American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL)

 - Class of 1939

Page 1 of 24

 

American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 24 of the 1939 volume:

K i ' I i C i ! We i 'J l , li "fm Y . 1 P I 1 V 1 1 4 f 1 , Ai Y rl . s' Xf 5 .ffl r f 6 Q X' . fi ' wi gf A jg K Yi 3 1 1 I L Q? Pi e if I ,ll r JL W ' 'VJ 1 1 l f n 1 A 3 . 9 M I L 1 K k -A X J 1 U 11 1 I if 11 1 J W n 'L ' x I ' 41 Q, , , iw y ,9:4 x V .' E , -V 'xr -Q ' - STAFF mericafz .dfzsfifafe of .gamzgerizzq S659 GEORGE H. JOHNSON YK LP: ad General Manager SecreRTJ0H .' do American Institute A ffl - of Quik XJAEXQ of Laundering gg-ericig gfeqfzfolv 3' WALTER A. REINHARD Manager Department of Engineering MAY LAING GRADY Manager Department of Sales Promotion ARTHUR I. ANDERSON Manager Department of Research and Textiles CARLYLE G. MORTON HUGH CARROLL Department of Department of Research and Textiles Research and Textiles DOMER E. DEWEY Manager Department of Accounting PAUL M. JONES Manager Department of Advertising and Publicity MARGUERITE E. RICHARDSON Department of Accounting J. HINTON MASSEY Instructor in Business Law N Page Three . 1 CLASS ORGANIZATION Avon Karp ............................... President Lawrence C. Deibold .. ..... V Vice-President Preben Becker ....... 1 ....... Vice-President P. Edward Jeieris .. Secretary-Treasurer STARCHED SHEET STAFF Ben S. Pollock ............................... Editor Irwin Harris .... . . . Assistant Editor ANNUAL STA+FF Ben S. Pollock ..................... . . . Editor Irwin Harris ....... Margaret Schwartz . . . ' Preben Becker ,,,,, . . . Assistant Editors Arthur Primack . . . Albert C. Menk . . . A. I. L. CLUB Elbert Fitch .............................. President A. O. Long, Jr. ........ ....... V ice-President William E. Kenney, Jr. . . .... Secretary-Treasurer s ntroduction It is an acknowledged fact that history is best Written by those Who are a part of it. Pepys, Casanova, and Cellini are read Widely because they Wrote of events of which they themselves were a part. It is for this reason that the class has delegated us to Write this History of the American Institute of Laundering Class of 1939. "We" are D. Tergent, a member of the class, who has witnessed every event to be described. Like Walter Durant, "We Write as We please." Let no one be offended as We record this momentous school year. I power Live steam goes in here and makes that wheel go 'round like a button. ERY few of those who were there can forget that first day of school.. . .Miss House cheery and full of welcome, Walt peppy and friendly, and Cec reserved, but friendly, too. There we were all intro- duced, and it can be said that from that first moment we were as old buddies. What a bunch.. . .all types from all places! Drawly Gabe Martin from New Mexico, husky Larry Deibold from up New York wayg "Short Stuff" Pappyg Silent Hank from Chi- cagog and not so silent Arky from the same place. Shuffling Avon Karp left his gal in Syracuse, and Warren Davies left his in Co- lumbus. Benjy Pollock came from Arkansas, slide rule in hand. O. C. and Irwin Harris met and immediately called each other "Pop" and "Son." Yes, sir. . .a great bunch. The course opened with a bang and main- tained a high state of interest all the Way Pa plant course through, although there were moments when Electricity had us feeling as low as a ground- hog.. . ."Pete" Becker excepted, of course. There were several highlights to be re- membered in the Power Course. Our terrific shellacking of the faculty in softball, a vic- tory made easier by Walt's errors in left field and Larry Deibold's hitting was one such high- light. Al Menk's late arrival was another. Then there were our trips to Chicago... always instructive. And, after all, what would the Power Course be without those two insults to clean- liness.. . .the cleaning of the Heat Reclaimer and the Exploration of the Boiler? The ar- rival of Becker to clean the former in his plus-four baggy pantaloons was a howl.. .. nothing more nor less. The sight of Ed Blois standing knee-deep in mud was an inspiration to any real working man fof which very few were presentj. The boiler job was a great one. Fellows like Pollock or Harris could get in every- where, but Blois and Gross could only make In the. case of a motor, the current goes mto the armature through these brushes. ge Six vt- va: 'Rl' 5' . - - -i Lrg-1 '- .. 3.. f.-ug, r.-.Q I .-1 ' . 1-f' wg . ,'.m1q"j?5.'-f if .f- MM- 1 ' ' - Y " :V -- ' '-5.1."jY.'m'eS5z'f?f4',15g 3-I -' X . ' . . ' ' . 1' K ' - -- K -f 2 'f 4.z':2'. 513: "J ,. 3iUl.51'.:1:-I.-' -. G '- '-'- Y"- FRONT ROW' Cleft to rightj-Maurice Papp, I. Ralph Hill, David Grier Perkins, Avon Karp, Lawrence C. Deibold, John Barlow, Ir., Irwin Harris, Leonard Arkiss, Warren T. Davies. SECOND ROVV Cleft to right?-P. Edward Jefferis, Ben S. Pollock, Henry Robeck, Presley A. Martin, Alfred I. Rawlinson, Edward James Blois, NVilliam B. Tench. Conrad A. Miller. BACK ROW Cleft to rightb-C. H. Lanham CDirector of Schooll. Earl Aikin Gross, Gordon Pigott, Albert C. Menk, Robert Henry Stoer, Lawrence C. Kline, Preben Becker, O. C. Harris, Walter Reinhard CManager, Engineering Departmentj. the big places. We were jet black, all of us, when the job was done, and it was a full week before any of us were really clean agin. The boiler test was extremely interesting. We tested the power plant for several hours at periods of fifteen minutes, recording such things as the temperature of the boiler feed water, kilowatts consumed each hour, tons of coal consumed, and other such vital factors. It was unquestionably one of the highlights of the course. The climax of the course came with our trip to the annual convention of laundryown- ers, however. What a swell time we had. Getting around to the various exhibits and meeting the laundrymen from back home was great stuff. It was the convention that showed that "Hank" Robeck is a real man's man. It was quite a time he had. The convention was followed. . .almost im- mediately, by Jeff's tummy-ache. Could there have been any connection between conven- tion and ache? Upon our return home, we had a week of study for our final exams. Cec., realizing well the limitations of us mere mortals, took it easy on us, but Walt, villain to the last, gave us a beauty of an exam. Only Willie Tench thought it too easy. And so the first course. . .Power. . .passed into history. Page Seven '1 --Aff-'H .as -r-?f.n-gp " .UV .1 .2f "+w'.f1'v - Hefwffw - 1' . A L .. plant production course For fifty percent extraction, this ma- chine takes about twelve minutes running time. T WAS in early November when we began this, our second course in the American Institute School of Laundry Management. A few of the old guard set forth to make their fortunes in the wide, wide world and several new seekers for knowledge of laundering registered with the same frightened look and strange appearance that we had had just two months ago. We soon found out that this course was divided, like Gaul, into three main parts. Laundry Management sneaked in along with the main part of the course, Production, and was lectured on by Walt several hours each week. Many were the hours we slaved bent over our drawing boards making a fewclines, many erasures and smudges on that piece of paper which was to become the "perfect" laundry. At the very beginning Walt tried to scare us by hinting about the "Problem," As old hands we scoffed at him, thinking that we could take this mighty work in our stride. Walt said to us many times, HD., old boy, you'll be burning the midnight oil before you are through with me.". . .and how right he was! A After studying in class about good laundry production and bad, we set out one fine morn- ing to pass judgment on methods as prac- ticed by some of the Chicago plants. When the bus arrived in Chicago we began very enthusiastically to criticize point after point in the laundries whose managers welcomed us so hospitably fin very quiet whispers, of course, so as not to disturb the operators, or arouse the ire of the managers, or show our ignorance. . .for ignorant we werej. As the day wore on and, we walked and walked through laundry after laundry and saw meth- You could use a 48 x 54 wash wheel -instead of that one and get a better flow of work. ' Page Eight ljj- FRONT ROW Cleft to rightl-Bernard S. Gerskovitz, Avon Karp, David Grier Perkins, Lawrence C. Dei- bold, Lawrence C. Kline, Paul VV. Badger, Stanley M. Hansen, VVilliam B. Tench, Ralph W. French, Ben S. Pollock. SECOND ROW Cleft to rightj-Hilton Watts, P. Edward Iefferis, Thomas. Charles Camp- b ll Leonard Arki s Henr R be k Wari H Griffi jam G Ma kechnie Ir Ir in Harri Alfrel e , s , y o c , f . n, es . c , ., w s, c Rawlinson, O. C. Harris. BACK ROW Cleft to rightj-Walter Reinhard CManager, Engineering Depart- mentl, C. H. Lanham CDirect0r of Schoolb, Earl Aiken Gross, Gordon Pigott, Preben Becker, Albert C. Menk, Jr., Robert Henry Stoer, Presley A. Martin, Edward James Blois, George johnson CGeneral Managerj. Members not in photograph-Paul McCoy, Maurice Papp. od after method, our fires burned lower and lower until as a very tired crew we hopped in the bus to be whisked Jolietward. Then came the advent of the chart of Fac- tors Influencing Production. Sure we memo- rized it. . .after a while. . .but it took a long time for us to see how valuable it is in inte- grating the entire problem of efficient work. For our social debut, one cold evening, we of the class and several of the staff, gathered at the Armory for a skating party. The side- line sitters were both amazed and amused as the evening wore on. Shortly after mid- night we found our way homeward and grate- fully dropped our weary and battered bodies into bed. It was during the Production course that the now famous "Sudsmen" came into being. Basketball suddenly became a veryfpopular sport and quite a few of the boys went down to the "Y" in the afternoons for practice. The first "Y" basketball league of the season was organized, in which the "Sudsmen" partici- pated with some success. Student Laundry came every afternoon, but we soon got into the swing of it and worked willingly and with great accuracy, attempting to get good production and better quality. We did! It was during the early part of the course that Ed Blois, who was on the receiv- ing side of the Flatwork Ironer, said to "Pete" Becker, who was feeding, "Never mind, Pete, I'll fold it after it comes through." This sort of work was the exception rather than the rule and we did some mighty fine work, even if that does seem to be bragging somewhat. After wsorking day and night we finally finished our "Problems," took final exams and left Joliet for the Christmas holidays. Page Nine I sz' :-I 'ef' " .vzffvff-'.--. -K. ff. --rr ef' '. ' "1-we-,.e!..,..-,rr .L 1 a 'f V , .. ,,,. --fi . -.,-4, - o, 'f ' Q 1 -1 . . 1 ' Yr ,f ,l,,f'3,:, 'wp-ogI,.1':fi" :Q r- 3:24. textiles and waslmroom practice The potentiometer indicates a pH of 5.3 in this sample from the last rinse. HE opening day of this course was an eventful one in that new students were greeted and the rest of us retold the happenings of the just recent holiday vaca- tion. A feminine touch was added to the class with the enrollment of our one female stu- dent, Margaret Schwartz. It was shortly after that she became known as A+ Marga- ret. Paul McCoy continued to be late for class. This time, however, he had excuses. He used the one about the "governor" on his new Plymouth. , - The school saw fit to purchase new uni- forms for the "Sudsmen." Very nice, too. They finished the first round play-off in a tie for iirst place, but in the second round our "Sudsmen" tied for second. The season ended with a better than .500 average for the team. Snow fell by the bucketfull until it reached almost a foot in depth and enforced a most welcome holiday, for it was impossible to drive through the streets and walking was treacherous. A few hardy students who did make it on foot to the Institute, helped out in the commercial plant. O. C. Harris and Tommy Campbell making an ideal "two girl" shirt unit. Some of the students who did not have their snowshoes with them were content to stay in the "Y" and make model airplanes. It seems that Ben Pollock and Dick Impson made more and better planes than the rest of the group. D. Tergent did not consider his life worth a plugged nickel in the gym, with model planes zooming around his head, so to bed to catch up on sleep. ' On a Saturday afternoon the sporting event of the season took place. The staff defeated the student team in a bowling match. Art Anderson proved to be the mainstay for the staff with his high game of 214, which also helped. The match ended with the staff leading by a slim margin of 31 pins. Everything went along fine in the student laundry with the exception of one event. It seems that a Mr. Gershkovitz, better known as "O'Brien," tried a new method of classifi- cation. Green sweat shirts are now to be washed with the white work. Note: this leaves a slight greenish hue in white shirts. The movie, "The Lost World," was shown So, if you control the temperature, mechanical action, and pH, there' will be no felting. Page Ten FRONT ROW Cleft to rightj-Maurice L. Papp, P. Edward Jefferis, David Grier Perkins, Jr., Bernard S. Gerskovitz, Avon Karp, Margaret F. Schwartz, Leonard Arkiss, Ben S. Pollock, Ralph VV. French, VVarren Thomas Davies, Carlyle Morton CInstructorJ. SECOND ROW Cleft to rightj-Paul McCoy, Thomas Charles Campbell, James E. Potts, Henry Robeck, Lawrence C. Deibold, Richard T. Impson, John Barlow, Ir., Alfred J. Rawlinson, Stanley M. Hansen. THIRD ROW Cleft to rightj-C. H. Lanham CDirector of Schoolj, Gordon Pigott, Walton E. Richwine, Alfred T. Batchelder, Ir., Preben Becker, james G. Mac- keclinie, Jr., Presley A. Martin, O. C. Harris. BACK ROW Cleft to rightj-Arthur I. Anderson CManager, Research and Textiles Departmentl, Hugh F. Carroll Clnstructorj, Robert Henry Stoer, Paul Dorris, Albert C. Menk, Irwin Harris, Henry Mar. one evening in the Institute cafeteria for the students and staff. Refreshments were served later in the evening. Through this get- together we became better acquainted with each other and with the staff. It was truly a delightful event. We gave a bang-up party for ourselves in the early part of February at the Trojan Hall. Pappy kept his record perfect with one of his famous fade-outs. Those that did not feel like dancing spent their time viewing the river from the back porch. Your friend, D. Tergent, wonders if anyone did see the river? " We boarded a bus early one morning and were off to Decatur to visit the Staley Starch plant. Upon our arrival there We were wel- comed and immediately set out on a tour of the administration building. At the end of this tour we were the guests of the Staley Company for luncheon in the office cafeteria. After lunch, special guides from the labora- tory took the class through the huge starch plants in detail. The "flu" epidemic hit the A.I.L. just as it did practically everywhere else. Many stu- dents Were ill, as were some of the instruc- tors. Art Anderson was the hardest hit, but came out of it in time to climb on his soap box and tell of the evils of smoking. The last Week of the course proved to be rather quiet. I do not think this quiet was caused by final exams as much as it was by the realization of the group that many stu- dents were leaving to take up duties in their home plants. Page Eleven ':.f"f'I'3'S"4 f' K! "Of 'FIN .dl 5' -" -,,,, .,1 ,k,:.wv,,:-:. I!" 1 'r sv .' '- ,' . -'rf ' .,-an 'A.w'1.f, 'K' 7' 5 45' 2"2"fl:9Ylf?Tf.l2 .355 'ni-,f-2T"n'5'ff'-' . 'TJ L F W fflgffiagifiiirf-'ziinf' ' cv ,, -. .,. .EM-EEK? 'W' ,V J I . ..,--M sales, service, and advertising course You see, in vertical filing, the clerk can go through the cards in very little time. HE Sales and Advertising Course started off with a bang. Our new professor, Paul Jones, initiated us with a quiz. No doubt he was as unimpressed with our "intelligence" as we were with that sort of an opening. Every day in Sales class brought more and more lively discussions. Mrs. Grady led them with a will, but more and more often became upset with her "Canaries" when they whistled at odd moments. Sales films were shown by members of the class who later led discussion on the various points they brought up. Entertainment was provided after each of these by a little recur- ring skit entitled, "I'll get that darned bundle from this house if it kills us both." All hands took the title roles at one time or another, but we unanimously elect "Mrs. Jeff" as the most domestic of the gamut of housewives we had to cope with. We took a field trip to Chicago, not in a bus this time, but in the cars belonging to some of the students and staff. We spent the entire morning becoming more and more amazed at the variety of processes going on at the Cuneo Press. Of course the hike through their plant reminded us of our Boy Scout days. After lunch, for which we split up, we met at the Daily News building and saw how a metropolitan newspaper is pro- duced from top to bottom and at length. Again we separated for supper and after- wards went through the NBC studios and heard the Carnation Hour being broadcast. It may have been coincidental, but we rather suspect the statement about the "pre-shrunk"' milk. Our Spring Formal, better known as "just a party," was held at the Trojan Hall and was a howling success. Music, dancing, and gen- eral good "spirits" prevailed. We found the back porch still good for those tired feet and for inhaling the fragrance of the river. Our advertising campaigns proved to be more work than We expected. But we worked with a will and with the help of Paul Jones, and despite ourselves, they were finished. Some of our stuff turned out to be pretty good, and some of it even usable. We had an interesting sidelight in a trip through the Joliet Herald-News. We started in the advertising department and followed the steps in making an ad from the idea through the layout, engraving, typesetting, mat-making, stereotyping, and finally seeing it come rolling from the giant press. We finally saw how the mysterious processes we By the same token, you could move this element down and make it a reverse plate. - Page Twelve U 1 ..v--ff-----,- FRONT ROVV Cleft to rightj-VVarren Thomas Davies, Thomas Charles Campbell, Donald M. Butz, Hubert K. Cowan, Margaret F. Schwartz, Arthur Primack, P. Edward Jefferis, Maurice L. Papp. SECOND ROW Cleft to rightj-Bernard S. Gerskovitz, Irwin Harris, Mrs. May L. Grady fManager, Sales Promotion Departmentb, Lawrence C. Deibold, Richard T. Impson, Presley A. Martin, Alfred T. Batchel- d .BACKROWClftt 'htb-H Rb kAl'H.B Pb Bk D FB Pl er,Ir e orig enry o ec, vm.. erg, re en ec er, on . ussey, au Dorris, Robert Henry Stoer, Paul Jones CManager, Advertising Departmentb, C. H. Lanham CDirector of Schoolj. Member not in photograph-Ben Pollock. had talked about in class actually work. Some of the Workers in Student Laundry, tiring of the frequency with which Gersh sent in his "study britchesj' did a fancy job on them one fine Monday. After they were washed "White as snow" they were dipped in collar starch and pressed. The Waist-band and cuffs were fluted on the curtain fluter in the latest laundry technique. It took two men and a boy to fold them, but it was Worth the trouble, because instead of sending in one pair . . . he began sending in three. After becoming thoroughly confused in the mass of detail connected with Sales Control, we finally began to see the dawn and at last understood it to Mrs. Grady's complete satis- faction. It Wasn't so hard after all. Another field trip took us to the Gerlach- Barklow Company where we saw offset print- ing done to perfection. It proved to be a very involved process, but H. K. Cowan got to the bottom of it by climbing on top of an offset press Where We found him finding out things from the pressman. The Illinois Laundryowners Convention gave us another vacation, for we attended several of the sessions and heard mighty fine talks by Walt and Mrs. Grady. Margaret came to school with the most beautiful black eye you ever saw one morn- ing, and claims to this day that they had an automobile accident on the way to Cleveland. She was unlike the usual woman in that she stuck to her story. Finally, after finals, we became graduate salesmen and advertisers. Funny, but it didn't feel any different. Of course, we have more confidence in our selling ability and We think We can at least tell a good ad from a bad one now. Page Thirteen -f f Wtinif' E,I+5?'T:2.1i 23727 375 - -JET." 1 . f. iff? S., ..i....' , V f- 2. .. .,1,,ps :.fv.-v"T-.WV ' f'-"-" ..,1:,'i.z:j1eg v 4: 5 g I laundry accounting course If you debit Accounts Payable, you must credit Account 2-4 in your In- voice Record. A HE monotonous inactivity of registration H day for the Accounting and Business Law Course was interrupted by a call for arms . . .to carry the voluminous packages of stuff and things that every true red-ink accountant should have in order that he may follow the straight and narrow path of the dollars and cents columns Cpronounced col-yumsh. The ensuing two weeks were devoted to teaching the "not too bright" students to speak in the vernacular that would enable them to direct a layman to a spot on a Balance Sheet which would be equivalent to Chicago and Cass Streets on the debit side of town. The remaining six weeks were filled with "cold facts" about expense classifications, interspersed with weekly examinations which seemed to enlighten the staff about the stu- dent body's dis-enlightenment. The legal end of the course was expertly administered to the class in lethal doses by Mr. J. Hinton Massey, attorney at law. Mr. Page Massey, in addition to being very proficient at teaching law, was equally proficient in instructing the cruder element in the class regarding classroom etiquette. The Republican element of the stai made an attempt at regimenting the class. The at- tempt was partially successful during the cooler portions of the course, but summer days brought the fiowers, the flowers brought per- fume, and Miss House got the mumps. It was in this course that extra-curricular activities were at their height. We visited the Illinois State Penitentiary at Stateville Cas spectators, of coursej. Some of the lads went down to the Kentucky Derby for a week- end without much financial success, although they still claim they were on the right horse. Two softball games were played by the stu- dents. The first was with the staff, in which the students, as usual, were victorious by an overwhelming score. The second was played a week later with the routemen, and the students were victorious again. ' 1 The Supreme Court in this case holds that the defendant is liable for nomi- nal damages. Fourteen FRONT ROW Cleft to rightj-Avon Karp, Bernard S. Gerskovitz, Margaret F. Schwartz, Leonard Arkiss, Maurice Papp. SECOND ROW Cleft to rightj-Albert C. Menk, Irwin Harris, Presley A. Martin, Preben Becker, Richard T, Impson, P. Edward Iefferis. BACK ROW Cleft to rightj-Arthur Primack, C. H. Lanham CDirector of Schoolj, Domer Dewey CManager, Accounting Departmentb, Miss Marguerite Richard- son Clnstructorl, George johnson CGeneral Managerj, Ben S. Pollock. Members not in photograph-Warren Davies, Henry Robeck. There was a student-staff golf match, but We haven't been able to find out from either side the final score. Through it all there was an honest en- deavor on the part of every student to put his studies before his maniacal craving for sun- shine, horses, and golf. The course was brought to a glorious and honorable end with a picnic of "red-hot" pro- portions. Both students and stai attended, and a good time was evidenced by the preva- lence of sunburn and mosquito bites the next day. Commencement exercises were held the evening of the last day of school and in- cluded a swell banquet and talk. At last we got those gold buttons which show to all the world that we know something of the right way of running a laundry. They do not, however, tell any of the story of the glorious time we've had in Joliet. Page Fifteen . - N -H .ee n P - A ' 1. .fwfr -ff 2 " 'wr i0':'f?'W1-. f I . , . fffxg ..f.iew,5- fe . V rap ? . M-,Nf.5A,g.,4.,5fjw.1.,-e.i,..'y1,vLg,f gfj,w'q,,,g?'f? , p. .f- - ,- .,,,ngf,M3,,5,Q1'f,: 154,23 , , 5 5-'3b9,.,,,, fgfkrg, yikgmdig L .. .U ., , . ., , , - L L,-, 4- : Q .,.. Cf- 4 - if - fr-.1 ' A -. fi - i GRADUATES OF 1939 mericcuz jizsfifufe of Baum erbzq LEOIN ARD ARKISS John Marshall High School, Chicago, Illinois, 1933 University of Illinois, 1937 Sponsor-Jacob Arkiss , Stockholm Laundry, Chicago, Illinois PREBEN BECKER Kathedral Skolen, High School, Aalborg, Denmark 1 Trade High School, Aalborg, Denmark Hohere Fachschule der Textilindustri, Sorau, Germany Sponsor-Christian Sorensen Thors kemiske Fabriker AXS, Copenhagen, Denmark g WARREN THOMAS DAVIES Culver Military Academy, Culver, Indiana, 1933 De Pauw University, 1938 Sponsor- George E. Davies Superior Laundry Company, South Bend, Indiana I IRWIN HARRIS Columbia High School, Maplewood, New Jersey, 1933 Cornell University, 1937 Sponsor - Benjamin Harris American Steam Laundry, Newark, New Jersey Page Sixteen P. EDWARD JEFFERIS West Chester High School, West Chester, Pennsylvania, 1934 Penn State College, 1938 Sponsor-C. R. Jefferis West Chester Laundry, West Chester, Pennsylvania AVON KARP Nottingham High School, Syracuse, New York, 1934 Syracuse University, 1938 ' Sponsor- Joseph H. Waldhorn Sunshine Laundry, Syracuse, New York PRESLEY A. MARTIN Lawton High School, Lawton, Oklahoma, 1925 Oklahoma A 81 M College Sponsor-I. W. Woolsey Roswell Laundry Company, Roswell, New Mexico ALBERT C. MENK McKinley High School, Canton, Ohio, 1932 Ohio- Mechanics Institute Sponsor- Charles G. Menk Menk Brothers Laundry, Cleveland, Ohio MAURICE L. PAPP Roxbury Memorial High School, Roxbury, Massachusetts Central Evening High School Sponsor-Abraham Papp Mechanics Apron and Towel Supply Com pany, Roxbury, Massachusetts Page Seventeen BEN S. POLLOCK Senior High School, Fort Smith, Arkansas, 1933 University of Michigan Tulane University Sponsor-Alfred W. Pollock Model Laundry and Cleaners, Fort Smith, Arkansas HENRY R-OBECK Carl Schurz Evening School, Chicago, Illinois The Central Y. M. C. A. College of Chicago Sponsor-Carle L. Becker Flat Iron Laundry, Chicago, Illinois JOHN BARLOW, JR. St. Joseph High School, St. Joseph, Michigan, 1936 University of Illinois Sponsor - John Barlow Barlow Brothers Laundry, St. Joseph, Michigan EDWARD JAMES BLOIS Palo Alto High School, Palo Alto, California Sponsor-J. B. Blois Stanford Laundry Company, Palo Alto, California ROBERT HENRY STOER Nash Prep of Y. M. C. A., Cleveland, Ohio, 1933 Miami University, 1937 Sponsor-Harry W. Stoer Troy Laundry Company, Cleveland, Ohio Page Eighteen STUDENTS, OTHER THAN GRADUATES, ATTENDING '38-'39 COURSES STUDENT Lawrence C. Deibold Earl Aiken Gross O. C. Harris J. Ralph Hill Lawrence C. Kline Conrad A. Miller David G. Perkins, Jr. Gordon Pigott Alfred J. Rawlinson William B. Tench Paul W. Badger Thomas C. Campbell Lawrence C. Deibold Ralph W. French Bernard S. Gerskovitz Earl Aiken Gross Ward H. Griffin Stanley M. Hansen O. C. Harris Lawrence C. Kline J. G. Mackechnie, Jr. Paul McCoy David G. Perkins, Jr. Gordon Pigott Alfred J. Rawlinson William B. Tench Hilton Watts A. T. Batchelder, Jr. Thomas C. Campbell Lawrence C. Deibold Paul Dorris Ralph W. French Bernard S. Gerskovitz Stanley M. Hansen O. C. Harris Richard T. Impson J. G. Mackechnie, Jr. Henry Mar Paul McCoy David G. Perkins, Jr. Gordon Pigott James E. Potts Alfred J. Rawlinson Walton E. Richwine Margaret F. Schwartz A. T. Batchelder, Jr. Alvin H. Berg Don F. Bussey Donald M. Butz Thomas C. Campbell Hubert K. Cowan Lawrence C. Deibold Paul Dorris Bernard S. Gerskovitz Richard T. Impson Arthur Primack Margaret F. Schwartz Bernard S. Gerskovitz Richard T. Impson Arthur Primack Margaret F. Schwartz POWER PLANT COURSE SPONSOR Paul F. Deibold E. H. Patton Ben Barnett Ralph Holland J. Alexander Kline Ed F. Lohmann David G. Perkins, Sr. J. W. Jennings George H. Rawlinson A. H. Crosby PLANT George E. Eye Paul F. Deibold Alvin Erickson I. Gerskovitz E. H. Patton W. A. Iredale David Nelson Ben Barnett J. Alexander Kline J. G. Mackechnie David G. Perkins, Sr. J. W. Jennings George H. Rawlinson A. H. Crosby C. I. Elzey TEXTILES A. T. Batchelder George E. Eye Paul F. Deibold T. M. Dorris Alvin Erickson I. Gerskovitz David Nelson Ben Barnett Thomas L. Brown J. G. Mackechnie Mr. Rossman David G. Perkins, Sr. J. W. Jennings A. S. Stover George H. Rawlinson Dr. Robert H. Haskell Mrs. J. L. Schwartz PLANT Purlux Laundry Somerset Laundry Sz Cleaners White Swan Laundry New Method Laundry Kline's Coat, Apron Sz Towel Service -Wm. Penn Laundry Home Laundry Clearwater Steam Laundry Acme Laundry New System Laundry New England Laundry PRODUCTION COURSE Peerless Steam Laundry Hennessey Laundry Purlux Laundry Grants Pass Steam Laundry Banner Laundry Somerset Laundry Sz Cleaners Parisian Sanitary Laundry Sz Dry Cleaners Nelson Brothers Laundry Co. White Swan Laundry Kline's Coat, Apron Sz Towel Service -Wm. Penn Laundry New England Laundries, Inc. Tucson Laundry 81 Dry Cleaners Clearwater Steam Laundry Acme Laundry New System Laundry New England Laundry Fulton Family Laundry AND WASHROOM COURSE Claremont Steam Laundry ' Hennessey Laundry Purlux Laundry White Swan Laundry Grants Pass Steam Laundry Banner Laundry Nelson Brothers Laundry Co. White Swan Laundry United Laundry Company New England Laundries, Inc. Model Laundry Tucson Laundry Sz Dry Cleaners Clearwater Steam Laundry Acme Laundry The Chambersburg Laundry New System Laundry Wayne County Training School Laundry McPherson Laundry SALES AND ADVERTISING COURSE A. T. Batchelder Charles E. Armstead L. J. Bussey H. E. Fiss George E. Eye James L. Lowe Paul F. Deibold T. M. Dorris I. Gerskovitz Thomas L. Brown Samuel Primack Mrs. J. L. Schwartz Claremont Steam Laundry Peerless Laundry Company Broadway Cleaners 8: Laundry Royal Cleaners and Laundry Hennessey Laundry Model Laundry Purlux Laundry ' White Swan Laundry Banner Laundry, Johnson Laundry Company Home Crystal Laundries McPherson Laundry LAUNDRY ACCOUNTING COURSE I. Gerskovitz Thomas L. Brown Samuel Primack Mrs. J. L. Schwartz Banner Laundry Johnson Laundry Company ' Home Crystal Laundries McPherson Laundry ADDRESS Glens Falls, New York Somerset, Kentucky Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Laramie, Wyoming Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Port Arthur, Texas Clearwater, Florida Murphysboro, Illinois Portland, Oregon Hartford, Connecticut Welch, West. Virginia Providence, Rhode Island Glens Falls, New York Grants Pass, Oregon St. Louis, Missouri Somerset, Kentucky Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Wilmette, Illinois Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Somerville, Massachusetts Tucson, Arizona Clearwater, Florida Murphysboro, Illinois Portland, Oregon Hartford, Connecticut Baltimore, Maryland Claremont, New Hampshire Providence, Rhode Island Glens Falls, New York Santa Fe, New Mexico Grants Pass, Oregon St. Louis, Missouri Wilmette, Illinois Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Des Moines, Iowa Somerville, Massachusetts Minneapolis, Minnesota Tucson, Arizona Clearwater, Florida Murphysboro, Illinois Chambersburg, Pennsylvania Portland, Oregon . Northville, Michigan McPherson, Kansas Claremont, New Hampshire Duluth, Minnesota Council Bluffs, Iowa De Pere, Wisconsin Providence, Rhode Island Knoxville, Tennessee Glens Falls, New York Santa Fe, New Mexico St. Louis, Missouri Albert Lea, Minnesota Chicago, Illinois McPherson, Kansas St. Louis, Missouri Albert Lea, Minnesota Chicago, Illinois, McPherson, Kansas '4J1,,.M' ,. 1 . 1, +!'1'fMgl-:xx , 5, H I P' "" V f , , Q R, 'f ' fa.. , ", V- ' ' 1 Z5 '4 r .w. f- --Q gr, ,'f- w' A -,A fn -,X 'f :N J' 1 .1 s r 1 . . nf ".1.' ff' -V -L, 514. nf f 4, 13 M- ., ' ' rv I' 14 . I 1 L11 r. 1 lp I. I igll N 'I rl Y wr E Ji, 1? I ,VI li i l 5 ! 1 ! Y Blonclay afternoon is always a busy one in the Student Laundry. 1 x Y ref r ! M X . J if. in I I lr I mf' 3 1 I 1 I v :Mx Ui mr : 5,0 Dig 1 V it V: 4: ,Iii E: x1 L . Between classes the new Student Lounge offers relaxation. r, ,I if 1 1 9 r A 1 2 I w 4 I2 uv 1.14.- . 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Suggestions in the American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) collection:

American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

1938

American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

1940

American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

1941

American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 1

1942

American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 22

1939, pg 22

American Institute of Laundering - Annual Yearbook (Joliet, IL) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 5

1939, pg 5

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
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