American University - Talon / Aucola Yearbook (Washington, DC)

 - Class of 1942

Page 1 of 112

 

American University - Talon / Aucola Yearbook (Washington, DC) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 112 of the 1942 volume:

THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY LIBRARY WASHINGTON. D. C. 19 4 2 UC OF THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY f AMERICAN UNIVERSITY ] LIBRARY J1C1IT1B ♦ MAY Al ♦ LLQ . . WE GET UP ... WE EAT WE GO TO CLASS P c oob shenton • editor • • ired carl . manaaer ■■i published by the students of The American University, Washington, D. C j ciJ9n r m • • . WE PLAY AND SO TO BED DR. PAUL F. DOUGLASS President of The American University lb O . . . Paul F. Douglass, minister, lawyer, author and friend ... a man of vision and dynamic purpose . . . whose youth enables him to understand students, their problems and their aspira- tions . . . Balance of physical vigor, mental prowess and spir- itual depth . . . Indefatigable administrator, responsible for in- novations vitalizing academic and social life . . . whose enjoy- ment of music, conversation and companionship makes his home the congenial meeting-place of the college community . . . The man with profound faith in the potentialities of Ameri- can University who with courageous effort is turning belief into reality. ) " 50523 ovnej come, duus that we ti ' t re a Sure, e it earn now for the pleuSur e t CO III eae we Knew 9 L • • • e n d 5 h i p wilt a I w ci u 3 bind u 3 ■ ■ I 3 iJt i 1 tf tj $ i±n u o u t n w e ti v e • • or m e m r i e J rem I n d a 6 © oranae an a, d blue . . . ome, duu5j PutleSl in measure Of our A. U V M ma t cite ir 4 p ' £r i ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS PAUL F. DOUGLASS President of the University B.A., M.A., LL.B., Ph.D. GEORGE B. WOODS Dean of the College and Professor of English .A.. M.A., Ph.D. MARY LOUISE BROWN Dean of Women and Professor of English B.A., vl.A. ' if EDWARD W. ENSEL C. HENRY LEINEWEBER Professor of Chemistry Professor of German Abounding in energy . . . definite disbeliever in snap A. U. ' s encyclopedia . . . friend, poet and teacher courses. stimulating speaker. JOHN E. BENTLEY Professor of Psychology A born actor . . . face contortionist extraordinaire rabid outliner. AUBERT BAIN POTORF William Fraser McDowell Professor of Philosophy and Religion Dramatic interpreter of the Bible . . . counselor interested in every student. WILL HUTCHINS Professor of Art Kindly, good-humored . . . has a deep appreciation for all fine things. WILLIAM B. HOLTON Professor of Chemistry Tennis coach . . . good-humored ioltester . . . knows al the tricks of students. WALTER F. SHENTON Professor of Mathematics Unappreciative of bad jokes . . . fly-catcher . . . exemplar of higher math. JESSIE M. FERGUSON Professor of Education Always a twinkle in her eye . . . ideal chaperone for debate trips. THE FACULTY FACULTY MERRITT C. BATCHELDER Associate Professor of English Lover of Milton . . . and details ... a subtle humor plus a poker face. EARL A. DENNIS Associate Professor of Biology Lectures interspersed with clever cracks . . . always new species to dissect. RUBERTA M. OLDS Assistant Professor of Spanish Impressive Spanish senorita . . . hostess deluxe at Pan- American entertainments. IRMA ZINK Librarian Conceals an all-pervading sense of humor . . . one eye on the library, other on the bookstore. GEORGE W. SMITH Assistant Professor of History Lecturer par excellence . . . slaves for his students explosive laughter. STAFFORD H. CASSELL Assistant Professor of Physical Education ' Pop " . . . tops with students and faculty alike grand coach and comrade. MAURICE A. MOOK Assistant Professor of Sociology Ultra-scientific approach . . . capable as teacher or chief air raid warden. JAMES McLAIN Instructor in Choral Music Expressive hands . . . subtle wit . . . inspiring director and leader. DORIS SNODGRASS Instructor in Physical Education All-round sports woman . . . interested in the chemical side of life. JOHN L. NUELSEN, JR. Instructor in German and Director of Band and Orchestra Informal classes . . . forms half of an excellent chaperone team. JOHN C. SLOVER Instructor in Speech Subtle in his coaching methods . . . students ' protector on debate trips. MELVIN C. WREN Instructor in Economics Walking joke book . . . pool addict . . . perpetually tardy to classes. WILLIAM B. NEWGORD Instructor in Speech and Dramatics A man with his heart in his work . . . truly appreciative . . . irresistible personality. CARL V. BERTSCH Instructor in Physics Authority on quartz crystals . . . kindly, unassuming. RICHARD C. SNYDER Instructor in Political Science Often found in the pool room . . . brilliant mind shy manner in classroom. CHARLES M. CLARK Instructor in English Unobstrusive promoter of student interests . . . artist spontaneous humor. FACULTY THE FACULTY THEODORE NORRIS Instructor in Biology and Botany ELOISE SWICK Assistant in Chemistry Master of wit and repartee ... an inspiring laboratory " Polly " . . . petite, quiet, conscientious . . . aid for the lecturer. flunking chemist. HELEN ZENTMYER Instructor in French JEANNE GEITHER Assistant Dean of Women Dignity hiding a ready love of fun . . . animated sup- porter of " Le Cercle Francais. " Practicality plus real companionship with coeds champion of students ' cause. SUZANNE MULLETT Assistant in Art MARGERY MILLER Assistant Dean of Women Indefatigable e nergy . . . cordial . . . modern tendency Calm, friendly . . . filling a difficult position with ef- artistically. ficiency and understanding. Reading from left to right: Lentz, Bushong, Morehouse, Walter, Howe, Rauch, Spalding, White, Walker. THE BUSINESS STAFF f resenti n % THE Wood, Waldron, Goodwin, Barkdull OFFICERS WALTER BARKDULL President JACQUELINE WALDRON Vice-President VIRGINIA GOODWIN Secretary EDWARD WOOD Treasurer SENIOR CLASS u e up e pi a tl S5 e nio r $ . . . Outstanding people . . . full of a zest for living . . . packed with the stuff it takes . . . fun and play in big doses . . . studying without grinding . . . sportsmanship . . . members of honorary fraternities . . . busy men and women around campus . . . de- pendable . . . participation in almost every- thing . . . contributions to A. U. through unrelenting effort. WALTER L. BARKDULL Washington, " Flat-top " . ... a pipe holds an opin editor, photograph ing pants and a ca n every subject — and History -, debater nera . . . xpresses it. CI He I, 2, 3, icron Delta Kappa president. 4); Pi Gamma Mu (Secretary 4)- Delta Sigma Rho (Vice-President. 4) : Pi Delta Epsilon (Secretary, 4); Class President. 4; Constitution Committee, 4; Camera Club, I, 2 3- Debate I 2. 3, 4; Dramat, 2, 3, 4; " Eagle, " I, 2 (Editor-in- Chief, 3: Managing Editor. 4); Handbook Editor 2; Speakers ' Bureau, I, 2, 4; Intramurals I 2 3 ' 4; Alpha Kappa Pi (Secretary, 4). CARL BYHAM Kane, Pa. Mather natics " Bing " . . . tall, blond, man-about-town a voice that makes the girls ' hearts beat in rap- tures ... a cracker-jack on the basketball . . . prefers whipped cream to everything, ir iclud- ing blondes and brunettes . . . always has ' a smile for everyone. Omicron Delta Kappa; Student Government Presi- dent, 4; Athletic Board 3; Arbor Day Chai rman 3; Chorus, 1. 2, 3, 4; Dramat, 3; El Grupo Pan- Americano (Vice-President, 3; President 4)- Glee Club, 1. 2. 3 (Manager, 4); Basketbail 1 2 3 (Captain, 4); Football, 1. 2, 3, 4; Track, ' l ; Phi Sigma Kappa. ROBERT KENNETH FOX Hughesville, Pa. Economics " Kenny " . . . blond, brawny and straightforward ... a man of sincerity and conviction . . . terror on the gridiron and at freshman meetings . . . never too busy to be thoughtful. Class Honors, 4; Varsity Club, 2, 3 (President 4)- Junior Prom Committee: Freshman Rules Commit tee (Chairman. 3); Chorus, I. 2, 3, 4; Glee Club I. 2, 3, 4; Football. I. 2. 3 (Captain 4)- Track ' 2; Phi Sigma Kappa (Pledge Master 2 3- Presi- dent. 4); Interfraternity Council ' 4. VIRGINIA GOODWIN sda, Md. History and English ny " ... a born executive ... the ability anage and lead ... a prospective journal- . . always willing to take on a thankless . . . versatile, sincere, considerate, sym- pathetic. Honors. I, 2, 4; Cap and Gown (Secretary i Gamma Mu; Pi Delta Epsilon; Publications ), 2 (Secretary, 3, 4); Assembly Committee ass Secretary, 4; " Aucola, " I. 2 (Associate r, 3, 4); " Eagle, " I, 2. 3 (Copy Editor 4)- lational Relations Club, I 2- League of en Voters, 2 (Secretary, 3; President, 4); Le e Francais. I 2; Independent Women 2 (Vice-President, 3). JACQUELINE WALDRON ishington, D. C. Biology ackie " ... A. U. ' s most versatile coed . . . talents from drawing board to gym floor. ss Honors, I, 2, 3, 4; Cap and Gown (Presi- ™t, 4]; Beta Beta Beta (Treasurer 3); " A " Club 2, 4 (President. 3); English Prize I; Wood ' s le Scholarship, 3; Assembly Chairman, 4- Di- tor of Cheerleaders, 4; Class Vice-President 2 4; " Aucola, " 4 (Art Editor, 2; Activities Editor Dramat, 2. 3; " Eagle, " I. 2; League of Women ■ers, 2; Omicron Epsilon Pi (Vice-President 2); dent Christian Fellowship, 2 4 (President, 3): iketball, I. 2. 3. 4; Hockey. 1.2 3 4; Sigma Delta (President, A); Panhellenic Council (Sec- retary i SENIOR CLASS Mt. Ranier, Md. JOHN P. ABBADESSA Business Administration Escapader and funster who knows how to forget his troubles which are mainly women . . . the most continuously moving man on campus. Class Honors, I, 2, 3, 4; Pi Gamma Mu; Student Comptroller. 4; College Council, 3; Stu- dent Life Committee, 3; Social Board, 3; Orientation Board, I; Class Treasurer, 2; Junior Prom Chairman; Class Dance Chairman, I; Freshman Rules Committee, 2; Dramat, 2, 3, 4; " Eagle, " 3 (Business Manager ' 1 4); Orchestra, I, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals, I, 2, 4 (Manager, 3); Alpha Kappa Pi (Treasurer, 2, 3; President, 4); Interfraternity Council (President, 4). History-Political Science BETTY JEANNE ADAMS Washington, D. C. Tall, darlc, blue-eyed . . . energetic student . . . helped out by a photographic memory . . . veteran alto chorister . . . engaged to an out-of-towner . . . amaz- ingly capable. Class Honors, I, 2; Class Secretary, 3; " Aucola. " 2 (Business Manager, 3); Chorus, I, 2, 3, 4; Debate, 3; " Eagle, " I, 2; Fund Drive Committee, 2, 3; Glee Club, I, 2, 3, 4; International Relations Club, I, 2 (President, 3); Student Christian Fellowship, I; Delta Gamma (Cor- responding Secretary, 3). RICHARD BEAN Washington, D. C. Biology Short, efficient, serious . . . Ed ' s constant companion . . . always found In the lab or on the south steps with a weed — and that awful white (?) coat . . . bears a dislike for catty girls . . . enjoys hunting, fishing — and girls ... a biological blessing to doomed freshmen . . . destined to be a teaching man. eta Beta (Tr 4); Social Board (Chairman, 4); Intr Kappa Pi (Secretary, 3). 2, 3, 4; Alpha BETTIE BLUMENTHAL Melrose Parle, Pa. Psychology All great people are small . . . enthusiastic participant in all sports . . . always seen taking someone for a ride in " Youngster " . . . ardent lover of music . . . has a definite preference for men — not mice . . . avoids chronic gripers and dull individuals. ' A " Club, 3, 4; " Aucola, 1 3, 4; El Grupo Pan-An 3; League of Women Voters, 3 RUTH COOLEY, R.N. Cherokee, Iowa Psychology Most ticklish individual in captivity . . . loyal and sym- pathetic . . . much interested in the students . . . unquenchable desire for " Convict cake " ... a square jaw ... a quick and ever-ready smile . . . clean, white uniform and starched cap ... a comforter for the sick — our college nurse for five years. CHARLES L. DOOLITTLE Woodmont, Conn. Business Administration " Chuck " . . . " Voo-Doolittle " ... six feet, five, two hundred and forty on his way to the shower . . . shy but with a booming voice . . . likes tennis, sleep, food, sports, tennis and food ... his pet aversions are exams and glamourish " specs " . . . spends his spare time being friendly. Junior College of Commerce, New Haven, Conn., I, 2; Pi Gamma Mu; Chorus, 3, 4; Dramat, 3 (Vice-President, 4); Glee Club, 3, 4; Tennis, 3, 4; Radio Plays, 3; Intramurals, 3, 4; Junior Varsity Basketball, 3; Alpha Theta Phi (Treasurer, ' 4)! ILSE PAULINE ENGEL Washington, D. C. German and French Trained mind, active interest in all languages . . . efficient and sincere . . . consistent and altruistic . . . a competent assistant in the French office . . . always willing to help a worried frosh. College Honor Society; El Grupo Pan-Americano, 3, 4; Ger- man Club (President, 2, 3, 4); Le Cercle Franca ' is, 3 (Presi- dent, 2, 4); Independent Women (President, 2, 3, 4). CORNELIA ENNIS Savannah, Tenn. Education Studious, quiet and very serene . . . often found on Hurst Hall ' s south steps smoking a fag . . . listens intently to student chatter but seldom voices her own opinions . . . goes in for swimming, bridge and reading. Brenau, Gainesville, Ga., I; University of Tennessee, Knox- ville, Tenn.. 2. 3. 19 4 2 . SENIOR CLASS MARGERY HALE Washington, D. C. History-Political Science Margie " . . . although usually just " Marge " . . . cooperative . . . possesses a st for living . . . feminine Eddie Duchin with a great love for music . . . enjoys ater sport, especially swimming and sailing ... a friend in deed and a ready smile for all. ' Eagle, " I (Advertising Manager, 2); Glee Club, 2; International Relations Club, I, 2; Le Cercle Francais, I; Alpha Phi. MARGARET HARNED Washington, D. C. Psychology Intelligence tempered with subtle humor . . . outside " interest " in New Jersey fejESg dy, willing and able ... a cooperative, thoughtful friend . . . graciously hospitable ... a charming woman with serene eyes and a quiet beauty. (Circulation Manager, 3); El Grupo Psn-America Club, 3; Student Christian Fellowship, 2; Delta Ga 2, 3; International Relatit ,a (Treasurer, 3, 4). CHARLES T. JOHNSON Washington, D. C. Chemistry Tall, broad, tolerant . . . " Chuck " . . . the man with a smile for everyone . . . always willing ... a bit wary of women — perhaps because he dislikes people who are late . . . prefers fishing, hiking and chemistry . . . even-tempered and easy-going, born comedian and actor, who appears lazy but loves life. Class Honors, I, 2, 3, 4; Fund Drive Committee, 2, 3, 4. EDGAR C. KELLER Washington, D. C. " Ivan " ' Killer History-Economics despises work, but versatile! Class Honors, I, 2, 3, 4; College Honor Society; Omicron Delta Kappa (Vice-President, 4); Pi Gamma Mu; Delta Sigma Rho (President, 4); Pi Delta Epsilon; College Council; Student Association Parliamentarian, 3; Constitution Committee, 2; Curriculum Board, 3; Class Treasurer, 3; " Aucola, " I, 2 (Literary Editor, 3); Camera Club, I, 2. 3; Debate, 2. 3. 4 (Freshman Manager, I); Dramat, 2, 3 (Business Manager, 4); " Eagle, " 2, 3, 4; Fund Drive Committee, 2 (Chairman, 3); Handbook (Associate Editor, 2); Omicron Epsilon Pi. I, 2, 3, 4; Speakers ' Bureau, I, 2, 4; Intramurals. I, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Kappa Pi; Interfraternity Council, 4. MARY JANET KENYON Washington, D. C. Philosophy-Religion Calm, collected, quiet . . . spontaneous love of fun . . . friendly, patient, dependable . . . does her work efficiently with little fuss and furor . . . fiercely loyal to all she loves. Class Honors, 3; Women ' s Glee Club Award, 3; Women ' s House Council (Social Activities Chairman, 3; Head Proctor, 4); Chorus, 3, 4; " Eagle, " I, 2, 3. 4; Glee Club, I, 2. 3, 4; League ot Women Voters, 3 (Secretary, 4); Student Christian Fellowship, 2, 3; Independent Women, 2 (Treasurer, 3). Hornell, N. Y. ROBERT LAKE History-Political Science Heavy, cheerful . . . " Puddle " . . . " Bob " . . . great Republican . . . once seen in charge of a rather dilapidated machine — sometimes called a campaign car . . . born for the part of Sir Toby . . . will argue on any subject — especially the New Deal . . . dotes on chocolate and hates cats. Debate, I, 2. 3, 4; Dramat, 3, 4; International Relations Club, I, 2; Republican Club (President, 2); Student Christian Fellow- ship, 2, 3. FRANCES B. McDOWELL Washington, D. C. Sociology Charming and understanding . . . housekeeper and student . . . and on the whole, versatile and likable. ELIZABETH L. MATHEWS Washington, D. C. Chemistry and Biology " Betty " . . . female scientist . . . addicted to ethyl cokes — and others, too . . . beat everyone into Col- lege Honor . . . likes red sweaters . . . fears mice . . . don ' t ever dare tell her that her lab coat needs washing . . . one-man band. College Honor Society; Beta Beta Beta (Secretary, 3; Vice- President, 4); Band, I, 2, 3; " Eagle, " I; German Club (Sec- retary, 2); Independent Women (Vice-President, 2). 19 4 2 . SENIOR CLASS EDITH MITCHELL Connellsville, Pa. Biology " Eadie " . . . sweet, lovable, quiet . . . smooth basketball player . . . dignified sorority president ... a dose of solemnity mixed with an equal portion of good humor. Beta Beta (Secretary. 4); " A " Club (Sport Manager, 3; President. 4); Women ' s House :il (Secretary, 2; Treasurer, 3; President, 4); " Aucola, " 2; Camera Club, 2; Fund Committee, 4; Basketball, 3, 4 (Captain, 2); Hockey, I, 4; Alpha Chi Omega (President, 4); Panhellenic Council, 3 (Vice-President, 4). ROBERT NEFF Washington, D. C. Biology " Nifty " . . . affectionately called " Amoeba " by lab studonts . . . sturdy worker " requently seen tramping about in boots with a pipe in his mouth ... a eliever in hunting . . . not at all averse to women . . . like all Bio majors, he has no use for English majors. Beta Beta Beta (President, 4); " Aucola, " 2; Assistant Engineer, 2. 3, 4; Intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Kappa Pi. HARRY NEWBY Washington, D. C Jo ' s beau Chemistry expert baseball pitcher . . . chemistry addict . . . still fights the Civil War — with Jo and company. Class Honors, I, 2, 3, 4; Omicron Delta Kappa; Athletic Board, 2, 4; Orientation Board (Chairman, 4); Student Life Committee, 3; Faculty Prize, 2, 3; Class President, 3; Freshman Rules Committee, 2, 3; Fund Drive Committee. 2, 3; Baseball, I, 2, 3 (Captain, 4); Foot- ball, I; Intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Kappa Pi (Secretary, 2; Vice-President, 3). Ponce, Puerto Rico BLANQUITA RAMIREZ English Short and sweet . . . shining example of how to dance the South American way ... a mean hand with a ping pong paddle . . . the only coed who doesn ' t like sweaters . . . allergic to Communists and artificial people . . . thoroughly unpre- dictable, usually has something clever up her sleeve. El Grupo Pan-An 4; Alpha Phi, RALPHA RANDELL Washington, D. C. Biology Little bundle of humor . . . small but a great talker . . . doesn ' t see why she has to have such a different name . . . interested in medicine, but never has time to study her first aid. Class Honors. I, 3, 4; Beta Beta Beta; " Eagle, " I; German Club, 4; Le Cercle Francais, 2; Student Christian Fellowship, I, 2, 3, 4; Phi Mu (Treasurer, 2, 3, 4). BARTHONHUE W. REESE Hughesville, Pa. History-Economics " Bart " . . . guiding spirit for the underdog freshman . . . plays basketball with the aid of his vocal chords . . . tennis player who swings a mighty racquet. Class Honors, 3; College Council, 2; Class Treasurer, I; Dramat (Business Manager, 3); Basketball, I, 2, 3, 4; Intra- murals, I, 2, 3, 4; Tennis, 2 (Class Champion, I, 2): Alpha Theta Phi (Recording Secretary, 3; President, 4); Interfrater- nity Council (Vice-President, 4). FORREST P. REYNOLDS Martinsburg, W. Va. History " Preacher " . . . hard-working, sincere, considerate . . . sermonizes to three congregations on Sunday . . . pleasant baritone voice. Choir, 3. ROBERT E. SHENTON Washington, D. C. English " Bob " . . . haughty owner of Ermyntrude . . . saxo- phonist in Watson Powell ' s orchestra . . . often seen ith camera over his shoulder . . . forever hav woman trouble. Class Honors, I; Pi Delta Epsilon (Vice-President, 4); Social Board. 3; " Aucola, " 2 (Sports Editor. 3; Editor, 4); Band, I, 2, 3; Camera Club. 2 (Chairman. 3); " Eagle, " 3, 4; Orchestra, I, 2, 3; Radio Club, 3; Alpha Kappa Pi (Vice- President, 4); Interfraternity Council, 3. 19 4 2 . SENIOR CLASS WILLARD SMITH Washington, D. C. Chemistry " Smitty " ... a great actor who does well in any role . . . humorous poet . . . is good to his sister . . . has a grand spirit and is loads of fun at anything. Dramat, 2. 3; Omicron Epsilon Pi, I, 2, 3; Intramurals, I, 2, 3; Alpha Kappa Pi. Bethesda, Md. J a n JANET STODDARD English . . tall and blue-eyed . . . has an outside interest at Annapolis . . . with a pleasing voice . . . English student . . . and the most able library assistant. Blue Ridge College, New Windsor, Pa., 3; Chorus, 2, 4; Delta Gamma. JOSEPH VAN WINKLE Salem, Ore. Political Science " Joe " ... a man who ' s almost as talkative as a woman . . . guaranteed to keeD anyone amused . . . left A. U. for the armed forces. Willamette University, Salem, Ore., I. 2, 3. GERRY WEIBLE Washington, D. C. " Eagle ' s " most dependable reporter English lives with a golf bag . . . efficient student body secretary . . . loves red and knee socks . . . and is definitely averse to oysters. Student Body Secretary, 4; Constitution Committee (Secretary, 3); " Eagle, " 3. 4; El Grupo Pan-Americano, 3; Alpha Phi. C. EDWARD WOOD Washington, D. C. Biology " Ed " . . . commonly called Paramoecium by the lab students . . . likes women and mice . . . almost blew himself up while making explosives . . . one grand guy. Class Honors, I, 2; Beta Beta Beta (Vice-President, 2); Orien- tation Board, 3; Class Treasurer, 4; Basketball, I; intramurals, I, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Kappa Pi (Secretary, 2). VIVIAN V. YEAGER Washington, D. C. Eng |; sh " Viv " . . . vivacious . . . irrepressible in class. CI Ho 2, 3, 4; Cap and Gown (Treasurer 4)- " A ' Club, I, 2, 3 (Secretary, 4); Orientation Board 4; Socia Board, 3; Student Life Committee, 2; " Aucola, " ' l (Circula tion Manager, 3); Chorus, I, 2. 3, 4; Dramat, I (Secretary, 2 Vice-President, 3; President, 4); " Eagle, " I, 2, 3; Fund Drivs Committee. 2. 3; Glee Club, I, 2, 3, 4; League of Womer Voters, I, 2, 3, 4 : Speech Choir, I; Doubles Badminton Cham pion, 3; Basketball, I, 2; Sigma Phi Delta (Treasurer 3 Vice-President, 4); Panhellenic Council, 3. 19 4 2 j reAenti n 9 THE Carl, Sattler, Fellows, Lundegaard. OFFICERS PHILIP FELLOWS President JANE SATTLER Vice-President HELEN LUNDEGAARD Secretary FRED CARL Treasurer JUNIOR CLASS Bernard Achhammer Forty Fort, Pa. Chemistry Bucknell Junior College, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., I, 2. Elaine Bell Assistant Advertising Director for Publications, 3; " Eagle, " I, 2; League of Women Voters, I, 2, 3; Basketball, I, 2, 3. Thomas W. Aiken Washington, D. C. English Curriculum Board, I; Publication Board, 2, 3; " Aucola, " I, 3; Dramat, I, 2, 3; " Eagle, " I, 2, 3; Alpha Theta Phi (Corre- sponding Secretary, 3). Freeman E. Bentley Cedartown, Ga. Chemistry West Georgia College, Genola, Ga., I, 2. Constance Barrows Washington, D. C. English Class Honors, I, 2, 3; " A " Club, I, 2, 3; Scholarship Cup, I; " Aucola " (Copy Editor, 2, 3); Dramat, I, 2; Handbook (Assistant Editor, 2); League of Women Voters, I; Hockey, I, 2; Basketball, I, 2; Sigma Phi Delta (Treasurer, 3); Pan- hellenic Council, 3. Paul Lucien Berry Washington, D. C. Biology Class Honors, I, 2, 3; Beta Beta Beta; College Council, 3; Orientation Board, 3; Religion Board, 2; Chorus, I, 2, 3; Double Quartet, 3; Fund Drive Committee, I, 2, 3; German Club (Treasurer, I); Men ' s Glee Club, I, 2 (President, 3); Student Christian Fellowship, I (Treasurer, 2; President, 3); Alpha Theta Phi (Corresponding Secretary, 2; Recording Sec- retary, 3). Joan Beadle Washington, D. C. Chemistry Basketball, I, 2, 3; Alpha Phi. Anthony M. Bozza Newark, N. J. Spanish " Aucola, " 2; Dramat, 3; " Eagle. " 3; Fund Drive Committee, I, 2. 3; El Grupo Pan-Americano, 2, 3; Omicron Epsilon Pi, 3. Edward G. Brandenberger Darmstadt, Ind. Biology Beta Beta Beta; Camera Club, I, 2; Radio Club, 2; Track, I. Frederick D. Carl Washington, D. C. Economics-Sociology Curriculum Board, 2; Class Treasurer, 3; " Aucola, " 2 (Busi- ness Manager, 3); Camera Club, I, 2; Fund Drive Committee, I; Baseball (Assistant Manager, I; Manager, 2); Intramurals, I, 2, 3; Track, 2; Alpha Theta Phi. Louise Campbel ngham Southern College, Birmingham, Ala., I, 2; Gle Club. 3; Alpha Chi Omega. Eleanor Case History Syracuse, N. Y. English acuse University, Syracuse, N. Y., I, 2; Debate, 3; Dramat. 3; Speakers ' Bureau, 3; Alpha Phi (Vice-President, 3). JUNIOR CLASS Germaine Coffey Washington, D. C. Homecoming Maid of Honor, 2; Class Secretary, I; Dramal 3; Alpha Phi (Vice-President, 2; President, 3); Panhellenic Council, 2, 3. Philip Fellows Spanish Washington, D. C. College Council, I, 2; Class President, 3; Baseball, I, 2, 3; Basketball, I; Intramurals, I, 2, 3; Alpha Theta Phi (Vice- President, 3). Robert W. Darby Green Mountain Junior College, Poultney, Vt., I, 2; Baseball, 3, Intramurals, 3; Alpha Theta Phi. Ann Ferrandi Boston, Mass. Sociology Stephens College, Columbia, Mo., I, 2; Dramat, 3. John Dean Washington, D. C. Psychology Phi Sigma Kappa (Vice-President, 3). Judson C. French Kenwood, Md. Physics Class Honors. I, 2, 3; " Aucola " (Photographic Editor, 3); Camera Club, I, 2; Freshman Debate Manager; Fund Drive Committee (Treasurer, 2; Chairman, 3); Radio Club, 2; Alpha Kappa Pi (Treasurer, 2, 3). Bernard Endelman Scranton, Pa. English Scranton-Keystone Junior College, Scranton, Pa.. I, 2. Katherine Fuchs Kansas City, Mo. Biology Kansas City Junior College, Kansas City, Mo., I, 2; Beta Beta Beta; Chorus, 3; Double Quartet Accompanist, 3. Iris Gabrielson Arlington, Va. English Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa, 2. Leon Glatt Enterprise, Kansas History Evanston Collegiate Institute, Evanston, III., I, 2; Chorus, 3; Debate, 3; Dramat, 3; Men ' s Glee Club, 3; Orchestra, 3; Student Christian Fellowship, 3 : Intramurals, 3; Track, 3. Reuben Ginsberg Athens, Texas Economics-Political Scienc Schreiner Institute, Texas, I, 2; Pi Gamma Mu; Debate, 3. Ruth J. Gross Fords, N. J. Economi, " Aucola, " I, 2, 3; Debate, I, 2, 3; El Grupo Pan-American, 2; International Relations Club, I, 2; League of Worn, Voters, I, 2, 3. JUNIOR CLASS Burke Hertz Ruth Kent West Falls Church, Va Trenton, N. J. Dramat, 2; Baseball, I, 2, 3; Basketball, I, 2, 3; Football, I; Class Honors, I, 3; Women ' s House Council, 2; " Aucola, " Alpha Kappa Pi. I; El Grupo Pan-Americano, I, 2 (Secretary, 3); Alpha Chi Omega. Lester Hewitt Craigsville, Va. History Ferrum Junior College, Ferrum, Va., I, 2; Basketball, 3. Richard Hinze Burlingame, Calif. Econor San Mateo Junior College, San Mateo, Calif., I, 2. Mary King Washington, D. C. Sociology " A " Club, I, 2, 3; Chorus, 2, 3; Glee Club, I, 2 (Vice-Presi- dent, 3); League of Women Voters, I, 2, 3; Le Cercle Fran- cais, I, 2 (Corresponding Secretary, 3); Badminton, I, 2, 3; Basketball, I, 2, 3; Hockey, I, 2, 3; Alpha Chi Omega (Secretary, 3). Hugh Leidel Washington, D. C. Carol Kennedy Kensington, Md. English Helen Lundeqaard Class Honors, I, 2, 3; Women ' s House Council (Treasurer, 3); Chorus, I, 2, 3; El Grupo Pan-Americano, 2; Glee Club, I, 2 Bloomfield, N. J. (President, 3); Le Cercle Francais. I, 2, 3; Phi Mu (Presi- Curriculum Board, 3; Class Secretary, 3; " Aucola, " I; League dent, 3); Panhellenic Council. 2, 3. of Women Voters, I, 2; Alpha Chi Omega (Vice-President, 3). History Henry McFarland Washington, D. C. John Manchester Chevy Chase, Md English " Eagle, " 2, 3; Baseball, 2, 3; Basketball, 2, 3; Intramurals, I, 2, 3; Class Ping Pong Champion, I; Class Tennis Champion, 2; Alpha Theta Phi. Lillian Maki Iron River, Mich. ! Michigan State College, East Lansing, Mich., 2; Cho Glee Club, 3; Alpha Chi Omega. Washington D. C. Pauline Manning Languages Class Honors, 2, 3; " A " Club, I, 2 (Vice-President, 3); El Grupo Pan-Americano, 2, 3; Glee Club, 3; League of Women Voters, I, 2, 3; Le Cercle Francais, I, 2, 3; Basketball, I, 2, 3: Hockey, I, 2, 3; Independent Women. JUNIOR CLASS Dorothy Mapes Westfield, N. J. Spa Union Junior College, Roselle, N. J., I; El Grupo Pan-Art cano, 3 (Secretary-Treasurer, 2); Glee Club, 2; Delta Garr Alberta Napper N. Y. ology Green Mountain Junior College, Poultney. Vt., I, 2; Class Honors, 3; Pi Gamma Mu; " Aucola, " 3; Dramat, 3; " Eagle, " 3; League of Women Voters, 3; Basketball, 3; Sigma Phi Delta. Richard Marsh Washington, D. C. Jeanne Mathews Harry Otto Nielsen Washington, D. C, Biology Le Cercle Francais, I, 2; Football, I, 2; Intramurals, I, 2, 3; Tennis, I, 2, 3; Track, I; Phi Sigma Kappa. College Council, 3; " Aucola, " I; Debate, I, 2, 3; Le Ce Francais, I; Speakers ' Bureau, I, 2, 3; Golf, I, 2; Tennis Alpha Chi Omega. Betty Parker Beverly Hills, Calif University of Califc rnia at Los Angeles, Calif., I, 2; Badmin- ton, 3; Delta Gamma. Marion M. Mattes Scranto English Pi Delta Epsilon; Orientation Board, 2, 3; Homecoming Queen, 3; Class Vice-President, I; Class Secretary, 2; " Au- cola, " I; " Eagle " (Copy Editor, I; Associate Editor, 2; Edi- tor, 3); Chorus, I, 2, 3; El Grupo Pan-Americano, I, 2; Glee Club, I. 2, 3; Phi Mu (Vice-President, 2; Secretary, 3). Doris Patterson Washington, D. C. Biology Beta Beta Beta; " A " Club, 2, 3; Chorus, 2, 3; German Club, I; Glee Club, 2, 3; Student Christian Fellowship, I, 2, 3; Basketball, I, 2, 3; Hockey, 2, 3; Sigma Phi Delta (Sec- Marjorie Plitt Chevy Chase, Md. " Aucola, " 2; El Grupo Pan-Americano. 2; League of Wome Voters, I; Student Christian Fellowship, I; Alpha Chi Omega Elsa Ramirez Psychology Ponce, Puerto Ri. Sociology Daisy Nadine Posniak Washington, D. C. Economics Class Hones, 2, 3; Pi Gamma Mu; El Grupo Pan-Americano, 2: International Relations Club, 3; League of Women Voters, 3; Le Cercle Francais, 3 (President, 2). Milton Reinhard ■idgeport, Conn. Junior College of Connecticut, Bridgeport, Conn., I, 2; Pi Gamma Mu; Phi Sigma Kappa. JUNIOR CLASS Homer Rhule Williamsburg, Pa. State College, State College, Pa Gamma Mu; Alpha Kappa Pi. Bethesda, Md. Walker Shumate ssurer, I; " Aucola, " 3; " Eagle, " I, 2; Basketball I; Intramurals, I, 2, 3; Alpha Theta Phi. Charles Richmond Rockville Center, N. Y. Political Science El Grupo Pan-Americano, 2; Debate, I, 2, 3; Orchestra, I, 2, 3; Track, I; Basketball, I; Intramurals, I. 2, 3; Alpha Kappa Pi. Margaret Rule Kenwood, Md. Spanish Social Board, 2; Orientation Committee, 3; " Eagle, " I; Delta Gamma (Recording Secretary, 2; President, 3); Panhellenic Council (President, 3). Jane Sattler Washington, D. C. Sociology-Religion Class Honors, 3; Religion Board, 3; Assembly Committee, 3; Class Vice-President, 2, 3; Class Dance Chairman, 2; " Aucola. " I. 2, 3; Chorus, 2, 3; " Eagle, " I; Glee Club, I, 2. 3; League of Women Voters, I, 2 (Vice-President, 3); Le Cercle Fran- cais, I; Student Christian Fellowship, I (Recording Secretary, 2; Vice-President, 3); Alpha Chi Omega (Corresponding Sec- retary, 2; Treasurer, 3). David C. Thatcher Washington, D. C. Economics Class President, 2; Chorus, I, 2, 3; El Grupo Pan-Americano, 2; Baseball. I, 2, 3; Football, I, 2, 3; Intramurals, I, 2 (Man- ager, 3); Alpha Theta Phi. Barbara Thomas Masardis, Me. English Westbrook Junior College, Portland, Me., I, 2; Dramat, 3; " Eagle, " 3; Basketball, 3; Sigma Phi Delta. Paul Weidler Williamsport, Pa. Econo Williamsport Dickinson Junior College, Williamsport, Pa 2; Baseball, 3; Football, 3; Phi Sigma Kappa. Catherine Wilkie Washington, D. C. Herbert H. Wood Port Angelos, Wash. Political Science Athletic Board, 3; Camera Club, I; Debate, I, 2, 3; El Grupo Pan-Americano, 2, 3; Student Christian Fellowship, I, 2, 3; Football (Manager, I); Track, 1,2 (Cross-Country, Captain, 3). George Zuras Washington, D. C. Economics High Point College, High Point, N. C, I, 2; Basketball, 3. JUNIOR CLASS SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS GRANT PRICE President ELOISE SMITH Vice-President JOANNE HEITMANN Secretary WENDELL WILLIAMS Treasurer FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS JOHN HARRISON President HAROLD McGRAW Vice-President GLORIA ENGLE Secretary JIM EDEN Treasurer . . . . THE SOPHOMORE AND FRESHMAN Williams Smith Price Heitmann Eden Engle Harrison CLASSES THE SOPHOMORE Emerging from frolicking infancy to sophisticated sophomorism, we returned to find W. R. H. all dressed up . . . Ham House remodeled . . . new sundial . . . We can now bull, apple polish, and cut classes gracefully . . . We ' ve also found that a little study keeps one in the running for a good time . . . Another set of upstart frosh . . . rules more severe and strictly enforced ... Jo taking sub-title to Homecoming Queen . . . Class officers elected after much ado . . . Grant efficiently presiding, " Darling Eloise " in second place, Jo taking notes, Windy holding a fortune . . . Rush season seen from the other angle . . . One more unique dance ... a bit bedraggled by exams . . . but we come up smiling. P o P ■ I CLASS. MEMB AMATUCCI. THOMAS Silver Spring, Md. AMTOWER, NORMAN Cumberland, Md. ANDERSON, MILDRED Chevy Chase, Md. ANDREWS, RHYNE Washington, D. C. BERMAN, MIRIAM Ellenville, N. Y. BOUTON, JAMES Washington, D. C. BRAUM, MARIAN Washington, D. C. BRIDGE, PHYLLIS Hazardville, Conn. BUNDY, MARIAN Saranac Lake, N. Y. BURRUS, MARGARET Washington, D. C. BYER, HERMAN Washington, D. C. CONE, GLORIA Washington, D. C. CORNWALL, ROLAND Bethesda, Md. COZAN, LEON Wildwood, N. J. CULP, WAYNE Yeadon, Pa. DETTY, WENDELL Washington, D. C. FORMAN, HELEN Washington, D. C. GARLAND, WILLIAM Washington, D. C. GERAN, RUTH Washington, D. C. HAYES, SARAH Franklin, Va. HEITMANN, JOANNE East Rockaway, N. Y. HOLLINGSWORTH, CAROL Bethesda, Md. HOLLIS, THELMA Fallen Timber, Pa. HOUSEMAN, MILDRED .... Old Greenwich, Conn. IRWIN, BARBARA Benning, D. C. JOSEPH, JAMES White Plains, N. Y. KROUSKOP, NED Bellefontaine, Ohio LaFONTAINE, FRANK Clarks Summit, Pa. LANZILLOTTI, ROBERT Washington, D. C. [Ml E RS MCCARTHY, JOHN Washington, D. C. McCULLOUGH, ALAN Clarks Summit, Pa. McEACHRAN, BARBARA Winchester, Va. McLACHLAN, LANIER Chevy Chase. Md. MALETZ, ROSALIE Chevy Chase-, Md. O ' HORA, ROBERT Scrantort, Pa. OTT, MAURINE Washington, D. C. PARKER, BETTY Washington, D. C. PETTIT, FAITH Jersey Shore, Pa. POTTER. MAC Antes Fort, Pa. PRICE, GRANT Atkinson, Neb. REDWINE, CHANNING Washington, D. C. RIDDELL, GLENN Arlington, Va. SCATTERDAY, RICHARD Pontiac, III. SHARRAH, FRED Arlington, Va. SIMON, BELLE Miami Beach, Flo. SITES, JAMES Gladstone, Va. SMITH, ELOISE Bloomfield, N. J. STAWICKI, THEODORE Nanticoke, Pa. SULZER, CAROLINE DeLand, Fla. SUTHERLAND, JULIA Washington, D. C. THOMPSON, GRACE Washington, D. C. VALLIERES, ARMAND Merrimac. Mass. WALKER, AUDREY Washington, D. C. WALKER, MARCH Washington, D. C. WALTER, KATHERINE Elkton, Md. WERNER, YVONNE Silver Spring, Md. WILLIAMS, WENDELL Youngstown, Ohio WOOD, JOHN Washington, D. C. THE FRESHMAN MEMBERS ARNAUD, RUSSELL Hamden, Conn ATKISSON, RUSSELL Mountain Grove, Mo ATWOOD, NOELLE Washington, D. C BAKER, FAYE Upper Marlboro, Md. BEALE, ELAINE Harrisonburg, Va. BOSIEN, WILLIAM Silver Spring, Md. BREWSTER, FRANCES Washington, D. C. BRINDLEY, LEILA Collinsville, Ala. BROWN, KENNETH Washington, D. C. BURNS. MARY ELIZABETH Scranton, Pa. CARTER, DEAN . . Washington, D. C. CHIN, WILLIAM Washington, D. C. CLARK. VANDA Washington, D. C. COHEN, FRANCES Washington, D. C. COKINOS, NICHOLAS Washington, D. C. COLLIER, NEIL Arlington, Va. CORDDRY, ROSEMARY Snow Hill, Md. COURTNEY, MARY LOU Chevy Chase, Md. CRESSWELL, FRANCES Elizabethtown. Pa. CROUTER. MARCIA Engelwood, N. J. CUNNINGHAM, CLOTILDE Washington, D. C. DORSEY, FRANK Bethesda, Md. DORSEY, KATHERINE Chevy Chase, Md. DOWLING, LAURENCE Bar Harbor. Me. EDEN, JAMES Washington, D. C. EDLER, MILDRED Washington, D. C. ENGELL, JANE Washington, D. C. ENGLE, GLORIA Washington, D. C. ERHARDT, BETTY Easton, Pa. FAULK, AUDREY Fairfax, Va. FUGLER, BARTLEY Washington, D. C. GAGER, MARGARET Washington, D. C. GRAHL, ELINOR Silver Spring, Md. GREENFIELD, LAWRENCE Peekskill, N. Y. GRINER, MABRY Washington, D. C. GROSS, DEAN Royal Oak, Mich. HAGIE, ELLAMAE . Washington, D. C. HARDEY, ROBERT Chevy Chase, Md. HARRISON, JOHN Arlington. Va. HILDEBRAND, SAMUEL Washington, D. C. HILL, DONNA Washington. D. C. HOBBY, GEORGE . Washington, D. C. HOFFMAN, JEAN McLean, Va. HOOVER, MERRILL Arlington, Va. HUDSON, ELAINE Washington, D. C. HUDSON, ERNESTINE Washington, D. C. HULFISH, BARBARA Alexandria, Va. JAMES, EVAN Johnstown, Pa. JAWOROWSKI, IRENE Bridgeport, Conn. JOHNSON, EDDIE East Falls Church, Va. KEESLING, RUTLEDGE Washington, D. C. KENNEY, CELESTE Chevy Chase, Md. KLIGMAN, CHARLES Washington. D. C. LEIGHTON, JEAN Rockville, Md. LEONE, ANJETTE Palisade, N. J. McALLISTER. MARGARET Washington, D. C. McGRAW, HAROLD Carthage, N. Y. MALONY, JAMES Youngstown, Ohio MANN, KARL Chevy Chase, Md. MARIS. ALBERT Washington, D. C MAUCK, VIRGINIA Chevy Chase, Md. MAY, DONALD Johnstown, Pa. MELSON, MARY Wilmington, Dei. MORGAN, FRANK Bethesda, Md. MURRAY, ELIZABETH Fairfax, Va. NELSON, ANNETTE East Burke, Vt. O ' CONNOR, CHARLES Washington, D. C. OLMSTEAD, GEORGIA Washington, D. C. O ' MILLIAN, ALBERT Peckville, Pa. ORTH, RICHARD Steelton, Pa. PARKER, NATHANIEL Granville, N. Y. PAYNE, PHYLLIS Arlington. Va PETRO, JAMES Washington, D. C. RABBITT, EDWIN Washington, D. C. REILLY, FRANCIS Washington, D. C. RHEA, ROBERT Washington, D. C. ROSENBLOOM. MAURICE Washington, D. C. RUARK, ALICE Park Ridge, III. RUBEN, LEONARD Washington, D. C. RUDD, THOMAS Cumberland, Md. RULE, ROBERTA Chevy Chase. Md. SANDLER, THEODOR Atlantic City, N. J. SCHENKEL, RUTH Chevy Chase, Md. SEGAL, JANET Washington, D. C. SHEPHERD, RAYMOND Arlington, D. C. SMITH, MARYANNE Washington, D. C. STARR, ROBERT . . Washington, D. C. STAUFFER, LYDIA Kensington, Md. STEVENSON, DAPHNE Babylon, N. Y. SWEET. ANNE Washington, D. C. THOMPSON, MARY JANE Washington, D. C. THOMSON, MARIAN Rosslyn, Va. TOOTHMAN, ROBERT Washington, D. C. TRADER, RAY Washington, D. C. TRAMMELL, ANNE McLean, Va. TRIESLER, ROBERT Hagerstown, Md. VAUGHN, MARGUERITE Alexandria, Va. WARSHAW, ROSLYN Morristown. N. J. WELLER, BETSY Washington, D. C. WHITTLE, HILDRETH Jamestown, N. Y. WILLIS, MARY KATHRYN Edgemoor, Md. WIMMER, EDITH Washington, D. C. WINDSOR, CLAYTON Wilmington, Del. WININGS, JANE Chevy Chase, Md. ZARBOCK, RICHARD Fairfax, Va. CLASS Friday, September 19 . . . the A. U. campus is crowded with new faces, new people . . . the usual first-day ex- citement and shyness . . . then a week-end of parties, tours, and lectures — a sunny freshman world . . . But the storm clouds gather with the arrival of upperclass- men ... in the place of an ideal existence for the frosh come the tortures of the sophomores ' domination . . . hazing . . . green tags . . . bright blue beanies . . . Tarzan yells . . . tuneless cheer songs . . . inevitable antagonistic mutterings about the dictators . . . Foot- ball season — ten snappy cheerleaders . . . excitement of rush parties . . . Christmas vacation . . . Exams, head- aches, sleepless nights . . . Spring — the frosh discover the Grotto . . . new couples for our colossal dance . . . Finals ... A year of fun in which we establish new tra- ditions for those who follow. N " T hctiuitied ' i ' ' % ■■• COLLEGE HONOR Dr. Engel (Vice-President), Dr. Woods (President), Miss Brown (Secretary-Treasurer), Keller, Math- ews, Newby. The outstanding students in one field or all . . . elected by the faculty or by the active members . . . The College Honor Society, not crammers but the possessors of genuine intelligence, de- pendability, integrity and interest in extra-curric- ular activities . . . Omicron Delta Kappa and Cap and Gown for men and women, respec- tively, chosen for the notable leadership, scholar- ship, and service of the top few . . . Members of Delta Sigma Rho, men and women of high scholastic rating and outstanding forensic talent . . . Coach Slover one of the newest members ... Pi Gamma Mu for majors in the social sci- ences who produce work of highest quality . . . Beta Beta Beta, the biology student ' s goal, not only serious but also social, hikes and movies ... Pi Delta Epsilon for the brilliant journalist . . . sends representatives to the national con- vention in Ohio . . . one of the most highly regarded societies both at A. U. and through- out the United States . . . These are the rewards and honors of college life. OMICRON DELTA KAPPA CAP AND GOWN Newby, Barkdull (President), Byham (Treasurer Keller (Vice-President). Waldron (President), Yeager (Treasurer), Good- win (Secretary). DELTA SIGMA RHO PI GAMMA MU Clay, Barkdull, Keller, Woods, Slover. Doolittle, Goodwin, Keller (President), Abbadessa, Barkdull (Secretary-Treasurer). BETA BETA BETA Front Row: Patterson, Waldron, Bean (Treasurer), Neff (President), Mathews (Vice-President), Mitch- ell (Secretary), Ott. Back Row: Fuchs, Berry, Brandenberger, Wood, Dr. Dennis (Faculty Advisor), Dr. Norris, Randell. PI DELTA EPSILON Keller, Barkdull (Secretary-Treasurer), Mattes (President), Shenton (Vice-President), Goodwin. COLLEGE COUNCIL CARL BYHAM Student Association President Democracy in action ... an opportunity for the closer companionship of those who cherish ideals promoting the development of knowledge, skill, and personality . . . Put into action through the organization of a publications board to assure academic freedom and to formulate student opinion . . . The social board to prevent over- emphasis or conflict in A. U. ' s many activities . . . revolution — dances may last until 1:00 a. m. . . . The orientation board to introduce the freshmen to campus life, and to teach them the traditions and ideals of the University . . . The athletic board to promote and sustain fair play and good spirit in all sports . . . The curriculum board to advocate the deletion or addition of specific courses . . . new requirements accepted by the faculty . . . The religion board to con- duct Christian activities on the campus . . . These, the institutions of the Council . . . Meet- ings every Wednesday at 1 :00 . . . Keller disser- tating on parliamentary procedure . . . Bing banging for order . . . No one arriving on time ... Dr. Bentley sneaking out at 1 :40 to catch his students leaving his 1 :30 class . . . Amendments . . . and more amendments . . . Barkdull, " I rise to a point of order " . . . Keller, " Sit down " . . . The College Council — the hashing-out place for all new ideas and organizations . . . Suggesters of the A. U. Fund drive . . . one big charity drive a year . . . Sponsors and organizers of Home- coming . . . old alums return ... a winning foot- ball team . . . dance in the gym and a dazzling sweetheart queen . . . Originators of Arbor Day ... no classes . . . overalls . . . slacks . . . poison ivy . . . professors puttering in the posy beds . . . free lunch . . . hot dogs and coffee . . . an odoriferous race for the garlic queen . . . The return of the spring carnival . . . crowning of a May Queen ... a beautiful bevy of girls . . . the foundation of the parchment parade . . . These the activities of the College Council which functions to unify school spirit and make A. U. a more nearly complete and compact working unit. PUBLICATIONS BOARD Faculty: Dr. Batchelder (Chairman), Dr. Shenton, Dr. Clark; Senior, Virginia Goodwin (Secretary); Junior, Thomas Aiken; Sophomore, Miriam Ber- SOCIAL BOARD Faculty: Miss Brown, Miss Snodgrass, Mr. New- gord; Senior, Dick Bean; Junior, Doris Patterson; Sophomore, Ruth Geran; Freshman, James Malony. ORIENTATION BOARD Faculty: Miss Brown, Dr. Woods, Mr. Cassell; Seniors, Harry Newby, John Abbadessa; Juniors, Paul Berry, Margaret Rule; Sophomores, Mildred Anderson, Grant Price. ATHLETIC BOARD Faculty: Dr. Engel (Chairman), Dr. Dennis, Dr. Potorf; Senior, Harry Newby; Junior, Herbert Wood; Sophomore, Robert Lanzillotti. RELIGION BOARD Faculty: Dr. Potorf, Dr. Bentley, Mr. McLain; Senior, Robert Neff; Junior, Jane Sattler; Soph- omore, Joanne Heitmann. [59] 5U523 BOB SHENTON Editor FRED CARL Business Manager EDITORIAL STAFF BOB SHENTON Editor VIRGINIA GOODWIN Associate Editor BELLE SIMON Literary Editor CONSTANCE BARROWS Copy Editor j } ) JUDSON FRENCH Informal Photography NED KROUSKOP Formal Photography THOMAS AIKEN Sports Editor JACOUELINE WALDRON . . . Women ' s Sports Editor CELESTE KENNEY Art Editor BUSINESS STAFF FRED CARL Business Manager GRACE THOMPSON Advertising Manager STAFF PEGGY BURRUS DEAN CARTER BERNARD ENDELMAN JANE ENGELL ALBERTA NAPPER GLORIA ENGLE JANE SATTLER RUTH GROSS WALKER SHUMATE VIRGINIA MAUCK [60] CAROLINE SULZER ARMAND VALLIERES ROSLYN WARSHAW A U C O L A Freshman hopefuls signing up for the staff . . . photographers, writers, data-getters . . . Bob pulling his hair and ekeing out a staff of editors . . . Jud snapping prize pictures of everything interesting . . . Changes in the dummy ... ar- guments . . . more changes . . . Chasing those who don ' t have their pictures in on time . . . Ginny slaving away lonesomely ... " I want more copy " . . . " It ' s too late to have your pictures retaken " . . . Jane Sattler and Bunny bringing in long lists of students, committees, faculty . . . Angle shots of campus spots and buildings . . . Suzy and Belle and coffee rushing to meet dead- lines all through the night . . . Last minute changes in make-up and copy . . . finally read- ing the proofs and wondering why printers are so dumb . . . another year, another book to be kept and cherished. ABBADESSA, MATTES, BARKDULL THE EAGLE WALTER BARKDULL . MARION MATTES . . VIRGINIA GOODWIN THE STAFF Managing Editor JOHN ABBADESSA Business Manager Editor NED KROUSKOP Circulation Manager . . Copy Editor TED SANDLER Associate Sports Editor REPORTERS NOELLE ATWOOD MIMI BERMAN DEAN CARTER ROSEMARY CORDDRY BERNARD ENDELMAN GLORIA ENGLE MABRY GRINER JAMES JOSEPH CELESTE KENNEY MARY JANET KENYON JOHN MANCHESTER BERTIE NAPPER BOBBIE RULE TED SANDLER JANET SEGAL BOB SHENTON BELLE SIMON CAROLINE SULZER BARBARA THOMAS GERRY WEIBLE ROSLYN WARSHAW After a year ' s labor trying to get the right at- mosphere, the new Publications Office in Hurst Hall is beginning to feel like home ... we are centered around our news editor in a journalistic horseshoe . . . more space . . . the " Aucola " no longer under our feet ... a barrel for a paper basket . . . blackboard space to scribble senti- ments on . . . Our slogans: " Barkdull is a drool " . . . " Dis rag smells " . . . " Vat, no advertising? " . . . " Nine out of every ten cubs prefer cokes " . . . " Do not put bottles here " and a row of coke bottles below . . . Dodging the clamor of the office with earphones . . . and Barkdull imi- tating a screaming vulture . . . " Close the door, cub " . . . " Where ' s that article I wrote? " . . . " Who the devil wrote this headline anyhow? " . . . " Aiken achin ' for his keys " . . . and so on rushing to meet Friday deadlines . . . " There ' s not enough copy, cubs " . . . " Oh, worry about it tomorrow " ... we just don ' t eat dinner on week-ends . . . Saturday morning . . . 10:30 . . . " Where are those galleys? " . . . 11:00 . . . cut . . . paste . . . enter a glue salesman, but who has $ 1 .50? . . . cut some more . . . enter Killer Keller with a few putrid puns to embel- lish his villainous verse and preposterous prose . . . Oh, that we could cut once again . . . cornily crooning a hill-billy tune ... I 1 :30 . . . come Barkdull complete with riding habit, pipe, well-worn hat — and in a great perpetual hurry ... he finally nailed down that Ruppert prize possession . . . poor Flattop mourning the early close of the book store — what ' s life without a coke? . . . " Who opened the window? " . . . watch the copy blow in the breeze ... 12:00 . . . Ted dashing in from a basketball game . . . " What can I write on today? Are there any cuts around here I can use? " . . . news and music through our sturdy radio . . . Abbadetc. appearing to announce a deficit — and disappear- ing . . . " Ow-w, why does that shade always fall on my head? " . . . the biggest, shakiest desk in any antique collection . . . the clatter of dilapi- dated typewriters . . . Mattes slack-clad . . . ever-disappearing shears . . . never-sharpened copy pencils . . . last minute revisions . . . un- ending printers ' errors . . . the News Mirror keeping the student body up-to-date on the lat- est world events . . . they take rumors, but boarders are rejected . . . pictured columnists . . . Sunday . . . 2:30 . . . back to slaving . . . Barkdull and Mattes in a last minute sweat . . . rounding out the rough spots . . . patch- ing up the worn places ... at last, we finally go to press . . . Tuesday a. m. ... at 10:00 an " Eagle " in every mailbox . . . sarcastic remarks from the students . . . after all that work . . . Wednesday . . . well under way again. First Row: Corddry, Gross, Carter, Shenton, Krouskop, Weible, Aiken, Engle, Sandler, Keller, Scatterday, Joseph. Second Row: Kenney, Atwood, Berman, Sulzer, Anderson, Mauck, Simon, Napper, Goodwin, Jaworowski, War- shaw, Endelman. King, Bundy, Waldr Amtower, Sattle Lentz, Potorf. student L hrl tlan FELLOWSHIP REVEREND LATCH, BERRY. Orientation Sunday, with college sing and faculty teas . . . close association with Metropolitan Me- morial Church . . . Dad ' s Day climaxing a great week-end . . . early morning service before Thanksgiving . . . help from the national move- ment . . . Sunday supper in Dr. Douglass ' s liv- ing room with honored guests, music, group sings led by Mr. Patterson . . . students united around couches, sitting comfortably on the floor . . . bull sessions — the cross-fire of different philoso- phies ... a warm feeling of friendship . . . Cabinet meetings . . . aid from Dr. Potorf and Reverend Latch . . . Christmas party for under- privileged children, complete with candy canes and Santa Claus . . . result — many smiling faces . . . discussions . . . delegates to student con- ferences . . . religious emphasis throughout the campus . . . the Lenten season brings weekly services for spiritual guidance . . . Easter serv- ice and another inspiring dawn ceremony at chapel ... a grand banquet and installation of officers . . . Mother ' s Day with a musical morn- ing in the church vestry. J k e 1 1 o m e n$ s4 o a 5 e COUNCIL OFFICERS EDITH MITCHELL Presidenr MARY JANET KENYON Head Proctor CAROL KENNEDY Treasurer MARION MATTES Social Chairman MARIAN BUNDY Secretary ELIZABETH BURNS ... Freshman Representative Sixty capricious coeds form our legislature, two charming ladies are our executives, but our judi- ciary department is in the hands of six domestic and democratic demoiselles — the Women ' s House Council . . . guiding us through discords and differences . . . joining in feasts and bull sessions . . . trying to keep order when we had the boys living downstairs . . . New house rules which make our Council more active . . . every room a smoker now . . . Cooking a din- ner for the boys . . . Beautifully redecorated W. R. H. . . . date parlors after the boys move into Ham House . . . Hide-out during air raid alarms, with the House Council maintaining quiet . . . Sparkling Christmas tree with little pack- ages beneath . . . Christmas carols by the Chorus in W. R. H. instead of in Chapel . . . white dresses, burning tapers, favorite carols . . . the memorable candlelight service with our best- loved qirl, Eadie Mitchell, presiding . . . Ginny Goodwin and Jo Heltmann, Marion Mattes and Becky Burns lighting our candles and starting the Yule logs gleaming ... all in the subtle charm and warmth of the Great Hall . . . Close com- panionship . . . telephone chats for dates or details ... a book and an easy chair for leisure hours . . . Snowball fights and husky serenades after blackouts . . . late sorority parties . . . never enough sleep . . . Cramming for exams with cokes, cigarettes and coffee . . . Ever con- scious of the dignity and prestige of our Council. POETRY CLUB OFFICERS CAROLINE SULZER President WILLARD SMITH Vice-President and Treasurer MILDRED ANDERSON Secretary League of Women Voters OFFICERS VIRGINIA GOODWIN President JANE SATTLER Vice-President MARY JANET KENYON Secretary MIRIAM BERMAN Treasurer i r 2) Scene from " Stage Door, " Fall Presentation. rawia t Dramat finally comes into its own . . . Mr. New- gord ... a new director with the ambition to make something of the A. U. Theatre . . . ably assisted by Mrs. Newgord . . . More interested students than ever before ... a brand new pol- icy in management . . . new classes and new spirit produce stage sets . . . hard work by everyone to get through on time . . . Keller turning out a printed program with ads . . . cooperation from the churches . . . interest from the high schools . . . " Stage Door " for our Christmas presentation ... a large cast includ- ing a great number of the fairer sex . . . long late rehearsals . . . two-night run to a full house . . . applause from Kurt Pinthus . . . after-show snack at the A and W . . . early start for the spring festivities . . . new combination of May Day and Shakespearian production . . . this time " Midsummer Night ' s Dream " staged in the Grotto ' s amphitheater . . . able assistance of Ned in bringing about effective lighting ... a hard year ' s work, but we end with a profit in- stead of the usual deficit. A 4 1 ™ fc t t t i » ± Mixed Chorus f IK en d e r DIRECTOR-ORGANIST McLAIN Symphonic numbers and blended chords floating through the late afternoon air . . . Hurst Hall . . . room 206 . . . auditions for the Septem- ber, 1941, chorus . . . " Try this scale " . . . " Too high? " . . . " That ' s better " . . . " Now, once more, please " . . . Monday afternoon, 3:20 . . . Wednesday night, 7:30 . . . Mr. McLain lead- inq us through musical realms with his unique and vigorous gestures . . . Couples coming in late from the Grotto . . . Eleven o ' clock, Wednesday morning . . . dashing from class to chapel ... all this has long been a tradition for us of A. U. . . . down in the basement . . . " Who took my robe? — oh, the seniors again! ' . . . " No fasteners on this one " . . . " My knees show in this " . . . " It ' s getting late " . . . " Hold up the dragging ends of your robe " . . . " Let ' s qo " . . . silence . . . organ music . . . Bing coming in late . . . serious faces . . . measured steps ... a standing student body to greet us . . . " What page? " ... " I don ' t have an anthem " . . . " The first altos are separated " . . . sermon time . . oh, for a little sleep . . good and bad speakers Leon ' s tenor booms . . long addresses . . . Chuck indulges . . . . . Skippy solos . . . . Christmas concerts we ' ve been rehearsing months for this . Combined Glee Clubs 3 we e tJJ a r m o vi 9 Anne Sweet takes the high note in " Fall on Your Knees " . . . carols for the Women ' s Guild . . . More rehearsals . . . Kenny concealing a cigar . . . " Louder, please " . . . " Try it again " . . . " Now, just a happy medium " . . . " Where do I stand? " . . . Our first winter concert . . . Mr. McLain beaming over our success . . . Concert in W. R. H. the night before vacation . . . and then one in chapel . . . Otto, Arch- duke of Austria, and Mr. Torovsky were in the audience . . . White gowns . . . lovely ladies . . . Girls ' Glee Club . . . Wednesday after- noon . . . " Arkansas Traveler " . . . " Omnipo tence " . . . Anne Sweet and Katie Fuchs try ing to play duets and making " Spiteful Neigh bors " even more spiteful . . . Tuxedos . . Boys ' Glee Club . . . Tuesday afternoon . . " Goodbye, Old Paint " . . . " Sea Chanties " . . " Pale in the Evening Light " . . . Doolittle ' s low " E " . . . nobody ever coming . . . After the holidays . . . new music for spring . . . gay, light and cheerful . . . rehearsals and more re- hearsals . . . chorus trips . . . bus rides to dis- tant cities . . . Mr. McLain trying to make us stick to business and forget bedlam . . . new and incongruous infatuations ... a week of pitching and singing . . . church suppers of potato salad and baked beans . . . hard beds . . . free afternoons for sightseeing and movies . . . stacks of books but no studying ... ah, this is life — and love ... all for the art of music . . . returning after hours and waking the half of the campus that did not wait up for us . . . horns blowing . . . people stumbling up the stairs . . . Miss Zentmyer still asleep — " What ' s the matter? Is it an air raid? Shall I ring the alarm? Oh, it ' s just you — well, go to bed qui- etly, girls; remember, quietly " . . . rehashes of past excitement before we try to get a week ' s sleep — in the remains of one night . . . Then more rehearsals — this time for the Spring Con- cert . . . we ' re back to annoying the scholars in Hurst Hall library just below us . . . we ' re breaking air raid rules with all this noise . . . some grumpy individual rings the fire alarm . . . let ' s go to the drill . . . but Mr. McLain is an impediment to safety ... he just won ' t let us leave . . . Finally, the Spring Concert . . . everyone nervous and looking handsome . . . we did a grand job ... a sigh of relief when it ' s over ... a feeling of regret that there is no more . . . and a wonderful warm sensation deep down inside . . . Next year will bring an- other chorus and new glee clubs . . . new solo- ists, different voices . . . they may be good — but they won ' t be quite the same as we were. b tnleti C5 Jf THATCHER FIRST SCORES CAPTAIN FOX American U. . . . 0; Susquehanna . . 6 American U. . . . 0; Swarthmore . . . 20 American U. . . . 21; Johns Hopkins . . American u. . . . 14; Allegheny . . . 20 American u. . . • 7; Randolph -Macon 13 American u. . . . 3; Juniata .... 16 Hope winging higher than ever this year . . . President Douglass and Coach Cassell working toqether for a winning team . . . practice the first of September, more than thirty candidates on hand . . . old stars and new material . . . Six games scheduled and contemplation of a clean slate . . . Then the old story . . . injuries . . . Russ Arnaud ' s shoulder . . . Bing ' s cleat S7AWICKI SHARRAH MALONY O HORA POTTER RUDD LANZILLOTTI FUGLER and TEN wound . . . But optimism born again at the pep rally in Spring Valley . . . inspiration, perhaps, from the new cheerleaders . . . The first game, with the crowd on edge, the president and the mayor on the bench . . . two Orange and Blue teams running plays up and down the field . . . the kick-off, and the 1941 Eagle spreads his wings . . . and shows surprising strength . . . Sharrah chugging through gaping breaches in the Crusader line . . . Garland and Potter clicking through the air . . . but no score . . . Susquehanna sneaks one over in the second quar- ter to lead six-nothing at the half . . . Confi- dence strong as ever, we watch thrilling drives and last-ditch stands . . . desperation and frustration, and the ride back home in bewild- erness . . . McCarthy lost for the season . . . small consolation in our fourteen first downs to their two . . . Douglass and dads here the fol- lowing week to see Swarthmore upset A. U. . . . see Eagles outclassed but not outfought . . . showing defensive strength down to the last whistle . . . Pudge ' s broken leg the following week . . . Enthusiastic Homecoming crowd sees Eagles at the peak of their power otherwise, with Bing back, plays clicking, Weidler snaring passes for long gains, Sharrah and Atkisson doing the groundwork . . . finally Arnaud, in for the first time, scoring through the line . . . Two more touchdowns on passes and the jubilant sup- porters are satisfied . . . The long jaunt to Meadville . . . the strong first half characteristic of the season . . . breaks and passes change the story . . . Home again to face Randolph- Macon in the mud . . . Thatcher and Sharrah plough through to set up Arnaud ' s score in the La FONTAINE first period . . . A. U. leads seven-six at the half . . . forced to play a defensive game there- after, stalling the Jackets three times inside the fifteen . . . the desperate attempts after R.-M. takes the lead . . . and another tough defeat . . . Juniata, and the fans still faithful . . . the Eagle dives in close, is driven away, but comes right back . . . Hoover ' s dependable toe gives us another lead . . . which is soon lost . . . and the game is Juniata ' s, though A. U. never stops trying . . . pulls screen play and other passes deep in home territory, keeping the Indians on their toes and the crowd on its feet . . . Staff ' s letter to the alumni . . . " one hun- dred per cent support of the student body " . . . praise for Menke, tribute to Kenny and to Bing . . . pride that no punches were pulled . . . Every game a contest . . . more first downs than opponents, better passing, and more fight! Next year, Catholic U. and Carnegie Tech. CAPTAIN FOX, CASSELL HOOP STARS BYHAM Captain REESE Only two veterans returning . . . outlook sad, though large squad turns up for first practice . . . Rigorous practice sessions and stringent training rules . . . Ensign Schulze back, this time as assistant coach . . . Season ' s opener with Gallaudet here . . . " Pop " struts new material and springs a surprise . . . team wallops Greenies . . . Hope rears its happy head . . . but George- town swings the axe . . . OGrady and Born- heimer too much . . . three more defeats fol- low . . . Hopkins overcomes tired Eagles in last half . . . Thobe of Loyola scores twenty points . . . Egli and his long Nittany Lions lit- erally stretch our losing streak . . . The story changes after the holidays . . . Randolph-Macon upset with the help of Fugler and Kligman . . . Gallaudet again beaten as entire squad sees action . . . Then Catholic U . . . Captain Byham out on fouls, A. U. barely leading . . . Klig- man fast-breaks the Cardinals ragged . . . team scores twenty-four points in seven minutes . . . Eaqles get revenge for grid defeat at hands of Juniata ... hit the road and lose to Randolph- Macon . . . Zuras gets hot and Western Mary- land succumbs in last seconds of game . . . but win return engagement the following weeK . . . " Pack-the-gym Night " shows student sup- port . . . crowd still with team at C. U. as that team falls again . . . Team looking good as it leaves for Conference play-offs . . . Byham leading the Conference with scoring average . . . Zuras sparking the play . . . Hewitt ex- hibiting flashy floor game . . . the Greek cinches first round victory with twenty points . . . team is eliminated second night as Loyola rides on to championship ... Up to Swarthmore for last reaular game . . . boys meet Stan Cope, come home . . . Grand finale in alumni " contest " . . . Eaqles show Cassell and Schulze what they have learned . . . Byham and Reese finish up . . . past stars come back for more . . . Varsity unhampered by six men on the floor . . . fin- ishing up a grand evening and victorious sea- son . . . anticlimax finds Coach Cassell leaving for Mid-Western Morningside . . . Bing and other admirers give a royal sendoff . . . " Pop " a real A. Uite both as varsity star and all-around coach . . . future alumni nights will miss his starring . . . next season is as yet uncertain. BASKETBALL SCORES American American American American American American American American American American American American Americjn American American iversity . 61; iversity ■ 26; iversity . 34; iversity . 33; iversity . 26; iversity . 56; iversity . 59; iversitv . 61; iversity ■ 57; iversity . 39; iversity 45; iversity . 55; iversity . 61; iversity . 57; iversity . 60; Gallaudet 37 Georgetown 70 Johns Hopkins .... 41 Loyola 42 Penn State 56 Randolph-Macon ... 48 Gallaudet 33 Catholic 33 Juniata 33 Randolph-Macon ... 45 Western Maryland ... 43 Western Maryland ... 66 Catholic 35 Swarthmore 72 Alumni 25 McNAB RABBITT BROWN ZARBOCK ZURAS HEWITT KLIGMAN FUGLER MANCHESTER MASON-DIXON CONFERENCE PLAY-OFFS American University . . 47; Mount St. Mary ' s ... 42 American University . . 34; Loyola 61 Total Points American University .815; Opponents 808 AMERICAN UNIVERSITY ' S 1942 ALL-OPPONENT TEAM Cope (Swarthmore) Forward Mogowski (Western Maryland) Forward Baltimore (Penn State) Center O ' Grady (Georgetown) Guard Bock (Loyola) Guard BASEBALL TENNIS ■TMthhfik SL H Hdtf •SHANTY " SLUGS MILLER MASHES GYMNASTIC ANTICS r THE 1 1 CLUB GIRLS Hot September . . . prophecy of exertion to come . . . sprained ankles, disjointed thumbs, eyes basketball-blacked . . . new class of fresh- men . . . playful lassies of A. U. flashing from one sport to another . . . The " A " Club opens the season with a wild and watery scavenger hunt . . . Coed sportlife starting with fall hockey season . . . shins showing signs of wear and tear . . . demonstration game with Mt. Vernon . . . playdays with Wilson Teachers ' College . . . upperclassmen fighting a stiff battle with the frosh — and remaining stiff . . . supper in the kitchen . . . and the losers taking possession of the spoils . . . the freshmen coming out with dishpan hands . . . Interpretative dancers posing for exhibition pictures . . . glamor and grace personified . . . Salut! en guarde, fence, touche . . . the clash of fencing foils ... An outstretched arm, a bent bow, a taut string, and a black and blue arm . . . Small racquet and a shaky net . . . why don ' t birdies bounce? . . . Campus coeds shining in off-campus sports: golf, bowl- ing, swimming . . . Basketball captivating the active combatants with interclass, sorority, and interschool playdays . . . practices point to promising material . . . games are nip and tuck encounters . . . Spring and the birds and the Grotto . . . Tennis and more archery . . . An- other year drawing to a close . . . " A " Club award dinner with honors, letters and new offi- cers . . . A. U. coeds march on. SPORTS Cheerleader Instruction, Basketbal Badminton, Modern Dancing. JiV cite unities 5: P A N-H E L L E N I C COUNCIL We meet to discover our original rushing dates in conflict with other activities . . . shall rushing be postponed till second semester? . . . only two rush parties this year . . . cut budgets . . . quotas raised . . . revised rushing rules . . . Panhellenic tea opens the season with the rustle and beauty of long dresses in the softly-carpeted Great Hall ... we are the first to use the newly-decorated parlor for a social affair . . . The usual rushing difficulties creep in — and are smoothed over in our meetings . . . tension rises as bids are issued — the suspense of silence pe- riod . . . lists of acceptances . . . squeals of joy and embraces of delight . . . informal pledg- ing and food . . . the thrill of formal pledging and pins . . . Keen competition at Home- coming . . . Intersorority basketball — and long hard fight with many upsets . . . Together with the Interfraternity Council, we make plans for a second-semester Interfraternity Prom . . . even better than last year ' s super dance . . . Songfest — after long hours of practice and Spring vacation ... as ever, a night of ex- pectancy . . . the freshman woman with the hiqhest academic average receives the Panhell scholarship cup . . . thought of next year ' s rush- ing dates as we leave for our house parties. The Inter-fraternity Council . . . the battlefield for all fraternity wars . . . the medium for inte- grated and cooperative action . . . dictator of pledginq rules . . . Rushing postponed until the second semester . . . pledqing finally under way with more fun than ever before . . . Hu- morous hazinq allowed . . . boys wearing every- thing from kilts at dances to reversed clothes in classes . . . autographed eggs becoming a fad . . . odd couples arranged by the older, more experienced actives . . . paddles of small dimensions used for drawing boards ... all the products of fertile college minds . . . Finally the Interfraternity Prom, unusually late, but made more exciting through anticipation . . . bundles of orchids to Dance Chairman Abbadessa for the maqnificent production of a superlative ball . . . intriguing decorations . . . smooth dance rhythms . . . coeds ' heaven . . . special late permissions for the dorm girls . . . town students weary in the yawning hours . . . the best prom ever . . . The manifestation of real coopera- tion between Panhellenic and Interfraternity Councils . . . the proof that the coordination of all social fraternities can achieve superior results. INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL - First Row: Kennedy, Walker, Mattes, Randell. Second Row: Burns, Corddry, Crouter, Hudson. OFFICERS CAROL KENNEDY President MARCH WALKER Vice-President MARION MATTES Secretary RALPHA RANDELL Treasurer MEMBERS MARY ELIZABETH BURNS MARCIA CROUTER MARY MELSON ROSEMARY CORDDRY ERNESTINE HUDSON AUDREY WALKER PHI M U Founded 1852 • Gamma Delta— 1933 [86 J DELTA GAMMA Founded 1874 Beta Epsilon— 1936 OFFICERS MARGARET RULE President MARGARET BURRUS Vice-President CAROL HOLLINGSWORTH Recording Secretary ELOISE SMITH Corresponding Secretary MARGARET HARNED Treasurer BETTY ADAMS NOELLE ATWOOD FRANCES BREWSTER JANE ENGELL GLORIA ENGLE MEMBERS MAXWELL GALLOWAY MABRY GRINER CELESTE KENNEY DOROTHY MAPES VIRGINIA MAUCK CHANNING REDWINE ROBERTA RULE JANET STODDARD GRACE THOMPSON First Row: P. Rule, Burrus, Hollingsworth, Smith, Harned, Adams, Stoddard, Mapes, Redwi Second Row: Thompson, Atwood, Brewster, Engell, Enqle, Griner, Kenney, Mauck, R. Rule OFFICERS EDITH MITCHELL President HELEN LUNDEGAARD Vice-President MARY KING Secretary JANE SATTLER Treasurer MILDRED ANDERSON MARIAN BRAUM RUTH KENT BARBARA McEACHRAN MEMBERS LILLIAN MAKI JEANNE MATHEWS GEORGIA OLMSTEAD FAITH PETTIT MARJORIE PLITT BETSY WELLER HILDRETH WHITTLE ALPHA CHI OMEGA Founded 1885 Beta Rho— 1937 ALPHA PHI Founded 1872 Beta Xi— 1937 OFFICERS GERMAINE COFFEY President ELEANOR CASE Vice-President YVONNE WERNER Secretary CAROLINE SULZER Treasurer MEMBERS JOAN BEADLE ELAINE HUDSON ALICE RUARK AUDREY FAULK BLANQUITA RAMIREZ MARGUERITE VAUGHN MARGARET GAGER ELSA RAMIREZ GERRY WEIBLE MARGERY HALE MARY KATHRYN WILLIS First Row: Coffey, Case, Werner, Sulzer, Hale, B. Ramirez, Weible, Beadle Second Row: E. Ramirez, Faulk, Gager, Hudson, Ruark, Vaughn, Willis. First Row: Waldron, Yeager, Patterson, Barrows, Napper, Thomas, Bundy, Geran. Second Row: Heitmann, Beale, Cresswell, Dorsey, Grahl, Nelson, Payne, Winings OFFICERS JACQUELINE WALDRON President VIVIAN YEAGER Vice-President DORIS PATTERSON Secretary CONSTANCE BARROWS Treasurer MEMBERS ELAINE BEALE LOIS BOORMAN MARIAN BUNDY FRANCES CRESSWELL KATHERINE DORSEY RUTH GERAN ELINOR GRAHL JOANNE HEITMANN ELIZABETH MURRAY ALBERTA NAPPER ANNETTE NELSON PHYLLIS PAYNE BARBARA THOMAS JANE WININGS SIGMA PHI DELTA Founded 1938 {oHoBof PHI SIGMA KAPPA Founded 1873 Epsilon Triton — 1936 OFFICERS KENNETH FOX President JOHN DEAN Vice-President ALAN McCULLOCH Secretary WENDELL WILLIAMS Treasurer MEMBERS THOMAS AMATUCCI EDWARD POTTER FRED SHARRAH CARL BYHAM EDWIN RABBITT TED STAWICKI 4 JOHN HARRISON FRANCIS REILLY PAUL WEIDLER HARRY NIELSEN MILTON REINHARD RICHARD ZARBOCK First Row: Fox, Dean, McCulloch, Williams, Mam. Nielsen, Reinhard, Weidler. Second Row: Amatucci, Potter, Sharrah, StawTcki, Rabbitt, Rsilly, Harrison, Zarbock. First Row: Abbadessa, Shenton, Barkdull, French, Bean, Keller, Neff, Newby. Second Row: Smith, E. Wood, Hertz, Rhule, Richmond. Joseph, Krouskop, Vallier Third Row: J. Wood, Bosien, Bouton, Dorsey. Eden, Hildebrand, Mann, Rudd. OFFICERS JOHN ABBADESSA President ROBERT SHENTON Vice-President WALTER BARKDULL Secretary JUDSON FRENCH Treasurer MEMBERS RICHARD BEAN SAMUEL HILDEBRAND HOMER RHULE WILLIAM BOSIEN JAMES JOSEPH CHARLES RICHMOND JAMES BOUTON EDGAR KELLER THOMAS RUDD FRANK DORSEY NED KROUSKOP WILLARD SMITH JAMES EDEN KARL MANN ED WOOD BURKE HERTZ ROBERT NEFF JOHN WOOD HARRY NEWBY ALPHA KAPPA PI Founded 1921 Alpha lota— 1940 ALPHA THETA PHI Founded 1928 OFFICERS BART REESE President PHILIP FELLOWS Vice-President PAUL BERRY Secretary CHARLES DOOLITTLE Treasurer THOMAS AIKEN NORMAN AMTOWER FRED CARL WAYNE CULP ROBERT DARBY LAURENCE DOWLING BART FUGLER MEMBERS BRADFORD HAGIE LESTER HEWITT ROBERT LANZILLOTTI JAMES MALONY JOHN MANCHESTER WILL MORIN ROBERT O ' HORA GRANT PRICE GLENN RIDDELL RICHARD SCATTERDAY WALKER SHUMATE JAMES SITES DAVID THATCHER GEORGE ZURAS First Row: Reese. Fellows, Berry. Aiken, Doolittle, Carl. Darby. Second Row: Hewitt, Manchester, Shumate. Thatcher, Amtower, Culp, Lanzillotti. Third Row: O ' Hora, Price, Riddel!. Scatterday. Sites Dowling, Malony. ike ( JLi it z taiu Lite aiiat The 1942 " Aucola " is American University ' s first wartime yearbook. This means that, in addition to the usual problems that confront an earnest herd of journalists responsible for the publication of an annual " Aucola, " the problem of drafted engravers, priorities on copper, paper, photo- graphic materials, and a diminishing student body have thrust themselves upon this bewildered group. It is with this added problem in mind that we want you to look at your " Aucola " . . . we ' re not apologizing for it, because even though it may not be the thickest one ever to come into the hands of students at A. U., we have tried hard to make it the best. Perhaps an explanation of the editorial " we " used above is in order. Virginia Goodwin, modestly known as the associate editor, again takes our biggest laurel wreath for her versatile work and advice gained through work on " Aucolae " of the past. Lesser laurels are also beamingly con- ferred on Connie Barrows, Belle Simon and Caroline Sulzer, who relig- iously produced endless copy; Judson French for his single-handed creation of the " Aucola ' s " informal pictures; Celeste Kenney for her original division pages, which, incidentally, were among the first copy submitted last fall. Ned Krouskop and Mary Lou Courtney, who assem- bled the masses for photographic purposes; Tom Aiken and Jackie Wal- dron, designers and producers of the sports section; and Tony Thompson, seller of advertising, are also worthy of added praise. Business Manager Fred Carl, now a genuine yeoman in the Navy, should be especially recognized for his pre-enlistment success. Finally, we wish to acknowledge the indispensable assistance given by the staff members " on the other side, " namely, Miss Chamberlin, Mr. Daniel and Dan Eadie of Benson, our printer; Frank Potter (now in the Army) of Pontiac Engraving; and Leonard Brown, Paul Gendler, and " Mac " of Merin-Baliban, the best " Aucola " photographer yet employed. BOBSHENTON. Unswerving Devotion to a Worthy Principle — is the measure of greatness among nations, businesses and individuals. For almost half a century, the Griffith-Consumers Company has steadfastly pursued the ideal of striving to make Washington homes and institutions more comfortable places in which to live. The extent to which we have succeeded is marked by the fact that today the Griffith-Consumers Company is a leader among the largest businesses of its kind. If you are already one of our customers, we pledge our continued efforts to merit your patronage. If you have not yet become acquainted with our merchandise and services, we invite you to try them. (riffith (onsumers (ompany 1413 New York Avenue Metropolitan 4840 Washington, D. C. © © Te HEAITH -Brink CHESTNUT FARMS eaXte © L. G. BALFOUR CO. Fra ternity Badges — Fraternity Jewelry Novelties, Favors, Stationery M edals, Cups, Trophies, Class Rings Class Pins, Club Pins, Buttons Convention Badges Teleph one NAtional 1045 Stephen O. Ford, Mgr. 204 In ternational Building 1319 F Street. N. W. WASHINGTON, D. C. Sales and Service REpublic 1 177 COMPLIMENTS OF UNITED TYPEWRITER ADDING MACHINE CO. Incorporated 813 14th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. SHAFER, INC. Over 40 Years a Good Name in Furniture 6700 Wisconsin Ave. Bethesda, Md. Artistic Communities for Homes of Character WESLEY HEIGHTS AND SPRING VALLEY Owned and Developed by W. C. A. N. MILLER DEVELOPMENT CO. I I 19 17th Street, N. W. Di. 4464 THE AMERICAN GIRL She loves beauty, quality, smartness . . . she wants value . . . she rather likes Jelleff ' s because here she so often finds the clothes she likes, priced within her reach. THE NEWER JELLEFF ' S 1214-1220 F Street STRAYER Degrees for ACCOUNTANTS QUALIFY for accounting and auditing po- sitions in business and government by taking Strayer ' s two-year day or three-year evening Bachelor of Commercial Science (B.C.S.) degree course. M.C.S. course, one year, in- cludes coaching for Certi fied Public Ac- countants ' (C.P.A.) examinations. STRAYER courses in Accounting are na- tionally-known, based on the same texts used by 200 leading universities. New Classes: SEPTEMBER FEBRUARY Diplomas for I SECRETAR I ES HIGH SCHOOL graduates and college stu- dents with Strayer training are preferred applicants for the best secretarial positions. Strayer graduates make excellent records in competitive examinations. COURSES for Beginners. Review and speed building classes in shorthand and type- writing for commercial students. New Classes: EVERY MONTH EMPLOYMENT SERVICE secures Positions for Graduates Over 200 calls each month for trained office employees Secretarial or Accounting Catalog on request HOMER BUILDING • 13f i and F Streets • Washington, D. C. JULIUS GARFINCKEL COMPANY A Store With the Heritage of a Fine Name Garfinckel ' s extends a cordial welcome to the girls and men of The American Univer- sity to shop in the Capital ' s most distinctive store. Girls will like our Greenbrier Sports Shop — filled with sweaters and skirts for their campus life, and our Debutante Shop — specializing in clothes for their gayer moments. Men will like shopping on our second and first floors for clothes and furnishings. And for a delightful luncheon or afternoon tea, rest awhile in our Greenbrier Garden. F STREET AT FOURTEENTH PEAKE NATIONAL 8979 444 NEW YORK AVENUE, N. W. PRINTERS C. ENGEL ' S SONS Incorporated Established 1850 FRUITS AND VEGETABLES District 0995 522 12th St., S. W. Washington, D. C. NATIONAL CITY DAIRY COMPANY Butter — Eggs — Cheese — Poultry Frosted Fruits and Vegetables Dl 0588 518-520 12th St., S. W. Washington, D. C. £ For Victory . . . UNITED STATES DEFENSE BONDS STAMPS LOGIC 301-302 A bull is a beast. To bull is to fake on an exam. Profs don ' t like bulling — the beasts! Education is obtained In a university. A university is an institution. Marriage is an institution. Therefore, marriage is an education. A. U. plays baseball. Baseball needs pitch- ers. This explains why so many baseball players use the Grotto. My man climbs trees. Monkeys climb trees. You ought to see my man. Money is made in the mint. A mint is a leaf. Leaves grow on trees. Therefore, money grows on trees. Professors are smart. Smarting gives a feel- ing of anguish. What do you think professors give? Sacrifices are made for loved ones. To sac- rifice is to offer. Which still doesn ' t explain why brides make sacrifices for their husbands in the form of burnt offerings. My man wears a toupee. A toupee is a wig. Whig is the name of a political party. Politics is fun. You ought to try my man! A. U. plays football. Football is a game. To be game is to be bold. Bold is a kind of type. When we type we pound. Pound is a weight. We are all waiting for the day when A. U. has the type of team bold enough to pound Carnegie Tech. A deck of cards has a joker. Bridge is a game played with cards. A number of bridge games is a rubber, which explains why this rubber shortage is no joke. Cats are pets. To pet is to make love. Co- eds are usually In love — which explains why co-eds are cats. Why Is a fire truck red? A fire truck has wheels, but no feet. A foot is a ruler. Queen Mary is a ruler. The Queen Mary is a boat. Boats sail in the ocean. Fish are also found in the ocean. Fish have fins. The Finns fought the Russians. Fire trucks are always rushin ' . Which explains why fire trucks are painted red. a " I a w I 3- M THIS BOOK DESIGnED A fl D PRII1TED BX (Z oWTsvn p n i n t i n c c o m p a n y n a s h v i lle © I SL MASTER ENGRAVERS TO AMERICA ' S SCHOOLS TRADITION For more than half a century Pontiac has been producing QUALITY printing plates for all types of publication work and has established o reputation for dependable service which unexcelled among photo-engravers. Every- where Pontiac yearbook service men have become known for their friendly, helpful assistance and are recognized for their ability as specialists in the school publication field it has become " An American Tradition " for schools to select Pontiac as thci. engraver year after year, with the result that the number of annuals handled by Pontiac has steadily increased Hundreds of these staffs have developed distinctive books with the assistance of Pontiac artists and have gained recognition for the originality and success of their publications. The entire personnel of Pontiac Engraving Electrotype Co. salute the publishers of this book for their splendid efforts in producing a fine year- book They invite other schools to join the thousands of satisfied Pontiac clients for assistance in the solution of their engraving problems. Pontiac served as the Official Engraver to this book PONTIAC ENGRAVING AND ELECTROTYPE CO 812-822 WEST VAN BUREN STREET, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS MEMH-BALIBAN PHOTOGRAPHY • Specialists in yearbook photography providing highest quality workmanship and efficient service for many outstand- ing schools and colleges yearly. • Official photographers to the 1942 Aucola, American University. • All portraits appearing in this publica- tion have been placed on file in our stu- dios and can be duplicated at any time for personal use. Write or call us for further information. 1010 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, Pa.


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American University - Talon / Aucola Yearbook (Washington, DC) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

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American University - Talon / Aucola Yearbook (Washington, DC) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

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American University - Talon / Aucola Yearbook (Washington, DC) online yearbook collection, 1944 Edition, Page 1

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