American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL)

 - Class of 1942

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American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 24 of the 1942 volume:

r ' ? Ei - ,1 1 5 1 . . 1 E , 2 1 1 1 1 V 1 ,I 5 1 n V N F 5 k I 4 4 3 - f K Q DEDICATION In sincere appreciation of the inspiration and knowledge extended to us and the inclustry as a whole,-we, the Class of 1942, respectfully dedicate D this Book to MRS. MAY LAING GRADY Way'--W-,T .YV. .iff - aw- w w ' FAC safwrrff J, fu, fa 'ylfj-fJ5f 5' V95 03' xqfigff-'Q ,, me iv v ig QE ,QW ,rx Y Q X if? 6, fa .., g:' zfvQf:.,. V V ' ' 45 X ww, 5 , V lf 7 5, . Q , 9 , t , W, f f f Z' - ww -' r, . . ' -veiieaeayfiiihf'Qkamawtnf ' " M- wer? 5 e A fl lf' w ' E? fry "ix NU ' 'I N' Q, ,Ya 5, 2-V11 r5'XS1W+f T'f:'QYi 'Vs' .v 9 v l -3 ws:-f ,' ,gzwnar ,+'f4:-Im zvfjzfv "" ' gift' il Wcays if 3 5 tw fi 1. f' L - NV? 0 ' ' V ' ji' 'u t ,va 'iv 4 'A-"',',.,f Z My : f, v 5' 5 Wasil? ,glam ULTY aM GEORGE H. JOHNSON GETLGTUI Manager American Institute of'Laundering CECIL H. LANHAM ALBERT JOHNSON Director Secretary-Treasurer ' School of Laundry American Institute Management of Laundering WALTER A. REINHARD Manager Commercial Laundry Department IRVING G. GARCELON Manager Department of Production and Engineering MAY LAING GRADY Manager Department of Sales Management Q HAROLD P. NUTLEY Manager Department of Advertising and Publicity Page ,Two A WILLIAM I. SHELD ON Department of Advertising and Publicity ROLLIN A. STEARNS Director of Service Departments ARTHUR I. ANDERSON Manager Department of Research and Textiles CARLYLE G. MORTON Department of Research and Textiles DOMER E. DEWEY Manager A Department of Accounting LEE JOHNSTON Department of Research and Textiles l RAYMOND F. GROHNE Manager Membership Department J. HINTON MASSEY Attorney'atfLaw - 'Instructor in Business Law Page Three power plant course if ,MJ-V .4 a XS' Jw' , 121214 45. ' ii' .- ii ,sci ., f f ' 1. Q, 'fin -P , . K, J . . , V , v , f f . X K Q n 5:3 ' -P G 1. S . 'aifp W iffa- -.- az, v -. J " 'Sai' ' - --.af 'f -. -:' w t . . l x V I ,, e. ...V .Mat 6 . 1 ' if 56 N ' we wh. fT'5"K'H - . , -" ' . ff if V ' V 4. .a s is N, .swrfs ,w U L g R I i ... V 4: ,fi 1- b , V ,gi x , , , ' ' yr. " , mv "f .1 .va 'n 1 . ,4 .- ng. ,. V , - Q .9 . ,A -. ,ig , . 1 , AX , ' fi3?s14 .is- . --'-'S' - V V . vl izgyaagar. aw.. L: .V 5.5. af, 1, rxpgx Iv .gig .. f f f - -A ' 5 f V ' '. - ' X' r. T, . . .. Gi- ,w ' ffl- . ., ' . ' J A 52 sm- , 2 V ,arf-,a..'+.r'z', an N Monday morning at ten o'clock, September 8, twentyfseven young men representing thir- teen states and the District of Columbia, met for the first time to enter the bonds of the American Institute of Laundering, seeking greater knowledge of our growing industry. By ten thirty with the aid of l'Cec" and Mrs. Brooker, those thirteen states became as one. Stan Wolf and Ken Khuans, the boys from away back, gave us all lessons in how to get the most from doing the least. We were soon in the midst of boilers, heaters, and ohm's law. "Chick" had us all chart the pipe lines throughout the A.I.L. power plant. James "Pierpont Morgan" McCarthy even included Joliet City pipe lines in his layout. Never before has the school had the good fortune of having a professional trio in its midst-Jacob, Jacobs and Jacobsen have taught us many extra cur' ricular activities. "Ceo" was sure glad Jake said "High 'Cec' Qld Shoe". Jake is a big boy. . Before many days passed Joliet and surrounding territory recognized the fact that another "fall inf vasion" had come. We had our first party at the "52" Ranch. "Big- Shot" Adelman and "One Punch" Tomlinson fur' nished entertainment with a demonstration in how to remove window panes. Tommy held the big wind to a draw. We continued the party at the "Y" and were invited to spend the night in the back alley. President Shirley used his talents to change the def cision. ' Next morning, with all in a gay mood, came the annual cleaning of the heat reclaimer. Red paint flowed freely. ,"S1ugger" Taylor and "Dick Tracy" Henckels came prepared in their clean white cover' alls. They always dress for Sunday. 1 "Chick" was so impressed by our excellent job on the heat reclaimer that we were soon cleaning the boiler. It certainly needed it. Fogg "old manga felt just like the rescuing fireman plunging through soot with a mask on his face. "Tex" and "Irish" never did get all of themselves into the drum. The 1941 Laundryowners' National Convention gave us all a short vacation in Cleveland. The class was accompanied there by Mrs. Marlin, Mrs. MC' Carthy, Mrs. Stormont, and Mrs. Longstreet. MOSt of the convention sessions were enjoyed by all, CSPC' cially ,those held at the "Hot Spot" and the "Cow Shed". We understand Jack Engle got the boys dates with some Cleveland beauties???? f Page Four 1942 ' POWER PLANT COURSE Front Row fleft to rightl: John Slattery, Lee Longstreet, James P. McCarthy, Lauren Taylor, Bemard Bronk, Gerald Boslow, Wanen E. Fitch, Jack R. Engel, Anson W. Bowden, Nicholas Marlin. Second Row: John Haverinen, Jack R. Henckels, Stanley S. Wolf, Martin Jacobs, Robert Joehnk. Edwin W. Mayer, Jr., William Singleton. Albion R. Fogg, Kenneth Khuans. Back Row: Irving G. Garcelon, Manager, Engineering Department: William A. Shirley. Robert S. Adelman, Eugene R. Jacobsen, Jr., George S. Yonkers. Charles Jacob, A. Harold Tomlinson, John M. Nahigian. Cecil H. Lanham, Director of School of Laundry Management. "Slugger" -Taylor added a black eye to his collecf tion of souvenirs from Cleveland. We hear that Fogg and Taylor are very much that way about each other. Eddie Mayer did well in Cleveland. Wonder if he'll be working in Philly after school. The students, as usual, beat the faculty in the an' nual softball game. Andy Bowden saved the game by a stirring catch of an infield fly combined with a irst class juggling act to end the game. Admission was free. Rusty Jacobs wondered what Mechanical Draw' ing was all about. He understood you were supposed to make those straight lines meet. But how? We'd like to know how Harold Tomlinson rates all those pies. We heard he has a technique of his own. It's just the talk where Joliet fair sex congref gate. John Nahigian has gotten ahead in his courses and is doing a bit of research in the Textile Department. He's making excellent progress. Uncle Sam was bound to get one of us 'before the course was over. Bob Stormont was chosen. Two days before leaving for Fort Sills, Oklahoma, Bob was married to Miss Helen Marie Barnbizer. He was the only one exempt from the 'final exams. Page Five plant production course Q25 ' . . , f, , ' .ya f,"f 4 ij, p ., . f- t...XW..,- vt, :ff as E P 1 ,f X 'Insta . . 'Q tl . E, ,. -,,,,.,5i. , . C N V i !Y..,":"?"- -'0 0 -- S" 'X f V lf, X -,G ,,v,:.f.t was . ,,. i ,S i- J, J wings, r Xt, A s.. gs- s K v ,,g,,, W- A . -V - fm., A " ' P hi ' ' " N 1 91.145 S' N ffm ? ,pf X iakf tu, . fi? 1 , , 5 f f f. as - 2 16 rigs' f. , 5. A235-ig,,',?X" . 557'-1 g, 5?'fi?l1-'Q-f x i f-1g ,,.:K., . 5. , ,- x 'r . A ,iw-Q" XM- N., A 2 , f- as 31 v k tgliaip wfniyr v , Q-1 V 5 2- 5.1 A Nl , 1, ,V X' - I +21 ,Ja - 3 3 . f , 55.3 1 it ,Z , t ' -rf-.f an at a a 'f 'K .1 .1 - s . My .. , , fa,-9351. LQ, .V , -7' ,. .x', , - , M. , f W' - . L .. 1 " M ' 941 fi ff 1 , , ,M HEN the news leaked out that the Produc' tion Course was about to begin, ten new stu' dents joined our ranks. The course began slowly but picked up momentum so rapidly, with "Chick" Garcelon and "Cec" Lanham at the helm, that many a gallon of midnight oil was burned be' fore we finished. In the morning 'iChick" told us how it should be done. We also had those two embryonic salesmen jim McCarthy and Andy Bowden who, for seven weeks, industriously peddled "American Laundry Machinery" and "Asher Ironers" respectively. "Irish" Jacob was on his toes the entire course and at this point we would like to recommend the benef its of the "hot foot" to all instructors who are inf flicted with lethargic students. In the afternoon "Cec", with Aggie,.Ann and Verne, showed us how it should be done. We labored diligently over millions of tiny garments and for some reason or other Warren HU. B." Fitch has snarled at children ever since. The student laundry was fortunately screened from the inquiring fem- inine eyes in the main plant since Slattery always fa' vored us with an enticing strip tease every afternoon. At the end of the first two weeks we started our plant layouts and we began to display how little we knew about Production. Templates, thumb tacks, scotch tape and aching backs came into their own-. After a few weeks of dreams and toil we all became the proud fathers of bouncing baby blue prints. "Gene" Lyons swore that "strictly speaking" he had the best layout in the class except for the fact that he didn't have any doors leading into his Power Plant. A As the dust had not yet settled at the "'S2" Ranch, we had our irst party of the course at Little jacks. Dates were the exception rather than the rule and the stags were like flies after sugar. Tomlinson fell off the "milk wagon" and caught a few hours sleep on the shoulder of some obliging girl, and before we could go home, Fogg and his date had to be pried out of Jack Hencke1's car. I A News Flash-War declared .on Japan, December 7, 1941. "Jake" Jacobsen was going to enlist the next morning. Stan Wolf got married. A full week of valuable time was lost out of our schedule with newspapers, war talk and radios in class. Gradually we returned to normal and the grindstone once again knew the touch of the A.I.L. noses. ' We began to realize that the strain was beginning to work its vicious effect upon us when Eddie Mayer proudly came forth with "Little Miss Muffetn as the name he had chosen for his plant. Something had to be done to relieve the pressure so a party Was thrown at Nick's Blue Moon Cafe. The emergeI1CY -committee, under the capable leadership of Robert Stuart Adelman, dreamed up an extravaganza de' Page Six ,H..,,....-r.---,.-, 1942 A PLANT PRODUCTION COURSE Front Row fleft to rightl: Lauren Taylor. Lee Longstreet. James P. McCarthy, Abe Lapides. Nicholas Marlin, William E. Drewes, Gerald Boslow. .laclc R. Engel, Warren E. Fitch, Howard E. Hastedt. Second Row: lrving G. Garcelon, lVlanager,'Engineering Department: John Slattery, Albion R. Fogg, Kenneth Khuans, Russell Gundrum. Bernard Bronlc, John Haverinen, William Singleton, .laclc R. Henclcels, Anson VV. Bowden, Cecil l'l. Lanham, Director of School of Laundry Management. Third 'Row: William Edwards, Eugene Lyons, Jr., John M. Nahigian, Stanley S. Wolf, Edwin VV. Mayer, Jr., Robert Joehnlc, C. Leroy Griffin. lVlartin Jacobs, VRobert P. Hammond Bach Row: Eugene R. Jacobsen, Jr.. William A. Shirley, Charles Jacob, Max Arthur Hansen. George S. Yonlcers, Wallace C. MacLean, A. Harold Tomlinson, Robert S. Adelman. luxe. "Robert Stuart" by this time had the City of Joliet well organized and running smoothly. Abe Lapides after a great deal of coaxing, did a tap danceg while Jerry Boslow, with no coaxing at all, furthered our education with Tango Lesson Number Seven. Howard Hastedt opened our eyes with a few unique interpretations of his famous "Eccentric Dance". A grand time was had by all and it was just what the doctor ordered. The Class, much refreshed, settled down for the final dash to a well deserved and untroubled night's sleep. After a great deal of effort, Eddie Mayer, managed to pull the entire third floor of the "Y" through the course with flying colors. Bob joehnk spent ten dollars dating a girl because she promised to type his thesis for him, and then discovered that she cou1dn't type. fP.S.j He got his money's worth. About this time Rusty Jacobs, "The Pickup, Pepup, with a Perkup Kid," introduced us to the mysteries of No Doze tablets which were used and appreciated by a few. The race with time was close but the class Hnished on schedule. We thus wrote inish to the course and began our Christmas vacations bear' ing the haggard, half dead appearance which is charf acteristic of all A.I.L. Production Courses. Page Seven textiles and washroom course 1 '24 1: 4 :Z 4 7' 11 5 A I gi A 2? P ts H., 5 i if '12 if " ii 5 s f L 9 i 2 1 4, J I FX .... O sooner had our Christmas vacation experif ences rolled off our tongues, when Art An' derson started 1942 off with a bang. With the help of his two side kicks, Carlyle and Lee, we ran smack dab into Chemistry, Washroom Procedures and Textiles. We were happy though to have eight new students join our group of wits and half wits. That quite subtle fellow from Seattle, Washington, remarked: "ls this really.Washroom? It sounds like ...i to me." Only a week had passed when "Tex" Shirley's edf ucational program went into effect--via phonograph records and transcriptions. The boys from Marion Street asked the entire class to their house one night, so that we might beneit from theiexperiences of "Mrs, Lapidesf' After the well known records there were games for all. Bingo for the meek and mild- poker and dice for the brave and foolish. "Rusty'i Jacobs displayed his mastery over the "Alabama Marbles" that night, just ask the boys who wanted to be brave. Our "Sudsmen" basketball team came into prom' inence this term, as they captured the Wednesday night league at the "Y"-commonly known as "Pur' ity Hall". Maybe our team didn't have such a good eye for that hoop, but we can say one thing for them -their attendance was perfect. One night in par' ticular, only four men from our team showed up but luckily enough the opposing team only had three men show up. Results: we won on another forfeit. Eddie Mayer, our Athletic Director, deserves the credit of running the team although he had quite a time trying to see the players on the side line with out his foureyes. The following members of the class constituted the team: Warren "U, B." Fitch, Brent "High Pokets" Farber, Abe Lapides, "Mold" Liebowitz, Bob Joehnk, Jake Jacobsen, "Irish" Ja' cobs, Bill Drewes, and Leroy "Grif" Griffin, ably as' sisted by Hjumpen Jive-Short Boulevard" Long' street, our cheerleader. The "SZ" Ranch, having changed management, was the site for our class party. After a very fine dinner we had a "Strictly Speaking" southern speech from our VicefPresident Eugene 'LHeuy Long" Lyons directed toward the love affairs of our Secretary' Treasurer Jack Henckels. Lee Longstreet's date, "Nicky", took over from there. It can be assured that everyone enjoyed her talents. Andy Bowden and his laboratory partner, "Tex" Shirley, while trying to titrate a sample of alkali, ran into some difficulty one day. Some "Rum Dum" doc' tored their caustic soda with quite a large dose of acetic acid. Too bad boys, that's one day you didn't manage to finish first. A We were- very sorry that Jack Henckels missed part of this course, but a serious throat ailment, that California type, stuck with him. Hard to shake off, but in spite of his weakened condition was able to Hnish the course. , Page Eight 1 942 U TEXTILE AND WASHROOM PROCEDURE COURSE Front Row fleft to rightl: Fred Mann, Vvilliam E. Drewes, Lauren Taylor, .lames P. lVlcCarthy, Lee Longstreet, Abe Lapides, Second Row: James J. Lynn, Gerald Boslow, .laclc R. Engel, Warren E. Fitch, Howard E. Hastedt. Wallace DeBoer, John Slattery, Paul l'lollman, Edwin VV. Mayer, Jr., John Haverinen, lvlartin Jacobs, Vvilliam Singleton, .Iaclc R. Henckels, Anson VV. Bowden. Third Row: Carlyle lVlorton, bowitz, Murray S. Levine, H. Lanham, Director of Chemist: Lee Johnston, Textile Analyst: Albion R. Fogg, l. lVlarvin Lei- Robert Joehnlc, Vvilliam Martin, Eugene Lyons, Jr., CC Leroy Griffin, Cecil School oi Laundry,lVlanagement. Baclz Row: Vvilliam A. Shirley, Eugene R. Jacobsen, Jr., Brent H. Farber, Jr., George S. Yonlcers, Charles Jacob. Vvallace C. lVlacLean, A. Harold Tomlinson, Arthur Anderson, Manager, Textile and Research Department. Many a cold day we will remember Bob Joehnk coming to school with that old Sea Captain's hat propped upon his noggin. He still insists that he found it hanging on an old rusty nail. To finish up the course we drained the treasury and had a big blow out banquet at the Woodruff Hotel. Our President "Tex" Shirley, gave a quite elaborate speech giving special recognition to those boys who were leaving us at this time. We are still wondering how Warren Fitch did all those card tricks. All we can remember is that there were too many fours of hearts in the deck. George "Triple Drip Drainoh Yonkersuand Lau' ren "One Punch" Taylor both left us and joined the Army and Air Corps respectively. Good luck fel' lows. ' Page Nine w ' f wr1aiF"'4ifgg vzenemunlrgiai sales and advertising course I " rift W. ' f-- 5 l A ja y e 'jggg I f ghiumm . V . Q5-1 V I jj,-ax ,Q Q, mf if-. ' at i J .Q I, ,V fy 'hz ,. ,V. V ,f ,f i ...NK ff' 4 if KJ.. . S .i ,. s. ' fp-3 I, P. ij, .ff ,ia st ,f J -V ffl if' X ' ' 375' I," ,-'ls . A ' - . M A- - . I' , Xkfqf. it AVING learned enough about the washroom to know that science hasn't as yet produced stains the same color as fabrics, we now leap headlong into sales and advertising, knowing full well that we have progressed, that is to say, we have swapped our old troubles for new ones. The old students we lost at the end of the last course were in part made up by new arrivals in the form of Ed. Stacer and Bob Bertenshaw. Bob, inf cidentally came to us in the guise of an old man but left frollicking like a young colt. The harsh effect of association, I suppose. ' Our sales instructor, Mrs. Grady, to whom we have proudly dedicated this annual, did not hesitate long in introducing the class to the problems of creaf tive selling and sales control. Intermingled among our lectures on this problem were sales talks and demonstrations by the students, movies depicting the virtue of "Mr, Sale", and frequent visits to the class by "Rusty" Jacobs. We constantly wondered whether the latter was a legitimate registrant or just a steady, guest. ' The afternoon periods were devoted to advertis' ing layout and copyrighting under the skillful direcf tion of Messrs. Nutley and Sheldon. The advertis' ing campaigns prepared by the class were praised as the best done in the school to date. However, Nutf ley and Sheldon were somewhat distressed, but nevf ertheless, complimented, when "Jake" Jacobsen inf sisted that there was little sense in straining to pref pare a campaign when one had at his disposal the work completely provided' by the Institute's dis' tinguished advertising department. Jake carried through with his conviction and filled his campaign with Institute material. Q Mrs. Grady, to a questionable extent, proved that women are not always disarmed by compliments. But if she had not been on guard "Brent" Farber would certainly have taken her by storm. It's like some' one once said, the fellows in the back of the class' room work for their grades, t-hose in front work for the teacher. Among the other memorable events of this course must be placed the defeated effort of Boslow, jacob, and Leibowitz to reach New York in Boslow's paper' thin tires. Other events included Fogg's recitation on the "Wonders of the telephone", the appointment of McCarthy as "bundle boy", and the frustrated attempt to use psychology on 'badfboy Joehnk by electing him SergeantfatfArms. He must have taken his election as the class's approval of his classroomanf Page 'lvvn 1942 SALES AND ADVERTISING SERVICE COURSE Q Front Row fleft to rightl: Edwin VV. Stacer. Albion R. Fogg, James P. McCarthy, Gerald Boslow, Mrs. lfflay L. Grady, Manager Sales Management Department: John Slattery. .laclc R. Engel, Jack R. Henckels, Warren E. Fitch. Second Row: Xvilliam Sheldon, Advertising and Publicity Department: Murray S. Levine, Edwin VV. Mayer, Jr., Robert Joehnlc, Martin Jacobs. Anson VV. Bowden, Harold P. Nutley, Manager, Adver- tising and Publicity Department: Cecil l'l. Lanham, Director ol School of Laundry Management. Third Row: William A. Shirley, Charles Jacob, l. lVlarvin Leibowitz, Eugene R. Jacobsen, Jr., Brent H. FBTIJCT, JF., Wallace MBCLCBH, I'IaI'0lCl Tomlinson, R0bCI't Bertenshaw. tics for he became worsethan ever. So you can see by these happenings, even though "Irish" Jacob was born in Cleveland, funny things can take place in Joliet, too. Adding to the neverftofbefforgotten episodes, the otherwise diplomatic "Tex" Shirley displayed at least upon this occasion that tact was what he had none of by telling Mrs. Grady that her tests and selling in particular was so much "boodle". It Was at the end of this course that the class lost the able leadership of "Tex". He had been an outstand' ing student as well as our class president for the four courses, and. to a man, the class was sorry to see him go. V - ' As the course drew to a close we all knew that advertising was the force that made people go out and buy something instead of saving up for it, and that all you had to do to sell laundry was to say to the housewife when she came to the door, "little girl, is your Mother in?" So with all this accumulated knowledge we strolled blithely into the next course, little noticing the anvil hanging over our heads. Page Eleven laundry accounting course if Q A Q ,Q a..S, , s ,J, ,1- . , i,7,47i, X. X if f 'ill y' ,Q 'Q Ms, 1 3 f 1' Wwfi 0 , ' Q it 1 gf5'2 ' f7y 'i , .1 ' L,.f'1 ', '15, ' J, ' 3 5 ,ij jQy,L,,,!AfZEgf,.. , , . ww - i ' . af? ' ff-443, X ' ' ' .aw . ,. '.-Ia. ffzrf - 1, V " f' 'K in Way? I .Ma .,1,,l,,1ff,,.,a4 , . ag, V .sb -at -634, .Vi r fy ,V . , f , . -, VV f-1-'ft ,lf ' QM f.-635. .r-5-Q,- f awzigji . ' 1 M. f 1, ,,.,.,3f,-5, ,fi any ,, N' f .. , .1 , -fa,- ,grwi W.. , f f fx fs at, Ir 3.3, ',,v7.',rl! it Q . A t ',,mg,3c,.,, J.. Ju '- f Q V ". f TM. I oi. v 1. ' . i. ..'. , ., "" . ,ff ff-ag ,f . .aa 43, f 4 ,fx-as may lit- -on :1 ' ,ge,w- ' '.MLvj --wt , . I 2 . tt ,5ls?2?'ff,,. ' 'aa .M . r- ' .fff f , . fo? A .Q 'qt' .wg ,,Z' , , , 'f 4,5-fgsiet f r K -'f ' w. 5, a..wf4g31g., 4 .. If . 45215 . ' ' A ' -' mg ' ' 'Sf - mms. " ' " ITH the Accounting Course, Joliet and the A.I.L. students welcomed Spring. Messrs. Dewey, Grohne, and Massey and their credit, debit, and ipso facto courses welcomed us. Accounting started off so fast that at the end of the first week everyone took a rest over the week' end. Quite a memorable weekend. Accounting class was quite a little workshop with all deeply absorbed in their Ledgers and Subsidiary Ledgers. The only disturbing noise heard was the cry for bleach. Even the best of accountants will make mistakes. "Jake" Jacobsen spent one entire morning, almost convincf ting Mr. Dewey that adding machines make mistakes. Better luck next time, "Jake," "At first blush," the law course looked like a pip. "Springer" Massey gave us two types of quizzes, either an insult to our intelligences, or so stiff that the "Lawyer," himself, had to look up the answers. "Rusty" Jacobs knew the law perfectly but when it came to putting it on paper he was Non Compismenf tis. Slattery, in answer tothe question "where must stockholders hold their meetings" came forth with "In the stockroom' Brilliant peta darling. "Mole" Leibowitz and "Irish" Jacob celebrated the coming of Spring with very close crew hair cuts. In anticipation of the visit to Stateville, no doubt. The annual trip to the State School of higher def gradation at Stateville will be held on graduation day under the auspices of Mr. Massey. Baseball became the favorite afternoon diversion and the old apple really took a beating. Little Jacks became the after dark hangout, superceding the Louis Joliet. Little Jacks was a fine place to relax and try to balance your books. Murray Levine and Wally MacLean bought a vintage Model Ford, but soon sold it because of the restriction on nonfessential cars. ,But tire rationing or no tire rationing, Abe Lapides continued his trips to Chicago every Monday, Wednesday and Friday nights to see his future wife whom he will marry on June 28. ' "Jerry" Boslow, after five A.I.L. courses, finally learned on which side to iron a shirt collar. Harold Tomlinson had an accounting course of his own with his own happy rate of speed. "Old Mon" Fogg got that spring urge more than the rest of the boys. He just had to go somewhere and do something. Slattery gave him a good race and png? rlqH70lI76? M , 1942 LAUNDRY ACCOUNTING COURSE Front Row fleft to riglitl: Gerald Boslow, James P. McCarthy, John Slattery, Vvarren E. Fitch, Albion R. Fogg. Jaclc Henclcels, JBCIC Engel, Anson W. BOWCICD. Second Row: Ray Groline. Manager. Membership Department: tl. Hinton Massey flnstructorj, Edwin W. Mayer. dt., Charles Jacob, 'Munay S. Levine, Martin Jacobs, Cecil H. Lanham, Director of School of Laundry Management. Third Row: l. lvlarvin Leibowitz, ,Robert Joehnlc, Eugene R. Jacobson, Jr., Brent H. Farber, Jr., Wallace ' C. lVlacl..ean, A. Harold Tomlinson, Domer E. Dewey, Manager, Accounting Department. began dating girls well tested by the rest of the class. A very successful steak fry was held at Hammel Woods on May 22, with everyone enjoying the def licious steaks and the fresh air for a change. C Accounting being the last course we all were anxf ious for the hours to roll into days and days into weeks so that we could get home and enjoy a well earned rest. The war had finally struck the Instif tute boys when we realized that all plans, hopes and dreams were out for the duration and that when we leave Joliet we are going to a world full of uncertainties. The year has been an enjoyable one. Cn the eighteenth of June we will all be sorry to leave. We have lived together for ten months and enjoyed each other's companionship. Page Thirteen s CLASS OFFICERS POWER PLANT COURSE William A. Shirley ............. L .............. ' ..... P resident james P. tMcCarthy ......................... V1cefPres1dent George S. Yonkers ....... . ......... Secretary'Treasurer Edwin W. Mayer, Jr .,................ Athletic Director TEXTILE AND WASHROOM PROCEDURE ' COURSE . William A, Shirley ........ ......,............. P resident Eugene F. Lyons ......... ............... V icefPresident Jack R. Henckels ..................... SecretaryfTreasurer Edwin W. Mayer, Jr .................. Athletic Director LAUNDRY ACCOUNTING COURSE Jack R. Henckels ..................................... President Edwin W. Mayer, Jr ...................... VicefPresident Brent H. Farber, Jr ........... . ..... SecretaryfTreasurer Warren E. Fitch ........ . ......... Athletic Director PLANT PRODUCTION COURSE William A. Shirley ............ . ...................... President Jack R. Henckels ............................. VicefPresident Edwin W. Mayer, Jr ........ . .... SecretaryfTreasurer James P. McCarthy ....... , ........ Athletic Director SALES AND ADVERTISING COURSE William A. Shirley ................................ President Robert Joehnk ............ ............... V icefPresident Jack R. Henckels .................... SecretaryfTreasurer Edwin W. Mayer, Jr .................. Athletic Director ANNUAL STAFF Anson W. Bowden .......... ...................... E ditor Jack R. Henckels .......... ........ A ssistant Editor Edwin W.. Mayer, Jr ........ ........ A ssistant Editor Robert Joehnk ............... ........ A ssistant Editor Martin Jacobs ......... ........ A ssistant Editor A. I. L. CLUB - Lew Bradley .......... ................................... ................... P r esident John Slick, Jr ........... ................. V icefPresident Cecil H. Lanham .......... ........ E xecutive Secretary Ito the class oF1942 UR first "War Class", the past can bring much to light that should bolster your comidence in the future. In the midst of the worldfwide depression of 1930, the- September issue of the National Laundry Journal in its dedicatory number makes the prophecy that the doors of the new American Institute of Laundering "Swing Open upon a new epoch in history, where scientific and engineering genius join hands with business skill, and from wi-thin its classrooms will come the future leaders of the industry." V How true this prophecy has come can best be seen in the accomplishments of those who have gone be' fore you. You 'need not be reminded of the conditions you are facing t0Cl21Y. It is enough to say that you are Pug ready for whatever lies ahead. You have secured the best training that money can buy and there should be no uncertainty about applying it. Other classes had only their industry to serve, you are more- for UJIIEILC, YOU Carl SCIVC YO111' COUIIIIIY, too. And too, you are entering that everfgrowing group of alumni who are scattered in the four corners of the' earth putting their knowledge to good use Wherever you go, you will find them, a credit to themselves, the industry and to the school that takes pride in them and their accomplishments. Thevleaders of our industry say we must assume the responsibility of the future. .We will not dis appoint them. Q 5 f Lew Bradley Fourteen President A. I. L. Club. GRADUATES CF 1942 Snhaalnffwwnchqlf A Q jmmazwff GERALD BOSLOW lame? Madison High School, Brooklyn, New ork George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia New York University, New York City, New York Sponsor-Harry Boslow Brighton Laundry Company, Inc., Brook' lyn, New York ' , "SWEET SMELLERN-we wonder why Jerry was so intensely interested in time and motion study-his time, her motion. ANSON W. BOWDEN Williston Academy, Easthampton, Massachu' setts Barnard School for Boys, Fieldston, New York City, New York Columbia University, New York City, New York Sponsor-Donald Francis Empire Laundries, Inc., Hartford, Connecf ticut "ANDY"-what do you think of an editor who draws and prints such a picture of him- self, even over the protest of the Associate Editors. cf? A4 Egi- vx IX! 24 CBE, JACK R. ENGEL r Lakewood High School, Lake Wood, Ohio Sponsor-W. E. Miller Wilbert'Miller Company, Cleveland, Ohio "JACK"-since his close confinement between five cars has taken a decided turn toward claustrophobia. Page Fifteen ,...-.. K WARREN E. FITCH Collinwood High School, Cleveland, Ohio Sponsor-William E. Kenney D i, , , I - The Davis Laundry fs? Cleaning Company, - I -'7 1 X ' ...l-- Cleveland, Ohio x'j- "U, B."-even though th-e "Y" isn't the Palmer House, Fitch believes he should have reasonable expectancy of an undisturbed nights sleep. ALBION ROWELL FOGG, JR. Hanover High School, Hanover, New Hamp' shire Clark School, Hanover, New Hampshire, Sponsor-Dr. Albion R. Fogg, Sr. Littleton Steam Laundry, Littleton, New Hampshire "OLD MON"-his ideas on production died of solitary conhnement, but with the Wash' room course the fogg lifted. X JACK ROSS HENCKELS P-ag,-5 Paschell High School, Fort Worth, Texas J University of Southern California, Los Angef " les, California , ' - Splolnsor-Mrs. M. J. Heaxckels N atatorium Laundry ompany, Fo t W th, Texas r or N CN "SNIFFfSNIFF"-the familiar cry heard ring' J ing through the halls was, "Hey, sloppy, hair g number 4921 is out of place." A f ,. MARTIN H. JAcoBs P Southwest High School, Kansas City, Missouri TAXZQ'-'-N.. University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri K Q 7' 'V'- Sponsor-William Jacobs Vx .5 Criterion Cleaners Ee? Launderers, Kansas City, Missouri A 'f y 5 I R ss I X X RUSTY"-the odor of his pipes was believed 2?1eLggd:,lge special blend by Messrs. Dunghill 1 X X 2' Page Sixteen EUGENE R. JACOBSEN, JR. ......----as St. Albans School, W h t , D t t f Columbia as mg on is nc O G 0 Sponsor-Eugene R. Jacobsen, Sr. I Sterling Laundry, Washington, District of 3- Columbia J learned there is no correlation between howl JAKE the human P. A. system has slowly ing success and mere howling. L ' l' BEAo-rxrus.. ROBERT D. JOEHNK MMV E W, Lincoln High School, Milwaukee, Wisconsin Sponsors-Richard V. Normington G'99-GEOUS Normington Laundry E99 Dry Cleaning Com' pany, Waukesha, Wisconsin T""' wnuaew Q X "JUNK"--Waukesha is noted for its water and has contributed one drip to the Institute. x ' d KENNETH R. KHUANS lj-, Calumet High School, Chicago, Illinois Sponsor-Mrs. A. J. Marcel n Avalon Laundry Company, Chicago, Illinois "KENNY"-it's a good thing that "Kenny" finished school before the event of tire ration. EDWIN W. C. MAYER, JR. St. John's Military Academy, Delafleld, Wisf X consin u 1 , . Northwestern University, EVanStOn, IUIDOIS - er Sr. Sponsor E. W. May , , l H, Kohnstamm and Company, Ch1cagO, ml' nois . "EDDIE"-otherwise very athlet1c,,takes tre' mendous beating from his Amazon queen, Kelly. Page Seventeen JAMES P. McCARTHY Central Y.M.C.A. Night College, Chicago, Illinois Lakeview High School, Chicago, I.llinois Sponsor-C. A. Boyd American Laundry Machinery Company, Chicago, Illinois "BUNDLE BOY"-during Mrs. Grady's class, "Mac" gathered material for his book, "How to Cultivate Canaries and Influence People." ELL --v K V JOHN W. SLATTERY Holyoke High School, Holyoke, Massachu' N V ., 4 'setts I X 1 W M Williston Academy, Easthampton, Massachuf W- N.- Sms Neem Q., ., Sponsor-Edward S. Freniere f ', '- Highland Laundry, Holyoke, Massachusetts 1 I gx u "SLATS"-did he pick up ,his Minsky's strip' tease on the alleged trips to Chicago's concerts. A. HAROLD TOMLINSON Franklin High School Seattle Washington Sponsor-A. D. Tomlinson i ' 7511: NR11 dLd,Sl,Wh'f f iwgn ic mon aun ry eatte as ing K J "TOMMY"-main problem in life is Hnding a Woman attractive enough to like, and dumb enough to like him. P Page Eighteen , ,j O If STUDENTS, on-TER THAN GRADUATES, ATTENDING 1941-42 couRSES STUDENT Robert S. Adelman Bernard E. Bronk John Haverinen Lee Longstreet Nicholas Marlin John M. Nahigian William A. Shirley William T. Singleton Lauren Taylor Stanley S. Wolf George S. Yonkers Robert S. Adelman Bernard E. Bronk William E. Drewes William I. Edwards C. Leroy Griffin Russell L. Gundrum Robert P. Hammond Max Arthur Hansen Howard E. Hastedt Iohn, Haverinen Charles jacob Abe Lapides Murray S. Levine Lee Longstreet Eugene F. Lyons, Ir. Wallace C. MacLean Nicholas Marlin Iohn W. Nahigian William A. Shirley William T. Singleton Lauren Taylor Stanley S. Wolf George S. Yonkers l ' POWER PLANT COURSE SPONSOR Benjamin Adelman Louis Fishman Louis H. Hein C. I. Longstreet Thomas Cowley Anoush Nahigian J. K. Shirley Ernest G. Willard J. S. Taylor Edward Wolf Leland P. Hamilton PLANT Adelman Laundry, Inc. Surprise Laundry Company, Inc. Y. M. C. A. Laundry I Pipestone Laundry E99 Dry Cleaners Cascade Laundry Purity Laundry City Steam Laundry Wakefield Laundry Hawkeye Laundry Wolf Sanitary Wiping Cloth Co. Otsego Laundry Company, Inc. PLANT PRODUCTION COURSE Benjamin Adelman Louis Fishman L. B. Sinclair james Brackett M. C. Iinkins F. M. Wilkinson Frank F. Hammond Walter I. Brunger Paul R. Hastedt Louis H. Hein Aaron jacob Henry Lapides Samuel Levine C. I. Longstreet D. E. Verlander L. W. MacLean Thomas Cowley Anoush Nahigian I. K. Shirley Ernest G. Willard I. S. Taylor Edward Wolf Leland P. Hamilton Adelman Laundry, Inc. Surprise Laundry Company, Inc. Reliable Laundry fe? Dry Cleaning Troy Laundry Lily White Laundry Wilkinson Laundry Company Tacoma Towel Supply Company Amer. Ldy. ES? Linen Supply Fame Laundries Y. M..C. A. Laundry City Laundry Quality Damp Wash Laundry Sanitary Laundry Pipestone Laundry 53 Dry Cleaners Crescent City Laundries, Inc. Old Colony Laundry Cascade Laundry Purity Laundry City Steam Laundry Wakefield Laundry Hawkeye Laundry Wolf Sanitary Wiping Cloth Co. Otsego Laundry Company, Inc. Page Nineteen ADDRESS Milwaukee, Wisconsin Bronx, New York Chicago, Illinois Pipestone, Minnesota Sioux City, Iowa Providence, R. I. Paris, Texas Wakefield, Mass. Boone, Iowa Detroit, Michigan Oneonta, New York Milwaukee, Wisconsin Bronx, New York Highland Park, Illinois Pasadena, California Nashville, Tennessee Reading. Pennsylvania Tacoma, Washington Boise, Idaho Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Chicago, Illinois Cleveland, Ohio Detroit, Michigan Pittsfield, Massachusetts Pipestone, Minnesota New Orleans, Louisiana Plymouth, Massachusetts Sioux City, Iowa Providence, R. I. Paris, Texas Wakefield, Massachusetts Boone, Iowa Detroit, Michigan Oneonta, New York TEXTILE AND WASHROOM PROCEDURE COURSE Wallace G. DeBoer William E. Drewes Brent H. Farber, Ir. C. Leroy Griffin Howard E. Hastedt John Haverinen Paul Hollman Charles Jacob Abe Lapides I. Marvin Leibowitz Murray S. Levine Lee Longstreet James Lynn Eugene F. Lyons, Jr. Wallace C. MacLean Fred A. Mann, Ir. William H. Martin William A. Shirley William TQ Singleton Lauren Taylor George S. Yonkers Robert B. Bertenshaw Brent H. Farber, Ir. Charles Jacob Abe Lapides I. Marvin Leibowitz Murray S. Levine Wallace Mac Lean Edwin W. Stacer Brent H. Farber, Ir. Charles Iacob Abe Lapides I. Marvin Leibowitz Murray S. Levine Wallace MacLean Roger A. Hanger L. B. 'Sinclair G. Y. Klinefelter M. C. Iinkins Paul R. Hastedt Louis H. Hein Louis Hollman Aaron Iacob Henry Lapides Harry Shapiro Samuel Levine C. I. Longstreet Dan S. Hollis D. E. Verlander L. W. MacLean Fred A. Mann, Sr G. R. Studebaker I. K. Shirley Ernest G. Willard I. S. Taylor Leland P. Hamilton Amer. Linen Supply Company Reliable Ldy. ff? Dry Cleaning Elite Laundry Company Lily White Laundry Fame Laundries Y. M. C. A. Laundry Michigan Cleaners City Laundry Quality Damp Wash Laundry Community Laundry Service, Inc. Sanitary Laundry Pipestone Laundry Ei Dry Cleaners Faultless Cleaners Laundry Crescent City Laundries, Inc. Old Colony Laundry White Swan Laundry Albany Hospital City Steam Laundry Wakefield Laundry Hawkeye Laundry Ostego Laundry Company, Inc. SALES AND ADVERTISING SERVICE .COURSE Joseph Ross G. Y. Klinefelter Aaron Jacob Henry Lapides Harry Shapiro Samuel Levine L. W. Mac Lean Robert I. Gray Killip Laundering Company Elite Laundry Company City Laundry 'Quality Damp Wash Laundry Community Laundry Service, Inc. Sanitary Laundry Old Colony Laundry Evansville White Swan Laundry Es? Cleaners LAUNDRY ACCOUNTING COURSE ' G. Y. Klinefelter Aaron Jacob Henry Lapides Harry Shapiro Samuel Levine L. W. MacLean Elite Laundry Company City Laundry Quality Damp Wash Laundry Community Laundry Service, Inc. Sanitary Laundry Old Colony Laundry Page Twenty K Minneapolis, Minnesota Highland Park, Illinois Baltimore, Maryland Nashville, Tennessee Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Chicago, Illinois Chicago, Illinois Cleveland, Ohio Detroit, Michigan Woodside, New York Pittsheld, Massachusetts Pipestone, Minnesota Rock Hill, S. C. New Orleans, La. Plymouth., Massachusetts South Bend, Indiana Albany, New York Paris, Texas Wakefield, Massachusetts Boone, Iowa Oneonta, New York Albany, New York Baltimore, Maryland Cleveland, Ohio , Detroit, Michigan Woodside, New York Pittsfield, Mass. Plymouth, Mass. Evansville, Ind. Baltimore, Maryland Cleveland, Ohio Detroit, Michigan Woodside, New York Pittsfield, Mass. Plymouth, Mass. 1300-6 42? . nw 1 1 W v. " , A Yi 'L K n fx 91..- Q- 1 x 1


Suggestions in the American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) collection:

American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

1938

American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

1939

American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

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American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

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American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 7

1942, pg 7

American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 10

1942, pg 10

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