaves ber iliinples to leaves ber gold teeth to leaves ber dramatic ability to leaves bis corset to leaves one quiet smile to leaves lbe men of Pelbam to leaves bis sbyness to leaves "Happy" to leaves bis blue eyes to leaves ber girlisb giggle to . .,,,.. leaves his brain to ...... . and bis rubbers to ........... leaves ber secretarial ability to , ......... leaves ber lipstick to .... .. leaves ber marks in A. H. S. ......, leaves ber morning walks to MILTON SCARBOROUGH ...... ...........,........,,,. l eaves .,........,..........., EVAN FOTOS .........,......,.... .... , , leaves an engraved Frencb list to .... . "PEANUTS" HARRINGTON "DON" MOSER RUTH CONNORS BETTY PATTON . ANNETTE DONALDSON "JIMMY" HOLDSWORTH NADINE ROBINSON ALBERT BERGERON "TWIGGY" BRANCH MISS WEEKS UHACKERU DEADY HARVARD MISS PINNICK RUTH CROSBY WINIFRED SEYMOUR ESTHER MATTHEWS MISS CHURCHILL .. ALL FUTURE CLASSES To this, our last will and testament, we aihx our seal, hereby revoking and cancelling all other or former wills made by us at any previous time. Lawyer: LAURENCE DONAHUE Committee: SALLY DICKINSON PATRICIA WELLINGTON If'. avfI Moonlight Last night the moon came riding high Out of the east over the skyg In all its golden glory shone From the heavens on our home. -JANE HOMAN. Qjcilufaforian f Essay i "THIS UNBELIEVING BELIEFH The time was early one july morning, the place-a wild-life reservation in Vermont, our guidela lanky native with a maple sugar complexion, and an untidy jacket which embarrassed his arms from his elbows to his jagged fingers. Starting at the upper end of the valley, we tramped along a foamy brook. A gaudy king-fisher bade us farewell from his business-like perch above the water. For us it was to be a day of eavesdropping OH Ilafufe- Here Heal' 3 P001 Of glassy stillness, herons stopped to drink. Over a mossy log listening rabbit ears were drooping. We surprised a timid, black-nosed faun showing his dainty head in a wreath of birch leaves. All morning there were delightful glimpses of nature's secrets. The afternoon came, and left long shadows on the mossy paths, later, evening. Save for the occasional cry of a lonesome owl, the crispings of the leaves underfoot were the only sound. In the heavens, a single star came forth and shone. Impressed by the silent beauty, my friend enthusiastically questioned the guide, "You must be very happy here?', After some thought, accompanied by vigorous scratching of the head, he replied, "No, ma'am, but I don,t reckon I want to be. I'm all right as I am." In a world where everybody craves success and happiness, what a relief this indifference is! At least, there is someone who realizes what a nuisance happiness really is! In the fairy story, you remember, the little girl learns this simple truth at the expense of a whole year of Christ- mases, granted by her fairy god-mother. But after a month of holidays, the houses are overflow- ing with presents, packages must be shoveled off the sidewalks, the police declare, streets must be cleared for traffic by snowplows on duty day and night. Yet today, if we should wrap in packages, the optimists who sent the gifts, there would be such a shortage of boxes that we could dispense with the police. On the other hand, reality is always more serious than fantasy. That we have a country filled with hundreds of thousands of graduates from colleges, as many more from business schools, and thousands more from parochial and high schools is no fairy tale. In our own state, Boston University graduates every year about twelve hundred students, so large is the graduating class that the exercises must be held in Boston Arena. Like wild animals, educated people are being turned loose on the country at large. Pleased with this mass production of "intelligentsia", American educators sit back in their stuffed leather chairs and congratulate each other. "This is a fine thingf' they say, "a fine thing. Soon we shall have everyone educated. Wouldn't George Washington be pleased if he Could gee us now!" And they are right! They are right! But what is act .ll h. ' P f - . . . . . U1 Y 1PPC111ng. What about this ensuing wave of optimism that is stifling and smothering the common sense of the masses? We have now not only the old dyed-in-the-wool 0PUm1Sf, but 21 IWW Variety, ufhe Voluntary optimist". Last winter, I heard an exceedingly pleas- ant lad f s e.k th' ' ' - - 5 p 1 on is very subject. We must overlook the fact, she intimated, that there are countless thousands unemployed in our own country, that labor is striving to take the profit and benefit out of capitalism. We must forget that across the Atlantic, a house-painter, stand- ing on the top rung of his ladder, is putting the finishing touches on the map of Europe. As U ' ' 33 . . , , VOIUUWYY 0PUm15f5 , WC muSt be happy playing with our own "tiddly-winks". This ceaseless haste to gain happiness, and to become successful, it must be granted, has al- ways characterized America! My first exposure to this impetuous haste was a trip to New York. Upon my arrival, my hostess whisked me out of Grand Central Station, prodded me forcefully in the back, and stuffed me into an over-crowded subway. Because of the train's speed, I was immediately button-holed out of my corner, and dragged down the aisle. An abrupt stop upset me. Hast- ening to catch my friend, I grabbed the sleeve of her coat. Wherever we were going, obviously we had very little time. Standing on the crowded pavement, amid the rumbling of the elevated, the shrieking of taxi horns, and the hurly-burly of the crowd, I yelled into her ear, "Do you think we shall be late?" "Why, we're just going to lunch." "Then, why are we in such a hurry?,' "Oh, everybody hurries in New York." New York is, indeed, one of our typical American cities. There are screaming taxi horns to take the joy out of sleeping, crowded subways to take the fun out of traveling, and automats to take the pleasure out of eating. Little wonder Hardy said he would get very little rest if he were an American, for he would feel obliged to finish his sleeping as quickly as possible. What a ridiculous situation is caused by our haste to become successful! We used to con- sider a man aggressive who opened the door at the faintest knock of opportunity, today he goes out and sets a trap for opportunity as it approaches the door-step. Making education pay has given us this newest variety of opportunist. A public-spirited acquaintance stopped me, a few days ago, to ask in what profession I was interested. She woefully shook her head upon learning my choice. "No," she said, taking be by the arm in a motherly manner, "that will never do. There are not enough opportunities." What are these busy-bodies and opportunists doing in the world of business and art? Suc- cessfully they have penetrated the innermost sanctuaries of the Muses. Even industry is taking advantage of their foolishness. In any magazine, there are eerie warnings of only one kind of mouthwash that employers like, gaudy pictures of celebrities who determine the model of hair- brush, or the brand of fruit juice that is to be used everywhere by "successful peoplen. In much . . - - .1 7, ' '. the same manner, Dale Carnegie, in "How to Win Friends and Influence People , v1sual1Les a world in which we may all be successful. But we must always remember to send flowers to our friends on their birthdays. Then too, the customer is always right, if not, we must never let him know. Consequently, Rockwell Kent today declares that an alphabet project for unemploy- ed artists will save the good name of the arts. By keeping the second class artists happy, and making them successful, beauty can be brought down for the enjoyment of all classes. In short, we shall all be artists at the expense of the geniuses. But, in the eyes of the German philosopher, Schopenhauer, "genius is the power of leaving oneys own interests, and wishes entirely out of sight". I suspect not many of us will be confronted with the problem of living up to the reputation of geniuses, but, at least, we shall find it necessary, in this erudite world, to appear intelligent and rational, and that may mean leaving our own interests and wishes entirely out of sight. That most delightful of all old world philosophers, George Santayana, confesses in his "Reason in Religion" that what he longs for most sadly is his childhood faith in the religion of his native Spain. "I believe her though I know she lies." The Vermont philosopher in his simple way says the same thing when he declares that he isn,t happy, but he is all right the way he is. If we combine the rationalism of Schopenhauer, the truthfulness of Santayana, and the simplicity of the Vermonter, it may be that we can escape this contagion of racing through educational institutions in a wild and frantic dash after happiness and success. -MARGARET BURROWS -K1 Pastoral The smell of chaff, The tickle of hay, Steel of milk pails Beginning the day. The neigh of horses Stamping in stalls, The cackling clatter Of henhouse calls. Sound of animals Munching the grain, And shouts of men At work again! -SALLY DICKINSON. l 46 afedzcfoman 'Dssay TRANQUILLITY It is evening in Berlin. In the middle of the square have been heaped many of Goethe's books. A Nazi, impersonal and efficient, touches a torch to the kindlings. A tiny yellow veil of Hre, increasing in size, soon overruns the pile, licking its lips with orange-tipped tongues of flame. The pages of Goethe turn sear, curl, and dwindle. Lurid in the darkness, the shifting light of the fire flickers, blood red, over a broken shop window, where there is scrawled a single word "Jude". Higher and higher the flames go, fed by the fire of Goethe. A boy of twelve, in a new uniform of the Hitler Youth, watches, his face glowing with the heat. From where he stands, the ambitious flames seem to lick even at the stars. Before long, the fire wanes. By morn- ing, the ashes of Goethe's works are cold. When such occurrences and the horrors they symbolize are common, do we have much in- centive to live? Greed, fear, hatred, false patriotism form nation's policies. In our own country are floods, overabundance, unemployment, and starvation. Cver all the world broods the shadow of future war, cowardly and unheroic. When world culture is on the brink of a crisis which has been called more disastrous than the fall of Rome, do we have much incentive to live? There is no need for despair. Whatever cares trouble us, we can still have comparative tranquillity and joy. We live a fortunate existence, if only we have the ability to realize the fact. We always have our sensations, our friends, and our minds. The consoling touch of a dog's cold nose, the stubborn eccentricities of a friend, the inspiration of the sweep of history are always ours. With a keen appreciation of life, we can form a better character, tranquil even in trouble. Every hour is full of fascinating experiences. I recall one particular night. Something awak- ened me. A vagrant feather of a snowflake floated onto my nose, and, turning coldly into a drop of water, rolled aimlessly down toward the sheet. Vaguely I thought of shutting the window. Yet the holes I had worn in the mattress were warm and comfortable. An old car squeaked and rumbled on its way down the street, while its headlights made on the walls of my room two flashes of yellow light, and gave a sudden sharp contour and shadow to a chair. As the car passed on, the chair became again a friendly blur. From somewhere in the night came the pri- meval eery call of a cat. An uncertain male quartet, rendering "Heaven Can Wait", was meander- ing home nearby. Once more, snow, cold and light, began to sprinkle on my face. I turned over, thinking of little heaps of this snow sifting onto the puff, the desk, and me. Dozing off, I decided I ought to shut the window. The last noises I heard were the purr of a mouse's feet through the walls, and the dying ticks of the clock I had neglected to wind. Such moments are perfect contentment. Lying in bed in nocturnal peace, one bewails the fate of those who must be in a political storm, or even in one of nature. But natural storms have attractions of their own, as a friend and I discovered recently on a bicycle trip in the rain. Thoroughly soaked, I was riding straight at a large rain drop which was aiming for my eye. We met, and I "took it" without blinking. Soon after, a wiry-haired dog of indeterminate breed came loping down the road. He amicably smelled of our wheels, and, satisfied, ran along beside with an air of ownership. He seemed to enjoy watching the bicycles as they noisily divided the water of a puddle, and, then, feeling the l'k d h et smells of green fields just out of snow, and the faint cold splash. Perhaps he even i e t e w I - - . . D Wh . fragrance of onion. We decided this carefree poet was the reincarnation of Walt itman At an' rate he answered to the name of Walt. Thougn i needed a Windshield Wiper for my glasses, thgiugh LW feet were numb and my Sandwiches soggy, 1,11 always have pleasant memories of that day when we met Walt Whitman. But enloyment can come from comm01'1PiaCef routine iobs' as Weil as in trips away from home One morning in early spring, while I was washing dishes, I stopped to dabble with the fragile froth of suds and to sniff the hot clean smell of drying giass- A5 i iooked out ine Win' dow, a bird whirred onto the feeding station. He was an English sparrow. Instructed as a child that his race were dirty, thievish, murderous pests, I had deigned to look at them only rarely. Now, watching the ,sparrow, I was surprised. Valiantly Hghting off a hungry competitor for food, he displayed his forceful bill, his black bib, and the finely delineated white of his wing bars. The blending of gray and chestnut on his head was lovely. Musing on his beauty, and munching a piece of cold, cooked carrot, I slammed shut all the cupboard doors in succession. The beauty of an English sparrow, the soul of a dog, a mouse's purring in the night-all are parts of the pleasure of life. Sincere sympathy with the lives of other persons adds to this enjoyment. There is much interesting variety in even a single individual. I am thinking now of a man in whom there is perhaps more diversity than in any other human being I know. He is a naturalist whom I call Mr. MacTierin. Vivid in the thickest fog, because of the brilliance of his sweater and sunburn, he shares with everyone his wide and accurate knowledge, and provokes laughter by his jokes, even when these are old. With enthusiasm undampened by an accidental dip in the ocean, he indentifies birds almost before they come into view, he recites their field marks, and points out their nests. He is such a mimic that an oriole, hearing his song, lands on his head, and a cow moos passionately in return to his bellowing. With his mimicry, knowledge and effervescent humor, Mr. MacTierin is an extraordinary acquaintance. Knowing such personalities as this man, and experiencing the joys of our senses make our lives more pleasant. And we have yet another source of happiness, learning. For all of us are eager forknowledge, in some form, whether it is the philosophy of Aristotle, the way to pack a leaky faucet, or the skill of performing a swan dive. From ordinary life and casual experience, we absorb many facts, from reading, many more. The life and loves of Julius Caesar, or of a cowbird, a poem written by Shakespeare, the way to pour out of a gallon can, the first letter of a name we ought to know, thousands of curious facts are accumulated without evaluation. But, as we live, we chance on bits of the philosophy of others. "The world is too much with us." "The miracle of my thumb joint is enough to confound all the atheistsf, "I have had a great deal of trouble in my life, most of which never happenedf' From inese thoughts, from our own experience, and from our own personality, we try to form 3 Science of iiving- We know that a healthy life is difficult today, especially in such an at os h ' ' - . 111 P CFC 35 6X1StS in parts of Europe, where constraint, hatred, fear, and grief can be extreme, and Where the burning Of Goetheis books is only a small occurrence. It must be hard for an aiiti'NaZi in Gefniiini' to iieeP both his sanity and his ideals. Essential in every philosophy that 1ves t ' ' ' . - - g 3nY ffmqullllty and happiness are. appreciation of the smell of the first snow, a true evalu- t. . . H G . i ' 3 ion of an ingenious, Shar? iongneei iflend, and a curiosity about what makes a puppy dog go. "Cant You See Them?" Perhaps you remember there was a hurricane last fall. About it everybody came to talk in the news room. Can,t you see them? A college professor, a spinster, an apple-grower, a girl of high school age, a college student, and a housewife. I was there, too. The professor was a distinguished-looking gentleman of about fifty-five years. His gentle features and thin grey hair were prominent as he scanned the last and only copy of the precious issue through his pince-nez. He was awkwardly attired in a brown suit, but his unusual height was impressive. The superior knowledge must have been hidden under geniality. "Hmmm- Hitler threatens to invade the Czechs again. Wouldn't it be nice if he'd blow out as soon as this hurricane did?" The spinster, somewhat older than the professor, put down her umbrella long enough to probe for her glasses in a large handbag. She also coveted a glance at the only remaining paper. Sharp features characterized her as old New England stock, just as a thin figure, in a dark coat and ancient hat, put her into another generation. Since she did not usually engage in conversa- tion with parties unknown, it was hard for her to get up courage to speak. Her comment was perhaps uncharitable. "Why should the Americans be concerned with the fate of the Czecho- slovakians? They don,t worry about the New Deal!" Next in line was the weather-beaten apple farmer from South Amherst. His ruddy face, the grey eyes, and several days' growth of beard, showed from under his battered hat. He wore an old leather jacket, mud splattered trousers, and rubber boots. The intelligence and strength in his appearance marked him as the type of man who is the backbone of our nation. While he scanned the sole copy of the evening news, he was complaining: "My wife and I usually eat all the windfalls, but I don't like applesauce that much! Does it say anything here about relief for the farmers?" Claiming the second section was a young college student who had chopped wood all day. His dress included a little green freshman's cap, a tattered brown sweater, and overalls. His face was excusably dirty and his hands quite blistered. But he was handsome enough. His blond hair and blue eyes were much in his favor. After a glimpse at the sport page he exclaimed, l'Boy, oh boy, the Cubs have beaten the Pirates three straight! 1,11 bet a million they beat the Yankees in the World Series!" Standing behind the freshman, and trying hard to see "Little Abnern over his shoulder was a high school girl of sixteen or so. She was wearing one of those white denim jackets, a blue skirt, and sport shoes. Her hair was curled just below her ears, setting off a rather pretty face. She also owned a charming dimple in each cheek, and a pair of brown eyes wistful at the mo- ment. Because it was an unsympathetic audience of which to inquire the probable outcome of her favorite comic's marital problems, she said nothing. The last to fall heir to the We11-w0m paper was a fairly young housewife. She had just Stepped down from her apartment and was not at her best. A housefrock with a white collar, 7 and an ap,-on made up her Costume, while a buxom figure filled it out. Her forehead and chin shone, she was the good-cook-and-capable-mother type. "You kDOW,,, She Said., when I Went F0 school, I learned that the earth had an axis, but only lately did I find that its more correctly called the Rome-Berlin Axis." just then the clerk came back, and I left them all trying to buy the only newspaper in the store. --JOHN I-IOWKINS. Epitaph Here on this spot Lies an ordinary tree, To you a "Mac,, apple, But a childhood to me. III I knew it was childish, But I felt that way, As I scrambled up high So happy and gay. V It came at the dusk Of my "young-girl's" day, And it swept down the tree, Cast my childhood away. It was only September That I started to climb, And grasp for the apples Before their time. IV But God took my tree, And my childhood, too, When he sent us destruction Before it was due. VI So I stand on this grave Of my two best friends, And I mourn now the brevity Of the friendship God lends. '-SALLY DICKINSON "Mine" Milton's lady is not a very impressive character. She gives the effect of being neither very intelligent nor resourceful, rather, she is a sweet, helpless, young thing who is more of an ornament than a use. Possibly that lady was the ideal of Milton's age, but, fortunately, she is not of ours. My ideal must have, above all else, two important qualities-intelligence and personality. I do not mean that she must have a Ph.D., rather, a quick, keen mind with lots of common sense. By personality, I mean a friendly attitude with an even temper, together with an attractive ap- pearance. If the world had more women of this type and fewer of Milton's type, it would be much better off. -ROBERT WEBBER. If ever I pick a wife, I hope that I shall be sensible enough to get a good one. She should be beautiful but not dumb. May she always be able to talk intelligently,-able to act in an emergency. If there is work to be done, let her do her share! I must be able to look down upon her, not up to her. In order that this be possible, she must not be too tall. I hope, further- more, that she will not weigh more than one hundred and ten pounds. Let us pray that there is somewhere such a woman. -JAMES FULTON. My ideal follows Milton's in many respects. Requirement number one is "brains". I do not mean that she must be a genius, but that she must have an I. in the double figures. Requirement number two is personality. She must have some personal trait that every other woman does not have. My third requirement is the ability to be silent in both word and man- ner. A woman "beautiful but dumbn will never be mine, I hope. -FREDERICK MCLAUGHLIN. li7 'I -I, iw Who Knows Who knows What the days may say, Or what the nights may tell? Who knows ' What the months have told, Or what the years may hold? Who knows What our future or destiny, Or what our life may be? Who knows? -JANE HOMAN. FRESH M AN CLASS SOPHOMORE CLASS I UN I OR CLASS ACTIVITIES QOL! 53.9 Ezfilor .,.,....,.... .... M ARGARET BURROWS Asxociafu Ezfifors: Avvisfani Ezfiforv QRUTH HAMLIN ALICE NEEDHAM M A "AAA """ I LAURENCE DONAHUE MAE DAMERST WILLIAM SEREX DOROTHY JOHNSON Business Managers ,,,,. JAMES FULTON ?,iI,I,IkZC3XIci5l?EE?IiIXlGTON JOHN VONDELL THERESA FINN Photography Editor .... ......,. W ILLIAM I-IOSFORD PHYLLIS MQRGAN Fdflllfy Affvixer ,,.., ...... ..,,... M I SS MILDRED WEEKS BARBARA GLAZIER A trip to the printing office to see the presses was the first organized move of thc "general staff." Every- body agreed that the idea was good. But the dissension was to follow at the first meeting. Naively, the board discussed arrangements for senior pictures, write-ups, and the general plan of the book. After the first conversation with the printerls representative, however, the vocabulary of the staff had changed. In an off-hand manner, they spoke of "the final dummyf, the placing of the "cuts,', and udraping the headsf' In fact. by the middle of the year, thanks to the advice and help of Miss Weeks, the board felt quite secure in its professional capacity. Then the advertising work began! Little realizing what the practical world of business was like, the sophisticated staff members set out to attack the merchants with their salesmanship. Sad was the expression on many of their faces when they found themselves before the awesome dignitaries of the business worldg sadder was that same expression when, seconds later, they were standing on the cold pavement outside the store. Now and then, however, they were lucky. In May came the excitement. Just a few days before the book was to go to press! Last minute arrange- ments to be made! Belated write-ups to be proofed! And Miss Weeks always ready and willing to help! Then the great day came. Again the "general staff" agreed upon a trip to the printing company. Standing before the great machines, and watching the pages fly through the presses, the board members, with satisfaction, turned to congratulate each other. After all, there had been fun in the work, as well as mistakes. And what a lot the staff had learned! - j2lflClQ1flt COUIWCT President ,.,. .....,,,A. ROGER SMART Secretary ESTHER THAYER Vice-President ,..... JOHN HARRINGTON Adviser ..., .... R ALPH HASKINS An essential feature of every year's activities-the Student Council was formed exceptional- ly early this year. The reason-the Student Activities' Association. The formation and formal launching of this new plan was directed by the Council. Under the careful guidance of this year's officers: Roger Smart, President, John Harrington, Vice-President, and Esther Thayer, Secretary, the Council decided to introduce many new plans into the governmental system. After much discussion, the group finally created a plan for more efficiently organized student government. The Traffic squad and its troubles were considered at the meetings, along with other con- ditions-the temperature of the locker rooms, destruction of posters, and the lighting of the main bulletin board. During the last four months, the Student Council has been forming a new custom: a ten- minute period every Thursday morning for Council members to discuss school conditions with students in the home rooms. Such a period is intended to arouse greater student interest. With the help of all students, it is hoped that future Councils will make actual the possibilities of a student government plan. Vl- OFFICERS: ADVISERS: President ........,.. ........................,,,. M AE DAMERST gpm, Secfim, ,"4, .--,-AA,,,4I, M ARJQRIE EBERHARDT Vice-President ..,,.. .......,.,,......,.. N ANCY RYAN l ' Trmmrer ANNETTE DONALDSON Service SCCHOII ...,.. EDITH PINNICK Secretary .... ......,............ M ARY RYAN Social Sefiiou ...... ...,.. L AURA COOLEY Social, Service, and Sport-the activities of three clubs in one! As President, Mae Damerst was busy this year. Early in the fall came the famous supper, planned and completed by the social section, di- rected by Miss Cooley. Helen Kosakowski supervised the cooking, needless to say, the feast was a success. But the most exciting event of the club year was the traditional Valentine's Day Dance. Unusual were the red decorations! Delicious, the refreshments! Successful, the event! The Sport Section, with Miss Eberhardt as adviser, was prominent in the interclass basket- ball games after school hours. A roller skating party at the Gables provided an entertaining evening for the many girls who attended. In the spring there were new activities. A group of the girls planned a successful bicycle trip. Through the efforts of Aspassia Babacas, a girls' baseball team was able to compete in one game with the Hopkins' team. With Miss Pinnick as supervisor, and Barbara Paige as Chairman, the Service Section had an important part in the year's accomplishment. 1- President A.A............. ROBERT WEBBER Secretary ...... ...A. W ILLIAM HOSFORD Vice-President ..... ....... E VAN FoTos Adviser .,... ..... G ILMAN RANDALL h h hool and community, high standards of "To create, maintain, and extend throug out t e sc Christian living." In trying to carry out the motto of I-Ii-Y, the officers planned many educational and enjoy- able programs throughout the year. To start the year, Professor Glick gave some much needed advice on "Common Sensef' ' me - ,, . f Mr. McCormack of the Boys Club contributed some tricks of Applied Psychology. Movies o the Grenfell Missions and the Labrador coast were shown by Professor Sears. With an illustrated lecture on "The Mysteries of the Universe," Professor Green took the members into the vastness ' V ' h d' ' f "The of space. As "Bob" Webber said, "Professor Bain brought them back wit a iscussion o Geological History of the Connecticut Valley." there were monthly feasts in the school cafeteria. In addition to this stimulating program, The food was cooked by the members themselves. In fact, even Mr. Randall gained much fame by wielding the frying pan. These "feeds" were followed by some basketball and a lot of unprepared homework. In the social field, the members "came out,' for a Christmas Party in December, and a 'n out" came at the June picnic when Father-and-Son Night in February. The "final blossomi g the members met for a farewell gathering. . 1f'CLQSt1f'Cl Director DORIC ALVIANI Sf'Cl'l'f6lI"Y .,,,,,,, KATHLEEN CRITCHETT Immediately after the opening of school, our new music instructor, Mr. di Gianantonio, began the reorganization of the orchestra. For the annual appearance at the Eastern States Ex- position, a period of incessant rehearsing followed. The hurricane prevented the traditional trip! But, after playing at a Parent-Teachers' meeting, the orchestra was rewarded for its diligence by the appreciation and enthusiasm shown at the Junior Play and the Christmas Assembly. Soon after mid-year examinations, Mr. Alviani returned to continue the work of Mr. di Gi- anantonio, who had resigned. In February the orchestra appeared in a program for the Daughters of the American Revolution. In April, some of the orchestra members played at a banquet at the State College. XVith the enthusiastic assistance of the glee club, the orchestra presented its spring concert, which was, in keeping with tradition, an event to be remembered. Also, in April came the anxiously awaited Music Festival at the State College, in which our school was well represented. The traditional appearance at graduation in June will complete a successful season. am! Director .... ..... G ILMAN RANDALL Secretary A.4.. KATHLEEN CRITCHETT In the fall, the band members looked forward eagerly to the annual events of their musical world. In place of Mr. Alviani was a new "maestro", Mr. di Gianantonio, who seemed to have great interest in the band. But, because many veteran players had graduated last June, the band was not "in conditionn to play at football and basketball games. ' After mid-years, however, new force and interest in the work were supplied by the leader- ship of Mr. Randall. New music was procured, and new inspiration. There was the added excitement of the Music Festival to be held in April. The ex-maestro and founder, Mr. Tarlow, returned to lead an all-band concert, in which Amherst High was represented. Remembering the crowded conditions under which he had worked, Mr. Tarlow cer- tainly appreciated the new music room. After the fun of preparing for the festival, the band settled down to learn a marching routine for Memorial Day. By the time of that festive event, the school's musical reputation was well established by the band members in their maroon and white uniforms. In June, the annual spring concert presented at Sweetser Park was enthusiastically received. Especially prominent in the program were some special arrangements of several martial airs. At graduation another successful band year closed, taking with it some of the band mem- bers, but leaving others to continue next year with the same enthusiasm. umor Cylay CAST Vffilliam Silvanus Baxter ...,... JOHN VONDELL john Wfalson .... .,..,..,., J AMES FULTON jane Baxter' ...,.,.,,,......... .,.......,...,,.. M AUDE PETERS George Croopcr ...... .....,......... R ICHARD CRAMER Genesis ....,,... .,..,,, R OLAND VERBECK Mr. Parvlaer ...... LAURENCE DONAHUE Mrs. Baxter ..,.. PATRICIA WELLINGTON "Ioan Bullitt ..., .,..,.....,......, E VAN FOTOS Mae Parchcr .....,. ...,....,.,..,... M AE DAMERST Eihcl Bokc .... ...,... H ELEN VAN METER Lola Prait ...,... .... H ELEN KOSAKOWSKI Mary Brooks ....,,.....,....,.. .,.....,.... U RSULA BAKER Mr. Baxler . CALVIN MCCULLOUGH Wfallie Banks ......,,......,..,..,.... ..,... F RANK RAY Coach .....,.....,,......,..,,,,...........,.. MISS DOROTHY LEE The triumph of our dramatically-inclined faction was the Junior Play. Never before was Booth Tarkington's 'QSeventeen" presented with such energy and ability. This success was pos- sible, however, only through the complete cooperation of property managers, coach, stage hands, technicians, and incidentally, the actors. Any observer of the endless rehearsals in the Town Hall must always remember "Cal,' McCullough's buck-and-wing, and ujuniorn Verbeckis antics. In spite of these distractions, the cast worked-really worked-as the finished product showed. While making the behavior of a ten-year-old into a fine art, "Maudie" Peters kept the cast con- vulsed. John Vondell did a beautiful job of being seventeen. On the other hand, Laurence Donahue took a fatherly interest in the situation. In fact, the entire cast was magnificent! Their ability, however, would probably have gone for naught except for the guiding hand and direction of Miss Lee. graphic Editor-ilz-chief .... ...,. L AURENCE DONAHUE News ...... RICHARD ALLEN Business MdlIHgPV ..,, .,,........,.,. .,.... F R ANK RAY Music' ........, ........... J OSEPH GORDON Features .,..,........... ..,. J OHN HARRINGTON Publicity ....... ..........,....,.,. B YRON SARRIS Art ....... ....,. J AMES HOLDSWORTH Typist ..... ...... J OSEPHINE KISELEWSKI Sports ..,... ......., P HILIP ANDERSON Adzfiscr ....... ............,,...... J OSEPH MOORE The Graphic staff, Hlled with new spirit after the vacation months, began a successful year, with Mr. Moore as adviser. The staff showed in its Hrst edition that its hearts and minds were working together. Everyone seemed eager to cooperate with the editor-in-chief, Laurence Donahue. The gift of the Class of 1917, a plaque to be awarded to the student who makes the best contributions during the year, added interest and enthusiasm to the work. Everyone went to work sharpening his pencil and brain. Another urge to write was supplied by the Graphic staff itself. Contests were organized. Prizes were awarded to the author of the best poem, essay or cartoon. These contests proved in- teresting not only to those who contributed, but also to readers who were anxious to know who won and why. The Graphic offers an excellent opportunity to all who wish to have their creative work read by their contemporaries. With Mr. Moore at the head of such an energetic group, the Graphic could not fail to be what it has been all year-an excellent paper. fiom!! Captain ..... ...,. C . NELSON WATTS Coach ..,....A...,..,,4.,..,.....,..,. GEOIXGE WILLIAMS Manager ..,..4...L........,..A., .,,..,.......,.., L EO FLEURY In September, when the call was issued for the Hrst football practice, none of us suspected that there was on the way one of our best football teams. The SeaSon's record proved, beyond a doubt, that the team was one of the most clever in western Massachusetts. The success can be attributed to the excellent training by Coach Williams, and unusual ability in the positions that each member played. "Joe" Toczydlowski was often Seen dodging a heavier and stronger opponent in running to the goal. In the time of need, "Mike" Woynar kicked the ball far down the Held, Captain Watts and "Stan" Wziontka advanced the ball by making winning passes. On the de- fence, while "Jack', Deady, Alden Hobart, and K'Ed,' Warner blocked the line, George Pushee, the center, broke up the opponents' attack by his sensational interceptions. After the excitement of the final Northampton game, Coach Eck of "Hamp,, said that he had seen no better team that year than that of Amherst High. In fact "Joe" Toczydlowski was chosen for the "All Western Massachusettsn first team. As a reward, at the end of the season, came the victory banquet at the Lord Jeffery in honor of the team. SCORES Westfield ...,.. 0-3 3 Ware ,.,......,.. 6-12 Chicopee ..,.,. 0-6 Enfield .,...... 0-3 2 Commerce ..., 0-0 Templeton .... 7-19 South Hadley 0-25 Northampton 6-37 Jiaslaftall Captain ..,..A JOSEPH TOCZYDLOWSKI Coaclo ....,.., .aaa G EORGE WILLIAMS Manager , .Q.... ..A.,..,. R OLAND VERBECK Scoreleeeper ..,. ..,.., W ILLIAM SEREX How the crowds turned out to witness the battles of the basketball team! Little wonder! The team of '39 boasted three last year's lettermen, "Stan" Wziontka, "Caesar" Kuzmiski, and Captain "Joe" Toczydlowski. Six other players appeared, "Bud" Kneeland, "Bob" jordan, "Fred" McLaughlin, "Miken Woynar, "Don" Miller, and Henry Ziomek. Each player did his best. "Caesar" Kuzmiski was always sinking the ball in the basket. Unfortunately, however, he was unable to play in all the games because of a leg injury. At the time of his accident, he was the leading scorer in the Hampshire League. "Don" Miller, blessed with long arms and legs, towered over his opponents in reaching for the ball. Characteristic of "Joe" was his fast interception, of "Stan" his powerful right-arm shots. Roland Verbeck became the busy manager, "Bil1,' Serex, scorekeeper. Although the team lost eleven of the twenty games, there were always strong com- petition and athletic comedy-lollypops for Chicopee, oranges for Orange, onions for Hopkins, and scores for Amherst.- SCORES Alumni ......,..... Amherst Arms ...,.,......... Amherst Ezisthzmiptoii ,, Amherst Deerfield .,..,.... Amherst Chieopee ,.,.... Amherst South Hadley ......., Amherst Commerce .,...... Amherst Smith Academy Amherst Eztsthampton .,...,,,.. Amherst Smith School .,........ Amherst Smith Academy Amherst Orzmge ..... .,........,... A mherst Hopkins ....,...,..,....., Amherst Arms ,.,...,......,, Amherst South Hadley Amherst Hopkins .,...... Amherst Smith School ,...,. Amherst Deerfield ...... Amherst Chimfopee ....., Amherst Orange .,..,......, .. Amherst MAG!! Captain ..A,.. , .... , LEONARD PAGE Coach ...,...A,..,,,...... GEORGE WILLIAMS Manager .,..,....,4..,..,. JOHN FITZGERALD Although we lost the first Hampshire league game to Arms Academy by a score of 4-0, since then, we have had overwhelming victories. We beat Deerfield by a score of 23-0. What a pleasure the game was with Hopkins, our old enemy! Amherst 10, Hopkins 3. On May tenth, our team topped Smith School by thirty-two runs against their two. These games foretold a successful season and a possible chance of visiting Springfield. Both fielding and batting were good. "Frannie" Strange was foremost on the mound, and "Len" Page was the catcher and captain. The infield consisted of John Page, second baseg Henry Kolasinski, short stop and "Bil1,' Hosford, third base. The outfielders were: Oscar Peterson, Myron Bolouch, and "Joe" Toczyd- lowski. Each player did his part behind the bat. "Frannie', Strange will long be celebrated for hitting a home rung "Len" Page for his unusual batting in the game with Arms Academy. The large audience especially enjoyed the worthwhile efforts of the team. a . . '- '- .Q-Q4 .Luis 'orc of 4-0, -gy What a May tenth, s foretold 21 matting WW catcher and and "Bill" P if" Toczyd' glcbratfd for Jdemy' The VCICL' Coach ...... ..... . NORMAN MYRICK The track squad anticipated a busy season this year, and incidentally, a successful one. Among the participants were "Charlie,' Warner, who Won the Western Massachusetts champion- Ship for low hurdling, and "Donn Herring, who hurled the discus for a magnificent distance. Almost every afternoon, under the splendid training of Mr. Myrick, the boys practised many different yard dashes at Massachusetts State College. There were three dual meets and a Western Massachusetts interscholastic meet. With their excellent training and cooperation, the team man- ifested always the spirit and joy of '39. Qwlwffgn JJW6, Www A5-5f j?wMLfff737. "Q.4,,H1, 571W MQ x,W7-,L FLMQMJ' 01!'l7"'70Ll 'dvd'- La . , . . . I Lv QL jg W4efJ,1'WwV7zzMf,Mf7Q7,f,W 71fb21fu2foO,j0-p+,4'f:fZf4'f1LwwLlpQ7w?"al4,,-47,,,g ,Juj- Yfllfvxuv UQ ,K,gcLdgdl4,l ' WMALWM EJ,,2ff0,fwf17qjZzf.fm ,M M ff W ml - Q, WM KWWMZ W4 A fggg-Pla WAQTZYQQJW7 'bwxbjdwffmwqbmwghvxwggmwm A affM4'f5T2fw.f fMygWwL Q 1 tLe,'6'C 0. I I" Mffmw UMW, iMM4M,LQ WMQVQQD 740 dw ' WW fin-051102. jfewpc, M70 F '7 l I l ' Printers of Mount Holyoke Alumnae Quarterly, Soliool and College Annuals and Periodicals UNITY PRESS, lnr., HULYUHE, MASS. Vfllc Engravings For 'lainie IAnnual Xvcre Furnishecl. By The ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY 120 Dc,Jr1':1IIcc Street Proviclencc, The Best in Drug Store Service WILLIAMS, MCCLOUD 6' CO. The Beer in Drug Store Merchandise INSURANCE of all KINDS A and REAL ESTATE The Rexall Sfore Telephone 888 S South Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mess. SAVINGS BANK BUILDING AMHERST Compliments of JACKSON 5' CUTLER Dealers iii GULF SERVICE STATION DRY and FANCY GUGDS D. R. HORTON, Prop. PALM BEACH SUITS Tailored By Goodall sold exclusively . . . BY . . . THOMAS F. WALSH READY TO WEAR AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS Compliments of DOUGLASS - MARSH FURNITURE - RUGS Wheife Courteous Service Is Outstanding AMHERST af the head of the VILLAGE GREEN SHEAEEER - PARKER - WATERMAN COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN Incorporated FOUNTAIN PENS The Place With Nice Things SKRIP - QUINK - and CARTER'S Fluid Tasty and Wholesome Lunches Every Kind of Writing Ink Sparkling, Fresh-Fruit Drinks Rich Ice Cream, College Ices, Sherbets A. J. HASTINGS N ewsdealer and Statioiieif GRIGGS, INC. HoME EURNISHERS 124 Amity Street AMHERST, MASS. Tel. 16 and Daily Homemade Pastry Fine Candy and Salted Nuts EXCELLENT SERVICE S-A-V-E With Modern Electric C-O-L-D WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS ELECTRIC CO. ELECTRIC SERVICE I-...,.. egeeeeeeeeeeye J :::ooooeoeeoe4eQeepooepo4..4,.,. , I 4I 4I 4I N ,, 4I 4I 4I 1 II 4I 4I 4I I 4I 4I 4I 4I 4I I I I I 4 I 4 4I 4I 4I 4I 4I -I-'J THE JEFFERY AMHERST I BOOKSHOP, ll1C. II AMHERST MASSACHUSETTS II Compliments Of 4I 4I I I I I I 4 4 DEADY'S DINER E. M. SWITZER, JR. CLOTHING H ABERDASH ERY BEMENT COAL COMPANY D. 85 H. ANTHRACITE KOPPERS COKE BEST GRADES BITUMINOUS FIRE WOOD 30 MAIN STREET : : Phone 232 Complimefzts of RALPH T. STAAB FORD SALES and SERVICE NORTH AMHERST Telephone 1173-W STEPHEN J. DUVAL Optometrist and O pticicm Compliments of GREEN'S GARAGE Triangle Street I : : Amherst, Mass. Comlbliments of WESTCOTT 6' SON PACKERS and MOVERS CRATING and STORAGE BURN ETT 6' NASH INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE Telephone 992-W - - 34 Main St. AMHERST CLEANERS AND DYE RS PHONE 828 AMHERST - - MASSACHUSETTS For DEPENDABLE FUEL and PROMPT SERVICE U PHONE 20 C. R. ELDER AMHERST - MASSACHUSETTS PATRON IZE OUR ADVERTISERS REMEMBER - - ST. GERMAIN STUDIOS 236 MAPLE STREET The best place to buy your Holyoke, Moss. CLOTHING at reasonable prices 1421 MAIN STREET Springfield, Moss. F' M' THOMPSQN SL SUN Class Photographer 1939 THE MUTUAL PLUMBING R SL HEATING CO. '7fze fam! MM, A "TREADWAY INN" Wishes Each Member gg of the ,3Q Class HARDWARE RICAL GOODS and a Realization of Every Ambition RADIOS SUCCESS! ELECT -..,,,.,., 5 5 I I 5 5 5 S 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 I 5 I 5 5 5 5 5 I 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 I 5 5 5 II 'I 55 'I 5 5 5 5 II 55 'I 5 I 5 5 Il 'N 55 .J :I 'I 5 I 5 5 I 5 5 5 5 5 5 I 55 55 55 ,,J AMH ERST SAVI NGS BANK AMHERST, MASS. Savings Deposifs and Life Insurance Conzplinzvnfs of H. A. THOMAS BROWNDIIT SHOES THE GIFT NOOK Ifzexpelzsivc' :md Atfracfive GIFTS 2 2 MAIN STREET LAN NON'S MARKETS RED Bc WHITE FOOD STORES NORTH AMI-IERST - SUNDERLAND AND AMHERST BILIJS COLLEGE DRUG STORE W. ITI. IVICGRATI-I PROPRIETOR W. R. BROWN 6' COMPANY INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE Telephone 1 Complimenix of R. L. BATES NORTH AMHERST W H I T C O M B ' S AMHERST THEATRE BUILDING HARDWARE - PAINT WALL PAPER C07l1Pli7l7FHfS of THE WELLWORTH PHARMACY, INC. C. CLIFTON WINN IEWELER FINE WATCH REPAIRING 22 Main Street : 2 Telephfme 710 AMI-IERST, MASS- F 4 I 4 4 I 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 4 4 44 44 4 4 44 44 4 I 44 44 44 44 44 44 4 I 4 4 44 44 4 4 4 4 44 4 4 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 4 if FULTON'S ICE CREAM ICE CREAM Ta-ae M - House for owls . lc ALL OCCASIONS Nonrnuupron, MASS. Call S45-M 22 AMITY STREET Complimenfs of CLASS OF '39 AMHERST LAUNDRY CO., INC. 11 EAST PLEASANT STREET Telephone 3 -W FOOD THAT SATISFIES . . . at Prices that Satisfy . . . with Service that Satisfies! DAVID'S BOOT SHOP NORTHAMPTON McCANN'S ICE CREAM CANDIES Clothing for Men ana' Young Men LOUIS' DELICATESSEN HARRY N. GAUDETTE CO. 76 No. Pleasant Street : : Telephone 478 57 No' Pleasant St' :Z Amherst' Mass JAMES A- LOWEU- GRANGE GROCERY STORE -T Dealers in BOOK SELLER -0- QUALITY GROCERIES Books and sfiifonefy The BGST In FOOCIS AMHERST THEATRE CARPENTER and MOREHOUSE AMHERST, MASS. Matinees Daily at 2 P. M. Evenings Continuous from 6:30 P. M. Saturday and Sunday Continuous 2 to 10:30 P. M. Where Good PRINTING Is Still iz CRAFT TEL. 43 - AMHERST, MASS. Compliments of BEST WISHES to the BOLLES SHOE STORE CLASSOF39 DR. THOMAS E. SULLIVAN DENTIST 'x'A"5"'0+.1 5 FII D. Nhss. 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 E 5 -,-,,,. ASS. 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 ISE 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 ,f 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 N -- 5 5, 5 5 I .,I""'J ."' ' I I1 ' sh W W . 4 ! r 4 Y 6 . K, A X -Q fe 1- i A x 1 . 9 I Q- . , A ,, . , U N' 1 1' ,. . 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Amherst Regional High School - Goldbug Yearbook (Amherst, MA) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Page 1

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