Ames High School - Spirit Yearbook (Ames, IA)

 - Class of 1964

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Ames High School - Spirit Yearbook (Ames, IA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 232 of the 1964 volume:

■aaUBMOMIHI 'J anPublished by The Spirit Staff Of Ames Senior High Ames, Iowa 3Contents Features............... 26 Academics....... 56 Activities 80 Athletics. ... 120 People ..142 Advertisements. -184 5 4Looking into a lake a person can't sec the fish. But if he puts them in a gold- fish bowl, he can see them clearly and know how they looked in the lake. A hook is not a substitute for real experience, but it can serve as a reminder. The pictures and words in the 1961 SPIRIT should serve as hooks to hang memories on.“a peopleshaped toomany-ness far too and will it tell us who we are and will it tell us why we dream and will it tell us how we drink crawl eat walk die fly do?” —e e cummings 8T10 “It is probable that the craft of building, as many other crafts beside, was derived from the Dunedain. But the Hobbits may have learned it direct from the Elves, the teachers of Men in their youth . . —The Lord of the Kings II 1A“ Taint the kind of Christmas where you feels like jumpin' around and singin' . . . Maybe it's the way all of them should be .. . quiet and thoughtful . . . Yeah sure . .. hut you know, it was a year when we lost so much . . . We didn't lose it. we just gave it hack after borrowin' it for a while .. —Pogo. December 25. 1963 h 1213y v'“Friend. Excellency, come join our competition, If you are practiced, as you seem to be. While a man lives he wins no greater honor than footwork and the skill of hands can bring him. Enter our games, then: ease vour heart of trouble. Your journey home is not far off, remember: the ship is launched, the crew all primed for sea.” The Odyssey 15I 16Recreation is an international language . . . Touch down every morning (ten times!) Not just now and then. Give that chicken fat back to the chicken, and don't be chicken again. No, don't be chicken again. Push uj»s. every morning (ten times!) Push ups, starting low. Once more on the rise, Nuts to the flabby guys, Go you chicken fat. go away! Go you chicken fat go! 1819NOTICE TO CANDIDATES 1. Campaign expenditures should be under $20. 2. Fosters may not go up until after the nominating assembly. 3. Fosters are limited to 20 with no more than six larger than 8V2 ' by 11" up at any time. •1. No posters may be stuck to the stage lectern, the auditorium curtains, or any painted walls. Masking tape is the only . . . 20 —a2122Aggressive: 1. sir. if that nose were mine. I'd have it amputated—on the spot! Descriptive: ‘Tis a rock -a crag—a cape— A cape? say rather, a peninsula! Kindly: Ah, do you love the little birds So much that when they come and sing to you. You give them this to perch on? Lyric: Hark—the horn Of Roland calls to summon Charlemagne! . .. Cyrano De Bergerac 1 23 In paths untrodden. In the growth by margins of pond-waters, Escaped from the life that exhibits itself. From all the standards hitherto publish'd—from the pleasures, profits, eruditions, conformities . Which too long I was offering to feed my soul: Clear to me. now. standards not yet publish'd—clear to me that my Soul, That the Soul of the man I speak for. feeds, rejoices most in comrades: Here, by myself, away from the clank of the world. Tallying and talk'd to here by tongues aromatic. No longer abash'd—for in this secluded spot I can respond as I would not dare elsewhere . . . Whitman 25 Features Yellow dust on a bumblebee’s wing. Grey lights in a woman's asking eyes, Red ruins in the changing sunset embers: I take you and pile high the memories. Death will break her claws on some I keep. . . . Sandburg To be a student is to accept the responsibilities of the world's most difficult and rewarding occupations. All that man has accomplished in thousands of years lies waiting to be discovered in a book. Rut books often leave the reader slightly removed from reality. There are things which must be experienced to be understood. To be deeply involved in life is often an inspiration to study, and to study is likewise often an inspira- tion to become deeply involved in life. Through the year the opportunity to share new found knowledge w ith the world and the opportunity for the world to reciprocate are mixed into a great chowder found in essence on the follow ing pages.STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT CAN- DIDATES: Robert Dumenil Jim Ingvoldstad Bill Nordskog Marc Woods I HE NOMINA I INC ASSEMBLY gave students an opportunity to sing out praises of their candidate. Voters hear platforms, promises, platitudes From crowded living rooms across the city of Ames there came the word: four hats were in the ring for the second semester. 1963 campaign. At first it began rather quietly. Pressure groups converged on possible candidates in order to con- vert the shy. retiring students into honey-tongued orators, willing to shout their virtues to the world. Then began the secret plans for the nominating assembly, where candidates traditionally vie for the most clever satirization of themselves. Nominees mounting the platform were Bob Dumenil. Jim Ingvolstad. Bill Nordskog and Marc Woods. Next came the poster making and planning of speeches for the Friday assembly. And then it was over for all except one: Jim Ingvolstad now had a job that would flavor everything he did for the next semes- ter: Student Body President of AHS. 28Government how’s, why’s taught at Hawkeye State Last summer five boys from Ames High bad their vacation broken up by attending Hoys’ State, sponsored by the American Legion. Chosen by a popular vote of their class, they spent sev- eral days learning about the various aspects of state and local government by conducting campaigns and elections and having their gover- nor and other officials carrying out govern- mental business. Boys from all parts of Iowa took part in the convention held in I)es Moines. Later in the summer. Girls State, also sponsored by the American Legion, was held in Cedar Falls on the State College of Iowa campus. The Ames representative was chosen by a class vote and an interview. She took part in the convention by running for office. The pro- gram of Girls State was very similar to that of the boys. ANN BARROW learned the complexities of American Government during Girls State. AMES’ DELEGATES TO BOYS’ STATE were Richard Black, Dave Schworm, John Burns, Rolfc Lowrie, Mike Schwartz. 29A NEW UNIT, a new class, hut the same old rush of registration. With registration, the ’63-’64 school year begins August 23. 24. and 26 sounded the warning that vacation was drawing to a close. Students flocked to the school, bucking the unfinished road, to pick up the fatal yellow slip that determined the major part of their lives for the next semester. For many it meant trips hack again and again and again to change the schedules. But at last the classes were balanced, most problems straightened out. and school underway. I'he sophomores got their first taste of high school life at an orientation to help them get acquainted with the building, their teachers, and each other. Knowing what to expect, the soph- omores breezed through the first day of school, having fewer problems than the upperclassmen. REGISTRATION DAY was so hectic that two hands weren't enough. 30 MISERY LOVES COMPANY . . . new sopho- SOPHOMORE GIRLS get a last-minute briefing before cheersquad try- mores coagulate to be grouply guided. outs. 31 'OK. GIRLS, all those who want to be sophomore cheerleaders raise your right hand.”EFFICIENT CAFETERIA PERSONNEL and gleaming new equipment took Ames High students off sack lunches. Personnel include: T Watson, C Kalsem, I) Sparboe, V Scandrett, I Matsen, I Adamson, C Erick- son. P Schcurmann, M Cultip. Cafeteria specializes in food Before school started this year, grumbling was heard among the students about the split noon hour, and many dire predictions about its failure were made. After the first day of school, the prophecies seemed to be true, for many students dragged into class half an hour late. But by the end of the week, people became accustomed to gulping their meal in five minutes, and soon the only tiling left to complain about was liver or mashed potatoes. To accommodate the large number of students in the cafeteria, a closed noon hour with three sessions was recommended. Approximately a third of the students were assigned to a lunch ses- sion at 11:00. another third at 11:30. and the re- maining third at 12:00. The system worked well with Mrs. Cutlip and her staff handling the food quickly and efficiently. They especi- ally noted holidays: turkey was served on Thanks- giving. and cakes were decorated with victory hells before the Boone football game. t 32WITH SPOON IN HAND. Jim awaits hi- noon meal. ' BOOKS ARE ABANDONED each day for a tray of food. 33f CONFERENCE ROOMS for group studying were a feature of the new library. STUDYING in the library is illegal, but these girls got away with it. THE LIBRARY provided many people with a quiet comer to read. MAGAZINES were a pleasant relief from the tedium of study hall. 34— New library is filled with books and quietude Coming bark to school last fall, the juniors and seniors found that many of their old haunts had been moved. The library had been I moved to new quarters in the third unit with the study hall taking over the old room. The two rooms were connected by a hallway which also led into cubby holes that were used for practicing speeches or any other private study. The library continued to add to its varied selections of books, paperbacks, and reference material to help the students in their classwork and to offer a diver- sion from homework. The library was occupied all day every day by students seeking an excellent haven for quiet research. WITH HOOKS, purses and I’ep Club jackets, there was hardly enough room to study. 35Homecoming is launched Homecoming week at Ames High was harrowing and hectic. The juniors scurried from room to room trying to solicit for mums. The Homecoming Com- mittee was frantically working on the party and the election of a queen while the Pep Club was wor- rying about a skit for the assembly. The football team pondered about the game with Oskaloosa, and the band marched endlessly to get their formations perfectly attuned. But everything fell into place and Homecoming 63 was a huge success. The actual festivities began on Friday morn- ing with a pep rally at the Central auditorium. The cheerleaders and the pep hand set the mood by leading the enthusiastic students in a frenzy of yelling. Things calmed down a bit as the Pep Club presented their skit, a takeoff on West Side Story. Donald K. Smith, former sports editor of the Arnes Daily Tribune, offered some words of en- couragement to the team and the student body. Then the exciting moment finally came. Barb Rosebrook was crowned as Homecoming queen with Carol Carmean and Cathy Carlson as attendants. The stage was set for a big night ahead. “THE CYCS are gonna have their way tonight . . .” And the Indian feathers flew at the Homecoming game. HOMECOMING CANDIDATES—Shirlee Smith, Marilyn Quam, Cathy Carlson, Linda Bergland, Barb Rosebrook. Sue Stucky, Carol Carmean, Jane Henrikson, Sue Cooper. k. 36' PRESENTED to the crowd at half- time were attendant Cathy Carlson . . . Ql'EEN Barbara Rosebrook . . . AND ATTENDANT Carol Carmean. 37 SPIRIT REACHES THE SKY along with balloons at the Homecoming game. 38 ELECTED DURING HOMECOMING were Queen Barbara Rosebrook and attendants Carol Carrnean and Cathy Carlson. DANCING i fast becoming a spectator sport. All systems are “go” for “Night In Orbit” ' The big night finally arrived. At 7:30 the team rushed onto the field amid the cheers of the i crowd. They left in the same fashion after break- ing a three year Homecoming losing streak. The Little Cyclones completely dominated play and soundly defeated the Oskaloosa Indians 13 to 0. The queen and her attendants were presented at half time, as the band gave another excellent performance. With victory in the air. the exuberant mi- gration to the high school began. The celestial j theme of “Night in Orbit” was carried out in the decorations that turned the everyday cafeteria into a festive dance floor. The music of the Rogues filled the air. as the old grads and present i students mingled. The night was over all too soon I as Homecoming 1963 became a memory. THE ROGUES launched the “Night in Orbit" with music that was out of this world.Students view tomorrow THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT presented a special pro- gram at Rack to School Night. Here parents learned about the high school English program and were entertained at the same time. Planning for the future was the keynote to College and Career Nights. College Night gave interested students the chance to meet rep- resentatives from various campuses in the area and ask questions concerning tuition, fees, and courses offered. All students attended Career Night, sponsored by the Kiwanis Club. Guest speakers from all walks of life told the students about the advantages and rewards of their chosen professions. Back to School Night resembled a grade school PTA meeting, for the parents were allowed to wander the halls and compare notes with the teachers on their offspring's progress. 40 PLANNING AND EXECUTING CAREER NIGHT meant much paperwork and legwork for the com- mittee in command. PROFESSOR HOLMES gave students valuable advice on planning for the future. 41Students give gifts, time Taking time out from Christmas shopping and the last minute rush before the holiday season, the Boys Club and Girl Reserves cabinets boarded a bus to visit the Story County Home. They went bearing gifts, not quite gold, frankincense, and myrrh, but gifts picked out by the home- room representatives. Another project undertaken by the Girl Reserves and Boys Club was the support of the Teens Against Folio Drive. Instead of canvassing the town door to door, the groups helped mail out propaganda on the drive and sent little plastic- boxes to all the schools in town to collec t pennies and dimes for the campaign. THE FOLIO DRIVE brought thousands of envelopes to be stuffed, stamped, licked, and made’ 42TWO SENIOR BOYS play “Santa for a day" as they gather gifts to take to the County flume. GIRL RESERVE AND BOYS CLUB cabinets help spread the Christmas spirit. AND IN THE END they wondered who had en- joyed it more . . . 43Frostfire highlights Christmas vacation FROSTFIRE. The ornate silver invitations and shining posters conjured up a conflicting image of winter and ice counteracted by light and .varmth. The senior girls' Christmas formal be- came the topic of conversation that prevaded in the halls prior to Christmas vacation. After the flurry of dress selecting, shoe dyeing, corsage ordering, and last minute telephone calling, the eve of the dance arrived. Following the rounds of pre-party parties, the students and alums flocked to the Union. Red lights and silver streamers decked the Sun room as the Frosty Four provided background music, with two Ames High graduates proving that good voices do come from Ames. The clock struck the magic hour of twelve, the music faded, and this highlight of the Christmas season passed into oblivion. 44A PIANO and an empty room await the enchanted evening. 45Assemblies bring students together Assemblies arc given to supplement book learn- ing. They present ideas, enlarge our field of thought. Like frosting on a cake, like butter on bread, they make school life richer and more enjoyable. But the problems assemblies presented could not be overlooked. Transpor- tation, time taken from classes, and what to do with the carly-birders were just a few of the main drawbacks. But these wrinkles were ironed out and several good programs were presented. The welcoming assembly, homecoming, and pep rallies held throughout the year bound tighter the ties each student had with the school. The music department displayed its many talented participants in programs of singing and con- certs by the bands and orchestra. Probably the most memorable assembly was a concert given by Dick Shory, a graduate of Ames High, and his band. His interesting style and arrangements captured the imagination of all students. Illough they seemed few and far between, the assemblies covered a wide range of interests which appealed to most students. THE BLARE OF Schory's three trumpeters added a new ring to Ames High Loyalty. HICK SCHORY leads his percussionists, listening for every gonging cymbal and tingling triangle. 46 47CANDIDATES for second semester Student Body President included: Mar- garet Shepherd, Dave SchWorm, and Dennis Ostrem. A LOT OK THINKING and a lot of work go into the colorful sign scattered through the halls before the election. HUNDREDS OF MAGAZINES, thousands of pictures, and millions of scraps . . . a campaign meeting. 48 VOTERS REGISTER and receive their ballots, using the new system of election. THE FINAL TALLYING of votes brought Dennis Ostrem a difficult but re- warding job. Issues, politics fly For seventeen weeks the student government of Ames High flows along through a subterranean cavern performing its duties relatively unnoticed by the humdrum multitude. Then all at once AHS be- comes a hot-bed of dissension and unrest. The issues appear in a scmesterly ground hog day, see their shadows, and dive underground within two weeks. But this brief period inspires an amaz- ing interest in government and politics. Dennis Ostrem. David Schworm, and Margaret Shepherd ran spirited campaigns for a week, and after all the activity subsided. Dennis was inaugu- rated second semester Student Body President. Someone rubbed the lamp, and politics disappeared from the scene in an instant. In the scattered ashes of platforms and speeches remained ideas that hopefully have made AHS a better place in which to study and teach. 49TStaff provides an oasis I he SPIRI T Dance comes somewhere in between semes- ter tests and the last deadline. The dance is somewhat overshadowed by these events: the junior staff rather noisily trips over it as the senior staff sits idly by stirring a cup of memories. The juniors suffer a collective nervous breakdown over the first problem that pre- sents itself: the need for a theme. Over the years an unspoken competition has grown up in the area of names for the dance. Two years ago it was simply called “A Touch of Blue.” This was easy to spell and say, not to mention easy to decorate for. In 1963. a great leap forward was made to "Carrousel,” difficult to spell and likewise to decorate. But the ’64 juniors met the challenge and discovered a name that was not only impossible to spell and say but also in- volved the problem of turning the cafeteria into a desert oasis. “Scheherazade” kept up the tradition of the SPIRIT Dance, being a highlight of the social year. PALM TREES and a quiet pool formed an oasis in a desert of semester tests. FREE REFRESHMENTS were a popular attraction at •"Scheherazade." SPIRIT SWEETHEART CANDIDATES were: C Craig, L Bergland, S Smith, M Quam, A Kcisler, B Hiscrote, K Rigg, C Carlson, J Henrikson. 51FRIENDSHIP WEEK provided an opportunity for students to compare and share ideas and goals. TEACHERS had their chance to meet Dr. Remley at an informal reception. 52Students reshuffle values Just as every house needs to be redecorated or needs its furniture rearranged to break mo- notony and improve appearance, everyone’s personal house needs a long look and a reshuffling of values. Ames High realizes this need and sets aside the time for redecorating during Friend- ship W eek, sponsored by the Girl Reserves and Boys’ Club. Attitudes and relationships with other students are examined, sometimes refinished or given a new place in the person’s inner home. 1'he interior decorator called in to give advice this year was l)r. K. W . Remley of San Fran- cisco. Dr. Remley was no stranger to Ames or to many Ames High students, having been pas- tor of the Collegiate Presbyterian Church from 1951 to 1960. The theme of his lectures was “The Adventurous Fife" with daily food for thought being provided in the topics '‘1-Strain." “Fear of Sanity." and “The Big Ballgame." Class forums and private conferences rounded out the picture of Friendship Week. 53 STUDENT FORUMS brought out individual ;ind group problems. mThe sun smiles — and winter melts away After an extended vacation, tin? sun comes back on the job fresh and full of a gentle vitality. Suddenly the earth is a big puddle, rippled by warm breezes. The world is so glad to be warm again that it turns green with enthusiasm. All at once the school year is almost over. The slow uphill journey of the first few months has crossed the divide, and the student body slides gleefully down the other side with increasing speed. Track, tennis, and golf begin in earnest, and the gym classes move out of the basement for good. In a few short weeks, school is out. and no one can resist a touch of nostalgia for a year that now seems but a fleeting moment. The only people for whom spring comes too soon arc the members of Junior Exec. A good portion of their free time in the past year has been spent in preparing for the event which now draws near, the Prom. Thoreau once said that "the mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation." As prom time draws near, this is certainly the position of many Ames High girls. However, even the smallest and most delicate of mothers finds strength to push, threaten, and bully her shy and nervous six foot, two- hundred pound football playing son. and so the prom is usually quite well attended. It is the big social event of the year for juniors and seniors. Highlighted by a dinner, entertainment, and dancing, it provided many unforgettable moments. 54Academics ‘‘With a little more deliberation in the choice of their pursuits, all men would perhaps become essentially students and observers, for certainly their nature and destiny are interesting to all alike. In accumulating property for ourselves or our posterity, in founding a family or a state, or acquiring fame. even, we are mortal: but in dealing with truth we are immortal, and need fear no change or accident." . . .Walden. Amid the flurry of joining, organizing, and promoting that is the recipient of most of the publicity emitted from Ames High, it is sometimes difficult to perceive the presence of that rare species known as the student. Surprisingly enough, they are quite common. They are inconspicuous because of a natural independence, which both leads and pushes them forward. Everyone becomes a student at some time during his three year stay, and if only for a moment, experiences the joy resulting from ojjening the door of truth enough to catch even the faintest glimmer of the light inside. Whether it be the understanding of a star, a planet, a cell, or a soul, a glimpse of truth is unforgettable, and acts like a magnet upon the mind of the observer.TOP CALIBER EDUCATION was provided by Walter Hctzcl, Superintendent of Schools, and Herbert Adams, Principal of Ames High School. Administration innovates 7-period school day The principal of a high school has a job akin to that of the beekeeper who must keep the bees in the hive and at the same time leave the bee’s freedom to live naturally completely undisturbed. He must ride herd on an institution that is progressing slowly forward with a good deal of Brownian type motion thrown in for spice. He takes over for two thousand parents during the day and is responsible to twenty thousand people of the community. Such a man is Herbert Adams, principal of Ames Senior High School. Twenty years ago Mr. Adams came to Ames from La Mars. Iowa, to take over the duties of the principal of AHS. With his leadership and supervision, the school has grown in this time to become one of the greatest high schools in the nation. The members of the “post-war baby boom." as they are known in adult circles, have caused a great deal of trouble for the citizens of Ames, and particularly those citizens who are counted among the members of the School board, and more particularly Mr. Hetzel. Superintendent of the Ames Public Schools. Their duties center around providing thirteen years of top-caliber education for every child in Ames. With the tremendous population increase, the schools quickly overflow, and new ones are needed right and left. Consequently a new high school has been a major task for the board. With the new swimming pool and later the auditorium and gym. the board will be able to relax and build a few elementary schools until they need the next high school. 58reality. MEMBERS OF THE SCHOOL BOARD include: Mr. McNabb Jr.. Mr. Howell, Sec., Mrs. Singer. Mr. Adams, Mr. Hetzel, Mr. Underhill, Pres., Mr. I.a Velle, Treas., Mr. Moorhead, Adm. Asst., .Mrs. Buck. Mr. Fellinger, Mr. Payer. 59THE OFFICE WAITING ROOM hosts all of the students with all sorts of excuses. MRS. WHITNEY heads the • ounseling taff at Ames High. Office simulates Grand Central Station Next door neighbors of Mr. Adams are Mr. Kitland and Mrs. Whitney. From their offices come a major part of the executive actions necessary to administrate the miniature community which is rushing about its business all around them. Through their offices pass every possible type of situation. Among the official duties of Mr. Everett Kitland. Vice-Principal, are Director of Adult Education and Director of Summer School and Driver Education. He and Mr. Adams share their daytime family and its problems. The third office down the line contains Mrs. Whitney. The sign above her door says "Co-ordinator of Guidance Services for the Ames School District and Senior Girls' Advisor." A FAMILIAR FACE to all latecomers, schedule changers, and pranksters is that of Mr. Ritland’s. The big office is the home of Mrs. Flack. Mrs. Carr, and Miss Dusso. They handle the mass of paperwork that is involved in running a high school. Together all these people compose the group with the ominous sounding name, administration. 60 ■ OYKR 100,000 HOT LI ACHES thi» year meant jii even busier office on Mondov and Thursdays. MRS. FLACK, Mi- Dusso, Mrs. Carr . . . what would the school do with- out them? 61LANGUAGE TEACHERS: Mrs. Hansen, Miss VonWiilicIi, Mr». Vandecar, Mr. Kipp. Mi»» Campos. Languages discipline minds The plot thickens as the detective sorts through his clues. He checks them again, changing their order, watching for small discrepancies. One last change and—there. Everything fits in perfectly. The mystery is solved. The actor studies his script. The emphasis should go on this word. Use gestures here and here. Move on this line. Be motionless while these lines are given. The whole th:ng must go smoothly. The psychiatrist eyes his newest patient keenly. What is his problem? What does he believe? How does he think? What are his likes, his dis- likes? After some serious study, the psychi- atrist learns the answers to his questions. Although not everybody is a detective, a psychi- atrist, or an actor, many students at Ames High are a little of each while taking French. German. Spanish, or Latin. As a detective, they put together phrases and sentences in their written work. As an actor, they use the sentences in conversation. As a psychiatrist, they learn a- bout the people who use the language. Being able to master all three roles makes the study of language very rewarding. "... SUM ... esse ... fui...' 62' ”... WAS SOLL ES BEDAUTEN . . ." through the lab German students JUST TALK and listen, talk and listen. became familiar with the poetry of Germany, talk and . .. GRACIELA A CAMPOS: Spanish 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6 .., sponsors Spanish Club . . . doctorate from Havana University. Havana, Cuba, graduate work at University of Michigan. MRS. PATRICIA HANSEN: Spanish 1.2... sponsors Spanish Club . . . BS from Iowa State University. MR. WILLIAM RIPP: Latin 1. 2. 3,4 ... Latin Club sponsor, assistant Fire Squad sponsor . . .BA and MS from Nebraska State Teachers College. MRS. DOROTHY VANDECAR: French 1. 2, 3, I ... sponsors French Club . . . BA and MA from Drake University. BARBARA VON WITTICH: German 1.2. 3,4, 5. 6. French 5. 6 . . . sponsors German Club . . . BS and MS from Iowa State University. 63u . who can spell Tuesday - 91 ENGLISH TEACHER: Mrs. Hodoval. ENGLISH TEACHERS: Mrs. Hunt, Mrs. Bauske. Mrs. Thomp- son. “You can't help respecting anybody who can spell TUES- DAY, even if he can't spell it right." ... A. A. Milne All men seek to know themselves. It is a quest that must be carried on without sight, sound, taste, or smell. The answer to the mystery of life lies lurking in the shadows of the mind, waiting to outwit even the most crafty hunter. Hut from every unsuccessful chase the hunter learns something of the quarry, and tries to record it in the journal of truth. That he may understand past efforts and perhaps make entries of his own. a course in English is required each year at Ames High: Sophomore English. American Lit for Juniors, and World Lit. Communications Skills. English Lit. Developmental Heading or Journalism for Seniors. No one may ever spell TUESDAY, but the attempt is a reward in itself. ENGLISH TEACHERS: Mrs. Lutz, Mrs. Reno. Mrs. S. Anderson. 64ENGLISH TEACHERS: Miss McNally, Mrs. Vegors Mis- Swedell. “. . . TWO MINOR CHARACTERS and describe . . and these English students must perform. MIKE TURNS COMPOSER to write a ballad for English Literature. Mrs. SHARON ANDERSON: English 3. 4. Beginning Drama . . . BA from Drake. Mrs. GRACE BAUSKE: English 3. 4. Am- erican Literature. Journalism . . . sponsors Web . . . BA from Carleton i College, attended University of Wis- | consin. State College of Iowa. Iowa State University. Mrs. JUDY HODOVAL: English 3, I... spon- I sors Girl Reserves . . . BS from Iowa State University. Mrs. BETTY WELLS HUNT: American Lit- erature . . . sponsors Girl Reserves . .. BA from University of Alabama. MA from Vanderbilt. Mrs. N NCY LUTZ: English 3. 4. Develop- mental Reading, Speed Reading . .. sponsors SPIRIT ... BA from University of New Mexico, attended University of Pacific. MARY McNALLY: World and English Lit- erature . . . general treasurer, soph- omore girls' counselor . . . BA from Grinnell. Mrs. MARY RENO: English 3. I. Communi- cation Skills . . . sponsors Service Committee . . . BA from Coe College, atten- ded University of Southern California. Western State. Colorado. Denver University. LA RHEA SWEDELL: American Literature, Communication Skills . . . sponsors soph- omore cheer squad . . . BA from Nebraska State College. Mrs. EVELYN C THOMPSON: American Lit erature . . . sponsors Girl Reserves, Scratch Vail. . . BS from Iowa State University, MS from Syracuse University. Mrs. AURILLA VEGORS: English Literature. Communication Skills . . . junior girls’ counselor, co-sponsors Service Committee AB from Cornell College. MS from Drake. 65I WORLD HISTORY STUDENTS are introduced to the heritage of Greece and explore the ancient world through Mr. Hausheer's lecture . Mr. TOM BECKH AM: American History. Amer- ican Government. .. assistant football coach . .. BA from Colorado College. MS from Drake. Mr. DC COLE: American History. Inter- national Relations . . . sponsors debate ... BA from the University of Nebraska, attended Nebraska State College. Mr. HS COVEY: American Government. Soci- ology . . . coaches fall, w inter, spring track ... BA from Penn College. Mrs. AVONEI.EE GARRETT: American History. Typing .. . sophomore counselor, assistant sponsor of Pep Clui». . . BA and MA from State College of Iowa. Mr. MAURICE HAUSHEER: World History ... coach . . . BA from University of Dubuque. MA from University of Wyoming, graduate study at I niversity of Washington. Mr. WALLY LINN: American History ... head basketball coach . . . BS and MA from Drake University. Mr. KENNETH PAGE: American Government. Economics, Sociology . .. intramural assis- tant . . . BS from Drake. MA from State University of Iowa. 66 HISTORY TEACHERS: Mr. Covey. Mr. Beckham. Mr. Page.HISTORY TEACHERS: Mr. Cole, Mrs. Garrett, Mr. I.inn, Mr. Hausheer. MR. PAGE brings home another point in government. Past and future world affairs make up History curriculum “Never had there been a dawn like this. In the murky gray light, in majestic fearful grandeur, the great Allied Fleet" . ..—The Longest Day. And so another tarnished and worn hit of the past is scooped out of its dusty corner and brought to light, so that we may not walk the same road twice. It could be said that the social sciences require less and offer more than any other field of study. A million years, a thousand kings, and a thousand civil- izations fly by in hours. Seven teachers extract the purest and most distilled essence of experience from a source as big as the earth and as old as time. American History, International Relations, American Government, and World History arc the result. The value of the social sciences is proven; thus American History and American Government wipe a little of the dust off every student's window to the past. The others are elective, with a bit more philosophy added to spice the mulligan stew that is history. 67Mrs. JEAN CRANE: Chemistry, Physics ... sponsors Science Seminar . .. A B from Northwest Missouri State College, MA from University of Missouri. Mr. JAMES JONES: Physics ... helps sponsor Science Seminar . .. BA and MA from State College of Iowa. Mr. CECIL SPATCHER: Biology . .. head football coach, sophomore basketball coach, assistant track coach . . . BA from Upper Iowa ami MA from State College of Iowa. Mr. FLOYD STURDEVANT: Chemistry . .. sponsors Science Seminar . .. BA from Midland College of Fremont. Nebraska and MA from Iowa State University. Dr. ANNE TAUBER: Honors Biology. Geometry .. . BS. MS. and PhD from Iowa State University. Mr. RICHARD TRUMP: Biology .. .sponsors Science Seminar . . . MS from Iowa State University. FOUR BUDDING ENTYMOLOCISTS get their revenge on the insect kingdom. A BUNSEN BURNER is the next-best thing to a bonfire. 68 SCIENCE TEACHERS: Mr. Jones, Mr. Sturdevant, Mrs. Crane.Science provides the path to understanding BILL IS FINDING that a microscope bring- out the beauties in things. A dark, narrow path twists and turns through the densely packed trees of a gigantic forest. Students view this trail, contemplating their fate if they follow it or avoid it completely. The curious, the hard-working, the pioneers stride confidently into the complex maze, the challenging world of science. For some the trail seems endless, with the path blocked by low-hanging trees and thorny bushes. But crawling into the light of understanding makes the tedious journey worthwhile. This path for Ames High students consists of three distinct phases: biology, physics, and chemistry. Six guides are willing to lead the expedition. A dead grasshopper, a well-used metric ruler, or a broken test tube may be the only tangible evidence that anyone has followed the path. But the intangible, a better understanding of the hows and whys of our amazing world, is a silent tribute to the science department at AHS. SCIEN'CE TEACHERS: Mr. Trump, Mr. Spatcher, Dr. Tauber. 69MATH TEACHER: Mr. MacBride. MATH TEACHERS: Mr. Hiedeman, Miss Stafford. Mr. Oltrogge. MATH TEACHERS: Mr. Wood. Mr. Albertson. 70ALGEBRA i» .1 challenging of complexities yet it eems '• «imple when Mr. Albertson -hows you the answer. Mr. HUBERT ALBERTSON: Algebra 3, 4 ... I sponsors Boys' Club . . . BS from Uni- j, versify of Missouri. MA from State J College of Iowa. I Mr. DALE HILDEMAN: Geometry. Trig- J onometry. Analytic Geometry . .. BS • and MS from Iowa State University. 1 Mr. GEORCE MacBRIDE: Applied Math ... head of audio-visual department. I sponsors Junior Class . . . BS and MS from Iowa State University. New teaching methods improve Math curriculum The two highest achievements and greatest pleas- ures of man lie in discovery and creation: the sciences and the arts. Perhaps mathematics could be called a nexus between the two. The musician invents his scale and rhythm patterns and then sets out to explore the possibilities of his creation: the mathematician creates a number systems and basic postulates and likewise proceeds to investigate his creation. Sophomores, one and all. meet geometry. This is usually explained as a subject to “teach the student how to think." but in a broader sense it serves as an introduction to thought beyond the fettering chains of practicality. The musicians must learn the rules, forms and types of composition. In order for the young math student to become acquainted with the rules and forms that govern his study, the Algebra II student reviews the work of mathematicians that lived a thousand years ago. Trigonometry and analytical geometry begin to approach the more newly built areas known as higher mathematics. Honors Algebra and Business Math arc available and popular. This year AHS participated in a five-state experiment designed to determine the effective- ness of modern teaching methods in mathematics. Mr. EUGENE M. OLTROGGEE: Geometry, Algebra . . . sponsors Boys' Club, coaches wrestling . . . BA from Wartburg, working on Masters at Drake. MARILYN STAFFORD: Geometry 1.2. Algebra 3. 1 . . . sponsors Girl Reserves . . . BA from State College of Iowa. MS from State University of Iowa. Mr. WALTER WOOD: Algebra 3. 4. Trigo- nometry, Analytical Geometry . . . sponsors Fire Squad . . . MS from Kansas State College of Pittsburg. 71Mrs. JAN ANDERSON: Art 1.2... sponsors Junior Class ... BS from Iowa State Uni- versity. Mr. WAYNE CROSS: Glee Clubs. Chorus. Choir . . . sponsors all-state vocal music quartets .. . BSM from Cornell College of Iowa. Mr. RICHARD DAY: Band .. . BA from State College of Iowa, MA from University of Iowa. Mr. ROBF.R I HAMILTON : Beginning. Advanced Drama, Sophomore Speech . . . sponsors Palm Club, assistant Junior Class sponsor . . . BA from State College of Iowa. MA from University of Michigan. Mr. DEAN MOBERG: Orchestra . . . BA and MA from State University of Iowa. 72 DRAMATICS TEACHER: Mr. Hamilton. Fine Arts courses encourage student creativity "One does not learn to know nature and works of art if they are finished: in order to comprehend them somewhat one must surprise them while they are still being formed."—Goethe To this end instruction in intrumental music, art. and drama is included in the curriculum at AHS. The variety of offshoots from these basic categories is limitless, depending only on the enthusiasm of the participants. With the coming of the phonograph, television, and radio, the fine arts have opened up a new world of creativity and understanding in which “longhair” is becoming a compliment. At Ames High the fine arts classes are the rule rather than the exception. 73Job preparation is the keynote For the first time in recorded history, there is no longer a great demand for unskilled labor. Technical skill has become practically a necessity for employment. Keeping this in mind. Ames High has a wide variety of programs in industrial art and commercial courses. Drafing, woodworking, metal working, and auto mechanics were offered in the beautiful new shop in the industrial education wing of A IIS. Commercial courses in preparation for secretarial work included typing, stenography, shorthand, and bookkeeping. The Commercial Department took up residence this year in the new third addition. ANOTHER HAMMER hits the motor; another motor hit the du t. JENNIFER CARMEAN PREPARES her mechan- ical drawing assignment. rVPJNG CLASS IS a perfect cro----ection of the school’s hunt and peckers. Mr. LEONARD BENGSTON: General Metals. Electronics. Automechanics . . . sponsors Boys’ Club hobby groups. Electronics Club . . . BS and MS from Iowa State Univer- sity. Mr. CAB BOLL BENNETT: Bookkeeping. Business Law, Business Organization, Personal Typing . . . sponsors money-making committee . . . BSC and MA from Iowa State University. 74' INDUSTRIAL ARTS TEACHERS; Mr. Stone. Mr. Bengston. Mr. Shadle. TYPING TEACHERS: MIm Canvin, Mr. Bennett. Miss Clamser, Mr. Overturf. MADALENE CANVIN: Personal Typing .. sponsors Awards Committee. Junior Class . . . BA from Grinnell College, MA from University of Michigan. WANDA GLAMSER: Typing, Shorthand. Advanced Stenography . . . sponsors Pep Club. Homecoming Committee . . . BA from Kansas State College. Mr. JAMES OVERTURF: Distributive Edu- cation. Bookkeeping .. . sponsors DECA Club, athletic treasurer . . . BA and MA from Colorado State College. Mr. OWEN SHADLE: director of Vocational Education, junior boys’ counselor, sponsor of Assembly Committee . . . BS and MS and secondary administrative certificate from Iowa State University. Mr. EDWIN STONE: Technical Drafting, Mech- anical Drafting, Woodworking . . . sponsors Boys’ Club . . . BS and MS from Iowa State University. 75 HOME EC emphasizes discussion as well as practical application. a 76DECA STUDENTS plan and prepare attractive displays in school showcases. Home Ec, DECA emphasize careers An appraising glance into a crystal hall reveals that most Ames High girls will spend a healthy portion of their lives in their own homes governing the lives of their children. Ames High offers courses in home economics to prepare girls for this destiny. Another look into the crystal hall shows a variety of jobs in technological areas being filled by competent workers who received their basic training at AHS. Thus another goal of high school is fulfilled—to give each student instruction which will help him follow the career of his choice. 77“We are not softies” Across the country rang the cry: “Americans are a hunch of softies!” President Kennedy hired Bud Wilkinson to lead a rebirth of physical fitness. Fifty mile hikes became the style, and the Canadian Royal Air Force practically financed a year's operation by selling exercise plans. The country resounded with the “one-two, one-two” of the calisthenics leader. Amidst the fury, there lay a small midwestem town with no high school gym. Rut Mr. Wells. Mr. Smalling. and Miss Zanders proceeded undaunted. Touch football, howling, cross country, isometrics, ping-pong, handball, and wrestling were all provided for by masterful improvision. By the end of the year we were proud to announce to the world. “WE ARE NOT SOFTIES!” PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS: Mr. Smalling. Mr. RAY SMALLING: Physical Education, counselor, sponsors intramural athletics, sponsors Social Committee, coaches base- ball ... BS from State College of Iowa. MA from State University of Iowa. Mr. KENNETH WELLS: Athletic Director. Physical Education .. . tennis coach. Pres- ident of Iowa State Education Associ- ation . . . BS from Iowa State University, MA from Colorado College of Education. MARLENE ZANDERS: Physical Education .. sponsors varsity cheerleaders, sponsors GRA . . . BA from Simpson College. Mr. Wells Miss Zjnder- 78TWO POINTS, A VICTORY, and (lacking the traditional shower?' tiro white team"' captain get dunked in a mud puddle. 79 Activities "Have not the wisest of men in all ages, not excepting Solomon himself.—have they not had their Hobby-Horses: their running horses.— their coins and their cockle shells.—their drums and their trumpets, their fiddles, their pallets, their maggots and their butterflies?— and so long as a man rides his Hobby-Horse peace- ably and quietly along the King's highway, and neither compels you or me to get up behind him.—pray. Sir. what have either you or I to do with it?"—Tristram Shandy The trunks of the stately elms bear close resem- blance to each other: it is in the branches where they differ. Let the heart-wood be strong and tough for all: the branches will display beauty and character. The tiny growing tip on the furthermost branch comes closest to the goal toward which the whole tree strives. The fragile paper leaves replenish the lifeblood of the sturdy trunks, and in the glorious fall they reach their zenith and eclipse all but themselves. A strong foundation protects from wind, storm, and drought, but what tree was ever loved or remembered for only roots? 81 WELCOMING NEW STUDENTS into Girl Reserves were first semes- ter officers: I Riggs, I. Bancroft, I) Howard, C Carlson, M Hinrich- sen, K Rigg, J Brown. PAT PREPARES A TREAT for the hungry representatives. GIRL RESERVE REPRESENTATIVE meetings, such as this, helped to co-ordinate the organizations ac- tivities. 82MANY GIRLS ran” many doorbells selling Christmas sprays to help finance the different service projects undertaken by the Girl Reserves. “As a Girl Reserve I will be . . The busy girls going from door to door some- time before Christmas were Ames High Girl Reserves who were trying to earn the money need- ed to sponsor the many service projects car- ried out by this group. While these same girls might have been the ones who were slow to pay their quarter dues, they gladly pestered their neighbors into supporting this worth- while organization. Ames High Girl Reserves were involved in a vari- ety of service efforts. One was the support of a foster child. At Christmas time each home- room sent her a Christmas card, letting her know that they were all thinking of her. During the same season, gifts were taken to the residents of the Story County Home. Friendship Week and the Teens Against Polio drive were jointly sponsored by the Girl Reserves and Boys’ Club. MISS STAFFORD, Girl Reserve sponsor, talks with Mary Hinrfchscn and Cathy Curlson, presidents.BOYS’ CLUB HOBBY GROUPS gave these film enthusiasts a chance to learn about projectors and camera equipment. MR. SPATCHKK, the football coach, rises to give a few appro- priate remarks at a Boys’ Club meeting. 84 PRESIDENTS JEFF COX AND MIKE SCHWARTZ spent many hours of behind-thc-sccnc planning with Mr. Stone. A COMPREHENSIVE roster of Boys’ Club as- semblies included a program by Police Chief Ol- son. Boys’ Club offers guidance As the name implies, the Ames High Hoys’ Cluh places only one restriction on membership. Boys' Cluh has two major fields of activity: projects of interest to the hoys themselves, and projects of service to the community. Due to its large size, the Boys' Cluh is ad- ministrated by a body of officers and represen- tatives that rival that of any organization in school in numbers. Each homeroom has a represen- tative. and the cabinet consists of eight officers. Faculty advisors were Mr. Albertson. Mr. Oltrogge. and Mr. Stone. In the field of student interest, the cluh organized the hobby groups. Tw ice during the year, the boys divided up into sections which met for a program concerning a hobby of mutual interest. Service projects included the organization of Friendship Week and Teens Against Polio and the support of a foreign orphan. 85DRAMA’S LONG AND FASCINATING history is retold. “All the world’s a stage’ Entombed in each person is a reservoir of creative ideas and expressive feelings which gives him the assets needed in the mythical, magical world of theater. The students of Ames High who are archeological enough to explore this tomb and tap its resources are often led to the Drama Department. However, the brilliance of this inviting field seems somewhat dulled and tarnished when a list of require- ments for the beginning drama course is handed out. Tech- nical theater must he learned first, and detailed scene design projects, elaborate costume drawings, and gooey make-up applications take up the time spent in class. The students who can hurdle these obstacles often take on the challenges of Advanced Drama. Character interpre- tations, directing exercises, and play writing are accom- plished to the appropriate tune of grumbling and excuses. But creative expression is given free rein and a wide open field so that the hopeful actor and actress can discover their strengths and weaknesses. DRAMATICS IS not all light , and glory as these flat scrub- bing students discover. 86MONOLOGUES AND CHARACTER studies provide opportunities for each dramatics student to “step into someone elsc's shoes." READING OR SPEAKING before a group requires good articu- lation, expression, preparation, and nerves. 87THE DEFT HANDS of a makeup artist change the butterfly hack into a catorpillcr. McTHING’S CAST THE MASTER shows them how it’s done. Virginia Jones ................. Mrs. Larue Shirlee Smith................... Carrie Sharon Sorenson ................ Sybil Kathy Burnet.................... Grace Lewis Sue Mathison.................... Evva Lewis Mary Jo Lasche ................ — Maude Lewis Jeff I arson ................... Nelson Randy Jones .................... Howay Larue Mike Sanders .................... Ellsworth Mike Fellinger ................. Virgil Wayne Knott .................... Stinker Chuck Grau ...................... Dirty Joe Rolfe Lowrie ................... Poison Eddie Katy Jo Rigg ................... Mrs. Shellenbach Jan Painter ...................... Mimi Marc Woods ..................... Policeman Bob Thomas ............. ... ... Policeman Mary Montgomery ................ Ugly itch Barb Sealine Beautiful Witch PAINTS, pictures, scenes, and sets, and so the play progresses. 88 The curtain rises on MRS. McTHING The alternating flashes of lightness and dark- ness and the eerie squeaking of the dimming house lights notified all crews and actors that the Drama Department's fall production of Mrs. McThing was ready to begin. Frantic whispers of. "Break a leg!” subsided as the curtain swished open and the audience's applause was heard. This sound soon changed to laughter as the excellent comedy by Mary Chase kept the audience in stitches for two hours. The scene opened in the elegant home of Mrs. Howard V. I irue III. Mrs. Larue discovered that a witch. Mrs. McThing, had put an animated stick in the place of Howay. Mrs. Larue's only child. Mrs. Larue went searching for Howay and wound up in the Shantyland Pool Hall Lunchroom. Here she found her son. who had joined a mob of small- time hoodlums. Another bout with Mrs. McThing resulted in a stick taking the place of Mrs. Larue. With a little witchcraft by Mimi. Mrs. Mclhing's daughter, the Larues returned to their home and Mimi became a part of their family after a tender parting with Mrs. McThing. ‘•WHY. he’s the picture of a little gentleman.' 2 GREAT RIG, comic book-reading mobsters hash over their day’s work. EVEN MOBSTERS have mothers. 89 ALL THE DETAILS of the latest turn in the stock market are given to the baron. WEEKS OF REHEARSING bring opening night closer and closer. . , , BACKSTAGE the actor- discus- the plays progress. THE MADWOMAN OF CHAILLOTS CAST The Waller Hon Seastrand The Little Man .............Mike Sevde The Prospector Alan Anderson The President Kevin Woodworth The Baron .. Boh Sommerfeld Therese.............. Janet Taylor The Street Singer Charlie Sivesind The Flower Girl Lynn Dunlap The Ragpicker Jay Villwock Paulette The Deaf-Mute Irma The Shoelace Peddler The Broker Dr. Jadiri Countess Aurelia The Doorman The Policeman Pierre The Sargent The Sewer Man Mine. Constance. Mile. Gabrielle Mme. Josephine The Presidents Janet Nairn Handy Jones Kitty Fisher Bill Heaton Jim McGinnis Steve Elbert Kathy Burnet Boh Thomas Marc Woods Chuck Grau John Powell Mike Sanders Jane Martin Pat Porter Annette Quinn Kevin Woodworth Boh Sommerfeld. Jim McGinnis The Press Agents Alan Anderson. Jeff Larson. Bill Heaton The Ladies................... Janet Taylor. Janet Nairn. Jodie Shearer The Adolphe Bertautt Boh 'I homas. Dario Zaffarano. Jeff Larson 90"ARE MY BONES ready, Irma?" MIRROR. MIRROR, on the wall . .. 1280 Applaud THE MADWOMAN OF CHAIUOT 'I he backstage area of Central auditorium was a beehive of activity around 6:00 P.M. on the 13th and 15th of February, production dates for the junior class play. The make-up room hum- med with excitement as powder flew madly from whisking brushes, as grease paint covered everything in sight, and as glue stuck on beards. The latest Beatles’ record was blaring from the taj)c recorder. A costume's crew member moaned as another pin was stuck in a dilapidated out- fit. But in two hours' time all was quiet and or- derly as the curtain swept open, revealing the cafe of Chez Francis. From this setting and the basement of No. 21 Rue de Chaillot traipsed an assortment of characters that ran the gamut of Jean Giraudoux’s imagination. After learning of a plot cooked up by a group of big businessmen to de- stroy Paris by drilling for oil. the Madwoman of Chaillot succeeded in setting the world in order again with the help of a conglomeration of vagabonds and three other madwomen. 91T Choir fills the air with song In a dark and misty corner of the basement, sheltered from all outside interruptions except an occasional trumpet player, seventy-five members of the a cappella choir met to practice. They sang every- thing from spirituals to the "Hallelujah Chorus.” The group was at its best in performance. Whether it was the lack of music, the robes, or the audi- ence that did the trick, no one knows. Hut sud- denly the whole choir experienced a sort of unity and joy that made inhibitions fly with the wind. Enthusiasm radiated almost visibly, and every accent and crescendo came without effort. A tiny smile spread across Mr. Cross's face, and as the last echo faded and the curtain closed, he whispered “good." And for that instant, as the world rushed into the vacuum of happiness and satisfaction, nothing existed but beauty, excitement, and wonder. SMALL GROUPS help bring out individual talent: the four individual talent in the Senior Boys’ Quartet are Larry McCoy, Allan Simpson, Charles Sivos- ind, Richard Black. 92. feta THE HIGHEST GOAL in vocal music is membership in Choir, which performed such numbers as Handel’s “Hallelujah Chorus" in the Christ- mas Program. 93. . . Star of Bethlehem . . SOPHOMORE, JUNIOR. AND SENIOR GIRLS united their Christmas cheer to entertain at the annual program. ENTHUSIASTIC PRACTICE assured the Senior Girls’ Sextet of polished performances. Pictured here are C Carlson, A Barrow, C Ustrud, I) Childs P " iener, S Smith, accompanist M Quam.. . And it comes T' out here!” AS PRODUCER AND DIRECTOR of the Christmas program, Mr. Cross had his hands full. SOPHOMORES LEARNED about singing coming in on cue in Mixed Chorus. CANDLES . . . and 200 voices brightened the Christmas Season. and HOURS OF PRACTICE go into the making of an All-State quartet. 96 Rising musicians win All-State positions Years of practice make a serious high school musician so much superior to his fellows in band, choir, and orchestra that even the most patient and dedicated artist would soon find a lack of challenge. The opportunity to audition for the All-State Music Festival helps a great deal in overcoming this dif- ficulty. Instrumental students prepare solos, scales, and sight reading skills to try out for All State Band or Orchestra. Vocal music students work in quartets to audition for the All- State Choir. Over the Thanksgiving weekend, the selected musicians met from all over the state to prepare a concert. Marilyn Quam was awarded the particular honor of being one of two to accompany the All-State Chorus. The annual festival was enjoyable, stimulating, and well worth the work neces- sary to become a part of it. BEING SELECTED All-State accompanist was a great honor for Marilyn Quam. ALL-STATE MUSICIANS includc—ZVo U: M Bochnkc, 1) Dowell, D Howard, D Childs, L Bancroft, J Larsen, A Eggleton, D Peglar. Hack: B Hamilton, L McCoy, J Piersol, P Marks, M Wilson, B Click, T Boast. 97r I THE AMES HIGH CONCERT HAND provided many concerts throughout the year, including those for FSEA. for the student body, and for the general public. 57 MEMBERS of Sophomore Hand presented a joint concert with the Orchestra on February 20. 98w Musicians band together | Hey! 7 fie Left Foot! Turn! Mow! For Heaven’$ Sake! The first day of marching is a harrowing experience for everyone. The drums are con- i fused; a sophomore forgot to turn; the seniors are dragging their feet. It appears as though the ! first halftime will be the most humiliating J experience in history. But with the addition of I colorful uniforms and a large audience, a miraculous [ change invariably takes place; feet lift high and • maneuvers come off with precision. And as the weeks go by things improve. But just as the members ' begin to learn which foot is left, the band is I literally frozen off the field. Auditions are held, and with a boom from the tympani and a squeak from a clarinet, the concert band is off and running for a season of classical and popular music ] performances. Come spring and they are back on : foot again, practicing for the Viesha parade. And j despite a good number of people with two left feet and an extra one to trip over, the band has ; accumulated a reputation for being tops • in every form in which they appear. MR. DAY I.ENDS a welcome helping hand. "I, 2, 3. 4. 5. 6, 7, 8 . . . Hit the line on 8.' 99ROWS OF CLARINETS add their tone to the hand. THE ROLL OF THE TYMPANY reaches a crescendo as the song is completed. 100ONE EVE ON THE MUSIC, the other on the director, fingers flying ahead of the mind . . . and another re- hearsal i under way. And the band played on THE FLUTISTS TAKE TIME OUT of a busy practice to eye a difficult part. ENTHUSIASTIC INDIVIDUAL PLAYERS insure a vivid per- formance. 101Orchestra offered opportunities for expression The most complex and grand instrument of artistic expression is the symphony orchestra. Most of the greatest classical music has been written for orchestra or a solo instrument with orchestra. Traditionally this is where the most serious and dedicated musicians may be found. The Ames High School Orchestra lacks the diversity and depth of players necessary for a full symphony orchestra, but its small size has the advantage of giving many more solo opportunities to the individual player. Section leaders from the band join with string players taught by Mr. Moberg and practice under his direction. They perform as a pit orchestra for the plays, for a student body assembly, and at a spring concert in Conjunction with the other student orchestras in Ames. MUSIC FROM THE PIT provided intermission music at plays. M WOODS PROVIDES the basis for the orchestra. PLAYING SECOND FIDDLE is more fun in the AHS orchestra. 102PRACTICE SESSIONS helped orchestra members put the professional touch on their numbers. 103 Language clubs enrich insight For the language students who felt that the package of knowledge offered in class needed some wrapping paper and rihbon to brighten it up and give it a more finished appearance, the language clubs were organized. The main function of the Latin Club was to throw the springtime revelry, the Roman banquet. Students came attired in togas that defied de- scription. none of which, however, could com- pare w ith Mr. Kipp’s gold and purple creation. A multi-course meal featuring a roast pig was served by genuine slaves. Spanish Club offered a variety of programs for its members. At one meeting. Jay Wallin presented a vivid account of his visit to Spain. A movie on Mexico gave the students a chance to learn more about our neighbor south of the border. A Christmas pot-luck proved a rous- ing success. A Mexican ballet presented at Iowa State enthralled all the members of Spanish Club. TEMPORARY SPANIARDS SERENADED Amp- High .indents with strains of "Noche de paz." I.ATI.N STl'DENTS don toga- for the annual Roman Banquet. I I 104A SPANISH FIESTA brings Spanish food . . . and many hungry students. FELIZ NAVIDAD—Merry Christmas. Spanish students enjoy their holiday party. 105FOLK DANCING ... AND GERMAN FOOD brought a touch of the "Old Coun- try" to German Club. French, German customs characterize clubs French students were kept busy with meetings which ranged from can-can dancing to slides of Mrs. Van decar's visit to France. In the fall, a French Fete, or celebration, was given at Ames High with French students from neighboring towns attending. The students tried to con- verse intelligibly in French, gave up. and en- joyed the refreshments. German Club also had an interesting array of programs. Pot-lucks seemed the best way of getting students together, since most A US students have a passion for food. Dr. Schwartz, professor of German at Iowa State, spoke to the group on one occasion, while at other times home-grown talent of singing and dancing to Cerman tunes was presented. 106 AN OPPORTUNITY to view a French dance doesn’t come often, however French Club students had this chance at the Fete. TELLING A GOOD STORY is hard in itself. Telling one in French requires even more ability. MUCH TIME WAS SPENT in preparing for the French Fete, a party to which French students from other towns were invited. 107ALERT KIRK SQl'AD MEMBERS listen intently to Mr. Ripp’s words of wisdom. PRESIDENTS Bill Nordskog and Bill Soult» bring their latest problems to sponsor Mr. Kipp. 108 EVEN THE MOST CONSCIENTIOUS Fire Squad member» have to study some- time. Fire squad and monitors assume noon duties W henever possible, the administration gives up its power of enforcement to student groups. Whether the smile that accompanies this transfer of authority is one of cheerful generosity or exuberant relief is a question that remains un- answered. but the students appreciate the right to govern themselves, and student-teacher relations are much improved when the teacher is able to throw off the role of disciplinarian that often covers up his larger role, that of the scholar. The two principal student enforcement agencies at Ames High are the Fire Squad and an innovation known as the hall monitors. The Fire Squad has several duties, including supervision of fire drills and control of conduct in the halls and classrooms. The hall monitors serve the dual function of checking student passes and assisting guests of the school. Both organizations have the respect of student and teacher alike and have been very effective in performance of their duties. DESPITE THE LOOKS of things, being a ball monitor is a hard job. 109CAREFUL PROOFREADERS insured a weekly Web without mistake?. STAFF MEMBERS planned balanced layouts for each edition.WITH WEEKLY DEADLINES to be met, the Web staff felt the pressure that goes with journalism. A SMALL JOl RNALISM CLASS afforded opportunity for individual advice. Journalistic experience gained The free press is a major factor in obtaining and preserving democracy. An ignorant populace is incapable of governing itself, lacking the necessary unity of thought and action to create and manage a government. An opportunity for students to gain actual practice in this field is the course in Journalism offered to Seniors. The result of their efforts is a weekly newspaper, tin Web, which is printed in the Arnes Doily Tribune. The Web contains news and feature articles, and a regular humor column. A weekly editorial is also traditional. Self-criticism is the best sign of a healthy government, and the right to complain is a cherished part of America’s national heritage. Thus the Web performs the double function of publishing news and editorials for A US and also giving participants invaluable career training. Ill— PHOTOGRAPHERS Bob Dotson, Tom Dixon, and Murk Peterson wait to Ik shot. SPIRIT STAFF MEMBERS Cathy Lcgvold. Editor: Brad Moses. Assistant Editor; Margaret Shepherd. Art Editor; Janice Miller, Assistant Art Editor: Tom I ken a. Copy Editor; Pat Porter. Assist- ant Copy Editor; Mary Hinrichsen. Business Manager: Pat Tonne, Assistant Business Man- ager: Mary Anne Cerwick. Mary Hagge. Caro- lyn Bliss. Ads Department: David Schworm. Sports Editor: Mary Anne Richards, Photo Editor: Bob Dotson. Tom Dixon. Mark Peter- son. Jim McGinnis. Photographers. PATIENT, patient Mrs. Lutz.. . . Wasn't it a mighty day!” A1 DEADLINE 1IMK tile whole Staff does nothing hut work. “Wasn't it a mighty day!" said the green blackboard. The typewriters wished madly into the closet, the pictures wilted in the darkroom drier, and sheets of paper flitted from desk to desk. The only living thing in the room was Mrs. Lutz, and she was just barely alive. For the SPIRIT Staff had come and gone. accomplishing whatever they did in a very loud manner. The last people to scoot the desks back into place and scramble for the door after the bell rang were met head on In those coming back for things they had forgotten. The confusion seemed complete. But everyone was just building up speed to slam into the brick wall called—the deadline. . . . AND SOMETIMES all the SPIRIT Staff members are in the room at the same time. . 113 Library club mends books; Debate moves to new success A political campaign needs many willing hands to keep it running smoothly. The Library Club at Ames High performed a similar service. Though the work and sacrifice of both organizations are often underestimated, their help ran not he valued. The members of Library Club, under Mrs. Dickinson's leadership, were responsible for the smooth functioning of the library’s inner workings. Their efficient work kept the library an attractive place for study. The participants took turns helping in the library by checking out books, collecting fines, sending out over-due slips, and keeping the shelves neat and orderly. But they found that all work and no play was not the ideal situation; so meetings were held so the members could do some socializing. Debate is intellectual football. It is wadding up two spider webs, and then trying to separate them again. It is trying to decide whether Mr. Cole likes what is being said, which is trying to decide what the Mona Lisa is thinking. It is a big pile of cards that are always in the w rong order, and a ten minute speech that runs down after two minutes. It is a debater motioning w ildly from the hack of the room to stop his partner from ruining what little thread of a case he may have had. And last, debate is the look of confident superiority that hides the surprise of the winner. RON I.ARSON drives home his side of the i-sue. 114 IT TAKES MANY HANDS to keep .. lb brary in order. 115 MRS. DICKINSON acquaints Library Club members with the Dewey decimal system.Seminar offers first-hand science experience While everyone else is home watch in" TV or doing anything else hut studying, a group of devoted young scientists drag themselves back into the dimly lit halls and laboratories to pursue their interest in the many fields of research including alchemy, fortune telling, and witch doctoring. Anyone who makes gold from lead or completes an equally significant project is entitled to the % credit that Science Seminar offers. Members of Science Seminar attend lectures, conduct related experiments, and engage in individual research under the leadership and supervision of Mr. Trump. Each year several of the projects are entered in the Hawkeye Science Fair. The excellent selection of cauldrons and potion ingredients recently installed at the new school is made available to everyone. Often one of the students experimenting w ith magic man- ages to conjure up a professor from ISU. who brings many secret recipes and spells. 11617 YOUNG SCIENTISTS made use of high school facilities and University speakers.Co-op links merchants, students; FHA produces homemakers The Future Homemakers of America was composed of girls who were taking home-ec or were in- terested in this field. Their main goal was to help the community through help in the home. Their meetings offered varied programs that were of interest to all the girls. Exchanges with other clubs in the surrounding towns were a com- mon practice. Interested members from Ames attended a district meeting at Pella to elect officers and share ideas. Mary Sielert served as president for the Ames chapter this year. The Ames High branch of vocational education had its own organization in the Co-op Club. As winter approached, the members earned money by selling antifreeze and windshield scra- pers to the Ames High motorists. A project for one of the members was to design a shield that would represent the Ames club. Larry Hedberg was president of the group under the sponsorship of Mr. Shadle. FIRST-HAND INFORMATION U salesmanship was acquired by on-the-job workers. FHA DEMANDS organization and cooperation from its officer . JO'tCE CRAIG AND Sue Schlebecker plan the particulars of the next FHA meeting. 119Athletics "In me younger days "twas not considered ray- spictable f r to be an athlete. An athlete was always a man that was not sthrong enough f r wurruk. Franctions dhruw him fr’m school an" th" vagrancy laws dhruw him to baseball.” . . . Dunne A hundred years ago the common conception of an athlete was summed up by a writer of the time in the passage above. In the short space of time between then and now the athlete has risen in public esteem until he shares the top of the pedestal with the scholar, and due to his superior size, often manages to push the scholar off. The tempo of everyday life in AHS rises and falls with the successes and failures of its athletes. Sports are among the favorite avocations of nearly every- one. The interest is so widespread that the variety of sports increases every year, with wrestling being the latest addition to the interscholastic program. It joined baseball, football, basketball, track, golf and tennis in providing a year full of excitement that never had a moment to die down.INITIATING SONGS AND CHEERS were the cheerleaders: Front—M Staniforth, B Rosebrook, L Bcrgland, P Wiener, S Cooper. M Maurer Back—S Stucky, A Clark. I, Partin. J Hoff. J Porter, B W'ard, M Wheelock. CHEERING ON THEIR WINNING TEAM were sophomore cheerleaders: Front—M Foreman, M Thompson, J Peterson. S Larson, Back—D Mullin, T Craig, T. Moeller, D Daley. PEP ASSEMBLIES helped rouse spirit for game-. Cheerleaders radiate pep at rallies, games At each football and basketball game, the bundle of arms. legs, and energy that jumped around madly and screamed wildly was the representative of Ames High femininity, a cheerleader. Thir- teen girls were chosen in class tryouts last year to make up this elite group. Then at a special assembly, the regulars were selected. At sophomore orientation the sophomores elected their own cheerleaders. Working just as hard as the athletes, these girls were responsible for promoting the great school spirit exhibited at all games. 122CIC MILE TEAM: A Simpson. I Handley. D Kelso, B Hacli, N Thompson, J Ingvoldstad, K Hatsios. DOTSON HURDLES. AND THEY RAN and ran in all types of weather. Track runs year ’round To keep in step with modern track programs of other high schools in the state. Ames High instituted a fall track program this year. Coach Hi Covey had long seen the need for such a program to gain added conditioning for the winter and spring programs. Considering that this was the first year for the program, it was a tremendous success. The cross country team ran in five meets. These inclu- ded the CIC mile meet—second place—. the State mile meet- fourth place-—, the Mike Augustine Invitational cross country meet—second place—. the CIC cross country—first place—the State Cross Country—fifth place. 123PEP CLUB GIRLS combined energy and talent to brighten the hallways with posters. BEHIND every $ucccs ful organization there’s a group of efficient officers. Pictured here are M Richards. C Sorenson, M Boehnke, C Ustrud. “Peanuts” posters, cheering characterize Pep Club The gaudy posters taped in the walls every Fri- day showed that those girls in the orange jackets and black socks had been at it again, rite Pep Club could be seen cheering wildly at all games, whether at home or out of town. They kept busy by thinking up original skits that the teachers wouldn't object to for the pep assemblies. Their posters reminded everyone of the games each weekend and offered a few laughs and groans for the stu- dents. The themes for these exotic creations ranged from Peanuts to poetry to puns. The whole group kept up Ames High's reputation of tremendous school spirit. 124PEP CLl B gave the extra boost in school spirit to spur the team on to a winning season. 125HUFFMAN BLOCKS a Mack connect!- to Yeaman for a 13 yard pain at TOM LANDSBERG LEADS team in for second half of Dowling game. 126Homecoming victory celebrated wildly 1963 was a brand new year for Ames High football fans. The season brought about many changes including a new head coach, a new assistant coach, and a completely different offense. Our head coach, Cecil Spatchcr, was ably assisted by Wally Linn and Tom Beckham, w ho was won over from conference rival Grinnell. From a won-lost standpoint. Ames High's 3-5-1 record does not show the effort that the members of the squad put forth: nor does it show the adverse conditions which continually haunted their efforts. A synopsis of the season would show many losses in key personnel. There were many fine defensive efforts but an inability to mount a sustained offensive attack often hurt the Little Cyclones. REFEREE SIGNALS Dave ScandrettV extra point attempt is good. HEAD COACH Cecil Spatcher ponders one of many weighty decisions. Ames finished fourth in the CIC behind Boone, Newton, and Marshalltown and ahead of Osky and Grinnell. Little Cyclones receiving all conference honors were Bob Best, first team end; Jim Hansen, second team halfback: Phil Carr, second team tackle: Pic Wilson, third team center: Dave Scandrctt. third team fullback. Highlights of the season were the 13-0 homecoming victory over Osky. the first homecoming win in four years, and the 12-7 victory over Fast Sioux City, revenge for last year's 31-7 drubbing. Bitterest defeat was Boone's 21-0 win. thus claiming the victory bell the second year in a row. Junior varsit) football is considered an important part of the varsity season by the coaches. These games gave the coaches a chance to get a closer look at juniors and some seniors who were not regulars on the varsity. This season the J.V.'s played North and Lincoln D.M., Marshalltown, and the Adel varsity. Sophomore coach Maurice Hausheer was quite pleased by this year's sophomore squad. Lacking any outstanding athletes but not fine team effort, the sophs compiled a 6-1-2 season record. 127Ames has 2-3 CIC Record JOHN "COUCAR" BURNS snatches a pas? from the waiting hands of a Newton defender. VARSITY RECORD Ames 0 Dowling D.M. 6 Ames 13 Grinnell 7 Ames 0 Marshalltown 12 Ames 13 Oskaloosa ... .. . 0 Ames 6 West Waterloo .......... 6 Ames 12 East Sioux City 7 Ames 7 ... Newton ............................. 14 Ames 0 Boone 14 Ames 0 Roosevelt D.M. 21 NORDSKOG'S FAKE AND KETELSON'S BLOCK spring Dave Seandrctt loose for a gain. 128WILSON move- in to aid Carr and Saul and to stop Willie Andrews of Marshalltown JIM HANSEN. 125 pounds, stops Larry Lust «.Newton) 180 pounds, for no pain. SOPHOMORE RECORD Arnes 9 Webster City 0 6 6 Ames 22 6 39 12 Ames 6 East Des Moines 7 Ames 14 Des Moines 6 Ames 34 Fort Dodge 7 Ames 7 Eldora Training School 6 Ames 0 Roosevelt Des Moines 0 129IT IS not until one endures the toil and strain of a match that one appreciates and respects the word ITrtstler. Wrestling in 2nd year A strange new breed of men has emerged at Ames High. Perhaps you have seen them at various stages of change. They are those hoys who sit in the cafeteria at noon and suc k ice c ubes for nourishment and drool over other people’s meals as they have none for themselves. These are the wrestlers. Organized wrestling is in its second year at A IIS. Forty boys attended planned bedlam sessions in the basement after school in preparation for their varsity meets. These boys felt that wrestling was the most all around competitive sport offered. It allowed individual competition and required extensive conditioning. 130 i THE CAN VOUCH that the mat conns up fast and hard.K1 "HU A LIMITED AMOUNT of space on the mat, the fellows took turns wrestling, resting, and watching pointers given by Mr. Oltrogge. THE ON IA WAY to become a wrestler is to give it every- thing you've got every time you’re on the mat. 131I EVERYONE SCRAMBLES to gain possession of the all-important ball. EVEN WITH ALL THAT INTERFERENCE Soults scores, another 2 points. MANY GAMES WERE WON as a result of the crucial seconds of the time-outs. 132SEASON S RECORD JEFF COX'S timely rebounds were the turning point in many games. Ames 51 Mason Citv . 52 .51 52 Ames 08 Oskaloosa 61 Ames.... 62 Grinnell 59 Ames 51 Boone 50 Ames . 64 Roosevelt Des Moines . 40 Ames. 63 . 70 60 .. 56 Ames... 38 Marshalltown . 72 Ames. .. 50 18 Ames ....75 Grinnell 67 47 50 Ames 61 Boone 60 .49 69 Ames 60 57 51 50 Ames. 57 lech Des Moines 69 A CAREFULLY executed out-of-bounds play is an easy two points. 133 JEFF COX CONTROLS the lip early in the Roosevelt game for a narrow victory. i 134 MIKE SCHWARTZ flies after the ball as Dick Musser watches. JIM KETELSEN displayed strong defensive effort during the season. Ames second in C.I.C. As in football, the basketball season began with basic practice in fundamentals on a new offense which was better fitted to the personnel of the squad. The team lived up to its expectations in compil- ing an 11-6 record in regular season's play. Once again, the C.I.C. came up with some of the state's toughest competition, with Ames in second place with a 7-3 record behind Newton and Mar- shalltown who tied for first with 8-2 marks. At the end of the conference season, these three C.I.C. teams were among the top sixteen in the state. I he effort displayed by the basketball team was welcome relief from last year's season as Ames was able to reverse the results of 11 games. I he first game, a 51-52 defeat of pre-season favor- ite Mason City, showed what was to come during the season: the game was undecided until the last minute. Coach Wally Linn felt the ability of the Little Cyclones to win close games served them well as 10 games were decided by three or less points. Ames played two double overtime games, beat- ing Boone and Marshalltown by identical 51-50 scores. The defeat of the Bobcats was the first victory on the Marshalltown court since 1951 by Ames. I he Ames Sophs surprised everyone but themselves in amassing a 10-0 record in the conference. Added to this were 3 w ins and I losses for a 13-1 over- all mark. I he all important State Tournament games were a challenge as usual as the district in which Ames competed was very conq etitive. 135State Indoor tests Ames track squad Indoor track is one sport which docs not cause a lot of commotion in tin high school hut which deserves all the attention it can get. Each year a group of dedicated boys begins practice during Christmas vacation and continues work until the out- door season begins in April. During this time, one can see many orange and grey clad trackmen rang- ing far afield, wandering down lonely country roads and over the golf courses. Practice and con- ditioning continue at a set pace and build to a climax at the end of March when the State Indoor Track Meet is held in Iowa Cit . Then all the hard work and preparation goes on the line and an- other assault on the record books begins. Ames High is most fortunate in having an institution as close as Iowa State which permits the Ames Track Squad to use their indoor facilities. The use of the track is added incentive toward a good season. About fifty boys were out for indoor this year. The squad competed in the Federation Meet March 21 at Drake as well as the Outdoor on March 30. TWO HOLD overs from Iasi year's champion two mile team. Mike Yeaman and Jim Ingvold tad practice baton exchanges. MONTHS OF hard work; superhuman effort; and another potential record holder emerges. 137Students work off frustrations through Intramurals, GRA INTRAMURAL BOYS give their best fur the ol' homeroom. I akin" the place of gang warfare in the Middle West is an institution known as Intramurals or GRA in its feminine form. F ighting it out after school in an endless variety of ways, the bossy compete in organizations with such romantic. West Side Story type names as 132-1 or 212-2. Uniforms vary from white gym shorts and black tee shirts to black gym shorts and white tee shirts. In charge of the rumbles are Mr. Page and Mr. Smalling. who obviously enjoy the whole thing as much or more than the boys. Anyone not engaged in varsity athletics is eligible, and the homeroom captains spend a good part of many homeroom periods in recruiting. A running point total is kept, and trophies are awarded to gather dust in some alcove from then on. The girls are organized on a more individual basis and are led by Miss Zanders. The greatest honor for a GRA girl is to hear her name read over the sound system in the list of GR A All- Stars. UP IN THE AIR, junior birdmen."CRA OFFICERS planned outings, games, and tournaments throughout the year. 139 PRACTICE-MAKES'PERFECT (plus cross-your-fingers-andhope) gives this junior team the victorious game point.I WRESTLING TEAM—E Huffman. T Orngard, 1) Kezar, I) Van Howeling, B Oshel, B Frum. S Goetsch, D Dixon, B Sorenson, B Walker. SOPHOMORE FOOTBALL TEAM—Front: M Stevens, B Doren, D Sliadle, D Dresser, H Phil- lips. G Yoder. I) Warg, B Cook. Second: Mr. Hau-heer, T Richards. D McFarland, M Bliss, B Steil, R Stucky, T Mealy, E Wilson, T McKinley, B Heaton. Had:: B Brunkow, C Eldridgc, P Blake, R Genowere, S Smith, B Beckman. VARSITY 1001 BALL TEAM Front: D Hedrick. N Nims, B Smalling, M Shockley, M Schmidt, B Saul, R Plumb, 1) Wheeler. Second: R Brown. I) Schworm, T Rassmussen, B Friedrick, B Soults. G Erskine, J Gilchrist. Third: D Ke .ar. I) Black, B Russell, N Penny, M Bellinger, J Hansen, T Watkins, R Jellinger, E Huffman. Fourth: M Gibbs, B Von Bergen, M Strickland, J Lasche, C Mack, M Ritland, C Knapp, C Kropf. Fifth: 1) Baker. K Hoskins, R Bappe, B Best, J Ketelson, 1) Ostrcm, I) Pasley, J Peters. Sixth: N Herrick, M Bonwell, G Clark, R Ro--, T Kee, B Moorhead, '1 Landsherg, J Owings. Hack: J Burns, P Wilson, I) Scandrett, M Y’eaman, I) Van Howcling, J Linder, B Nurdskog, K Page. 140Teams do their best for AHS VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM—Front: K Page, M Schwartz, S Coe, M Ritland, B Best, J Ketelson, Mr Hausheer. Back: G Er kine, Mr Linn, J Cox, T Landsberg, C Knapp, J Dunleavy, B Soults, B Nordskog, K Blceker, I) Schworm. SOPHOMORE BASKETBALL TEAM—Front: M Bliss, R Agard, B Steil, G Yoder, T McKinley. Second: J Ingvold- stad. M Calhoon, C Eldridge, R Stucky, D Dresser. Third: B Doran, M Kelso, T Mealy, D Shadle, R Fate. Back: Mr Spateher, B Beckman, M Anderson, T Read, R Blake, M McCowen, B Brunkow. 141People “Summer was our best season: It was sleeping on the back screened porch in cots, or trying to sleep in the treehouse: summer was everything good to eat: it was a thousand colors in a parched landscape: but most of all, summer was Dill.” ... 7 o Kill a Mockingbird There are many memories from three years of high school: the tingling excitement of football that is heightened by the crisp fall air: the night before the research paper is due: the SPIRIT deadline: the prom. But these all fade and the morning fog that devours the world before the eyes of the watcher preys upon the mind, blotting out all memories save one: the people. A teacher that kindles a flame never to be extinguished; the comradeship of hard work: the joy of mutual discovery: the commiseration on Monday morning; the rereading of Macbeth to find Spot again: the hearing of the 1812 Overture: All these bring memories of people—a thousand of them thrown together for three years in the same red brick building, with the same freezing gym classes and the same impossible Frig problems. And when the time is up. they find that they enjoy and respect nothing more than each other.SERVING ON SENIOR SENATE were: B Nordskog (Pre»», C Carlson. B Dot- son, D Oslrem, J Handley, D Sherrick, C Knapp. G Erskine. Mr Ritbnd «Spon- sor). L Field 'Treast. M Woods (V- Pres), P Anderson, P McConnell. M Peterson, A Barrow «Sec». SENIOR CLASS PRESIDENT Bill Nordskog discusses Senior Senate business with Gary Erskine. Senior Senate works for successful graduation A senator from each homeroom gets a chance to par- ticipate in the unforgettable experience of attempting to organize the Senior Class of AHS. Graduation announcements and name cards had to be ordered, cap and gown measurements taken, ticket sales for the senior class play promoted, and baccalaureate and graduation exercises organized. The members of Senior Senate were probably the most deserving group to take advantage of the five day vacation for seniors in the spring. 1 hey met under Mr. Kitland's sponsorship and were led by Senior Class President Bill Nordskog. 144mmmmm ROBERT G BALLARD: Boy»’ Club 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3. LENORE LOUISE BANCROFT: GRA 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 2, Officer 2, Rep 1. Cheersquad 1. Pep Club 3, Girls' Glee 1. 2. Choir 3. Chorus 1, 2. ff'cb 3. French Club 2. 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3, Cabinet 3, Pres of Rep 3, Rep 1. ROBERT J BARRIE: Bo»' Club 1. 2. 3. Radio Club 2. 3. ANN KRISTINE BARROW: GRA 1. 2. 3, Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 1. Choir 2, 3, Chorus 1, Latin Club 1, Class See 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. Cabinet 3, Senior Senate 3, Student Council 1, HR Pres 1. V-Pres 2. KF.NNE1 H XM'KKW IV Mv Tenni- 2. Band 1. 2. Bov.-' Glee I, 2, Choir 3. Chorus 1, Bovs’ Club 1. 2. 3. PAMELA ANN ADAMS: Pep Club 3, Rep 3. Band 1, 2, 3, Girls' Glee 1, Choir 2, 3, Chorus 1, Orchestra 2. 3, German Club 1, Spanish Club 3, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. DOROTHY E ANDERSON: Ciris Glee 2. Choii 3, Chorus 2. Girl Reserves 2, 3, moved from Nevada, Iowa 2. PAULA JEANNE ANDERSON: GRA I. Rep I, Pep Club 3, Band 1. 2. 3, Sec-Treas 3. Gjirls' Glee 1, Choir 2, 3, Chorus 1, Latin Club 1. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3, Cabinet 3. Rep 2. STEPHEN JOHN ARMSTRONG: Band 1, 2. Wtb 3. .Spanish Club 1, 2, Scratch Pad 1. 2. Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. ELIZABETH JANE BACON: Pep Club 3. Girls' Glee 3. Drama 3. Latin Club 1. French Club 3, Girl Reserves 1. 3, HR V-Pres 1. Sec 1, lived in Newton Mass 2. CONNIE LYNN BAILEY: Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee I, 2, V-Pres 1, Chorus 1, 2. Drama 1. 2, 3, Palm Club 2. 3, French Club 1, Spanish Club 2. 3, Treas 3, Scratch Pad Ast Ed 2. Ed 3. Spirit Rep 2. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3, Cabinet 3, HR Sec-Treas 1. ROSALIE MARIE BALDUS: Pep Club 3. Drama 1. 2, 3. Palm Club 3, Latin Club I. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3, Rep 1. 145THOMAS C BARTON: Intramural Council 3, Tennis 1, 2. 3, Varsity Club 2, 3, Science Seminar 3, Boys' Club 1. 2. 3. CARY LEE BATH: Track 1.2,3. Band I. Boys' Glee Club 1. Boys' Club 1. 2, 3. Rep 2. MICHAEL CLAUDE BELLINGER: Football 1.3. Science Seminar 2. 3, Latin Club 1, 2. Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3. Cabinet 3, E- lectronics Club 2. 3, Pres 2, 3. ELIZABETH JEAN BENSEND: Pep Club 3. Spanish Club 2. 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. LINDA BERGLANI): CRA I, 2. 3. Cheersquad 2. 3. Pep Club 3, Girls Glee 1. Chorus 1, Spanish Club 1. V-Pres 1. Class Treas 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3, Cabinet 2. Junior Executive Council 2, Student Council 1, HR Pres 1, V Pres 3. ROBERT G BILLINGS JR: Bo»' Club 2.3. Student Council 2, moved from Louisville. Kentucky 2. RICHARD ALLEN BLACK: Football Trainer 1, 2. 3. Track 1. 2. 3. Boys' Glee 1, 2. 3. Choir 2. 3. V-Pres 3. Chorus 1, Web 3. Latin Club 1. SPIRIT Rep 1. Fire Squad, Boys Club 1. 2. 3, Stu- dent Council 2, HR Pres 2. BARBARA LUISE BLACE.N : Band 2.3. Point Recorder 3, Pep Club 3. French Club 2. 3, Publicity Chairman 3, Girl Re- serves 2. 3. HR Sec 2. moved from Estherville Iowa 2. SANDRA KAY BLAIR: Pep Club 3, Band 1. Girls’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Chorus 1. 2. 3. FHA 3, French Club 1. 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Rep. 3. BETTY BROXANN BLANFORD: Pep Club 3. Band Majorette 1. 2. 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. Rep 3. MARY CAROLINE BOEHNKE: GRA 1.2.3. In- tramural Chairman 2, Rep 1. Pep Club 3. V-Pres 3, Band 1. 2. 3. GirLs Glee 1. Choir 2, 3, Scc-Treas 3. Chorus 1. Orchestra 1. 2. 3. Pres 3. Latin Club 1, Girl Re- serves 1. 2. 3. HR V-Pres 1. 2. SHIRLEY GRACE BOWEN: GRA 2, Pep Club 3, Girls' Glee 2. 3. Chorus 2. Drama 1. FHA 2. French Club 1. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Rep 3, HR Sec 1. 2. DONALD WAYNE BROWN: Football 2. Tennis 2. 3. Boys' Glee 1. Chorus 1. Debate 3, Spanish Club 1. 3. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. HR Officer 1. 3. JOHN MILTON BROWN : Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. Boys’ Glee 1. Chorus 1. 2. Web 3, Drama 2. Spanish Club 1, 2, 3, Student Council 3. JUDY KATHARINE BROWN: GRA 1. 2. Rep 2. Girls’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Chorus 1, 2, 3. Latin Club 1. F’rench Club 2, 3. Class Treas 3, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3, Cab- inet 3, Rep 2, Treas 3 HR Officer 1. 2. SAREN L BROWN: Pep Club 3. Drama 1. Spanish Club 1, Latin Club 2, 3. Girl Reserves 1, 2,3. 146Ingvoldstad leads students first semester JONATHAN E BUCK: Bo V Club 1. 2. 3. JOHN M BURNS: Bast-ball 2, 3. Basketball 1. Football 1, 2. 3. Track 1. 2, 3, Varsity Club 3, Boys' Club 1. 2, 3. Rep 1. Web 3. HR Sec 1, 3. Pres 2. MICHAEL MARTIN BURNS: Science Seminar 2. 3, German Club 2, 3. Electronics Club 2, 3, Boys Club 2. 3. moved from Ottumwa, Iowa 2. MARTHA YVONNE Bl SICK: GRA 1. 2, 3, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. DEC A 3. STAN J. CALDWELL: Band 1, 2, German Club 1, SPIRIT Rep 3. Boys' Club 1. 2, 3. HR V-Pres 2. ROBERT WILLIAM CAQUELIN: French Club 1. 2. Boys' Club 1. 2. 3. ELLEN FRANCES CARBREY: Pep Club 3, Orchestra 1, 3, German Club 1. 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3, Rep 1, lived in Southold, New York 2. CATHY GAVE CARLSON: Pep Club 3, Girls’ Glee 1. Choir 2, 3, Chorus 1, Web 3. Drama 1. French Club 1, Spanish Club 2, 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Cabinet 2. Pres 3, HR V-Pres 2. CAROL SUE CARMEAN: Pep Club 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. Rep 1. 2. PHILIP WAYNE CARR: Bas- ketbal) 1, Football 1, 2, 3, Varsity Club 2, 3, Latin Club 1, 2, Fire- Squad 1, 2, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. CARMEN CASTIELLO: Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 3, Spanish Club 3, Girl Reserves 2, 3, Rep 3, moved from Garner. Iowa 2. ROSE SKETCHES a few improvements for the Brooklyn Bridge. SOME SENIORS just couldn’t adjust to early- bird classes. 147MAin ALICE CAVE.N: Pep Club 3, Girl»' Glee 3. Drama 2, FHA 1, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. MARY ANN CERWICK: Pep Club 3. Girls Glee 1, 2. Choir 3. Chorus 1, 2. Orchestra 1, 2. Web 3, Latin Club 1. SI'IHIT Staff 3, Rep 1. Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. Rep 3. Student Council 2, HR Pres 2. DIANE MARGARET CHILDS: GRA 1. 2. Rep 2. Pep Club 3. Girls Glee 1, Choir 2. 3. Chorus 1. FHA 1. 2. 3. Sec-Treas 1, Spanish Club 2. 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Rep 1. Cabinet 2. HR V-Pres 3. RICKEY DEAN CLAYBERG: Athletic Trea- 2. 3, Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. GARY I) CLOUSER: Wrestling 2. 3. Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. CLYDE R COLE: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. JOHN EDWARD CONLEY: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. CHRISTINE KAY CONSTANTINE: GRA 1. 2. 3. Pep Club 3, Rep 3, Girls’ Glee 1. 2. Chorus 2. FHA 1. 2, 3, Parliamentarian 2. Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, DECA 3. Seniors enjoy being at top of AHS ladder AMES HIGH'S bread-and-butter play- chalks up six points. 148 NANCY JO COOK: OR A 1, Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 1, 2, 3, Chorus 1. 2, 3, Web 3, Drama 1. 2, 3, Palm Qub 3, Spanish Club 1, 2, V-Pres 1, Librarv Club 1, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Rep 3. SUZANNE COOK: Pep Club 3, Drama 1, FHA 3, French Club 1, 2, 3, HR Sec 1. KITTY SUE COOPER: Cheersquad 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 3, Drama 1, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Rep 1, HR officer 1, 2. CHRISTINA COSTE: Spanish Club 3, Girl Reserves 3, moved from Norfolk, irginia 3. MICHEAL GERALD COSTE: Boys Club 3. moved from Norfolk, Virginia 3. LINDA RAE COTTRILL: GRA 1, 2. 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. JEFFREY H COX: Basketball 1. 2, 3, Football 1, 2, Track 1, Varsity Club 2, 3, Class Pres 2, Fire Squad 1, Boys' Club 1, 2, 3, V-Pres 3, HR Pres 1. CAROL ANN CRAIG: GRA 2. 3. Rep 3. Pep Club 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. CYNTHIA LYNN CRAIG: GRA 1. Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 1, 2. 3, Choir 3, Chorus 1, 2. 3, French Club 2, 3, Sec 2, Spirit Rep 2, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Rep 1, HR Sec 2. DIANA JOYCE CRAIG: GRA 3, Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 1, Choir 2, 3, Chorus 1, Drama 1, FHA 3, parliamentarian 3, French Club 2, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Rep 1, 2. 3. STEPHEN RAY CRAIG: Golf 1, 2. 3, Intra- mural Council 1, 3, Latin Club 1, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. JAMES C CRAIN: Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. DAVID L CROSS: Spanish Club 3, Rep 3, Boys’ Club 2, 3, moved from Millard, Nebraska 2. BRUCE C CUMMING: Track 1, 2, 3, Band 1, Web 3, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. FREDERICK MARK DAHLMEIER: Football 1, 2, 3, Intramural Council 2, Track 1, 2, 3, Varsity Club 2, 3, Band 1, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3, Student Council 3, HR Pres 3. DONALD DENNIS DALTON: Football 1, 2, Track 2, Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. 149KATY JO RIGG lashes out at the Boone Toreadors. LEE ROBERT DANIELSON: Band 1. 2, 3, Boys’ Glee 1, Science Seminar 1, 2, German Club 1. 2, 3. Boys' Club 1, 2, 3. JEAN DAVIDSON: Drama 2. 3. Lib- rary Club 1, 2. 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. RAYMOND L DAVIDSON: Boys' Club 1. 2, 3. RICHARD R DE BOER: Band 2. 3. Boys’ Glee 3, Choir 3. Orch- estra 2, Dance Band 3, Boys’ Club 2. 3. moved from Gilbert, Iowa 2. THOMAS WILLIAM DIXON: Tennis 1. 2. Boys’ Glee 1, Chorus 1. De- bate 2. 3, Spanish Club 1. SPIRIT Staff 3. Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3. DONALD I) DOLING: Band 2. 3. Choir 2, 3, Boys’ Club 2. 3. moved from Dcs Moines, Iowa 2. ERIC C DONHOWE: Intramural Coun- oil 1. 2, 3, Tennis 1. 2, 3, man- ager 1, 2. 3, Varsity Club 2, 3, Web 3, Debate 2, French Cluh 1, Boys’ Cluh 1. 2, 3. ROBERT ADAIR DOTSON : Track 1, 2. 3, Varsity Club 2. 3, Boys’ Glee 1. 2. Chorus 1. 2. Web 3. German Club 1, 2. SPIRIT Staff 2. 3. Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3. Rep 2. Senior Senate 3, Student Council 1. 2. HR Pres 1. 2. DENNIS R DOWELL: Band 1. 2. 3, Pres 3, Boys’ Glee I. 2, 3. Choir 2. 3, Chorus 1. Orchestra 2, 3, Pres 2, Drama 2. 3, Palm Club 3. French Club 3, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3, moved from Adel, Iowa 1. KEN E DUNCAN: Basketball 1. 2. Golf 2. 3. Boys’ Glee 1, 2, Chorus 1, Track 1, French Club 1. 2, Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. KENNETH ALAN EERNISSE: Track 1. 2. 3. Boys' Glee 1, 2, 3, Chorus 1, 2, 3, Wrestling 3, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. MICHAEL JOHN ELBERT: Basketball Man- ager 1, Football 1, Track 1, 2. 3, Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. 150298 Seniors make up class of ’64 ROGER RANDALL ERWINE: Boys’ Club 2, 3, HR officer 3. moved from Lamoni, Iowa 2. CAMILLA MARIE EVANS: CRA 2. 3, Ciris’ Glee 2, Choir 3, Chorus 2, Girl Reserves 2, 3, moved from Kelley, Iowa 2. STEPHEN T ELBERT: Drama 1, 2, 3, Palm Club 2. 3. Prc' 3. Science Seminar 1. German Club 1, Bo -' Club 1. 2. 3. Stage Technician 1. 2. 3, Head 2. 3, Electronic Club 2. JAMES DUANE ELLIOTT: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. PAMELA LEE ELLIS: GRA 2, Pep Club 3. Flf 1. French Club 1, Spanish Club 2. 3, Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. moved from Kissi nice. Florida 1. LARRY DOUGLAS ENSER: Football 1. Wrestling 2. Spanish Club 1, Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Student Council 3. HR Pres 3. KATHLEEN LORRAINE EPSTEIN: Girls’ Glee 2. Drama 2. 3, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. JUDITH ANN ERICKSON: GRA 2, 3. Rep 3. Pep Club 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. GARY LYNN ERSKINE: Football 1. 2. 3, Basketball 1. Track 1, Manager 2. 3. Varsity Club 2. 3. Spanish Club 1. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3: Cabinet 3. Senior Senate 3. Student Council 2. HR Sec 1. Pres 2. THROUGH EXPERIMENTS students discover scientific prim ciples for themselves. 151Senior girls plan “Frostfire,” December 28 ELLEN OKNER FE1NBERG: Web 3, Drama 1, Science Seminar 1, Spanish Club 1, 2, 3, Scratch Pad Staff 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. Student Council 3, Social Chairman 3, HR Pres 2. MICHAEL WILLIAM FELLINGER: Drama 2.3. Palm Club 3, Cerman Club 1. Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3, Electronics Club 2, 3. LOIS ELLEN FIELDS: Pep Club 3. Band 3. Girls’ Glee 1, 2, Chorus 1. 2, Latin Club 1. German Club 2. 3, Library Club 1, 2. 3, Sec 1. 2. SPIRIT Rep 3. Class Treas 3, Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Rep 1. Senior Senate 3. HR V-Pres 2. Treas 3. JAMES ROBERT FINCH AM: Football 2. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. DEALTA FODDERBURG: Pep Club 3. ('.iris Glee 1, 2, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3 LARRY FORTNER: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3 JUNE FREDRICK: Pep Club 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Girls’ Glee 1. 2, Web 3. Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 3. Cerman Club 1. 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3, returned from Braunschweig Germany 1. ROSE M FREEL: Pep Club 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. RITA ANN GETTY: GRA 1. 2. 3. Tennis 1. Pres 3, Pep Club 3. Council, Rep, FHA 2, 3. Historian 2. V-Pres 3. German Club 1, SPIRIT Rep 1, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3, Cabinet 2. Rep 1, HR Treas 1, V-Pres 2. 3. 152JAMES S GILCHRIST: Baseball 1. 2. 3. Foot- ball 1. 2. 3. Latin Club 1, SPIRIT Rep 2. Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3, Student Council 1. HR Pres 1. ROBERT DAVID CLICK: Band 3, Orchestra 3. Pep Band 3, Dance Band 3, Student Di- rector 3, Bovs’ Club 3. moved from Bur- lington, Iowa 3. THERESA ANN GLOSEMEYER: FHA 2, DECA 3. Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. MARLENE KAE GOOD: Girl Reserves 3, moved from Nevada, Iowa 3. MARTHA KAY GRABAU: GRA 1. Pep Club 3. Gi.Is’ Glee 1, Choir 2, Chorus 1. FHA 1, 2, 3. Pari 1. Pres 2, Sec 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Cabinet 3. Rep 1. HR Sec 1. 2. MICHEAL C GREEN: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. DANNA M HAGEMAN : GRA 1. Girls’ Glee 1. 2. Sec 2, Chorus 1. FHA 2, Library Club 2, 3. Scratch Pad 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Rep 1. BARBARA ANN HAGEN: GRA 2. Pep Club 3, Girls’ Glee Club 2. Drama 1. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3, Rep 2. Ast General Treas 3. GARY ALAN HALL: Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3, Web 3. COLIN HALTER MAN.: Football 2. Tennis 2. 3. Track 1, Bo» Club 1. 2. 3. BRUCE W HAMILTON: Band 3. Boys’ Glee 2. Choir 2, Pep Band 3, German Club 2. 3, Boys’ Club 2. 3, moved from Iowa Falls, Iowa 2. JAMES P HANDLEY: Track 1. 2. 3. Cross Coun- try 3, Varsity Club 2. 3, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3, Senior Senate 3. Student Council 2. HR Pres 2. VICKIE ANN I' XNNUSCH: GRA 2. Pep Club 3. Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, DECA 3. PAMELA MARGARET HANSON: GRA 3, Pep Club 3. Band 2, 3. Drama 2, French Club 2. 3, Girl Reserves 2, 3, Rep 3, moved from Cor- vallis, Oregon 2. JOHN J HAN WAY JR: Basketball 1, 2. Band 1. 2, Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3, Boys’ Glee 1. Chorus 1. SPIRIT Rep 2, Student Council 3, HR Pres 3. PAUL E HARRIS: Boys’ Glee 1, 2. 3, Choir 2, 3, Chorus 1, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3, Rep 1. Wrestling 3, DECA 3, Pres 3. LARRY LEE HARSTAD: Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. Intramural Council. 153KOSTA T HATSIOS: Track 1, 2. 3, Cross Country 3, Hoys' Club 1, 2, 3, Cabinet 3, Student Council 2, HR Pres 2, V-Pres 3, Intramurals 1, 2, 3. STEVE C HAUSNER: Boys' Club 1, 2, 3. RICHARD T HAYWARD: Wrestling 2, Hand 1, 2, 3, Dance Hand 1, 3,. Drama 2, Science Seminar 1, Hoys' Club 1. 2, 3. JEFF COX PREPARES for a crucial free throw. ROBERT MARTIN HAZEL: Baseball 1. Intramural Council 1, 2, 3, Web 3. German Club 1, HR Pres 1 Student Council 1, Hoys’ Club 1. 2. 3, Rep 3, Student Council 1, HR Pres 1. STEPHEN EARL HEADY: Intra- mural Council 1, Track 1, 2, Science Seminar 1, Boys' Club 1. 2, 3. LARRY HEDBERG: Baseball 1. 2.3. Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3. Rep 1. CAROL HEDDLESTON: CRA 1. 2. Pep Club 3. Girls' Glee 1, French Club 1. SPIRIT Rep 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. H R Sec 2. 3. EDWARD ALLAN HEERS: Baseball 1. 2. 3. German Club 1, Boys' Club 1, 2, 3. DAVID HAROLD HEGLAND: Football 3. German Club 1. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3, Student G.uneil 1. RH Pres 1. JANE ANN HENRIKSON: CRA 1. 2. 3 IVp Club 3, Girls' Glee 1. 2. Chorus 1. 2. Web 3, Drama 1. Spanish Club 1. 2, 3. Si;e-Treas 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. Cabinet 3, Jr Exec 2. HR Sec 1. MICHEAL HOWARD HILDEBRAND: Football 1. 2, Track 1. 3, Boys’ Glee 1, 2, Chorus 1, 2. Spanish Club 1, 2. HR Officer. 154Nordskog, Woods, Barrow, Fields lead seniors KENT WILSON HILDRETH: Football 1.2,3, Coif 1, 2, 3, Intniinurul Council 1, 3, Varsity Club 1, 2. 3, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3, HR V-Pres 1. IERRA KAA HILL: Pep Clui» 3, Drama 2, 3, Palm Club 3. Girl Reserves 2. 3, Rep 2, 3, HR See 2. moved from ludianola, Iowa 2. JACQUELINE HILLS: GRA 1, Pep Club 3. Girls' Glee Club 1, 2. Robe Keeper 2. Chorus 1, 2, Robe Keeper 2, If 'eh 3, Drama 1, 2, 3, FHA 1, French Club 2. 3, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3, Cabinet 3. MARTI KATHREEN HUHN: GRA 1, 2. Pep Club 3, Girls' Glee 2, Spanish Club 1. Cirl Reserves 1, 3. BARBARA HUMPHREY: Orchestra 1.3. See 3, French Club 1, 2. Web 3. Drama 1, Girl Reserves 1, 3. JAMES PAUL INGVOLDSTAD: Baseball 1, 2,3, Basketball 1, Track 1, 2. 3, Varsity Club 2. 3. Rand 1, V-Pres 1, Boys' Glee 1, V-Pres 1, SPIRIT Rep 2. Fire Squad 1. 2. 3, Boys' Club 1, 2, 3, Student Council 1, 2, 3, Student Body Pres 3, HR Pres 1, 2. LARRY A JEFFERSON: Boys' Club I, 2, 3. DONNA RAE JOHNSON: GRA T, 3. Rep 1, Pep Club 3, Rep 3, Cirl Reserves 1. 2, 3, Rep 3. HR Sec. JOYCE ELAINE JOHNSON: Pep Club 3, Girls’ Glee 1. Pres 1. Chorus 1, 2. Palm Club 2, 3, French Club 1, Spanish Club 3, Rep 3. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3, Cabinet 3, HR Sec 1. MARY ANN HINRICHSEN: Cheersquad 1, Pep Club 3, Chorus 1, Girls’ Glee 1. Chorus 1, Latin Club 1, Treas 1. German Club 2, 3. Sec 2. SPIRIT Staff 2, 3. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3. Cabinet 2. Pres 3, V Pres 3, HR V-Pres 1, Sec 2. BETTE ANN HISEROTE: Pep Club 3, Web 3. Cirl Reserves 1. 2, 3. DEC A 3. BARBARA G HOLMES: GRA 3, Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 1, 2. Chqjus 1, 2. Latin Club 1. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3. KARLA KATHLEEN HORSWELL: GRA 1, 2, 3, Rep 2, 3. Girls' Glee 1, 3, Chorus 1. Spanish Club 1, 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. DONNA EARLENE HOWARD: Band 1, 2, 3. V-Pres 3, Girls’ Glee 1, Choir 2, 3, Chorus 1, Orchestra 2. Web 3, French Club 1, 2. 3. V-Pres 2. Pres 3. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3, Sec 3. HR V-Pres 2. GARY W HOWERTON: Baseball 1. 2. 3. Foot- ball 1. Varsity Club 3, Band 1. 2. 3, Boys Glee 1. 2. 3. Choir 2, 3. Chorus 1, Latin Club 2. Boys' Club 1, 2. 3. 155DIANE ENJOYS a moment of mirth before the Christ- mas program. Shepherd, Schworm, Ostrem vie for presidency NANCY I.EA JOHNSON: Pep Club 3. Girl He- serves 3. moved from Fort Dodge. Iowa 3. VIRGINIA KAE JONES: GRA 1, Pep Club 3. Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 2, 3, Spanish Club 2. Latin Club 1. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3, representative 3. THOMAS R KEE: Baseball 1, 2. 3. Football 1. 3. Intramural Council 2. Rand 1. 2. 3. Librarian 3. Boys (dee 2, Mixed Chorus 2. Dance Band 3. Pep Band 3, Web 3, Spanish Club 1, 2. 3. V-Pres 2. Student Council 3. HR V-Prcs 2. Pres 3. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. PAUL KEIGLEY: F.K tball 1. 2. 3. Track 1. 2. 3. Varsity Club 1. 2, 3, Boys Glee 1, 2. 3. Boys' Club 1, 2. 3. ANN MILLER KEISLER: Pep Club 3. W eb 3, Girl Reserve 2. 3. moved from Rabat. Morocco 2. MARSHA LYNN KELLER: GRA 1. Pep Club 3. Latin Club 1. Spanish Club 2. 3, Library Club 1. 2. 3. V-Prcs 3. Pres 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. JOHN R KENNEDY JR: Track 3, Boys' Club 1, 2. 3. DENNIS D KEZAR: Football 1, 2. 3. Track 1. 2. 3. Varsity Club 2, 3. Wrestling 2. 3. Band 1. 2. Drama 3, German Club 2, 3, V-Pres 2. 3. Boys' Club 1. 2. 3. 156RONALD STANLEY KIN ART: Boys' Club 2, 3. DECA 3, moved from Huxly, Iowa 2. EDWARD J KING: Baseball 2. Golf 1, 3. Web 3, Latin Club 1, Fire Squad 2, 3, Boys' Club 1.2,3. Hop 1. MARY ANN KL1NGSEIS: CRA 1, 2, Intramural . Chairman 2, Pep Club 3, Girls" Glee Club 1, Drama 1. 2, 3, Palm Club 3. Spanish Club 1, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Cabinet 3, Jr Exec Council 2. CHARLES B KNAPP: Basketball 1, 2, 3. Foot- ball 1. 2. 3, Golf 1, 2, 3, Varsity Club 1. 2. 3. Boys’ Glee 1, 3, Choru- 1,3. If eb 3, Latin Club 1, 2, 3, Officer 1. Fire Squad 1. 2, 3. Sec-Treas 3. Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3, Cab- inet 3, Senior Senate 3, Student Coun- cil 1, HR Pres 1, Officer 3. DEW AVNE L KNOTT: Golf 1. Tennis 3. Band 1, 2, 3. Dance Band 3. Drama 1, 2. 3, Palm Club 3, Science Seminar 1, Spanish Club 1, Boys Club 1, 2. 3. COLLIN R KROPF: Football 1. 2. 3, Track 1. 2, 3, Varsity Club 3, Bovs’ Club 1,2,3. Rep 2; Wrestling 2. 3. HR V-Pres 3. THOMAS EDWARD LANDSBERG: Basketball 1. 2. 3. Football 1, 2. 3, Intramural Council 1. Track 1. 2, 3, Varsity Club 1. 2. 3. IT eb 3, Spanish Club 1. Fire Squad 1. 2. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3. Student Council 1, 2. HR Pres 1, 2. DENNIS EUGENE LANGE: Baseball 3, Football 1. Track 3, Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3. PATRICIA JANE LANGE: Pep Club 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3 Rep 3. JUDITH MARIE LARSEN: GRA 2. 3. Pep Club 3. Band 1. 2, 3, Girls' Glee 1, 2, 3, Choir 3, Chorus 1, 2, Spanish Club 1, 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Rep 2. LINDA KAY LARSON: CRA 1. 2, 3, Rep 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 1. 2, Chorus 1. 2, Spanish Club 1, 2, Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3, Rep 2. PAULETTE L LARSON: GRA 2. 3, Rep 2. Pep Club 3. Council 3, Rep 3, Girls’ Glee 1, 2, Chorus 1, 2, Web 3. Latin Club 1, Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3, HR Sec 2. TERRY ANN LARSON: GRA 2. Pep Club 3, Drama 1, FHA 2, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Rep 1, 2, HR Sec 1. MARY JO LASCHE: Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee I, 2, Sec-Treas 2, Chorus 1, 2, Orchestra 1, 2, Sec-Treas 2, Web 3. Drama 2, 3, Latin Club 1, French Club 2, SI’IRIT Rep 1, 2, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Cabinet 3, Rep 1. HR Sec. CATHY J LEGVOLD: Pep Club 3, Band 1. Girls Glee 1. 2, Chorus 1, Drama 1, 2, Palm Club 2, 3. SI'IKIT Staff 2. 3. Rep 1. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3, Cabinet 3. Rep 1, HR V-Prcs L 3. JAMES D. LINDER: Football 1. 2, 3, Track 1. Varsity Club 3, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. Rep. 1, Wrestling 2, 3. DALE THOMAS LOVE: Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3, HR Sec 3. J 157ROLFE NEWELL LOWKIE: Track 3, Drama 2, 3, Palm Chii» 3, French Clui» 2, 3, Student Council 2, HR officer 1, 2; Hoys' Clui» 1, 2. 3. RICHARD LUNDVALL: Track 1, 2. 3, Hoys' Club 1. 2. 3. C CRAIG MACK: Baseball 2, Basketball 1, 2, Football 1, 2, 3. Coif 1, Track 1. 2. 3, Var- sity Club 2, 3, Fire Squad 1, 2, 3. Hoys’ Club 1, 2. 3, Student Council 1, 3, V-Pres 3, HR Pres 1. 3, Hall Monitor 2. 3. MARNA LYNN MALONE: CRA 1. Rep 1, Pep Club 3, Girls' Glee 1, 2, Choir 3, Chorus 1, 2, French Club 3, Library Club 1, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. KATHLEEN JOYCE MANCHESTER: Pep Club 3, Girls’ Glee 1, 2, 3, Scc-Treas 3, Chorus 2, 3, Drama 1, 2, 3, Palm Club 2, 3, Spanish Club 1, 2, 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Rep 1, HR V-Pres 1. 2. DIANA MASSEY: Pep Club 3, Drama 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. SUSAN KAY MATHISON: Pep Club 3. Girls' Glee 2. Drama 1, 2, 3, Palm Club 3, Spanish Club 1, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. KATHLEEN MAHALA MATTSON: CRA 1, 2. 3, Rep 2. Girls’ Glee 1, 2, 3, Chorus 1, 3. Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Rep 3. HELEN JEANNE McCARTNEY: Pep Club 3. Drama 2, 3, German Club 1, 2, Library Club 1, 2, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. JAMES H McCLUGAGE: Spanish Club 1. Boys' Club 1, 2, 3, HR officer 1. PATRICIA ELLEN McCONNELL: Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 1, Chorus 1, ITeb 3, Drajna 1, 2, Palm Club 2, 3, German Club 1, Sec-Trcas 1, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3, Rep 3, Senior Senate 3. HOLLY SUE McCOY: Pep Club 3. FHA 2, 3, Library Club 1, DEC A 3, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. LARRY KENNETH McCOY: Track 1. 2, 3, Boys' Club 1, 2, 3, Choir 2, 3, Chorus 1, Hoys’ Glee 1, 2, 3, Cabinet 2, 3. 158Senior philosophy: hard work mixed with plenty of fun ROBERT K Mil LER; Boy»’ Glee 1. Band 1, 2. 3, Latin Club 1. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. STEPHANC MILLER: HR Pres 1, 2. Base- ball 2, 3, Foot- ball 1, Intra- mural Cap 1, 2. Track 1, 2. 3. Var- sity Club 1, 2, 3. Band 1. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Boys' Glee 1. Chorus 1, Orchestra 1. Web 3, German Club 1, Student Council 1. 2. HR Pres 1. 2. MARY RUTH MONTGOMERY: Girls’ Glee 1, Chorus 1, Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 3, Trcas 3, French Club 1, 2. SPIRIT Rep 2, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Cabinet 3, Jr Exec Council 2, Student Council 1,3, HR Pres 1,3. MARTHA JEAN McCRARY: GRA 3. Band 3, Girl Reserves 3. moved from Red Oak. Iowa 3. JANE ELIZABETH McCULLOUCH: GRA 3. Pep Club 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3. DENNIS M McFARLAND: Track 3, Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. JACK McILWAIN: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. AN OFrEN HEARD cry in trig class was . . . "First one done gets an autographed picture of Mr. Hiedemann.” PHYLLIS J McMAHON: GRA 2, Pep Club 3. FHA 1. 2. 3. Pres 3, Girl Reserve 1. 2, 3. DECA 3. CHARLENE MARIE McMILLEN: GRA 2. Pep Club 3, Debate 1, Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Rep 2. DON McMILLEN: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. 159 ROBERT H MOORHEAD: Football 2.3, Track 2. Varsity Club 2. 3. Boys’ Club 2. 3. moved from Oskaloosa, Iowa 2. ROBERTA MORGAN: Spanish Club 1. 2. 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. DEC A 3. ROGER MULL1N: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. GLENDA M MYERS: CRA 2. Rep 2. Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 1. 2. Chorus 1. 2. Library Club 1. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. JEANETTE MAE NELSON:Cirl Reserves 1. 2. 3. MARILYN JEAN NELSON: Pep Club 3. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3. DONN A J NTCOI.LE: Girls’ Glee 1. 2. 3, Chorus 1, 2, Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. NANCY ANN NOID: Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 1, 2, Chorus 1. 2. Girl Reserve 1.2.3. CYNTHIA SI E NORDHAGEN: Pep Club 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. Rep 1. HR Sec- Treas 2. WILLIAM HOWARD NORDSKOG: Baseball 2. Basketball 1. 2. 3. Football 1. 2. 3. Track 1. 2, 3. Varsity Club 2. 3. Web 3. Clas- Y'-Pres 2. Pres 3. Fire Squad 1. 2. 3. Chief 3. Boyv’ Club 1. 2. 3. Rep 1. Jr Exec Council 2. Senior Senate 3. Student Council 1. HR Pres 1. JANET KAY OLSON: GRA 1. 2. 3. Pep Club 3. Rep 3. Band 1. 2. 3. Web 3. Drama 1. 2. 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Rep 2. SPIRIT Ren 3. ROBERT KEITH OSHEL: Baseball 1.2. Football 1. 2. Track 2. 3. Wrestling 2. 3. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. DENNIS LEE OSTREM: Basketball 1. Football 1. 3. Track 1. 2. 3. Latin Club 1. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. HR officer 1. 2. GARY LYNN OVERLAND: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. JAN CAROL PAINTER: Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 3, French Club 1. 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. 160MISS McNALLY’S English Lit class discusses Pride and Prejudice. Seniors carried much of the burden of student government LINDA JEAN PARKER: CRA 1. 2. Pep Club 3, Girls Glee 1. 2. Band 2. 3. Chorus 1. 2, Drama 1, FHA 2. Library Club 1. 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. JUDY LEE PARKS: CRA 1. Pep Club 3. Girls Glee 2, 3, Web 3. Spanish Club 1, 2. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3. JERROLD C PEDERSEN: Basketball 1. 2, 3. Tennis 1. 2. Weh 3. Boys Club 1. 2. 3. Student Council 1. HR Pres 1. NORMAN DALE PENNY: Football 1. 2. 3, Intramural Coun- cil 1. Track 1. 2. 3, Varsity Club 2. 3, Boys’ Glee 1. Chorus 1, Boys' Club 1, 2. 3. Rep 2. HR V-Pres 1, 3. JERRY MICHAEL PETERS: Football 1, 2. 3. Intramural Council 1, 3. Boys' Glee 1, Chorus 1. Latin Club 2. SPIPIT Rep 3. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. HR V-Pres 1. 161 PEGGY ANN REINBERGER: GRA 1. 2. Rep 2. Pep Club 3. Girls Glee 2. Chorus 2, H eb 3. Drama 1, 2, 3, Palm Club 2. 3. V-Pres 3, French Club 2, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. HR Sec 2, DEC A 3. WIN OR LOSE, the Pep Club was on hand to promote spirit and sportsmanship. SHARON KAY PHILLIPS: Pep Club 3. Girls Glee 1. 2. Choir 3. Chorus 1. 2. Orchestra 1. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. HR See 1. RONALD RICHARD I'Ll MB: Football 1,2. 3. Intramural Council 1. Bovs’ Glee 1. Chorus 1. Boys Club 1, 2. 3. Rep. 2. HR officer 1. DECA 3. Trcas 3. ELAINE P POLITIS: Pep Club 3. Band 2. 3. (.iris Glee 1. Chorus 1. Drama 1. 2. Spanish Club 1. 2.3. Pres 2. SPIRIT Rep 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Rep HR Sec 1. DECA 3. V Pres 3. MARILYN A QUAM: Band 1.2. Ciris’ Glee 1. 2. Choir 1. 2. 3. Chorus 1. 2. French Club 2, Spanish Club 1, Girl Reserve- 1. 2. 3. Rep 3. HR Sec 2. JOSEPH ROBERT QUINN: Football 2. Tennis 2. Track 1. Drama 1, Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. JO ANN LYN RADEMACHER: GRA 1. 2. 3. Rep 3. Pep Club 3. Rep 3. Band 1, 2. Girls’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Choru- 1. 2. 3. Sec-Treas 3, French Club 1, 2. Library Club 1, 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3. HR Sec 1. CURTIS I. PETERSON: Golf 2. 3. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. DONNA PETERSON: Pep Club 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. DECA 3. MARK A PETERSON: Tennis 1. 2. 3. Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3, Choir 2. 3. Chorus 1. Orchestra 1, 2. V-Pres 2. Science Seminar 1, 2. German Club 1. 2. 3. SPIRIT Staff 3. Fire Squad 2. 3. Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3, Cabinet 3, Senior Sen- ate 3, Student Council 2. HR Pres 2. 162 13 merit scholarship semi-finalists in Senior Class BETTY ANN REITZ: Ftp Club 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. DECA 3. THOMAS M. RICE: Golf 1, 2, 3, Varsity Club 1, 2. 3. Boys Club 1,2,3. MARY ANNE RICHARDS: Pep Club 3, Pres 3, Girls’ Glee 1, Choir 2, 3, Chorus 1, Spanish Club 2. 3, SPIRIT Staff 3, Rep 2, Girl Re- serves 1. 2, 3. Rep 2, Student Council 2. HR Pres 2. KATY JO RIGG: Pep Club 3, Web 3. Drama 1, 2, 3, Palm Club 2. 3, Sec 3. French Club 1. 2, Library Club 1, 2. 3, Sec 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3, Cabinet 3, Pres of Rep 3. HR V-Pres 2. Sec 3. PEGGY ANN RIGGS: CRA 1, 2. 3. Cabinet 3, Intramural Chairman 3, Pep Club 3, Council 3, Rep 3, Girls’ Glee 1, Choir 2, 3, Chorus 1, Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3. ELIZABETH PARKER ROBINSON: Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 1. 3, Chorus 1. 3, French Club 1, 2, 3, Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3, Rep 3. BRl’CE KENT ROGERS: Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Choru» I. 2, 3, Web 3. Science Seminar 1, Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. SUSAN MARY ROCNESS: Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 2. Drama 1. 2, 3. Palm Club 2, 3, Spanish Club 2, 3. Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. DAVA LYNNE ROLF: Spanish Club 1. 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. SPIRIT Rep 1. LEANDRA DALE ROSE: GRA 2. 3. Rep 3, Pep Club 3, Girls’ Glee 1, 2, 3, Chorus 1. 2. 3, FHA 2. 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. BARBARA JO ROSEBROOK: Cheersquad 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 3, Band 1. Girls’ Glee 1. Choir 2, 3, Chorus 1, Web 3, French Club 1, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3. Rep 2. HR Officer 1, 3. THOMAS JAMES ROSS: Basketball 1, 2, Track 1, 2, 3, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. JONATHAN M RUHE: Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. SHARON RAE RUSSELL: FHA 1, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. LEE M. SARGENT: Football 2, Track 1, 2, 3, Varsity Club 2, 3, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3.SALLY ANN SAUL: CRA 1. 2. 3, Pep Club 3, Spanish Club 1, 2, Library Club 1, 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3, Rep 3. WILLIAM I) SAUL: Basketball 1, Football 3. Tennis 3, Track I, 2. Varsity Club 2. 3. Rami 1, Roys' Glee 1, Chorus 1. German Club 1. Roys' Club 1, 2. 3, Wrestling 2, 3. SUSAN SCHLERECKER: Pep Club 3. Drama 1. FHA Officer 3, French Club 2.3. Girl Reserves I. 2. 3, Rep 2. JAMES MICHAEL SCHWARTZ: Basketball 1. 2. 3, Football 1. Track 1. 2, 3. Varsity Club 1. 2. 3. Roys’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Choir 2. 3. Chorus 1. French Club 1. Roys' Club 1. 2, 3. Pres 3, Student Council 2. HR See 1. V.Prcs 2, Pres 2. DAVID WILSON SCHWORM: Basketball Man- ager 2, 3. Football Manager 1. 2. 3. Intramural Council 2. Track 1. 2. 3. Band 1. Roys' Glee 1. 2. 3. Choir 2. 3. Chorus 1. Latin Club 1, SPIRIT Staff 3. Rep 2. Roys' Club 1. 2. 3. HR V-Pres 2. 3. MARVIN R SCLAROW: Basketball 1. Foot- hall 1, Student Trcas 1. Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3. BARBARA ANNE SEALINE: Band 1. Girls' Glee 1. Chorus 1. U rb 3. Drama 1. 2. 3. German Club 1. 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Rep 1. Student Council 3. HR Pres 3. SUSAN MARAI.EE SHADLE: CRA 1. 2. 3. Rep 1. 2. Girls' Glee 2. Drama 1, French Club 1, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. Rep 1. MARGARET FRANCES ADAIR SHEPHERD: GRA 1. 2. 3. Point Chairman 2. V-Pres 3. Rep 1. Rand 2. Choru- 1. Science Seminar 1. 2. German Club 1. 2. 3. Pres 2. SPIRIT Staff 2. 3. Rep 1. Class Sec 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 2. Rep 1. Jr Exec 2. A. DANIEL SHERRICK: Base- ball 1. 2. Basketball 1. Golf 1. Intramural Council 3. German Club 1. V-Pres 1. Scratch Pad Staff 2, SPIRIT Rep 3. Boys' Club 1. 2. 3, Student Council 2. HR Pres. GERALD RAY SHULTZ: Boys' Club 1. 2. 3 KATHLEEN MARY SHUMAN: Pep Club 3. Girls' Glee 2. Spanish Club 1. 2. 3. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3. Rep 2. moved from Rogers Heights. Maryland, 1. MARIAN ELLENE SIMONS: CRA 1. 2. Pep Club 3. Girls' Glee 1: FHA 1. Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. moved from San Diego. California. 1. ALLAN C SIMPSON: Track 1. 2. 3. Varsity Club 3. Boys'Glee 1, 2. 3. Choir 2. 3, Chorus 1. Science Seminar 1. German Club, Boys Club 1, 2, 3. CHARLES MILTON SIVESIND: Band 1, 2. 3. Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Choir 2. 3. Pres 3. Chorus 1. Dance Rand 3, Latin Club 1, Officer 1. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Student Council 2. HR Pres 2. CAROL JOY SMITH: CRA 1, 2. 3, Rep 3. Pep Club 3. Girls' Glee 1. Chorus 1. Spanish Club 1. 2. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3, Cabinet 2. Rep 2. 3. Seniors produce class play April 17-18 164 MICHEAI I' SMITH: Baseball 1,2,3, Boy Club 1,2,3. R M 1 l E SMITH: Baseball 1.2. R..»ket- ball 1, Football 1. 2. Intramural Coun- cil 1. Track 2, Varsity Clui» 1, 2, French Club 1. 2, Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. HIRLEY K A SMITH: CRA 1. 2. 3. Rep 1. 3. Pep Club 3. Band 1, 2, 3, Girls’ Glee 1, 2. 3 Robe Keeper 2, Choir 3. Choru' 1, 2, Drama 1. 2, 3. Palm Club 2. 3. Latin Club 1, French Club 2. 3. Library Club 2, 3. Pro- 3, Girl Reserve» 1, 2, 3, Rep 2, 3, HR Sec 1. sTEPHAME SHE SMITH: GRA 3. Pep Club 3, Debate 3. Span- ish Club 3. Girl Reserves 3, moved from Cedar Rapids, Iowa 3. SHARON MARIF SORENSEN: Pep Club 3, Girls’ Glee 1, 2, 3. Drama 1, 3. FHA 2. 3, Spanish Club 1, 2, 3, Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3, Rep 3. HR See 1. WILLIAM LUCAS SOULTS: Football 1, 3. Basketball 1, 2. 3. Track 1. 2. 3. Varsity Club 3, Boys Glee 1, Chorus 1. Latin Club 1, Fire Squad 1, 2. 3. Chief 3. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Rep 1. V-Pres 3, Jr Exec Council 2. KATHRYN ELAINE SPEAR: CRA 1, 2. 3, Cabinet 3, Rep 3. V-Pres 3. Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Girls’ Clee Club 1. 2, Chorus 1, 2. FHA 2. Spanish Club 2. 3. Rep 3. Library Club 1. 2. JOY LYNN STARR: Pep Club 3, Girls’ Glee 1, 2. Rohe Keeper 2. Chorus 2, Web 3, Drama 1. Latin Club 1. Girl Re- serves 1, 2, 3, DECA 3. CAROL JEAN SORENSON: GRA 1, 2, Rep 1, 2. Pep Club 3. Council 3. Treas 3. Girls' Glee 1, 2. Sec-Treas 1. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3. Rep 1. HR Sec I. 2. ACT TESTS WERE AN EXPERIENCE most Seniors will never forget. A 165I HR WINNER doesn't have to do the World Lit alignment for tonight. Senior week, graduation climax year LINDA MAURINE STEPHENSON: GRA 1. 2. Pep Club 3. Girls' Glee 1. 2, Chorus 1. 2. Web 3. French Clui» 1, 3, Spanish Club 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3. SUSAN KAY STUCKY: Checrsquad 1. 2. 3. Pep Club 3. Girls Glee 1, Scc-Treas 1. Chorus 1, Drama 1. 2. French Club 2. 3. Sec 3. Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3, Cabinet 3. Student Council 3, Sec-Treas 3. HR Sec 2. BETTY ANN SWANSON: Checrsquad 1. Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee I, 2. Chorus 1. 2. Drama 1, 2. FHA 1. French Club 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3, Cabinet 3. Student Treas 3. KEN TALCOTT: Rand 1. 2. Bovs' Glee 1. German Club 1, SPIRIT Rep 2. Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. Cabinet 3. Treas 3. Fire Squad 1. 2. 3. Student Council 1. HR Pres 1. LINDA D TAYLOR: Pep Club 3, Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Rep 1. SHERRY TAYLOR: GRA 2, Pep Club 3. French Club 2. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. JANICE KA TEMPLETON: GRA 1. 2. 3. Pep Club 3, FHA 1. 2. 3. V-Prcs 2. Girl Rerervcs 1, 2, 3. MARTHA JANE THOMPSON: Girls’ Glee 1. 2. Chorus 1, 2. 3. Drama 1, Spanish Club 1. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3. MARY TEASDALE THOMPSON: Pep Club 3. Web 3, Drama 3, Latin Club 1. French Club 2, 3, V-Pres 3, SPIRIT Rep 1. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3, Rep 2, Student Council 2, HR Pres 2. 166EUGENE THORSON: Football 1, Bovs' Club 1.2,3. JOY LOUSE THORSON : Girls' Glee 1, 2, Girl Reserves 1, 2, 3..Rep 3. JOHN 1. TIMMONS: TennG I. 2. 3. Y.,r-it Club 3, Boys’ Glee 1. Chorus 1, Debate 2. Spanish Club 1, 2, Latin Club 3. Fire Squad 2, 3, Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3, Rep 2. HR Y-Pres 2. JAMES IVAN TUTTLE: Football 3. Boys' Club 1. 2. 3. Student Council 3, HR Pres 3. THOMAS ERIC I KEN A: Tennis 2. 3, Track 1. Band 1, 2, 3, Boys’ Glee 1. 3. Choir 3. Chorus 1, German Club 1, 2, SPIRIT Staff 2, 3. Fire Squad 1. 2. 3. Boy»’ Club 1. 2. 3, HR Sec 3. CAROL SUE USTRUD: Pep Club 3, Sec 3, Girls' Glee 1, Sec 1. Choir 2. 3. Chorus 1. Sec 1. ffcb 3, French Club 1. 2. Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3, Cabinet 3, Student Coun- cil 3, Sec 3. HR Pres 3. CORNELIUS DON VAN HOUWELING: Football 1, 2. 3, Basketball 1. Track 1. 3, Varsity Club 2, 3. Wrestling 2. 3. Captain 2. Boy»' Club 1.2,3. MARY LEE YIERKANT: GRA 1. Pep Club 3. Girls’ Glee 2, 3, Chorus 2. 3. Spanish Club 1, 2, 3, Girl Reserves ], 2, 3. ROBERT DANIEL WALKER: Track 2. 3. Band 1. Boys' Glee 1, Chorus 1. Spanish Club 1. 2. Boys' Club 1. 2. 3. Wrestling 3. MARTHA JEAN WALKUP: GRA 1. 3. Pep Club 3. Drama 1. 2, 3, Palm Club 3. French Club 2. 3. Scratch Rad Staff 2. 3. Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Rep 2. JAMES W WARREN: Tennis 1, Science Seminar 2. Boys’ Cluh 1. 2. 3. Audio Visual 2. 3. STEVEN WARREN: Boys' Club 1. 2. 3. TERRENCE A WATKINS: Football 1. 2. 3. Track 1, 2. 3. Boys' Club 1. 2. 3. DONNA KAE WEISER: GRA 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3, Sec-Treas 3. Rep 2, 3. Girls’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Chorus 2, 3, W'ch 3. Latin Club 2, Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. STEPHEN J WESSMAN: Boys' Club 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3. 167CHARLES DAVID WHEELER: Football 1, 2. 3, Track 2. 3. Wrestling 2, 3, Boys'.Club 1, 2, 3, Rep 2. MARY HELEN WHEELOCK: CRA 1. Cheersquad 1, 2, 3, Captain 1, Girls’ Glee 1. 2. Drama 1. 3, Girl Reserves 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 2. HR officer 1. WILLIAM L WICKERSHAM: Intramural Council 2. Tennis 1. 2, 3. Band 1. 2, 3, Boys' Glee 1. Chorus 1, Debate 1, 2, 3. Boys Club 1, 2, 3, Cabinet 3. MOST AMES HIGH STUDENTS have ten toes and find them indispensable in higher math courses. PATTY JO WIENER: Chccrsquad 1. 2. 3. Co-Captain 1. 3. Pep Club 3. Rep 3, Band 1, 2, Girls’ Glee 1. Choir 2, 3. Chorus 1, Girl Reserves 1, 2. 3. Cabinet 2. HR Sec 1. 2. LAURA ELINE WIERSON: Pep Club 3. Band 1, Girls' Glee 1. 2, 3, Scc Trcas 3, Chorus 2, 3, French Club 2. 3, Girl Res- erve 1, 2, 3. 168MARK DOIT.LAS WILCOX: Baseball 1. Boys’ (»lce Club 1, 2, 3, Choir 2, 3, Chorus 1, Track 1. Band 1, Spanish Club 1, SPIRIT representative 1. Boys' club 1, 2. 3. Cabinet 2, Junior Executive Council 2. HR V-Pres 1, 2. JOHN WILDMAN: Baseball 3, Coif 2, Boys’ Glee Club 1. 2, Choir 2, 3. Chorus 1, Web 3, Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3. JEW WILLENBURC: Pep Club 3, Girls’ Glee 1, 2, 3, Chorus 2. 3. Girl Reserves 2, 3, moved from Atlantic. Iowa 2. CHARLES A WILLIAMS: Football 1. German Club 1, Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. UK V-Pres 2. 3. GEORGE PICKETT WILSON III: Baseball 2. 3. Football 2. 3, Varsity Club 2. 3, French Club 2, Boys’ Club 2, 3, Cabinet 3. Sec-Trcas 3, Rep 2. Student Council 2. moved from Charlottesville, Virginia 2. MICHEAL RODNEY WILSON: Band 1. 2. 3. Boys’ Glee 1, Chorus 1, Orchestra 1, 2, Dance Band 3. Science Seminar 1. German Club 1. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. MARC LEE WOODS: Football 1. Track 3. Boys’ Glee 1, Chorus 1. Orchestra 1, 2. 3. Debate 1. 2, 3. Pres 3. Drama 1. 2. 3, Palm Club 2, 3, French Club 1. 2. Scratch Pad 3, Class V-Pres 3. Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. Rep 1. Student Council 1. HR Pres 1, V-Pres 1. JAMES G WRIGHT: Baseball 1. Basketball 1. Football 1. Intramural Council 2. Track 1. 2. 3. Boys' Glee 1. Chorus 1. Web 3. Spanish Club 1, 2, Fire Squad 1, 3. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. UK V-Pres 1. MICHAEL L YEAMAN: Baseball 1. 2. 3. Basketball 1. 2. Football 1. 2. 3. Captain 3, Track 1. 2, 3, Varsity Club 2. 3. Boys' Club 1, 2, 3, Rep 3, UK officer 1, 2. ROBERT ARTHUR YOUNIE: Intramural Council 2, Track 1, 2, Boys’ Clce 1, Chorus 1. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. HR V-Pres 2, Sec 3. SENIORS NOT PICTURED DAVID FISHER BECKY HOFSTAD DAVE MOPPIN DAVID SEARI S SCOTT HAROLDSEN DAVID KELSO TIM OKNGAARD JACKIE WILLIAMS Seniors leave AHS to meet new challenges 169Ut,... JUNIOR EXECUTIVE COUNCIL planned moneymaking activities. Members included: B Moses (pres), D Dick»on, 1) Rau»ke, P Marks. C Bliss. I) Scandrett, M Ilagge (sec). M Jenkins (treas). T Linder. C Warner, M Ritland (v-pres). Juniors become Ames High’s middle children Looking through the junior class last fall, the members of Junior Exec could be easily spot- ted as the ones with the worried, harried expres- sions. They had problems mainly money, money, money. The Junior Executive Council, headed by Brad Moses, had charge of the monumental task of raising eighteen hundred dollars for the Junior-Senior prom. Short of robbing a bank, the juniors undertook any project imaginable to raise the needed funds. MOSES LED JUNIORS to the PROM- ised land. The first effort was selling mums for Homecoming. This was followed by a successful car wash and leaf rake. Then came the drive to sell student directories. Several new ideas were tried, such as selling note paper and sponsoring a faculty-student basketball game. The class play, always a good money-maker, was held in Feb- ruary. When the Prom had finally come and gone, the juniors could look back on a job well done. THE JUNIORS cooperated by raking; the weather cooperated by warming; and the leaves cooperated by falling. k. 170 HOMEROOM 160-1 Front: S Accola, M Bauder, D Bates. J Bcrliow, S Benson, M Augustine, L Bcese, Second: J Arnbal, S Bristol, R Moore, T Bauder, D Barnes, Z Aronoff, S Barrett, D Bauske, Third: Mrs. J Anderson, M Ander- son, D Beckman, S Bappe, D Albertson, T Bappe, J Aho, Bock: J Billings, B Best, D Baker, R Buppe, 1) Barber, 1) Baldner, A Anderson, B Barton. HOMEROOM 255-2- Front: J Seidel, C Sandberg, M Staniforth, L Sobotka, E Straehle, B Kalsem, 1’ Sheeler, Second: M Sielert. D Skarshaug, J O’Daniels, C Sorenson, C Sheehan. J Shearer, M Shaw, Third: 1) Sheeler, M Schmidt, M Sevde. J Smith, M Smith, M Schank, R Skrdla, Back: Mrs. G Bauske, R Seastrand, M Shockley, I) Small, T Roach, J Sheeler, D Scandrett. B Smalling. HOMEROOM 111-2—Front: I. Dalton, S Christenson, C Shultz, N Claude, A Clark, J Carmcan, J Brown, Second: D Cumming, J Disney, C Bliss, N Crovisier, C Carlson, C Byers, Third: K Burnet, G Buttermore, Don Christensen, I) Christensen. R Brown, L Carr, J Carlson, Back: T Boast, P Cafferty, M Blaess, F Bortle, J Bowen, M Bonwcll, R Bleeker, D Knight. 171HOMEROOM 111-1 Front: A Eggleten, K Denisen, I. Dodd. K Peterson, R Crowley. R Eilts. S Dowden, Second: Mr». A Garrett, I’ Ellis, M Duffy, K Donliowe. J Drake, Jewett, I. Dunlap, Third: M Dennis, G Davis. J Dodd. D Dickson. G Clark, II Diehl, J Davidson, Hock: J Collins, J Easton. K Everson. I. Cross. J Dunleavy, H Hayes. S Coe. S Clark. HOMEROOM 215-3—Front: I. Enser. I) Ferguson. K Fisher, J Fi'ke, M Hagge, G Gombossy. Second: Miss Glamser. P Faber, K Gray, J Ferguson, B Friedrich. G Goodman. C Hamme. Third: R Friest. J Fleig, I. Hand, J Foreman. J Hannum. E Foshe, Hack: R Evans. R Exner. C Farley, M Gibbs, I) Elbert, S Fincham, J Green. HOMEROOM 215-2 Front: I) Johannes, T Linder, S Kinker, M Lange, R Jones, P Linder. Second: L Lanczos, I) Lee. M Lewis. B Kelton, P Kroeheski, N Joseph, Third: Mrs. Hodoval, J Ketelsen, D Kelso, B Kloinschmidt, P Larson, D Davis, Hock: R Rot hacker, C Kirkham. C Kauser. R Kline, B Johnson, H King. 172Juniors trounce faculty in basketball game HOMEROOM 212-2—From: L Hazel, M Jack-on. J Hoff, 1 Hussey, K Hull, S Harwell, M Jenkins, Second: J Heer, M Hakes, N Herrick, B Henry, J Israel, 1 Harrell. G Hurlbut, G jacobson. Third: Mrs. Lutz, B Hach, B Anderson, B Hawke-. M Hcggen. D Hedrick. A Anderson. J Hansen, Back: F Heubner, B Heald, G Greene, R Hopkins, J Hensing, R Jellinger. L Harless, K Hoskins. 173HOMEROOM 136-1—From: A Miller, N Veline, B Sorensen, J Spink . C Tevebaugh, A I'the. Second: J Spicer. B Ward, S Trow, S Trexel, I Tonne, R Truhe, I' Svcc, Third: Mr. Oltroggc, I) Squire, K Swanson, J Stewart. D Swanson, J Taylor. T Taulx-r, Hock: M Strickland, I) I'kena, R Fari . I) Bennett, B Tysseling. J Thor on. B Vance. M Ulmer. HOMEROOM 153-2—Front: M Maurer, A McIntosh. 1» Millard, L Makilbust, M Jone . V McKenna. M Miller. S Ag- garwal. Second: I) Miller, J McDowell. T McIntosh. M Miller, J Martin. J Miller. M McLean, Third: Mr. Page. I) Sansgaard, C Macheak, G Lytton, T Lowman. Jerry I.itzel. J Litzel, C Lone, Hack: P Marks, R McCay, A Ickowitz, J Lyon, J McClurkin. J McGinnis, B Lewis. R Manthei. HOMEROOM 211-2 Front: J Horn, S Pepper, I) Olson. L Nickcy, I. Overland. I. Partin. P Friesner. Second: Mrs. Reno, G Oppcdal, A Patterson, L Nelson, J Nairn, A Paulson, M Mulhall, E Mills, Third: B Moses, D Paisley, J Owing , B .Neal, I) Moreland, N Packer, K Page, J Mormon, Hack: B Peters, C Nickel, M Osam, I) Peterson, N Nims, G Perkovich, R Olson. M Pedersen. 174"I am NOT a Volkswagen! Prom ends a year of blood, toil, tears and sweat “FUNNY, this car was blue when we started ..." HOMEROOM 206-3- Front: I) Stilwell. J Porter. $. Reilly, J Reinhart, A Quinn, J Reid. Second: M Bacon. K Pohl, J Piersol, M Poeckes, K Roberson, M Bickel, B Watson, Third: Mr. Ripp, S Piet . M Ritlund, P Sargent, B Rus ell, P Porter. E Crennan. Hack: 1 Pott-. R Ross, S Ri dal. D Rod. T Rasmussen, S Posegate, C Robertson. HOMEROOM 114-1--Front; P Young, B Walker. C Webb, R Wagner. J W irt , C Warner. M Webb, P Wayne. Second: T Pound', J Weiss, K Yeaman, M W bee lock, C Young, J West, B Bathel, A Wharton, Third: Mr. W’ood, P Wood, B Von Bergen. J Van Scoy, J Wheeler, R Wilson, R Reed, B Whattoff. Hack: S Ladd. J Wallin. V Villwock, J Villwock, I) Voight. R Voss, K Woodworth. L Watts. 175AS SOPHOMORES, the class of '66 reached their fir t goal, a winning football team. Optimistic sophomores begin first year HOMEROOM 109-2 Front: C Whiting, C Bristol, C Nicoile. M Rodenborn, M Morris, B Fuller, S Zmolek. J Coyle, Second: W Lovely, C Firkins. S Bunce, S Larson, M Mathers, D Keisler, J Hart, Third: V Pirtle, B Baker. T Carbrey, J Dickson. 1) Paulson, K Shocn, C Wood, V Yoclker, Hack: Mr. Beckham. T Ellett, B Saturen. R Houge, R Agard. Si Thomas. S Wells, B Gloscmeycr. 176HOMEROOM llT-l—fron : M Schaefer, S Spatcher, S Wickcrsham, M Christenson, C Sullivan, S Keller, J Zober, S Larson, Second: C Mattson, 0 Pohl, M Mosse, B Smith, V Albright, K Eness, J Gunnerson, I. Simpson, Third: N Roelof- 'cn, E Brown, D Craig, S Goettsch, K Sills, M Vreeland, 1) Baker, 1. Fiscus, Muck: Mr. Covey, S Pepper, D Blackburn, M McClurkin, M Nolin, D Poling, E Huffman, B Thomas, A Woodrow. HOMEROOM 133-1- Front: K Svec, A Huntress, A Engeldinger, S Wierson, S Baker, I) Peglar, J Wagner, Second: M Gammon, B Best, M Craig, K Kelley, V McCoy. D Politis, T Oates. A Buchanan, Third: Mrs. Crane, I) Graea, J Brown, 1 Simmering, T Healy, B Doran, M Thompson, S Arens, Hock: M Woodward, D Speer, M Burns, B Gutman. M McCowen. B Wright, I. Allison. A Mulhall. HOMEROOM 134-2—Front: L Singer. K Olson. T Billings, L Coinptom. C Wicsmer, I) Miller, J Baldus, L Garland, Second: B Anderson. M Gos ard. K Brown, A Meyer, D Hagelock, J Sprouse, S I.asche, 1. Hutchinson, Third: E Work- man, J Ellis, T Craig, K Ross, L Eucher, M Walters, M Stevens, Hock: G Duncan, B Buchanan, I) McFarland, B Penny, M Kelso, B Heaton, N Thompson. J Powell. 177PHHHnBBHBn HOMEROOM 112-1 Front: C Anderson, A Barber, I) Dreewn, S Slatlclman, S Purvis, C Marpuardt, J Epstein. Second: M Foreman, B Swanson, R Reynolds, E Kennedy, S Mickelson, S Olson, 0 Cross, D Mullin, Third: B Hutchison. T llagebock. J I.ash, C Bruner, I) Tweed, B Ward, J Hedden, Hack: Mr. Hiedeman, B Schoemembcrger, B Beckman. M Calhoon, I) Gauger, I) Wilcox, B Singer, B Groomes. HOMEROOM 251-2 Front: S Rullestad. 1) Gilreath, M Erickson, J Middle, M Foreman. R Ingram, G McKenna, N Vang. Second: Mrs. Hunt, B Knight. S Trow, G Constantine. H Sylvester. C Scott, C Myers, T Wardle, Third: C Peter- son, K Wildman. 0 Skaff. J Cummings. B Stcil, K Brunia.J Hagcman. C Latta. Back: 1) Dresser, C Canaday. D Barnhart. C Grau, S Olson. R Blake, H Ramsey, J Anderson, S llegland. HOMEROOM 213-3—Front: R Skei, 11 Randles, I. Andrew, A Hemstreet. I. Tranz, S G re we II, E Sealine, D Miller. Second: S Swan, T Daffin, B Baumann, J Peterson, G Loder, J Nelson, J Synhorst. N Kezar. Third: K Drummond, D Gibson, M McKern, C Beal, T Lawrence, B Cook, C Engelhard!, Back: Mr. Overturf, B Brunkow, J I ng voids tad, K Rutter, S Knudson, S Hagen, D Warg, K Cantonwinc, A Sandvick. 178SOPHOMORES DISCOVER, through labwork . . . Sophs learn the ropes at AHS HOMEROOM 254-2- Front: C Stewart, M Krocheski. K Watkins, T Moeller, D Daley, .1 Freel, J Rogue, Second: I. Smith, L Self, M Gilchrist. C Beach. L Rutter. M Dotson. A Talhott, K Cooper, Third: I) Uhl, L Williams, 'I McKi’nley, v Orning, R Brunkow, J Peterson, J Larson. R Fate, Back: Mr. Smalling, I) Younie, D Leder, G Carlson, T Read, R. Green. M Anderson, T Hall. B Jacobson. HOMEROOM 118-1 Front: B Aggarwal. A Greenwood, I) Jones. S Underhill, S Dullman, I) Smith, M Stewart, P Batman. Second: M Williams. P Carr. P Taylor, E Lagerstrom, J Herrick, M Corbin, G Montgomery, C Jenkins, Third: A Fellinger. B Beach. K Younie, I) Halterinan, P Dunkin. S Maas. M Peterson, S Gilchrist, Back: Mr. Spatcher, J Lindell, P Nelsen, J Borden, L Andrews. W French, D Shadle, M Weiser, J Bryan. 179HOMEROOM 212-3—Front: S Peterson, S Smith J Cote, I' Sliadlc, C Moore, D Eckard, M F»-rgu-'in, N Hoffman, Second: I) Lanipe, J Fnbley, J Vallinc, M Key, A Catus, M W'esack. I. Reilly, L Lockhart, Third: Mi ' Swedell, D Zack, E Johnson, E Wilson, T Magilton, J Ryding, J Strand, Rommueller, Hack: C Davi , C Orngard, J Halverson. K Pace, I) Rryner, K Genovese, M Bliss, J Green. HOMEROOM 252-2—Front: C Love. S Beals, K lloldren. W Strother, I. Glandorf. K Parker, L Davis. L Bowen. Second: Mrs. Thompson, S Netcott, S Johnson. I. Charles, G Elln-rt. M Frigaard. J Templeton. P W inkier. Third: H Phillips, J Buck, G Hanson, A Sharlin, I) Bushore, A Morgan. I) Cottrill. W Wcstvold, Hack: M Sanders, D Femclius. (.' Marklcy, I) Zaffarano, S Smith, S Vance, B Armstrong, T Richards. HOMEROOM 213-2—Front: G Charlson. C Groal, I. Austrheim. D Coy. M White, L Davis, J Zearley, K Wolf. Second: Mrs. Yegors. K Finnegan. M Pascale, G Smith. B Martin. P Anderson. B Riegel, L Phillips, Third: I) Love, R Han- way. J Morgan, J Horsefield, C Nichols, I) Beaty, B Vaughn, R Stuck) , Hack: G Thiel. J Boylan. 0. Eldridgc, C Whaley, W Sandre, I. Sherman, R Larsen. A Jones.Sophs end up older, wiser . . . and juniors "NOW IS THE TIME for all good mm to conul to the adi ro their cxrjlmm .. THROUGHOUT the year students must fill out a never-ending supply of forms and papers. 181 FIRST SEMESTER STUDENT COUNCIIj-Front: S Pepper, E Feinberg. N Thompson, B Von Bergen, C Latta, V Voelker, Second: G Carlson. J Ingvoldstad. I) Shadle. M Strickland. M. Staniforth. S Stucky (treas), C U trud (sec). B Sealine, M Montgomery, H Diehl, D Bauske, 1) Brown Hack: B Beckman, M Bliss. M Woodward, B Rus- sell, T Boast. J Ingvoldstad (pres), C Mack (v-pres». J Tuttle. I. Enser. B Hach, I) Kelso, R McCay, B Moses, Mr. Ritland. Students share goals, gripes in student council After the flash of glory during the campaign week, the new student body president settles down to the responsibilities and duties of his job. most important of which is leading the Student Council. A representative from each homeroom is awarded experience in learning the intricate facets of democracy, and also the chance to participate in the government of Ames High. From the homeroom to the president, to the council and back travel the complaints and sug- gestions that keep the school constantly moving forward. Besides this, the council also had the responsibility for several major programs, in- cluding Homecoming and Back-to-School Night. Due to this organization, a contrast was established between the students and the adminis- tration that made life a lot easier for all; both students and faculty are indebted to this organization for the smoothness of operation that characterized ‘63-'6l school year. STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS provided the motivation and leadership that made Student Council an effective organization. 182DAVID RECORDS the proceedings at the Stu- dent Council meetings. STUDENT COUNCIL COMMITTEES provide an extra link between the Council and the students. SECOND SEMESTER STUDENT COUNCIL: Front—S Stucky (treas), C Mack. C Kropf, J Ingvoldstad, S Vance, R Agard, E Wilson, T Healy, D Younie. T Bauder, L Enser. T Kce, D Brown, C Williams, E Workman, R Flanway, D Ostrem (pres), J Wallin, P Svec, B Moses, P Fricsner, J Martin, 1) Schworm (sec) Back- J Tuttle, J Hanway (vice-pres), H King. D Wilcox. C Montgomery. L Williams, S Spatchcr, N Yang, J Davidson, P Sargent. I) El- bert, R Jellinger, R Blceker, M Montgomery. FI Feinbcrg, I) Scandrctt. F' Dahlmeier. T ; 183 Advertising “It is far easier to write ten passably effective sonnets, good enough to take in the not too inquiring critic, than one advertisement that will take in a few thousand of the uncritical buying public." . . . Huxley In the past century advertising has grown from a luxurv to a necessary part of everyone’s life. Advertising is based on a proposition of give and take. Without the profits received from selling ad space, television, radio, and most periodicals, including the SPIRIT, would cease to exist. Rut this is an interdepen- dence that extends also to the advertiser. In the complex society of the twentieth century there is no time for the average citizen to sample every brand of breakfast food, clothing, perfume or gasoline, in order to decide which one he wants to buy. Nor can he expect to be informed of every new invention that goes on the market. He must rely on advertising. The advertiser has the tremendous responsibility of attracting attention, giving a sales pitch, and making a friend, all in the space of perhaps four square inches. Turn the page and meet the merchants of Ames, displaying their wares for the citizens of tomorrow.FRANGOS RESTAURANT FOUNTAIN SERVICE PIZZA STEAKS and CHOPS 210 Main Street Ph. 232-9710 Distinctive HOUSE OF ORGANS ALLEN ORGANS PIANOS CHIMES Piano Tuning and Repair 819 Lincoln Way Apparel for Women 308 MAIN Ph. 233-1876 66 Motor Inn Building When the occasion demands the best . . . always depend on Coe's. 517 Grand Ph. 232-5432 Flowers from Coe's 186 COE'S HOUSE OF FLOWERS DUNLAP MOTOR COMPANY OLDSMOBILE CADILLAC Ames, Iowa SECURITY it room to grow in. Clothes From RYERSON'S Are Always in Good Taste. WALTER %£ £ DRUGS YOUR PRESCRIPTION!----- Our rviosr i fvi porta kjt trust- 217 Main Street Ph. 232-7745 ZALE'S ... AMERICA’S LARGEST JEWELERS 17-JEWEL ELGIN...FOR QUALITY AND VALUE a. Petite 17-jewel lady’s Elgin... smart styling. Your choice of white or gold-tone case. b. Man’s Elgin is shock and water-re- sistant.0 Features precision 17-jewel movement... stainless steel back. »ckrn rate and rryilal are inlael "NO MORE DIRTY TENNIES" as Donna picks a pair of roal shoot. THE BOOTERY "Fashion With a Fit" SHELDON MUNN HOTEL a 187....m WHETHER IT'S FOR tho Junior Class Car Wash. Leaf Ralte. or Prom, a now hairdo from ANDER- SON'S is always in stylo. ANDERSON'S BEAUTY SALON SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO. Catalogue and Appliance Store 220 Main Street Ph. 233-1942 RAY JEWELERS Quality Diamonds REGISTERED JEWELER AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY 2528 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-2155 220 Main Street Ph. 232-4761 CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1964 188 ■ The Place to Meet Your Friends When You Attend I.S.U. L-WAY CAFE CAMPUS TOWN SHOES. SHOES, AND MORE SHOES. Cinderella never had it so good. WILSON'S MOBIL STATION BROWN-SHOE FIT 317 Main Street Ph. 232-6633 2602 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-4101 Congratulations, Class of '64 Smartest in Fashion Finest in Quality 428 Fifth Ph. 232-6512 227 MAIN Ph. 232-6135 ... 189 Congratulations P. M. PLACE CO. 5c to $1.00 Specialists FINESSE BEAUTY SALONS FOR A HIGH SCHOOL GIRL ON THE GO. choose a hairdo at FI- NESSE. THE PIZZA HOUSE AMES' OLDEST AND FINEST TWO LOCATIONS FINESSE BEAUTY SALON FINESSE BY THE CAMPUS Across From Friley Hall HOURS: 4 P.M. TO I 'A.M. 2504 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-1077 819 Lincoln Way 2408 Lincoln Way MARIAN LOKKEN "The finest in care for the discriminating woman." Congratulations and Best Wishes TO OUR HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS We think we have a wonderful bunch of kids in Ames. We're very proud of you, hate to see you grow up, and well miss you when you go on to bigger things ... as we know you will. TILDEN'S AMES DEPENDABLE SINCE 1869 190 BEATY INSURANCE REAL ESTATE The Favorite Clothing Store For Young Men. VISIT OUR STUDENTS SHOP CAMPUS DRUG See BOB for Real Esfafe See EARL for Insdranco Office 116 Welch Ph. 232-5115 Drugs Cosmetics U.S. POST OFFICE 2430 LINCOLN WAY Ph. 232-4252 SERVING AMES AND IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY for 61 YEARS Individuality in Good Furniture HOVERSTEN FURNITURE Furniture and Floor Coverings The Motor Bank WALK-UP CUSTOMER DRIVE-UP BANKING “ PARKING BANKING Across from City Hall in Downtown Ames times Trust TSavinos Baiik TWO GIRLS investigato what troes havo boon mado into at HOVERSTEN’S FURNITURE. Member Federal Reservo System 412 Main Ph. 232-2674 191 " • ( ORIGINALS BY 2 AM UT ACTURI MC COMPANY '' j fP o njrfi L i (t U '!r » . 0 P' MFG. CO. AMES • IOWA 192For More Natural Living AMES NURSERY 3 Miles South of Ames Hwy. 69 S. Ph. 232-2840 204 Main Ph. 232-6755 i RICHARDS' Serving Buffet Noon and Evening West Lincoln Way CONGRATULATIONS, SENIORS! 193JOE'S MEN'S SHOP Your Best Buy in Men's and Boys' Apparel 2536 LINCOLN WAY Ph. 232-5264 From Head to Toe Shop at JOE’S WEAVER JEWELERS WYLER WATCHES ORANGE BLOSSOM DIAMONDS Between the Shows CAMPUSTOWN MATH ISON MOTORS Ford - Falcon - Fairlane - Thunderbird Low Cost Financing THE FAIR Dry Goods Draperies Notions 323 FIFTH Ph. 232-5521 CHRISTMASTIME. SPRINGTIME. ANYTIME . . . find what you want at FASTCO DRUG 41 I Kellogg 203 MAIN Ph. 232-5101 Congratulations to the 1964 GRADUATING CLASS Ames High School Ph. 232-3161 STRAND PAINT COMPANY 194A SWEATER ... A SKIRT TO MATCH IT ... A blouse to match it . . . and a pin to make it cool; shopping is so much fun at TOWN and CAMPUS. CONGRATULATIONS, SENIORS! Remember Us Next Fall For The Perfect College Wardrobe. TOWN and CAMPUS 2514 Lincoln Way (Across From Friley Hall) HOLTZ AND NAIRN AGENCY Insurance and Real Estate EARL HOLTZ DEAN KNUTSON 51 I Main Street BILL NAIRN B. H. COTTINGHAM Ph. 232-5350 ENCO SERVICENTER I EVERT'S 218 5th Street Ph. 232-5634 We Telegraph Flowers Complete Service for Your Car 311 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-9836 195Congratulations, Class of 1964 LOOKING INTO THE FUTURE: To build or buy your own home as soon as you are financially able is wise . . . and will pay good dividends. H. L. MUNN LUMBER CO. Established 1891 Main and Duff Ames, Iowa We are pleased to serve you— Whatever your needs— LARGE or small For Over 50 Years HEADQUARTERS FOR Gifts Books Stationery Typewriters Greeting Cards Office Supplies School Supplies Photographic Supplies AMES STATIONERS 238 Main St.—Ph. 232-4161 AMES HARDWARE MUSIC Always the Very Latest in RECORDS JAZZ — POPS — STEREO HARDWARE PAINT RADIOS RECORD PLAYERS 105 Welch Ph. 232-5405 Croton and Favre-Leuba Watches Watch Repairing SWANK'S JEWELRY 2522 LINCOLN WAY Ph. 232-6653 COLLEGE PIPE SHOP Your Corner Pipe and Tobacco Store Corner of Lincoln Way and Welch FLOOR COVERINGS! LINOLEUM—CARPETING—TILES RUGS—CERAMICS—FORMICA Ph. 232-4151 402 Main Street Ames, Iowa 196 Home means more when the carpet on your floor is from Heaton's."p GIFT AND CHINA SHOP LUCILE’S "Satisfaction Always" 413 Douglas Ph. 232-4215 Prescription Specialists APOTHECARY SHOP 218 MAIN 521 DUFF • NOTIONS • SMALL ELECTRICS • APPAREL • COSMETICS • DRAPERIES • MEN'S AND BOYS' SHOP • FABRICS • GIFTS AND CHINA • ACCESSORIES • FABULOUS SPORTSWEAR • SHOES • MILLINERY 323 Main Ph. 232-2320 Congratulations, 1964 Seniors UNION STORY TRUST SAVINGS BANK "Your Friendly Main Street Bank" AMES BANKING CENTER SINCE 1882 197 Main at Burnett Ph. 232-2362MOSER LUGGAGE AND LEATHER STORE Ladies' Handbags Samsonite, American Tourister, Skyway Luggage Billfolds, Brief Bags, Attache Cases 310 Main Street Ph. 232-6260 SHOPPING AT PENNEY'S it to much more to when you're helped by Amet High ttudonh. CARTER PRESS, INC. PENNEY'S Creative Printers and Lithographers 125 WELCH AVE. AMES. IOWA - DRIVE-IN OPEN YEAR ROUND Sunday—Thursday II A.M.—II PiM. Friday—Saturday II A.M.—12 Midnight Ph. 232-5613 524 Lincoln Way AMES, IOWA 198 Insist Upon O'NEIL'S BATES JEWELERS WATCHES OMEGA — BULOVA QUALITY CHECKED ICE CREAM AND MILK Headquarters For Smart Jewelry Styles Sterling and Gold Charms—Charm Bracelets Pearl Rings and Pearl Pendants Look for the Big Red Check Mark 2400 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-2515 V When Your Shoes Need Repairing, Think of O'NEIL DAIRY COMPANY AMES IOWA SKEIE ARCHIE GOODYEAR SHOE SHOP 107 WELCH IN CAMPUSTOWN HOTEL BARBER SHOP MOTOR CO. "The Shop With the Blue Window" IN SHELDON-MUNN Ph. 232-6565 Pontiac - Tempest Sales — Service "GOOD WILL USED CARS' 202 S. Duff Ph. 232-3650 It pays to look your best. Let a professional dry cleaner take care of your clothes. AMES PANTORIUM Finest in Cleaning 410 Douglas Ph. 232-4302 199HILL'S STUDIO 2530 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-4570 SENIOR PICTURES are inevitable; but HILL'S makes thorn cnjoyablo and give special attention to each customer. WHEELOCK CONOCO SERVICE Conoco Products ★ Tires and Accessories "JOE" WHEELOCK, JR.. Owner 6th and Douglas Ph. 232-4544 200 SPIEGEL, INC. Catalog Shopping Center Ph. 232-2452 400 Main "Quality Food at Competitive Prices" PLENTY OF PARKING SPACE NINTH STREET GROCERY Fred Malander—Owner 623 NINTH STREET Ph. 232-9161TOWING RUTH'S JEWEL BOX (Formerly Plumb s Jewelry) DIAMONDS SILVERWARE WATCHES JEWELRY 236 Main Street The Ideal Way to Travel in a Group is by a Chartered Bus. MIDWEST TRANSPORTATION, INC. 1003 Second Street PH. 232-7270 4 WRECKERS FOR BETTER SERVICE Day or Night 313 Main Ph. 232-4564 Ph. 232-7272 AMES COMPLETELY EQUIPPED WRECKER SERVICE Will Serve You Anywhere COMPLETE MECHANICAL SERVICE EARL'S GARAGE 104 Good Luck, Class of 1964 AFTER THE GAME Kellogg SCHOENEMAN LUMBER COMPANY HEADQUARTERS FOR HARDWARu Paint — Plywood — Lumber and All Other Building Supplies Main and Northwestern Ph. 232-2372 TOM'S GRILL "Creators of Good Food" DOWNTOWN AMES DURING VACATION 201AMES DR. PEPPER BOTTl'lNG CO. ALLEN MOTOR CO. Chevrolet-Corvair Buick-Opel 5th and Douglas, Ph. 232-2462 raAyOOfVd WEST STREET GROCERY Open 9 A.M. to I I P.M. Daily 2902 West Street 2 Blocks From Westgate 105 Kellogg Ph. 232-7320 LINDQUIST VARSITY CLEANERS For the Service You Want When You Want It. 120 Hayward Ph. 232-1055 ‘CONES. MALTS. SUNDAES . . ." THE DAIRY KING will con- tinue At long At there it tunlight And young people. LANDSBERG PHARMACY University Rexall 2402 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-5175 DAIRY KING 2650 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-7630T NELSON LUMBER AND CONSTRUCTION CO. "Where the Home Begins" Lumber, Hardware, Paint Ph. 232-2665 West Lincoln Way PH. 232-7920 ! VAN VOORHIS CO. AIR CONDITIONING • PLUMBING • HEATING • SHEET METAL PH. 232-6270 Ph. 232-8081 ESCHBACH'S HAS THE KEY to enchantment: records by Potor, Paul, and Mary. ESCHBACH MUSIC HOUSE 302 Main Ames, Iowa Ph. 232-3624 OUR BEST WISHES TO AMES HIGH In Campustown at 112 So. Sheldon Downtown at 207 So. DuffYE OLDE HOBBY VILLA "Your Ames Hobby Headquarters" CARS • PLANES • TRAINS • BOATS MOSAICS • CRAFTS • PAINTING SETS 407 Kellogg Ph. 233-1663 CAMPUS CAFE 2512 Lincoln Way "Where Friends Meet to Eat" ACCIDENTS WILL HAPPEN LET US MX 'EM RAY'S PAINT AND BODY SHOP Wreck Rebuilding Expert Spraying Frame Repair Glass Installation 404 E. Lincoln Way Ph. 232-6205 And +o the Spirit of Ames High best wishes for success to all the Seniors from the friendly people at ZJJtvinei PAINTS and WALLPAPER Picture Framing Artist Supplies 214 Fifth Ph. 232-5265 W AA ONTGOMERY WARD SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 327-329 MAIN Ph. 232-6531 AMES LUMBER COMPANY 501 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-4772 204AMES HIGH is constantly in the news . . . DICK SCHORY (A.H.S. 1950), prominent Ames High alum, entertains at an assembly. BARBARA ROSEBROOK, 1963 Homecoming Queen . . . and fans. ... in the AMES DAILY TRIBUNE 205 AMES FRUIT GROCERY THREE STORES TO SERVE YOU PAUL R. JONES SHEET METAL Heating, Air Conditioning and Spouting SINCE 1914 364 S. Duff Ph. 232-6252 MERT DAULTON'S Laundry Dry Cleaning Village Second and Elm 24th and Grand Colorado and Lincoln Way 12 Dry Cleaning Units Attendant on Duty Daily— 129 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-9723 MARION'S SANDWICH SHOP Try Our Delicious BEEF-BURGERS Across from the Ford Garage 326 5th Ph. 232-9876 ALLAN MACHINE SHOP No Job Too Large or Too Small 224 DUFF Ph. 232-6505 Congratulations, Seniors! HOME FURNITURE APPLIANCES The Home of Quality Merchandise 128 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-6233 206 UNION BUS DEPOT S. HANSON LUMBER servet the needt of the Ames commun- ;ty. Congratulations, Seniors! S. HANSON LUMBER CO. 212 Duff Ph. 232-5152 Greyhound and Jefferson Lines Safe, dependable drivers "Travel is our business” Group Charters — Escorted Tours Package Express GENE J. FONTECCHIO—Mgr. Ph. 232-2404 - Amos High Regittor and Tribune carrier!: Dave Schworm, Jerry Peten. and Kent Hildreth. DES MOINES REGISTER AND TRIBUNE 2500 Lincoln Way 3011 Kellogg Everything in Hardware for the Home We take pride in having the biggest and most complete variety of kitchen wares, tools, paints, electric table appliances and gift wares CARR HARDWARE Ph. 232-6324 Charge Accounts Welcome 207BOB ALLEN RAMBLER CO. Congratulations, Seniors Rambler Sales and Service 229 S. Duff Ph. 232-4742 Electric Wiring and Supplies NELSON ELECTRIC CO. 816 Clark Street Ph. 232-2445 Garden-Fresh Vegetables Orchard-Fresh Fruits The Best in Meats Complete Stock of Nationally Advertised Canned Foods Oven-Fresh Pastries CAROLYN chooses from the fine selection of cosmet- ics at Oslund's. PHOTO FINISHING Color—Black and White Enlarging Personal Greeting Cards Polaroid Copies Billfold Pictures COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY Architectural Industrial Campanile Iowa Stato Univorsity Ames' Only Ph. 232-7363 208 OSLUND'S 308 Main Ph. 232-6342 PHOTO FINISHERS Since 1948 121 Main P.O. 908 The Ideal Way to Travel in a Group is by a Chartered Bus. MIDWEST TRANSPORTATION, INC. 1003 Second Street PS. 232-7270 Water in tho gat tank, gat in tho radiator, and wo toldom con- futo the two. WALT'S NEWSSTAND Greeting Cards, Magazines, Books LARSON'S DEEP ROCK SERVICE 221 Main Street, Ph. 232-0455 517 Lincoln Way Ames Phil enjoyt bowling at Twontioth Century Lanot. TWENTIETH CENTURY HOSTS tho GRA bowl party. ing TWENTIETH CENTURY BOWLING 209 517 S. Duff Ph. 232-5530 Best Wishes to THE SPIRIT AND THE STUDENTS OF AMES HIGH RON ENJOYS the advantage! of Blookor furnituro. BLEEKER FURNITURE AND CARPETS 125 Main Ph. 232-5675 RICHARD K. BLISS CONSTRUCTION COMPANY Ames HANSENS MOBIL STATION Lincoln Way at Kellogg Ph. 232-9715 GET speedy, friendly sorvico at Hansen'i Mobil Station. 210IP Agency, Incorporated • The Spot tor Homes A Complete Real Estate Service tor City Property Insurance ot All Kinds Travelers and Aetna Fire JAN AND TONI do it the eajy way. Ph. 232-6401 413 Main Ames, Iowa BILL VOGT AL STOLL FRANK •TED" TEDESCO STUDENT SUPPLY STORE Spiral Notebooks—Pens and Pencils Zipper Ring Books—Slide Rules Book Covers—Drawing Paper SEE US FOR ALL YOUR SCHOOL SUPPLIES 2424 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-7665 AMES BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION Home Mortgage Loans BRAD OPENS a new account at College Savings Bank. Insured Savings Accounts COLLEGE SAVINGS BANK 2546 Lincoln Way, Ph. 232-4310 300 Main Ph. 232-2714 211CONSTANT RED CARPET SERVICE at BOB McMAHON'S CHEF'S INN Newly Opened "The Lamp Post Lounge" "In the Old Farm House" DOTSON'S MOBILGAS SERVICE 3329 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-9MO n« r YOUR ENTERTAINMENT DOLLAR BUYS MORE HAPPINESS AT THE THEATRES IN AMES . . . COLLEGIAN WHITE'S SELECTION furnishes the perfect dress for every occasion. WHITE'S SPECTATOR Headquarters tor Smart Sportswear 219 MAIN Ph. 232-1381 212 I ONE OF THE FEW remaining places in Ames where you can buy a hamburger for only 19c. ■■■I ■ ■■ DON FRED'S SPEED SHOP SPEED IS OUR ONLY BUSINESS Guaranteed Lowest Prices on All Speed Equipment BET YOU didn't know this is a Ducati "250.' BURGER BAR GOOD FOOD LOW PRICE HIGH QUALITY Authorized Ducati and Norton Franchise Iskendcrian Hurst Offenhauscr B M Hydros Crankshaft Co. Cragor Hilborn Forgetruo Mickey Thompson Vortex Timberland Heights Ames, Iowa 3339 Lincoln Way Ph. 233-1081 KNAPP ! INSURANCE AGENCY A. B. "BEEZER" KNAPP S. A. KNAPP "Insurance Is Our Only Business 616 Kellogg Ph. 232-7060 Ph. 232-5984 or 232-6362 11 BOTH VICTORIOUS: The Mercury Cyclone and the Ames High Little Cyclonos! GRAND AVENUE STATION "Your Skelly Man" 13th and Grand Ph. 232-4631 LARRY PETERSON MOTOR CO. Mercury—Lincoln—Comet English Ford—Triumph 213 363 SO. DUFF Ph. 232-7474 ife s iREX SERVICE STATION LEE TIRES—PHILLIPS BATTERIES GREASING —WASHING Lincoln and Franklin VAN VOORHIS GREENHOUSE "When you think of flowers, think of ours. Hwy. 69, North KELSO RADIO TV 108 Lincoln Way Next to corner of L-Way and Duff Your Zenith Dealer Ph. 232-4445 NOAH’S PIZZA MOBILE loads up with another delicious cargo. THE FAMOUS | g "PIZZA KING" LINCOLN WAY AT HYLAND Ph. 233-1000 THE BEST in all kinds of sporting equipment is only at Serving the Best With the Best Phone 232-1481 or 232-1482 225 Main Street Ames, Iowa AMES TUNE-UP Complete Automotive Service 513 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-2375DAIRY QUEEN CONES MALTS SHAKES 123 Lincoln Way GENERAL FILTER COMPANY Design—Construction—Erection PRODUCTS: Iron Removal Filters Water Softeners Aerators and Degasifiers Chemical Feed Equipment Coagulators and Mixers Swimming Pool Equipment Ph. 232-4121 Ames, Iowa ARMSTRONG TRACTOR TRUCK Machinery Parts Story City, Iowa 621 Broad Ph. RE 3-2051 Ames, Iowa So. Hiway 69 Box 663 Ph. 232-4155 COLLEGE CLEANERS Pick-Up and Delivery 136 Welch Ph. 232-7730 HAVE YOUR CAR serviced at . . . KEN PAT'S PHILLIPS 66 821 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-6670 215General Index A ACADEMICS .56 Accola, Sonja ........... 93, 98, 171 11 I nES . 80 Adams, Mr. Herbert 58 Adams, Ken 145 Adams. I'.im 93, 145 ADMINISTRATION .................. 58-61 ADVERTISING ................... 184-215 Agard, Richard 1 11, 176, 183 Aggarwal, Rina .................. 179 Aggarwal, Sudbir ................ 174 A ho, John ........................ 171 Aibcrtscn, Dorothy ............... 171 Albertson, Mr. Hubert.............. 71 Albright. Vickie .............. 91. 177 Allison, Linda .................... 177 ALL-STATE MUSICIANS . 97 Aim. Norm 219 Anderson, Alan 90, 171 Anderson, Allan ............. 98, 173 Anderson. Rrenda ...................177 Anderson, Brian 173 Anderson, Charmain 178 Anderson, Dorothy 93, 145 Anderson. Mrs. Janice ....... 72. 171 Anderson, John .................... 178 Anderson, Mary .............. 93. 171 Anderson, Merrill . Ml, 179 Anderson, 1’aul ................... 180 Anderson. Paula ........ 98. 141, 145 Anderson. Mrs. Sharon . 61 Andrew, Linda 178 Andrews, I.arry ................... 179 Arens. Sue . 177 Armstrong. Bill ................... 180 rmstrong, Steve 145 Arnbal, Judy ................ 91. 171 Aronoff. Zena .. 91. 171 SSEMBLIES 46 ATHLETICS 120 Augustine. Mary ............... 94, 171 Austrbeim. Linda .............. 98. 180 B BACK-to-SCHOOL NIGHT 10. 11 Bacon. Elizabeth .............. ... 145 Bacon. Mary 91. 175 Bailey, Connie 115 Baker. Barbara 91, 176 Baker. Delores ................ 91. 177 Baker. Dick 110. 171 Baker. Shonney ... 177 Baldncr, Doug 171 Baldus, Judy ...................... 177 Bablus. Rosalie ................... 145 Ballard. Bob 115 Bancroft, Louise 82, 93, 97, 115 BAND 98-101 Bappe, Rich 110. 171 Bappe, Steve ...................... 171 Bappe. Tom .... 171 Barber, Alice .................... 178 Barber. David .................... 171 Barnes, Dean ..................... 171 Barnhart. Dean ................... 178 Barrett. Sharon ............... 93. 171 Barrie, Bob ....................... 145 Barrow. Ann 29. 93. 91. 141. 115 Bartels, Arthur .................. 219 Barton, Bob 171 Barton, Tom ....................... 146 B -KETBALL 132-135 Bates, Deanna ..................... 171 Bath, Gary ........................ 116 Batman, Pam ....................... 179 Bauder, Mary ................ 91. 171 Bauder, Tom 171. 183 Bauman. Betsy 178 170, 171. 182 Bauske, Mrs. Grace . 64. 171 Beach, Cheryl 178 179 178 180 94. 180 Beck, Linda Beckham, Mr. Thomas . 66, 176 176 171 Beckman, William 98. 140. 141, 178. 182 Beese. Lynn 94. 171 140. 146 Bengston. Mr. Leonard Bennett, Mr. Carroll 75 75 174 146 171 Bergland, Linda 36, 51, 122, 146 171 Best, Bob 127, 128, 140, 141, 171 177 Bethel, Barry 175 175 146 171 177 Black. Richard . Blackburn, David 29, 92. 93. 140. 146 177 Blackburn, Terry Blacss, Mike 171 171 98. 146 94. 146 Blake. Rick 95. 140, Ml. 178 98. 146 93. 141. 171. 183 93. 112. 170. 171 Bliss, Mike". 95, 140. 141. 180. 97. 98. 171. 182 182 Bochnke, Mary .. 93. 97. 98. 103. 124. 146 178 140. 171 179 180 171 171 180 94. 146 95. 98. 180 BOYS’ CLUB 84 , 85 BOYS’ STATE 29 94. 98. 171 94. 98. 171 .... 1-46. 182. 183 177 98. 177 146 171 ... 82, 94. 146 Brown, Kathy 140, 177 171 146 178 178 178 140. 141. 179 179 180 Buchanan. Ann 177 177 219 180 147 98. 176 88. 90. 93. 171 29. 128. 140. 147 147 Burns, Marv Kay 177 Bushore. Dave 180 Busick, Marty .. 147 Buttermore, Gary 171 Byers. Cheri ................ 94, 171 c CAFETERIA STAFF 32 Caffcrty, Phil 171 Calderwood. David 171 Caldwell. Stan .............. 98, 147 Calhoon, David 219 Cal boon, Mike ........... Ml. 178 CAMPAIGN, SPRING of 1963 28 CAMPAIGN. WINTER of 1964 48 Campos, Miss Graciela .............. 62 Canada)-, Craig .. 178 Cantonwine. Kenneth 178 Canvin. Miss Madalenc 75 Caquelin, Bob ................... 147 Carbrey, Ellen....................... 147 Carbrev, Theresa 94. 103. 176 CAREER NIGHT 40. 41 Carlson, Carol ............. 94. 171 Carlson. Cathv 36. 37, 38. 51, 82. 83. 93. 91. 98. 144. 147 Carlson. Gregory.............179. 182 Carlson. Jim ........................ 171 Carmcan. Carol ........ 36, 37. 38. 147 Carmean. Jennifer ................... 171 Carpenter, Paula 94. 219 Carr. Larry ...................... 171 Carr. Mrs. Lois 61 Carr, Patsy 179 Carr. Phil 127, 129. 147 Castiello. Carmen 94. 147 Catus. Ann 94, 180 Cavcn, Marv---------------------------148 Cerwick. Mary Ann 93. 112. 148 Charles. Linda........................180 Charlson. Gary’ 95. 180 CHEERSQUAD 122 Childs, Diane 93. 94. 97. 148 Child'. Pete........................ 171 CHOIR 92, 93 CHORAL GROUPS 94-96 Christensen, David 171 Christensen. Don----------------------171 Christensen. Mike 177 Christensen. Sharon 98. 171 CHRISTMAS FORMAL 44, 45 Clark. Ann 93. 98. 122. 171 Clark. George-----------------M0. 172 Clark. Stcrc 172 Claude, Nancy 93, 98, 171 Clayberg, Rick ..................... 148 Clouscr, Gary-------------------------148 Coe. Stew Ml, 172 Cole, Bob .......................... 148 Cole, Mr. Donald--------------67, 171 Collin'. Jed 98, 172 COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 7 4; 77 Compton. Linda------------------------177 Conklin, Bob..........................178 Conley, Ed .......................... 148 Constantine, Chris--------------------148 Constantine, Gloria ......... 98. 178 Cook, Bob-------- ---------- 140. 178 Cook, Nancy ................. 94. 149 Cook. Suzanne ...................... 149 CO-OP 118. 119 Cooper, Kathy ... 1 9 Cooper, Sue 36. 122. 149 Corbin. Marsha------------------------179 Coste, Christina .................... M9 Coste. Michael 149 Cott, Julie ------------------------- 180 Cottrill, Dave ---------------------- 180 Cottrill. Linda .................... M9 Covey. Mr. Hiram . .........— 66. 177 216Cox. Jeff 83. 134. Ml. 149, 98. 154 180 176 149 50. 51. 94, 149 177 93. 119, 149 95. 177 149 98. 122. 177 119 68. 177 178 149 93, 98. 172 Cross. Mr. Wavnc 72, 95 . 96 Crovisier, Nancy 91. 171 172 Cumming, Bruce 149 171 Cummings. John 178 0 178 Dahlmeier, Fred 149. 183 Daley, Dee Ann 9». 122. 179 179 Dalton. Dennis . 149 94. 171 Danielson. I.ce 98, 150 Davidson. Jean 150 Davidson. John 172. 183 Davidson. Rav 150 180 172 172 Davis, I-aticia 94» 180 180 Dav. Mr. Richard 72 . 99 DEBATE 114 Deboer, Richard 93. 98. 103. 152 Denisen. Kathy 93. 172 Dennis. Marv . 91. 172 Dickinson. Mrs. Elizabeth 115 Dickson. David 93. 98. 140. 170. 172 Dickson. Jonathan 95, 98. 176 Diehl. Harvey 95. 172. 182 172 Disnev. Jean 91. 171 Dixon. Tom 112, 150 172 Dodd. Linda 91. 172 -95, 177 Doling. Don — 98, 150 Donhowe, Eric 150 Donhowe, Kathv 91. 172 Doran. Robert 140. 177 Dotson. Bob 112. 123. 144. 150 Dotson. Melinda 94. 103. 179 Dowell, Dennis 93. 97. 98. 103. 150 Dowden. Sue 93. 172 Drake. Jeane 94. 172 DRAMA 86 . 87 Dreeszen. Dee 91. 98. 178 Dreeser, David 140. 141. 178 Drummond. Kathv 91. 178 172 Duncan. Greg 177 150 Dunkin. Peg 179 Dunlap. Lynn 90» 172 Dunleavy. John 141. 172 Dusso. Miss Donna 61 E Easton, Jane --------------------- 172 Easton. John----------------------— 172 Ericard. Diane ..........—..... 91. 180 Eemisse. Ken................... 150 Egglrton. Ada ........ 93. 97. 103. 172 Eilts. Randall -------------------- 172 Ekberg, Carl 172 Elbert. Catherine.................. 180 Elbert. Dave ................... 172. 183 Elbert, Mike 150 Elbert, Steve ....................... 90, 151 Eldridge, Charles ......... 1J0, 141, 180 Ellet, Tom .......................... 176 Elliot, Jim ......................... 151 Ellis, Mike 177 Ellis, Nancy ‘ ».219 Ellis, Pam ....................... 151 Elii», Patricia -.....................172 Eness, Kirsten -177 Engcldingcr, Ann 177 Engelhardt, Cheryl 178 ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 6». 65 Enser, I.arry ............. 151, 182. 183 Enser, Lowell . —.................... 172 Epstein, Jackie ..................... 178 Epstein. Kathie ..................... 151 Eriekson, Judy ...............-...... 151 Erickson. Mary ..................... 178 Erskine. Gary ....... 110. 141, 144, 151 Erwine, Roger........................ 151 Eucher, Larrv ................... 98. 177 Evans, Camilla 93. 131 Evans, Richard ...................... 172 Everson. Karin 98, 172 Exner, Rick 93, 172 F Faber, Pat 172 FAI I PI V'i 8«. »9 FALI TRACK 123 Faris, Richard........................174 Farley, Charles ................. 93, 172 Fate, Robin.......................95, 179 FEATl RES 26 Fcinberg, Ellen 152. 182, 183 Kellinger, Ann 179 Fellinger, Mike 88. 132 Ferguson. Donna .. 1 2 Ferguson. James ..................... 172 Ferguson. Marlene ................. 180 Fernelius, Dan ...................... 180 FHA 118. 119 Fields, Lois 98, 144, 132 Fincham, Jim 152 Fincham. Steve 172 FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT 72. 73 Finnegan. Kathleen 180 FIRE SQUAD 108 Firkins. Carol ........... 98. 103, 176 Fiscus, Linda ................... 98, 177 Fisher, David 109 Fisher. Kitty ............. 90. 93. 172 Fiske, Jane ................... 94. 172 Flack, Mi'. Daisy »-l Fleig, John ........................ 172 Foderherg, IV Alta ................. 152 Fontecchio, Ron .................... 171 FOOTBALL 126129 Foreman, John ...................... 172 Foreman, Mark 178 Foreman, Muriel 122, 178 Fortner, Larry ..................... 152 Foshe, Ernie 172 Fox, Paul 172 Franz, Linda ....................... 178 Frederick. June .................... 152 Frecl, Judy .........................179 Free!, Rose ........................ 152 Freisner, Phyllis ........ 98, 174, 183 French. Walter ... 93. 98, 179 Friblev. Jack 180 Friedrich, Bob 98. 140, 172 FRIENDSHIP WEEK 52. 53 Friest, Boh ........................ 172 Frigaard. Marcia ....................180 Frum, Barry .................. 140, 219 Fuller. Bertha ..................... 176 G Callahan. Alan .................... 177 Gammon. Michael 177 Garland, Linda 177 Garrett. Mrs. Avonelle 67. 172 Gauger, Don ....................... 178 Genovese. Ross................ 140. 180 Getty, Rita ........................ 152 Gibbs, Monte MO. 172 Gibson, David ...................... 178 Gilchrist. Jim 140, 15.3 Gilchrist. Mary 94. 179 Gilchrist, Sherri 179 Gilreath. Deanna 178 GIRL RESERVES 82. 83 GIRLS’ STATE 29 Glamser. Miss Wanda 75. 172 Glandorf. Lorraine ................. 180 Click, Dennis 219 Click. Robert 97. 98. 103. 153 Glosemeyer. Bill 176 Glosemeyer. Theresa ................ 153 Goettsch, Stephen 140, 177 Combossy, George ................... 172 Good, Marlene 153 Goodman. Gail 94, 172 Gossard, Margaret 177 GRA 138. 139 Grabau. Martha ..................... 153 HAPPINESS is being the onlv girl in the White Shirt section. 1217NO MORE PENCILS, no more books . . . Graca, Richard 177 Grau, Chuck 88. 90. 178 Gray, Kathy 172 Green, Jack 172 Green. Joseph 180 Green, Julanne 172 Green. Mike 153 Green, Ron 179 Greene, (-rant 93, 173 Greenwood. Alice 179 Grennan. Eileen 103. 175 GrewcII, Sharyn 178 Groat, Connie 94, 180 G monies, Hoi) 178 Gunnerson. Janet 177 Gutmann. Robert 177 II 123. 173. 182 178 177 153 178 153 178 112. 170. 172 172 Hakes. Mark 173 153 Hall. Tom 179 HALL MONITORS 109 153 179 180 97 . 98. 153 72 172 94. 172 123. 144, 153 94. 172 153 Hansen, Jim 127. 129. 140. 173 62 98. 180 Hanson. Pam 98. 103. 153 153. 183 Hanway, Rodney 95. . 98. 180. 183 173 169 Harrell. Mike 93. 173 153 153 176 173 123. 154 Hausheer. Mr. Maurice 67, 140. 141 154 173 Haves, Hrnrv 172 98. 154 173 154 154 Heald. Betty 91. ' 8. 173 140. 177. 183 90. 140. 177 154 178 154 93. 140. 173 98. 103. 173 154 98. 103. 173 154 95. 178 94. 178 36. 51. 15-4 Henrv, Bill 173 173 179 110. 173 58 98. 173 ... 71. 178 154 155 155 155 Hinrichsen. Mary 82. 83. 112. 155 51. 155 64. 172 Hoff. Jan 91. 122. 173 180 Hofstad. Becky 169 180 155 HOMECOMING 36 39 173 174 180 155 140. 173 176 Howard, Donna 82, , 93, 97. 98. 155 93. 08. 155 126. 140. 177 155 93. 98. 173 103. 155 Hunt. Mrs. Betty 178 177 98. 173 Hussey, Pat 173 177 98. 178 I Ichowitz, Angelo 174 INDEX. CENERAI.......... 216-221 INDOOR TRACK 136. 137 Ingram. Rosemary 94. 178 Ingvoldstad, Jim 28. 123, 155. 182 Ingvoid !ad, J.-seph 141. 178. 182. 183 LNTRAMURALS ........... 138. 139 Israel. Janice .......... 94. 173 Jackson. Marcy ................. 173 Jacobson. Bradley 179 Jacobson. Gary -.......... - 173 Jefferson. Larry ... 155 Jellinger. Rick 140. 173. 183 Jenkin-. C.irla 94. 179 Jenkins. Marilyn .. .. 94. 170. 173 Jewett. Alfredia 94. 172 Johannes. Dennis 172 Johnson. Bruce 172 Johnson. Donna .................. 155 Johnson, Elaine 180 Johnson. Joyce ................. 155 Johnson. Nancy 156 Johnson. Sharon 94. 180 Johnson, William 172 Jone . Ann .94, 180 Jones, Darlene 179 Jones. Mr. James .............. 68 Jones. Marianne 174 Jones. Randy 88. 90. 172 Jones. Virginia 88. 156 Joseph. Nathaniel 172 JOURNALISM 110. Ill JUNIOR CLASS PLAY 91. 92 JUNIOR EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 170 JUNIOR HOMEROOMS 171-175 K Kalsem. Becky ...... Kalton. Barbara Kee. Tom Keiglcy, Paul ...... Keisler, Ann ....... Keisler. David Keller. Lynn Keller. Susan Kelley. Kitty Kelso. David Kelso, Dennis Kelso. Mike Kennedy. Eileen Kennedy. John Ketclsen, Jim Key. Marc Kezar. Dennis Kezar. Nancy Kinart, Ron ...... . King. Edward King. Harris» Kinker, Sandra Kirkham, Collier Kleinschmidt. Robert Kline. Ronald Klingsei-. Mary Knapp. Chuck Knight. Richard Knight. Robert Knott. Dewayne Knutson. Sumner Krocheski, Marilyn Krocheski. Paul Kropf, Collin 94. 171 ...... 98, 172 98. 140. 156. 183 156 51, 156 176 156 177 94. 98. 177 123. 169 93. 172. 182 177 178 156 128. 140. 141, 172 95, 180 140, 156 178 157 157 172, 183 93. 98. 172 98. 172 172 ................172 157 140. 141. 144, 157 171 ............... 178 88. 98. 157 95, 178 179 172 .... 140. 157, 183 .add, Steven 175 .agerstrom. Eric ............—...95, 179 impe, Dennis ------.---------------- 180 anezos, Leslie —.................... 172 .andsberg. Tom ..... 126. 140, 141. 15. .ange. Dennis 157 .ange. Mary 172 Ange, P.it 157 218Langfitt, Perry ............ 219 I C,I ACE CLUBS 1M-107 i INGI AGE DEPARTMENT ... 62, 63 Larsen. Judy 93, 97 98, 103, 157 .. 88. 90. 179 172 157 172 Larson. Ron 95, 98. 114. 180 176 122, 177 157 . 219 140. 219 88. 157 177 178 178. 182 La user, Gregory 172 179 95. 98. 178 179 172 112, 157 172 172 174 LIBRARY CLUB 114. 115 179 140. 157 172 98. 170. 172 6 7. 140 174 174 180 91. 180 157 98. 180 180 174 176 174 29, 88. 158 158 64. 112. 173 174 174 M 98. 179 71 Macheak. Cecil 171 Mack, Craig 126, 140. 158, 183. 183 MagKton. Thomas 98. 180 Makclbust, Lonnie 174 Malone, Mama 93. 158 Manchester, Kathy 94. 158 Manthci, Ronald 174 Marguardt. Connie 178 Marklev, Charles 180 Marks, Paul 97. 98. 170. 174 180 Martin. Jane 90, 94, 98. 171. 183 Massev, Diane 158 MATH DEPARTMENT 70. 71 Mathison, Sue 88. 158 Matters. Merry 176 Mattson. Christopher 177 Mattson. Kathv 94. 158 Maurer. Marv Anne 122. 174 McCaffrev. James 174 McCartnev, Helen 158 McCav Rob 174 McCluggage. Jim 158 McClurkin. John 1 4 McClurkin. Mike 177 McConnell, Pat 111. 158 McCowen, Mike 95. 98. 111. 177 McCov. Hollv 1.58 McCov. I.arrv 92. 93 . 97. 158 177 McCrarv. Marty 159 McCullough. Darlow 219 McCullough. Jane 159 McDowell. Janice 91. 174 McFarland. David ■5» . 98. 140. 177 McFarland. Dennis 159 McGinnis. Jim 90. 112. 174 McIIwain. Jack 159 McIIwain. Marguerite 219 Mclnnis. Mark 93. 219 McIntosh. Ann 91. 174 McIntosh. Tom 174 McKenna, Gavle 94. 178 McKenna. Vickie 174 McKern. Mike 178 McKinlev, Tim no. Ml. 179 McLean. Merry 94. 174 McMahon. Phyllis 159 MoMillcn. Charlene 159 McMillen. Don 159 McNallv. Miss Marv 65 Mover. Duane 177 Mickelson, Sheri 91. 178 Middle. Joanne 91. 178 Millard. Patricia 93. 174 Miller. Anne 174 Miller. Bob Miller. David Miller. Diana Miller. Janice Miller. Margaret Miller, Maurice Miller, Steve Mills, Esther 98. . 98. 112. . 94. 91. 159 178 174 174 174 174 159 179 72 Moeller, Tish 91 122. 179 Montgomery. George 183 Montgomery. Mary 88. 159. 182. 183 Moore, Cynthia 180 Moore, Joan 94. 219 Moore, Roger 171 Moorhead. Robert no. 160 Moorman. James 174 Moppin. Dave 169 Moreland. Dennv 171 Morgan. Archie . 180 Morgan. Jack 98. 180 Morgan. Roberta 160 Morris. Marv Ann 176 Mortvedt. Mr-. Marj ry 76 Moses. Brad 93. 98. 103. 112. 170. 17-1 . 182 183 Mosse. Marcel 95. 177 Mulhall. Ann 177 Mulhall. Marv 91. 174 122 177 Mullin. Donald 178 Mullin. Roger 160 Myers. Glenda 160 Myers. Claudia 178 i Nairn. Janet 90 98. 103. 174 Neal. Bill 174 Nelsen. Paul 179 Nelson. Jeanette 160 Nelson, Judy 91. 178 Nelson. Linda 171 Nelson. Marilyn 160 Netcott, Sherry 91. 180 180 174 174 176 160 174 160 160 140. 160 Mickey, Linda Nicolle, Carolyn Nicolle. Donna Nims. Nyle 91. 91. MO. Nordhagen, Cynthia Nordskog, Bill 28. 98. 128. 141. 111. NOT PICTURED with their homeroom?.: front rou: L Stutzman. M McIIwain, I) Click, R Buchele. W Larson, T Towns, M Rou- leau. second rou: J .Moore. F Shuman. I) Calhoon. J I.asche, N Ellis. P Carpenter, back rou: P Langfitt, B Frum. A Bartels, I) McCullough. M Mclnnis, J Sucher. N Aim. 219 Norlin, Mark 177 Norris, Mary Ann 176 0 Oates, Thomas 177 O'DanicIs, Joann 171 Olson, Deanna 98. 174 Olson, Janet 98. 160 Olson, Kimberly 177 174 Olson, Sandra 178 178 Oltroggc, Mr. Eugene 71. 131, 174 Oppedal. Gary 174 ORCHESTRA 102, 103 Orngard, Gary 140. 180 Orngard, Tim 169 179 174 Oshel, Bob no. 160 Ostrem, Dennis 48. 140. 144, 160, 183 Overland. Gary 160 Overland. Linda 174 Overturf, Mr. James 75, 178 Owings, Jerry 140. 174 P Pace, Kathy 94. 180 Packer, Nylc 174 Page. Mr. Kenneth 66. 174 Page, Kirk 140. 141. 174 Painter. Jan 88. 160 Parker, Karen 94. 180 Parker. Linda 98. 161 Parks, Judv 94. 161 Partin. Louise 122. 174 Pascale, Marv 98. 103. 180 Paslev, Dick 140. 174 Patterson, Annie 9». 174 Paulson, Anita 94. 174 Paulson. David 176 Pedersen. Jerrv 161 Pedersen. Mark 112. 17! Peglar. Deidre 97. 103, 177 Penny. Norm 140. 161 Pennv, Robert 95. 177 PEOPLE 142 •137 SENIOR GIRLS. 138 Senior girls 139 Senior girls. 140 Senior girls . . PEP CLUB ..................... 124. 123 Pepper, Sandra ..................... 174 Pepper. Steven ........... 95, 117, 182 Perkovich, George .................. 174 Peters, Jerry ................ 140, 161 Peters, Robert ... 93, 174 Peterson, Christine . 178 Peterson, Curt ..................... 162 Peterson, Delbert . 174 Peterson, Donna ................... 162 Peterson, Jane ...............122, 178 Peterson, John 179 Peterson, Kristin................... 172 Peterson, Mark 93. 144. 162 Peterson, Mary 179 Peterson. Stephanie ........... 94, 180 Phillips, Harrv 140. 180 Phillips, Linda 91. 98. 180 Phillips, Sharon ............. 93, 162 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 78. 79 Piersol. Jim 93. 97. 98. 175 Piet , Sandra 94. 175 Pirtle, Victor...................... 176 Plumb. Ron 140. 162 Pocckes, Micheal ................... 175 Pohl, Dick 177 Pohl, Kathy 98, 103, 175 Politis, Deborah ............. 98. 177 Politis, Elaine 98. 162 Porter. Jane ............. 94. 122, 175 Porter, Pat 90. 112. 175 Posegate, Steven 175 Potts, Tom ........................ 175 Pounds, Toni ..................... 175 Powell. John 90. 177 Purvis. Sue ........................ 178 Q Quam, Marilyn 36. 51, 93. 94. 97, 162 Quinn, Annette 90. 98. 175 Quinn. Joe ......................... 162 R Rademachcr, Jo Ann . 94. 162 Ramsey, Homer ................. 95, 178 Randles, Howard 98. 178 Rasmussen. Mike . 175 Rasmussen, Tom 98. 140. 175 Read, Terry 141. 179 Reed, Rick 175 Reid. Janet 98. 175 Reilly. Lorraine .................— 180 Leilly, Sarah 175 Reinberger, Peggy 162 Reinhart. Julie - 165 Reitz, Betty ....................... 163 Reno, Mrs. Mary 64, 174 Reynolds, Rosalyn ................ 178 Rice. Tom ... 163 Richard», Mary Ann 93. 112. 124, 163 Richards, Tom 98. 140. 180 Ricgel. Betty .................... 180 Rigg, Katv jo 50. 51. 82, 88. 150, 163 Riggs, Peggv.............. 82. 93, 163 Ritland, Mr. Everett 60, 144, 182 Risdal, Steven ................. 175 Ritland. Mr. Everett 60. 144. 182 Ritland. Mark 98. 140. 141. 170. 175 Roach. William ..................... 171 Roberson. Kathleen............. 94, 175 Robertson, Charles 175 Robertson, Elizabeth 94, 163 Rod. Douglas .................... 175 Kodcnborn, Mary .............. 94, 176 Roelofsen, Nancy ....... 177 Rogers, Bruce ..........-...... 95, 163 Rogness, Susan . 163 Rolf, Dava Lynn .................... ,163 Rose, Leandra ................ 94, 163 Rosebrook, Barb ..... 36. 37, 38. 93, 122. 163 Ross, Cristine 94. 177 Ross, Ronald 140, 175 Ross, Tom 163 Rothackcr, Ron .. 172 Rouleau. Mary Jo 219 Ruhe. Jon 163 Rullestad, Suzanne .................. 178 Russell, Bernard 98. 140, 175, 182 Russell, Sharon ................... 163 Rutter, Kenneth .................. . 178 Rutter, Linda „.................... 179 Ryding. Jim ......................... 180 s „ 171 88. 90. 180 174 95. 180 178 163 98. 175. 183 176 164 129. 140. 164 Scandrett. David 127. 140. 170. 171. 183 177 171 119. 164 140. 171 Sehocnenbergcr, William 178 SCHOOL BOARD 59 Schwartz. Mike 29. 85. 93. 141, KA Schworm, David 29. 18. 93. 112. 140. 141. 164. 183 SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 68. 69 SCIENCE SEMINAR 116. 117 164 178 88. 164. 182 178 169 90. 98. 171 98. 103. 171 79 SENIOR SECTION 145-169 SENIOR SENATE 14-4 90. 171 171 Shadle, Douglas 98. 103. 140. 141. 179. 182 75. 85 98. 180 164 98. 180 Shaw. Mac 98. 171 90. 171 103. 171 171 171 91. 171 18. 112, 164 144, 164 103. 180 no. 171 176 164 Shultz, Kathy . 171 219 164 91. 171 177 177 164 92, 93. 123. 164 .177 171 95. 178 Sivesind, Charles — Skaff. David 90. 92. 93. 98. 103. 164 98. 178 220Skarshaug. Donna . Sb i. Russell Skrdla. Robbie Small, Dean Smalling, Mr. Raymond S tiling, Robert ... Smith, Don ------- — Smith, Greg Smith, John Smith, Joi Smith, Linda Smith, Mike B....... Smith. Mike Smith, Randy Smith, Rebecca .. Smith. Sandra Smith, Shir lee Smith. Steve --hotka. Linda --------------- 180 171 164 ............ 179 ...-........... 165 .... 165 180 36, 50. 51, 88. 93. 91. 165 .......... 140. 180 94. 171 SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 66,67 Sommerfeld, Bob .......... 90, 174 SOPHOMORE BA SKETBALL TEAM 141 SOPHOMORE FOOTBALL TEAM 140 SOPHOMORE HOMEROOMS 176. 181 Sorensen, Sharon 88. 165 Sorenson, Boh 110. 174 Sorenson, Carol 124, 165 Sorenson, Connie.............. 171 Soult . Bill 108. 132. 140. 141. 165 Soy, William 176 Spatcher, Mr. Cecil 69, 127, 111, 179 Spatcher. Sandra 81, 98, 103. 177. m 165 177 174 174 Spear, Kathy Speer. David Spicer. Jerry Spink . James SPIRIT DANCE SPIRIT STAFF SPRING Sprouse, Joan Squire, David ---------- 50. 51 ------- 112, 113 -----------54, 55 177 174 Stafford. Miss Marilyn 71, 83 Staniforth. Margv Starr. Joy --------- Stattelman. Sandra -t. il. Bill Stephenson. Linda Stevens. Mike Stewart, Carolyn — Stewart, John ...... Stewart, Marilyn Stilwell. Dixie ---- Stone. Mr. Edwin . Straehle, Elaine Strand. John ------- Strickland. Mike Strother. Wenda ..................... 180 •Stuckv, Roger 140, 141, 180 Stuckv. Sue 36. 122. 166. 182. 1B3 STUDENT COUNCIL 182. 183 Sturtevant, Mr. Floyd ................. 68 Stutzman. Lonnie 219 Sucher. James Sullivan, Gail . Svec, Katharine Svec, Peter .... Swan. Sandra ... Swanson. Beth Swanson. Betty Swanson. Duane Swanson, Kay ---------- Swedell. Miss La Rhea Sylvester. Helen ------ Synhorst. Janie ------- Talbot. Alyce .... -.... - 98. 171 Talcott, Ken .................. 93, 166 178 Tauber, Mn. Anne ............... 69 . 93, 95, 98, 171 Tauber. Tom 174 98, 171 Taylor, Janet 90, 174 . 78, 179 Tavlor, Linda .................... 166 140. 171 Taylor, Paul .1. ... 179 179 l.,ylor, Paul S. 177 Taylor, Sherry .................. 166 Templeton. Janice .....„........... 166 Templeton. Joan ................... 180 Tevebaugh. Carolvn ........... 93. 174 Theil, Greg .................. 95. 180 Thomas, Marshall ................ 176 Thomas, RolnTt .......... 88. 90. 177 Thompson, Mrs. Evelyn ........ 61. 180 Thompson, Martha ........... 94, 166 Thompson, Mary .......... 94. 122. 177 Thompson, Marv T................... 166 Thompson. Neil .... 95. 103. 123, 177, 182 Thompson. Sherry ................. 172 Thorson. Eugene.................. 167 Thorson, James .................. 174 Thorson, Joy .................... 167 Timmons, John ......... .......... 167 Tonne. Patricia 91. 98. 112. 174 Towns, Tovna .................... 219 Trexel. Sue 91. 98. 103. 174 Trow, Sandra .............. 91, 171 Trow, Susie ............... 95. 178 Truhe. Rose Ann .......... 91. 174 Trump. Mr. Richard ...—.......69. 116 Tuttle. Jim ........... 167, 182. 183 Tweed, Danny .................... 178 Tvrrel. Gregory ................ 178 Tysseling. Bill 93. 91. 103. 174 u Uhl. Danny ................ 95. 179 Ukena. Dick .......... 98, 170. 174 Ukena. Tom ........ 93. 98. 112, 167 Ulmer. Margaret ......—...... 93, 174 Underhill, Sue .................. 179 Ustrud, Carol ..... 93. 91. 121, 167. 182 Uthe. Anita ................. 91. 174 V Valline, John ................... 180 Vance. Bruce ..................... 174 Vance, Sam ................. 180, 183 Vandecar, Mrs. Dorothy ............ 62 Van Houweling, Don --------- 140. 167 Van Scoy, Jerry.............. 98. 175 VARSITY BASKETBALI TEAM 111 VARSITY FOOTBALL TEAM .... 140 VARSITY WRESTLING TEAM .. 140 Vaughn, Bonnie .............. 91. 180 Yegors, Mrs. Aurilla ....-... 65, 180 Veline, Nancy ........ 91, 98. 174 Vierkant. Man ............. 91. 167 Villwock, Jay ........... 90. 175 Villwock. ran ................— 175 Voelker, Vickie ... 94, 98. 103. 176, 182 Voigt. Dick .................. 175 Vnn Bergen, Bill ...... 140, 175. 182 Von Wittich, Miss Barbara ......... 62 Voss, Rick .................. -... 175 Vreeiand, Micheal .......... 95. 177 w Wagner, Jeanne .................. 177 Wagner, Ronald ................ 175 Walker, Bob 167 Walker, William ........... 140, 175 Walkup. Martha .............. 167 Wallin. Ja 175. 183 Walters. Marvin ................. 177 Ward. Beth ......... 91. 98. 122. 174 Ward, Brian ............... 98, 178 Wardie, Terry ............... 103, 178 179 Warg, Richard Dana ....... 140. 178 98. 122. 171, 182 165 178 140. 141, 178 .......... 166 140, 177 94. 179 174 94. 179 -----------175 75 98. 171 98. 180 110. 174, 182 98. 219 ----------------94. 177 177 93. 98. 103. 174. 183 ............... 94. 178 ----------------94. 178 ------------------166 ----98. 174 93. 98. 174 61. 65. 180 95. 178 178 Warner. Carol 170. 175 Warren, Jim 167 Warren, Steve 167 Watkins. Karla ... 179 Watkins, Terry . 110. 167 Watson, Barbara ... . 93. 91. 175 Watts, Larry 175 Webb, Carl 175 Webb, Marv 175 Weiser. Donna Kae ... 94, 167 Weiscr, Michael 95. 179 Weiss, John 175 Wells. Mr. Kenneth 78 Wells. Scott 176 Wesack. Marlene 91. 180 Wessman. Steve 167 West, Janet 175 Westvold, Warren 180 Whaley. Carl 180 Wharton. Ann 98. 175 Whattoff, Boh 175 Wheeler. Dave 110, 168 Wheeler, John 175 Wheelock. Marilyn 175 Whcelock. Marv 122. 168 White. Marv Jo 91. 180 Whiting. Christine .. 91. 176 Whitney, Mrs. Charlotte Wickershant, Bill 60 98. 168 Wickersham, Sue 177 Wiener. Pat 93, Wierson. I tura 94, 122. 168 91, 168 Wierson. Sheila 177 Wiesner. Christine Wilcox. Dave 93, Wilcox. Mark 177 103. 178, m 93. 169 Wildman. John . . . 93. 169 Wildman, Kevin Willenberg. Jean 178 91. 169 Williams, Alice 178 Williams, Charles ... 169. 183 Williams. Jackie 169 179. 183 Williams. Mike 179 140. 180. 183 98. 103. 169 129. 110. 169 175 Wilson, Mike .. 97, Wilson. Pick 127. Wilson. Robert Winkler. Pam 180 Wirt . Judy 91. 98. 175 Wolf. Kathy 180 91. 98. 176 Wood. Phil 175 Wood. Mr. Walter 71, 175 98. 103, 177 90. 144, 103. Woods. Marc 28. 88. Woodward. Mike .. 169 177. 182 Woodworth. Kevin 90. 93. 98, 175 Workman. Ed 177. 183 WRESTLING 130. 131 169 Wright, Robert Wynne. Pat 98. 177 175 Yang, Nancy Yearnan. Kristine Yeaman. Mike .... Yoder, Gary...... Young, Cheryl ........ Young, Pam ........... Younie, David ........ Younie, Kathy ....... Younie, Rob . 103. 178, 1 3 .............. 175 126, 110. 169 .... 110. 141. 178 ............. 175 ... 93, 98, 175 .. 179, 183 ... 94. 179 ....... 169 Zack, Deborah....................... 180 Zaffarano, Dario................90, 180 Zanders, Miss Marlene................78 Zcarley, Jeff ..................... 1 0 Zniolek, Steven ................... 1 6 Zober, Janet .................. 91, 177 221 1-17-0 Pain would I take with me all that is here. But how shall I? A voice cannot carry the tongue and the lips that gave it wings. 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Ames High School - Spirit Yearbook (Ames, IA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

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