Ames High School - Spirit Yearbook (Ames, IA)

 - Class of 1963

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Ames High School - Spirit Yearbook (Ames, IA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 200 of the 1963 volume:

Published by the Spirit Staff of Ames Senior High School Ames, Iowa Volume 512 MVE MINUTE passing perimis art- synonymous with long, windy walks. Units of the new school are to be connected in cellular fashion with enclosed, glass corridors.ents Attack One Year Situated at the edge of an Iowa corn field on a 74 acre site are the first three units of Ames' new multi-million dollar high school. In 1960 the first unit was completed; and this year’s seniors, then sophomores, joined the student body. The following years were characterized by a split school system. Half the student body at- tended the old high school building while the other half went to classes two miles away in the new unit. At noon the classes switched schools by- way of crowded, daily bus rides. Those days were crammed with impromptu situa- tions. On the first day of school in sixty, a traffic jam developed on the temporary dirt road lead- ing to the new high school: and students had to walk to the school over unsodded hills. In class it was no less hectic; teachers had to scream to be heard over the road grading equipment. With winter the school was occasionally snowed-in and students frozen out. The problems of today were no less eminent. This year we were without a gym and an auditorium. However, administrative and student ingenuity have solved many immediate problems. I MF. SITE of the new high school at night is the picture of peacefulness. SARDINE PACKING i at the height of fashion throughout the halls and stairways.DAYBREAK was blown in morning after morning as the band rehearsed for its half time shows. Contents Introduction .. .. Features ......................... 10 Academics ....................... 38 Athletics ........................ 58 Activities ....................... 82 Students .........................122 Advertisements ................. 158 Offering many rich and varied fields of extra- curricular activities, our high school has enabled its students to develop their interests and talents in all their facets. Most Arnes students participate in two or three of these rewarding activities during the year. Some of these organizations provided entertain- ment for the city of Ames as well as the school. Our excellent dramatics department presented three major plays this year, and the vocal music department organized concerts for the holidays. Friendship Week and other events. The orchestra and hand provided programs and entertainment for all students. Much hard work and consistent practice went into these performances. Among the other organized activities are debate club, science seminar, and the language clubs. In debate, the club members traveled and competed with other schools. The various language groups also provided entertainment for interested partici- pants. All these activities are worthwhile, and each student was encouraged to learn about them, de- cide which ones interested him, and join. General Index 186 STREAMLINED SIMPLICITY mixed with functional stur- diness are keynotes of the new buildings. A DRAMA CLASS without a stage suffered while class- room addition went up first. 5ENTICING BOOKS, thick padded chairs, jnd a quiet atmosphere conducive to study make the modern, new library just the place for leisure time readers. 6SETTLING DOWN to work in clas? take? some doing, . . . but Mary Ellen Bragonier has discovered that a cough and . . . an index finger are just the right tranquilizers to do the trick. Ames High offers the student one of the finest academic programs in the country. High national ranking in merit scholarship tests and in the Iowa Tests of Educational Development indicates the outstanding scholarship of Ames High students. In the 1961-1962 school year, the Iowa Tests of Educational Development showed that the school average ranks in the 99th percentile in almost all areas of testing. A fine faculty and up-to-date courses furnish an excellent learning situation for students of all abili- ties. Programs in vocational education are pro- vided to help the student make career choices and receive valuable job experience. This year a series of honors courses were instituted, which provided an opportunity for students with exceptional ability to go beyond the normal scope of a class. Stu- dents could apply for up to two classes in the honors program; applications were judged on past performance and teachers’ recommendations. The honors sections included biology, sophomore English. American literature, physics, algebra, and chemist! )'. TONS OK CEMENT, bricks by the million, countless hours of work a building. Special equipment is provided to help the teacher. Some of the many teaching aids in the new high school include a language laboratory, well-equip- ped science labs, and other various visual and audio equipment. 7FURIOUS CHEERS of the Pep Club led the sports fans in stadium rumbling hys- terics. ROARING FANS followed the cheer leaders in a pep as- sembly on one of the mounds which surround the parking lot. 'Flic Little Cyclone teams, well-known throughout the state for the lively support of their fans, have earned their triumphs. At home games the stadium or the gym was filled to capacity with enthusiastic fans: for out-of-town games, Cyclone followers left Ames on game night with boundless pep and energy. This spirit of loyalty was evident not only at games, hut also throughout the school during the week before the games. Cheerleaders, in an effort to keep the enthusiasm high, initiated the idea of reading original poems about forthcoming games over the loud speaker during morning announce- ments. Pep assemblies were held as often as pos- sible on the eve of a game, and during the noon hour ten-minute pep rallies were held outside the school on one of the mounds surrounding the park- ing area. The pep club, composed of interested senior girls, helped the cheerleaders plan the pep assemblies. ‘'Pep' skits depicting scenes from the coming game were presented, and signs and posters were placed conspicuously throughout the halls reminding everyone of the game. It was this spirit of loyalty and enthusiasm dis- played by the fans and the spirit of fair play shown by our teams that made our school what it is this year and what it has been.9I Features Making student life more enjoyable were many in- dispensable highlights. It is unlikely that any docu- mentary could relate all the experiences of a com- plex mass of nearly 1.000 enthusiastic students; but the following major activities and pastimes are a representative norm: Enrollment—a new, united school Homecoming Career and College Nights Assemblies “Teens Against Polio" Court Day Christmas Formal Campaigns Spirit Dance Friendship Week Foreign students; student exchange Boys’ and Girls’ State With a year full of planned and spontaneous high- lights, each of us was pulled into an uproarious and hectic life, beyond that of the school. IIOn three days in August, 914 students registered, filled out questionnaires, received information, and were given their schedules. Activity centered around the office in new unit two. A new feature of the preparatory actiivities was “Sophomore Orientation.” held on the Friday fol- lowing registration. The program began with an informal assembly in the study hall, which included a talk by Principal Adams and an introduction to the student leaders. The sophomores then spent ten minutes in each of their classes getting to know their teachers. A mixer in the study hall followed the “preview day.” giving students and teachers a chance to become better acquainted. With the beginning of school, the faculty and ad- ministration found that registration wasn't over yet. I .ate enrollment, last minute schedule changes, and the rush to buy milk tickets added to the first day turmoil. By the end of the week though, the stu- dents had fallen into their normal routines, and the school was regaining some resemblance to normalcy. Registration Ends 2 Years of Bus Rides, ANN KLISLEK fills out an information form with the aid of Mrs. Lois Carr . . . picks up her schedule from Mrs. Daisy Flack 12SOPHOMORE ORIENTATION enabled the newest high school class to meet their teachers and preview their first semester subjects. Mrs. Bauske, a newcomer herself, talks with Alan Anderson. 13Hundreds of Sack Lunches A NEW MAGAZINE, sonic spare time, and a quiet place provide Chuck Proffitt with a good substitute for studying. MRS. DICKINSON, librarian, helps Mary Hinrichsen check out one of the many new books. 14 SACK LUNCHES and cartons of milk were in order for Tern Cook and many other students this year.Symbolize Continuing Construction AMASSED for the fir t school assembly, the students observed the MR. TAYLOR, a former Ames High graduate, raises the dedication of the flagpole. flag on the pole he made and donated. This year, the library is occupying what will later become the study hall. The library staff has tried to make the best of the situation and has managed to provide an excellent place for students to study and read. Much new equipment has been bought in- cluding ten individual study tables, several lounge chairs, and 115 straight-backed chairs. Over 260 new books ranging in price from SI to SI 7.50 and 1-10 paperbacks have been purchased. Due to lack of a cafeteria, this year's students were required to either bring their lunch or cat at home. Many preferred to bring their lunch, and the study hall and the library were opened at noon to furnish them with a place to eat. The school did sell milk, for which tickets with 5 or 25 punches were sold, at three cents a punch. Students took care of the milk sales and cleaning the study hall after lunch. 15J. Hall Four, Pumpkins, Cornstalks CLEATS, passe , and strategy make for a worried AHS team at half time. HOMECOMING CAN DIDATES—Front Row: A. Toms, J. Coletti, G. Hatasaki, T. Spicberg, B. Von Bergen. Rack Row: A. Wilson, P. McCowen. M. Buehholtz. M. Bragonier. B. Picken. 14 16Highlight 1962 Homecoming Dance Bus loads of hand members, fans, and a top rated team from West Waterloo rolled into Ames on the night of October 12 for the long awaited Home- coming game between the Wahawks and the Ames High Little Cyclones. Knowing at best they had an outside chance to win. the Little Cyclones tossed in their best game of the season and fought to the end before bowing in defeat. 14-0. The music of the J. Hall Four with the songs of Janet Wildman filled the study hall later in the evening as the students and alums gathered for the Homecoming Dance 1962. Cornstalks, pumpkins. and the school colors of black and orange were used by the Social Committee to carry out the In- dian Summer theme and transform the study hall into a dance floor. Members of homeroom 118-1 served soft drinks and doughnuts in the basement to those who wan- dered down. Ping-pong games were a rousing source of entertainment from nine-thirty to eleven. Home- room 112-1 was in charge of publicity for the well attended dance. Weeks of work by various Student Council, homeroom, and Pep Club committees were climaxed in the Homecoming '62 festivities. ATTENDANT BECKY Von Bergen, Queen Jane Coletti, and AMES HIGH’S JANET Wildman sang with the J. Hall Attendant Ann Wilson were introduced to the football enthusiasts Four to entertain guests at the Homecoming Dance, after entering the stadium in bright convertibles. 17JANE COLETTI, 1962 Queen, graciously reigned over the traditional activ- ities of Homecoming with attendants Becky Von Boreen and Ann Wilson. Queen Jane Reigns at Football 18■SURROUNDED BY THE FOOTBALL team. Quecrt Jane an«l Attend- :£ant«, Becky and Ann. smile after receiving their royal bouquets. . . 1962 HOMECOMING Queen, Jane Colctti!” Cheerleader Jane is congratulated by her friends. Homecoming Queen elections are a complicated mess. On Tuesday of Homecoming week, the tradi- tional announcement is made that each student should write the senior girl’s name of his choico on a slip of paper. After a harried counting of the ballots, the eight to twelve girls with the highest number of nominations became candidates. From the time that their names are announced late Tues- day the suspense mounted. Thursday morning the second voting took place, and the candidates could once again become human. Friday morning the Homecoming Assembly was held —tradition ends there; each year the ceremony is different. For '62 a short pep rally was held. This was followed by numerous pep talks and the introduction of the varsity football team. Tom Grabau and Butch Mickelson took the honors of naming the queen. Jane Colctti, and her attend- ants. Becky Von Bergen and Ann Wilson. The Home- coming Royalty was introduced to the football crowd later Friday evening and then honored at ; the dance. Festivities 19Career, College, School Nights CAREER NIGHT SPEAKER Mr. Kelso explains his field of electronics and tells his listeners of its pros and cons. On tlie evening of November 20th the student body met in the Central Junior High Auditorium for the opening of Career Night. This program enabled the student to receive “first hand” information on the career of his choice. It was organized by the Career Day Committee of the Student Council, headed by Kicky Lloyd. Career Night 1962 opened with an address entitled “And the Tide Rolls On” by Dr. Virgil Lagonmar- cino. Director of Teacher Training at 1SU. At the conclusion of the address, the students spent two 55 mipute periods in small groups with representa- tives from any of forty chosen fields. As a feature of Education Week, Ames High invited the parents to visit classrooms on “Back to School Night.” Each student attended his morning classes with his parents as observers. The program enabled parents to see the progressing school, experience the noon traffic jam, and view the abnormally large classes. This event was reinstated after the split school, two year transition period. Later in the year, students wishing information about higher education were invited to attend Col- lege Night. This provided an opportunity to meet and talk with representatives from many surround- ing colleges and national universities. Je Contribute Plans for Education SEVERAL GIRLS pause to check the location of College Night speakers. DR. VIRGIL LAGOMARCINO spoke to the Career Night assembly on their future education and vocations. JOYCE DICKSON helped serve refreshments at “Back to School Night.” Instead of attending regular study halls, students brought their parents to the basement for punch and prattle. I 21WITH THE LIGHTS DIM and the audience hushed, Archie Greene sang a lullaby accompanied by Jane Riggs at the Christmas program. Other soloists for the yulctidc concert were Janet Wildman and Nancy Uhl. Although the closest auditorium was nearly two miles away, the Assembly Committee, under the leadership of chairman Hob Beaty, proceeded un- daunted to organize several fine programs during the year. The student body made the mass migration to the Central Junior High Auditorium with a surprising lack of confusion, considering the situa- tion. A fleet of buses and untold numbers of cars provided the transportation to and from the pro- grains. show had many acts including pianists, vocalists, a short skit by the Drama Club, and the by now famous “Culture Club.” Bob Beaty, as master of ceremonies, provided an interesting diversion in a costume that defied description. The next program was a talk by Johnny Boyd, champion race driver, and a movie about the “In- dianapolis 500.” Mr. Boyd spoke about his experi- ences and their relation to safe driving. The first item on the calendar was a talent show. Other assemblies during the year included election Ames High's future Broadway stars were given a,u PeP rallies and a program on the works of free reign to display their talents onstage. The James Whitcomb Riley. Assemblies Held at Central Van 22BOB BEATY. M.C. of the talent show, entertained the stu- dents between acts. STUDENTS CONGREGATE in the lobby before entering the audi- torium. Most assemblies were held during the first part of the morning. “WRENCH, TIRE PUMP, PLIERS." The Pep Club’s skits during pep rallies were rib-rattling. from Election Rallies to Concerts 23WILLING Teens Against Polio workers assign districts to the 200 students who signed up to canvass Ames. Boys’ Club and Girl Re- serves jointly s|H»nsor this service project each year. Every year Ames High seniors have the opportunity to get an inside view of the Iowa Court system in action. On February 6 in the County Courthouse at Nevada, the senior class participated in a mock trial as both jurymen and spectators. After the en- trance of District Court Justice. Ed J. Kelley, the trial began. A civil case involving an auto accident in which the plaintiff was suing the defendant for damages was presented by members of the Story County Bar Association. The question for the stu- dent jury was whether such negligence was the di- rect cause of the damages to the plaintiffs automo- bile. After hearing all the evidence and retiring for a short period of deliberation, the jury returned a verdict of not guilty. From this experience the sen- iors gained valuable insight into court procedure and our judicial system. Seniors Attend Court Day in Nevada; 24 AMES CITIZENS were, as a rule, very generous: and when collector' came to the door, they were well- rewarded. Tom Ukcna receives a contribution for Teens Against Polio. DON Rl’NYA.V Foreman of the jury during Court Day, gives the jury'- verdict. "We find for the defendant. AHS Students Raise Money for TAP A great number of Ames High students participated in community service projects during the year. On Halloween Eve, while younger children went ‘'trick or treating for cookies and candy, high school students went from door to door asking for money to support UXICEF (United Nations International Children’s Emergency fund». The project, carried out by individual church youth groups in their areas, was coordinated by the Ames I CYM (United Christian Youth Movement) Council. As a result of the night s work, $1500 was collected which will go to clothe and feed starving children in the world’s under-developed countries. On January 31. Ames High students took part in the annual 1'eens Against Polio Drive in an effort to collect money for research on birth defects and arthritis. Girl Reserves and Boys Club, headed by Jane Coletti and Rick Lloyd, sponsored and or- ganized the entire project. About 200 students col- lected money totaling $2,330, the largest amount collected in the history of the Ames drive. Dona- tion boxes were placed in the homerooms and down- town stores: envelopes were sent to all Ames resi- dents asking for contributions: and a house-to-house drive was organized to complete the campaign. RICK LLOYD and Jane Coletti. give their contribution to the March of Dimes. 25CO-CHAIRMEN Vivian Voelkcr and Karin Saral pause lo gaze at their creation, a Norseman heaven, in the dimly lit ballroom. Carol Rouzc provides mood music on the piano for her fellow workers. SANDY PERC1VAL decorates one of the white flocked Christmas trees with gold balls. Snow didn't fall until Christinas Eve this year, but by the end of the first week in December students were heading towards Lake Lavern. Squaw Creek, and Brookside with their ice skates for the first of the winter sports. With the snow catnc toboggan- ing. snowball fights, stalled cars, sidewalks to shovel, and cold north winds. Accompanying winter came the Christmas season: shopping, carols at noon over the sound system, and the after-game party “Mistletoe Madness." The com- bined language clubs' Christmas party was held on December 11. Carols were sung in the different languages; punch and cookies were served. Girl Reserve and Boys' Club cabinets took gifts from the homerooms to the County Home on December 20. The vocal music department presented a program of Christmas music before school was dismissed. The last of the Christmas activities was the semi- formal dance given by the Senior Girls on Decem- ber 29. The Sun Room of the Memorial Union was decorated with flocked Christmas trees, glimmering stars, and sunbursts to carry out the theme “Val- halla.” Dance music was nrovided by the J. Hall Four with Janet Wildman as vocalist. Karin Saral and Vivian Voelker served as dance co-chairmen. 26Service Clubs Bring Christmas to Old PRESENTS ARE PACKED UP by Girl Reserve cabinet members in preparation for their journey to the County Home. THESE GIFTS WERE RECEIVED gratefully . . . AND ALL INVOLVED felt a glow of satisfaction as they started the trip home.COLORFUL POSTERS arc easy to take down for the victor Jim Mannum and his backers, Mary Ellen Bragonier and Bill Strand. KEEPING TIME DURING the two campaign assemblies enabled each candidate to have equal speaking time, Dan Roach and Mary Mont- gomery watched the clock at Friday’s assembly. To the Ames High student body there is only one thing certain in life: There will always be semester tests. They are as impossible to stop as a steam roller and produce about the same effects. Sopho- mores are petrified with fear; juniors are nervous and bleary eyed: and the old gray seniors calmly observe the proceedings with a philosophical attitude that usually develops into a bad case of “senior cynicism ' by the end of the year. Those with enough energy left to open their eyes found the tortuous boredom of study somewhat abated by the myriads of colorful and catchy post- ers which suddenly appeared announcing the be- ginning of the campaign for second semester stu- dent body president. Candidates were Bob Beaty. Dick Gibson. Jim Hannum. and Bill Easton. Showers of paper airplanes, cheering students, and a barrage of fruit for one unlucky speaker marked the enthusiasm and hilarity of the nominating as- sembly. There was also a serious side to the eve- ning though with each candidate presenting his ideas for improvements to be made in the event of his election. The election assembly on Friday cli- maxed a week of vigorous campaigning. Ballots were cast, and first semester president Archie Greene announced over the sound system that Jim Hannum had been elected. 5-Day Campaign Features Rabbits, 28JIM HANNl’M count the vote on the first i' ue presented to Student Council after his election and swear- ing in as Student Body President. 'Bills’, Rocking Chair, Real Estate Sign 29Cotton Candy, Ponies, Lemonade Set JANICE FRIEST, Spirit Sweetheart, was crowned during the semester-break dance ‘'Carrousel" by master of ceremonies Jim Mannum after her attendant» Ann Tom» and Carol Rouze had been announced. w 30Spirited Mood for 'Carousel’ Dance High spirits following the end of semester tests combined with a carnival atmosphere made the annual Spirit dance a thoroughly enjoyable ex- perience for all who attended. The only party poopers were the members of the Spirit staff who had spent the entire day at the monumental task of transforming the dank, dreary, junk-filled basement I into a bright, wildly colored ballroom. The theme of the dance was either "Carrousel” or "Carousel." No one was ever quite sure how it was spelled, but this did nothing to diminish the fun ! and excitement. i Entertainment was provided by the Junior Girls’ i Sextet and a junior combo. Following this, Jim Hannum. master of ceremonies, announced the I "Spirit Sweetheart.” The golden crown went to I Janice Priest, with her attendants being Carol I Rouze and Ann Toms. I Cotton candy, pink lemonade, suckers, cookies, and piles of other goodies beckoned invitingly from 1 the refreshment tables. By 11:35 the basement was empty and the staff ) was busy filling it up with junk so that it would I look like itself again, but all agreed that "Carrousel” was well worth the effort. SWEETHEART JANICE FRIEST and Attendant Carol Rouze admire the traditional heart-bracelet given to Jan after her crowning. SPIRIT SWEETHEART CANDIDATES—P. McCowen. B. Bean, B. Picken, H. Friest. A. Wilson. J. Miller. M. Bragonier. A. Toms, C. Rouze. 31“A WAV TO LIVE” was the subject for Dr. Wells’ final lecture to the student body. Each morning the assembly included music by a choral group, devotions by an Ames minister, and introductions by officers of Boys’ Club and Girl Reserves. 32 Ji Resinning on February 4. the student body met at the Central Auditorium for a series of three as- semblies which marked the highlight of Ames High's annual Friendship Week. Featured speaker at the assemblies was Hr. Ronald V. Wells, presi- dent of Crozer Theological Seminary, Chester. Pennsylvania. Also included among his many titles are Associate Executive Secretary of the Board of Education and Publication and Executive Director of the Division of Christian Higher Education. Ad- dresses were on the theme ‘‘To Every Man There Openeth . . . “A Way to God." “A Way to Love." “A Way to Live." Dr. Wells was a minister of the First Baptist Church in Ames from 1947-1052. 1963 Friendship Week was sponsored jointly by the Boys’ Club and the Girl Reserves with the help of the Ames Rotary Club. Friendship Week is held each winter as a time for Ames High students to learn to understand them- selves and others better. Students had opportunities also for individual conferences with Dr. Wells. Each class had a forum in which it met with the speak- er. In it he answered questions submitted by stu- dents through the homerooms. After the questions had been completed, the floor was opened for questions and discussion which afforded specific- problems to be evaluated by a learned observer. Dr. Wells Speaks at Friendship Week DR. RONALD WELLS flew from Chester, Pennsylvania, to speak at the GIOVANNI BON A NATE is an exchange student from Turin, thirty-sixth annual Friendship Week. Speaker- are chosen from all over Italy. He spent his entire senior year here, the United States. 33Sophs, Juniors Move Up; Seniors Every year when the second semester gets well un- derway, contests, concerts, and tournaments are scheduled to feature organizations and teams in their final performances of the year. The music de- partment presented assemblies for the student body and concerts for the public. This year the orches- tra, band, and sophomore band presented their con- certs in March. Basketball, track, tennis, and golf were all athletic highlights of the second semester. Basketball tourna- ments began late in February and aroused the in- terest of the AHS fans. The state indoor track meet was held in Iowa City on March 30. The outdoor track highlights were the Drake Relays, the Ames Invitational, and the district and state meets. Tennis and golf offered opportunities for both boys and girls. Several meets were held before the season of- ficially ended with the state meets on May 25. UNIT THREE nears completion as the year closes. It will house many new classrooms and facilities for the growing school campus. April was a busy month for the seniors as they made final preparations for their class play, for the Debate Club as they prepared for the Iowa Forensic league finals, and for the whole student body as they campaigned and elected a Student Body President for the first semester of the '63-'6T school year. 34Move Out as 62-3 School Year Ends VIVIAN VOELKER picks up a registration form from the WITH THE SECOND semester's end came increased study Iowa State University Registrar as the graduation date ap for the week long tests. proache«. AFTER GAME PARTIES arc given by a different homeroom each week. A five dollar limit is allowed for decorations. BY POPULAR VOTE these boys were picked to attend Boys’ State: Bill Pyle, Jack Lasche, Hamp Tisdale; (standing) Bob Beaty, Don Runyan. Rick Lloyd. CAROL ROUZE was chosen through an interview to represent Ames at Girls' State. 36WITH SPRING GRADUATION a large majority of seniors will arrive at a college campus to begin four years of work. Iowa State University at Ames receives the major bulk of graduates. Seven Attend Mock State Conventions Spring was a busy time for the Ames High students as the year's activities came to a close with a rush of parties and programs. After months of prepara- tion and anticipation the class of '63 finally ex- perienced the excitement of senior week and gradua- tion. Slumber parties, dances, and picnics provided the fun while a proper note of seriousness was supplied by an inspiring baccalaureate sendee and the final graduation exercises. The juniors had earlier entertained the senior class at the annual Junior-Senior Frolic held in the Central Gymnasium. Track meets, school parties and concerts also filled the calendars of AHS students during the spring months. However, as the last weeks of the school year approached, pleasure was put aside and in its place came hard work and study. Important semester tests loomed ahead, and everyone put forth his last store of brain power in an attempt to bring up lag- ging grades. Summer vacation seemed especially appealing after the long hours spent studying and taking tests. This year, as in the past, seven fortunate Ames High Students will start their summers by attend- ing Boys' State and Girls’ State, both sponsored by the American Legion. Last year the six hoys, chosen by their classmates, spent a wonderful week at Camp Dodge and learned about government by taking part in its functions. Ames High's representa- tive to Girls' State went to Cedar Falls where a model working government was created through ex- citing campaigns and elections. 37Academics Each of our lives has centered around a jammed curriculum. A multitude of inspirations, shaded facets different from all other experiences, were offered to the inquisitive mind. In a quiet way, through a battered book or learned mind, vistas of unbelievable taste illuminated our worlds; and fields such as these came to life: History, Government, International Relations Mathematics English. Literature Science—Biology to Chemistry Languages—Latin, Spanish. French, German Drama Art Music—choral and instrumental Physical Education Industrial Arts; Home Economics Distributive Education Probing the sensitive pathways to the mind were the teachers, their assistants, the administration, and the initiative of the students. 39SUPERINTENDENT Waller Hetzel PRINCIPAL Herbert Adam. Increased Enrollment, New School VICE-PRINCIPAL RITLAND held counsultatiohs with all senior boys. With the student body finally settled in the new school, the loudest sigh of relief probably came from the members of the administration. For the past two years they faced greatly increased re- sponsibilty and difficulty due to the unique two school system. The problems that arise while ad- justing to the new lmildings must still be met. but this year duties resemble more those of a normal administration. Heading the executive de- partment of Ames High were Mr. Herbert Adams, principal, and Mr. Everett Ritland. vice-principal. Principal Adams came to Ames from La Mars. Iowa, in August of 194-1: he had been principal of the senior high school there. He has received de- grees at the State University of Iowa and South Dakota State College, and has attended summer school at Minn. U.. Wis. U.. and ISC. The class of '63 was the nineteenth Ames class to graduate under the dedicated leadership and inspiration of Mr. Adams. 40Mr. Kitland came to Ames from Gilbert in 1936, where lie bad taught English and coached. He re- ceived Ids B.A. at Luther College, and did bis graduate work at ISl and 11. Besides bis immediate duties. Mr. Adams must always be looking toward the future. He attempts to keep the scholastic program comprehensive, so that both those students who will go to college and those who will not can be educated in the best pos- sible manner. s chief executives of Ames High School the prin- cipal and his assistant were responsible for provid- ing schedules of classes suitable to both teachers and students. Also included in their duties were organizing and coordinating all the various func- tions and activities, conferring with students and teachers, acting as clearing agents for the many problems of the school, making final decisions on important matters, and interpreting and executing the regulations of the School Board as they af- fected the policy of Ames High. Determining the overall policy for the management and operation of the school system was the duty of the Ames School Board. They were active in determining a comprehensive budget for the schools. MRS. CHARLOTTE WHITNEY served as the coordinator of guidance services for the Ames School District and as senior girls’ advisor at Ames High. Plans Create Administrative Problems 41 HOARD OF EDUCATION—Sealed: Mrs. William Buck, Walter Hetzcl, Frank Adams (pres.), W. R. Underhill, Mrs. W. A. Singer, Frank Howell (sec.). Standing: Dave Moorhead, Robert Fellinger, Herbert Howell, Thomas Hannum. Not Pictured: Mr. Munn (treas.).THE DULL DRONE of u rambling lecturer is typical of some history' courses, hut Mr. liaushccr has found the key to mental stimulation. Social sciences are considered a vital part of the curriculum at Ames High, since the future of our nation may largely depend on increased knowledge and understanding of our world. The Social Studies Department, headed by Mr. Page, offers a wide variety of subjects which deal with human beings and their relations with one another. Two semesters of American History and one se- mester of American Government are required for graduation. A year of both World History and In- ternational Relations and a semester each of Econom- ics and Sociology and elective courses available for students who wish to study further in the field of social science. International Relations was offered for the first time this year. Taught by Mr. Cole, this class care- fully explored the background of state relationships, contemporary international problems, and American foreign policies. A large number of students have judged this to be an extremely valuable course, and it will become a permanent part of the cur- riculum. MRS. GARRETS American History classes had avid dis- cussions over the Civil War. International 42 SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT- I). Colo. K. Page, W. Linn, H. Covey. Mr. D. C. COLE: American History; International Relations . . . sponsors debate . . . B.A. from the University of Nebraska; attended Nebraska State College . . . member Phi Beta Kappa. Mr. KENNETH PAGE: American Government; Economics . . . sponsors boys intramurals . . . B.S. from Drake: M.A. from SUI. . . member of Kappa Delta Pi and Phi Delta Kappa Mr. WALLY LINN: American History . . . coaches basketball . . . B.S. and M.A. from Drake University. Mr. 11. S. COVEY: American Government; Sociology . . . coaches track . . . B.A. from Penn College. Mrs. AVONELLE GARRETT: American History . . . sophomore counselor ... helps sponsor Pep Club . .. B.A. and M.A. from State College of Iowa . . . member of Torch and Tassel and Alpha Delta Kappa. Air. MAURICE HAUSHEER: World History; American History ... coach ... B.A. from University of Dubuque: M.A. from University of Wyoming; graduate study at University of Washington. Relations Is Added to Curriculum 43Second Year Algebra Claims AW ED. STUNNED or maybe just surprised at the com- plexity of simple trig problem» is Janet Wildman. Mathematics, often called the “Queen of the Sci- ences.” began when early man wanted to measure the objects of the world around him. Since then mathematics has become an intrinsic part of numer- ous areas. I oday. more than ever before, a knowledge of basic mathematical principles is a necessary element in fulfilling social, practical, and vocational needs, which constitute better citizens and civilizations. I'herefore. Ames schools required all students to take one year of algebra in ninth grade and one year of geometry in the sophomore year. This re- quirement might be waived and substituted with r another math course by a signed request from a parent and approval by the principal. Additional courses in the mathematics curriculum, which may be taken by qualified students, include: Applied Math. Business Arithmetic, Algebra 3 and 4. Trigonometry, and Analytic Geometry. This academic year offered superior students a challenge through the installation of an honors course in second year algebra and geometry. The Mathe- matics Department consisted of six teachers and was headed by Mr. Hiedeman. MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT Front Row: H. Albertson. M. Staf- ford, A. Tauber. Hack Row: W. Wood, I). Hiedeman, E. Oltroppc. 44Largest Enriched Class Enrollment GEOMETRY and sophomore;- are inevitable; but no subject meetings, questions about assignments from sleeping students, can stop ceiling and classmate staring, little summit and occasional tic tac toe games. Mr. HUBERT ALBERTSON: Algebra 3, 4 . . . sponsors Boy’s Club . . . B.S. from University of Mis- souri; M.A. from State College of Iowa . . . member of Phi Delta Kappa. Miss MARILYN STAFFORD: Geometry 1, 2; Algebra 3, 4 . . . sponsors Girl Reserves; sophomore cheersquad . . . B.A. from State College of Iowa; graduate work at SUI . . . member of Kappa Mu Epsilon and Kappa Delta Pi. Dr. ANNE TAUBER: Honors Biology: Geometry . . . B.S., M.S.. and Ph.D. from ISU . . . member of Phi Kappa and Sigma Xi. Mr. WALTER H. WOOD: Algebra 3, 4; Trigono- metry; Analytic Geometry . . . sponsors Fire Squad . . . M.S. from Kansas State College of Pittsburg .. . member of Kappa Mu Epsilon . . . travel in Germany while in Army. Mr. DALE HIEDE.MAN: Chairman of Mathematics Department . . . Geometry; Trigonometry: Ana- lytic Geometry . . . B.S. and M.S. From ISU . . . attended several summer institute , for math teachers Mr. EUGENE M. OLTROGGE: Applied Math; Algebra Geometry . . . sponsors Boy’s Club . . . coaches wrestling . . . B.A. from Wartburg; working on masters at Drake . . . trdvel in 32 states and 12 European countries. 45 Satw The increasing complexity of modem society has made a knowledge of the subjects taught by the English Department a prerequisite to success. Man must be able to communicate his thoughts and ideas to others, or his works will lie in vain. He also must be able to interpret the writings of others in order that he may make use of their accomplishments and avoid their mistakes. Four years of English are required at AHS. The department consists of thirteen teachers, headed by Miss Wilcox. The courses offered include Sopho more English. American. English and W'orld Litera- ture. Journalism. Communication Skills. Develop- mental Reading, and Speech. The division also spon- sors some of the school s largest activities which include the Web, Spirit. Scratch Pad, and drama. New equipment bought for this section included textbooks, tape recorders, records, and also reading accelerators for use in developmental reading. The new high school also provides the photographers on the publications' staff with a centralized, well-equip- ped dark room. ENGLISH DEPARTMENT -Seated: S. Anderson. M. Reno. Stand- ing: 0. Ourth, G. Bauske. Mrs. SHARON ANDERSON: Eng. 3. 4: Beginning Drama . . . B.A. from Drake. Dos Moines. Mr . MARY S. RENO: Comm. Skill : Eng. 3, 4 .. . sponsor? Service Committee .. . attended l.'SC, Western State. Colorado, Denver University, and ISU: B.A. from Coe College . . . member Zeta Phi Eta. Mr. OSCAR J. OURTH: Eng. 3. 4 .. . co-sponsors Boys’ Club ... B.A. and M.A. from University of Iowa. Mr . GRACE R. BAUSKE: Eng. 3. 4: Am. Lit.: Journalism . .. sponsors Web . . . B.A. from Carleton College: attended University of Wisconsin, SCI, and ISU. {A■ joai 4ke cjoly of- whom X was ore STENE CLARK PUZZLES over an uncooperative sentence in Mrs. Anderson’s sophomore English class. 1200 Students Make 46 Eight Electives,ENGLISH DEPARTMENT (continued)—Seated: E. Wilcox. Standing: M. McNally, A. Yegors, E. Thompson, N. Lutz. Miss EDNA G. WILCOX: Chairman of English Department . .. American Lit . . . co-sponsors Girl Reserves . . . B.A. from State Univ. of Iowa Miss MARY McNALLY: World and English Lit . . . counsels sophomore girls; general treasurer; sponsors student treasurers . . . B.A. from Grinnell . . . traveled in Europe. Mrs. AURILLA YEGORS: World Lit.; Comm. Skills .. . counsels Junior Girls; co-sponsors Service Committee . . . A.B. from Cornell College of Iowa; M.S. from Drake University. Mrs. EVELYN C. THOMPSON: American Lit.; Eng. 3, 4 . .. sponsors Girl Reserves and Scratch Pad . . . B.S. from ISU; M.S. from Syracuse University. Mrs. NANCY LUTZ: Developmental Reading; Eng. 3, 4; Eng. Lit . . . sponsors Spirit . . . B.A. from Univ. of New Mexico; working on M.A.; attended Univ. of Pacific . . . member of Sigma Alpha Iota; Pi Lambda Theta. English Department Largest Section 47 Science Division Offers Honors Courses FASCINATION in the wonders of chemistry is nearly universal; here Libby Rocpke works on a lab involving the balancing of chemical equations from experimental data. Science is becoming an increasingly important field in our complex world: Ames High presented no ex- ception to the recent rule of increased emphasis in the science curriculum. This year introduced to the students honors courses in biology, physics, and chemistry. These classes provided a challenge to exceptional students. Mr. Trump headed the Science Department con- sisting of five teachers. Under the division’s super- vision. new facilities for laboratories in each field have been provided. New equipment has enabled extensive work to be done through experiments by all classes. No science courses are required: however, a great number of students saw the courses' importance and completed several years of science classes. The elec- tives offered were: biology, usually taken during the sophomore year: physics, taken by juniors: and the seniors' chemistry. The department also spon- sored Science Seminar which was a one-fourth credit activity for extending the science training in specialized fields. 48in Biology, Physics, Chemistry Mr. CECIL SPATCHER: Biology . . . coaching . . . B.A. from Upper Iowa and M.A. from State College of Iowa. Mr. FLOYD STURDEVANT: Chemistry . . . sponsors Science Seminar . . . B.A. from Midland College in Fremont, Nebraska and M.A. from ISU. Mr. RICHARD TRUMP: Biology ... sponsors Science Seminar . . . M.S. from ISU . . . Member of Phi Kappa Phi. Mr. JAMES JONES: Physics . . . helps sponsor Science Seminar . . . B.A. and M.A. from State College of Iowa. UNBELIEVABLE DISORGANIZATION characterized students dur- ing laboratory experiments in physics. SCIENCE DEPARTMENT—C. Spatcher, F. Sturtcvant. R. Trump, J. Jones. 49MR. HAMILTON gave director’s advice on Prom MRS. ANDERSON taught art cla--es only in the entertainment and various other groups. mornings since she attended ISU in the after- noon. Dialogues, Vocabulary Words, History Mr. ROBERT HAMILTON: Beginning and Advanced Drama. Sophomore Speech . . . sponsors Palm Club, assistant Junior Class sponsor'. . . B.A. from State College of Iowa; M.A. from Univ. of Michigan; member of Theta Alph Phi. Mrs. JAN ANDERSON: Art 1, 2 . . . sponsors Junior Class . . . B.S. from Iowa State University . . . member of Alpha Lambda Delta: Omicron Nu . . . travel in Mexico and Canada. Mr. DEAN MOBERG: Orchestra . . . B.A. and M.A. from the State University of Iowa. Mr. RICHARD DAY: Band .. . B.A. from State College of Iowa; M.A. from University of Iowa . . . member of Delta Sigma Rho; Phi Mu Alpha. Mr. WAYNE CROSS: Glee Club, Chorus, Choir . . . sponsors All-state vocal music quartets . . . B.S.M. from Cornell College of Iowa. 50 MUSIC DEPARTMENT—D. Mobcrg, R. Day. W. Cross.Mr. WILLIAM KIPP: Latin 1, 2. 3, 4 . .. Latin Club. Noon Hour. Assistant Firesquad Sponsor . . . B.A. and M.S. from Nebraska State Teachers College. Mrs. DOROTHY VAN DECAR: French 1, 2. 3, 1; American Literature 1. 2 . . . B.A. from Drake and M.S. from Drake . . . Sponsors French Club. Miss BARBARA YON WITTICH: German 1. 2. 3, 4; French 1, 2. 5. 6, 7, 8 . .. sponsors German Club . . . B.S. and M.S. from Iowa State University . . . Traveled in Europe. Mrs. MARY LOU YOUNG: Spanish 1. 2. 3. ... sponsors Spanish Club . . . B.A. from New York State College for Teachers; M.A. from University of Rochester. LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT—W. Kipp. D. Van- decar, B. Von Wittich. Characterize Language Classes I Noises, paint, and action keynoted the four major I divisions of fine arts courses and activities. The I Language Department, headed this year by Mr. I Ripp. offered several years each of Latin. Spanish, «French, and German. The students in these classes used the language laboratory. Through the recorded lessons, oral communication and word pronunciation I were improved. j Music, both vocal and instrumental, played a major I part in the school life of about half of Ames High's E students. Class choices included Boys’ and Girls' E Glee Clubs. Mixed Choruses. Concert. Pep. and (Marching Bands, and Orchestra. Special lessons were given in all areas to individuals and groups. I Three art classes were taught this year by Mrs. J. I Anderson, a new teacher. Students in these classes need not have had any previous instruction. The Dramatics Department also had a new in- structor. Mrs. S. Anderson, who. with Mr. Hamilton, led dramatics classes and produced the plays. The I number of participants in the Fine Arts Depart- I ment increased greatly this year, and the new I teachers were welcome additions to their divisions. MRS. YOUNG operates the master console in the language lab during a Spanish class. 51 Scores of girls clad in black shorts and white blouses were seen nearly every day exercising, playing football and baseball, or hiking through the weeded areas of the school grounds. At the same time, hi rain. mud. cold weather and even in an Octo- ber snow, the boys had football and baseball tourna- ments, ran cross-country races, and attempted other popular sports. The Physical Education Department was without a gym this year; but the girls teacher. Miss Zan- ders, and the boys' instructors. Mr. Wells and Mr. Smalling. solved the problem. S hen winter set in. the classes retired to the basement of the second unit for ping pong, more exercising, trampolining. and other appropriate activities during each of the required bi-weekly PE periods. Besides the program of physical education for stu- dents not out for sports or in marching band, a full interschool athletic program was offered in many sports. These included football, tennis, track, golf, baseball, and for the first time this year wrestling. An after school intramural program for the boys and a recreational program for the girls filled out this division of the school. MR. SMALLING organized all intramural activities. MR. WELLS had increased duties with the honor of being the first representative of the physical education teachers to be elected President of the Iowa State Education Association. Mr. RAY SMALLING: Physical Education . . . counselor . . . sponsors intramural athletics; Social Committee . . . coaches baseball . . . B.S. from State College of Iowa; M.A. from SUI: counseling certificate from ISIJ. Mr. KENNETH WELLS: Physical Education . . . coaches football and tennis . . . Athletic Director . . . counseling . . . President of Iowa State Education Association . . . B.S. from ISU; M.A. from Colorado College of Education . . . member of Phi Delta Kappa . . . traveled in the Pacific. 52 School Has No Gym; PE Classes Bowl,Miss MARLENE ZANDERS: Physical Education . . . sponsors Varsity Cheerleaders; GRA . . . R.A. from Simp- son College . . . member of WRA honor society MISS ZANDERS shows Mary Jo Hyler the accumulated points of girls in GRA for the first quarter of competi- tion. BOYS’ GYM CLASSES were divided into four teams for A WINDY SLOPE provided the perfect seat for a time out from football competitions until cold weather moved everyone football for Mary Nordskog and Sandy Feamster. inside. Wrestle, Enjoy Seasonal Sports 53Equipment Bought for Kitchens, Shops Industrial Education gives special manual training to hoys interested in technological occupations. Mr. Shadle, who directed this department, was assisted by Mr. McBride, Mr. Bengtson, and Mr. Stone. Mechanical drawing students worked with letter- ing. layouts, instruments and blue prints. Technical drafting supplemented the skills learned in me- chanical drawing. Woodworking students designed and constructed pieces of furniture. Future me- chanical engineers learned about welding, metal- casting and sheet metal in the metal shop to give the auto mechanics students first hand information on the operation of the automobiles. Basic elec- tricity. and communications were studied by the electronics students. Every individual is interested in his future. The Home Economics Department prepared girls for both their future occupation, and marriage and a family. Miss Trout is the Home Ec instructor for AHS. Ihe wide field of vocational homemaking included many units to help the individual become a better participating family. member. The second year of this course emphasized preparation for marriage and home management. Planning a wardrobe and constructing clothing, preparing and serving at- tractive meals, and interior decorating are popular areas of study. The Future Homemakers of America was made up of interested students. A special theme. ‘’Home Eco- nomics—Heart of Your Future." was carried out in FI IA work all over the state this year. MISS TROUT instructs home economics students in practical fir-t aid methods. Through class experiences the girls learn to cope with minor everyday accidents. 54INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT—E. Stone, G. MacBride, L. Bengtson. Miss BETTY LEA TROUT: Homemaking . . . sponsors Future Homemakers of America . . . B.S. from University of Idaho; M.S. from ISU. Mr. EDWIN STONE: Technical Drafting: Mechanical Drafting . . . sponsors Boys’ Club . . . B.S. and M.S. from ISU . . . member of Pi Delta Kappa and Epsilon Pi Tau . . . travel to the Isle of Capri. Mr. GEORGE MacBRIDE: Industrial Arts . . . spon- sors Junior Class; head of Audio-visual depart • ment . . . B.S. and M.S. from ISU . . . member of Epsilon Pi Tau; Phi Delta Kappa; Gamma Sigma Delta . . . travel in Nova Scotia; Jamaica; Haiti. Mr. LEONARD BENGSTON: General Metals; Electron- ics; Automcchanics . . . sponsors Boy’s Club hobby group . . . B.S. and M.S. from ISU . . . member of Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Eta Sigma; Epsilon Pi Tau; Phi Delta Kappa. ROGER LITCHFIELD wires a mock-up of a house wall. In this way, all electronics students receive instructions in basic house wiring techniques. 55Typing, Shorthand, Bookkeeping COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT M. Canvin. C. Bennett, W. Clamper. Miss MADALENE CANVIN: Personal Typewriting . . . spon- sors Awards Committee; Junior Class . . . B.A. from Crinncll College; M.A. from University of Michigan; attended American Institute of Business; Gregg School in Chicago. Mr. CARROLL L. BENNETT: Bookkeeping. Business Law; Business Organization; Personal Typewriting . . . sponsors Moneymaking Committee . . . B..S.C. from SUI; M.A. from SIT . . . member of Delta Pi Epsilon. Miss WANDA GLAMSER: Beginning and Advanced Stenography; Office Training; Special Typing . . . sponsors Pep Club; Homecoming Committee . . . B.A. from Kansas State College. Mr. JAMES K. OVERTURE: Distributive Education: Bookkeeping . . . sponsors DECA (Tub; Athletic treas- urer . . . B.A. and M.A. from Colorado State College . . . member of Delta Pi Epsilon. Mr. OWEN SHADLE: Vocational and Industrial Educa- tion .. . counselor .. . sponsors assembly committee .. . B.S. and M.S. from ISU: Administrative certification . . . traveled in Hawaii. Guam, and China. HUMMING TYPEW RITERS racing again-t a ticking clock sym- bolize flustered typing students. 56r i Work Experience Are Popular Courses CUSTODIANS—Mr. Lash, Mr. and Mr-. Whaley. To help the students make career choices, reach de- cisions as to future education, and gain valuable job experience, the school offered several programs. These included distributive education, industrial occupations, and office training. The student spent a maximum of one-half of each school day during his senior year in one of these programs. Credit toward graduation was given, and a nominal wage was paid to the student trainee. The work experience programs at AHS gave the student a chance to explore an occupation such as nursing, teaching, secretarial work, or other jobs approved by the school coordinator. Faculty mem- bers in charge of these programs were Mr. Over- turf and Mr. Shadle. Commercial courses offered included typing, short- hand. and bookkeeping. These courses were especial- ly popular and worthwhile. They often led to direct summer or permanent employment. Two buildings containing numerable classrooms filled with over nine hundred muddy shoed students provided the janitorial staff with a monumental task. The staff were, however, ready to help when special functions took place in the building. DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION—J. Overturf and 0. Shadle. 5758Athletics From the first whiff of a burning September leaf, the race is on: and the most important event of each week is the Friday night game. Fall means football: winter signifies basketball; spring, track; and summer, baseball. These four sports with nu- merous others make up more than enough activities to fill an athletic year. Ames High participates in many inter-school sports. Several organizations are devoted solely to the support of the various teams. The actual game, however, involves much more than buying a ticket; countless hours of work go into the athletic per- formances as in any play. The story of a few of those performances is told in this section: Football—varsity and sophomore Pep Club Wrestling Varsity Basketball Sophomore Basketball Cheersquad GRA Intra murals 59VARSITY FOOTBALL Front Row: Mr. Spatchcr, J. Peterson, I . Wilson, J. Cox. B. Rowell, M. Hildebrand, T. Mpnison, T. Tice, G. Magoon, C. Haltcrman, C. Kropf, I). Litchfield, C. Markcn, Mr. Wells. Second: J. Burns, D. Schank, J. Dahl, C. "Androy, C. Ogg, L. Sargent, 1). Brown, 1). Wheeler, C. Mack. C. Knapp, T. Watkins, J. Fincham. H. Tisdale. Third: D. Schworm, D. Myers. B. Nordskog, I). Vanllowellings, S. Erskine. I). Constantine. I). Roach. F. Dahlmeier, D. Dalton. S. Mulhall. J. Silchrist, J. Preston, S. Epstein. M. Montrose. Fourth: R. Black. M. Yeaman. R. Plumb. R. Smith, B. Dike, D. Throckmorton, P. Carr, K. Hildreth, J. Linder, M. Allen, D. Carr, D. French, T. Landsgerg. Fifth: Mr. Covey, B. Osnel, T. Grabau. N. Penny, J. Peters, B. Moorhead, W. Thorson, J. Dunlap, R. Brcckenridge, B. Gualdoni, S. Socsbe, M. McKinley, B. Mickelson, J. Cole, Mr. Linn. Varsity Football Squad Captures A season riddled with setbacks! If the final score alone was used. Ames High apj carcd to have a rather discouraging season: 4th in conference, five game losing streak, lost to Boone for the 1st time in 29 years, and to Grinnell for the 1st time in 22 years. But. basically, what really counts is how the boys played facing one of the toughest schedules in the state: the Little Cyclones marked their games with a fight to the finish. Several games saw Ames hold highly rated, high-scoring teams in the state to a 1 touchdown advantage, only to fail in the closing minutes. The CIC boasted one of the tough- est conferences in a decade, with four teams rated in the top 10 during the season. Whatever the final score, Ames High spirit and fight left their im- pression on the foe. Once again Ames opened its football season against Roosevelt of Des Moines and for the third straight year they wrecked the Roughrider opener. Roosevelt opened the game with a long drive that pushed to the Ames six. Then the Ames offensive shifted into high gear as they powered the ball to the 46 in three plays behind the running of Yeamen and Landsberg. Ihe next play saw the Orange and Black catch the Roosevelt defenders flatfooted as Grabau tossed the pigskin to Gauldoni to net the final 54 yards to the goal. The conver- sion was good and Ames led 7-0. Not to be outdone, the 'riders came back twice in the first quarter to score. 13-7. The second quarter saw the Little Cyclones and the- Roughriders battle to a nearly scoreless duel. How- ever. a bad pass from the Roosevelt center to the punter saw Ames gain control of the ball on the Roughrider's 10 yard line. Tom Landsberg then punched through the 'rider defense in two plays to rack up another tally. The conversion supplied Ames a shaky lead, 14-13. at the half. 60TOM GRABAU twists through a horde of Roosevelt opponents. COACH WELLS views the final game of the season against Oskaloosa. 3-5 Season, Fourth Place in CIC LANDSBERG is pulled to the turf by a Grinnell Tiger. 61GRABAl DUCKS a Boone defender. CRINNELL FINDS YARDAGE hard to come by . . . The third period saw Landsbcrg score from the I to cap a 60 yard drive. Tally later came as junior quarterback Craig Mack raced 62 yards to the Roosevelt goal on a punt return. The last Ames tally went to Landsberg again as he lugged the ball over from 5 yards out to end an 85 yard drive. The ‘Riders pushed across two more touchdowns, but time ran out and Ames had a victory. 33-26. History was rewritten Friday. September 21. as the Toreadors of Boone, behind the running of Roger Dutton, outplayed the Little Cyclones. 28-12. to end 20 years of dominance. Not since 1033 had Ames lost to Boone, but this year Boone had de- cided to win. Boone drew blood in the first quarter on a plunge over the goal by Dutton from the 3 to cap off an 80 yard drive. A good conversion pushed the score to 7-0. Not to Ik outdone. Ames returned the kick- off to their 36. Three plays later saw Craig Mack drop an aerial over the Boone defenders to Lands- berg for a 61 yard romp to the goal. The attempt to tie the score failed and the quarter ended with the Toreadors leading 7-6. Another Boone T.D. came with 0:1 I left in the half after an Ames scoring attempt lost steam on the 10. The score stood 14-6. ... SO DOES AMES. Boone Topples Little Cyclones 28-12 The final Ames score came in the third quarter as the Little Cyclones again took to the air on a pass covering 61 yards from Mack to Grabau. Again the conversion failed and Ames moved within scoring reach 14-12. Boon rounded out the scoring with two more T.D.'s and the following conversions to rack up a com- manding 16 point lead. As the gun sounded, the field was covered with screaming Boone Fans as they rushed to claim their prize—the victory bell. 1 he first loss of the season had come and gone. Newton, rated third in the state and favored to AMES SURROUNDS a Grinnell drive through the center. win the conference, was the next CIC opponent. The ball changed hands three times early in the first quarter: it was Grabau who finally twisted over the goal to tally a hard earned T.D. The extra point failed, but the Little Cyclones held a 6-0 advantage. Undaunted, the Cardinals took the following kick on their 36 and promptly drove 61 yards to score. The conversion was stopped and the game was knotted. 6-6. Two scoring threats highlighted the second quarter; but the half ended with the game still tied, 6-6. ■ End 29 Year Ames Dominance 63Wahawks Win Ames TOM LANUSBERG: fir-t team TOM TICK: elected year team ali CIC in UPI poll. captain. The second half saw the Little Cyclones' defense weaken as Newton repeatedly battered the line for gains. Two touchdowns were registered to push the score to 20-6: the final gun sounded. After two successive CIC defeats. Ames hoped to regain lost status: hut history repeated itself and the Grinnell Tigers loped home with a 13-7 victory. The first tally of the game was notched after the Little Cyclones gained control of the hall on their 39. Grabau and Gualdoni. on consecutive drives, ground out 25 yards to the Tiger's 36 yard line. After a 3 yard setback. Mack passed to Peterson who crossed the goal for 6 points, f our minutes and 31 seconds had ticked off the clock when Tom Landsberg hurst into the end zone for the extra point Homecoming, 14-0 and Ames led 7-0. Grinnell then drove 30 yards to the goal and reg- istered for 6 points. The conversion was blocked and Ames held a slim lead 7-6 at the half. The final tally came with 2:15 gone in the 3rd quarter as a punt return covered 75 yards to the goal. Homecoming “62". Spirit—determination—hope. The odds favored heavily toward the powerful Wa- hawks of Waterloo. Two fumbles in the first quar- ter proved to he the death sentence for Ames. Three plays after the opening kickoff the Little Cyclones fumbled and West Waterloo gained possession on the Ames 30. In six plays the Wahawks scored on an end sweep to break open the game. The extra point “split the crossbars" and Waterloo was in business 7-0. On the third play after the following kickoff, a fumble saw Waterloo pick it up and run to the Ames 4. In two plays West raised the score to 14-0 with 5:15 left to play in the first quarter. The remaining part of the game was fought to a stanstill. The Little Cyclones registered their fourth loss. 14-0. After four hours of riding to Sioux City, the Little Cyclones fell to the powerful East football team. 38-7. Strong running and hard blocking proved the 64 Varsity Seasons Record Ames—Roosevelt .................... 33-26 "Arnes—Boone 12-28 "Ames—Newton ....................... 6-20 Ames—Grinnell 7-13 Ames—West Waterloo ................ 0-14 Ames—East Sioux City .............. 7-38 Ames—Marshalltown ...................33- 6 tones—Okaloosa ......................18-12 Conference games A LOOSE HATSTRAP, a lost baton, a missing plume, but the show must go on. ROWELL skirts the end against Marshalltown. 65VARSITY CLUB—Front Row: J. Cox. S. Miller, G. Erskine, M. Y'eaman, M. Allen, K. Agard, K. Kamraercr. Second: I). Schank. T. Tice, S. Soesbe, B. Mickelson. M. Schwartz, B. Rowell. T. Rice, Third: T. Landjberg, C. Ogg, B. Duke, C. Mack, T. Morrison, A. Severson. Back Row: D. Runyon. M. McKinley. R. Smith. D. French, W. Thorson, F. Smith, C. Knapp, P. Carr, J. Trow, M. McGuire. Junior Varsity, Sophomores Plow downfall of Ames as the marauding Raiders struck four times in the first half to jump to a 25-0 lead. 153 yards rushing in the half with 127 in the first quarter proved too much for the Little Cyclones as they were held to 56 yards. Ames only T.I). came when a blocked kick went loose in the end zone, and left end J. Peterson jumped on it to score. As T. Landsburg ran the extra point, the gun sounded, giving East a thump- ing 38-7 victory. Ironically, the Raider offense moved easily against Ames in scoring six touchdowns, but when the time came to run the extra point, they weakened and made only two during the game. Carrying with them the burden of a 1-5 season's record, the Little Cyclones met and defeated the Marshalltown Bobcats to score their first CIC vic- tory. The Little Cyclones laced the Bobcats' de- fense for five touchdowns while yielding only one to the enemy. The fourth quarter saw most of the action as Mar- shalltown erupted with a barrage of passes to score on a 31 yard pass play. Ames added two more T.D.s and one extra point to its score, bringing the final total to 33-6. Junior Varsity Record Ames—Lincoln ........................11- 7 Ames—Jefferson ................... 6-19 Ames—North .......19- 6 Ames—Lincoln 20- 0 Ames—Marshalltown 20- 0 Sophomore Season's Record Ames—Webster City.................... 12-6 Ames—Marshalltown .............33- 6 Ames—Nevada ........... 19-13 Ames—Newton .................. 20- 6 Ames—Des Moines East 7-7 Ames—Des Moines Tech .. — 44 0 Ames—Ft. Dodge ................... 6-12 66Fresh from a 32-6 pasting of Marshalltown, The Little Cyclones met and scalped the Oskaloosa In- dians in the last CIC game of the year. 18-12. hat was thought to be a comfortable 12 point lead vanished as Osky scored twice in succession, but also failed to convert successfully, and the half I ended a different game. 12-12. The third quarter saw an Oskaloosa fumble on their 32 prove fatal as the air attack from Grabau to Yeamen and Yeamen's running netted the final score of the game. Again the extra point failed, but the lead proved sufficient and Ames won. 18-12. to I end a 3-5 season. Playing a five game season, the Ames High Junior Varsity finished on the long end of a 4-1 record. Meeting Des Moines Lincoln (twice). Lies Moines | North. Marshalltown, and Jefferson: the JC's lost only to Jefferson by the score of 19-6. Coached by Cecil Spatcher. Junior Varsity consists of junior boys on the varsity team and is designed to give them valuable experience for varsity play and the coming year. This is JC's third year at Ames High. After rolling over Webster City, Marshalltown. Ne- vada. Des Moines Tech, and tying Des Moines Hast, the sophomore football team was defeated in a penalty ridden game with Ft. Dodge, to bring their record to 5-1-1. Sophomore coach Maurice Hausheer deserves a lot of credit for his third successful season. Mr. Hauseer came here three years ago from Webster City. Since then he has compiled a record of 16 wins, three losses, and two ties. The success of the sophomore and junior varsity teams usually forecast quite accurately the success of next year's team. With this in mind, Ames High should field a greatly improved team for the '63 season. Through Foes to Winning Season SOPHOMORE FOOTBALL—Fro if Row: B. Hach. B. Best, P. Childs N. Joseph, K. Page, 1). Pasley, N. Herrick. Second: R. Ross, T. Trausch. M. Ritland. J. Hansen, M. Strickland. M. Kingrey, D. Scandrett, K. Jellinger. Third: C. Robertson. J. Kctclsen, S. Coe, R. Baker, R. Bappe, K. Hoskins, M. Bonwell, B. Russell. Back Row: T. Rasmussen, G. Lauser, S. Risdal, C. Kirkham, B. Smalling, B. Tysseling, D. Swanson. 67PEP CLUB, IN THEIR HONORED POSITION in front of the pep band, tries to out-yell the white-shirt section. Pep Club Sponsors Many Bake Sales PEP CLUB COUNCIL—Front Row: Sally Schworm, Mary Jo Hyler. Jan Priest. Second: Carol Haupt, Mary Wells, Kim Kammcrcr, Barb Bean (pres.) Back Row: Joyce Dickson (vice pres.), Mary Ellen Br3gonier, Vivian Voelkcr (sec.), Loma Norris (treas.). 68rhe white-shirt section didn't know what they were getting into when they challenged the Pep Club to a yelling duel at the North basketball game. All anonymous facult judges proclaimed the Pep Club “I ndeniably victorious!” Pep Club, aided by the white shirtcrs, boosts the spirit tremendously at all major athletic clashes. The publicity and hoop committees really had some wits and artists in their ranks, for signs and hoops were indescribably weird. To pay for the paper, paint, and tape used by those weird sign makers, the money-making committee instigated duel-purpose bake sales: replenishing the treasury and the stomachs of starving students. I o entertain these students the assembly committee worked hand in hand with the cheerleaders to create a light-hearted, hilarious atmosphere in which en- thusiasm fairly crackled! The halftime activities, planned by a committee of tin- same name, also served this purpose. The ushers committee serves a very necessary part of Ames High’s athletic program, as does the pom pom committee. Who could get along without their piles of black and orange crepe paper to throw in the air? PEP CLUB—Front Ron: C. .Meyer, A. Toms. J. Rigg-. K. Kammerer. K. Ho«.t©tter. T. Spicberg. B. Von Bergen, J. Corbin. J. Wildman. Second: P. Reid, J. Van Winkle, J. Miller. M. Berck, L. Jarvis, C. Hagen, G. Hatasaki, M. Johnson, C. Hudspith, K. Nickey, L. Fleming. Third: K. Saral, L. Bcrgeson, C. Haupt, J. Brandenburg. S. Boylan. P. Routli. M. Workman, S. Elbert, C. Rouzc. L. Uthe. Back Rote: M. Maxwell, N. Lowther, A. Wilson, B. Picken, B. Miller, I . Powell, L. Roepkc, J. Christopherson, J. Nolen. PEP CLUB (continued)—Front Row: S. Schworm, M. Wright, N. Jones, S. Rush, K. Skold, M. Hyler, E. Green, M. Greiner, C. Slutton, K. Torkelson. Second: T. Judge, P. Bushman, M. Brown, L. Zeliadt. S. Percival, S. Fcamster, K. Haupt, G. Nelson. J. Coletti, L. Norris, B. Criswell, N. Uhl. Third: J. Griffith, C. Kirk, C. Goettsch, R. Farley, S. Thogerson, M. Wells, P. Vinograde, J. Hague, P. Bennett, M. Clem, D. Jetmund, S. Timm, B. Bean. Back Row: 1 . McCowcn. B. Meier, J. Dickson, V. Anderson, V. Voelker, M. Bragonier, B. Oest, R. Barron, C. Thompson, B. Hatch, M. Chalmers, S. Hayes, K. Thorcson. 69New Wrestling Team Scores 1-2 WRESTLING TEAM From Rote: B. Sorenson, I). Dickson, B. Saul. L. En«er. Second: D. Myers, T. Morrison, I). Van Houweling, G. Coy. Back Row: Coach Oltrogge, D. Sc3ndrett, T. Orngard, B. Oshel. T. Wright. DAVE SCANDRETT finds the going tough against Newton. 70Mark in First Season of Competition 1%2 marked the beginning of the addition of a new sport to the Vines High curricula, wrestling. While battling against obstacles such as no show- ers. lack of space, and inadequate facilities, the team did very well for their first season. Basic wrestling, rope jumping, weight lifting and other exercises combined to make a sound physical build- ing sport. Three meets were scheduled with B teams of other schools. The grapplers tallied 1-2 for the season, winning against Colfax. 21-14. and losing to West Marshall. 38-8. and the Newton B" squad. 41 5. The Little Cyclones traveled to Colfax on January 16 for the first match of the season. Competition saw Ames win seven of eleven matches and win the meet 21-14. Although there were no falls. Ames turned in a fine perfonnance. The final meet was held at the I.ST’. Armory against the Newton "B" squad on February 1. Newton, bringing with them a strong array of manpower, swept eleven of the twelve matches. Denny Myers, wrestling in the 165 lb. class, registered the only win, as he pinned his man in 47 seconds. DON VAN HOUWEI.ING grapples against Newton. THE MATCH is over—but they’re still friend-. BILL SAUL holds the upper hand. 71ALTHOUGH SCHANK exhibit» a rather odd -tyle of shooting, who cares as long as he makes it? 72 rJlVARSITY BASKETBALL SQUAD—Front Row: J. Hanway, K. Agard. M. Vcaman. B. Duke, J. Pedersen. B. Nordskog. Second Row: Mr. Linn. J. Cox. C. Mack. M. Schwartz, T. Ross D. Shank. Mr. Haushcer. Rack: D. Runyan, B. Soults, T. Landsbcrg, S. Soeshe, C. Knapp. Varsity Finishes Season 6-14 Conference play ended for the Little Cyclones in the '62-'63 basketball season, as they lost to the Boone Toreadors. 66-16. Conference play proved to be very exasperating as Ames finished in the cellar with a 1-9 record. Overall play saw the Little Cyclones com- pile a 4-13 record, winning against Marshalltown. Des Moines Dowling. Webster City, and Des Moines North. The Newton Cardinals completely overran the con- ference this year smashing every team they met and finishing with a 10-0 record. They were rated the number two team in the state. Two losses to Oska- loosa. one by a mere two points, two to Grinnell. two to Newton, two to Boone, and one to Marshall- town resulted in a rather discouraging season for the Little Cyclones. The team was thought to have good potential but was quite inconsistent. I he boys would play well for a half and poorly for a half—then on other occasions would play beautifully for the whole game, only to lose their touch in the next. RUNYAN MISSES a lay-up and finds himself enmeshed in Rough- riders. 73Little Cyclones Chalk Up Only Conference W in Over Bobcats, 61-55 Varsity Season's Record Ames-Mason City .................... 55-61 Ames-Rooseveh .................. 41-56 Ames-North ......................... 71-64 Ames-Newton ................... 42-69 Ames-MarshalUibwn ................. 61-55 Ames-Grinnell ................. 45-56 Ames-Roosevelt .................... 42-46 Ames-Oskaloosa ............... 66-63 Ames-Webster City ................. 6645 Ames-Boone ........................ 53-72 Ames-Dowling ...................... 72-57 Ames-Newton ...................... 42-62 Ames-Marshalltown ............... . 57-61 Ames-Grinnell ................ 38-46 Ames-Oskaloosa.................... 43-48 Ames-Boone ... .. 46-66 Ames-Tech 42-50 Conference games I he Polar Bears of Des Moines North were the first to fall before the Ames cagers. The game was a welcome uplift, for we had dropped the first two matches of the season to Mason City 61-55, and to Des Moines Roosevelt 56-41. The highlight of the season came as the Little Cy- clones downed the Marshalltown Bobcats 61-55, in a contest held at the I.S.U. Armory on Decem- ber 1 1 before a crowd of screaming, devoted fans. Ames High scorer for the evening was Mike Schwartz with 19 points. He was followed by Bill Soults with 13 and Tom Landsberg and Dick Shank with 8 points apiece. The game proved to be a fine team effort. Webster City and Des Moines Dowling both suf- fered at the hands of the Little Cyclones. Webster City losing on its home court by the score of 66- 45. and Dowling by 72-57. State tournament competition began March 1 with the Little Cyclones defeating Roland 57-61 and Ballard 50-10 and falling to South Hamilton 53-66. 75 NEWTON CRABS the rehound. The mighty Cardinals swept the Central Iowa Conference.SCHANK BACKHANDS for two points against Dowling of Dcs Moines. EXCITEMENT built up through the game is evident on the face on Carolyn Hudspith. JEFF COX tallies against the Bobcats. THE BAI.I. keeps floating away. 76VARSITY CHEERSQUAD—Ann Tom , Barb Rosebrook, Jane Coletti, Barb Picken, Carolyn Hud pith, Linda Bcrgland. Cheersquad Holds Noon Rallies Many Ames High students are full of pep, energy, I and ambition. In the spring of '62 about twenty- five of these energetic girls decided to participate in cheersquad elections. The interested sophomores and I juniors demonstrated their skill in front of their own classmates in both the new and old school buildings. Elections were held and the six sopho- mores and six juniors with the most votes became | members of the cheersquad for the following school year. At an all-school assembly these twelve girls I did cheers again and the whole student body voted. The six girls with the most votes became regular I members of the cheersquad and the remaining girls j became alternates. Jane Coletti was named head I cheerleader. Pat Wiener, Sue Stucky, Sue Cooper, and Mary Wheelock were alternates. Linda Berg- land became a regular to replace Gloria Hatasaki. Sophomores interested in becoming members of the sophomore cheersquad tried out in front of their classmates early in the fall. Margy Staniforth was named head cheerleader. Serving as alternates were Louise Partin, Carolyn Bliss, Nancy Veline, and Jan Hoff. The cheerleaders kept the student body informed on I the advent and outcome of various athletic events; ] I held pep rallies and cheered at all major sports I events. SOPHOMORE CHEERLEADERS—-F o jJ; Jane Porter. Second: Margy Staniforth, Mary Anne Maurer. Back: Beth Ward. 77Sophs Nail CIC Second, 14-3 Season SOPHOMORE BASKETBALL TEAM—Front Row: B. Best, B. Anderson. N. N’ims. S. Posegate, J. Fleig, M. Ritland, J. Hansen. J. Kctelson. K. Page. Second: Mr. Cecil Spatcher, S. Coe. I). Elbert, J. Hensing, B. Vivian, J. Dunleavey, J. Bowen, B. Johnson, M. Kingcry, R. Bleckcr. Breaking through tough defenses added up to a lively game. Success marked the sophomore basketball season, as they rounded out a 14-3 record by smashing the Des Moines Tech sophomores. Only three losses, two to Marshalltown and one to Des Moines Roose- velt. marred their record. Wins over Mason City, by 15 points. North of Des Moines, by 42 points, Newton, by 32 points. Oskaloosa. by 20 points. Boone, once by 35 points and the other by 27 points, and Dowling, by 35 points added up to a very satisfying season. Conference play saw the sophomores firmly en- trenched in a second place berth with an 8-2 rec- ord. Hopes for first place were dashed as Marshall- town squeezed past Ames in a 64-62 duel which lasted through two overtimes. The Bobcats finished in first place with a 9-1 record. Scoring aces for the sophomores were Steve Coe. who topped all conference scorers with 173 points, and Mike Kingery, who finished second in con- ference scoring with 161 points, limely aid in scoring also came from Bucky ivian, who often found himself open under the basket. I alent was not lacking in the guards, as Kirk Page, an expert ball handler, and Mark Ritland held down starting positions. Prospects look good for next year s var- sitv team as many talented boys will be returning. 78RITLAND SHOOTS from the charity line. STEVE COE'S deadly «hooting harasses Boone. MARK RITLAND hooks for two against Boone. SOPHS HUDDLE UP for the last minute instructions. TENSE- NESS is evident on the face of Jeff Peterson during a sophomore game against Marshalltown. Sophomore’s Season Record Ames-Mason City ....................52-37 Ames-Roosevelt .................. . 45-42 Ames-North ............. 69-27 Ames-Newton ........................ 66-34 Ames-Marshallto vn ................. 35-15 Ames-Grinnell ...................... 63-57 Ames-Roosevelt .............. ...... 25-47 Ames-Oskaloosa .............. .... 64-44 Ames-Boone 73-38 Ames-Dowling ....................... 84-58 Ames-Newton ........................ 69-56 Ames-Marshallto vn ................. 62-61 Ames-Grinnell ....................... 72-59 Amcs-Oskaloosa .............. ...... 38-29 Ames-Boone ......................... 61-34 Ames-Tech .......................... 59-21 •Conference games 79GRA REPRESENTATIVES—Front Row: J. Corbin, J. Horswcll, L. Fleming, A. Clark, C. Sorenson. Second: K. Kammerer. S. Shadle, D. Skardiaug, M. Johnson, K. Nickey, J. Hoff. Third: D. Childs, Z. Aronoff, K. Yea man, S. Trexel, D. Wciscr, P. Larson Hack Row: S. Timm. P. Porter, P. Reinbergcr, Si. Shepherd, J. Nairn, V. Voelker, G. Myers. IN I K AMI RAL REPRESENTATIVES— Front Row: D. Schwonn, J. Wheeler. R. Manthei, R. Lowrie, K. Kammerer. B. Wickersham. Second: I). Palcy, Z. Dunlap, A. Severson. I). Beach. C. Robertson, T. Kee. Rack Row: Mr. Smalling, J. Dunlap. M. McGuire. D. Stober. B. Ballard. J. McGinnis. Sports Clubs Are Active All Year With participation on a voluntary basis, the intra- mural program pits homeroom against homeroom in a year long battle for the coveted intramural championship. The slate of activities contains every- thing from touch football to horseshoe pitching and a swimming meet. At least one of the intramural activities is taking place at any time throughout the year, and participation is open to any boy wishing to represent his homeroom and not in varsity ath- letics at the time. A running tally of points is kept based on the homeroom’s placing in each individual event, with the trophy being awarded to the homeroom with the highest number of points. GRA. as the one chance which girls have to express their inhibitions and frustrations, is set up to pro- vide good. hard, bruising, grueling activities de- signed to take the edge off one’s energy, the pounds off one’s middle, the curl out of one's hair. 80BASKETBALL PLAYERS in intramurals warm up through random shooting and impromptu games. CRA VOLLEYBALL i - a challenging sport. Carolyn Thompson pro- CHI CK KN PP shows off his varsity basketball jump vides this study in motion. ing ability. 81Activities Put several people together and they form an or- ganization. Bring a thousand students into a group and you have a school bursting with a hundred varied clubs all deserving recognition. The follow- ing groups have one thing in common, they work: Girl Reserves Ames High Boys Club Band and Orchestra All-State Choir Girls' and Boys’ Glee Clubs Mixed Choruses Drama Class Play; Drama Activities Junior Class Play Journalism—The Web Spirit Staff Scratch Pad; Library Club Student Treasurers; Firesquad DEC A and FHA Language Club activities Debate Science Seminar. 83GIRL RESERVE REPRESENTATIVES- Front Row: J. Hartley. L. Bcesc, M. Cerwick, T. Spicberg, L. Dodd, J. Smith, L. Hazel. Second: Mrs. Thompson, J. McDowell, C. McMillcn, J. Griffith, B. Meier, J. Brandenburg, M. Chalmers, E. Politis. M. Sielert. Third Mi s Stafford, K. Swanson, M. Workman, C. Carlson, T. Larson, M. Mulhall, S. Hayes, B. Kalton, C. Young. Back Row: Miss Wilcox K. Shuman, S. Pictz, P. Anderson, T. Hill, B. Oest, J. Hannum, M. Thompson, B. Squire.-. REPRESENTATIVES (continued)—Front Row: S. Schlebecker, J. Brown, M. Jackson, C Carmean, B. Hagen, C Sletten, A. Toms. Second: S. Smith, J. Craig, S. Thogcrson, G. Hatasaki, L. Nickey, J. Olson. Third: L. Uthc, Z. Aronoff, K. Fisher, M. Wheelock, J. Miller, P. Shccler, J. Reinhart. Back Row: M. Richards, J. Brown, P. Routh, J. Drake, M. Ulmer, P. McCowcn, A. Wrilson, M. Walkup. “Christmas Customs in other Countries” was the topic presented by two Iowa State foreign students to the Girl Reserves during their December meeting. Tom Timm, former Ames High student, gave an account of his trip through South America to the girls at their initiation meeting. He used slides and souvenirs to illustrate his talk. Other activities carried out under the leadership of Billie Criswell and Jane Coletti, this year's presi- dents. were Friendship Week, the Teens Against Polio drive, Christmas spray sales, buying presents and delivering them to the residents of the Story County Home, and a Mother-Daughter Tea. Jane and Billie were assisted in these projects by Libby Roepke. secretary; Judy Christopherson. treasurer; and Barb Squires and Annie Toms, presidents of the representatives. Girl Reserves is chiefly a service organization. Un- der the Foster Parents Plan, a foreign teenage girl is supported by our local organization. Luciana Savina, an Italian teenager who has been our fos- ter child, is no longer in need of our aid. This year our new foster child was Bai Jung Ja from South Korea. Her ambition is to become a medical doctor Take Active Part in Girl Reserves 84PRESIDENTS Billie Criswell and Jane Coletti discuss Friend- ship Week with sponsor Miss Wilcox. SECOND SEMESTER PRESIDENT Jane hunts for TAP material. GIRL RESERVE CABINET Front Row: A. Tom-. L. Roepke, J. Coletti. B. Criswell, J. Christopherson, B. Squires. Second: S. Schworm, J. Riggs. K. Skold. C. Carlson. N. Uhl, M. Hylej, I). Stein. B. VonBergen. Third: Mrs. Ihompson. J. Smith, D. Childs, L. Zeliadt. J. Nolin, R. Getty. S. Elbert. L. Bergland, M. Brown, Mrs. Whitney. Back Row: Miss Wilcox. M. Wheclock, M. Bragonier, P. Powell. B. Miller, M. Shepherd, P. Wiener, M. Hinrichsen, Miss Stafford. Not pictured—E. Walsh. TAP, Raise Money With Wreath SaleBoys Sponsor Fourteen Year Old BOVS’ CLUB CABINET Front Row: D. Carr. J. Klopf. R. Webb. L. McCoy, H. Nichols. Second: T. Grabau, F. Gulden. M. Wil- cox. J. Trow, I). Brown. Third: Mr. Albertson. L. Anderson. J. La-che. I). Gibson. K. I.Ioyd, Mr. Ourth. Back Rou. : Mr. Stone, J. Cole, D. Miller, S. Socsbe, 1). Brown, E. Oltrogge. Sot Pictured—B. Strand. CABINET MEMBERS Dennis Brown. Don Carr, and president Rick Lloyd hear discussion of the County Home Christmas present project. 86Philip Koumbis, Native of Greece Boys' Club is the largest boys’ organization in the high school. The club engages in various activities designed to be a service to the school and commu- nity and to spread the reputation of the school. Hue to the lack of auditorium facilities, the Boys’ Club program had to be drastically cut this year. Hobby groups met twice during the year. I hese groups offered each individual a chance to take part in his favorite hobby or activity. Hobby group leaders were selected and they or- ganized the programs for their groups. Groups cov- ered a wide variety of interests from athletics to international relations. Jim Trow and Rick Lloyd were each president of this organization for a semester. Service projects were carried on normally. In con- junction with the Girl Reserves, the Boys’ Club or- ganized Friendship Week and leens Against Polio. The members of the club also contributed toward the support of a Greek orphan named Philip Koumbis. FIRST SEMESTER Roys’ Club President, Jim Trow, can’t resist the joke? that are inevitably told at noon meetings. ROVS CIXB REPRESENTATIVES—Front Row: M. Shaw. K. Page. P. Childs. R. Dotson, R. Plumb, R. Friedrieb. Second: D. Carlson, J. Kctelsen, J. Timmons, M. Strickland. R. Russell, C. Rath. Third: R. McCay, D. Wheeler, R. Brcckenrige, N. Penny, R. Ketelsen, S. Gammon, Mr. Albertson. Back Row: Mr. Stone. R. Jellinger. C. Sinners. L. Cross, A. Oslund, C. Kropf, F. Smith. 87REHEARSING for the Junior Town Program, thr band plays Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture. RICHARD DAY conducts the hand through a novelty number before JEAN NOLIN, fir t chair flutist, was also an accomplished its spring concert. solo pianist for the concert band. 88Anyone courageous enough to drag himself to school at 7:45 this fall found the Ames High Marching Band already practicing on the field across from the parking lot. Coming closer an observer could make out the voice of Mr. Day pouncing on some unlucky sophomore who had become nervous and forgotten which was his left foot. By the time of the first football game, however, a miraculous transfor- mation had taken place, and spectators were treated to a scintillating performance by the band. The end of the football season brought the dreaded auditions for concert band. The cream of the AHS crop of musicians then began a three-day-a-week rehearsal schedule to prepare for appearances later in the year. The director of the concert band was Richard Day and the student president was Rick Lloyd. On the days when rehearsals were not sched- uled. Mr. Day met with individual sections to work out the more difficult parts. The band built up a repertoire containing a wide variety of musical se- lections and climaxed the year's work with a pro- gram for the student body and the annual eve- ning concert. In the spring the band attended the Tri-City Band Festival in Webster City. Students interested in music found the 1962-63 con- cert band to provide a challenging and very en- joyable experience. Band Blares the Pleasure of Masses HOMECOMING RO YALTA were formally presented to West Waterloo and Ames fans during the marching band's half-time show. CONCERT BAND—Flute and Piccolo: J. Nolin. D. Peterson, S. Boylan, S. Trexel, B. Ward, J. ONon. P. Hanson, N. Velino, P. An- derson. Oboe: J. Curry, P. Adams, J. Heer. Clarinet: J. Dickson. I). Howard, T. Lkena. C. Rou c, .1. Colctti, R. Lloyd. J. Larson, L. Danielson, B. Bean, B. Pyle. B. Blagen. M. Staniforth, C. Kirkham, .1. Seidel. R. Skrdla, .S. Linker, K. Polii, K. Swanson, J. Smith. P. Young, J. Martin. Alto Clarinet: S. Armstrong. D. Stein. Bass Clarinet: B. Wiekcrsham, D. Small, E. Strachle. Alto Sax: B. Rus- sell. L. Norris, S. Caldwell, A. Clark. D. Knott. Tenor Sax: K. Taleott. R. Scott. Baritone Sax: B. Smalling, L. Cross. Cornet: M. Heggcn, R. DeBoer, C. Sivcsind. D. Messincr, M. Shaw, I). Myers T. Kee. K. Everson, D. Doling, T. Rasmusson. Horn: M. Wison, .1. Wildman, J. Piersol, B. Friedcrich. P. Svcc. Trombone: D. Miller. V. Li4iburn, D. Brown, J. Bowen, B. Tysscling, B. Miller. Bari- tone: D. Dickson. D. I’kena. J. Collins. Bass: D. Dowell. P. Marks. C. Howerton. P. Craig, S. Nichols. Bass Viol: B. Moses. Percus- sion: P. Bushman. J. Mannum, K. Adams. M. Ritland, J. Nairn. J. DeYoung, P. Sargeant. 89A ROW OF SHINING HORNS add their voices to the concert band. BOB MILLER waits comfortably for the music to invite him into its grip. The real “long hairs" at Ames High found a haven in the orchestra directed by Mr. Moberg. This group occupied the band room on Tuesdays and Thurs- days. Outstanding members of band were selected to join the string players in forming the orchestra. This year’s orchestra was quite small, placing more emphasis on the individual player. The first public appearance made by this organiza- tion was in the form of a pit orchestra for the play. Numbers ranging in style from classical to modern were performed preceding the play and during the intermission. The orchestra then began work rehearsing for its concert at an all-school assembly. Following this the Ames High Orchestra joined with the other school orchestras in presenting its annual spring concert which has become known for its casual atmosphere in which spectators sit around tables, and popcorn and drinks are served. Orchestra and Band Provide Concerts, 90ENTHUSIASM REIGNS in the wee hour? of this DENNIS DOWELL play? away on his cello. He is a new member of practice for Pam Bushman and Jan DeYoung. the orchestra. DIRECTOR DEAN MOBERG conducts the orchestra in one of its early morning rehearsals. Members arc practicing for the pi orchestra for the Junior Class Play. Light Entertainment for Students 9133 Win Seats in All State Music JEAN N0L1N, ACCOMPLISHED PIANIST, wins one of the two reveried All-State Accompanist spots. INSTRUMENTAL MUSICIANS Front Ron: J. Dickson, A. Eggleton, M. Ccnvick. Second: M. Ulmer,"M. Bochnke, I). Howard, M. Wells. Rock Row: I). Miller. R. DeBoer, M. Heggen, I). Dowell.Festival; Jean Nolin Is Accompanist ALL-STATE CHORUS—Front Rou: C. Route. A. Green, M. Bucholtz, B. Criswell, K. Nickey. Second: M. Bragonier, J. Coletti, J. Nolin. K. Skold. I . McCowan. Third: L. McCoy. B. Peders. B. Strand, D. Peterson. Back Row: F. Gulden, D. French, J. Bowen, R. Lloyd, D. Chipinan. Arof Pictured: J. Peterson. In the fall of 1962. talented high school musicians from all over Iowa gathered for the annual All- State Music Festival. The Iowa High School Music Association and the Iowa Music Educators Associa- tion sponsored this event, which included an or- chestra. hand, and chorus. Auditions were held in early November, climaxing j weeks of concentrated practice by the vocal music students, directed by Mr. Cross, and the band and orchestra members, directed by Mr. Day and Mr. j Moberg. Band and orchestra members had individual try- I outs, which included selected scales, sight reading, ; and a solo. Chorus members auditioned in quartets. When the results were announced, thirty-three Ames High musicians found that their long, hard hours of i practice were well worth it. Jean Nolin was selected : to be one of two All-State accompanists. I Cher the Thanksgiving weekend, the All-State musi ians from Ames went to the Festival in Dcs Moines. I taking their place among the 1,017 junior virtuosos 1 taking part. Two days of rigorous rehearsals were I climaxed by a concert at KRNT Theater. The an- nual festival was enjoyable, stimulating, and well j worth the work necessary to become a part of it. DURING REHEARSAL, all arc intent on the business of perfecting the musical interpretation of director Robert Page. Choir Holds Christmas Reunion A CAPPEI.LA CHOIR—front Row: J. Craig. B. Rosebrook. I). Childs, J. Colctti, R. Farley, C. Kirk, B. Meier, D. Howard. P. Riggs K. Nickey. Second: S. Nichols, I). Roach, B. Pyle, J. Nelson, C. Howerton, J. Wildman, J. Peterson, P. Harris, B. Strand. Tkird: Mr. Cross, J. Curry. P. McCowen. P. Wiener, A. Barrow. 1 . Anderson, M. Buchholtz, M. Quam, M. Bragonier. Back Row: W. Thorson. A. Simpson. T. Cook. I). Mat lire, I). Runyan. 1). French. R. Abbott, S. Maas, M. Peterson. CHOIR (continued)- Front: D. Jetmund. M. Richards, B. Criswell. B. Bean, P. Bushman, K. Skold, N. Uhl, S. Schworm, J. Wildman. Second: I.. McCoy, I). Peterson. G. Allen. K. Adams. R. Black, C. Sivesind, 1). Dowell, D. Schworm. B. Beaty. Third: C Rouze. J. Nolin. M. Boehnke, M. Grabau, M. Wells. V. Riegel. J. Dickson. P. Adams, C. L'strud, C. Carlson. Back Row: F. Smith, R. Lloyd. J. Hannum. B. Hamilton. J. Sales. D. Chipman. M. Wilcox. G. Gulden. I). Carr. A Capella Choir, under the direction of Mr. Cross, was made up of Ames High's most accomplished vocal virtuosos. I ryouts were held in the spring, and about 75 students were selected to become members. They met Tuesdays and Thursdays, second period. Don Runyon was elected President, and Jeff Peter- son was Vice President. The major performances of the choir included the Christmas program. Friendship Week, and the Spring Vocal Concert. The choir was responsible for the bulk of the music sung at these programs, being assisted by the other vocal organizations. They performed some quite difficult music includ- ing parts of Handel's “Messiah" and several mod- em numbers. The Senior members of the choir were entertained by the Rotary Club in the spring, and a reunion was held during Christmas vacation. 94BILL PYLE, Dave Peterson, Dave French and Rick Lloyd made their quartet the hit of many concerts. ADA ECGLETON PERFORMS for the Talent Assembly by singing “Don't Bring Lulu.” ASSEMBLED FOR THEIR annual performance for the women of Ames at the Presbyterian Church, the Choir sang seven religious carols.SOPHOMORE GIRLS’ GLEE- Front Hon: L. Bcese, J. Brown. P. Millard. P. Young. M. Augustine, J. Ambal, N. Claude. N. Veline, M. Miller, P. Fricsner. Second: A. Patterson, L. Dalton. M. Jackson. G. Goodman. A. Eggleton, J. Miller. K. Denisen, S. Kinkcr, E. Straehlc, J. Hoff, L. Dodd. Third: Z. Aronoff, C. Bli , P. Hussey, P. Tonne, K. Donhowc, J. Kennedy, M. McLean. C. Byers, K. Fisher, J. Reinhart. Hack Rou : J. Taylor, R. Truhe, J. West, M. Anderson, M. Dennis. L. Hand. J. Martin, D. Miller. J. Seidel. SOPHOMORE GIRLS (continued)—Front Ron: N. Jones, K. Hull, L. Hazel, M. Bauder, C. Tevebaugh, A. L'the, L. Sobotka. S. Dowdcn, S. Benson, A. Clark. Second: L. Partin, D. Ferguson, J. Fiskc, G. Winters. J. Moore. D. Skarshaug, S. Accola, S. Barrett, J. Porter, 1.. Nickey, C. Sandberg. Third: J. McDowell, P. Shecler, M. Sielert, M. Whcelock, M. Lewis, N. Crovi-icr, C. Carlson, B. Ward, A. McIntosh, C. Sorenson. Hack Ron: Mr. Cross. M. Mulhall, K. Swanson, K. Burnet, M. Ulmer, J. Drake, S. Pietz, J. Hannum. E. Mills, K. Roberson, K. Gray. S. Ix-nning. JUNIOR-SENIOR GIRLS' GLEE—Front Ron: A. Toms, B. Hofstad, I). Stein. D. Hagcman C.. Craig, S. Blair. P. Woolsey, M. Wright. Second: N. Noid, E. Politis, G. Hatasaki, M. Laschc, J. Rademacher, 1). N’ervig. S. Shadle, K. Epstein, M. Cavcn. Third: J. Hills, B. Holmes, S. Timm, C. Evans, L. Stephenson, J. Frederick, J. Larsen, J. Parks, M. Hulin. Hack Ron: Mr. Cross, G. Mvers. L. Bancroft, P. Rcinbcrger, L. Fields, K. Spear, S. Rogness. M. Whcelock. S. Mathison, J. Christopherson. 96 150 Participate in Girls" Glee;WHO SAID GIRLS aren’t disheveled and disordered? The Girls’ Glee are scurrying into their places just before curtain time. Girls Glee Clubs participated in several programs during the year, including the Christmas program and the spring Vocal Music Concert. Nearly 150 girls participated in the combined organization. Membership in the Girls Glee Club was open to any girl who liked to sing. They were divided into two groups: the Junior-Senior Girls' Glee, which met on Monday, and Sophomore Girls' on Tuesday. One of the most popular vocal groups was the Senior Girls' Sextet. This group was organized five years ago, and made many appearances this year. Members were Carol Rouze, Jane Coletti. Karen Skold. Mary Ellen Bragonier. Pat McCowen, and Karen Nickey. JUNIOR-SENIOR GIRLS (continued)—Front How: C. Sorenson, M. Cerwick, D. Nicollc, B. Hagen, J. Willcnburg, B. Swanson, J. Friest, S. Schworm, L. Rose. Second: C. Bailey, S. Smith, L. Wicrson, S. Phillips, C. Constantine, J. Starr, P. Johnson, C. Gray, J. Brown, S. Sorensen. Third: M. Vicrkant, P. Larson, S. Bowen, D. Weiser, L. Parker, S. Fcamstcr, L. Bcrgeson, J. Henrikson, M. Thompson. Back Row: P .Routh, M. Whattoff, K. Shuman, K. Mattson, M. Malone, N. Cook, P. Popcpkc, L. Larson, J. Thorson, K. Manchester. Group Must Buy More Red Robes 97JUNIOR-SENIOR ROY'S GLEE- Front Rote: G. Allen, T. Kcc, I), Schworm, R. Black. D. Evan-. B. Beaty, C. Sivesind, K. Ecmisie, B. Roger?, R. Skrtlla, B. Strand. Second: I). Peterson, K. Adams, S. Nichols, I). Roach, C. Kropf, B. Pyle, J. Nelson, G. Howerton. J. Wildman, J. Peterson, P. Harris, 1). Dowell. Third: Mr. Cross. F. Smith. R. Lloyd, J. Hannum, J. Sales, D. Jordison, F. Gulden, I). Doling, M. Wilcox, 1). Chipman, B. Rowell. D. Carr, L. McCoy. Rack Row: . Thorson, M. Hildebrand, A. Simpson, T. Cook. I). Mathrc, I). Runyan, I). French, T. Abbott. S. Maas, M. Peterson. J. Brown, B. Hamilton. SOPHOMORE BOY'S GLEE—Front Row: I). Barnes, J. Foreman. D. Bauske, B. Barton. D. Hedrick, T. Boast, R. Eilts, B. Sorensen, B. Friedrich. H. Diehl. Second: J. Piersol. R. Bleeker. D. Christensen, R. Peters. S. Bappe, J. Moorman, D. Baker. B. Moses, P. Svec, D. Dickson. Third: K. Woodworth. 1). Gardner. R. Exner, M. Ritland, M. Strickland. H. King. C. Kirkham, L. Cross. M. Mclnnis, D. Kelso, M. Harrell. Rack Row: Mr. Cross, B. Hacli, G. Lauscr, G. Greene. C. Farley, J. Dunleavy, J. Bowen. J. Lyon, B. Tysseling, B. Smalling, A. Bartels. Music Given Male Touch by Boys’ Glee NANCY UHL. soprano, sings at the Christmas pro- gram before vacation. SENIOR GIRLS’ SEXTET—Karen Skold, Mary Ellen Bragonicr. Pat McCowen, Jane Coletti. Karen Nickey. Carol Rouze. «piano) Jane Riggs. 98 WHITE SHIRTS AND TIES and a place to stand . . . the curtain goes up. Strong voices ing the serious, comical, and popular songs. Molding close to one hundred boys into some- thing resembling a vocal group-constituted the most difficult task facing Mr. Cross during the year. The result of his work is the Boys’ Glee Club. This was divided into two groups: the Junior-Senior Club which met on Monday or on Friday and the Sopho- more Boys’ Glee which met on Tuesday. In between pushing each other off the risers, the combined Boys’ Glee clubs put on several perform- ances during the year. These included the Christmas program and the spring concert. They sang a great variety of music ranging from religious spirituals to songs from popular musicals. Membership in Boys’ Glee is open to any boy who enjoys singing. Out of the ranks of Bovs’ Glee came the Senior Bovs Quartet. The members were Rick Lloyd, Dave Peterson. Bill Pyle, and Dave French. They ap- peared many times during the year. 99Mixed Choruses Provide Musical Among the most popular vocal groups at Ames High are the two mixed choruses. Upon the recommenda- tion of the junior high vocal music teachers. Mr. Cross selects the members of the Sophomore Mixed Chorus for the following year. Due to the large number of sophomore members, this chorus was divided into two groups, which met on separate days. s | erformances drew near, the combined groups met for several practices in which singing positions were assigned and songs were sung. Performing in combination with the two sections of the Sophomore Mixed Chorus are the members of the Junior-Senior Mixed Chorus. The participants in this group are chosen by Mr. Cross. I he combined Mixed Chorus presents itself to the public several times during the year through the Christmas program and the Spring Vocal Music Concert. A wide variety of numbers are placed in their folios, including religious music. Negro spirit- uals. and novelty and modern pieces. BRING A CAMERA into view and someone will wave: focus it. everyone will -mile. Why can’t singers line up on the risers, stop wasting time, and stop munging up picture?? ariety at Christmas, Spring Concerts JUNIOR-SENIOR MIXED CHORUS—Front Ron: L. Rose, A. Toms, M. Cerwick, B. Swanson, B. Hofstad, J. Wi lien bur", D. Con- -tantine, C. Bailey. S. Smith. I). Stein. F Woolscy. S. Blair, C. Soren on, S. Schworm. Second: G: Hatasaki, P. Larson. M. Lasche, L. Wierson. J. Henrik son. P. Johnson, C. Craig, J. Larsen, D. Wciser, M. Vierkant. J. Starr. C. Evens, B. Holmes, X. Noid, S. Phillips. Third: L. Bergeson, J. Rademacher. K. Manchester. C. Myers, L. Parker, J. Christopherson, L. Larson, M. Quam, L. Rocpke, P. Rein- berger, P. Routh, L. Bancroft, L. Stephenson, J. Hills, S. Bowen. Ruck Ron: M. Malone, N. Cook, K. Eernissc. 1). Jordison, B. Roger-. B. Rowell, M. Hildebrand, J. Brown, D. Doling, C. Kropf. T. Kee, I). Evans. R. Skrdla, K. Spear, L. Fields. SOPHOMORE MIXED CHORUS—Front Rou : J. Brown, P. Millard. P. Young, X. Claude. A. Egglcton, J. Fiskc, K. Denisen, M. Augustine, K. Hull, T. Linder, P. Friesner. Second: S. Kinker. G. Goodman, J. Moore, B. Barton, D. Bauskc. I). Hedrick, B. Moses, D. Bame . H. Diehl. D. Skarshaug, S. Accola, E. Straehle. Third: Mr. Cross J. McDowell, J. Seidel, M. Mulhall, B. Ward, J. Hannum. K. Burnet, J. Martin, P. Tonne, C. Carlson, S. Trexcl, Z. Aronoff. Rack Ron: J. Picrsol, R. Peters, R. Exner, B. Hach. G. Greene, C. Farley, J. Dunleavy, J. Bowen. D. Baker, L. Cross. M. Harrell, S. Bappe. SOPHOMORE MIXED CHORUS (continued) A. Clark. N. Veline, M. Jackson, J. Reinhart, S. Fcamster, G. Winters, S. Barrett, M. Sielert, C. Tevebaugh, L Hazel, S. Dowdcn. Second: A. McIntosh, K. Fisher, B. Friedrich, J. Foreman, R. Blcckcr. K. Wood- worth. 1. Boast, P. Svec, R. Eilts, S. Sorenson, N. Crovisier, P. Hussey. Third: K. Roberson, K. Donhowe, K. Gray, E. Mills, M. Ulmer. J. West. M. Anderson. J. Taylor, K. Swanson, C. Bliss, S. Lenning. Rack Ron: D. Christensen, J. Moorman, 1). Gardner, H. King. B. Smalling, C. Lauser. B. Tysseling. M. Strickland. C. Kirkham, D. Kelso, M. Mclnnis, I). Dickson. 10.MISS CASEWELL, Sue Elbert, arrives at Monk-well Manor and is greeted by proprietor Ralston and guest Christopher Wren. Strains of the theme song “Three Blind Mice” could he heard as the curtain ojiened for The Mousetrap, a mystery by Agatha Christie. Monks- well Manor, a newly opened country guest house, was the scene of the action. In scene one Mollie and Giles Ralston, the proprietors, were making final preparations before greeting their anticipated guests. Their guests included Christopher Wren, a tall lad in his twenties. Mrs. Boyle, an elderly, complaining lady, Miss Casewell. a pleasant, easy- to-please woman, and Major Metcalf, a spry, elder- ly gentleman. Other guests soon arrived and murder begins. A snowstorm, cut telephone wires, and weird actions by some of the guests added mysten- to the scene . . . Mrs. Boyle is found strangled. Suspi- cion pointed in turn towards each of the characters: but a reconstruction of the crime reveals the murderer before the death of his second victim. The explanation of Sergeant Trotters' strange ac- tions is fast and just as exciting as the reason for them, and makes an intriguing ending to a fas- cinating and suspense filled play. AT THE HEIGHT OF SUSPENSE, each guest suspects the other of murder. Mr. Wren jeopardizes his safety by acting very strangely. 102THE MOUSETRAP CAST Mr. Paravicine, Mike McLaughlin; Miss Cascwcll, Sue Elbert; Giles Ralston, John Brown; Mollie Ralston. Mona Berck; Detective Sergeant Trotter. Bill Beck; Mrs. Boyle, Mary Ellen Bragonier; Major Metcalf, Dennis Dowell; Christopher Wren. Jay Yillwock. Drama Stages Christie’s "Mousetrap’ ML'RDER IS INEVITABLE in a play by gatha Christie. Mrs. Boyle, Mary Ellen Bragonier, THE FACE of a murderer .. .'i is strangled to close act one. murder two. 103Drama Club Does Behind-the-Scenes SCENES, SETS, COSTUMES, and weary after-school hours of rehearsals ... at times like this, opening night seems years off. 104W ork and Planning Plus Acting Although drama is not a full-credit, graded course, most dramatics students agree that it involves al- most as much work as an academic subject. This year Advanced and Reginning Dramatics courses were offered all six periods. The instructors were Mr. Robert Hamilton and the new addition to the Dramatics department, Mrs. S. Anderson. The main requirement of both class divi- sions of dramatics was a neat and complete note- book containing play summaries, class lecture notes, and various projects concerning such theatrical techniques as scene design and costuming. During much of the class time students prepared monologues approximately five minutes in length, lecture recitals on a play chosen from an approved list, and short dramatic presentations. During the weeks of play production. Beginning Drama classes helped with construction of scenery and the ad- vanced class students worked on their various crews or helped their instructors with miscellaneous jobs. Participating in drama takes a lot of time and energy, but most participants believe that all the work is worth it. The goal of most drama students is to become eligible for Palm Club. The requirements for mem- bership in this honorary organization include the earning of 52 points (awarded on the amount of time spent working on productions), two crew- heads. and approximately 12 hours work construct- ing scenery. -DOUBLE. DOUBLE TOIL AND TROUBLE: Fire burn and cauldron bubble . . ." says the third witch. FIREPLACES THAT BURN, stairs that step, and doors that open in the right direction are challenges which Drama Club takes in stride. AMES HIGH LUMBERJACKS prepare another heap to be transformed into sets, props, and scrap wood. I0JFIVE WEEK'S WORK is perfected in the last three days of rehearsals for the Jr. Play. “WILL YOU DINE WITH US?" asks Mrs. Gyurko- vics. CATHY LEGVOLD, bookholder for the Junior Class play, blinks between act». Junior Class Presents 'Seven Sisters The successful play which the junior class chose to present this year was Seven Sisters, a three-act comedy by Edith Ellis. The well-chosen cast and cooperative crews helped to make this one of the best Ames High School productions ever presented. Seven Sisters is the story of the solution to a widow's problem of getting her daughters married. As the play opens. Mitzi, the problem child of the family, has been sent away to a convent. Soon she returns, proudly stating that she has been expelled and is now all grown up. Her angry mother immediately tells Mitzi that she cannot be grown up until her three older sisters are married. Mitzi, now reduced to the age of fifteen and a half, has abandoned all hope, until one day the multi-named hero of the play. Pierrot, appears. Mitzi had met Pierrot when she was dressed as Pierret at a masquerade ball in Budapest during her brief stay at the convent. Pierrot is shocked to see Mitzi as a little girl and promises to find husbands for her three elder sis- ters if she gives him three kisses after her sisters are married. Claiming to be Tony, the godson of Mitzi's mother. Pierrot becomes close to the Gyur- kovics family and manages to get the three sisters married. Everything is going smoothly until the real Tony appears with official papers as evidence of his identity. lie presents them to Pierrot, but the hero skillfully keeps the papers and temporarily gets rid of Tony. Mitzi explains the situation to all. Pierrot asks Pierret to marry him. she agrees to the proposal, and the hero gets his three kisses. Pro- duction nights, February 14 and 16. climaxed five weeks of hard work for the actors and crews. 106"ANSWER, OR I’LL peel off that tin armor" screeches Colonel Rudviany to Gjda. Jl'NIOR CLASS PLAY CAST- Janko, Mike Fellinger; Toni Teleki. Marc Woods; Ella. Barb Scalinc; Gida Radviany, John Brown; Katinka, Sue Mathison; Colonel Radviany. Dennis Dowell: Mrs. Gyurkovics. Peg Reinberger; Ferenz Horkoy. Rolfe Lowrie; Mitzi, Connie Bailey; Michael Sandorffy, Steve Rullestad; Sari. June Frederick: Terka, Katy Jo Rigg: Liza, Shirlec Smith; Klara. Pat McConnell. 107MRS. BAUSKE explains one of the newspaper’s basic concepts to one of her second semester classes. The world is full of news that is gathered by re- porters who continually keep their eyes open look- ing for something new or unusual to write about. In the same mariner fifty-four Journalism students have roamed the halls of AHS this year looking for interesting events they could use to write a story. These journalism stories are compiled and used to fill a page of the Ames Daily Tribune every Tues- day. I his page is called the Arnes High Web. Journalism is a one semester senior course. The twenty-nine first semester and twenty-five second semester students learned the fundamentals of writ- ing news, feature, and sports stories, editorials, by- lines and fillers. Mr. Kenneth Wells. Ames High Athletic Director, talked to the classes about writing sports stories. Mr. Rod Riggs of the Ames Daily Tribune talked to the classes also. The Journalism students toured the Tribune building to see the ac- tual printing of the newspaper. Each semester the journalism class divided into two Web staffs. Two students were elected by their class- mates each semester to serve as editors. Carol Ilaupt and Jean Nolin were the first semester editors. Ka- ren Skold and Mary Nordskog were elected as sec- ond semester editors. Other class members signed up for the first, second, and third choice of posi- tions. The editors used this as the basis of their selection of the staff members. While one staff was checking to see that all the copy was complete, the other staff was busy plan- ning the next week’s paper. Each student was re- sponsible for one story each week. If he didn't re- ceive a specific assignment, it was his duty to find his own topic for a story. Stories were to be writ- ten by the end of class on Thursday and be in com- pleted form by Friday. Headline sizes were assigned and each student wrote a headline for his story. Mondays and Fridays were used as lab periods when students worked on their stories. Make-up editors and proofreaders spent part of Tuesday's class per- iod checking the copy and lay-out at the Tribune. On W ednesdays a critical discussion of the week's II eb was held. 108 Journalism Staff Produces Web. STORIES ASSIGNED are not always easy to write as Randy Ketelson and Allan Severson will admit. LARRA ZELIADT types her copy as Dan Chipman waits for an inspiration. EVERY TUESDAY MORNING the proofreaders met at the Tribune Office to check the Web (Ron Skrdla, Sandy Per- cival, Carol Kirk). ONE WEH COMPLETE and another begins. Jean Nolin, editor, confers with Mrs. Bauske. Gains Knowledge of Newspapers 109A d Spirit Staff Increases Sales by 100, “7000 LINES?! . . Bill break» llic news of an approaching deadline to copywriters Tom and Sandy. noAdds 32 Pages, Rearranges Book Spirit Staff is a frantic operation. The editorial staff consisting of tin art. copy, and editorial depart- ments specializes in assigning their own work to other departments. Bill Strand is the editor and he "beats ' anvone who displeases him. Sandy Percival is the copv editor, and she makes the art depart- ment write all her copy. Karin Saral and Margv Shepherd of tin- art staff spend every Spirit period combing their hair, giggling, exchanging secrets, and playing tic-tae-toe; so Bill has to finish their jobs. Assistant editor. Cathy Legvold. is the onK one on the staff who does her own work and every- one veils at her. Tom I kena spends all his time writ- ing copy in which he elects himself to various non- existent honorary positions. Barb Bean schedules all the pictures to he taken and retaken and retaken. Jim Hannum. sports editor, writes vivid, eyewitness accounts of all football and basketball games whether he goes or not. Polly Vinograde assists gen- erally by writing last minute articles, typing apol- ogetic letters to the publishing company, and smil- ing. One of the most frustrating aspects of yearbook work is meeting a deadline. No matter how well planned the page order is, how carefully scheduled the pictures are. how fast the typewriters click and how conscientious the editor is. there is always a dreary Saturday session. Everyone comes and talks and eats and listens to records and somehow the work gets done. Then the whole staff breathes a sigh and starts ignoring the next deadline. Within this confusion have emerged the new ideas for this book; from the happy atmosphere described above have come improved layouts, cheerful, in- formative (if sarcastic) copy, and artistically in- triguing pictures. THE AD DEPT.. Hump 3nd Debbe. confer with Polly, the general assistant, on ad layouts. EDITOR BILL Strand gives editor-to-be, ("athy Legvold, a few pointers on the frustrating task of compiling an index.SCRATCH PAD members judge submitted pieces of literature for publication: Mrs. Thompson. S. Feamster, S. Armstrong, M. Walkup, C. Kirk, P. Kouth. CONNIE BAILEY and editor Sandy Feamster proofread con- tributions to the Scratch Pad. Budding novelists and poets find a publisher for their works in the Scratch Pad. Put out annually by the Creative Writing Club, this magazine consists of original poetry, essays and prose fiction. Besides offering prospective authors a chance for self-ex- pression. the Scratch Pad. Ames High’s only literary publication, allows the entire student body to enjoy the talents of its creative members. The Scratch Pad staff works all year gathering ma- terial from English teachers and students, selecting articles to be published, and typing up chosen pieces. Last spring Mary Nordskog, a member of the Scratch Pad staff, was recognized for her poetic abilities at the annual honors assembly. There it was announced that her poem, “Night Train to Nowhere.” was chosen to appear in the Motional Anthology of High School Poetry. 112 Scratch Pad Adds to Literary World;LOIS FIELDS puts a reference book back into the stacks. Library Club members help keep the library functioning. One of the most useful and beautiful additions to Ames High School this year was the school library. A marvelous selection of books, colorful lounging chairs and various other articles of furniture in- duced study and provided an atmosphere of com- fort and relaxation to all Ames High students dur- ing noon hours and study halls. Twenty-eight high school students participated in library club to aid Mrs. Elizabeth Dickinson, school librarian. Library Club met every other Wednesday of the school year during the noon hour in Room 213-2 to discuss matters concerning the library. It is required of all Library Club members to work in the library twice a week aiding students in finding books, checking them out. returning them, and pay- ing fines. Harold Nichols led Library Club as presi- dent and Kat Jo Rigg acted as secretary. The average Ames High School student is oriented to the library and its Dewey Decimal System as a sophomore. However, it is during the junior year that an individual puts his knowledge to use and discovers many new uses of the library in compos- ing a vocational research paper. As seniors, the li- brary is put to good use in writing research papers and reading informative college catalogs, which help college-bound students reach decisions. LIBRARY CLUB—Stated: V. Lint, S. Saul, M. Keller, K. Rigg, S. Smith. B. Hcald, C. Haupt, J. Hague, S. Barrett, A. Uthc, J. West, D. Childs, D. Hageman, K. Spear, K. Fisher, L. Nickey, M. Anderson, A. Wharton. Standing: J. Arnbal, H. Nichols, S. Fcamstcr, D. Reiser, R. Iruhe, C. Tevebaugh, K. Kutish, M. Malone, J. Davidson, S. Timm, Mrs. Dickinson. Library Club Files Books Neatly AwayStudent Treasurers Organize Money; S I l DEN I rREASl RERS—Sm ; C. Rouzc, J. Nolin. J. Cliristophcr-on. J. Hannum, I.. Norris S. Thompson. R. Claybcrg. Standing: L. Bergland. R. Farley, C. Haupt. . Kirk. Mi ss McNally. JIM H ANN I'M. Student Council treasurer, let' the green stuff fly to Carol Kirk, assistant treasurer to Miss McNally. Treasurers of school organizations are chosen by the advisors or sponsors for the organization rather than by popular election. Student treasurers are responsible for collecting money, making out re- ceipts. planning a tentative budget, and making fi- nancial reports. The Student Council treasurer also serves as head of the money-making committee. Junior and senior class treasurers serve on Junior Executive Council and Senior Senate. 'I he treasurer of the drama department is chosen from the Palm Club membership. Other treasurers serve on councils or cabinets for their respective organiza- tions. All treasurers turn their cash books and rec- ords over to Miss Mary McNally, general treasurer for Ames High School, once each month to have them checked. Carol Kirk was Miss McNally's as- sistant this year. • Some organizations handle several thousand dollars and some handle only a very small amount. 1 he student assistant in the vocational educational de- partment handles the most money during a year s time, and the Spirit business manager handles the next largest amount.i Firesquad Members Organize Students During those cold winter fire drills, the superior- looking gentlemen holding open the doors and dis- creetly remaining inside were the members of the Firesquad. This organization is distinguished mainly by the Firesquad passes that won't get you into anything, and the annual picnic. A year's accumulation of fine money is used to attempt the nearly impossible task of filling 30 bottomless pits. The serious function of the Firesquad is enforce- ment of the rules and policies of AHS. They also supervise the fire drills. Students caught violating school rules were reported to the firesquad faculty sponsors. Members pulled duty on specified posts every-other week. Those failing to be on their posts were fined accordingly. Meetings were held once a week under the leadership of Mr. Kipp and Mr. Wood. Membership is based on faculty recommenda- tion, and the final selection is left to the members. CRAIG MACK INSPECTS Mr. Kipp’s Firesquad badge. MARG SHEPHERD i- apprehended by alert Firesquad members DON CARR keeps one eye on his hook and the other on for illegal possession of an apple, the fruit of all evils. potential rule breakers. 115FHA MEMBERS eagerly await the delicious refreshments being prepared. THREE MEMBERS find time to laugh at a busy meeting. DECA, FHA Prepare Students for 116Pot luck supper , a swimming party, and talks In guest speakers highlighted the year for the Future Homemakers of America. An exchange was held with the Nevada FHA at Ames during the year. Meetings were held in the home economics room twice each month. The club membership was open to girls interested in home economics. Bake sales and selling Christmas tapes were two FHA moneymaking projects this year. The club chartered a bus to Oskaloosa for the district FHA meeting. Diane Childs was district vice president this year. Next year the Ames club will choose the district president from among its members. Several homemaking students accompanied Miss Betty Trout, homemaking instructor, to Des Moines to purchase dishes, silverware, and other essentials needed to equip the brand new home economics de- partment. Four sparkling kitchens and many new sewing machines are special features in this depart- ment. Martha Grabau was elected president of the local club this year. Other officers were Janice Temple- ton. vice president; Judy Christopherson. secretary- treasurer: Kathy Spear, music chairman; Rita Getty, historian: and Marilyn Workman, parlia- mentarian. MR. OVERTl RF discusses employment conditions to DECA members. Careers in Business, Homemaking Distributive Fducation Clubs of America try to de- velop in their members leadership in the field of dis- tributing information on career opportunities in the field of commercial distribution. DECA has only been in existence for five years. Mr. James Over- turf is the club sponsor. DECA membership is open to any student who is enrolled in cooperative distributive education. Dis- tributive education is for senior students who spend half of the school day at a retail or wholesale busi- ness establishment receiving “on-the-job" training. Training areas include ladies ready-to-wear, men's furnishings, hardware, jewelry, variety store, ap- pliance, shoes, radio and television sales, wholesale electrical supplies, and wholesale plumbing sup- plies. Distributive education students arc required to take a course in distributive practice. “On-the- job" trainees receive two credits per semester for a weekly minimum of fifteen hours of work. 7 WORK EXPERIENCE STUDENTS arc eligible for membership in DECA.French, German, Latin, Spanish Cluhs I.ATIN CLUB OFFICERS—Front How: Rick Jcllingcr, Paul Marks. GERMAN CLUB—Mary Hinrichsen, Mark Peterson, Mar- Back: Dick Ukena, Mark Ritland. garet Shepherd. AH the Language Clubs were extremely active this year. French Cluh, under the leadership of Ann Wil- son. president, invited all French students, past and present, to the Mardi Gras. A hake sale was held to earn money for this extravaganza, as it truly was. for a play. “Leave It To Suzanne” was produced after five weeks of hard labor. Christmas caroling in German was one activity in which German Club participated. Miss Von Whit- tich was sent flowers on Valentines day. compli- ments of the club. Spring activities included a talent show in which all entries were related to Germany, and earlier in the year a guest speaker was invited to expound on German history. In May. the Latin Club held their traditional, sen- sational Roman banquet. Clad in togas, transplanted students reverted to the Roman riot of feasting on roast pig. Each month a speaker talked to the Spanish Club on Mexican and Spanish culture. The human interest aspect of these countries was emphasized. 1 wo of FRENCH CLUB OFFICERS- Ann Wilson (pres.), Cindy Craig, Donna Howard, Margy Stanifortli. 118Sing at International Christmas Party SPANISH CLUB OFFICERS—Jane Henrikson, Carol Kirk. Tom Kee, Elaine Politis. TOM KEE and Dan Mesnier enjoy a lively Spanish Club meeting. these speakers were Marie Rubio, who demonstrated her native dances, and Mrs. Wallin, of the Guate- mala shop, who showed slides and typical articles of clothing. In May. an outdoor Fiesta was held as a climax to the year's activities. The combined clubs held an International Christmas Party which was the high point of activity. Each club sang songs in its language and all joined in singing “Jingle Bells" in their respective languages simultaneously. LEARNING LINEIS for the play presented by the French Club are Randy Smith and Pick Wilson. 119DEBATER JANET Wildman furthers the negative’s cause. Noontime meetings combined interesting arguments and sporadic lunches. Debate, Science Seminar Offer Many organizations spend a good deal of their time arguing, but the only one that does it on purpose is the debate club. Instead of arguing with their par- ents. teachers, and friends, the debaters do research on a specified topic and then vent the accumulated frustrations of several weeks upon their opponents. The object is to find fault in as much of what the other team is saying as possible and then turn this against them until they are thoroughly dejected, befuddled, humiliated, and disgraced. Besides bolstering the ego of the winner, debate also has many intellectual rewards. The dehater be- comes well informed on some current controversy and also is introduced to the invaluable art of pre- senting a well organized and water-tight argument. The topic this year.was “Resolved: that the United States should promote a Common Market for the Western Hemisphere.” The club met presumably twice a week under the sponsorship of Mr. Cole. They also participated in several interscholastic- de- bates throughout the year. Science Seminar, another academic club, is geared to the student with an interest in learning and prac- ticing science. It offers an opportunity to attend lec- tures, conduct related experiments, and work on in- dividual projects. This year university professors lectured on astronomy and bio-chemistry: equip- ment and instruction were provided in these fields. Each member also worked on a project of his own choice to earn the l credit which Science Seminar offers. These projects, which could be in any field, were rated mostly “acceptable" and occasionally “superior.” 120DR. HEARN of the ISU Bio-Chemistry Department gave a series of SCIENCE SEMINAR met Tuesday evenings at 7:30. lectures to Science Seminar. Topics for programs were interestingly diversified. Opportunities for Specific Interests ADVISOR DON COLE and members of debate listen intently as a speaker weaves his traps. 12Students Throughout the year the atmosphere at the school changes with the personalities of its thousand stu- dents. Semester weeks are characterized by a ten- sion pitched as high as that of a tournament game; and each day various class groups are scurrying around finishing assignments, research papers, and projects or cramming themselves full of quiz facts. Thus, the year progresses with its colorful charac- ters playing various roles. Let it never he said that students find no time for fun; walk down any hall and a joke or its aftermath will greet your ears. In the spring the campus is covered with groups of students dotting its rolling hills. Following are the student divisions: Student Council Student Body Presidents Senior Senate Seniors Junior Executive Council Junior Homerooms SophomoresStudent Council Organizes Hall JIM HANNUM was elected as second -eme-ter Student Body President in January. Me presided at all council and executive meetings. After weeks of campaign meetings and a week of campaigning last spring. Archie Greene was elected by the Student Body to sene as first semester Stu- dent Bo'dy President. Her installation was held dur- ing the first assembly of the ’62-"63 school year. Homerooms elected presidents to sene as repre- sentatives to student council. Other student council officers for this semester were Bob Beaty, vice presi- dent: Hamp Tisdale, secretary; Jim Hannum. treas- urer: and Mary Nordskog. social chairman for the year. Campaign meetings began again during Christmas vacation and lasted until January 11 when Jim Han- num was elected as second semester president. The other officers this semester were Hamp Tisdale, vice president: Dick Gibson, secretary: Bill Easton, treas- urer: and Jack I-asche and Bob Beaty, parliamen- tarians. Mr. Ritland is the sponsor. As one of its major assignments. Student Council organized all of the Homecoming activities: election of the queen and presentation of the first major dance of the school year. Other special events carried out by the council this year were a very successful Back-to-School Night, placing “yield" signs at 16th and Ridgewood, plac- ing guide posts in the parking lot. work on the con- stitution revision, the hall monitor system, and the installation of pop machines in the basement of the second unit. STUDENT COUNCIL—F wu Row: C. Sivesind, D. Brown, D. Miller." T. Landsberg, J. Hannum. B. Beaty. J. Tisdale, M. Nordskog. B. Ward, S. Kinkcr, D. Albertson. E. Fcinbcrg. Back Row: D. Small. J. Handley, K. Black, J. Ingvoldslad, D. Gibson, J. Lasche, J. Bums, F. Vivian, B. Moses, J. Bowen, M. Ritland, M. Heggen, M. Gibbs. 124Monitors and Student Receptionists STUDENT COUNCIL Front Row: D. Throckmorton. B. Easton. M. Nordskog, J. Hannum, I). Gibson. B. Hach, K. Hatsios. Second: J. Moorman, M. Cerwick. M. Staniforth, J. Hannum, D. Kelso, T. Thompson, M. Richards, II. Diehl. Back Row: B. Beaty, M. Schwartz, T. Boast. B. Russell. B. Dotson, B. Strand. J. Billings. M. Strickland, D. Schank, B. Von Bergen, P. Wilson, R. Lowrie, D. Brown, J. Lasche, D. Sherrick. R. McKay, Mr. Ritland. PRESIDENT ARCHIE GREENE was elected COUNCIL MEMBERS wait for a during-school meeting to begin: during the final quarter of her junior year. She meetings rotate from period to period each week, is the third girl to be President at Ames High. 125Fun and hard work presented themselves to 240 graduating members of the 1963 Senior Class. Graduation announcements and name cards were ordered, cap and gown measurements taken, ticket sales for the senior class play promoted, and bac- calaureate and graduation exercises organized. Dur- ing senior week, seniors were finally rewarded for their hard work. While diligent sophomores and juniors sat in classrooms and took semester tests, the class of "63 took part in five days of relaxation and fun. The annual all-day party at the Ames Country Club, including swimming, golf, and movies, was supplemented by numerous private dances and open-houses. Graduation brought all events to a climax as every senior felt a sense of pride and accomplishment on receiving his diploma. Senior Senate was again the organizing body for the Senior Class as each of the eight senior home- rooms was represented by a senator. Mike Allen led the Senior Class as President, aided by Hamp Tisdale. Vice President. Karin Saral. Secretary, and Sandy Feamster. Treasurer. Mr. Ritland was the sponsor. SPRING AND GRADUATION seem a long way off dur- ing this December meeting, but President .Mike Allen is already ordering graduation announcements and preparing for commencement. ROY LINCOLN ABBOTT: Track 1. 2. 3; B. Glee 1, 2. 3. Choir 2. 3. Mixed Chorus 1; Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3; HR V. Pres. 2: Senior Senate. KENNETH KIM ACARD: Baseball 1, 2. 3. Basketball 1, 2, 3. Football 1. Track 1. Varsity Club 2, 3; Choir 3; Firesquad 1. 2. 3: Boys Club 1 2., 3, Representative 1; HR Pres. 1; Sutdent Council 1. FRANKLIN DEAN ALBERTSEN: Boys’ Club 2, 3; Moved from Audulntn, Iowa, 2. BEN ALEXANDER: Boys’ Club 3; Moved from Mali- bu, California, 3. GARY WAYNE ALLEN: Boys’ Glee 1. 2, 3, Choir 3. Mixed Chorus 1. 2; Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. MICHAEL JAMES ALLEN: Basketball 1, Football 1, 2. 3, Track 1, 2, 3, Varsity Club 2, 3; Band 1; Class V. President 2, Class Pres. 3; Firesquad 1, 2, 3; HR Pres. 2. 126r SENIOR SENATE—Front Row: K. Saral (sec.), S. Feamster (treas.), K. Haupt, J. Dickson, H. Tisdale (v. pres.), M. Allen (pres.), Mr. Ritland. Back Row: R. Lloyd, R. Abbott, D. French. Senate Plans Graduation Activities LEE ROGER ANDERSON: Football 1, 2. 3. Track 1. 2; Boys’ Glee 1, Mixed Chorus 1: Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. Cabinet 3, Representative 1; HR V. Pres. 1. VERDENE ANN ANDERSON: GRA 1. 2. 3. Rep. 3; Pep Club 3: Girls’ Glee 1. 2. Mixed Chorus 1, 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3: Drama 1, . BONITA JANE ANDREW: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. CONRAD ORAN ANDROY: Football 1. 2. 3, Track 1. 2. 3; Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3: HR V. Pres. 2. JOHN ARMSTRONG:’Football 1, Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. ALAN EUGENE BAKER: Bovs’ Club 1. 2, 3. 127GIOVANNI BONANATE: Boys' Club 3; Moved from Turin, Italy, 3. LaVERNE DALE BOWERS: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. SHARON RAE BOYLAN: Pep Club 3; Band 1, 2, 3; Girls’ Glee 2. 3, Mixed Chorus 3. DAVID LEE BATMAN: Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3; Science Seminar 2. DOUGLAS JAMES BEACH: Baseball 2, 3, Track 3, Varsity Club 3; Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. BARBARA ANN BEAN: GRA 1. 2. 3, Tennis 2. 3; Pep Club 3, President 3: Band 1, 2, 3; Choir 2, 3, Girls’ Glee 1, Mixed Chorus 1; Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3, Rep. 1; HR See. 1, HR V. Pres. 2; Scratch Pad 2. 3; SPIRIT 3. RHEA BARRON: Pep Club; Girls’ Glee 1, 2, Mixed Chorus 1, 2. Sec. 1; Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3, Rep. 2; Drama 2,3; SPIRIT Rep. 1. ROBERT EARL BEATY: Track 1, 2, 3; Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Choir 2. 3; Class Pres. 2: Firesquad 2; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3; HR Pres. 1, 3. HR See. 1: Stu- dent Council 1, 2, 3, V. Pres. 3; Latin Club Pres. 1. WILLIAM BERNHARD BECK: Base- ball Trainer 2. Track 1; Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. Rep. 2; Drama 3. RICHARD EDWIN BENDER: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. PATRICIA ELLEN BENNETT: GRA 1, 2. 3; Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 1. 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2, 3. V t MONA BERCK: GRA 1. 2, 3; Pep Club 3: Girls’ Glee 1, 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3: Drama 1, 2. 3, Palm Club 2, 3. LINDA MARIE BERGESON: Pep Club 3; Girls Glee 1, 3, Sec. 1, Mixed Chorus 3; Girl Reserves 1. 2, 3; HR V. Pres. 1. HR Sec. 3. EUGENE BLACK: Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3. Rep. 1. 3; Science Seminar 1. Allen, Tisdale, Saral, Feamster 128MARY ELLEN BRAGO- NIER: GRA 1,2,3; Pep Club 3, Council 3; Band 1. 2; Choir 2. 3, Girls’ Glee 1, Mixed Chorus 1; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3; HR V. Pres. 1, Sec. 2; Drama 1. 2. 3. JANICE RAE BRAND- ENBl’RG: Tennis 2, 3; GRA 1. 2. Rep. 1. 2; Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 1, 2, Officer 1; Girl Re- serve 1, 2, 3, Rep. 1, 3; HR Officer 1, 2. RANDALL WAYNE BRECKENRIDGE: Foot- ball 1, 2. 3; Intramural Council 2, Track 1, 2; Boys’ Glee 1, Sec. 1, HR Pres. 1; Firesquad 1, 2, 3; Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. DENNIS H 0 W A R I) BROWN: Basketball 1, Tennis 1, 2, 3, Varsity Club 1, 2, 3; Band 1, 2, 3; Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. DESPITE THIS CONFUSION, when the curtain goes up Mixed Chorus members will be robed and ready to sing. MARGUERITE ANN BROWN: Tennis 2, 3; GRA 1. 2, 3; Pep Club 3; Band 1. 2; Girls’ Glee 1; Girl Reserve 1. 2, 3; Cabinet 3; HR Sec. 2; Drama 1. MARGARET JANE BUCKHOLTZ: Checrsquad 1; Band 1. 2. 3; Choir 2, 3, Girls' Glee 1, Mixed Chorus 1; Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3, Rep. 1; HR Pres. 2; Student Council 2. Sec. 2. PAMELA MARIE BUSHMAN: Tennis 2, 3; Band 1. 2. 3, Pep Band 1, 2, 3; Choir 2, 3, Girls’ Glee 1, Pres. Mixed Chorus 1; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3, Cabinet 2; Rep. 1, HR Sec. 3; SPIRIT Rep. 2. DENNY LEE CARLSON: Intramural Council 2; Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3, Rep. 3. ROBERT EUGENE CARR: Golf 1. 2. 3. Track 1, 2, 3, Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. DONALD FREEMAN CARR: Football 1, 2, 3, Track 1, Varsity Club 3; Boys’ Glee 1, 2, 3, Choir 2, 3, Mixed Chorus 1; Firesquad 1, 2, 3; Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3, Officer 3; HR Pres. 2; Student Council 2; SPIRIT Rep. 3. Serve as Senior Class Officers 129Seniors Present Class Play to MARILYN GAYLE CLEM: Pep Club 3; Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3. JESS NATHAN COLE: Foot- ball 1. 2. 3, Track 1. 2, 3; Rand 1, 2; Roys Glee 1; Rovs' Club 1, 2. 3. Cabinet 3; HR Sec. JANE JOSEPHINE COLET- TI: GRA L 2. 3; Cheewquad 1. 2, 3, Captain 1. 3; Pep Club 3; Rand 1, 3: Choir 2, 3. Robe Keeper 2, Girls’ Glee 1, Mixed Chorus 1. Sec. 1; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3, V. Pres, and Pres. 3; HR V. Pres. 1. Pres. 2: Student Council 2;'Drama 1; SPIRIT Rep. 1. DEAN GEORGE CONSTAN- TINE: Football 1. 3. Coif 2. Intramural Council 1. Track 1, Wrestling 3: Roys’ Club 1. 2. 3. LITTLE CYCLONE Don Runyan jumps in a winning effort to re- capture the ball for Antes in the Grinnell basketball game. GARLAND VIRGIL CLAPP: Track 1. Roys’ Club 1, 2, 3. MARGO ANNETTE CHALMERS: CRA I. 2. 3: Pep Club 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3, Rep. 3: HR V. Pre . 1; Drama 2. 3; Library Club 1. DANIEL MYRON CHIPMAN: Football 1. Intramural Council 2. Track 1. 2. 3; Rjnd 1. 2: Roys' Glee 1. 2. 3, Choir 3, Mixed Chorus 1.2: HR V. Pr«-s. 1. 3; Roy-’ Club 1. 2. 3. JUDITH DIANE CHRISTOPHERSON: Tennis 2. 3: GRA 1. 2. 3: Pep Club 3: Rand L-2. 3; Girls’ Glee 1, 2. 3, Mixed Chorus 1. 2. 3; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3: Cabinet 3. Treas. 3, Rep. 1. 2; Student Trcas. 3. FHA 3, Sec. Treas. 3. 130Aid in Financing Senior Week TERRY MICHAEL COOK: Track 1; Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3, Pres. 2. Choir 3. Mixed Chorus 1, 2, Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3: HR Pres. 2; Student Council 2. JANICE MARSHA CORBIN: GRA 2. 3. Rep. 3; Pep Club; Girls’ Glee, Mixed Chorus 1; Girl Reserve. GARY WAYNE COY: Golf 3. Wrestling 3; Boys’ Glee 2. Mixed Choru 2: Science Seminar 2. PHILIP STEWART CRAIG: Track 2. 3; Band 1, 2. 3; Bovs’ Glee 1: Mixed Chorus 1: Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. JEAN ELIZABETH CRAIN: GRA 1 , 2, 3: Girls’ Glee 1; Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3. BILLIE JANE CRISWELL: Pep Club 3; Choir 2, 3. Girls’ Glee 1. 2, Mixed Chorus 1. 2; Girl Reserve 1, 2. 3, Pres. 3, Rep. 1. 2. SUSAN KAE CROSSLEY: Band 1, 2; Girl Re- serve 1. 2, 3: Drama 1. JANICE KAY CURRY: Band 1. 2. 3; Choir 2, 3, Girls’ Glee 1. Mixed Chorus 1, Orchestra 1, 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2, 3. JERRY MARVIN DAHL: Football 3; Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3, Rep. 2. RICHARD ELDON DEAL: Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. GARY WAYNE DeMOSS: Football Trainer 1; Track 1, 2. 3; Boys' Club 1, 2, 3. JAN ADRIAN DcYOUNG: Track 1, 2, 3; Varsity Club 3; Band 1. 2, 3; Boys’ Glee 1, 2, V. Pres. 1, Mixed Chorus 1; Orchestra 2, 3; Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. JOYCE ELIZABETH DICKSON: GRA 1, 2. 3, Rep. 1; Pep Club 3. V. Pres.; Band 1, 2, 3; Choir 2, 3, Girls’ Glee 1, V. Pres., Mixed Chorus 1, Or- chestra 1; Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3; HR Sec. 1, HR V. Pres. 2; Senior Senate. JOHN NORMAN DUNLAP: Football 2, 3; Intra- mural Council 1, 2. 3; Track 1, Manager 2, 3; Firesquad 1, 2, 3; Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3, Rep. 1, 2; HR Pres. 1, HR V. Pres. 1; Student Council 1; SPIRIT Rep. 1. ZAC DUNLAP: Intramural Council 1, 2, 3; Track 1; Firesquad 1. 2, 3; Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3. BERTHA ANN DURBY: Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3; Drama 1, 2. WILLIAM EASTON: Intramural Council 1; Track 1, 3; HR V. Pres. 1, 3, HR Pres. 2; Student Council 2; Debate 1, 2, 3, Pres. 3; Film Operators 1,2; Boys’ Club 1,2,3. "V i ■ v'ij£ iii A It ,4. I f, 1 t. i ! r a j 13DAVID PAUL FISHER: Boys CIul. 1. 2. 3. LINDA RAE FLEMING: GRA 2. 3. Rep. 3: Pep CIul» 3; Girl Reserve 1. 2, 3. DONALD CLAIR FOLK: Intramural Council 1. 2. 3; HR V. Pres. 1; Boys’ CIul. 1. 2. 3. DONALD WAYNE FRAME: Boys’ CIul» 1. 2. 3: Film Operators’ CIul» 3. DAVID LAWRENCE FRENCH: Basketball 1. 2. Football 1, 2. 3, Track 1, 2, 3, Varsity Club 3; Band 1. 2: Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Choir 2, 3, Mixed Chorus 1; Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3; HR Officer 2. 3; Senior Senate 3: Science Seminar 1. 2. JANICE HOPE FRIEST: GRA 1; Pep Club 3: Girls' Glee 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3: Drama 1: SPIRIT Rep. 2. STEPHEN LESLIE GAMMON: Bovs’ Club 1. 2. 3. Hep. 3. RICHARD JAMES GIBSON: Football 1; Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3. Cabinet 3. V. Pres. 3; HR Pres. 3: Junior Exec 2; Student Council 3; Drama 2. GLORIA JEAN COETTSCH: GRA 1, Rep. 1; Pep Club 3; Girls' Glee 1. Sec. 1, Mixed Chorus 1; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3; HR Sec.-Treas. 1. STEPHEN EDWARD EPSTEIN: Football 1. 2. 3. Track 2. 3; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. DOUGLAS LEE EVANS: Golf 2; Boys’ Glee 3, Sec. 3; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. RUTH ANN FARLEY: Pep Club 3; Choir 2. 3, Sec.-Treas. 3, Girls' Glee I, Mixed Chorus I: Orchestra 1. 2. 3: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. SUSAN CARY FEAMSTER: GRA 1. 2. 3; Pep Club 3; Choir 3. Girls’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Mixed Chorus 2. 3: Class Treas. 3; Girl Re- serve 1. 2. 3; Senior Senate 3: Library Club 1, 2. 3; Scratch Pad Staff 1. 2. 3. Editor 3. SUSAN ELIZABETH ELBERT: GRA 2. 3, Rep. Club 3; Girls' Glee 1; Girl Re- serve 1, 2. 3, Cabinet 3. Rep. 2; Drama 1, 2. 3. Palm Club 3. ROY LaVERN FATLAND: Boys’ Club I. 2. 3. Senior Girls Decorate Christmas 132Four laughing boys, a small bench, and presto! ... a game of musical chairs is on! iriuiMAS . i. r. GHA- NA U: Baseball 1. 2. Basket- ball 1. 2. Intramural Council 1, Football 1. 2. 3. Track 1. 2, Varsity Club 2. 3; Boys’ Glee 1. 2. Choir 2. Mixed Chorus 1; Firesquad 1, 2. 3. Chief 3; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3; HR Pro . 3; Stu- dent Council 2. CAROLYN SUE CRAY: GRA 2. Rep. 2: Pep Club 3: Girls’ Glee 1. 2. 3; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3; FHA 2: DECA 3. V. Pres. 3. ARCHIE LOU GREENE: GRA 1. 2; Choir 2. 3. Girls’ Glee 1. Pro . 1. Mixed Chorus 1; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Cabi- net 2: HR Pres. 1. HR V. Pres. 2; Class Sec. 2; Stu- dent Council 1. 3, Student Body President 3; Drama 1. 2. ROGER BRI CE CUALDOM: Baseball 3. Foot- ball 3. Track 3. Varsity Club 3: Moved from Christopher. Illinois, 2. FREDERICK HARRY GULDEN: Intramural Coun- cil 2; Band 1. 2; Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Sec. 3. Choir 2. 3, Mixed Chorus 1. Orchestra 1: Boys’ Club I. 2. 3. Cabinet 3. Rep. 1: HR Sec. 2. MARY HANNAH HACH: GRA 1. 2, 3, Rep. 1: Or- chestra 1. 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3: Debate 3; Science Seminar 1: SPIRIT Rep. 3. CAROLYN LEE HAGEN: GRA 1: Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 1.2; Girl Reserve 1.2.3. DEAN RUSSELL HAGEN: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. ELLEN GREEN: Girl Reserve 1. 2, 3. MARILYN ANN GREINER: Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 2, Mixed Chorus 2; Girl Reserve 1, 2. 3. JOANN GRIFFITH: Pep Club 3; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Rep. 3. Formal, Valhalla, in Gold and Blue 132 ATTENDANT Anne Wilson HOMECOMING ROYALTY: QUEEN Jane Colctti . . . TOM LANDSBERG drives through for an Ames High Homecoming Touchdown. JUDY ANNE HAGUE: GRA 1. 2. 3. Rep. 1; Pep Club 3; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3: Library Club 3. JAMES WILLIAM HANNUM: Tennis 2. 3, Track 1: Band 1. 2. 3, V. Pres. 3: Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Choir 3. Mixed Chorus 1, 2: Boys' Club 1. 2. 3: Student Council 3. Treas. 3; SPIRIT 3. GLORIA JEAN HATASAKI: Chcersquad 3; Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 3. Mixed Chorus 3, Pres. 3: Orchestra 1: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3, Rep. 3: HR Sec. 1. 3. Pres. 2: Student Council 2: Debate 1; Drama 1: DECA 3. Pres. 3. BONNIE JEAN HATCH: GRA L 2. Rep. 2: Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 1. Mixed Chorus 1; Girl Re- serve 1. 2. 3. Rep. 1; Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 2. 3. PAUL DAVID HATHAWAY: Baseball 1. 2. 3, Golf 2. Track 3. Intramural Council 1. 2. Varsity Club 2. 3: Firesquad 2. Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. CAROL ANN HAUPT: Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 2. V. Pres. 2. Mixed Chorus; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3; HR V. Pres. 3; Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 2. 3. Treas. 3: Library Club 1. 2. 3. KAREN SUE HAUPT: GRA 1. 2. Officer 2. Rep. 2; Pep Club. Council 3; Girls Glee 1. 2, Sec. 2. Mixed Chorus 1. 2: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3, Cabinet 2, Rep. 1: Senior Senate: Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 2. 3. Pres. 3; Library Club 1, 2. SHARON HAYES: Pep Club 3; Band 3; Girls’ Glee 3; Girl'Reserve 3, Rep. 3: Moved from Shen- andoah, Iowa, 3. KAREN SUE HOSTETTER: Pep Club 3; Girls Glee 1. 2. Mixed Chorus 1, 2: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Rep. 2; Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 3. CAROLYN MARIE HUDSPITH: GRA 1: Cheer- squad 1, 2, 3; Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2, 3. Rep. 1, Cabinet 2; HR V. Pres. 1. Sec. 3; Drama 1. 2: SPIRIT Rep. 2. MARY JO HYLER: GRA 1. 2. Rep. 1: Pep Club 3. Council 3; Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3, Cabinet 3; HR Sec. 1; Drama 1. 2, 3. Palm Club 2. 3; SPIRIT Rep. 2. JOE HENRY HARRIS: Football 1: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3: Film Operators’ 1. 2. W" 134Homecoming Highlights Fall Events ATTENDANT Becky Von Bergen. LINDA BELLE JARVIS: GRA 1. 2, 3; Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 2: Girl Re- verve 1, 2, 3; HR Pres. 2; Student Council 2; Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 3. V. Pres. 3. SHERYL DIANE JETMUND: Pep Club 3; Choir 2. 3, Girls' Glee 1. Mixed Chorus 1: Girl Reserve 1, 2. 3. MARIE SHIRLEY JOHNSON: GRA 3; Pep Club 3; ('.iris' Glee 2: Tennis 3: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. NANCY ANN JONES: GRA 1; Pep Club 3: Girls’ Glee 1, 2. 3. Pres. 2. Mixed Chorus 2. 3; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. KIM KAMMERER: GRA I. 2. 3. Rep.'l. 3: Pep Club 3. Council 3; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. KIT KAMMERER: Intramural Council 3, Track 1.2.3: IW Club 1.2.3. RANDALL ARTHUR KETELSON: Baseball 1: Basketball 1. Golf 3. Track 1. 2. 3: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Rep. 1; HR Officer 2. CAROL JEAN KIRK: Cheersquad 1; Pep Club 3; Choir 3. Girls' Glee 1, 2. Mixed Chorus 1, 2: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3, Rep. I; HR Sec. 2: Student Treasurer; Spanish Club Sec. 3; Scratch Pad 3; SPIRIT Rep. 3. JOHN LANCE KLOPF: -Baseball 1. 2; Boys’ Club I, 2. 3, Cabinet 3. MICHAEL RONALD LAMBERT:.Boys’ Club 2. 3: Moved from Ann Arbor, Michigan, 2. JOHN FRANCIS LASCHE: Band 1, 2, 3, Librarian 3, Mixed Chorus 1, 2; Orchestra 2, 3; Firesquad 1. 2. 3; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3, Cabinet 2. 3; HR Pres. 2, 3; Student Council 2, 3; Student Treasurer 1. L. DEAN JORDISON: Football 1; Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3, Choir 3, Mixed Chorus 1. 2. 3; Bovs’ Club 1, 2. 3. THERESA MARGARET JUDGE: Pep Club 3: Girlv’ Glee 1. Mixed Chorus 1; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 2: HR Pn-. 1. HR Sec. 2: Student Council 1. JoANNE EVE KALTON: Band 1. 2; Girl Reserve I. 2, 3. KENNETH WILLIAM LINT: Football 1.2; Boys’Club 1.2.3. 13MICHAEL JAMES McLAUGHLIN: Debate 2; Drama 1, 2. 3; Film Operators' 1: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. BARBARA KAY MEIEK: Pep Club 3; Choir 2. 3; Girls Glee 1, Mixed Chorus 1: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Rep. 1. 3. ROGER STEVEN DITCH FIELD: Track 1. 2. 3: Boys' Club 1. 2. 3. RICHARD AQUILLA LLOYD: Football 1. 2, 3. Track 1, 2; Bund 1. 2, 3, Pres. 3; Boys Glee 1, 2. 3, V. Pres. 2. Choir 2, 3. Mixed Chorus 1; Firesquad 1. 2. 3. Scc-Treas. 3; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3, Cabinet 3. Pres. 3; HR Pres. 1. V. Pres. 2; Senior Senate; Student Council 1; Latin Club V. I'res. 1. NANCY JANE LOWTHER: ORA 1; Pep Club 3: Girls’ Glee 1, 2. Mixed Chorus 2; Girl Reserve 1, 2. 3. Rep. 2; Drama I. 2. 3. Palm Club 3. STUART WILLARD MAAS: Boys’ Glee I. 2. 3; Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. Rep. 2: Choir 3. Mixed Chorus 1. 2; Drama 1. GARY EVAN MAGOON: Football 1. 2. 3; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. CLINTON CRAY MARKEN: Baseball 2, 3, Man- ager 1. Football 1, 2. 3. Intramural Council 1. Track I. Varsity Club 2, 3: Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. DALE RAYMOND MATURE: Golf 2, 3; Pep Band 1; Boys' Glee 2. 3. Choir 2. 3: Bov-’ Club 1. 2. 3. MARGARET ANN MAXWELL: CRA 1. 2: Pep Club 3; Orchestra 1. 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2, 3; HR Pres. 1; Student Council 1: Drama 1, 2. 3. PATRICIA CAROL McCOWEN: ORA 1: Pep Club 2; Band 2; Choir 2. 3, Girls’ Glee 1. Mixed Chorus 1; Orchestra 1. 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 2. Rep. 1. 3; Junior Exec; Drama 1. ROBERT WILLIAM McKENNA: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. MICHAEL ALLEN MeKINLEY: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Rep. 3; Basket- ball 1. Football 1. 2. 3. Track 2. Varsity Club 2. 3; HR C. Pres. 1. JACK MILLER McGLTRE: Intramural Council 3. Track 1. 2. 3. Varsity Club 2, 3; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3; HR V. Pres. 2. LEE ANN LYNN McHONE: GRA 1. 2. 3. V. Pres. 3; Pep Club 3; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3: Library Club 1. 2. WILLIAM MICHAEL McINNIS: Track Manager 1; Boys’ (dub 1. 2, 3; French Club Officer 3. FIVE SENIOR BOYS approach the Archie Greene Leads Students as 136CAROL ANNE MEYER: Fop Club 3; Girls’ Glee 2. Mixed Chorus 2; Moved from Mahomet, Illinois, BERNARD OSCAR MICKELSON: Basketball 1. 2, 3. Football 1, 2. 3. Track 1, 2. 3. Varsity Club 2, 3; Band 1; HR Pres. 2; Boys Club 1. 2. 3. Rep. 2: Student Council 2. BEVERLA JANET MILLER: Pep Club 3; (.iris' Glee 1, 2. Mixed Chorus 1. 2: Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3, Cabinet 3, Rep. 2: HR V. Pres. 2. HR See. 3. DONALD GAEDICKE MILLER: Boys' Club 1. 2. 3. DONALD VERNON MILLER: Track 1. 2. 3; Band 1, 2, 3; Orchestra 1, 2. 3, V. Pres. 2: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3. Rep. 2: HR Pres. 3; Junior Exe. 2; Mudent Council 3. JEAN ANN MILLER: Cheersquad 1, 2. 3: Pep Club 3; GirN' Glee 2: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3, Cabinet 2. Rep. 1, 2; HR Sec. 1, 2; Drama 1. 2. WILLIAM EDWARD MI ELI KEN: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3: Boys’ Glee 1. 2. Mixed Chorus 1: Orchestra 1. 2; Debate 3: Science Seminar 1. TERRA LEE MORRISON: Basketball 1. Football 1, 2. 3. Intramural Council 1. Track 1. 2. 3. Varsity Club 3: Boys Glee 1; Firesquad 1. 2. 3; Boys' Club 1, 2, 3.' GARY MICHAEL MULHALL: Football 2. 3. Track 2. Varsity Club 3; Boys’ Glee 1. 2, Choir 2. Mixed Chorus 1. 2: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3, Rep. 1. GLORIA RAE NELSON: ORA 1. 2; Pep Club 3: GirN’ Glee 1. 2. Pres. 2: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3: Drama 2. 3. JERRA JOHN NELSON: Tennis 3: Band 1. 2: Boys' Glee 1. 2. 3. Choir 2. 3: Boys’ Club 1. 2 .3: Spanish Club Sec. 1. HAROLD JAMES NICHOLS: Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. Cabinet 3: Debate 2, 3: Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 2, 3: Library Club 1, 2. 3, Pres. 3. school willingly but not too eagerly. STEVEN RAY NICHOLS: Band 1. 2. 3: Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Choir 2. 3. Mixed Chorus 1; Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3; Science Seminar 2. 3. KAREN RUTH N1CKEY: GRA 1, 2. 3. Rep. 3; Pep Club 3; Band 1. 2. 3; Choir 2, 3, Girls’ Glee 1, Mixed Chorus 1: SPIRIT Rep. 3. First Semester Student Body Prexy 13Beaty, Easton, Gibson, Hannum KAREN KAYE NICOLLE: Pep Club 3: Girl Re-erve 1. 2, 3; FHA 1. 2. 3. lii lrict See. 3. JOSEPH NOLAND: IG. -' Club 1. 2, 3. JEAN ANN NOUN: CRA 2. 3; Band 1. 2. 3. Sec. 3; Choir 2. 3, Girls Glee I. Mixed Chorus 1: Orchestra 1. 2. 3: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3: HR Pre«. 1. V. Pres. 1. Sec. 2: Student Council 1. MARY NORDSKOG: GRA 2. 3. Rep. 2; Girl Re- serve 1, 2. 3, Rep. 2: HR Sec. 2. Pres. 3: Stu- dent Council 3. Social Chairman 3: German Club . Pres. 1: Scratch Pad 3: SPIRIT Rep. 2. LORN A NORRIS: GRA I. 2. 3; Band 1. 2. 3: Pep Club 3. Treat-. 3; Orchestra 2. 3: Girl Re- serve 1. 2. 3: Student Treas. 3. BETH OEST: Band 2. 3; Girl- Glee 1. 2. Robe Keeper 2: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Rep. 1. 3: Mixed Chorus 1. 2. Robe Keeper 2. CLAYTON OGG: Football 1. 2. 3. Intramural Council 3. Track 1. 2. 3. Varsity Club 2. 3: Boys Glee 1. 2. Mixed Chorus 2: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3, Rep. 1. DIANA LaVONNE OPPEDAL: GRA 1. 2. 3. Rep. 3: (.iris Glee 1; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. l.l VN FRANK OSLl XI): Irack 1. 2. 3: Band I. 2, 3: Orchestra 1: Boy -’ Club 1. 2. 3. Rep. 3. STEVEN PENKHl'S: Track 3: Boys Club I. 2. 3. Rep. 3. SANDRA EILEEN PERCIVAL: GRA 1.2. Rep. 2; Pep Club 3: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3: HR . Pres. 3; Drama 1.2.3: SPIRIT 2, 3. DAVID . PETERSON: Band 1. 2. 3: Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Pres. 1, Mixed Chorus 1; Bovs’ Club 1. 2. .3; Science Seminar 1. 2. 3. .IEI F PETERSON: Basketball 1. Football 1. 2. 3. Intramural Council 1. brack 1. 2. Varsity Club 2.3: Bovs’ Glee 1, 2. 3. Choir 2. 3. V. Pres. 3: Mixed Chorus 1. Pres. 1: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Rep. 1: HR Treas. 1. Pres. 2: Student Council 1. 2. V. Pres. 2. STEPHEN PETERSON: Track 3; Boys’ Club 3; Moved from Orwell. Iowa. 3. BARBARA PM KEN: ChcciM|uad 1. 2. 3; Pep Club 3: Girls’ Glee 1. 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3, Cabinet 2: HR Pres. 2: Student Council 2: Drama 1. 2.3, Palm Club 3: SPIRIT Rep. 3. PEGGY ANN POWELL: Pep Club 3; Band 1. 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3: Drama 3. JOHN SEIRI INC PRESTON: Boys Club 1. 2. 3. 138I Battle for Second Semester Prexy ! I JON MASON RISDAL: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3: Film Operators' Club 1. 2, 3, Officer 1. 2. DAN VINCENT ROACH: Football 1. 3. Intramural Council 2. Track 1, 2, 3; Band 1. 2; Boys Glee 1, 2. 3, Choir 2. 3, Mixed Chorus 1; Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3; HR Pres. 1; Student Council 1. ELIZABETH JUANITA ROEPKE: GRA 2. Rep. 2; Pep Club 3: Girls’ Glee 2. 3. Mixed Chorus 2. 3; Girl Reserve 2. 3. Sec. 3: Moved from Silver Spring, Maryland, 2. CHARLES CARRINGTON PROFFITT: Boys’ Club 1. 2, 3. WILLIAM VINCENT PYLE: Basketball 1. Intra- mural Council I, Track 1, 2, 3; Band 1, 2, 3; Boys' Glee I, 2, 3, Choir 2, 3, Mixed Chorus 1; Boy-'' Club 1, 2, 3. Rep. 2; HR Sec. 1. V. Pres. 2; SPIRIT Rep. 3. LEONARD WAYNE RAMSEY: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. — PATRICIA ANN REID: GRA 1, 2: Pep Club 3: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 2; Drama 1, 2. 3, Palm Club 2. 3. VIRGINIA HELEN RIEGEL: Choir 2. 3. Girls’ Glee 1. Mixed Chorys 1; Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3. DORA JANE RIGGS: Choir 2. 3, Girls’ Glee 1. Mixed Chorus 1; Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3. Cabinet 3: HR Sec. 1. “AND TWENTY-SIX from Homeroom 217 . . .’’ As the deadline nears, Barb and Bill make a last minute check on SPIRIT sales. 13«;Six Seniors Reach A FORGOTTEN LUNCH, a frantic phono call, and a bleak day is changed for Dave French. PAMELA KAV KOI JTH: Pop Club; Band 1. 2. 3: Girls’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Mixed Chorus 2. 3; Girl Reserve 1, 2. 3. Rep. 2. 3; HR Sec. 2: Scratch Pad Staff 3. C A K O L M A R C A R E T KOI ZK: GRA 1: Pop Club: Band 1, 2, 3; Choir 2. 3. Girls’ Glee 1. Mixed Chorus 1: Or- chestra 2: Girl Reserve 1, 2. 3; HR Pres. 1. V. Pres. 2: Junior Exec: Student Coun- cil 1: Student Treas. 3: Drama 1. 2. 3, Palm Club 3; SPIRIT 3. ROBERT F. ROWELL: Base- ball 3. Football 2. 3. Track 2. 3. Varsity Club 2. 3; Boys' Glee 2. Sec. 3, Mixed Chorus 3. Sec. 3: Boys' Club 2. 3: Drama 2: Moved from Mexico, Mo.. 2. JOHN STEVEN BUNDLE: Track 2. 3; Band 2. 3: Boys' Club 2. 3: Moved from Japan 2. DON VLD RALPH RUNYAN: Baseball 1. 2. 3. Basketball 1. 2. 3. Varsity Club 2. 3; Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3: Choir 2. 3. Pres. 3. Mixed Chorus 1: Boys' Club 1. 2. 3; HR Pres. 2; Senior Senate 3; Student Council 2. SUSAN KAY RUSH: GRA 1. 2. Rep. 2; Pep Club Band 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. JEFFREY WALLACE SALES: Golf 2. 3; Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Choir 2. 3. Mixed Chorus 1: Boys' Club 1.2.3. Rep. 1. KARIN SARAL: GRA 1. 2: Pep Club 3; Orches- tra 1. 2. Asst. Sec. 2: Class Sec. 3: Girl Reserve 1, 2. 3, Cabinet 2. Rep. 1; HR Pres. 1. HR Sec. 2; Senior Senate 3: Student Council 1: Drama 1. 2. 3, Palm Club 2.3: SPIRIT 2. 3. 140National Merit Scholarship Finals RICHARD JOHN SCHANK: Basketball 1. 2. 3. Football 1, 3, Track 2, 3, Varsity Club 2, 3; HR Pres. 3; Student Council 3. PHILIP EDWARD SCHIMER: Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3. SALLY JOAN SCHWORM: GRA 1. 2. 3: Pep Club 3, Council 3; Rand 1, 2. 3; Choir 3, Girls’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Mixed Chorus 1. 2. 3; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3. Rep. 1; HR Pres. 2; Junior Exec; Student Council 12. RONALD LYNN SCOTT: Band 1. 2. 3; Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3. RICHARD MICHAEL SEALOCK: Football Man- ager 1; Boys’ Club 1, 2, 3; HR V. Pres. 1: German Club V. Pres. 2: SPIRIT 1. 2, 3. ALLEN ROE SEVERSON: Football 1. Intramural Council 3. Track 1, 2, 3. Varsity Club 2. 3; Mixed Chorus 1; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 1: HR Pres. 2; Student Council 2. RONALD KENT SKRDLA: Band 1. 2. 3; Boys’ Glee 1, 2. 3; Mixed Chorus 1, 2. 3; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. JAN RAE SLAGEL: Pep Club 3; Girl Reserve 3. Rep. 3: Moved from Beatrice, Nebraska, 3. CAROL SLETTEN: Pep Club 3; Girl Reserve 3. Rep. 3; Moved from St. Louis. Missouri, 3. FRANK JAMES SMITH: Tennis 2. 3. Track 1, Varsity Club 2. 3; Rand 1. 2. 3; Roys’ Glee 1. 2. 3; Choir 2. 3. Mixed Chorus 1: Roys Club 1. 2, 3. Rep. 2. 3. STEVEN PAUL SOESRE: Raseball 1, 2. 3. Basket- ball 1. 2. 3. Football 1. 2. 3. Intramural Council 1; Track 2. 3. Varsity Club 2. 3; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3, Sec. 3. Rep. 1. 2. HELEN JEAN SOY: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. ANN MARIE SPEER: GRA 2: Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 1; Mixed Chorus 1: Orchestra 1; Girl Re- serve 1. 2. 3; HR Sec. 2; Drama 2. 3. TIJA A. D. SPICBERG: Pep Club 3; Bund 3; Girls’ Glee Club 1. Mixed Chorus 1. Officer 1: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Rep. 2, 3; Drama 1. 2. 3. CURTIS NEEL SIEMERS: Rand 1; Roys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Rep. 1. 3; HR Pres. 1; Junior Exec; Stu- dent Council 1. DIANNE SILLS: GRA 1. 2. 3; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. KAREN ELLEN SKOLD: GRA 1; Pep Club 3; Rand 2; Choir 2. 3. Girls’ Glee 1, Mixed Chorus I: Girl Reserve 1, 2. 3. Cabinet 3, Rep. 1: HR Pres. 2: Student Council 2; Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 3. 14Seniors Enjoy College Night Dec. 6 BARBARA ALICE SQUIRES: CRA I. 2. 3. Rep. 1; Cirb’ Glee 1. Librarian 1, Mixed Chorus 1; Girl Re- serve 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 2. 3, Pres, of Rep. 3. Rep. 1: HR V. Pres. 2. 3: Junior Exec 2: Drama 1. 2: SPIRIT Rep. 1. ROBERT BUSCH STAUDER: Boys Club 1. 2. 3. RICHARD JAMES STOBER: Basketball 2. Intramural Council 3: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3; Moved from Clarion, Iowa, 1. BRIAN DcLOSS STONE: Intramural Council 1: Bovs’ Club 1. 2. 3. WILLIAM LEWIS STRAND: Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Sec. 1, Choir 2. 3. Mixed Chorus 1: Orchestra 1. 2. Pres. 2; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3: HR V. Pres. 1. Sec. 3: SPIRIT 2. 3. EDITOR: Debate 3. MARY LOUISE SVEC: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3: Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 2. 3; Scratch Pad Staff 3: SPIRIT Rep. 2. KENNETH RAYMOND TANNER: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3: Intramural 1. 2: Moved from Cedar Rapids. Iowa. 1. ROBERT TESDAHL: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. SANDRA E. THOCERSON: GRA 1. 2. 3. Rep. 1; Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 1. 2: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Rep. 3: Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 2. 3. CAROLYN TERRY THOMPSON: Pep Club 3; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3; Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 2. 3. Sec. 3; SPIRIT Rep. 1. RICHARD L. M. THOMPSON: Baseball 1. Foot- ball 1: Boys’Club 1.2. 3. ROBERT C. THOMPSON: Football 1. Intramural Council 2: Boys’ Club 1, 2. 3. KAREN MICK FA THORKSON: GRA 1; Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 1. 2: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3, Rep. 2. WAYNE C. THORSON: Football 1. 2. 3. Track 1. 2. 3. Varsity Club 2. 3: Boys’ Glee 1. 2. 3. Choir 3. Mixed Chorus 1, 2; Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. THOMAS DEAN TICE: Baseball 1. Football 1. 2. 3. Captain 3. Intramural Council 2. Varsity Club 2. 3: Boys’ Club 1. 2. 3. Rep. 2. 3. SUSANNE B. TIMM: GRA 1. 3. Rep. 1. 3; Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 1, 3, Robe Keeper 1; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Rep. 2: Drama 2. 3; I-HA 3; Library Club 1. 2. 3. JOHN HAMPTON TISDALE: Basketball Manager 2. Football Manager 1, 2. 3. Tennis 2. Track I: Class V. Pres. 3; firesquad 2: HR Pres. 1. 2. V. Pres. 2: Senior Senate: Student Council 1. 3. Sec. 3; SPIRIT 2. 3, Rep. 1. 142DONALD THOMAS VAN SCOY: Intramural Council 1; Boys' Club 1. 2, 3; HU V. Pres. 1. JUDITH LEE VAN WINKLE: GRA 1, 2. 3. Rep. 1; Pep Club 3: Band 2. 3; Girls’ CIcc 1. 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3: French Club Rep. 3. NANCY LEE UHL: Pep Club 3: Choir 2. 3; Orchestra 2; Girl Reserve 2, 3. Cabinet 3: HR Sec. 3; Moved from Des Moines, 2. LINDA DIANE UTHE: Pep Club 3: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Rep. 3; Debate 1. 2, Sec. 2; Drama 3. ANN LOUSE TOMS: Cheersquad 1. 2. 3: Pep Club 3: Girls’ Glee 3. Mixed Chorus 3. Sec. 3; Girl Re- serve 1. 2, 3. Cabinet 3, Rep. 3: HR V. Pres. 2. KAREN SUE TORKELSON: Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 1. 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3: HR V. Pres. 1. JAMES EDWARD TROW: Basketball 1, Intramural Council 1. 2. 3. Track 1. 2. 3, arsity Club 1. 2. 3; Firesquad 1, 2, 3. Chief 3; Bovs Club 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3: HR Scc.-Treas. 1. Pres. 1. V. Pres. 2. 3; SPIRIT Rep. 2. 143POLLY JEAN VINOCRADE: Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 1, 2. Pres. 1, Mixed Chorus 1. 2; Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3; HR Pres. 1. V. Pres. 2; Student Council 1. 2; Drama 1,2.3. Palm Club 3; SPIRIT 3. VIVIAN KAY VOELKER: CRA 1. 2. 3, Rep. 3; Pep Club 3, See. 3, Rand 1, 2. 3; Girls’ Glee 1, 2, Mixed Chorus 2. See. 2; Girl Reserve 1, 2. 3; HR Pres. 1; Junior Exec 2; Student Council 1; SPIRIT Rep. 3. REBECCA VON BERGEN: GRA 1. 2. 3. Point Chair- man 2. Pres. 3. Rep. 2; Pep Club 3; Rand I. 2. 3; Girls' Glee 1. V. Pres. 1. Mixed Chorus 1; Orchestra 1. 2; Girl Reserve I. 2. 3. Cabinet 3, Rep. 1; Drama 2. 3, Palm Club 3. EILEEN ANGELA WALSH: Drama 1. 2. 3. Palm Club 2. 3; Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3. Rep. 1. 2, Cabinet 3; Spanish Club Pres. 2: HR V. Pres. 1; Creative Writing 3; Pep Club 3. ELINORE JOY WALTERS: GRA 3; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3; Palm Club: Library Club 1. 2. RICHARD CHARLES WERR: Football 1. Track 1. 2. 3. Varsity Club 2. 3; Roys’ Club 1, 2. 3. Treas. 3. June 4 Graduation Ends Senior Year PATRICIA ANN WEISS: Pep Club 3; Girls’ Glee 1. 2. Mixed Chorus 2; Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. MARY ELLEN WELLS: CRA 1, 2, 3. Rep. 2: Pep Club 3. Council 3: Tennis 1. 2. 3; Rand 1, 2, 3. Rand 1. 2. 3; Choir 2. 3. Girls’ Glee 1. Mixed Chorus 1; Orchestra 1, 2: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. STEVEN B E R N A R I) WESTVOLD: Bovs’ Club 1, 2, 3. MARY JANET WHAT- TOFF: Girls’ Glee 3: Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3, Rep. 2; HR Treas. 1; FHA 3. MARILYN WORKMAN: GRA 1. 2. 3: Girl Re- serve 1, 2. 3. Rep. 2. 3; Drama 1. 2. 3. JOHN WEDDLE NANCY R A E WHITE- SELL: DECA 3; Girl Re- serve I, 2. 3. m JANET JOYCE W1LDMAN: Cheersquad 1: Pep Club 3: Rand 1. 2. 3; Choir 2. 3. Girls’ Glee 1, Mixed Chorus 1; Orchestra 1. 2, 3: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 2; Debate 2, 3; Drama 3; German Club Pres. 2. ANNE WILSON: Student Council 3, French Club Pres. 3. Moved from Charlottesville. Virginia. 3. 144MARCIA LOU WRIGHT: GRA 1, 2. 3. Rep. 1; Pep Club: Girls’ Glee 1. 2, 3. Mixed Chorus 1: Girl Reserve 1, 2, 3; Drama 1. 2. 3, Palm Club 3. LARRA RAE LOUISE ZELIADT: Pep Club; Band 2. 3; Girls’ Glee 1. 2. Sec. 1. Mixed Chorus 2: Girl Reserve 1. 2. 3. Cabinet 3. CURT BUYS his milk . . . SENIORS NOT PICTURED: Velvet Abbott Edward Davidson Margery Ilofstad Ralph Kilstrom Donald Litchfield Ernest Martin Daniel Mcsmer Eric Mickelson Richard Sailsbury Joe Skaff John Weddle AND REGRETFULLY throws the carton away. Thus the noon hour is drunk away. 145 DRINKS IT with relish . . .Cox, Nordskog, The splendor which characterizes the Junior-Senior Prom marks the culmination of a year of hard work by the Junior Class. They were responsible for not only the prom itself, but also the fund-raising ac- tivities before it. Undertaking the difficult task of organizing the juniors were the members of the Junior Executive Council. This consisted of the class officers and members elected from unrepresented homerooms. They met on Monday of each week under the leadership of President Jeff Cox and Mr. Mac Bride, the faculty sponsor. The first section of the juniors' master money- making plans to be put into effect was the sale of Homecoming Mums. This successful venture was handled for the most part by members of Junior Exec. But the carwash at Central required the help of all juniors. As they sat at home drying off from sporadic water fights that had erupted, the members of the Council were already busy with plans for the annual leaf rakes. Thus the tempo for the year was set with the juniors constantly busy at projects including the student directory, the class play, and finally the Prom. JUNIOR EXECUTIVE COUNCIL—Seated: M. Klingscis, M. Montgomery, B. Soults. J. Cox (pres.), J. Hcnrikson, B. Duke. Standing: Mr. McBride, M. Shepherd (sec.), L. Bcrgland (treas.), B. Nordskog (v. pres.). 146Shepherd, Bergland Head Juniors SOLVING electronics problems JANE HENRICKSON finds junior lift are Kosta Hatsios and I.arrv rather hilarious. McCoy. BARB ROSEBROOK helps arrange hair for a junior skit. HOMEROOM 123-1—Front Ron: R. Baldus, C. Bailey, B. Blanford. L. Bergland, A. Keislcr, S. Blair. Second: J. Brown, L. Bancroft, S. Bowen, A. Barrow. P. dams. K. Berwick, M. Boehnlie. Third: Mr. Albertson, P. Anderson, R. Black. M. Bellinger, M. Burns, S. Ander-on. Back Ron: K. Adams, D. Brown, T. Barton, S. Armstrong, B. Ballard, J. Brown, B. Barrie. HOMEROOM 132-1—Front Ron: J. Willcnburg, D. Stein, J. Smith. M. Simons, B. Swanson, C, Sorenson. Second: J. Warren, J. Starr. L. Stephenson, R. Kinart, S. Smith. J. Templeton. K. Talcott. Third: S. Stucky, T. I’kena, J. Stewart, J. Tuttle, C. Sivesind, B. Walker, E. Thorson. Back Rote: Mrs. Tauber, I). Sherirk, M. Smith, B. Soults, D. Doling, K. Spear, J. Timmons. 147 HOMEROOM 138-1—Front How: 11. Reitz, I). Peterson. J. Parks, S. Phillips, M. Richards, E. Pirtle. Second: E. Politis, C. Evans, L. Parker, R. DeBoer. S. Miller, D. Myers, J. Rademachcr. Third: Miss Zanders, C. Moppin, R. Mullin, M. Quam. D. Ostrom, N. Penny, P. Reinberger. Buck Row: 11. Miller. II. Nordskog, M. McVicker, T. Orngard, C. .Mack, B. Oshcl, B. Moorhead. HOMEROOM 149-1 Front Row: M. Thompson, S. Son-nsen, I.. Wicrson, M. Yicrkant, S. Cooper, V. Vanvoorhis, D. Nicholle. Second: G. Erskine, S. Warren. B. Wickersham, D. Weiscr, J. Wright, J. Thorson, M. Walkup. J. Williams. Third: I). Wheeler, M. Woods. P. Wiener, J. Wildman, M. Yeaman, M. Wheelock, C. Ustrud, C. Williams. Back Row: Mr. Bennett, M. Thompson. T. Watkins, M. Wilcox. R. Younic, S. Craig, S. Wessman, M. Wilson. A ROUSING BURLESQUE of T Love Little-Willie” by the Junior Girls’ Sextette captured acclaim in the annual talent assembly. 148THREE DISTINCT EXPRESSIONS depict Dave Sch- Tom Key in hurried conccntra- worm in losing football agony .. . tion .. . and Dave Cross in Spahish Club frivolities. HOMEROOM 159-1 Front Row: S. Schlebecker, D. Rolf. S. Shadle, S. Russell. K. Rigg, B. Johnson, L. Rose. Second: R. Plumb, B. Rosebrook. K. Shuman. S. Saul. D. Schworm. C. Risden, P. Riggs. Third: J. Quinn, B. Saul, J. Peters, C. Peterson, J. Ruhe, M. Sclarow. B. Robinson. S. Rogne.--. Back Row: Mrs. Anderson. M. Shepherd. T. Rice, B. Rogers, M. Schwartz, T. Ross, M. Peterson, L. Sargent. HOMEROOM 163-1—front Row: L. Cottrill. M. Cerwick, C. Carmean, B. Bensend, S. Cook, C. Craig, M. Busick, M. Caven. Second: Mi-- Canvin. R. Davidson, C. Craig, Ray Davidson. C. Constantine, C. Carlson, E. Conley, D. Childs. Third: J. Davidson, B. Cole, J. Crain. F. Dahlmeier. S. Caldwell. I). Dalton. R. Clayberg, P. Hanson, T. Ncwland. Back Row: B. Caquclinc, N. Cook, J. Burns, L. Danielson, J. Cox. B. Cumming, S. Brown, G. Clouscr. 149 Juniors Take Merit Tests on March 5HOMEROOM 152-2—Frout Row: J. Erickson, D. Hagemann. T. Newland, K. Epstein. I). Dowell. E. Donhowe. J. Craig. Second: P. Ellis, K. Cetty, B. Blagcn, J. Gilchrist, B. Dumenil, T. Gloscmcyer, E. Fein berg, I). Foderberg. Third: L Enser. B. Dotson. J. Frederick. M. Fellinger. K. Eemisse. S. Elbert, M. Grahau. Back Row: T. Dixon. T. Mill, J. Fihcham, M. Elbert. K. Duncan. J. Elliott. L. Fields, I.. Fortner. HOMEROOM 217-2 From Row: D. Lee, H. McCartney. S. Heady. P. Lange. L. Hedberg. V. Litchfield. C. Legvold. Second: M. Klingseis, J. I.arsen. J. Ingvoldstad, H. McCoy, M. Lasclic, P. Larson. Third: Miss von Wittich. L. Larson. K. Kutish. G. Howerton, T. Larson. 1). Hcgland. B. Kcigley. Back Row: D. Heldt, T. Kee. J. Kennedy, L. Jefferson, E. Heers, E. King. M. Keller. Juniors Wash Cars, ENTHUSIASTIC JUNIORS go out to hang up more business. 150HOMEROOM 218-2—Front Row: V. Fishbum, N. Noid, C. Nordhagcn, M. Montgomery, J. Olson, P. McMahon, C. Miller, J. Nelson. ■S' on •: R. Morgon, P. McFarland, D. Nervig, K. Mattson, G. Myers, E. Mars ton, K. Manchester, L). Lange, M. Nelson. Third: Mrs. Young. M. Malone, R. Lowrie, D. Lundvall, L McCoy, J. McClugage, 1). Knott. S. Mathison. Hack How: J. Mcllwain, J. Linder, D. Love, T. Landsberg, C. Knapp, R. Lorenzen. C. Kropf. HOMEROOM 219-2—Front Ron: J. Hartley, B. Hofstad. P. Woolsey, J. Henrikson, 1). Howard, B. Hagen, K. Horswell, J. Johnson. Second: B. Holmes, B. Hazel. M. Huhn, B. Hiscrote, J. Hills, P. Harris, G. Hall, V. Hannusch, K. Hatsios. Third: Mrs. Vandecar, C. Heddleson. J. Shultz, R. Hayward. S. Hausner, L. Harstad, M. Hinrichsen, 1). Johnson. Rack Row: J. Hanway, J. Handley, B. Hamilton, M. Green, J. Hauenstein, T. Groomes, V. Jones. Rake Leaves to Earn Money for Prom ONCE OVER LIGHTLY and the promise of clean clear through, characterized the Junior Class Car Wash.THE HOMECOMING PEP RALLY served to initiate the sophomore» into the swirl of things: Bruce Bergland, an ex-Student Body President gave one of the enthusiastic speeches. 370 Sophomores Make Largest Class HOMEROOM 117-1 Front How: B. Walker. J. Weiss, P. Young, J. VanScoy, B. Whattoff. R. Wagner, P. Wynne. Second: P. Wood, M. Wheelock, J. Wheeler. B. Yon Bergen. G. Winters, C. Warner, M. Webb. C. Webb. Third: J. Wirtz. K. Yeaman, J. West, J. Wallin, C. Young, A. Wharton, R. Wilson, L. W'atts. Hack Row: Miss Stafford, K. Woodworth, F. ivian, J. Nillwock, V illwock, I). Voigt, R. Voss. 152HOMEROOM 136-1—Front Rote: B. Sorensen, A. Uthe, S. Trexcl, S. Trow, B. Ward, C. Tevebaugh, N. Veline. Second: J. Spinks, R. Truhc, T. Tauber. K. Swanson. P. Tonne, C. Taylor, P. Svec. Third: J. Taylor, M. Ulmer, J. Spicer, J. Thorson, J. Stewart, D. Swanson, D. Squire. Back Ron : Mr. Oltrogge, R. Steele, D. Ukena, B. Tysseling, T. Trausch, M. Strickland, B. Sommerfeld. HOMEROOM 158-1—Front Ron : R. Evans, J. Green, A. Bartels, R. Exner, C. Farley, M. Gibbs, D. Elbert, D. Gardner. Second: G. Combo--y, J. Ferguson, M. Hagge, C. Hamme, S. Hague, L. Enser, B. Fricst. Third: Miss Glamscr, J. Foreman, D. Ferguson, J. Green. J. Fiske, B. Fredrich, P. Fox, K. Fisher. Back Rote: P. Faber, J. Hannum, J. Fleig, J. Ellis, L. Hand, K. Gray, S. Fincham, G. Goodman. HOMEROOM 160-1- Front Ron: E. Beese, M. Bauder, S. Barrett, J. Arnbal, $. Benson, J. Bcrhow, M. Augustine. Second: S. Accola, D. Bat -s, T. Bappe, D. Beckman, T. Bauder, D. Barnes, Z. Aronoff, J. Alio. Third: Mrs. Anderson, B. Barton, D. Bauske, R. Moore, D. Albertson. M. Anderson, M. Agan, A. Anderson. N. Ellis. Back Row: J. Billings, T. Blackburn, D. Baker, R. Bappe, I). Barber, D. Baldner. B. Best, S. Bappe. 3 r- O. %. - — — - , ■ -a . ana 153Sophs Participate in Plays, Clubs, HOMEROOM 151-2—Front Row: J. Brown, J. Carmean, L. Dalton, C. Byers, S. Christenson. N. Claude, A. Clark. Second: L. Carr, C Carlson, N. Crovisier, J. Disney, K. Burnet, C. Bliss, D. Cumming, P. Hanes. Third: C. Buttcrraorc, P. Childs, D. Christensen, P. Caffcrty, F. Bortle, D. Knight, T. Boast. Rack Row: David Christensen, M. Blaess, J. Bowen, M. Bonwell, R. Bleeker, S. Brown. HOMEROOM 153-2—Front Row: V. McKenna, L. Makclbust, P. Millard, T. McIntosh, M. Maurer. M. Miller, M. Jones. Second: M. McLean, J. McCIurkin, G. Lytton, J. Litzel, T. Ixtwman, R. Manthci, J. Martin. Third: K. Page, J. I.itzcl, M. Mclnnis. R. Lewis. P. Marks, J. Lyon. J. McGinnis, R. McCay. Back Row: C. Machcak, J. McCaffrey, J. McDowell, A. McIntosh. D. Miller. J. Miller, D. Sansgaard, M. Miller. 54 GIRLS' FOOTBALL served to familiarize the girls with rules and tactics so that watching the game would be more enjoyable. Other Activities HOMEROOM 212-2— Front Row: K. Hull, M. Jack on, J. Hoff. T. Hunt, L. Hazel, 1 . Hussey, S. Harwell, 11. Humphrey. Second: C. Hurlbut, D. Hedrick, M. Hcggen, B. Henry, N. Herrick, J. Hansen, G. Jacobson. Third: Mrs. Lutz, B. Anderson, M. Harrell, B. Hach, B. Hawke?. F. Heubner, M. Hakes, j. Heer. Back Row: K. Hoskins, R. Jcllingcr, G. Greene, R. Hopkins, L. Harless, B. Heald, J. Hensing. HOMEROOM 215-2—Front Row: P. Linder, T. Linder, 1). Johannes, P. Krocheski. J. Lawrence, R. Jones, V. Pankey, V. Lint. Second: N. Joseph, M. Lewis. S. Lenning, J. Kennedy, B. Katton, K. Larson, S. Kinker, M. Lange, V. Larson. Third: Mr. Ourth, J. Ketelsen. B. Kleinschmidt, C. Kirkham, D. Kelso, 1). Davis, L. I inc .os. Back Row: P. Larson, H. King, G. I.auser. B. Johnson, B. Johnson. R. Kline. M. Kingrey, R. Rothacker.HOMEROOM 214-2—Front Row: L. Overland, S. Pepper, D. Olson, L. Nickey, A. Patterson, L. Partin. P. Friesner. Second: J. Moore, K. Pane, N. Packer, 1$. Moses, B. Neal, R. Peters, G, Perkovich, G. OppcdaL Third: Mrs. Reno, J. Nairn, E. Mills. A. Paulson, 1). Moreland, I). Pasley, I). Peterson, L. Nelson. Rack Ron : C. Nickel, M. Osam, N. Nims, D. Peterson, J. Moorman, M. Pedersen, R. Olson. J. Owing . STIFF SCHOLASTIC COMPETITION among the sophomores necessitated in- creased study. HOMEROOM 2242- Front Row: J. Reid, M. Poeckes, A. Quinn. J. Reinhart, J. Porter. Second: S. Pirtle, S. Posegate, B. Russell, P. Sargent. K. Roberson. S. Reilly. Third: C. Robertson, P. Porter, S. Pietz, J. Piersol, K. PohL Back Row: Mr. Ripp, T. Potts, S. Risdal. D. Rod. T. Rasmussen. M. Ritland. In Spring 156CELLS AND SIMPLE LIFE become visual reali- ties through increased . . . use of microscopes . . . in biology. HOMEROOM, 251-2- Front Row: R. Eilt , C. Davis. S. Clark. J. Davidson, B. Dietl, 11. Diehl, R. Crowley. Second: S. Dowdcn, L. Dodd, L. Dunlap, P. Ellis, G. Clark, K. Donhowc, A. Eggleton, K. Denisen. Third: Mrs. Garrett, J. Dodd, M. Dennis, J. Drake, M. Duffy, D. Dickson, K. Peterson. Back Row: J. Easton, K. Everson, C. Ekberg, II. Hayes, J. Dunleavy, S. Coe, L. Cross, J. Collins. Sophs Elect Jr. Officers, Serve at Prom HOMEROOM 255-2—Front Row: M. Shaw, M. Staniforth, C. Sandberg, L. Sobotka, M. Sielert, D. Stone, D. Shecler. Second: C. Sorenson, P. Sheeler, E. Straehle, J. Seidel, D. Skarshaug, M. ScvJe, R. Skrdla, C. Sheehan. Third: M. Smith, J. Shearer, J. Smith, R. Seastrand, M. Schmidt, M. Shank, R. Schumer. Back Row: Mrs. Bauske, G. Sines, M. Shockley, J. Sheeler, B. Smalling, D. Scandrett, B. Sexton, D. Small. I SiAdvertising Salesmanship is the lifeblood of a buying world, and getting the “younger generation” price con- scious is the advertiser’s job. In the past years merchants have begun to realize that the student holds one side of the family purse strings. In numerous surveys the advertiser was surprised to note that the high schooler controls several thousand dollars a year; and that in a high school the size of Ames, the student body has influence over several hundred thousand dollars of yearly purchases. It's the high school student who patronizes many of the following industries: School supplies Books, paperbacks Ice cream products Gas stations Clothing stores Grocery stores Restaurants. The piggy banks of today will become the automo- biles, homes, and banks of the future! 159And to the Spirit of Ames High best wishes for success to all the Seniors from the friendly people at WARD SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 327-329 MAIN Ph. 232-6531 PHOTO FINISHING Color — Black and White Enlarging Personal Greeting Cards Photostatic Copying Application Pictures COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY Architectural Industrial Ph. 232-7363 Campanilo Iowa State University V PHOTO FINISHERS 121 Main P.O. 908 Congratulations, 1963 Seniors UNION STORY TRUST SAVINGS BANK "Your Friendly Main Street Bank" AMES BANKING CENTER SINCE 1882 Ph. 232-2362 160 Main at BurnettPAUL R. JONES SHEET METAL Heating, Air Conditioning and Spouting SINCE 1914 364 S. Duff Ph. 232-6252 GULLIVER RADIO AND TELEVISION 108 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-6311 WHEELOCK CONOCO SERVICE AMES DR. PEPPER BOTTL'lNG CO. 105 Kellogg Ph. 232-7320 LUCILE'S GIFT AND CHINA SHOP 400 MAIN Ph. 232-4215 Conoco Products ★ Tires and Accessories "JOE" WHEELOCK, JR., Owner 6th and Douglas Ph. 232-4544 16 DUNLAP MOTOR COMPANY OLDSMOBILE CADILLAC Ames, IowaVAN VOORHIS PLUMBING AMES HARDWARE MUSIC Plumbing and Heating 120 KELLOGG Ph. 232-8081 Always the Very Latest in RECORDS JAZZ — POPS — STEREO HARDWARE PAINT RADIOS RECORD PLAYERS 105 Welch Ph. 232-5405 JOE'S MEN'S SHOP The Place to Meet Your Friends When You Attend I.S.U. L-WAY CAFE Your Best Buy in Men's and Boys' Apparel 2536 LINCOLN WAY Ph. 232-5264 CAMPUS TOWN Flowers from Coe’s From Head to Toe Shop at JOE'S When the occasion demands the best . . . always depend on Coe's. 517 Grand Ph. 232-5432 COE'S HOUSE OF FLOWERS 162AMES DAILY TRIBUNE Serving Ames High Through . . . "Your Hometown Newspaper" Bringing You Local and National News CoverageCOLLEGE PIPE SHOP Your Corner Pipe and Tobacco Store Corner of Lincoln Way and Welch MOSER Luggage and Leather Store Fashion conscious AHS students shop first at WHITE'S SPECTATOR 310 Main Street Ph. 232-620 Headquarters for Smart Sportswear 219 MAIN Congratulations, Ph. 232-1381 Class of 1963 LOOKING INTO THE FUTURE: To build or buy your own home as soon as you are financially able is wise . . . and ALLEN MOTOR CO. Chevrolet-Corvair Buick-Opel 5th and Douglas, Ph. 232-2462 will pay good dividends. H. L. MUNN LUMBER CO. Established 1891 Main and Duff Ames, Iowa We are pleased to serve you— Whatever your needs— LARGE or small WEST STREET GROCERY Open 7 A.M. to I I P.M. Daily 2902 West Street 2 Blocks From Westgate 164Prescription Specialists APOTHECARY SHOP 218 MAIN 521 DUFF — See the TR-4 and Triumph Herald STUDENT SUPPLY STORE Spiral Notebooks—Pens and Pencils Zipper Ring Books—Slide Rules Book Covers—Drawing Paper SEE US FOR ALL YOUR SCHOOL SUPPLIES 2424 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-7665 LARRY PETERSON MOTOR CO. Mercury—Lincoln—Comet English Ford—Triumph 363 SO. DUFF Ph. 232-7474 These Senate Pictures are typical of the quality at JOHNSON STUDIO One Mile South on 69 Ph. 232-2865Individuality in Good Furniture HOVERSTEN FURNITURE Furniture and Floor Coverings ADMIRAL TELEVISION AND RADIOS ADMIRAL AND GIBSON REFRIGERATORS AND ELECTRIC STOVES FLEX-STEEL AND PERMALUX LIVING ROOM FURNITURE 412 Main Ph. 232-2674 Smartest in Fashion Finest in Quality 227 MAIN Ph. 232-6135 Congratulations to the 1963 GRADUATING CLASS Ames High School 166 STRAND PAINT COMPANYr Quality Food at Competitive Prices" PLENTY OF PARKING SPACE NINTH STREET GROCERY Fred Malander—Owner 623 NINTH STREET Ph. 232-9161 Distinctive Apparel for Women CAMPUS DRUG 308 MAIN Ph. 233-1876 Drugs Cosmetics U.S. POST OFFICE 2430 LINCOLN WAY Ph. 232-4252 CARTER PRESS Creative Printers Across from Rippy Memorial Coliseum and Lithographers 125 WELCH AVE. AMES, IOWA SPUDNUT SHOP Spudnuts for All Occasions Special Price on Party Orders. Spudnuts: Glazed Chocolate Maple Spuddios: Chocolate Sugared Powdorcd Sugar 319 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-5335 Motel 66 L DOTSON'S MOBILGAS SERVICE 3329 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-9640 iIt pays to look your best. Let a professional dry cleaner take care of your clothes. AMES PANTORIUM Finest in Cleaning 410 Douglas Ph. 232-4302 HOLTZ AND NAIRN AGENCY Insurance and Real Estate EARL HOLTZ BILL NAIRN 511 Main Street Ph. 232-5350 Let’s Shop At THE FAIR Cc Me c s bb CNc? 229 Main CiVV Dry Goods Draperies Notions The Favorite Clothing Store For Young Men. 203 MAIN Ph. 232-5101 VISIT OUR STUDENTS SHOP Ph. 232-5613 524 Lincoln Way AMES, IOWA DRIVE-IN OPEN YEAR ROUND Sunday—Thursday || A.M.—II P.M. Friday—Saturday II A.M.—12 Midnight 168BcollegiateB MANUFACTURING ■ company! UInsist Upon O'NEIL'S QUALITY CHECKED ICE CREAM AND MILK Look for the Big Red Check Mark O'NEIL DAIRY COMPANY AMES IOWA Congratulations and Best Wishes "Can I charge if?" COLLEGE SAVINGS BANK 2546 Lincoln Way, Ph. 232-4310 TO OUR HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS We think we have a wonderful bunch of kids in Ames. We're very proud of you, hate to see you grow up, and we'll miss you when you go on to bigger things ... as we know you will. TILDEN'S AMES DEPENDABLE SINCE 1869 170COLLEGE CLEANERS Pick-Up and Delivery 136 Welch Ph. 232-7730 Agency, Incorporated • The Spot for Homes A Complete Real Estate Service for City Property Insurance of All Kinds Travelers and Aetna Fire BATES JEWELERS WATCHES Omega—Bulova STERLING SILVER Reed Barton Gorham—Wallace International—Heirloom Ph. 232-6401 413 Main Ames, Iowa BILL VOGT AL STOLL FRANK "TED" TEDESCO 2400 L. WAY Ph. 232-2515 You want me to shorten it how much? Clothes From RYERSON'S Are Always in Good Taste. WALT'S NEWSSTAND Greeting Cards, Magazines, Books 221 Main Street, Ph. 232-0455 ALLAN MACHINE SHOP No Job Too Large or Too Small 224 DUFF Ph. 232-6505 IFor More Natural Living WALTER ?£££ DRUGS YOU» P R E 3C P I PT i O M- OUQ MOST IMPOPTANT T [} (j S AMES NURSERY 3 Miles South of Ames 217 Main Street Ph. 232-7745 Hwy. 69 S. Ph. 232-2840 Linoleum—Carpeting—Tiles Rugs—Ceramics—Formica HEATON'S FLOOR COVERING, INC. Ph. 232-4151 402 Main Street Ames, Iowa "Home means more when the carpet on your floor is from Heaton s." When Your Shoes Need Repairing, Think of ARCHIE GOODYEAR SHOE SHOP 107 WELCH IN CAMPUSTOWN 172 CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1963 VAN VOORHIS GREENHOUSE See Pam and the Allen organ at "When you think of flowers, think of ours."’ HOUSE OF ORGANS Hwy. 69, North 819 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-2340 Congratulations, Seniors! S. HANSON LUMBER CO. 212 Duff i Ph. 232-5152 LINDQUIST Electric Wiring and Supplies VARSITY CLEANERS NELSON ELECTRIC CO. For the Service You 816 Clark Street Ph. 232-2445 Want When You Want It. 120 Hayward Ph. 232-1055 1TOWING HOTEL BARBER SHOP "The Shop With the Blue Window" IN SHELDON-MUNN Ph. 232-6565 We appreciate our High School patrons. ANDERSON'S BEAUTY SALON 2528 Lincoln Way Ph. 232-2155 4 WRECKERS FOR BETTER SERVICE Day or Night Ph. 232-7272 AMES COMPLETELY EQUIPPED WRECKER SERVICE Will Serve You Anywhere COMPLETE MECHANICAL SERVICE EARL'S GARAGE 104 Kellogg AMES HIGH j 174BROWN-SHOE FIT AMES TUNE-UP Complete Automotive Service 513 Lincoln Way PH. 232-2375 MATH ISON MOTORS Ford-Falcon-Thunderbird Low Cost Financing 323 FIFTH PH. 232-5521 317 Main Street PH. 232-6633 GENERAL FILTER COMPANY Design—Construction—Erection PRODUCTS: Croton and Favre-Leuba Watches Watch Repairing SWANK'S JEWELRY 2522 LINCOLN WAY PH. 232-6653 i Iron Removal Filters Water Softeners Aerators and Degasifiers Chemical Feed Equipment Coagulators and Mixers Swimming Pool Equipment PH. 232-4121 AMES, IOWA LANDSBERG PHARMACY University Rexall 2402 Lincoln Way PH. 232-5175 17AMES BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION Home Mortgage Loans Insured Savings Accounts BOB ALLEN RAMBLER CO. Rambler Sales and Service MOTOR TRENDS car of the year 229 S. Duff PH. 232-4742 300 Main PH. 232-2714 AMES FRUIT GROCERY THREE STORES TO SERVE YOU Second and Elm 24th and Grand Colorado and Lincoln Way The Ideal Way to Travel in a Group is by a Chartered Bus. MIDWEST TRANSPORTATION, INC. 1003 Second Street PH. 232-7270 Congratulations, Class of '63 MOORE'S DAIRY FRANGOS RESTAURANT FOUNTAIN SERVICE PIZZA STEAKS and CHOPS 210 MAIN STREET PH. 232-9710 428 Fifth P.H. 232-6512 176  I Bowling is a sport for both spectators and participants. TWENTIETH CENTURY BOWLING 517 S. Duff PH. 232-5530 Host to Ames High Gym Class '62-'63 "Maybe it will run if you put gas in the radiator.' LARSON'S DEEP ROCK SERVICE 517 Lincoln Way Ames "Say It With Flowers" From EVERT'S 218 5th STREET PH. 232-5634 We Telegraph Flowers Congratulations to the Surviving Staff From HAMP TISDALE AND BILL STRAND 177Take the whole gang to DAIRY KING 2650 Lincoln Way PH. 232-7630 ■ Good Luck, Class of 1963 SCHOENEMAN LUMBER COMPANY HEADQUARTERS FOR HARDWARE Paint—Plywood—Lumber and All Other Building Supplies Main and Northwestern PH. 232-2372 - SPIEGEL, INC. Catalog Shopping Center PH. 232-2452 400 Main WEAVER JEWELERS WYLER WATCHES ORANGE BLOSSOM DIAMONDS Between the Shows CAMPUSTOWN 178 "Put it back. Dcbbc.' ESCHBACH MUSIC HOUSE 302 Main Ames, Iowa PH. 232-3624 ■SKEIE MOTOR CO. Pontia c-Tem pest Sales—Service "GOOD WILL USED CARS" 202 S. Duff PH. 232-3650 Barb Icnows that Town and Country shoos aro best for prT and style. THE BOOTERY "Fashion With a Fit" ENCO SERVICENTER Complete Service for Your Car 311 Lincoln Way PH. 232-9836 SHELDON MUNN HOTEL “Satisfaction Always • Apparel • Draperies SEVERSON INSURANCE AGENCY PAUL SEVERSON, Manager • Fabrics • Accessories • Shoes "Insure with Confidence" • Millinery 1222 Kellogg PH. 232-7203 323 Main PH. 232-2320 17AMES LUMBER COMPANY 501 Lincoln Way PH. 232-4772 RAY JEWELERS Quality Diamonds 220 MAIN STREET PH. 232-4761 Congratulations, Seniors Garden-Fresh Vegetables Orchard-Fresh Fruits The Best in Meats Complete Stock of Nationally Advertised Canned Foods Oven-Fresh Pastries 180 TOM'S GRILL "Creators of Good Food" DOWNTOWN AMES KNAPP INSURANCE AGENCY A. B. “BEEZER" KNAPP S. A. KNAPP "Insurance Is Our Only Business" 616 Kellogg PH. 232-7060 BEAUTY CARE FOR THE DISCRIMINATING WOMAN FINESSE BEAUTY SALON 66 Motor Lodge Finesse-by-the-campus Lincoln Way 2408 Lincoln Way PH. 232-4667 PH. 232-6611 MARION LOKKENAMES STATIONERS to serve you Stcbcc And CASES To delight dad and make your grad c ( glad. { « each a Turn» Caw. Smartly »t led TltriM Caw» compliment the uwr't nc»t appearance. And nothin clw but Tl'IIW ab- aotba all the hard near »ou can gt«e il )«r altaa»» look» neat and ne». So ou la»» tout • ill be appeccuceJ »e t« to come. Gift and Grad I tom complete «election ol C »et Remember — one genuine if ha«c ir. HIND! DllUXt BRIII BAG Ha» iractAt Vale titmioa lock, patented lifetime Peotetted fdget and latum lltnllr. Went ivxlit» 16 $0000 LOOKS atae teaiaee,.. FEELS rta iaaatar... OUTWEARS caataae a ta I... TUNDI STUDINT BRUT BAG Built to take trua rough » . Ibi three »id poelet., brill loth atd handle loop» Heart wee I frame, lull molded patented unhreaV •We edge 16 a 12 oo°° mi oc co¥ irt MliCTO Of »uw CAMS »»o « 00 00 School Supplies 238 Main PH. 232-4161 Dart—Dodge—Chrysler MOTOR SALES AND SERVICE Lincoln Way and Kellogg PH. 232-2551 BEATY INSURANCE REAL ESTATE See BOB for Real Estate See EARL for Insurance Office 116 Welch Ph. 232-5115 Res. Route 1, PH. 232-6922 HOURS: 4 P.M. TO I A.M. PIZZA HOUSE Across from Friley Hall Pizza and Spaghetti PH. 232-1077 2504 Lincoln Way Ames, Iowa IE. . and I want two licorice sticks and a bag of lemon drops." The Oldest Jewelry Store in Iowa THE PLUMB JEWELRY STORE DIAMONDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY AND SILVERWARE DES MOINES, IOWA AMES, IOWA REX SERVICE STATION LEE TIRES—PHILLIPS BATTERIES GREASING — WASHING OSLUND'S Lincoln and Franklin 308 Main PH. 232-6342 SERVING AMES AREA SINCE 1903 5th and Kellogg Savings i 1 rn( i 1111 i i i: i i:: 11) I BunR I I •s •••• •••• • • •• • s s -I:-. • 0 %- ••• •• •• •• "IU, BohJ, 'k ltCA y Wool ai Jiam ' AMES TRUST AND SAVINGS Ames High Register and Tribune carriers. DES MOINES REGISTER AND TRIBUNE 2500 Lincoln Way 30M 2 Kellogg 182HU HILL'S STUDIO 2530 Lincoln Way PH. 232-4570 ‘No. I'm sorry, we have to keep the pictures on file. HOME FURNITURE APPLIANCES The Home of Qualify Merchandise 128 Lincoln Way PH. 232-6233 ARMSTRONG TRACTOR TRUCK Machinery Parts Story City, Iowa 621 Broad Phone RE 3-2051 Ames, low So. Hiway - Box 663 PH. 232-41 PAINTS and WALLPAPER I NELSON LUMBER AND CONSTRUCTION CO. Picture Framing Artist Supplies 214 FIFTH PH. 232-5265 "Where the Home Begins" Lumber, Hardware, Paint PH. 232-26 West Lincoln Way PH. 232-79i IUNION BUS DEPOT Greyhound and Jefferson Lines Safe, dependable drivers "Travel is our business" Fastco allows you to choose any timo you wish FASTCO DRUG Group Charters — Escorted Tours Package Express GENE J. FONTECCHIO—Mgr. 508 Lincoln Way PH. 232-2404 41 I Kellogg PH. 232-3161 Congratulations P. M. PLACE CO. 5c to $1.00 Specialists GRAND AVENUE STATION "Your Skelly Man" 13th AND GRAND PH. 232-4631 ' WHATTOFF MOTOR CO. Studebaker Cars and Trucks 3605 Lincoln Way PH. 232-7450 184 See the new Avanti atT RICHARDS' HOLIDAY HOUSE STEAKS—CHICKEN—PIZZA • 4 Mile West on Highway 30 SEARS 230 Main 233-1942 PH. 232-9449 — AMES is divided into two sections, one surrounding the University and the other, in the foreground, comprising the major residential and business districts. IGeneral Index A Abbott, Roy .......... 94, 98. 126. 127 Abbott. Vel Academics .............................. 38 Accola, Sonja ............ 96, 101, 153 Activities ............................. 32 Adams, Mr. Herbert .................. 40 Adams, Ken ........... 89, 94, 98, 117 Adams, Pan» .............. 89. 94, 147 Administration ......................... 40 Advertisements .................... 158-185 Agan. Mike ............................ 153 Agard. Kim ............... 66, 73, 126 Abo, John ............................. 153 Albertson. Dorothy ........... 124, 153 Albertson, Frank ...................... 126 Albertson, Mr. Hubert .. 44, 86. 87. 147 Alexander. Ben ........................ 126 Allen. Gary .............. 94, 98. 126 Allen. Mike .......... 60. 66. 126. 127 All State Music Festival ...... 92, 93 Anderson. Alan ........................ 153 Anderson, Bryan ............... 78, 155 Anderson, Dean ........................ 154 Anderson, Dorothy Anderson, Mrs. Janice...........50. 153 Anderson. Lee ................. 86. 127 Anderson. Mary .... 96. 101. 113. 153 Anderson. Paula........ 81. 89, 94, 147 Anderson, Mrs. Sharon ......... 46, 149 Anderson, Stephen ..................... 147 Anderson, Verdenc ............. 69, 127 Andrew. Jane .......................... 127 Androy, Conrad ................ 60, 127 Armstrong, John ....................... 127 Armstrong, Steve...........89, 112, 147 Arnhal, Judy ............. 96. 113. 153 Aronoff, Zena .... 80. 81. 96. 101. 153 Assemblies .................... 22. 23 Athletics .............................. 58 Augustine, Mary .......... 96, 101, 153 B Bailey, Connie . . 97. 101. 107, 112. 147 Baker, Alan 127 Baker. Dick . 67, , 98. 153 Baldncr. Doug 153 Baldus, Rosalie 147 Ballard, Boh 80. 147 Bancroft, Louise . 96. 101, 147 Band . 88. 89 Banks, Barbara 147 Bappc. Richard 67, 153 Bappe, Steve 98. 101. 1.53 Bappe, Tom 153 Barber, David Barnes, Dean 98. 101. 153 Barrett, Sharon .... 96, 101. 113. 153 Barrie, Robert 147 Barron, Rhea . 69. 128 Barrow, Ann 94. 147 Bartels, Arthur 98, 153 Barton, Robert . 98. 101. 153 Barton, Tom 147 Basketball. Sophomore .. 78 . 79 Basketball, Varsity 2-77 Bates. Deanna 153 Bath, Cary ..................... 87, 147 Batman. David ...................... 128 Bander, Mary ................... 96. 153 Baudcr, Tom ........................ 153 Bauske, David..............98. 101, 153 Bauske. Mrs. Grace.............. 46, 157 Beach, Doug .................... 80. 128 Bean. Barbara .... 31, 68, 69. 89. 94 110. 128 Beaty, Bob . . 36. 94. 98. 124. 125. 128 Beck, Bill .................... 103. 128 Beckman. Richard ................... 153 Brese. Lynn................81. 96, 153 Bellinger. Mike .................... 147 Bender, Richard .................... 128 Bender, Russell Bengston, Mr. Leonard ................55 Bennett. Mr. Carroll ...... 8. 14. 56 Bennett, Dan Bennett, Pat ....................69, 128 Bensend, Betty .................... 149 Benson, Sherrv ................. 96. 153 Berck, Mona.......... 69. 103. 107, 128 Bergeson, Linda....... 69. 97, 101, 128 Bergland. Linda .. 77. 85. 114, 116, 117 Berhowe, Janice ................... 153 Best, Robert ............. 67, 78. 153 Billings. Jim ................. 125, 153 Black, Eugene ..................... 128 Black. Richard .. 60. 94, 98. 124. 147 Blackburn. Terry.................... 153 Blacss Mike ....................... 154 Blagcn, Barbara..................89, 150 Blair. Sandra ............ 96, 101. 117 Blanford, Broxann ................. 147 Bleeker, Ronald....... 78. 98, 101. 151 Bliss. Carolvn ........... 96. 101. 154 Boast, Tom .......... 98. 101. 125, 151 Boehnke, Mary............. 92, 94, 147 Bonante, Giovanni ................. 128 Bonwcl), Merrill ............... 67. 154 Bortle, Frank ...................... 154 Berwick. Kathy ..................... 147 Bowen. Jerry .. 78. 89. 93. 98. 124, 151 Bowen. Shirley ........... 97. 101, 147 Bowers, La Verne ................... 128 Bovlan. Sharon ........... 69. 89. 128 Boys’ Club ..................... 86. 87 Boys’ Glee ......................... 91, 98 Boys’ State ......................... 36 Bragonier. Marv Ellen . . 7, 16. 31, 68 69. 85. 93. 94. 98. 103, 107. 129 Brandenburg, Janice ...... 69. 81, 129 Breckenridgc, Randy........ 60. 87. 129 Brown. Barbara ..................... 154 Brown, David ....................... 147 Brown, Dennis .. 86. 89. 124. 125, 129 Brown. Donald ............ 60. 86, 147 Brown. John ......... 98. 103, 107, 147 Brown. Joni ......... 81. 96, 101, 154 Brown. Judy ......... 81. 97. 101, 147 Brown. Marguerite......... 69, 85, 129 Brown, Roger ....................... 154 Brown, Sarcn ....................... 149 Brown, Steve ....................... 154 Bucholtz, Margaret.........93, 91. 129 Buck, John ......................... 147 Burnet, Kathy..............96, 101, 154 Burns. John............... 60, 124, 149 Burns, Mike ........................ 147 Bushman, Pam ........ 69. 89, 94, 129 Busiek, Martha ..................... 149 Buttcrmore, Gary.................... 151 Byers, Cheryl .................. 96, 154 c Cafferty, Phil ..................... 154 Calderwood. David .................. 154 Caldwell. Stan ................... 89, 149 Canvin. Miss Madalene ............ 56. 149 Caquclin, Bob ........................ 149 Career Night .......................... 20 Carlson. Carol ...... 96. 84. 101, 154 Carlson, Cathy............... 85. 94. 149 Carlson. Denny ................... 87, 129 Carlson, Jim ....................... 154 Carmean, Carol ....................84, 149 Carmean. Jennifer .................. 154 Carr, Bob .......................... 129 Carr. Don .......4. 60. 86. 94. 98. 129 Carr. Larry .......................... 154 Carr. Mrs. Lois ..................... 12 Carr. Phil .................. 60. 66. 149 Cavcn, Mary........................96. 149 Cerwick. Mary Ann .. 84, 92, 97. 101 125. 149 Chalmers. Margo ............. 69. 84. 130 Cheersquad, Sophomore ............... 77 Chcersquad. Varsity ................. 77 Childs, Diane .. 80.85.94.113.116.149 Childs. Peter................ 67. 87. 154 Chipman, Dan ............ 93. 94. 98. 130 Choir............................ 94. 95 Christensen, David ................... 151 Christensen. Don ............ 98. 101. 154 Christenson, Sharon .................. 154 Christmas Formal ...................... 26 Christopherson, Judy .. 69. 85, 96. 101 114, 116, 130 Clapp. Garland ....................... 130 Clark. Ann........ 80. 89, 96. 101. 154 Clark, George......................... 157 Clark. Steve ......................... 157 Claude. Nancy ............... 96, 101, 154 Clavberg. Rickey ................ 111. 149 Clem. Marilyn .................... 69. 130 Clouser. Gary ...................... 149 Coe, Stephen ................ 67, 78. 157 Cole. Bob ............................ 149 Cole. Mr. Don ......................... 43 Cole, Jess .................. 60. 86. 130 Coletti, Jane .. 16, 18. 69, 77, 85. 89 93. 94. 130 Collins, Jed ..................... 89. 157 Combs. Bernard Commercial Department ............ 56. 57 Conley. Ed ....................... 119 Conley, John Conner. Mrs. Beverly .................. 13 Constantine. Chris ............... 97, 149 Constantine, Dean ........... 60. 101. 130 Cook, Nancy ......... 97, 101, 107, 149 Cook, Suzanne ...................... 149 Cook. Tern .................. 94. 98. 131 Cooper, Sue ........................ 148 Corbin. Janice............... 69, 80. 131 Cottrill. Linda .................... 149 Covey, Mr, Hiram ................. 43, 60 Cox, Jeff............ 60. 66, 73, 146. 149 Coy. Gary .......................... 131 Craig, Carol ..................... 96, 149 Craig, Cindy ................ 96, 101. 149 Craig. Diana Craig, Joyce ................ 84, 94, 150 Craig, Phil ...................... 89, 131 Craig. Steve ....................... l- Crain, Jean ........................ 181 186AN EXPRESSION of despair on Jim Warren’ face is typical of the feelings shared by many basketball fans. Crain. Jim .......................... 119 Crisswell, Billie .. 69. 85, 93. 91. 131 Cross. David ........................ 147 Cross. Larry .......... 87, 89. 98. 157 Cross. Mr. Wayne .. 50. 94, 96. 98. 101 Cross ley. Sue ...................... 131 Crovisier, Nancy .......... 96. 101, 15-1 Crowley. Richard .................... 157 Cumming, Bruce ...................... 119 Cumming, Deborah ............. 154 Curry. Janice ............. 89. 94. 131 Dahl. Jerry .................... 60, 131 Dahlmeier. Fred .............. 60. 149 Dalton. Dennis ................. 60, 149 Dalton. I.inda ................. 96. 151 Danielson. Lee ............... 89. 149 Davidson. Ed ..................... 131 Davidson. Jean ................ 113, 149 Davidson. John ................... 157 Davidson, Ray .................... 149 Davidson, Russ ................... 149 Davis, Denny ....................... 155 Davis, Gary ........................ 157 Day. Mr. Richard .................... 50 Deal, Richard ...................... 131 DeBoer. Richard ........... 89. 92. 118 DeMoss. Gary ....................... 131 Denisen. Kathy..............96, 101. 157 Dennis. Mary ................... 96. 157 DeYoung, Jan ................... 89. 131 Dickinson. Mrs. Elizabeth .... 14, 113 Dickson. David ...... 89, 98. 101, 157 Dickson. Joyce .. 68, 69, 89. 92. 91 127. 131 Diehl. Harvey ....... 98. 101, 125, 15. Diet). Bruce ...................... F5. Disney. Jean ...................... 134 Dixon, Tom ........................ 130 Dodd. John ........................ 137 Dodd. I.inda ............. 81, 96. 157 Doling, Don ......... 89, 98. 101. 147 Donhowe, Eric ..................... 130 Donhowe, Kathleen ........ 96, 101. 157 Dotson, Bob ......... 87, 110. 125. 150 Dove. Tom Dowden, Sue .............. 96. 101, 157 Dowell, Dennis .... 89. 92. 91. 98. 103 107, 150 Drake, Jeanne..............81. 96. 157 Drama Fall Play .............. 102. 103 Duffev. Mary ...................... 137 Duke, Bill ...... 60. 66, 73. 146, 150 Dumenil, Bob ................. 110, 150 Duncan. Ken ....................... 150 Dunlap, John ............. 60, 80, 131 Dunlap. Lynn ...................... 137 Dunlap, Zac ................... 80. 131 Dunlcavy, John ........... 78. 98, 157 Durby, Bertha ..................... 131 E Easton, Bill ................. 125, 131 Easton. Jane ...................... 157 Easton, John ...................... 157 Eernisse, Ken ... 98. 101, 150 Eggleton, da . 92. 96. 101. 157 Kills, Randy ... 98. 101. 157 Ekberg, Carl 157 Elbert. David 78. 153 Elbert, Mike 150 Elbert. Steve .. 107. 132, 150 Elbert. Susan 69. 85. 103 Elliot, Jim 150 Ellis Mike 153 Elii», Nancy 153 Ellis, Pam 150 Ellis. Pat 157 English Department . 46. 47 Eii'er. Larry 150 Enser. Lowell 153 Epstein, Kathy .... 96. 107. 150 Epstein. Steve 60. 132 Erickson. Judy 150 Erskinc, Gary .... 60. 66. 118 Erwin. Roger Evans. Camilla ... 96. 101. 118 Evans. Doug ... 98, 101. 132 Evans. Richard 153 Everson. Karin 89. 157 Exncr, Rickey .... 98. 101. 153 F Faber, Patty ........................ 153 Farley, Charles................ 98. 153 Farley. Ruth ........ 69, 94, 114, 132 Fatland, Roy ........................ 132 Feamster. Susan .. 69, 97, 101. 112. 113 127. 132 Features ............................. 10 Feinberg, Ellen .............. 124. 150 Fellinger, Mike .............. 107. 150 Ferguson. Donna ............... 96. 153 Ferguson. Jim ....................... 153 Fields, Lois ............. 96, 101. 150 Fincham, Jim .................. 60. 150 Fincham, Steve ...................... 153 Fishbum, Valerie .............. 89. 151 Fisher, David ....................... 132 Fisher. Kitty .... 81. 96. 101. 113, 153 Fiske, Jane............... 96, 101. 153 Flack. Mrs. Daisy .................... 12 Fleig, John ................... 78. 153 Fleming, Linda ........... 69, 80. 132 Foderberg. DcAlta ................... 150 Folk. Don ........................... 132 Fontecchic. Ronald Football, Sophomore .................. 67 Football, Varsity ................. 60-65 Foreman, John ............ 98. 101, 153 Fortner. Larry ...................... 150 Foshc, Ernest ....................... 153 Fox. Paul ...................-....... 153 Frame, Don .......................... 132 Frederick, June .......... 96, 107, 150 Frcdcrickson, Jim French, David .. 60, 66, 93, 94, 95, 98 127. 132 Friedrich, Robert .. 87, 89. 98. 101. 153 Fricsner, Phyllis ........... 96, 101, 156 Friest, Jan .......... 31, 68, 69, 97, 132 Friest, Robert ........................ 153 Frohardt, David G Gammon, Steve........... 87, 132 18Gardner, Don 98. 101. 153 Hague, Judy .... 69. 113. 134 Heady. Steve 150 Garrett. Mrs. Avonelle . 42. 157 Hague, Sue ... 153 Heald, Betty Get tv, Rita . 85. 116. 150 Hakes, Mark .... ... 155 Hcdlferg. 1 arry Gihbs, Monte 153 Hall. Garv Heddleston. Carol .. 151 Gibson. Dick 86. 124. 125, 132 Hulterman, Collin 60. 151 Hedrick. Danny ... 98. 101, 155 Gilchrist, Jim 60. 150 Hamilton, Bruce . 94, 151 Heer. Jaqueline 89. 155 C.irl Reserves 85 Hamilton. Mr. Robert 50. 107 Heers, Ed 150 (’.iris’ Glee 96, 97 Hamme. Charlotte Heggen. Mark . 89. 92. 124. 155 Girls’ State 36 Hand. Linda 96. 153 Hcgland. David 150 Glnmser, Miss Wanda .. 56. 153 Handley, Jim .... 124, 151 Heldt, Don 150 Click, Robert 118 Hanes, Pauline .. H«nrik .n, Jane .... 97. 101. 146, 151 Gloscmcyer, Teresa .... 150 Hannum, Jim .... 89. 94. 98. 110. 114 Henry. Bill 155 Goettch, Gloria 132 124. 125. 134 Hensing. John 78. 155 Combossy, George 153 Hannum, Judy ... 81. 96, 101. 125. 153 Herrick, John 67. 155 Goodman, Gail 96. 101. 153 Hannusch, Vickie .... 151 Het el, Mr. Walter . 40 Grabau, Martha . 94, 116. 150 Hansen, Jim 67, 78. 155 Heubner. Frank 155 Grabau, loin .. 60, 86. 113 Hanson, Pam .... 89. 149 Hiedemun. Mr. Dale 44 Gray, Carrie .Sue 97. 133 Hanway, John . .. 73. 151 Hildebrand. Mike .. .60. 98. 101. 150 . 96. 101. 153 Harless, Linda ... .... 155 Hildreth. Kent 60, 150 Green, Ellen 69, 133 Haroldsen. Scott Green. Jack Harrell, Mike .... 98. 155 Hills. Jackie .... 96. 101. 151 Green, Julanne 153 Harris, Joe .... 134 Hinrichscn. Mary 85. 110. 151 Green, Mike 151 Harris, Paul .... 94, 98. 151 Hiserote. Bette 151 Greene, Archie 93, 133 Harstad, I-arry .. .... 151 Hoff, Jan 80. 96. 155 Greene, Grant 98. 155 Hartley. Jennifer 84. 151 Hofstad. Becky 96. 101, 151 Greiner. Marilyn 69, 133 Harwell, Shirley . .... 155 Hofstad. Margery Griffith, Joann .. 69, 81. 133 Hatasaki, Gloria . 16. 69. 84, 96 Holmes, Barbara .... 96. 101. 151 Groomes. Tom 151 101. 134 16-19 Gualdoni, Bruce 60. 133 Hatch, Bonnie ... 69. 107, 1.3-4 Gulden, Fred 86. 93. 94. 98. 133 Hathaway, Paul . .... 13-4 Horswell. Karla 80. 151 Hatsios, Kosta ... 125, 151 Hoskins, Kevin 67, 155 Hauenstein, John .... 151 Hoskins, Kick Huupt, Carol .... .. 68. 69. 107. 113 Hostctter. Karen ... ... 69. 107. 134 H 114. 134 Howard, Donna .. 89. 92. 94. 151 Haupt. Karen .... .. 69, 107, 127. 134 Howerton. Gary .... .. 89. 94. 98. 150 Haushcer, Mr. Maurice . 42. 73 Hudspith. Carolvn .. 69. 77. 134 Hach. Bruce 67, 98. 125, 155 Hausner, Steve .. .... 151 Huhn. Marti 96, 151 Hach, Mary 133 Hawkes, Bill .... 155 Hull. Karen 96. 101. 155 Hageman. Danna . 96. 113, 150 Hayes, Henry .... .... 157 Humphrey, Barbara 155 Hagen. Barbara ... 81. 97, 151 Hayes. Sharon ... 69. 84. 134 Hunt, lerrv Hagen, Carolyn 69. 133 Hayward. Richard .... 151 Hurlbut, Gary 155 Hagen, Dean 133 Hazel, Bob .... 151 Hussey, Pat .... 96. 101. 155 Hagge, Mary 153 Hazel, Laurie .... 81. 96, 101. 155 COTTON CANDY MAKER Margy Shepherd presents her finished product to a hungry customer at “Carrousel.” I Industrial Education.................54, 55 Ingvolstad, Jim .................. 124. 150 Introduction ............................ 2 Israel, Janice ......................... 155 J Jackson. Marcia . Jacobson. Gary .. Jarvis, Linda Jefferson, Larry • Jellinger, Richard Jenkins. Marilyn Jetmund, Dianne . Johannes, Dennis Johnson, Bill ... Johnson, Bruce . Johnson, Donna . Johnson, Marie .. Johnson, Joyce . Johnson. Paula . . Jones. .Mr. James Jones, Marianne . Jones, Nancy ... Jones, Randy ------- Jones, Virginia . Jordison, Dean . Joseph. Nat .... 84, 96. 101. 155 .............. 155 .... 69. 107. 135 .............. 150 ,.... 67. 87. 155 .............. 155 ....... 69. 94. 135 ........... 155 .............. 155 ......... 78. 155 .............. 151 ....... 69. 80. 135 ....... 107, 151 ... 97, 101. 149 ............... 49 ......... 96, 154 ....... 69. 135 .............. 155 ....... 107. 151 .. 98. 101. 135 ....... 67, 155 188Journalism .................. 108, 109 Judge, Theresa .............. 69, 135 Junior Class Play ........... 106, 107 Junior Executive Council ......... 146 Junior Homerooms ............. 147 151 k Kalton, Barbara . 31. 155 Kalton. JoAnne . 135 K am merer, Kim . (kS. 69, 80. 135 K.immerer, Kit .. 66, 80, 135 Kee. Tom . 80. 89, 98, 101, 150 Keiglev, Paul .... 150 Keisler, Ann . ... 147 Keller. Marsha . .. 113, 150 Kelso, David .... 1.50 Kelso. Dennis ... ... 98. 101, 125, 155 Kennedy, JoAnn . 96. 155 Kennedy, John .. 150 Ketelsen. Jim ... 67. 78. 87, 155 Kctelsen, Randv . 87. 135 Kilstrom, Ralph . Kinart. Ron 135 Kins, Ed 150 Kina. Harriss .... 98. 101. 155 Kingerv. Mike .. 67. 78. 155 Kinker. Sandra . . 89. 96. 101. 124. 155 Kirk, Carol .... 69. 94. 112. 111. 135 Kirkham. Collier . . 67, 89. 98. 101. 155 Kleinschmidt, Bob Klinasei . Mary . 155 Klopf. John .... 116, 150 Knapp, Chuck . . 86, 135 Kniaht. Richard . 60. 66, 73. 151 Knott, DeWavnc . 89. 107, 151 Krocheski. Paul . 155 Kropf. Collin .. 60. 87, 98, 101. 151 Kutish, Kathy .................. 113, 150 L Lambert, Mike .................... 135 Lanczos, Le-lie .................. 155 Landsberg, Tom .. 60. 64, 66. 73, 124 151 Lange. Dennis .................... 151 Lange, Mary ...................... 155 Lange. Pat ....................... 150 Language Clubs .............. 118. 119 Language Department .......... 50. 51 Larsen. Judy ........ 89, 96, 101, 150 Larson. Karen ....................... 155 Larson. Linda ............. 97, 101, 150 Larson. Paul ........................ 155 Larson. Paulette........ 80, 97, 101, 150 Larson. Terry .................. 84, 150 Larson, Vickie ...................... 155 Lasche, Jack .... 36, 86. 124. 125, 135 Lasche, Jim ......................... 155 Lasche. Mary Jo .. 96. 101, 107, 150 Lash. Mr. 57 Lauser, Greg ... Lawrence, Joe . Lee, Dennis ... Lee, Donagene .. I.egvold. Cathy .. Lenning. Sheryl Lewis, Marilyn . Lewis, Robert .. Library Club .., Linder, Jim .... Linder, Peggy . . Linder, Toni ... .... 67. 98. 101. 155 ................... 155 ....................... 155 ........................ 150 107. 110, 111. 150. 192 ........ 96. 101, 155 96, 155 .... 154 112, 113 60, 151 .... 155 101, 155 Linn, Mr. Wallace .......... 43, 60. 73 Lint, Ken ............................ 135 Lint, Virginia ................. 113. 155 Litchfield, Don ....................... 60 Litchfield, Roger .................... 136 Litchfield, Velma .................... 150 Litzel, Jerry ........................ 184 Litzel, Jimmy ........................ 164 Llovd. Richard .. 36. 86. 89. 93. 94. 95 98. 127, 136 Lorenzen, Roger ...................... 181 Love, Dale ........................... 181 Love, Gale ........................... 184 Lowman, Terry ........................ 154 l.owrie, Rolfe ........ 80. 10,, 125, 151 Lowthcr, Nancy....................69, 136 Lutz, Mrs. Nancy ........... 47, 155, 192 Lundvall, Dick ....................... 151 Lyon, Joe ....................... 98, 154 Lyon. Stuart Lytton, Gary ......................... 154 M Maas, Stuart ........... 94, 98, 136 MacBride, Mr. George..........55, 146 Macheak. Cecil ................... 154 Mack, Craig ........ 60. 66. 73, 148 Magoon. Gary ................ 60. 136 Makelbust. Lori .................. 154 Malone, Marni .... 97, 101. 113, 151 Manchester. Kathy .. 97, 101, 107, 151 Manthei, Ronald ............. 80, 154 Marken, Clint ............... 60, 136 Marks, Paul ................. 89, 154 Marston, Elaine .................. 151 Martin, Ernest Martin, Jane ....... 89, 96. 101, 154 Massey, Diana Mathematics Department .... 44, 45 Mathison, Sue .......... 96. 107, 151 Mathre, Dale ........... 94, 98, 136 Mattson. Kathy .............. 97, 151 Maurer. Mary Ann ............... 154 Maxwell, Margaret ........... 69, 136 McCaffrey, Jim ................... 154 McCartney, Helen ................. 150 McCay, Bob .................. 87. 154 McClugage, Jim ................... 151 McClurkin, John .................. 154 McConnell, Pat ............. 107. 150 McCowen, Pat .. 16, 31. 69, 84. 93, 94 98. 136 McCoy, Holly ..................... 150 McCoy, Larry .... 86, 93, 94, 98, 151 McDowell, Janice .... 84, 96, 101, 154 McFarland, Dennis............. 151 McGinnis. Jim .......... 80. 107, 1S4 McGuire. Mike........... 66, 80, 136 Me Hone, LeeAnn .................. 136 Mcllwain, Jack ................... 151 Mclnnis, Bill .................... 136 Mclnnis, Mark .......... 98, 101, 154 McIntosh, Mary Ann .... 96. 101, 154 McIntosh, Tom .................... 154 McKenna, Bob ..................... 136 McKenna, Vickie .................. 154 McKinley, Mike ......... 60, 66, 136 McLaughlin, Mike ........... 103, 136 McLean, Merry.................96, 154 McMahn, Phyllis .................. 151 McMillen, Charlene........... 84, 151 McMillen, Don .................... 147 McNally, Miss Mary .......... 47, 114 McVicker, Mark ................... 148 Meier, Barbara ....... 69, 84, 94, 136 Mesmer, Dan ....................... 89 Meyer, Carol ................ 69, 137 Mickelson, Butch ......... 60. 66, 7 Mickelson, Eric Millard, Pat...............96. 101, 15 Miller. Beverly .......... 69, 85, 13 Miller, Bob .................. 89. 14 Miller. Diana ................. 96. 15 Miller. Don C. ... 86. 89. 92. 124, 13 Miller. Don V....................... 13 Miller. Janice ........... 31, 96, 15 Miller. Jean ............. 69, 84. 13 Miller. Margaret .............. 96, 15 Miller, Maurice .................... 15 Miller, Steve ................. 66, 14 Milliken, Bill ..................... 13 Mills, Esther ............ 96, 101, 15 Mixed Chorus .................. 100. 10 Moherg, Mr. Dean .................... 5 Montgomery. Mary....... 107, 146, 15 Montrose, Mike..................60, 15 Moore, Joan .............. 96. 101. 15 Moore, Roger........................ 15 Moorhead, Bob ................. 60, 14 Moorman. Jim........... 98, 101, 125,' 15 Moppin, Carl ....................... 14 Moreland, Dennis ................... 15 Morgan, Roberta .................... 15 Morrison, Terry .......... 60, 66, 13 Moses, Bradley .. 89. 98. 101, 124. 15 Mulhall, Gary ................. 60, 13 Mulhall, Mary ........ 84, 94, 101, 15 Mullin, Roger ...................... 14 Myers, Dennis ............ 60, 89. 14 Myers, Glenda......... 80, 96, 101, 15 N 80. 89. 69, 94. 98, Nairn, Janet .......... Neal, Bill ............ Nelson, Gloria ........ Nelson. Jeanette .... Nelson, Jerry ......... Nelson, Linda .................... Nelson, Marilyn .................. Ncrvig, Doreen ................. 96, Ncwland, Tin ..................... Newland, Tom ..................... Nichols, Harold .... 86, 107, 113, Nichols, Steve......... 89, 94, 98. Nickel, Craig .................... Nickey, Karen .. 69, 80. 93. 94. 98. Nickey, Linda ........ 84, 96, 113, Nicolle, l)onn3 ................ 97, Nicolle, Karen ................ Nims, Nancy ................... 8, Noid, Nancy ........... 96, 101, Noland, Joe ...................... Nolin. Jean .... 69, 85, 89. 92, 93 114, Nordhagen. Cynthia ............... Nordskog, Bill ....... 60, 73, 1 16, Nordskog, Mary ........ 124, 125, Norris, Lorra .... 68, 69, 89, 114, 15 15 13 15 13 15 15 15 15 14 13 13 15 13 15 14 13 15 15 1.3 9 131 15 14 13 13 O Oest, Beth .......... 69, 84, 107, 131 Olson, Deanna ..................... 15 Olson, Janet ............. 84, 89, 15 Olson, Ronald ..................... 15 Oltrogge, Mr. Eugene .... 41, 86, 15." Ogg, Clay ................ 60, 66, 13 Oppedal, Diana .................... 131 Oppedal, Gary ..................... 15t Orngard, Jim ....................... 13 Osam, Martin ................. 107, 15tOshcl, Bob .................... 60, 118 Oslund, Allan ................. 87. 138 Ostrem. Dennis ..................... 118 Ourih, Mr. Oscar ......... 16, 86, 155 Overland, ('.ary ................... 118 Overland, I inda .................. 156 Overturf. Mr. James ................ 57 Owing . Gerald ..................... 156 I» Packer, Nylc ......................... 156 Page, Mr. Kenneth ..................... 13 Page, Kirk ............. 67, 78. 8., 156 Painter, Jan ................... 107, 118 Pankey, Virginia ..................... 155 Parker. Darlene Parker. Linda .............. 97, 101, 118 Parks Judy ...................... 96, 148 Partin. Louise .................. 96. 156 Pa-ley, Richard ............ 67, 80, 156 Patterson, Annie ................ 96, 156 Paulson, Anita ....................... 156 Pederson, Jerry ................. 73. 118 Pederson, Mark ....................... 156 Penkhus. Steve ....................... 138 Penny, Norman .............. 60. 87, 148 Pep Club ........................ 68. 69 Pepper, Sandv ........................ 156 Percival. Sandy......... 26, 69, 110, 138 Perkovich, George .................... 156 Peters Bob ............. 93. 98. 101. 156 Peters, Jerry ................... 60. 119 Peterson, Curt ....................... 149 Peter-on. David .. 89, 93, 94. 98. 138 Peterson, Delbert .................... 156 Peterson. Dennis ..................... 156 Peterson, Donna ................. 94, 118 Peterson. Jeff ......... 60, 94. 98. 138 Peterson. Kristin .................... 157 Peterson. Mark.............. 94. 98. 119 Peterson. Stephon .................... 138 Phillips Sharon ............ 97. 101. 148 Phv-ical Education .............. 52. 53 Picken. Barb .. 16, 31, 69, 77, 107, 138 Piersol. Jim ........... 89. 98. 101. 156 Piet . Sandra .............. 84, 96, 156 Pirtle. Edith ........................ 148 Pirtle, Susan ........................ 156 Plumb. Bon ................. 60, 87, 149 Poeckcs. Mike ........................ 156 Pohl. Kathy ..................... 89, 156 Politis, Elaine ........ 84, 96, 107, 148 Porter, Jane .................... 96. 156 Porter, Pap ..................... 80, 156 Posegate. Steve ................. 78, 156 Potts, Tom ........................... 156 Powell. Peggy .......... 69, 85, 107, 138 Preston, John ................... 60, 138 Proffitt, Chuck ...................... 139 Pyle. Bill .... 36. 89, 94, 95. 98. 139 Q Quam, Marilyn.............94. 101, 148 Quinn. Annette ................... 156 Quinn, Joe ....................... 149 R Rademacher. JoAnn........96, 101, 148 Ragsdale, John Ramsey, I-oonard .... 139 Rasmussen, Tom ..... . .. . 67. 89. 156 Registration 12 Reid, Janet ........... 156 Reid, Pat 139 Reilly. Sarah 156 Reinberger, Peggy ... ... 80. 96. 101 107. 148 Reinhart. Julie »4. 96. 101. 156 148 Reno, Mrs. Mary 46. 156 Rice. Tom 66. 149 Richards, Mary 84, 94. 125. 148 Ricgcl, Virginia 94, 139 . 107. 113. 149 Riggs, Jane 69. 85. 98. 139 Riggs, Peggy 94. 149 Ripp. Mr. William ... 156 Ri-dal, Jon 139 Risdahl. Steve 67. 156 Risden, Candy 149 Ritland. Mr. Evcret .. 40. 127 Ritland. Mark .. 67, 73 89. 98. 124. 156 Roach. Dan . 60. 94. 98. 139 Roberson. Kathleen ... .... 96. 101. 156 Robertson. Charles .. .... 67. 80. 156 Robinson, Elizabeth .. 149 Rod, Douglas 156 Roepke, I ibbv . . (»9, 85. 97. 101. 139 Rogers. Bruce .. 98. 101. 149 Rognc-s. Susan ... 96. 107. 149 Rolf. Dava Lynne .... 149 Rose, Leandra .. 97, 101. 149 Ro-ebrook. Barb .... .... 77. 94. 149 Ross. Ron 67, 156 Ross, Tom 73. 149 Rothacker, Ronald . . 155 Routh, Pam .. 69. 84. 97. 101. 112. 140 Rou e. Carol .. 31, 36. 69. 89. 93. 94 98. 110. 114. 140 Rowell. Boh .... 60. 66. 98. 101. 140 Rube, Jon .......................... 149 Rullestad, Steve ............. 107, 147 Bundle, John ....................... 140 Runyan. Don ... 36. 66, 73, 94. 98. 140 Rush, Sue .......................... 69, 140 Russell, Bemie .. 67. 87, 89. 125. 156 Russell, Sharon ................... 149 s Salisbury, Richard Sales. Jeffry ............ 94, 98. 140 Sandberg, Carla ............... 96, 157 Sandvick, Arnie .................... 156 San-gaard. Dave .................... 154 Saral, Karin. .26, 69, 107, 110, 127. 140 Sargent, Lee .................. 60, 149 Sargent. Phil ................. 89. 156 Saul. Bill ......................... 149 Saul, Sally .................. 113, 149 Scandrelt, David .............. 67. 157 Schank, Dick .. 60, 66, 73, 125, 141 Schank, Mike ....................... 157 Schlcbccker. Sue .............. 84, 149 Schmidt, Boh ..................... 157 Schumer, Phil .................... 141 Schumer, Ro-emary .............. 157 Schwartz, Mike .... 66, 73, 125, 149 Schworm, David .. 60. 80, 94. 98, 149 Schworm, Sally .... 68, 69, 85. 94, 97 101, 141 Science Department ............ 48. 49 Sclarow, Marvin .................... 149 Scott, Ron .................... 89, 141 Sealine, Barbara .............. 107, 149 Sealock, Richard .............. 110, 141 Searls, Dave ....................... 149 BELIEVE IT OR NOT! Ames High has a Squa-h team: B. Wicker-ham, T. Ukena, D. Schworm (manager». MAJORETTES were right on cue through the fall and spring marching band season. Seastrand, Ronald .. 157 Seidel. Judv 89. 96. 101. 157 Senior Section 126-145 Senior Senate 126. 127 Scvde, Mike 157 Severson. Allen 66. 80. 141 157 Shadle, Mr. Owen . . 57 Shadle. Sue 80. 96. 149 Shaw. Mac 87. 89. 157 Shearer, Jodie 157 Sheehan. Carol 157 Shceler. John 157 Sheeler, Penny 84. 96, 157 hepherd. Margaret . 80. 85, 110 146. 149 Sherick, Daft 125, 147 Shocklev, Mike 157 Schultz, Jerry 151 Shuman, Kathv 4, 97, 149 Sielert, Man- 84. 96, 101, 157 Siemers, Curt 87. 141 Sills. Dianne 141 Simon-, Marian 190Simps.m, Allan ............. 94. 98« 1L Sines, Greg ........................ I ''1 SivrMnd. Chuck .. 89, 94, 98, 124. 147 Skaff. Joe ............................ Ml ''karshaug, Donna .... 80, 96, 101, 15 Skold, Karen .. 69, 85, 93. 94, 107, 141 Skrdla, Bob .......................... b5. Skrdla, Hon .......... 89, 98, 101, 141 Slagel, Jan ........................... Ml Slctten, Carol .............. '9. 81. 141 Small, Dean................. 89, 124, 15. Smalling, Mr. Ray ..................... 80 Smalling. Robert .. 67. 89. 98. IOi ’5, Smith, Frank........ 66, 87, 94, 98, 111 Smith, John .......................... 157 Smith, Joi ............. 84, 85, 89, 147 Smith, Mike .......................... 15 Smith, Mike ........................... M7 Sfnith. Randy .............. 60, 66, 11. Smith. Sharon Smith, Shirley .. 84, 9.. 101. 10 . 113 147 Sobotka, Linda ................... 96, 15. Social Science Department .... 12. 13 Soesbe. Steve .... 60, 66. .3. 86, 111 Sommerfield, Bob ................... • 153 Sophomore Homerooms .............. 152-157 Sorensen, Sharon ................. 97, 148 Sorenson, Bob .............. 98. 101. 153 Soren on, Carol........ 80, 97, 101. 11 Sorenson, Connie ................. 96, 15. Soults, Bill ............... 73, 146, 11. Soy, Jean ............................ 141 Spatcher. Mr. Cecil ........ 49. 60, .8 Spear. Kathy .... 96. 101. 113. 116, 147 Speer, Ann ........................... 141 Spicberg, Tija ......... 16. 69, 84. 141 Spicer, Jerry ....................... 153 Spinks. Jim ......................... 153 Spirit Staff .................... 110. Ill Sports Clubs ..................... 80. 81 Squires. Barbara ........... 84, 85, 142 Squires, David ....................... 153 Stafford, Miss Marilyn .......... -14, 84 85. 152 St3niforth. Margaret .... 89, 125, 157 Starr, Joy ................. 97, 101, 147 Stauder. Bob ......................... 142 Steele. Richard ...................... 153 Stein. Dehbe .. 85. 89. 96. 101. 110. 147 Stephenson, Linda............96. 101. 147 Stewart, Julie ...................... 147 Stewart, John ....................... 153 Stober. Dirk ......................... 80. 142 Stone, Brian ........................ 142 Stone, Darla ........................ 157 Stone, Mr. Edwin ........... 55, 86. 87 Straehle. Elaine .... 89. 96. 101, 157 Strand. Bill .. 86. 93. 94. 98. 110. Ill 125, 142. 192 Strand berg, Lauren Strickland. Mike .... 67, 87. 98. 101 125. 153 Stucky, Sue ......................... 147 Student Council ................. 124, 125 Students ............................ 122 Sturdevant. Mr. Floyd ................. 49 Svec, Mary .......................... 142 Svec. Peter............. 89. 98. 101, 153 Swanson. Betty...............97, 101, 147 Swanson. Duane ................. 67. 153 Swanson, Kay .... 84, 89. 96, 101. 153 T Talcott, Ken .................. 89. 147 Tanner, Ken ........................ 142 Tauber, Mrs. Anne ............. 44, 147 Tauber, Tom ....................... 153 Taylor, Corecn .................... 153 Taylor, Janet ............ 96, 101, 153 Taylor, Linda ..................... 147 Taylor. Sherry .................... 147 Templeton, Janice ............ 116, 147 Tesdahl, Robert ................... 142 Tevebaugh, Carolyn .. 96, 101. 113, 153 Thogerson, Sandy .. 69, 84. 107. 142 Thompson, Mrs. Evelyn .......... 47, 81 85. 112 Thompson, Carolyn ...... 69. 107. 142 Thompson, Martha ............. 97. 148 Thompson, Mary ......... 84, 125, 148 Thompson. Richard ................ 142 Thompson, Robert ................. 142 Thompson, Sherry ........... 114, 153 Thoreson, Karen .............. 69. 142 Thorson, Eugene .................. 147 Thorson, Jim ..................... 153 Thorson, Jov ................. 97, 148 Thorson, Wayne .. 60. 66. 94. 98. 142 Throckmorton. Dick ..... 60. 125. 147 Tice, Tom........... 60. 64. 66. 142 Timm, Susanne .. 69. 80. 96, 113, 142 Timmons, John ............... 87, 147 Tisdale, Damp ...... 36. 60. 110. 121 127. 142 Toms. Ann .. 16, 31, 63, 77, 81. 85. 96 101, 143 Tonne. Pat ............. 96. 101. 153 Torkelson, Karen ............ 69, 143 Traush. Tom ................. 67, 153 Trexel, Su an ...... 80. 89. 101. 153 Trout. Miss Betty.............54, 116 Trow, Jim .............. 66, 86, 143 Trow, Sandra ..................... 153 Truhe, Rose Ann ........ 96, 113, 153 Trump. Mr. Richard ................ 49 Tuttle. Jim ...................... 147 Ty-ding, Bill .... 67, 89. 98. 101. 153 u Uhl. Nancy .... Ukena, Dick ... Ukena, Tom ... Ulmer, Margaret Ustrud, Carole . Uthe, Anita . .. lithe. Linda ... ... 69, 85. 94. 143 ..............89. 153 ...... 89. 110, 147 81. 92. 96. 101, 153 ............. 94. 118 ...... 96. 113, 153 ...... 69, 84, 143 V Vance. Bruce ....................... 153 Vandecar, Mrs. Dorothy ........ 51, 151 Van Houweling, Don ............ 60, 147 Van Scoy, Jerry .................... 152 Van Scoy, Tom ...................... 143 Van Voorhis, Virginia .............. 118 Van Winkle, Judy .............. 69, 143 Vegors, Mrs. Aurilla ................ 47 Veline, Nancy ....... 89, 96. 101. 153 Vierkant, Mary ........... 97, 101, 148 ViUwock. Jay ............ 103, 107, 152 Villwock. Van Kent.................. 152 Vinograde, Polly .... 69, 107, 110, 144 Vivian, Bucky............. 78, 124, 152 Voelker, Vivian .. 26, 68, 69. 80, 141 Voight, Richard .................... 152 Von Bergen, Becky .. 16, 18. 69. 85 107. 141 Von Bergen. Bill ............... 125. 152 Von Wittich, Miss Barbara .... 51, 150 Voss, Kick .......................... 152 w Wagner, Ron 152 Walker. Bill 152 Walker, Boh 147 Walkup. Martha .... .... 81, 112, 148 Wallin, Jay 152 Walsh, Eileen 85. 141 Walters. Elinore 107. 141 Ward. Beth 89 . 96, 101. 121. 153 Warner, Carol 152 Warren, Jim 147 Watkins. Terry 60. 118 Watts, Larry 152 Webb. Carl 152 Webb, Mary 152 Webb. Richard 86, 141 Weddle. Johnny Weiser, Donna .. 80. , 97, 101, 113. 118 Weiss, Bill 152 Wei s Pat 144 Wells, Mr. Kenneth 52. 60 Wells, Mary i 68. 69, 92. 94, 144 Wessman, Steve .... 118 West. Janet 96. 101, 113, 152 Westvold, Steve .... 144 Whaley, Mr. and Mrs. Earl 57 Wharton, Ann 113, 152 Whatoff. Mary 97, 111 Whatoff. Boh 152 Wheeler, Dave 60. 87, 118 Wheeler, Jon 80. 152 Whcclock. Marilyn .. 81. 96. 152 Wheelock. Mary ... 85. 96. 118 WhResell, Nancy ... 144 Whitney, Mrs. Charlotte 41, 85 Wickersham. Bill . . 80. 89. 148 Wiener, Pat 85. 94. 118 Wierson. Laura .... 97. 101. 148 Wilcox. .Miss Edna . 47, 81. 85 Wilcox, Mark .. 86. 94. 98, 118 Wildman. Janet .... ... 69. 89, 94, 141 Wildman, John .... 91. 98. 118 Willenhurg, Jean .. .... 97. 101. 147 Williams, Charles .. 118 Williams. Jackie ... 118 Wilson. nnc . . 16, 18. 31. 69. 81. 141 Wilson, Boh 152 Wilson, Mike 89. 118 Wilson, Pick 60. 125, 150 Winters, (derma ... ...... 96. 101, 152 Wirtz, Judv Wood. Phil 152 Wood, Mr. Walter . 44 W oods, Marc 107, 148 Woodworth. Kevin . 93, 101. 152 Woolsev, Pam 96. 101, 151 Workman, Marilyn . . 69. 81, 116, 141 Wright, Jim 118 Wright, Marcia . ... .. 69, 96. 107. 145 Wynne, Pat 152 Y Yeaman, Kristine ............. 80, 152 Yeaman, Mike ........ 60, 66, 73, 148 Young, Cheryl ................ 84, 152 Young. Mrs. Mary Lou ......... 51, 151 Young. Pam .......... 89, 96, 101, 152 Younie, Robbie ................... 118 z Zanders, Miss Marlene.............53, 118 Zeliadt, Larra .............. 69, 85, 145Feb. Deadline Ends 6 Months’ Work AI the end of «leadline week we finally looked bark on the six months of fourth periods we called "Spirit.'' It’s not true to say that nothing went right, because we were never sure how events should have happened. Horizontal pictures, vertical spaces; no copy and four hundred words needed; lost pages, wrong page numbers; and mixed up orders for Sat- urday hamburgers and cokes; these trivial problems combined with personality conflicts and foibles such as forgetfulness are recorded for you in the pre- ceding pages: confusing copy, unbalanced layouts, pictures rescheduled for the fourth time. Now that you have your hook, win don't you sign ours. Editorial Staff EDITOR: Bill Strand ASSISTANT EDITOR: Cathy Legvold ART EDITOR: Karin Saral ASSISTANT ART EDITOR: Margaret Shepherd COPY EDITOR: Sandy Percival ASSISTANT COPY EDITOR: Tom Ukcna SPORTS EDITOR: Jim Hannum PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR: Barb Bean HEAD PHOTOGRAPHER: Richard Sealock PHOTOGRAPHERS: Bob Dotson, Robert Dumenil GENERAL ASSISTANT: Polly Vinograde ADVISOR: Mrs. Nancy Lutz Business Staff ADVERTISING EDITOR: Hamp Tisdale ASSISTANT ADVERTISING EDITOR: Dcbbe Stein BUSINESS MANAGER: Carol Rouze ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER: Mary Hinrichsen HOMEROOM SPIRIT REPRESENTATIVES: Bill Von Bergen. Barb Picken, Lee Anderson. Connie Bailey. Ken Talcott. Vivian Voelker. Dick Ukena. Mary Anne Richards, Bill Wickersham. Mary Hagge. David Schworm. Sonja Accola. Cindy Craig. Mary Hach. Tom Boast. Jim Gilchrist. Don Carr. Bruce Hach. Carol Kirk. Anita Paulson. Jim Ingvolstad. Mary Montgomery, John Hanwav. Mark Ritland. Harvey Diehl. Bill Pyle. Janice Miller. Karen Nick- cy. Margy Staniforth. Sandy Kinker AROUND DEADLINE time, tile staff's most severe punish- ment is to stand in a corner and type. OUR PHOTOGRAPHER, Richard Sea- lock, will go to any extreme to yet a picture. I HE LAST PAGES arc signed, checked, and sent in. and Mrs. Lutz can smile again. Acknowledgements Hills Studio. Mr. Hossle: group pictures Johnson's Studio. Inc.. Mr. Johnson: Queen pictures . Ames Daily Tribune: sports pictures Iowa State University Bomb: university picture Roy Abbott: pictures Mr. Harris: Taylor Publishing Co. representative TAYLOR PUBLISHING COMPANY L 


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