America (CV 66) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1992

Page 1 of 317

 

America (CV 66) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1992 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 317 of the 1992 volume:

- AIQZTIYC.-Cui-CI-5 , ..-ARE 1: IA' T k . J" P" - 1 El-AND?4 ,, :' f if gp ' .' ' pf I f A1-Lmfrw 005114 I H 1 193 ,. ' r S I 1333- 58835351-, awffb 66 Marv STAR 91 ro SEPTEMBERNII 0az'oBs:FL1991 .AN D EDJ rin RANEAN 'vDsJ1s1AN G ULF CRUISE 2- DECEMBER H91-4 JUNE 1992 'LSD-1 I-6 Ji. 4' 1' .ii ,3 , , 'ai vplif all f 'US' NYIQYHY YVIVNOQ 'VId0iH..L3 wvang 1-.1 .V YN vsavuy mnvg Asnufy, A NVNH ' L 1, -. 'awbwigsyggoyy ' :a-vsm5 5, 4 ,"' "4 f' ' ff? 17 Alf C X ' rl, 1,43 fx Q' 1 'P+ CJ- - X , v ,J fs ff'-A - :J e I ' , ' x f f 3 wzawl ,' , 1 I 5 I ' J ' . J 1 , 4: 5 I W . If ' I f ,' ' v , I 4 I r so s : Q sr. ' L, s -L ' 1 , 4 ' .x f ...,.. .. N., -. - Part I: Staff ........................ 4 Part II: Ship X Airwing Overview ...................... Part III: Work ups 17 33 RefT ra .................................... North Star 91 ................ ...... 3 8 England .............. ...... 6 2 Rescue Ship ........ ...... 7 6 Part IV: Home Port! POM Period Russians .......................... 78 Ammo on-load CVW-I C of C ................. 80 Thanksgiving . :,? I X ' --AA . N1 -31 Q ' 1' '-' P --v-. ':,..i--,4. va, YY 'z-, LMA Ximian E 'Lf N N ' H, . x X v. - :- , n L rf. u 'bf- ' Q, wr- I 1 Commanding Officer Captain Kent Ewing Ihllllillll l'Sl'lll W. lfwiug is Ll llklllll' ol' Dayton, Ohio. A 1961 1.1l'.lKlllLl1l' ol I11-orgigi Nlilitaut'A1'a1tl1'l11y. 111' .1tu'11c1cd the L'11i1'er- sits ol Iikllllllllllil at 1.osAl1g1'l1's. glllilllllllllg i11 1965. He holds .1 Nl.1sl1-1"s 131-gr1'1' i11 11lAl1lilgt'111t'111 from the L'11iversity of Slllllllflill fIg1lilor11ig1a11cl is also a graduate ol' tl1eN1F1i School of Iam-1'111111-111 al llAll'X'lll'I1 l'11iw.-1'sity. Iillpllllll liwing was Cll'S1gIl2llt'Kl il naval aviator i11 1966 and 1'l'lltll'll'I1 lor llllll' with '1'r.1i11i11g Squadron THREE as a basic llighl lIlNl1'lll'lUI'. Alter' ll tour ol' duty at Naval Air Station JAIQIIIIUKIQI, 1I.1lilo1'11i.1, 111- was assigin-cl to A-4F training at Attack Sqtiaclroii 125 in I,l'1l1UU1't', IIalil'o1'11ia. 111 August 1969, he 111-por11'1l loAllA1l'lx Squaclron 164. H1' niacle two COIIIDZII deploy- 11101115 .1l1o.11'cl USS HANCOCK 1CVA 191 and flew more than 21i11111i1sm11si11sntitiit-11s1Asi.1. I'i1'Ulll 1971 to 19721, 111' was assigned as Laser Systems and '1'l1l'K'All Missile 1,l'Q1L'I'1 Olilicci' at the Pacific Missile Test Center, Point Nlugu. Iialilornia, Wlll'l't' he was recognized as the Navy 1.1'a1g111- -luuior Officer ol' the Year. Following completion of '11-sl Pilot School i11 Slay 197-l, 111' served with Flight Test and Strike .'A11'I'1'Lll'1 1Jll'l'l'1Ol'ilIt' at Naval Air Test Pilot Center Patux- t'lll Riu-r, x11l1'YlLlIlfl. Among his prcjects were the YT-34C, TA- -IF a11d XA-7E. He test flew the TAV-8A Harrier carrier certifica- tion and INSERV trials, making the first night shipboard l21llllCl1 a11d recovery aboard USS FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT QCV 421 i11 june 1976. In October 1976, he joined Attack Squadron 86, deploying aboard USS NIMITZ QCVN 681. In july 1979, he reported as Executive Officer and later assumed command of Attack Squadron 66 aboard USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER QCVN 695. His squadron completed the his- toric 11ine-month Indian Ocean deployment during the Iranian hostage crisis, on line for 156 days. In May 1982, he reported to the staff of U.S. Sixth Fleet in Gaeta, Italy, as Strike Warfare Officer and temporary assignments as Special Assistant to the Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe in Naples. He then commanded Carrier Air Wing 17 aboard USS SARATO- GA CCV 601 from March 1984 to August 1985, followed by assignment as Tactical Air Analyst in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy. He commanded USS SYLVANIA QAFS 21 from October 1987 until May 1989. Prior to assuming command of USS AMERICA fCV 661 in February 1991, he served as Assis- tant Chief of Staff for Readiness on the staff of Commander Naval Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. Captain Ewing's awards include the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star Medal, three Meritorious Service Medals, 15 Air Medals, four Navy Commendation Medals, the joint Service Commendation Medal and numerous unit and foreign cam- paign awards. He has flown more than 6,000 flight hours dur- ing his career, with more than 1,150 carrier landings. Captain Ewing is married to the former Ann Graves of Colton, California. They have two children, Alexis and Taylor. A -' -,sims I ,, , - -" -, - , .,qf,,:,?:t.,-.:..v. . - , -45. . --Q?-veqhuyail-G Y, iii- :.j..:: ,:7' g.,A1 -:A 94: .3-M - 1-. ,T if Sq-75,11 - -,-- . N 1 V ,- ,b fw-,en-if-fzzmrqf :rm-Z2-Hfff N' A ' ,J ti' i . 2 K vw- '!'3"54 1 L Blu 1 ITF ' , ati' f ' ws' .11 .gg , . . .. f--fr -..- 171- ',-1-.. -1,-.- . x , - ' " ' - V ' -" ,. w?"- ,f ...'f-tr::r11-ff..-,,Y-..?, , 'G f -fqncn. : - , .. - 1" - . '-. . ' " -. .A --50 .- ' .,,, .- v - --. .-,.,,,, ,-..- .dsx X' -:, 'E-.,-x.:f"' -..fg.,-it --5--.,, -- , . W .N,. ' - --1 - fix! ,A f -. si A. Q, . .. ,A - wi, -. X R , 1 x x ' '- X " ' Y x Q , y , xxx f 'W .. . . V-,..- .F M--'----s1'?""S"""'f" 'M 5"'1.-. M" ' ' ' -1' W "V -' il , - - "'iLfx 4 , .- ,N V f F . K" C ' , f ff? - Q I K- 'J L' ,f i 3,31 A xl "ref" ' I 8 xg. we N - my . . Cl FEI: I . M-14-k i l"i'l 45 'IX iff? H? iff A 1 .,,1 '1-w - '7 ,A S li 1 SR Y vw., f Z if p ..,: L,-ff ,.V1 I h"',gj4I.q Yi 5 15' QL-K, . 5- wa-06.4615 Lqfg-. 'na ffl ' apfglin ames A Bolcar Executive Officer 9january 1991 - 27 March 1992 Captain james Andrew Bolcar was born on 2 lanuarv 19-19 and raised in Vander- grift. Pennsylvania. He graduated from the l'nited States Naval Academy in june 1971 and began commissioned service on USS WORDEN QDLG 181 as First Division Offi- cer in -lulv 1971. Captain Bolcar began flight training in Xlarch 1972. and was des- ignated a Naval Aviator in October 1973. After completing his initial aviation assignment as a flight instructor in Training Squadron TWICNTY-ONE in -lune 1975, Captain Bolcarhjoined Fleet Composite Squadron SliV1iN in july 1975. He began A-fi transition training with Attack Squadron FORTYTWO in September 1976, and reported to Attack Squadron EIGHTY FIYli for his first fleet tour of duty in April 1977. ln December 1979, he reported to Attack Squadron FORTYTWO for duty as an instructor pilot. Returning to Attack Squadron 1ilGl-ITY-FIVE in April 1982, he served as Safetv Officer and Operations Oflicer until October 1984, when he joined the staff' of' Cotnmander Medium Attack Wing ONE as Readiness Officer. Captain Bolcar was selected for post-com- inand assignments with Commander, SEC- OND Fleet where he served as Air and Strike Operations Officer from October l9S9 until hlulv 1990. He was selected for assignment as an aircraft carrier executive officer in the spring of' 1990 and reported to USS AMERICA fCV 661 in November 1990. lle is now assigned to Supreme Head- quarters, Allied Powers, Europe. Captain BoIcar's personal awards include the Meritorious Service Medal, the joint Service Connnendation Nfedal, two Naw Cotnmendation Nfedals and the Navi' Achievement Nledal. i Captain llolcar is married to the former Sandra lililabeth Dvke. 'lihev reside in Vir- ginia Beach with their daughters Christine and Kathleen. ., up .. CCM AW Davld Borne Command Master Chlef N1.1s11-1 111111-1 11.11111 1'1111'111- 1111s 1111111 N121I'C11 24. 11132 111 N1-11 c11'll'l111N, 1,1111isi111111. 111- gl'21C1L1L1lt'C1 1111111 11.1111111111 liigh 511111111 111 Hal1111'111e. l,1l111N1111111. 111 111711. 111111 1-111is11-11 111 1111- Nz11'1'111 1.11111.11X 11171, 1'O1I11llt'11l1g 1'1-1'1'11it 1l'i11l11I1g211 141111111 1'111i11i11g KQ1-1111-11 U1'11llNl0- Fl0V1f111- 111s 11lx1 .1ssig111111-111 1111111- 111 12171 11111111111 USS SAR.-XTOGA 1CV 601, 11'111-1a1- 111- wo1'141-11 111 the 1-111111-11 X11ss111- 1Ji1'isi1111 111' W1'11111111s D1'pa1't111e11t. f1l'1,lllx1l1g 111 1111- N1l'K11lk'I'1'1111l'2l11 111111 V11-t11a111. 111 11171 111- 1-1-1111111-11 111 '1'1'z1111i11g Sf1ll21C11'OI1 FOUR 1V1 11 .11 N111'g1l .X11'S1111i1111. 1'1'11s111'111a, F1111'i11a. 111 111711. 111- was 11ssig111-11 111 F11-ct Cloinposite S1111.1111'1111 11-IN 1111 1111 111 Ni1X'21l:X1I'Sl2111OIl, 1Q11.11111111.111111 11111. C111111, 11'111'r1- 111' s1'11'e11 as 11112111- 11 11ss111'.1111 1- 111-111' 1111111-1' 111111 11111-11 as Weapons 1l1'1l.lI1111l'I11 1l'k1C11l1Q 111-111' 11111111-11 It was during 1111s .1ssig111111-111 111111 111- was s1-11-C11-11 as VC 10 and 1111111111.111111-1'. '1'111'1i11g11 5111313011 Wing ONE Sailor 111 1111- YQ'l11'. .'x111l'1' l1l1t'I1C11Ilg P-3 FRANIP school in 1L111iN111lX111k'. 1'11111'i11z1. Blaster CI111e11B111'11e reported 111 1'.11111l S1111111111111 TW1-QNTY THREE CYP 231 in 1'111111s11i1'11. x1Al1l1t', 11'l11-1'1- 111' se1'1'1-11 as leading 111-111 11l111'1'1' 111' 1111- 111'1111a111'1- shop. It was during 1111s .1ssi1g111111-111 111211 111- was pr11111ote11 to Chief 111'111 1111i1'1'1'. 111 WSI. 111' 11111-11111-11 1111- DC11CI1SC Equal Oppor- 11111i11' x1kll1.l11L'1l1l'11l l11s11111t1- at Patrick Air Force 11.111 111 11111-1111 B1-11111, F111111111, 1Dl'1OI' to 11is assign- 1111-111 111 llll' s11111 111 CI11111111a11111'1' Patrol Wings .X11.1111i1' 111 IS1-llllxxxlifk, N111i111-. as E1111alOppo1't11ni- 11 l'111g1'.1111s S111-1'1111is1. 111 1218-1, 111- r1-ported for 111111 .1l111.11'11 L'SSu1OHN F. KENNEDY QCV 671215 W1-.1111111s111-11.11'11111-111 lk'k1C1111g C111l'11pC1l1'O11f1CCI'. 51'l1'1'1l'11 111 11111-1111 1111- 1'.S. Nam' Senior Enlist- 1-11 .X1.l11l'1l1N 111 N1-11'11111'1, R1111111- Island, 111 1987, x1.1N11'1 1Q1111-1 11111111- 1A1l1'I' 1'l'17Ol'lt'C1 111 Naval Air N1.11i1111 11l'1'.l1lL1. 11'l11-1'1- 111- s1-1'1'1-11 as Weapons ll1'11.l1'1111l'111 11-.111i11g 11111-1' 111-111' 1111111-1' and later .1N11ll11111.111l1 X1.1s11-1' l.1111'1. 111 1S1911,11e was .1ss1q111-11 .is 1f11111111.11111 x1i1N1t'1' 111111-1'1111'.-Xt1z1C1L 5l111.111lU11 11111111 111115. 1X'.-X C151 l111111cp111'te11at Y XS O1 1'.111.1. 111111-11 111- 11111111111-11 11111111111 USS SAR.-XTOC.-X 1CY 601 rlnring O111-111111111 Desert N111K'111 .1l111 111-s1-11 S1111111. 111- 1'1-1111111-11 a1111ar11 L'SS.-XMERICA1CY661i11.11111 111211 111 f:11111111l111f1 x1.1N11'1 1111111 X1.1N11'1 1 l111'1 1gl11'1ll' 11 .111111111'1f1-11 111 11't'l1l' the X.111 1111111111-111l.1111111 X11-11.11 111111 g111'111'11s1, 1111- X.111 .K1'11l1'11'l111'11I x1l'11.11 l11N11.1XV,11'f1x1,N111'yL'1111 1111111111-1111.1111111 111111.111.111111, X11-1-1101-1,,11, 11111 c1111l111ll'11fl.1111111 111111 .111.11-1111, Igt1111t' "1f' R11,1,1m 1.11111111111111111 N11'11.1l 111X1' .111.11'11s1. Ng11i1111g11 l11'11'11s1' 51'I'1l11' X11'1l.11 111N11 .111.11'11s1, S1111ll1X1'1's1 111.1 SK'lW111' X11'11.11 1111111 1l11'1'1' l1I'1ll1!l'xl111'g1v 1111- Vietnam Service Medal, and various deployment and campaign ribbons. He is married to the former Tommie Yevette Winborne of Portsmouth, V sons, Brian and Brandon. irginia. They have two AMERICA s MISSICH Iht tx iclition il mission of the Lnited States N in is to control thc st is Without this control Amt in in loitts lbio id could suffer from lack of support and industry it home could decline or hilt lor lick of thc i us mateiiils that must e clt lm it cl xi 1 tht se 1 routes ofthe uorld lht coming of the nuclear age has not th mgttl this btsic concept In fact it has broad Only tht inciaft carrier can proyide the mobility uid tus itihtx needed to ensure that this control ls in unt nntrl AMERICA is a completely equipped naval air sl ation But instead of being a fixed point on the in ip th it can be targeted by ballistic missiles AMERICA c in range the oceans of the world th urging her position by hundreds of miles in a singlt cl ix AMERICA and her sister carriers of the fleet illou tht L nitcd States to qulcklv assemble great tonctntritions of Hrepouer whereyer it may be nt t cltcl to tnsuie global stability This was accom plishtcl un cffectnely during Operation Desert Storm And unlike bases oyerseas carriers are not dependent on the political temperament of for eign goyernments for their CXISICDCC Versatile and mobile AMERICA can be used alternately or simultaneously against submarines surface ships aircraft or shore f3C1llIICS She can also support amphiblous land and air operations In brush fire conflicts AMERICA can move qulckly to apply the required amount of offensive of total war she represents a hard to find base from which retaliatory strikes can be launched agamst enemy targets Finally the recognlzed offenslve and defenslve capabilities of AMERICA provide a powerful deterrent to conflict and a force for peace around the world 7 0 0 , ' 'z I S' ' ' , ' , l l .1 Y' l . I I 9 1 ' ' 1 " ' ' 'Q ' ' "2 ' b ' , i - , , . N A SL 91 ' . . , , ' z f ' lf' ' ' . ' , ' - ' l ' cm-cl it to include control of the air over the seas. firepower to stabilize the situation. In the event I A r. .. , i - 2 2 U y Q I l . . . . 1 . .Q ., 3 n ' ' 1 ' ' I r r ' .I A . S- Q f - . ' ' yi ' - x . 4 r I V , . Qty X -.-i-....................1..----'- Airwing ERICAE Air ing arri er One The F-14A Tomcat is a two-seat, twin-engine all- weather aircraft capable of flying twice the speed of sound. Its mission is to intercept and destroy enemy aircraft in order to establish and maintain local air superiority. The Tomcat can carry long-range Phoenix missiles in addition to Sparrow and Sidewinder mis- siles, and can engage multiple targets simultaneously. Fighter squadrons VF-33 and VF-102, based at NAS Oceana, Virginia, fly the F-l-1 from AMERICA. mb 4 , ,B 4 ar Jn -flf' , O i f m a XA 1 N N i t i N xx .fa-ff' 6 s,p, b rl X S ,:..,- f ' V f fv , A ,QI x 4 JL ff' I F-14A Tomcat Length 62 Span 641 Speed Mach 2+ Height - 16' EA-6B Prowler my X5 -3- In FP. 1 Xkxlqix- Length 59 Span 53 Speed 516 Kts Height- 162' Length - 49.5' Height- 15.6' Span - 69' Speed 400 Kts The EA-6B Prowler is a four-seat, all-weather aircraft with the primary mission of providing electronic warfare sup- port to the fleet by detecting and jamming enemy radar signals. Modern anti-air defense systems, whether they use missiles, gunfire or fighter interceptors, rely heavily on radar for tracking and guidance. By denying the enemy the use of his radars, the Prowler can effectively screen friendly strike aircraft and neutralize enemy weapon systems. Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron VAQ,-137, based at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, flies the EA-6B from AMERICA. S-SB Viking The S-3B Viking is the first completely computerized, car- rier-based, anti-submarine jet aircraft. It has the all-weath- er capability to search for, localize and destroy enemy submarines. It is designed to carry an array of ordnance, including homing torpedoes, mines, depth charges, rock- ets and missiles. Equipped with the latest ASW sensors, it is capable of searching large areas of ocean and detect- ing modern nuclear submarines. The Viking is flown from AMERICA by Air Anti-Submarine Warfare Squadron VS-32, based at NAS Cecil Field, Florida. ---- i if 1 i. .1 ti rv if T! E? 1? vi 2 I I L -....,.-gun: arrler Fhght Like a well-choreographed ballet, aircraft operations on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier require precision and coordination between the perfomiers. More than 200 men respond to the call to flight quarters and move to the skill- fully orchestrated ballet of man and machine. In what appears to be total chaos to an observer, the men, who are identified by their various colored jerseys, perform their jobs professionally, rapidly and safely. Airplanes move at the direction of the yellow shirts, and weapons are loaded by the red-shirted ordnancemen. Green shirts maintain the cata- pults and arresting gear, blue shirts chock and chain the air- craft, and the purple-shirted 'grapes' provide JP-5 fuel to the aircraft. Safety checks on aircraft prior to launch are done by the white shirts. In order to land on the pitching flight deck of an aircraft carrier, the pilot must bring his aircraft in at an exact prede- termined speed, altitude and angle. One of four arresting cables on the flight deck brings the plane to a stop from 150 mph within a distance of about 350 feet. A catapult launch from one of AMERICA's four catapults sends a 22-ton air- craft 260 feet from zero to 180 mph in two seconds. The tempo of operations can be exhausting, with a launch as often as every minute, and a recovery as often as every 45 seconds. Day and night, underway in all weather conditions, the men of AMERICA and CVW-1 respond to the challenge of the world's most dangerousjob. 0 0 , ' , up Xt-,.vl Qvw J. . X3 - , 9 V. : xt Peratlons Q- X I 'P l l l I. W l i .1 't 1 1 it I Y t I l l K E F s E I ,sg.. -. Repleni hment at Sea Rt-plenislunent .tt stni IR.-X81 i'eliei's to the trzuisfer ol' fuel, munitions, supplies .incl personnel from one vessel to another ishilt- timleiwnn, Dtirinig World W.u' ll, replenishment :it sea w.is tleielopecl In .i line .irt of setinituisliip which today is l.lkl'II .15 -I IIIAIICI ol LUIIINU. RAS mn he .tttotriplislit-ti in two ways. Uiiclerwzn' Replen- ishinent tl NREIN tukes place with both the replenishment ship .ind the ship ht-ing replenished stezuning side bv side on p.u.illel courses .it .1 predetermined speed. During IINREP, the tiistsint- lx-nwen AMERICA and the supply ship may be .is little .is l00 feet. Onte in position, AMERICA tires shot lines to the replenishment ship. These lines are used to haul .itross the ht-.iw spain wires. Once these are properly .itt.u'lierl, the profess oi' passing cargo begins. In the Case of rt-lui-ling, fuel hoses ride across the span wires to couple with rt-ceners on AMERICA. lt is not uncommon for AMERICA to receive hundreds of tons of cargo. more Lhan 11 million gal- lons of luel, or both during at single UNREP. Vt-rtiml Replenishment CVERTREPJ permits AMERICA to rcin.un on station in combat formation. eliminating the need to teuiporzirilx' iinmohilize itself by going alongside another ship. As ai supply ship steams in company with AMERICA, helicopters transfer supplies from helicopter platforms on the it-plcuishnu-nt ship to AMERICA's fhght deck. Both LNKI-IP and VERTREP require a tremendous amount of coordination and skill from all concerned. It is a total team effort thzu allows AMERICA to resupply safely and efficiently while underway anywhere in the world. 1 Y 'ITTIIHL , I lv! 1 -- . ag: - --'f -' , ..s.-...gg-.:. ff. - . - ,W ..,,, ,,,, , - ..- -r :-'. N 5,-,... , l Q. 34- l 4 I, f If O . Z ii 1 l l f S f ,, 4- Y 1.4..,..-., A V Y Q -M v ,, A ' " "' "' ' - '-' ' " 4 ,J 4 I ,' V: tl s, r , ,ai 3 2 ERICA Facts 200,000+ .. 50+ Knots 1048 Feet 252 Feet 98 Feet .. 4.57 Acres 80,000 Tons 5,300 18,000 30 Tons 391 Pounds 22 Feet Welght of each Propeller 69,300 P0Uf1dS Area of each Elevator 3 880 Square Feet Dally Capaclty of Dlstlllmg Plants 280,000 Gallons I-Ilghest Pomt of Shlp ..... 195 Feet ith.tt lttlt liltt' tl.ns. ttntil nt- pi'tn't-tl tmtn' t-xpt-itistt tltning lht lin.tl l3.tttlt 1' l'inhlt'in l' lt. snnnltttt-tl it nnssilt hit stiilting tht' ship Inst gilt til tht' port ht-.nn, lht' uxpltmsitmn t't't'4ttt'tl li1't'stn1 tht' st-ttintl tlt-tlt. tht' httng.n' hgn. ttntl twttn tin tht- H13 lt-xt'l. .X st-t-tintl inissilt' strnclt ns ltiiimtitl tin tht' port sitltx Ctllblllg ltunt intl tl ntn tlntitiglitmttt tht- l'tn'wut'tl pQtl'l tml tht- ship. llnt xtt' htztt tht- ht'st FTE h.ttl ltr tlntm .tt ns - wt' sgnt-tl tht- ship. llt'p.n1 l.Ut'lxl'l' Ili. xvht'n till tht' snioltti h.itl tlt-.nt-tl. h.ttl tht' highcst st'tn't's ztntl tttwn tht' .nt.n'tl lm' lacing tht' ht-st ltmtiltct' in tht- ship. ln tht' lllt'llllllllll'. on top tml' ull the thills, nt' hgttl lnt' zttitttztl tnttitn' htel oil ltutlts tty ttinilmtit. ti nitijtn' stwnn lt-uk, and ttinntltws tlttss "t'litn'lit"' lircs. Our htlhing tn wus, "Drills ull tltny ztttttztls all night." lint tht- ship tznnt' togtttlitfr, and twntt- .tggtin AMERICA prtmvctl she could light inn txtsttzilty. 1't'ztl tn' imposed, and th.tt slit' was rtuith' to httntllt' any task she nits t'.tllt'tl npun to tlti during het' tlvpltixint-nt to tht- Nlt-tlitt-iiznttutii. . - f ,J , ' -, 0 ,Mw -+-,gh g,,fi:,'h 1-rv ll 4 X As -" +4548 9 A 4 A -,a ,f x Lf- wna-u,5 x,,,.. 1 - Wil li fb. 1.. alta., , N 9. 0 va.-1 .-Q-. .1-4 .sq vw-1 s 11:1 P-up-...,,,,:5,,,.., r--N -.xvzwnp-w 1 1 rx. .- fe.. -9. 1 -D. . ,. .411 f"2'gy'y.-was--AM, ,',,"" ,y ,W I 1 K. . ef sv-ry 11,1 N- , 1 I: .3 ' XQ- Lx, Y I S b .V . iw 4, ' . awk. .yn 'ark lu: i..-1g:.w b 'I nxv- 'X 1 115 -. N 'Q' - 4 .,, Pm I.. , ff 'ff . X-,V 1 M5354 A W' ,,.f 4, - J'-r., 1 " Jf'1 f'f'f -H' U s a .n-'Sf cf Aw 0 21' A, .A 6 ,. 4 , - 53" L ,fi-.UIQH ' , A ' mqgf 1514015 nu-., fzf. f:if'7E,g': 2 V - . . .21 Q 924A-'ins I R, ,. Q, ' .gyw K f .4 n Q J, sf - v if-,gf .:- V Nunn star 91 A .- ' ,,,f '. ':f". 42 Q ,, Avy, yes? 4, . -5 if Q ff V . "Www, '. . 'fx Vx? " .,':4.,,',., r4,..:,g,,g3'vuL ,, , ,X W. u..,,,,',,,.- . 5 if t, ' ., . - I . 1 , A L , P..-we-nf 3. K M W -' 2, -.g', 'qs-M. Q A..,.Q, , . . . If .ifrfq 'Q 'I -1 !'f1,,t-1- ,' 3' 554. 'Mr-f..1 1 A -ui' ' , ., , - V. . . , ,, r , . L.. . , A., : , .v , - g .2 . .- ,yr 4: , . a 1 ,..1.... -v ,W .f. ,Lg,,,f:'-51A,g.i...,- - ff K I ,V 1 - .' I - -sp-,Nfn, fl Y vw ,A A-A, L. v. . I' ,..',L,, ks f...b5 f "- .. , 'U 4' Q , -4. ,WW Q df fr , J V I 5' ' , - - ,I A ' ,. 'tht 'fifw'M"L:,,1, fy." vip.. - 35.8 ' , ' 'a ' 1" rv' I . . .S v...,p1.- Q .M - ' .1 'Lk Q ' 5 ' ,Q .-7 ,. 391, -tg' . .. - " ' ,. .v'- cp.. . 4 K A, - f 04' ' Ja , X -Q' "H tjv'-Qjlg., 'F' -L "9 ' ' V' ' ' .,.. ,-'Q ff f. 4: -' ,...sv . " A.',, , 5" , Q , -- , , 5-v ,, . Y ,.-.,' ,- - v , -. L-4 -L..,?,, ,,. - A I N '94 '29-hY:",.NT:v -. , .-.A .. -- ,lg-MWA, IJW .rue Mb Lx tv: ': b-ff Y al.: . .W mv' .. . J., fx'-.41-, '7"- - - -1 A -. .....- ,gg .t vm- Pv in' Q' s 1 to ,I-,P ,- "'-" ' f 'rg' -' -3. -2' .f: -- w, 'H' . . qu ,, . .. X , !,Q.,.. Q, if N' " , - '- ' .- . 1:4 "" H '- .ar-1.1.1 rl " 'f t "W" 1 ' .. , - , -5. g ,Q . . . - .. --.f Q . .Is , -. w.'Q.,, H -I ,L Y . W, is , v ,,'.-a.gf- - . ...Q J I ' '11 1 an N. wg?-f" , Y-i-4'4io xg' W 1 3 4- ' .. " vw -v ' 1 'gf ' i ,.-1 ' N--.....-n 1 .- f 0- 1-'40 16 M.. qhkntx Q '4n,, V 1 Y' "1E5',g,, 'x V tru: 'W .1- '-L,-6--Fzd N ,Ain mv 'g vii .n ., f uw.-4.1. huilding the tactic .il surlat e .intl .ur picture. luiiiting loreign airt ialt and launching sim- ulated weapons. lilet ironic and anti-suhma- rine warlare skills were also tested. While our pilots llew missions in support of carrier delense, they also sharpened their high speed skills gunning and homhing weapon ranges. The operators in the anti-submarine war- fare module were kept busy hy countering the suh-surlace threat with every asset avail- ahle to them. The radiomen were chal- lenged with a coiniminications exercise that involved an extremely high volume of mes- sage trallic and frequency changes. Deck personnel rigged numerous underway replenishments. Navigators plotted courses through unique and restricted operating areas, and the intelligence analysts worked around-the-clock monitoring scopes and screens to provide the early warnings to alert the Air Boss when to launch planes into action. 'l'he list ol work centers that tackled increased commitments during the exercise ran from how to stern. On I5 September, AMERICA entered the coastal conlines ol' northern Norway and operated in some of the long, narrow, mountain-ringed waterways known as the Yestljiord region of the country ta good place lor ships to hide and avoid satellite detectionl. As the Captain said. "lf we can operate successlullv here in the Arctic Circle where the environment challenges both men and equipment - we can operate anywhere." And operate in this region ol' the world we must. The Soviet lleet must exit the waters ol northern Norway and, not surpris- inglv, the Pentagon warns that they are redistributing lormer Soviet Air Force assets and creating nine new Soviet Naval Aviation tactical air regiments in the region in order to avoid heing "hottled up" in their own hack vard. A "Across the spectrum ol' naval warfare." said Rear Admiral l.ewis, Commander flar- 'tivl' Uwllii 'txt-a. wilt- AMERICA Biarri- llroup performed ahsolutelv superhlv and exceeded mv highest expectations. l'm very, vers proud ol' their perlorinance." I I Realm of the Arctic: Circle "Know ull invn hi' thc-sc presents: and to all wail- rus, hnskics, foxes, wolves, polar hears, whales, nizlru-ns, rciliclc'c'r, Caribou and all othcr living dcnizcns ol' the frozen northern wastes, know ye, that thc frcw oi' thc' good ship USS AMERICA QCV 661 with nn' royal conscnt passed thc gutcwzn' lo thc lop of thc world hi' crossing thc' Arctic Cir- cle. llc it furthe-r understood: than thvy vntercd thu land ol'ic'ic'l1's, hliunrds, williwuws and niyriud snowllgikcs on lsl SL'IJlt'llllJCl' 1991 an 009 Dcgrccs I'1I'r.7' F longilndc. Than l, Borczis Rex, Rnlvr ol' the North Wind and sou-wigii of gill thc fwfr-11 l'L'Lll'll- cs il lonrhcs, do lN'l'l'lll' flm-clam' wich hot hloodcd Nl-oplmvtc' to nn royal doinnin lo hm- ll ll'llt' Lind misu-cl im- and hrinc 4-iic'i'11stc-cl Bl,l'liNUSl1. "Bc il known: 'lhgn hx' virtnv oi' thc powcr lllYt'Sl- cd in inc l do llt'l't'lJX' ronnnnnd all nn snlill-els to show dm- honor and rn-spurt lo Illl'lIl wlic1'ci'c-r thu' ingu ln-, Disohm this ordcr unch-r pcnzlllx' of nn' roxul clisplcgislm-." - llorcuis Rvx ,, W, , .,.-, .., .- .. -,- , . .. - -f ..,- M-. Y......,-y---.....,,, -.-0...-....,.YYi..... .-,.V-- --,-.- -..... -.- -.-, - -If. - . .J .L 5 ,J ,I ,V f.s,f5JfjQ'?x5'?9?s" ' f .I 4' K . ,. ' of Z jgzf " r jig jg . fgn. . ,,xj:' "P F-:V 'Nei V L' x - f u, - :Eff fa- -v f , , , ,?,.,,,, . .-., ji,,,,q,L I .. A 14 A. r- in A 'X Q x ,f n- - 51,1 'H Q ' 'ID .., a A-, fn ,' ,ljg sign ,quin- Y 519- ' S' '? p- - . .Q 'ul Q, 'I--4 SD' ,t,.f' C ., Sui Z .. U Away the Sigh ting T cam, away-' 1 t Win During North Star 91. Soviet intelligcnce-gathering aircraft and surface vessels were frcqttcnt visitors to AMERICA's are-at of'opcr'1tio1is TL' 95 BEAR D ' . . . - c aircraft Cabove, top righti wt-rc iittcrccptcd and cscortcd by CIXWY-1 F-14A TOMCATS. AGI surveillance ships tbottom right! camc close to AMERICA on several occasions. Shipboard Photographcris Mates and cockpit crcwmcn cloctimcntccl these visits on film and videotape for analysis by AMERICA's intclligcncc ccntcr tcztm. Q. ""- I 9 'hw 115 -4 0 I V 4, f Q' 0-uf? ,--,- von-: 9' -U C 'D ,f . A ' - .... -' - LQ-44 ' ' ' v-A 'uv' 'Q' A 1 -----W ,M ,,, W, x ,4 J,-,, -urn:-1" V --...xqmM,JA Q 'F A xifwkff 'j"ff'j'3'r'--'M 4.-- "' , , d ' ' ...qos ,---, ' ' ' '.,..4,,f': 1-.,.f..-f 1 J ff' -. DN.-"' ful.. - N .. , L VA if t . . -s., . 'f I . .- - - -I ' " M-4' - ,ww-'f-wif", . - -,,w,. s., ' -8- Y ' ' ' Az' , . f wi. A V WWW f f . Q , , v A..-N ., V ..!.fffq..A-. ..,,n, 4 A I A V. I . 4 V- J tm ' ,Y fwfr: gg'-f 'ZW' ,.,. . P " .f y .- . A Q V -t- a lk! . ' - - if - 6 5 Q' P+ .. Bl 701,41 Q . F N119 in an fe Aw' ' 'T 'va -M. 'fl' gg V., Iac lv- , - ..,,,.,, 7 I V I v 1 'H I 5 . is CQ., -'H , ., mln, 2 f' Q ,J I , 2 lx -"O .J-L' N' ' "1-:1Q,..' ," " "3 1 ' ,L Q - 'Q' . O . anim A ,,,,-.--- ""' ,- 1.44 - -A-A VM R HM Jw.,-Sutsi A N WA-Wm ,V Ygifll-Fflllifllfill ,l gnu h M .,.,. .!:4'-'maMgj,V. .gf.Q..,.l..L..,,..l...,a, X fl '-1""' , - '1 4-N ' .pa-A-------"' ' U -----gg:-.:g."-....." j Njjfl '-,QQ ff, M H M ,-,.N.-,-,A--A. M---fw'- Rfwhffff "' ....-.....-,. ,A is 4':"' . ...I0"" Qi" ' ,,,a"' ff .ig- gk. D4 7 V Mzzgi 'TH-L-dv'-'U"""'h 9. , Z , , .f ,, '- J' . , .. . ' rf?e"f"'f ' ,, g,,....M-f-"T ...a"" 4 uf' 'A , lf' . W, uf 'www 4 sv . 5 Q I I ,Q M-r1F."-',.,:1f:' ,K ngruz 4, ,.. ge l""l' 1, v N- KM 5' K Q, I 1 -- , 1 L: if ,Qi f ff . V. 1 N ' 3 ' Q. v 4 , 1 6 74" ' "I J 1' .a ,-.f-fi. E. A .f1L1.-,.. gmih J ' ' 1'i'TMi,v-, . ,'.s- "nga, - I f En" .4 W I ' I' ' 1, WF V ' 'E 'A x 4 i' B , ,un Stl 1? . Tx- n' In .iii - ' ,542 uf.: 1 -I" , me J' V if ' A 1 U I S 'vi , I 59" . r JA L - 15 , A , ' A X ' "' Li. '. -- uw' ,A 43. ,.,, ifim--:f2'Q:s":'57 " . 1 -n '. ' x"' -'fs' T 1' 'J 1+ I 1 r P i s ? Portsmouth England Portsrnouth, England, proved to be a very exciting and enjoyable port visit for all of the crew. Special Services, combined with the lNel- fare and Recreation staff, provided entertain- ment and relaxation by means of tours and sporting events. One of the tours was an overnight trip to London in which the crew was able to sample English history and hospi- tality. lt included a guided tour of many land- marks such as the Tower of London, Big Ben, Westminster Abbey and Buckingham Palace. The evening was spent in deluxe accommoda- tions and free time enough to enjoy the nightlife. A one-day tour of London was also offered, and included many of the same sights as the overnighters. A trip to Stonehenge, was also enjoyed by many. It included a relaxing bus ride through the beautiful countryside to Bath, England. There, crewmembers enjoyed a self-guided excursion through the streets for shopping and a look at the Roman hot springs which gave Bath its name. Many shipmates ventured out to Canterbury where the classic "Canterbury Tales" were derived. They were guided through the historic city with a stop at Canterbury's Cathedral. Sporting events were numerous in Portsmouth. AMERICA's basketball team played the Solent Stars, a British semi-profes- sional team, and the ship's soccer team kept busy with a game against the Royal Navy's best. During a scheduled sports day softball, foot- ball, soccer, volleyball and rugby contests were played. AMERICA also responded to a sailing challenge regatta, The Reed Cup, with four two-rnan teams. This event is a tradition between the British and United States navies. The Royal Navy Chiefs' Association played host to AMERICA's CPO community with an evening of events every night at their CPO club. Activities ranged from a disco to horse racing to a country-western night. The Royal Navy CPO's also assisted in providing a loca- tion and refreshments for the newly selected AMERICA CPO's "wetting down." British hos- pitality was certainlv a highlight of the port VlSll - it never ran out. 3-X M , T, f.. X f J 1' 1 w , ' f f LN -XM ,Q f-fffxx V,-' 1 ,, N 3 'AN 1 1 "fl ' f 1 f 7 Vg Qiililliyjlxllgf E 5 x f Vx, ' f idfgwx Y Ly? 'Awfx' l X V ' x f w V y X .f 'Mx ' N' , 2k."!'fJ . .QS i ,I 4 -Qu .S-ya x'x'5Qf' -v yi X I R' .ax K ll F! v1 i 1 -Q--.5,. KQV- S wa ww ' X, '74 V gh TW", QfCA ' 3 ....q..,.4 ' 4 nu 5 11 Y if igis -if f., A--if: -,. ii 1 N 4 I 1 ,I -1 Q f-k .- it il' ti' ll Ii f, 1 ...J I, is ' 1 I 1 F I . V ff .V -. '.-,.. -.A ,V .,-V-.MV-4w..1n -.:.f4S..i.:.:.1-'.,..A.-' -ui V7,,:,r:.1.' Ar:-1-V1g1.m,., -: V --,, ..--.,. V ,V V V MTH nu pm dingy!-:rrp .121-if -ff. V I , K... . A AMERICA to the Rescue On 28 August while conducting flight operations off the coast of the U.S. prior IO steaming to the North Atlantic to head up the battle group for "North Star '9l," AMERICA received a call from a Coast Guard C-130 to assist in the rescue of three people adrift in a raft 150 miles off the coast of North Carolina. The three, two men and a six-month pregnant woman, had been drifting for 10 days after their 38-foot sailboat was sunk by the remnants of Hurricane Bob. As it turned out the three had run out of fresh water and food and were drinking lim- ited amounts of salt water three days prior to their rescue. Within an hour of the Coast C-uard's call an SH-3H Sea King helicopter from HS-11 was hovering over the raft. "I knew as soon as l saw a U.S. Navy helicopter, we'd be alright," said the captain of the sailboat. The crew had battled the weather for more than a day when they decided to abandon their craft. Minutes later it sank. The days spent drifting were arduous. "The seas capsized our raft 10-15 times," the cap- tain said, "I lost count." AW3 Steve Doerner of HS-11 was the res- cue swimmer that day. 'KI saw six to eight sharks less than 10 feet from the raft," he recalled. "But I couldn't think about them. I had to stay focused on myjobf' The HS-ll crew was able to hoist the cap- tain into the helicopter, but the other two were too weak to hold on, and one fell in the water after the attempt. Doerner went into action, jumping in the shark-infested water to attach the line and get him and the woman hoisted to safety. , The three received medical attention aboard AMERICA and were pronounced ' '... in good shape, despite being severely dehydrated." bv our senior medical officer, GXPT jerry Rogers. K wing's humanitarian efforts when he said, 'AWe are delighted to, again, be instrumen- tal in saving lives. We're always aware that we share the seas with thousands of others H Thanks to the reactive work by the ship's and we're proud to do what we can to help .journalists and photographers, the rescue our fellow mariners." mission received national media attention and provided the Navy with a great story to tell. - Deja ui struck again at the end of Octo- ber when two Coast Guard helicopters land- ed on AMERICA with nine sailors who had lost their sailboat in a SIOFIU associated with Hurricane Grace 100 miles off the Virginia X 1 coast. Thev were treated bv AMERICA's X X medical team and given hot showers, hgt -. --.W W, by wh--H nd, coffee and dn' clothes before being flown 'xii A Si, df ashore bv the Coast Guard. I X64 The Skipper summed up the ship and air- The R ssizzn are Confung, Un Friclny, 8 Noveinher 1991, AMERICA was visited hy several high- iuniking iiuxzil oflic'c1's of the Soviet l'nion. .-Xcliniinl Ylztdiinii' Climiiziviii, UJillIll2lllClL'll-Ill-L'lIlCl'Oil the SovietNz1W, z1c'c'oii1pii1iit'cl hy othvi' scniot' officers twill on hogntcl lillll lviuilalizist :incl at tout' ol' thc ship hostccl hy Aclinirzil P. D. Nlillt-ip CQINCII..-XN'llFlfl', zincl AMERI- CA's skippcip Ckiptniii licnt Ewing. Fol- lowing liituikliist in thc flag mess. tht' otliciail ptntx' totirccl thc iizivigzition hiticlgv, pi'iingn'x flight control zincl thc flight clcck. .'Xi'l4'II posing for at photo- giniph in front of the islttnfl with ADM Nlillei' and CI.Xl"l' Ewing, thc niost st-nioi' Smit-is wt-rc pitsc-iitctcl with AMERICA hgilluips and Yll' hooklt-ts. A-Xt cgicli loctition on tht-ii' toni thtt Soviets wcrtt gi't't'tt-cl ht' AMERICA Cicwinen who pi'ox'iclticl tht' visitors with gin vxplgiiitttioii of' opt-izttioiis and p1'ot't-cli1i't-N in with giiui. l I 4 l ,445 hange of Command CAPT Paul D. Cash relieved CAPT Michael L. Bowman as Commander, Carrier Air Wing ONE CCVW-lj in a pier-side ceremony on board AMER- ICA in Norfolk, November 13. CAPT Bowman commanded CVW-l since September 1990. He led the wing in the Gulf War as it logged 3,008 combat sorties on both sides of the conflict in the Red Sea and Persian Gulf. CAPT Bowman detached CVW-l to become Director, Aviation Officer Distribution in Washington, D.C. CAPT Cash reported from duty as Deputy Director, Program Resource Appraisal Division COP-815. Previ- ously he served as Deputy CAG of Carrier Air Wing THIRTEEN. 441A 1 L... is 5 N , ,1 l 4 l Ammo Load F Departure: MED 1-92 2 December 1991 'g' NJ N 1.gff ff- f 1 s 1 0 IK X 1 5 ...nj Battle Force Sixth Fleet USS AMERICA 4fCV-662 USS NORMANDY .KOS-501 USS MONTEREY ICG-612 USS SCOTT IDDG-9952 USS JOHN HANCOCK IDD-9812 USS THORN IDD-9882 USS BOONE IFFG-281 USS SIMPSON KFFG-562 USS SUNHSH ISSN-6492 USS OHOTON ISSN-6941 USS SIERRA IAD-181 USS SAVANNAH 1AOH-41 Not Shown: USS SUFZIBACHI KAE-211 -,. I .. 9 , ,i I I 1.5 . . . .N -RE, - Palma de M YI me 8 U -0- W' M. nga- K ' an .V 'g A 1:5 4-' Q 4 v f 2 5 It 0 N f'PnF'iIl'3ini21.1 ,f 325 9? i Ili' 5' ,,,n1gg,..V.., x-., .. sz - 1.7 ,.p- ' is PN: ' a,"'FE'vi f, -A fu .u Um 1 -r--1 l ggixl 1 1 I . E: , . . , I 1 0 ?,, bl' ' an fi- ll 'N 16 . -b-'H Y Y f,- 1 g,f'nI" C5 Ill Y I V 'x 'N XXX -X., -it 1i!l' lQ 1 Je. -v y A , 1 fifE'E.liVLV+'AA X "f'Jsd7f f 4 1 . I Ill Q r 2 Z .,,,4, .. 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N ' 1 QZH ' f .Vg ' Z , 5 1 . 94 ' .- 4 ' rv- 1,125 I it d u , ,..!"-Af:-Q-AA ' 4 ff . if A , " ' ' " f'7'?'f' ., 'g9.5 :- if ", L + ' ' , mafia.-- Affff- ' "-11 ,,,, 313165 tal LHR -' A, , . wg:9'5'ff" 'T' f 'L5,j3j,g'?.-.411 A ' ffif 552525,-f3?E?,'2'Q?g''!1f5f?l?,fi3f: fy 'A .ff'.1'?n.a iff?--I , P vs, --.a"5:f-A . fm" iff "':-iy-1.9 --,i,-'J fe-L ,.,:.w.f' ,f, gg - ' : -" -3 A ww ...T ,.,.fE 4 ' ,--r' - Q V ' . -1,5 -14:1 wi- ' Q1-5, A: A 'g,,-'i-iff", vi Jgffgxif ,,v.f..u ,. ' ' 'gf ' N , 'gfQ-H"-" -.v:1av'- jfs, A -' Xp -, - 3 , L pf. z. ww- ,155 ' gn' ,4 w 2' ' ': 1-. ' y.. , , .4 4' " , -n , ---..--.7 4' we 1 .2 H , ' , ,M Vi fc 1 xx HA . t . , ,Ama 139 gvQ3-'--z-gf T Agway? UA! D . ,V A am' , -. f,"f' ' if '14 . , 4,3412 1. '-+ "aw xx - ' Q Fl' fl. IJ: -r- 'f -' . ' V- " -Q A ff' - - g- rw 'X ' . . rr 1:11 ,' x,,- Ex' ,' Q , ,,, f-"?'I"91v-JV., '5"'.p-s ' " .yrs E . 1 , 5' I a'st,,,fA:, ,. , A 1. A., .L 4 "M I V b '. . Q iid' A ' 51. il I ,N 5, . hm ,N 4'f"'fZQ. dt! Y 1 1-1 ' L. '71 I ' 2 Q Vw. fa K' H ".f"'Q ,Ui nk-', I Q. 'g-.Y-'f""' ' -' Qrfiiwp' ,pin ,, Y g- - - "4 I hp. .....,.,4l:s.. ' """"' x I i 'iq I W4 n Y i I -ill 5. Pope hlohn Paul presided over the service inside that magnificent Renaissance-era cathedral. Christmas Dav was a bit disappointing. The winds picked np, and the liberty boats were secured for the erew's saiietv. But the timely receipt of the "llello Daddv" video from home helped to lift everyones spirits. That evening Big Bucks Bingo, which had heroine a popular pastime at sea, pro- vicletl welcomed enlertaimnent and something to tlo. Nlanv line tonrs were offered by Special Ser- vices. lrips to Rome and the Vatican, Sorrento, and l'onipeii were well attended by the crew. lhev olleretl all hands the chance to experience the ancient history as well as the modern culture and enisine ol' ltalv. lt txpiral AMERICA fashion, the chaplain's olliee sponsored a eoinnninitv relations project lo rehahilitate a homeless shelter in downtown Naples rnn hv the Sisters ol. Theresa Charities. l'sing lllQllt'l'l.llN supplied hv the ship, 77 civic- niinded sailors painted and plastered for two dats. 'lihe gralelnl nnns provided line home cooked meals. 'lihe project was a great wav for the crew to legne their niarla in Naples and represent AMERICA .ii its ht-si. Q- N .......,-x.....-...., f-.--. fr-, ... .,... . -- --- -.......v.. ...-Y.,-1....n. -v-.fQQ1w..47--f vw-- , .---4-f ml 1 . . 'F 1 v P W x 1 JH' 1 Xx X " .' sj' xi .5 x gi-'f' I f "5 lr L .' 'S '.-Al. r., fi' . 1.1 0 'O s . " ': vt' , V , ' ,t Q 1 1 ' , .9 . I 1.4 X H. "-T. 0 - I ..--,. 1 Af' .f 3 .,,. C3 ' , J + .vu . ' 3 E .., E ., e Efwiibfwif . - A it , ' 1 x , ' ' wi ' . iq ..,: ,,T: Q. 3 L' ry 1 ' 'ff' ' ,1.. .' It QQ we.. ' EVX 1 ' W I L 'I 5Qkr ' 22 4 1 ' .y-..y-,.f.,-....z-ww--vv- ,1 . lf' sf-'Lf Q: err. ln, . f -L . , -1 ive. 4 Klint, E .QU La, a 2- ' :'..+' 'U '91 ' 4 . if ', .- ...ff ' 6 U c'.. Ji? ln... ,.i..- . ,Q ,I up .t ',,.-I L. 9' 9..- ., -I 14, .,. fr .,' Q J 9' 1 Q 'tl-. ,i , . . ' 1 . Qx, . . ,, , ful, ul I V- in. -"' U LQUF ilfv -4 ., ' Q Z. 's ...al- , J - 'A SF. .K P Q "Q F -1.-Y-, -1. -.,- V.. -wwf-4 -. . ,:., . i Q , O vo. 'I Q . , -ft . 1- .5--z Q s. cn Q y , M l K' I v v :cl ' .g A 1 ' u C hi ' v -Q Q 4- Q' ' Q' ' ' I. Q ,X Xu f ' ,Q ' 1. ,, ,V ' 3- i ' QR". ,, , V .k Yxhsf- 5f,. -" ' 2 .4.C ix , A A fi. ,I 'N MN.,-N'..s -',' V . .' 1 ' s 1, . . 5 " ' 5. -"-if . .. I- - , Q, .- u ..,,u' ,. .. I .l. ' ami K aff 's in al " 1 A Q' f' 4 i"4.w- -u ' 0 Q 4 11, . 'IJ ' N I X '11 , I 1 '15 - .V XV, '- is -IZ,9.,Nm 5'-'9""' -' Dlx 7:13 if-Q' 4 43' sf 5-fr , fwsz. 1.,., " 5 .Y V I . , .. -. . ., . . ,,. --,v . -av.,-x.-. -Y-7 .- -1? f-, , -.- , - . - - ' ' Y f .s 3 'Dix' :iff "I I I' I 1 4 I I R K v I I v I K ! i ,,A p A I 1 I I 1 l Y ,A . , - -W-by 'i V --, ! I I i E x I I ,L Y , 9 V v ..- ,... P I f Ll i f The Grandeur that was Rome ff K , "'?"9'5 ""E-10-:rv-1, -0- .1 -.--ff ,.,,.f--- -MM - - - 4. -, -.,...N-.,v ' L--f w1f-v-vffwif-" "?':YT""'j7f""""' x"'- ' 1 v'TrQ' j , ! I . az, 1 f I J.. ..- x r 4 ML . A- 2 F- ,51 I If , if . J xug .Q A . ur . , "1 4 gn ,, as s T -E! 1 ., ,. M .,.--,l71-f.. :Hi 'f 4 9" ,, A, ' ,l. 5 N W fl-, . L . f f 'ff ' , "f 75.52-' ' L-,- .r A M ,, if 71 -1 . W1 T ,,4f ,, ' ' Q, . ' W: FA., A' 'pd bg' A .fx 4 w ', -- A .- 42223 .. - I s v' I - F ,twirl an-,,x,'g Q- V . ' ' fm wi.. -4 ,N ffi Y' . ' I 73 ,f hr- ln1,x,,f ' 2? J ' 1 QM.. . K -x. ,, -V-V , H, i WM, , s ,ag """'gQ' 347.9 ' . V1 V.5 -f35',x'.,g: ' V - -, , X V 1. 05- r-N5 lthwgqq ,.,, Y A h and Q 4' v'??W:,,,,,.,1V 'f ,',g.,,kl.r l ' 'W' Y ' . ' - ,1-' f' .'Z'f- - A ' Win- . -" ' f H5 . .1 f., 2 ""'?"' 1 4- 'QA I hi ' "1 -tllvff. Y' n Lf." 5 7 - J 5 'I if - - . "':',ff I ' f A " I t 'gl' 4 r . '41, Y Nfl., ' fa' -ff ,nl ',g,2' , 'T' 4. '1' ' iv vf ll 4, .,:f 44-,-f W Q L- a- 143 lx! AE? , is 41 Pomp ii L? fu 1 4. ,L A 14" 'qt if" I Visitors from Spain Uni hlgiiitiziri' li. Iwo Spgiiiish .-Xriiiziclai Harriers lztnclecl on tht- lliglit clt-ck ol the USS AMERICA. The .-XY-SA Nlzitziclors' visit iiitirlwcl tht' lirst time thzit at Spztiiish Harrier hzicl lziiiclecl oii :iii ,Xiiit'i'ic'tiii giii't'rzil't tutrricr. .Xll Sptiiiish pilots zirt' i'eqttirecl to tiiiclergo their flight trtiiiiiiig att NAS l't-iisticolzi ziiicl NAS Nlt-riclitiii prior to trziiii- ing lor tit-stui opt-rtttioiis on the llllllllllg Currier USS LEX- INGTON CAVT-163. Rt-gitrcliiig the Spniiisli pilots, CIAPT Paul Cash, Comman- clvr. uirricr .-Xir Wing One, sziicl, "these three pilots have hot-ii super to work with. They are very prol'essioiizil people." During their two-clay stay, the pilots flew their Harriers in trtiiiiiiig sorties with QIYW-l F-Hs :incl FKA-l8s. They also got thc' rliztiitc to lh' zihozircl :iii .-X-6 Intruder and an F-14 Tom- till, allowing tht-iii to experience catapult lziunches, forma- tioii lliglit atiicl rzirrier zwrestmeiit with CVM'-1 pilots. Ont- ol' thc- Spziiiish pilots, LCIDR-lose Pz1lomi1io,sz1id, "We think it is iiiipi't-ssive to see how the greatest naw in the worlcl operates." illieei' ri-'tlilgl 0 X 'lx i I iilzix .1 'll l 9 tx -, 'v. is ,'eeTT. .. - . X lr 5 Q9 i X Wa- ggi . ,, ,,,A ,,,,,,. A Z 3' -1-- -,n. lg .1 ..,,., N '32 f -.ry -4- , 4 41 , 4 4 4 K J , . . ,4 -'lr X 1 Q " r 1 , 2 2 1 f 1 - - . .,.,. - m......,.,Q:-,,. ,,f, -Y A , 5 ' A,,, : X ' N- I 1711. 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X,-...Ax , 'f ' , Ewa,-ff' H f fax K -P 3 ., ,, v . ,,, x X . XL Y- fb, 'X,,.- - I-,, X ,-, - --,,,--rf f f 'f 1 'wg U wx '- -:IVV -,' .-.1 -X -- 'Sr ' I- 5 ", , 5' X" - 2, , . V 5, ' A .,,,j,f'u '- ,f ' rf , fl,x,f 'I' 33571.-l 'f, Q V. 1 I - - vggi-,,'-J',.f, ,. 61, 'hr N' .- 1 ,y', ,f 'pn' Vf'W4 xglx- x ' 1, A7 , . -- ,'l",f:J ,,,' I .Lg in 1. 41' 41' 'T ' -'4'...'1'. --'N f .Q 31 A 5 ' I ,g. -my I. Q, . iw I D , '. .4 Q ' ., 1 f , ,' ,' k '. ,. KN' Al, ff 'T :lsr ' 351 1 A - .fa 'Ll ,-Wi 1'fQ f' I "lip ' 1 Q"""A , .- - Qgfl' . . ffl' 1 5M i ,S '.,,,Vl:v,:,.3A, 'f M, . ,Q I 'V J ,' xxx., wgvf., -'n:g'f"i, fb--L, - I , ' ' H' "M - Aw f -125 , , , ' V ' V' 'YZ' y ' f ex 2:33 s :t'Q1E'ii?sb.. 1 Ll llfln 4 NPN' , W Q """ '.p-...1 .M it ,rl X... .4- ,, A I 'xpfgfli ', l . 4 s 4. - A ', I 1 , uvuff-2 ff ' 7 , fu wwwwf-.,,,, ff.1,MB-w.r,- 'L -wr nf- , "K fy Q 4 v . A x A BSN Sf 'K iv I A .,,-Q7---f. ., ,I 1. JSI!! ,,r'a-1 ., v- A r-'N-f .4 , inf , fy' f , X' -' g 0.4, x fr MARDET Fast Rope I i 4 .V-.A Ni F .. '1..,. .,. Lg, L .f.. , , J. 1 it A -qv-v?Zii?3"Waf' 'Mk i i "wif i i Y . ,Wg I .ni I I " i x A uc, -'Jw 0 LBS. 1:-X M' I I ni 1' r :Ad .Af l -,, , -,...... ,fi G CONC CONC CONC. The General Quarters alarm rings. Throughout the ship, men interrupt their normal workday to don gas masks, life pre- servers and battle gear. Adrenalin flows as repair party personnel bolt to their assigned general quarters stations. The IMC barks out, "General Quarters. General Quarters. All hands man your battle stations. Up and forward on the starboard side, down and aft on the port side." Traffic patters develop as personnel move to repair lockers. As personnel arrive at their lockers, the on-scene leader calls the rolls and zone setters report, "Zebra is set." Firefighters don fire fighting ensem- bles and oxygen breathing apparatuses. Investigators patrol their designat- ed areas for any fires or flooding. Other members of the team stand by their damage control equipment ready for any emergency that might occur. Repair locker officers muster all hands and relay reports that zebra has been set in under 12 minutes. All unnecessary traffic throughout the ship come to a halt. As the IMC is keyed, all hands listen for further word from the bridge on the casualty at hand. This time, its just a drill, but the Damage Control Training Teams CDCTTJ have placed simulated casualties for the locker personnel to handle as if they were real. An investigating team returns and reports an "Alpha" fire in compart- ment 1-97-2-Q. Fire fighting teams consisting of on-scene leader, nozzlemen and hose handlers are dispatched to the scene. Locker leaders report the location and the of fire to Damage Control Central CDCCJ. Boundary men are sent out to set primary and secondary boundaries to keep the iire from spreading. Their job is to keep bulkheads, surrounding overheads and decks cool, and remove all flammable materials form hot areas. At the scene of the fire, the on-scene leader sends a messenger back to the repair locker for an electrician. Once power to the area has been secured, the team is ready to enter the space. The access man is called for. He tests the door with the back of his hand for heat and reports the condi- Don. Upon entering the space and finding the location of the fire, Hose Team Number One attacks the scorching flames. Meanwhile, Number Two Hose Team keeps a light fog of water on Number One Hose Team to prevent injury to shipmates. When the fire is out, messages are sent back to the repair locker to be forwarded to DC. When the burning material has been overhauled and a reflash watch set, word is passed, 'Secure from fire in compartment l-97-2-Q. Restow all gear." With the drill complete, locker leaders and DCTT members evaluate the day's training with the repair party teams. When "Set Materialo Condition Yoke' is passed on the IMC, zone Setters are dispatched to open zebra fittings and retum the ship to normal. When this is complete and they have reported to the on-scene leader, DCC is noti- fied by a phone talker. ,, lf U . i, N When all repair oliicers have reported that yoke is set, DCC secures from General Quarters and the ship's routine continues. DCT T members gather for a meeting, give the Damage Control Officer results of the drill and plan for the next GQ. All members of the crew prepare for the next general quarters and pray the training they have received today will never be used in a real situation. C5-X .se ,N Qi -'I' " vii'-1-. .......,.. .,, 744- F -v ST? ' 4' Q H "'4g.,,,,,,- I 'This is a drill, Thi is a dri11!!" wir? F Q. Na NX .af avr, When AMERICA anchored in the Saronic Gulf off the coast of Athens. she was the first carrier in more than five years to visit that historic city. lt was a Rx ,"Mi'XX ,,!'MxxX' E x A , 2 if , if K 1 .W yi X ' Q l,,..,,.1 l y lu Sky Kal l Q V V X' R xaN.,,.J ' ' ' .,,,,,. R K i xxx During AMERlCA's 2 l-26 January visit, the crew took part in special services tours around Athens and the Greek countryside. Many spent their time shopping in the markets of' Monastiraki, in the shad- short. inexpensive train ride from fleet landing in the port city of Piraeus to downtown Athens. The crew eagerly took advantage of the chance to experience the historical heritage of ancient Greece. From the world-famous Acropolis to the ancient sites of Delphi, Corinth and Mycenae, the crew was able to enjoy both the ancient and modern day culture of the Greeks. The capital of Greece since I834. Athens is home to around four million people, about a third of the population of Greece. It is a modern concrete city that covers about ISO square miles of the surrounding plain from the sea to the encircling mountains. .,,,1.s.f,., , 1.0 -K I, QM " le pi I ' -,, Q 1 -rf., gf: s c f , 4-A-if atlas . -. pt , ' ,s Pl if -ff ow of the Acropolis. Therewere also of great dining opportunities and an abundance of AMERlCA'S visit to Greece was a several ways. lt gave the crew a discover a unique and important tural heritage. Michael Sotirhos, a "historic and our twoc words of X, ...Z IVA. ,4 A 'P V4 QQ. J! 4- px. L L 4 I .,-, ' . I I. ff E .Y ...Va L i-' I x .,:l:7x2,' - lm Q .AV f an 31 N-F l 59 f xi? . Vid Y i!L" M 1 lv C " '57 I ,LP "z, 'NO N 1 x x x 1 , L WN w Inf? qt. Ar. -, xadfii A54 X x, - f ,fffx . ,,,,., Q '9 1 '31 xx lj , , "v- 'PX n ,,,-'J ' , 'v 4. , A , , A . . N .1,m-.- B ' -'lx X A T X X :W -H X- W' Q v . X , 4 , x xx nz .g ' w x x M K-.. AHA While anchored in one of the world's most ancient and picturesque harbors, the USS AMERICA was the location of a very special ceremony. On Saturday, 25 January, off the coast of Athens, LT Michael Kirkpatrick of VS-32 and Amy Simpson of Atlanta exchanged their wedding vows on AMERlCA's bridge. LT Gerald Bailey, AMERlCA's Protestant chaplain, penormed the ceremony. The two met as members of an Atlanta jogging club, and Amy would ERICA Wedding Michael proposed just prior to AMERlCA's departure for the Mediterranean deployment. The couple's idea of a shipboard wedding in Athens was beset by numerous bureaucratic complications, but love conquers all, and the ceremony took place as planned. ln Greece, the couple honeymooned in Corinth, Hydra, Aegina and Athens. goto a local night club to watch Michael perform as a drummer in a local band. He was later commissioned an Ensign after completing ROTC at Georgia Techg and, although the Navy took him far from Atlanta, he and Amy kept their love aflame. V+ -sf e,A I 1 Q 'x ,v, ,JV 'S-X, 1 .Y -Q' fi xg Q f T1 , -X F 1 I A. x . ' .,,.N.Q Q. 3,1 YL ,ff " ,A "WH, , N .- 4. l xr? ' 'iff J ,Qi 1 xf FN 1' ' 9. ' -,gh K WNAN ,. ,fa f ,A sf ,pmiefff B3 srqfgfffif RQ:-1 -1:1 1:1 wa! 11 ' iii avvW' I 3 0' V1 .B '59 x ALM J,-H x aw, , ,ii L, W L 'Adi P 1 W " Wk sw X :L " I. , -- A Vl1'L,5,5,b ul 2, ...mi +4 '-x' W ,..,, 4 v. Qi ,9gZ"-ff'-1 - ,ff x,,', f ,e! , ,x A ' if .1 ' p -r.. . V . J S, .M T xx 'N ' ' if V ll 1:-fx., - rw -'-- 'TJ , 1 2 gpg-gm -1 ' " nk' -.15 :H , f ,. ,,,,, , :J lr, ' ' fm, , sf ,A .rf ' -Z ' ' v , 42 . W v l " : 'JV . , y ,, ' .3- "gh, - 'Q' L ' ' A, - ,.- ' , 4 -1-if x ,H V , 'K ' f?'Z1f'1'l52i3,1f " "" 'M '+-0' :F . . in ., ., .. 1- . -W :,f2fu,,, " 5 , Q 1"-W , iz 'hy-' :' . ' . 3 A "-Q'-2' -3' 'wi .Am Maw" .Q . .-55 1, .,,,, ' .-,V . fzw- 5 ' 5-ff fx' ,z Y- L Qin! qv -3"' .bf . 1 U? v . ,. FW ,iQ 'fu :1:,:La. 'r'5-- I-2, TQ? 224 af: ff,- LQ5, M-, V,,,, ,- '- Lg ' 4 , - nw- -Y-Y--N fi. QE i E Rising SIE feet above the Attic plain. the Acropolis is the heart of the city of Athens. The upper plateau is 984 feet in length and 492 feet wide. With fresh water springs and caves at its foot, precip- itous on three sides and accessible only from the west. the Acropolis provided the ancient Athenians with a citadel capable of defending itself. Excavations have confirmed that the Acropolis and the slopes around it were inhabited since Neolithic times l28OO B.C.l. The first great palaces were built circa l9OO - I 580 B.C. The entire city and the structures on the Acropolis were almost com- pletely destroyed by Persian invaders in the summer of 480 B.C. But after the Greek victories at Salamis and Plataea, the Athenians began to rebuild. The general and statesman Pericles employed the best artists and craftsmen of the time to create the architectural mar- vels we see in ruins today. Con- struction of the Parthenon began in 447 B.C. and was completed in 438 B.C. when the temple was first used as a place of worship. The Erechtheion was completed about 20 years later. On the southern slope of the Acropolis are the ruins of two ancient theaters. ln the theater of Dionysus. rebuilt in the fourth cen- tury B.C. to hold I7,000 specta- tors. the plays of the greatest ancient dramatists were first per- formed. The temple of Herodes Atti- cus was built about IGO A.D. dur- ing the Roman period. Today. the most serious danger threatening the monuments of the Acropolis is not Persian invaders but modern pollution. The corrosive action of atmospheric sulphur and other pollutants has caused crack- ing and splitting of the marble. 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F U, I, 4 " 1 - u ,A tem? - f 'f" I 4 f N ' '1 F ' 5. v s " I ' 'k' f K di 'UQ 1' 4 . -It an 3. . , 'Jil U 'nf' , -WW I 1. + 'SA Q n 0 Q ,Ulf fe - e tl"i-'ZZZJ an , 3 i 1 11 1 s H l 4 5 l 1 ! ? 1' .11 erunalem a..,r - -aim 700175 'Sr -? - 'viii idk l l w I I hild in the Hol Land Mount of tl And the disciples came unto jesus, saying, lNho then is the greatest in the kingdom of heav- en? And jesus called a little child unto him, set her in the midst of them, and said. Verily I say unto you, unless you are converted and become as little Beatitudes children, ye shall not enter the kingdom of heaven. Whoever therefore shall humblff himself as this little child is thC greatest in the kingdom of heaven. And whosoever shall receive ont? such little child like this in my name receiveth me. - Matthew 18:1-5 x A ' . 24,?f 24fF f 135 ' -- A 'i f ' SE' . , .wav A- 1. ' .. ' 577 1' ,av " .. V' ., K ." ' W' ' ' fha - if' -V gi 'I y jg: if QQ-nf, W ' A W 1 V w,-,f,,A . 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J Q.,-I' '22 Un March 12, 1992, the USS AMERICA transited the Strait of Hormuz and entered the Persian Gulf. A little more than a year earlier, midway through Operation Desert Storni, AMERICA had departed the Red Sea and joined three other carriers operating in the Gulf. Airwing One aircraft flew a total ol' 3008 sorties in support of both the air and ground phases ofthe war, On Nlarch sl, 1991. four days after the cease fire, AMERICA departed the Gulf. She had earned her place in history as the only carrier to fight the war lironi both sides ol' the Arabian peninsula. Her performance had been second to none. .-Xnd so the hero ship was back in the waters of the war. On 13 March, while at anchor oil' the coast ol' Bahrain, AMERICA was visited by RADM R. .-X. li. 'I'ai'lor. llonunander L'. S. Naval Forces Central Command. RADM '1'at'lor welconied AMERICA to the Gull' and spoke to the crew concerning their iniportant role in the current Gulf situation. On 17 March, the crew enjoyed re1'reslunents and recreation during a steel beach picnic, again at anchor o1l'Pmahrain. 1,ater that month. AMERICA hosted numerous distin- guished visitors, including Clongressinan john P. Nlurtha, D-PAL and VADNI .Xnthonv 1.ess, Clonnnander 1'. S. Naval .-Xir Forces Atlantic. On 29 March, the crew was treated to a hangar bay USO rock concert featuring Christian Scarborougli. ln preparation for upcoming liberty calls in the United Arab 1-Iinirates. a sunnner whites inspectionfaward ceremony was conducted 30 Nlarch. During Desert Stortn. AMERICA had sailed into harnrs wax' and done her ioh as onlx an aircraft carrier can. She had proven her ability to fight and win a war in one ol' the niost remote corners ol' the world. As an instru- tuent ol' .Xinerican loreign policy. her retttrn to the Gull sent a clear signal to Iraq and Iran, Once again, AMERICA was on station in the Gulf. ws. i, 'T i i A4-I M53 1,5:4,.-Wm -1. 045. ,-aw., fi X ,s -ALA 4 'AJ3 .1 - atquvfff - ,hiio , wuaaiz.. 5 2 P if is? 1517 B7 On Station in the Gulf A5 .. f-I .jg f '17 X ig fa xg? I I , 4 1 IXIIXZJ 6? I 1 J, J,-1'0" ,..-ft f U ' 5'i?"' f V ,.n. 5 lCl"U1!'?'Q r'- a. li Stee I. 'f W 5 1' ,M B e ac 1e1 1' lr 'ff' . wg-- .- Y, - ... ansezvnum..--2.-..-..., -l ' 4.2 1CI11C I in Q T ' X: :n:.uv Ni ty H. 3 . X "'."4ln1 I -Vi! 32534: x ,gui , L 'mnfwvw ""--.- A, X ' x .I , WW ff six F I ,,.' .5126 V -3 I 4? Y Q .s 'iizr A iff? . 69. I " if fei kzesf 1 1-1. 'L MHFV 4 . I , +4 1 ,-s - 1 +1-Qs W Q , N ffl, Dubai Uni ted Arab A 1, lik-. .4 - n .BX - 1 Q ,,,,.1-11-' ii l if' Tw! -lla' W A llv TL3 K .- x'7S:?S ' ,-.- 112 ff" ,P n 1 1 R W B i E I 3 1 llH 1 A 1 -:-, 'S . i Wi' U,--,V gf , 5-,. , ,A -N.. . - .-..1'-- X - . , . - .. 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X w E23 1 I 3hff3.h46y?w N 4, - Q3-iff, JH X, 2 tiff' J3l?UO! A 268 Persmmeil CWO2 James Hackett PNCS Rogelio T amayo PN1 Andrew Rizzo PN2 David Baker PNZISWJ Dante Bradford PW2 Andrew Marfongella PN2 James McA11aster PN2 Jonathan Poff PN3 Jeff Burt PN3 Rogelio Cacho PN3 Charles Dow PN3 Michael Levy 1' i, 'S X f b- sf ,rd rj VN N lei - x .Post Gifitiien PCC Louis Abraham PC2 Stephen Davis PC3 Richard Brown PC3 Johnny Hayes PCSA Kenneth Lowery ' 1 1 l SA Andrew Hollandsworth PCSA Keith Pattenaude SR Jerry Banks 1 ! .. IK M f i 2 i f Q f fi A i iii ' 5 ' 1 A iiii 1 A 1 it ,sp N, I 'IE 'Q' , Q rv? - it Amy A Q " i Vai? 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LCDR Harry Bryant LCDR Mark Karr LT Scott Rettie AVCMIAWJ Harry Hart I VENT r3lWPI.X Q inxkfl -- as , ,AFQEHYA Q, 2 4 10545 O :V 1- f I . f' A - LT Chuck Beach AMCS Vincent Vaneekelen AMHC Jesse Lynch ADI Larry Christiansen AMSIAWJ Charles Elliott AMSI Daniel Estep AMSIIAWJ Steven French AEl David Girouard AMSI Gary Hardnett ADl Rickey Howard AD l IAWJ John Laginess AD1 Dale Petzoid AMS1 Kris Schwab ADI James Toscano PRl Richard Williamson Y'-2: If-f f4'q,f' I 15 Hg U5 HC Q IIVM gd 6,1 - LT Graham Guiler ATCS Raymond Krause ATCSKAWJ James Todd ATC Donald Craft ATC Donnie Nichols ATC William Reese ATC Gregory Trace AEC Doyle Uncel ATC Grant Wallace MR Tim Eaton ATI Robert Banner ATI Jeffrey Blonigan ATI Beverly Cole ATI Randy Coleman ATI Vincent Dively ATI James Farris ATIIAWJ Joe Garcia ATI John Gellett AEI Leonard Golay AEI Pete House ATI Jon Jayroe ATI James Jenner-man ATI Rauel Lively ATI Mark Lussier ATI Ronald Malone MIT' , f 'V , 4'-T"7'1..Q'.f:, k- , rf ATAN Eraclio Sanchez ATAN Rodney Schmitt ATAN Cary Scott ATAN Spencer Shropshire ATAN Charles Smith ATAN J uvernia Smith AEAN Kenneth Smith ATAN Scott Traylor AEAN Travis Traynham ATAN Terrence Treat ATAN Russell Weissman AN Steve Wehterington ATAN William Wood ATAA Brian Bram ATAA Matthew Breneisen AEAA Ken Brud ATAA Sean Cueny ATAA John Eckley ATAA Lloyd Frank AEAA Michael Legris 1 N AO3 Frank Rock AS3 Joaquim Rosa AS3 Stephen Soika AO3 Allan T ondreau AS3 Trini Watts ASAN Quyen Dang ASAN Jonathan DeLuna ASAN Dunston George AN John Harrill ASAN James Harris ASAN Robert Lindsey ASAN Garry Robinson ASAN Glenn Rodgers ASAN Phillip Taraddei ASAN Jorge Valdez ASAN St. Michael Wilkinson ASAA Theodise Alexander ASAA Christopher Davis ASAA Troy Gomes AOAA Kevin Kennedy Q V-X DIVISION: The "Dirty Dozen" of the Air Department are a team of pro- fessionals who assist the Air Boss and Mini Boss in the Control Tower with every phase of launch and recovery of airwing aircraft. They may work "behind the scenes" but their demanding tasks are essential to the safety of all aircraft onboard AMERICA . Whether "spotting', aircraft to ensure proper configura- tion, maintaining accurate status boards and logs or assisting the Landing Sig- nal Officer CLSOJ in recovering aircraft, they can be counted on to do it right every time with remarkable attention to detail. During our recent deployment, the men ofV-X were responsible for the safe launch and recovery of over 7,000 aircraft for the AMERICAXCVW-1 team. The Air Boss and Mini Boss demand only the best! Every evolution depends on V-X division to be at the top of their game, and they have proven equal to every challenge on this action packed, high pressure deployment. V-l Division: Working in what has been called "the most dangerousjob envi- ronment in the world," the men of the flight deck proudly display a special tal- ent and skill that all who view cannot help but admire. Day and night, during fast-paced, high tempo flight operations, these fearless sailors are the hinge pin around which successful aircraft launch and recovery operations revolve. In a beautifully synchronized effort, they coordinate the movement of over 50 air- craft in all directions, "feeding" AMERICA 's four catapults and pulling aircraft clear of the arresting gear once they've been "trapped" Identified by the color of their clothing, the "Yellow Shirts" are the aircraft directors who are the supervisors of all movement on 4.57 acres of flight deck surface. The "Blue Shirts" are tractor drivers and aircraft handlers responsible for safely towing, securing or preparing aircraft for movement. The K'Red Shirts" are the flight deck special fire fighting unit who are also responsible for rescuing crew mem- bers in the event of a crash. Combined under the leadership of the flight deck officers and chiefs, this thoroughly trained team, possessing an inherent ability to improvise, is often the deciding factor between smooth operation and mis- sion threatening delays. With imminent danger lurking at every turn, these K'Roof Rats" unite in a special brotherhood to watch over all hands on deck, to protect their shipmates against the occasional physical or mental error that could spell disaster. Forever at the mercy of Mother Nature, from the pitching, rolling decks and perilous seas of the North Atlantic where the freezing W1r1dS often exceed 50 mph, to the hot, humid waters of the Red Sea and Arablall Gulf, where unseen danger from unfriendly countries is a constant threat, these incomparable professionals called Aviation Boatswainis Mates keep thC1f mind focused on the task at hand. They are a highly dedicated team, standing poised and ready to help USS AMERICA fulfill her mission. l V-2 Division: The 'KPrimary" Mission" division of an aircraft carrier: V-2 QCHVS the responsibility for the safe launch and recovery of all mission aircraft. With a green beacon primary passes the word - "stand clear of the catwalks and sh0l lines, launching aircraft" - then the men of V-2 take over. At the push of a but- ton, the K'Cat Crews" accelerate 70,000-pound F-14's to over 140 miles per hourf Under the roaring intakes of engines, topside petty officers ensure the safety gl aircraft hookups, while below deck console operators verify that the a1rcraftWl receive its minimum flying speed, plus that little bit of gravy called excess. DUT' ing recovery operations, the "Gear Dogs" tailor four arresting gchar ffngmes EO the weight of each aircraft and set the ready deck. Each AKG erlglfle 15 Capab C of absorbing the up to 50-million foot-pounds of kinetic energy generated Q15 3 tailhook snatches the wire off the deck. After each plane slams to halt lf? lust 320 feet, topside and below deck crews rapidly prepare for the next, prowdlflg a ready deck in less than 35 seconds. The Gear Dogs also maintain the ever- ready barricade for that one time a pilot may need just a little more help "PlatfLens" maintains the pilot's primary landing reference, affectionalg Y called "The Ball" and constantly records all events across the flight deck Of safety and debriefing. After a grueling day on the flight deck, these same m6f1 then perform maintenance all night long, guaranteeing availability of four cat- apults and four wires for the next day's operation. V-2's guarantee: "Four CMS, four wires, barricade and Plat!Lens: ALL UP," . V-3 Division: Three stories and nearly 73,000 square feet make up the Maui Deck which is the Hangar Deck of the USS AMERICA. Working the hangar bay requires a special individual whose mind is sharp and skills are strong' Th? handling and spotting of multi-million dollar aircraft is a duty taken VCIY Ssfl' ously by 69 of the hardest working men of the AMERICA . It's quite a trick moving aircraft in and out ol' thc tight spaces on the hangar deck, but the SIX 1 CDR Gary Evans LT Vincent Natale ABCM Stephen Miller ABFC Richard Bailey YN1 Gary Lee ABE1 Larry Wainscott YN2 Donald Brown ABH2 Gary Jones ABH3 Charles Woodrum AN Joseph Garner AN Cole Kinstrey AN Todd Kloga AN Kent Scarbrough AN Darren Thain YNSN Randal Vetter AA Timothy Baggett l I I i ff? A fp, A f-aa ., Qui J AN Kenneth Ford AN Derrick Fountain AN Aaron Gentner ABHAN Dewayne Gibson AN Anthony Gilbert ABHAN Rodger Gingco AN Johnny Henry AN Steven Highbaugh, Jr. AN John Howard AN Scott Immel AN Rodney Johnson AN Roger Jones AN Kenneth Lowe AN Samuel Mayberry AN Eric McCray AN Jimmy Mitchell AN Larry Moore AN Sean Morris AN Windsor Nared - ,V 8 AA Jeffrey Pearson AA E. Pomeroy AA John Porterfield AA Carlos Quintanilla ABHAA Lindsay Simon AA Fric Staples AA Rafael Valtierra AA David Wilson AA Eric Withers AR Billy Collins AR Mitchell Gonzales AR Don Johnson AR Chris Jones AR Shelton Like AR Kenneth Main AR John Miller AR Steven Palmer AR Kevin Peterson AR Ralph Pickinpaugh AR John Pratl "If 'Q 4... l l l ABE2 Jorge Cardona ABE2 Andrew Chinloy ABE2 Rafael Corral ABE2 Will Davis ABE2 Glynn Doyle ABE2 Matthew French lC2 David Garner ABE2 Karl Haler ABE2 William Hall ABE2 David Hunter ABE2 Samuel Jenkins ABE2 Ronald Locke ABE2 Thomas Locke IC2 John Marcum ABE2 Steven Mercer ABE2 Kent Montford ABE2 Kenneth Noel ABE2 Sesky Paul ABE2 Byron Payne 9 ABE3 Roderick Aquino lC3 Michael Beasley ABE3 Scott Bogart ABE3 Willie Brown ABE3 Troy Clyne ABE3 David DeWeese ABE3 Jeffrey Doolittle ABE3 Paul Edmeade ABE3 Jerome IC3 Todd Gerbers ABE3 Michael Gordon ABE3 Tod Hamilton ABE3 Tony Henderson IC3 Gerald Hesselman ABE3 William Hill ABE3 Byron Howard ABE3 Michael Hudson ABE3 D'Angelo Inman ABE3 Brian Katanick lC3 David Kellenberger ABE3 Brian Kuipers ABE3 Hoshea Lester ABI-33 Mark Lyons ABE3 Reginald Mack ABE3 Kevin Matthews AN Hubert Chambers AN Ruben Cortez AN Dick Cowan ABEAN Lamont Devane ABEAN Steven Dobyns AN Oswald Farrell ABEAN Stewart Fisher AN Tim Fisher AN John Frandsen AN Gilbert Garza AN Gerald Gurule ABEAN Garry Haas AN Pamell Harvin arf I AN Phalla Seng AN Bryant Soonier AN Shawn Townsend AN Larry Vincent ICFN Todd Weise ABEAN George Whisenant FN Ron Wright AN Frank Zanazaro AA Matthew Allenbrand ABEAA Juan Andrade AA Bryan Andrews AA Dowovan Ashley AA James Babcock ABEAA Devin Baker AA Tim Benton AA Jason Berry AA Luis Castillo A Mario Chamorro AA Brian Clawson ABEAA Steve Cuny S AA Bradley Schultz ICFA Kevin Stilwell AA Alberto Villa AA Christopher Wilch AA David Wllliams AA Nicholas Young AA Jonathan Zdanis AR Angel Amicay AR Michael Collins AR Francisco Gines, III AR Arturo Gonzalez AR Maurice Knox AR Jorge Meza ABEAR Richard Morris AR Timothy Ryan AR Bobby Seiler AR Daniel Smelser ABEAR Robert Todd ABEAR Edwin Villacorte Mi.,t'x . -Q V ,439 A K i AN Walter Tootle AA Lance Bryant AA Jesus Caro AA Josh Collins AA Richard Ford AA Patrick Harris AA Dwight Miller AA Robert Norwood AA Harold Rowald AA Gary Shaw AA Gordon True AA Sean Wilkie AR Bryan Darling AR Charles Dickerson AR Kenneth Keller AR David McPherson AR Miguel Patino AR J oe Prosser AR Garrett VanHuizen 'f-Rrw-- qty: Q rg A I ... ,... V . -.- ...v-'.,,,. .. -.- .. - -.,..V...-.vu-.g.....:,3T. ,?,:,f,,..T..z11,.N,,1?,fs,- ,,,cl,q,..,.., .. ...V ,,. .,. , 4 + LTJ G James Robertson LTJG Duncan Watson CWO3 Dale Thompson RMCMISWJ Robert Anderson, III RIVICS John Transue RMCISWJ David Hobbs RMC Ricky Mclver RMCISWJ Charles Perry RMI Stephen Armstrong RMI Franklin Beech RMI Leonard Conway RMI Bradford Parsons RMI Esteban Rosado RIVI 1 KSWJ Michael Taulbee RM2 William Drewer RM2 Joseph Erskine RM2 Robert Holden RM2 Robert LaCascio RM2 Darryl Lambright RM2 Steven Morales RM2 Sam Ritenour RM2 Victor Roberson RM3 Eric Brown RM3 Darrell Darling 4 I I as I RMSN Timothy Moody RMSN Joshua Redden RMSN Matthew Sias RMSN David Stroud RMSN Michael Wagner RMSN Marcel Washington RMSN David Vkfhitaker RMSN Richy Wissinger RMSN Franklin Young RMSA John Carlson RMSA Danny Creekbaum RMSA Clint Dspain RMSA Jeffrey Jernigan RNISA Todd Ludwig RMSA Larry Lyon RMSA Donald Smith RMSA Stanford Sylvia RMSA Robert Ward RMSA Travis Westcott RNISR Micahel Genna ss, T t i T L, Eiijf N . I 1 L ,vs l RMSR Robert Stone A Deck This deployment was challenging for AMERICA 's Boatswainls Mates and deck seamen. Both undeiway and inport, the deck department was gainfully employed with never a dull moment. Underway the deck crew stood lookout watches, drove the ship and handled the ship's general announcing system. They also conducted over fifty mishap free alongside replenishment evolutions. In addition, they also spray painted ship's spaces, issued cleaning supplies, conducted routine maintenance and found a few hours of sleep when they could. The men of Deck did spectacular work while safely anchoring and handling lines to moor the ship in vari- ous liberty ports. Once inport the men stood 24 hour shifts every other day to run the shipls small boats, ensuring their shipmates enjoyed maximum liberty. When the sea states permitted, everybody in deck chipped in to clean and paint the sides - always an enjoyable day of box lunches, sun and fun. Deck Department does it all, and did it all on this cruise. They were taken to task and proved they could meet every challenge. i j'..i'f.E 4? LCDR Timothy J. Willmott ' l ,aff T First Lieutenant ,lx 3 LTJ G Robert McBumey LTJG Jeff Starecheski CWO4 Robert Haskell BMCSISWJ Danny Hensley BM1 Robert Abels BMI Anthony Antonelly BM1 George Jarvis BM2 Cesar Gelle BM2 Scott Kittleld BM3 Dennis Arnundson BM3 Kerry Asberry BM3 Raymond Coats I 1 V 1 1 v l I l V 1 v 6' ENE 3 i we - 340 LTJ G Todd Owlett BM1 Gary Hampton BM1 William Hooper BMI Russell Roeder BM2 James Barnes BM2 Michael Howard BM2 Kelvin Moore 5'. Klsta. . BM3 Rafael Martinez BM3 Marc Pradier BM3 Martin Williams Q11 X ,Q- ci, 59 fn 1 F , 51922, 'W ew-- , sw mfzmfwV-awffffkf14514fff?f?19W?'9?5ff55'::F3f'f9Vw'm''F' ,. , m1..C 41, -wiht, fi 'fi' , ,Ax Q iff E Fi YK ll! Sll J f Q 1.44 ,y N, -1' .nw 'Q W2 T, f X .. W, ,qw 1,5 ,f '-,Yr-:fy 4, gc' wQf'4Z'1 A mf- x I -15. ww ,Lyjft -' f ' aj ''H'if:1,l,',f,f:5f1ig: '-W:i"'f:':f,3,1r:2:ff'Twma?-.af ' ' W, H ,,,, 4!,.n , Y., X, .,., 1 jiw Y .,i5,2.',q1,' ' ' slrxvziiifk if w -Aww-1 1 n vw.-rw,- .-:1 I','.'IFv!l rv.'eLw'1f"I "' V' L ""'?ni7'iI' SIL' Avi. -A-1-4 ,yt- 'W M mx' - mv' 1 Il IIICCTIH Eg. .g CDR Dwight D. Dew Chief Engineer lljan 92 - Present The Engineering Department is the heart and blood of AMERICA . From the anchor windlass in the bow to the after-steering machinery rooms in the stern, and from the fire pumps and massive boilers deep below the waterline to the steam driven whistles high above the flight deck, Engineering is responsible for the ship's smooth operation. Without the men of Engineering, there would be no steam to power the catapults and engines of AMERICA . The Engineering Log Room, Engineering Administrative, or EX Division, is one of the smallest divi- sions in Engineering. lt is made up of all Principal Assistants, Quality Assurance Officer, Engineering Department Leading Chief Petty Officer, Departmental Career Counselor, Department 3M Coordi- nator and administrative personnel. It is responsible for administrative and clerical functions within the department. Auxiliaries Division, or A Divi- sion, is responsible for the mainte- nance of the shipls hydraulics, air- CDRjohn T. Manvel Chief Engineer 24 May 89 - ll jan 92 craft elevators, galley equipment, emergency diesel generators, and air-conditioning and refrigeration units. Electrical Division, or E Division, is responsible for every aspect of the ship's electrical supply and dis- tribution. This includes ship's light- ing systems, flight deck lighting, implementing the shipls electrical safety program, repair and mainte- nance of ship's ventilation systems and electrical motors, maintenance of the ship's service turbine genera- tors and main electrical switch- boards, and installation, mainte- nance and repair of the ship's internal communications and alarm systems. The Fire Department is responsi- ble for the initial rapid response to fire on board AMERICA . The men of this division are experts in the dangerous job of combatting fires at sea. They are also responsible for the maintenance of all fire stations, firefighting equipment, and ballis- tic doors and hatches on board AMERICA Main Propulsion Division, or MP, is responsible for operating alld maintaining the eight massive main propulsion boilers. These b0ilCfS drive the ship's giant propell6fS, generating the 200,000-plus horse- power needed to move the Ship through the water. In addition, MP provides the low-pressure steam needed to heat water for bathing, cooking food, and washing laundry- MP also runs the ship's distilling plants capable of making 380,000 L I I v 5' IIE' Vw " A uf w 1 - XV 'S H? 41' V f If f 1 'Yr S , K, .. 5 if 1 if 'K fmt in f X ' x ,rl 1 H 556 Ni Q , . w .A GN, N ' w . 1 , . vm 5- gi' 5 - . . Q - - RQ I ry 551 m ai .1 , 1 1 A "' f :1- - Sff - +' - W' ?7 L 5, QQ W Q- .9 N 5 lx 154 "'4 l I L gf, -.m rw Xl T! x xf , 1 - 5' 5 F P 97 5 I , I , gg-im gE. 1.i,g,A ,lf 'N ' I-ri: 'Q 1 A f H 1 Q I 1 '.-V ' x! " f U , Y I x 4 -U-11. rv 3 .av-4 I ff. K, f r, . .i' Z 2 V PM u I N35 I s F I x ' x 'Z EMFN Michael Carr FX David Cranlield EMFX Michael Cuimiugliam ICFN Casey Demiard ICFN Daxicl Dill lCl-'X l.eSea1i Douglas ICFX Matthew Fitch EMFX Morris Guienclou EMFN Paul Hannigan ICFX James Holt 'Q l 1' I "Ww.,,,w g i EMFN Donal Schauer ICFN Larry Schideman ICFN Thomas Stephenson ICFN Charles Summers EMFN Allen Vanasse EMFN Michael Whitehead EMFN Kevin Whittlesey EMFA Rodger Bunte EMFA Marquis Clinkscales EMFA Sheldon Cummings EMFA Brian Gagnon FA Michael Gray ICFA Jerry Hyman ICFA John J ablonski EMFA William Maher EMFA John McGill FA Brett Seebeck EMFA Anthony Smith EMFA Timothy Smith FA David Stroud E n T LCDR Allan Berke LT John Rinkacs ENS James Talbert BTCM Charles Erler MMCMLSWJ James Jacobs BTCSQSWJ Marvin Hummer MMC Robert Borowski BTC Steve Connell BTCtSWlNo1Tis Ellis BTCtSWb Jerry l-Iaueter MMCQSWJ Rahn Herrick BTC Kenneth Marchant BTC Lee Noriega MMCLSWJ Michael Ridler BTC Roy Wright MMI Brent Bailey. Jr. MMl Kenneth Campbell BTl Wayne Doman MM l QSWJ Robert Dranberg BTMSWJ Walter Hamilton Q , 1 l , 1 mlm BTZCSWJ Jeffrey Boyden BT2 Cody Butler BT2 Steven Carter MMZCSWJ Nathan Clarke BT2 Bruce Daugheny, Sr. MM2 Clinton Deemer MM2 Brian Faulkner MM2 Melvin Greenlee BT2 Muhammad Johnson BTZCSWD Donald Libbly MM2 Bruce McCarley BT2 Peter Paradiso Y V. -f -3 -1,2-'-mul 4 ll' eo o .1-,4-J vi If 4 BT3 Jason Chapman MM3 John Cook BT3 Robert Crowell MM3 Quarry Dinkins MM3 Carl Doggett MM3 Eric Dorr MM3 Ronnie Evans BT3 Timothy Findley BT3 Michael Fisher BT3 Scott Fisher MM3 Warrick George MM3 Jesse Graham, Jr. J za r.,,, , garrek gi, ,,,,,M S, ii x -. 2. i. i, x ,f I-,H I I I I I FA Shannon Shauer BTFA Theodore Scott, Jr. FA Byron Shore BTFA Philip Simmons BT FA Tommy Skinner FA Doug Spiewak FA Jeff Stanley FA Orlando Villarreal FA James Wade FA Benjamin Wright FA Bobby Young FR Kevin Dillon FR Darian Evans FR Kevin Hyde BT FR Thomas Norris BTFR Kenneth Trommater Xl -If K I Q X i an 5 Q5 Q' Eg I W v X wx N 4 'fl ,Q -gg if Q, , 4 , V -QQ' N A mr V X A V xx Q Q .Hy uk. -Wi 'iff .xi F m 5 M, KW N- ULN. 9 x Wfi wi KE EV' 2 ma vfiu' , J' Y 1 l V, l-fw-. fv,,,. 5.12, T ,-,-1,,,,, A 2-5 4-:JJ f: at-E73,'??:f'1l1S :ruff 1' , if- . , Q f v- . :A ' -, ...- JL X,-4 - .'Qvl-,-,-1,5ge41Z.-'79 '-- A 3"'A'1 :f ' A' ' 'M' - lR"""' I i mil' Legal 4 1 9 . 1 ' ' x H.. I ,+L , lx, 1 if ' 'x fi ' I V 57 mg' ., Hs! - , ,r Y , M I mx 51 -. x X x f uN ,"'4-4','H X ,.f5jM 'f. . 33. X "2:i!'1:53 X , X K JH X x K A , ' X K 'NAV' ' 7. , " 77 gi' , , .V - rx I 5 . .S ' "3 lx: ' ' J 3 QT- Y . , Q-. t, x - 7. fd' ,Z N Q., :Ae fl. , x-nf 'X ' an ' E, ":. , N wi-'QL Q' X451 ax "7 x f X .- N Y -fl V .-. 4 xx . .,V I' h Y - LT Michale Pinette LNIISWJ Ronald Jones LNHAWJ Ronald Pieper LNIISWJ Carlos Saldivar SN Dennis Diller SN Carl I-leinnchsrneyer SKI Luis Heredia W il'l"'1"' ' Arn . fxlffqi. .QAg V 1 in . N X Qui AK2 Roberto Anta PH2 Lloyd Constable OS2iSW'l Geoffrey Decker AS Michael Huerta AS2 Joseph Jones AK2 Jose Maltos MA2 John McNabb AT2 Carl Miller ABH2 Willie Nelson MA2 Steven Stroud A02 Robert Thacker AO2 James Ware AE2 Stephen Xavier MM3 Elix Beale AD3 Michael Biles MA3 Daniel Blasz SK3 Michael Bloss ABI-I3 Ken Bugler BM3 Reginald Bundy AC3 Todd Burkett AS3 Ronald Davis ABE3 Bemard Dunlap OS3 Jeffrey Elizalde ABH3 Stewart Ewing ABE3 Francisco Garcia 3167- 177 . .ryyv- A A E , . . . " if ,gf- -5 X fs? W Tpx ,, 'fx I n "W, I 1 ' -wx ! 'ki . Q A il I ' X, ik 35, ' ' 251' ...- Y' , J '. i .A fi-Q: - HN Lst LT Curtis Catencamp lst SGT Rafael Molitalvo SGT Kevin Conboy SGT Robert Eberhardt SGT Dennis Zemla CPL Edward Brown CPL Jimmy Clark CPL Stephen Crews CPL Greg Gervais v Q M5 ' W :lv T ,ANN all ,its LCPL Michael Hines LCPL Michael Humphrey LCPL Randall Jamison LCPL Brad Jones LCPL Joel Kinney LCPL Casey Mahr LCPL Timothy Miller LCPL Kevin Moody LCPL Teny Nashwinter LCPL Larry Olivares LCPL Joseph Pagano LCPL Luis Partida LCPL Danny Pilgrim .,,,,- , iff 'T 1fF'4TIi' ', f-.f ,,v.,.,f.A .ff f, 1 11"1f.gf-:If , -14.41-14:-gan? wi 'f f' ' , I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I , I 1 f. .,.--" - if LT Rolly Cedo WTCM William Pass TMC Jeffrey Borgrud rf- E 7 X 4" jf','g',." -A X., gl SJ .1 7 ,, 129 f l x, w ,f ,V PPI ' :J - X' VX 'HNMX A 99' X x Medical The Medical Department aboard USS AMERICA has a staff and state of the art equipment to accommo date a small city with a population of 5000. AMERICA's Medical Department consists of a Senior Medical Offi- cer, Medical Administration Officer, General Surgeon, Anesthesiologist, General Medical Officer, Physician's Assistant, Registered Nurse, two Flight Surgeons with the embarked airwing, and 37 hospital corpsmen. Services available include: military sickcall, emergen- cy room treatment, major and minor surgery, physical examinations, pharmacy, laboratory, X-ray, physical therapy, inpatient hospital care, preventive medicine, medical equipment repair, and medical administrative services. As always, the Medical Department is standing by to assist AMERICA 's Battle Group to "Keep iEm F lyingf, CAPT Jerry R. Rogers Medical Officer H0 igation The Navigation Department is manned by approximately fourteen enlisted personnel and three officers. The primary responsibility of the avigation p ment of AMERICA . The traditional skills associated with taking a ship to sea, namely ' ' ' M . Th rter- the art and science of navigation, are those of the quartermaster CQ J e qua master's duties include ordering, maintaining and correcting all charts and publications required for sailing the world's waterways. Quartermasters also compute tides, currents, sunrise, sunset, moonrise a N ' ' De artment is the safe and timely move- nd moonset for the area of the world in which AMERICA is sailing. Although the art of navigation has seen many technological advances which assist the seaman in determining his position on the seas, AMERICA 's quartermasters maintain . . . . . f ble their proficiency in the traditional art of celestial navigation. They are as com orta using a sextant to fix AMERICA ,s position as they are using electronic systems. Special evolutions such as transiting restricted waters, anchoring, mooring and replenishment at sea are particularly demanding and require the involvement and undivided attention of every man in the department. During these evolutions, a few select quartermasters, designated as master helmsmen, expertly steer AMERICA under some of the most demanding and intense underway steaming conditions imaginable. These individuals and the entire team of AMERICA 's quartermasters are the finest in the fleet. During MED! Arabian Gulf '92, the professionalism and dedication of quartermasters enabled AMERICA to sail thousands of miles including the Suez Canal, Straits of Hor- muz, and the farthest north any carrier has operated in the Persian Gulf, truly a history making deployment in support of Operation Desert Storm X Provide Comfort. CDR Christopher Hale CDR Russell E T 1 . . a e Navigator Navigator 2 Apr 92 - Present gjan 91 - 2 Apr 92 .L .V -.5 . Q lf?-.. -v--'vu-'-wmrvp-wlfvvr' viii., XJ fa ,Q . ff Q ij - . . Sf- i .. a. i i 'T I - tn I r5,.....1 'X ' , T nn ' .".."i . Citi i ' ii Wil D E .L If :fm .5--' .L li ff' ' .7 ri , , 3,1 R ' f ,,.. np xxoff 'J , Z 1 X f LT David Taylor QMCM Roger Crabill QM1 Clifford Clausen QM1 Robert Darron QM2 ISWJ Jerris Bennett QM2 J effory Campbell YN3 LaMont Adams QM3 Benjamin Hays QM3 Rodrick Hill QM3 William Nordell ' N a mg, X Q- poration The Operations Department controls or influences virtually every 39PeCt of AMERICA 's many missions. Its 13 divisions are .responsible for the plan' ning of AMERICA 's operational and training m1SS10YlS, C00fd1f13Ung The offensive and defensive employment of the ship's weapons systems, the col- lection and analysis of intelligence, the maintenance and repair of AMER!-' CA is electronic equipment, the control of AMERICA 'S HIYCY3-ft, HS WCB 35 the monitoring and forecasting of the weather for AMERICA and her battle 31' OUP' , The Combat Direction Center, or 4'Cornbat", is the nerve center for war- f h urs a da while fighting aboard AMERICA . Fully manned twenty- our o Y underway, the men who work here maintain a watchful eye for any threat to the battle group from the air, surface, or subsurface. Combat ts composed of OX Division - Anti'Submarine Warfare QASWY M0d1l1C, OW Dmslon ' Electronic Warfare LEW! Module, and OI Division - the Surface Module, which monitors surfaceitrafiic near AMERICA and coordinates the ann-sun face warfare QASUWH prosecution of surface targets both near and far. t Theillecufonic Materials Office is responsible for the maintenance and repair of all installed electronics and ocombatwrelated systems aboard AMER- ICA . OEC Divisions repairs and maintains communication equipment, including portabie radios. OED is responsible for data systems' which inciudes all computers, copiers and typewriters. OEM repairs, maintains, and operates AMERXCA 's defensive weapons systems, such as the NATO Seasparrow Anti-Aircraft Missile System, and the ship's Close-In Weapons System QCIWSJ - Vuicantcannons that defend against cruise missiles. OER's responsibilitiesare the radar systems which guide AMERICA 's aircraft and detect pairborneand surface threats to the ship. Air Ops forms the hub fromgwhich daily flight operations are directed. Air Operations servesas they coordinating center between the aircraft, Com- bat, QControlTowerJ, Fiight Deck Control, and the bridge. They are responsible forornaintaining updated information on individual flights, controlling airborne tankers, and executing the daily airplan. The Carrier Air Trams: Qontrol Center QCATCCJ provides air traffic control services to flights, oinclliding departure and approach control, as well as precision approaches at night andjduring inclement weather. "Strike Ops" is the planning and scheduling center for the ship. They plan and conduct exercises while on deployment, as well as operations in support of national tasking. At home, they are responsible for designing a turnaround training plan to hone the AMERICAXGVW-I teamfs fighting skills to a razors edge. Strike also publishes the daily airplan, the schedule of AMERICA 's air assets, and the 'Green Sheetv, which schedules the ship's other training and operational evolutions. In short, Strike combines available aircraft, ship weapons assets to develop cohesive training and operational plans. r r A Meterology providesfdetailed meterological and oceanogaphic and relat- edyservicesnecessaryffor the safe and effective operation of the ship, air- wing and battle gronpl 'Ifhis includes weather observation! forecasts as well as thefvarious acoustic and refractive predictions that aid the sensor plat- form operators inevaluating eneirlpmatics. 01985 is responsible for all the incoming and outgoing correspon- dence in the Operations Department. In addition to the departmental paperwork, evaluations and awardsnzhe Gps Admin ofiice also coordinates the departmental Maintenance Material management 13MB effort, provides career counseling services for departmental personnel, coordinates depart- mental berthing assignments, reports the shipis readiness levels to the chain of command, and coordinates the submission of requests for suppiies and services for AMERICA is port visits. The' Carrier Intelligence Center CCVICJ coordinates the intelligence gathering effort, and is divided into five work centers, each with its own area of responsibility. In addition, CVIC is supported by two intelligence- related divisions. SUPPLOT is AMERICA 's long-range indications and wlaimxng celii and also produces daily intelligence briefings. MSI provides p otographac mterpretatxons. The Drafting Ship provides artistic and graphic illustrations for both intelligence and non-intelligence tasking. Storage and Retrieval maintains AMERICA 's intelligence database. CVIC Admin provides for the administrative and security functions as well as maintaining the intelligence publications library. OS Division, better known as "Spook Central' is the home of the crypto- logic technicians. They would love to say what they do for a living behind their vaulted doors, but they cannot They provide critical support to the ship and battle group. The Photo Lab provides operational, intelligence, reconnaissance and administrative photographic imaging support to the ship, air wing and bat- tle group. The lab can deliver time-critical black and white or color pho- tographs to the customer in minutes. Op Division also provides videotaping' in support of operational and administrative requirements. LCDR Tim Sheridan AGCISWXAVVJ Andrew Jakubowski AGI Thomas ALlinder AGIKAWJ Michael French AGI Robert Hollenbach AG2 Glenn Newton AG3 Robert Heard AGAN Dallas Siddens AGAA Lonny Spencer ET2 Keith Daye ET2 Alfred Harmon ET2 Dean Schamore ET2 James Schlesser ET2 Grayson Stubbs ET2 Richard Wickliff ET3 Raymond Bell ET3 Joseph Chatiield ET3 Stephen Cozad ET3 Theodore Douglas ET3 Paul Millar ET3 Charles Oprisko ET3 Jeffery Richards ET3 Joseph Swango ' I 0 rv w 5. M 'vii ,HF GUICKRAC ,, X 4 ,J 4 gsm ,,i l 1 'Tit- l I i 1 I K ll 1 ! 4 li DS2 Brian Patterson DS2 Ronald Smith DS3 Mark Bedell DS3 Mark Bozak DS3 Derrick Burnell DS3 Joseph Cimijotti D53 Brent Geck DS3 Jance Hamrick DS3 Roxy Lyons DS3 Timothy Watters N3 W 1 fi :Huy wt! YJ ' sr l Q 'Q 'U' X 7 Q xy X Y G M .., Vi M M W X if xx fm N YY X i 5 7-5 7 ET3 Michael Bonanti ET3 Thomas Duchemin ET3 Peter Flavin FC3 Robert Galletta ET3 David Hawkins ET3 Jeff Mars ET3 Jimmie McLeroy ET3 Deon O'Bryant ET3 Ernest Rogers ET3 Christopher Sormie ET3 Craig Veatch .4 X , 1 5 X U S i ' EEE N 4, - 41 , 43 Q bl gs ff V-5 H 4 I I I Q2 I, IEW 'MMF 6 'X 3. J" Vg OSSN Robert Dizon OSSN Fabian Fowler OSSN John Jackson OSSN Kevin Mathews OSSN James McGrath OSSN Damien Patton OSSN Henry Phillips OSSN Dexter Prater OSSN Israel Reyna OSSN Christopher Saunders OSSN Bennie Watson OSSN James Wight OSSA Kevin Caldwell OSSA Melvin Jensen OSSA Michael OSSA David Perryman OSSR Gregory Patchen CDS LT Chris Miller CTRC Daniel Cosgrove CTO1 Mark Fletcher CTA1 Daniel Jackson CTM1 Howell Rasor CT MZISWJ Joseph Authement CTO3 Michael Austin CTO3 Shawn Bowman CTO3 Noel Garcia CTO3 Joseph Kahney CT M3 Scott Milliman CTOSR Neal Bracewell 4? f l X if f' gk , . .ff SW f"""N 9, Y 'u -I EW2 Stephen Stoy EW2 William Striebel EW3 Daniel Aszmann EW3 William Chase EW3 Daniel Inman EW3 Jason Simpson EWSN Neal Dieterle EWSN Douglas Ebbink EWSN Edwin Rhodes EWSN Michael Woodward N , f ' 21 :lT.'L'!.'f .J'f.!!'Jvi'S5lZ9FxWDiKff?vL liEf3,L"J': T ." .H " ' '-4" 7 ., . . 7 I uw. 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I X, 'x - LT Gerald Bailey LT Gary Williams RPC Robert Walsh lflll 4.7 Q llffji 2991 'Ir- li! wvurvn v 1: nw 'Awww nm -:fu svn!! an 6'-1 mum NWN: ur: fm-mf-a wx Urlbdtnd. :. In-1 1 mu mum aomru un dn AMI emu. n n, m U' -.. A. s x 4 vm N Ln' .. l",'w fx vw vu. im- ,LQ ni: ,. exruimxzgm 4. wo 2 uv za, :Q-0. up Ulf! H1 lo. cv-M mu new was in . ,dw , f v4 Xu' H ,nv-" , ,qw W' Au' 0 w 'O M vfwq' wx", .1 03" X 4 wk -'- xv A-D9 'A N' 1:0 w ,A " v f , www'-"' ,...-W ,w',,o1' ,NQU U-Lf' 'FX' 02 Maw' MU,wgn:4w4 TU- :ww QW, xv' ,fx M N N ' -v ,J ' 4 H up I X- W4 Wm .nl - ,may A A - 0 ww ve- -jan . ,w ,X munsy-:,w.,.-v W- x5n,,,:w,1 Hx.:-V!! ,vw V N bm' ,u-'Nw uf' .AX MU A.,- xwo "H, v,Wj,,1v-Ixvvg' mv, wx, 1' Hx K" Q-' ,w N.-'x,n-X A. ' . w ,,, 1- - A ' f ,fx , X, A .Q W. rf In -4 ,,f X ...uw .,,a'u Safe 'ly C Here -. f--...Av iv.. Mun "" 1'-U., -v-..-X' M , 3- N. 4 -... -... ' --Q. Q H iff-f Call Safely , 7233 "-- -1.m::f.:.:::,, -, -nuf- E3 " Z K 2 ii: ,G . ' Q . v xi? 2 a , 0 X5 1 -A L2 k 54 K mkff-1,,:.4V Q + A 1 ,.,, . ,Q 15. 112 3 fb 1. k 9 5 A4 '. -Q. . ,L , ' 1, .X 'S uppl AMERICA's Supply Department started fast this deployment cycle b winnin the Ney Award for the Navyas best food service operation Y 8 in the CV category. Providing the best possible supply support to the AMERICAfCarrier Airwing ONE team, the Supply Department ensured parts were there to keep aircraft flying and the ship operating, as well as guaranteeing all USA crew members receive primary morale services. Comprised of 675 personnel, many of d ts and the which are temporarily assigned from other ship epartmen airwing, the Supply Department's eleven divisions order, receive, and issue repair part and consummablesg feed the crew over 18,000 meals a day, operate the ship store, laundryfdry cleaning, and barber shops, pay the crew, and operate all non-tactical data processing services. ln addition to providing onboard supply services, the supply team ensured maximum battle group readiness by exercising logistics coordination through the battle force staff, the combat logistics force ships, and the supporting combatants. USA received over 5,000 pallets of supplies during the deployment which included those received by replenishment at sea, and inport by barge and logistics helicopters. Managing a budget of over 330 million, the Supply Department ensured the "right stuff" made it to the right customer. The sales division enjoyed a record setting deployment with sales of 32.7 million which generated over S5400,000 in profits to the AMERICA Welfare and Recreation fund. Other notable service accomplishments include the disbursing division's average payday of over 31 million, the food service operations' food consumed each month of 3600,000g and the wardroom and CPO messes hotel management accommodating over 800 officers and chief petty officers while also feeding them in grand style. The food service operation was also responsible for the impressive hangar bay reception in Athens, Greece, in addition to baking and decorating over 10 ceremonial cakes per day. Finally, the data processing division entered over l million aviation maintenance documents in the computer that required over 3 billion keystrokes. CDR Robert M. Russell Supply Officer CWO2 John Collins CWO2 Michael Waters SKCM Mariano Dionela SKCS Edgardo Evangelista Fx Lfxx-1,4 Xxx i......i r.......-..-- ,-........... 'fl Al ,ZZ .,-f"W' X V X x 5 J ,-.rm '.:'N?f-9115 F7317 A lik wp? -. gy' T.,-f D-,r-ehf.. fn: 4.6 -?!zt'iE':'.x2,-,1:Zi1e:s' r , s I Q S L l --ff' ' 1 'A "Q ' ff' E " ' 193 si Z 7. , L M, V ? N I x V . ,,- - ,--f..-a.-:if'wf'," . , , - , , ,mg ,-L.:-5,,jsy-.-V -yer 1. V - 3 -Q A ' , , V: .,.,. ,,,,,-rg, . Nv,:,.,,f. ,J - 3 , .. ,',1b' :,4Q:,-75:23-1 .,-:ss .- f 1-- SK2 Thomas Tweeter SK3 Francis Bernard SK3 Timothy Fisher AKAN James Augustine AMSAN Ronga Banks SKSN Brian Batsford AN Avery Breeden AN Scott Davis AKAN Robert Delap AKAN Methven Dixon SN Michael Franklin SKSN Mitchell Holt - LTJ G Paul Kloberg AKC Timothy Hobbs AK1 Deniield Henry SK1 George Rudd SK3 Richard Charboneau AK3 Tony Whisnant MSSN Lalviarr Coles SHSN James Dyess MSSN David mello MSSN Joseph Stirmett AKAN Gregory Worley Mathemati Volume 1 ll!! ADVANCED D c Q,9 GLCQV V K Emenasucv Vigo? H ' 0 SQAQQWQ Awf::giQ'?,g:':,z1r AND TRAINING Mmcn 1991 CMG 'osx A CWO2 William Piersol NCCMISWJ Jeffery Thomas RMCS Thomas Hughes PNCISWJ Donald Gallimore NCCISWJ Maurice Irwin RMC Gregory Johnson NCCISWJ Martin Kesner ICCISWJ Mahlon Legg AT1 Michael Barker MM1 Ernesto Niles AZIIAVVJ David Stanton N -I 'U' IIUV I .11-71' ,, A ,, nl . S, 1" 2' I. . J, V , l-. aw ::..:' -, , ifE,g'4T:'V',,' 5 V 54-WnffifHim?-Mf2:f 'i. ' .Qitffl ' , Y .,f?1L"F7f:- L - - 4, f""1..f.?..gg:,Q A ' V V -4111 3 ' . fr? '..h"'f 'H D f- fi,,g:::...- -QV'-"' -1 -- 'T f X L , -, , ,f - -,.. " 'TM f 5 ' - 41? Xi . 'xi ' . ' 'rj : " ' 'lsmw -Q w X ' - , ' X' '.... 1 9 A ga, -5-3, , ' ' 3 -7 j I I 1 V Q ,Q , I , , 1 ,,.,. , R 'g 1 .ug-'I '- "' tif' if ' 5. I .' ,A ' J .. , ,, ,F - 1 - X, ,E Q I - f ,rl 4, I- l - K X n 1 A ' I I - f ix 94,41 fn- . ,, , X 'Q H 9' - ' 1 T x -1 f - ra, f. -- ," , Q.. - iii l lf a f 'fl' l A ll ,i . 2 5 l 4 . x 1 XIZJJ ll Xb,l J CW02 Hugh Hamblet AOC Tim Bucko AOCIAWJ Gilbert Huffman A01 Michael Bordnax A0llAWJ Adam Clevenger AOIKAWJ James McNamara A01 Robert Schofield A01 Willie Tetterton A02 Scott Belanger A02 Billy DeLee A02 Carl LeMaster A02 Daren 0'B1'ian A02 Mack Patterson A02 Lawrence Swartz A02 Robert Thacker ,-4' 2 , Amyx an N? 7 ff' Nj, .Q-A , L 'Bit 1 f Rf, .,... G 2 if LT Alex Marr AOCSIAWJ Robert Schackmuth AOC Swelling Lippwe A01 Donald Brown AO1 James Carter AO1 Ervin Faison TM l ISWJ Tom Gallagher AO1 Linwood Holden AOIIAWJ John Kitchen Aol Donald Wilson A01 Stephen Wright A02 James Scott, Jr. 1 1 xl N N w FT' 53 A03 William Spells AO3 Antonio Thompson AO3 Lee Wyre An Addison Anderson AOAN Phillip Beville AOAN David Bishop AOAN Robert Backwood TMSN Ray Brown AOAN Troy Carr AOAN Kenneth Copeland ,.. 1 ,fl AOAN Norm Turner AN Lewis Whitten AOAN Marc Zaleski AA Terry bench AA Tredrick Booze AOAA Pere Brown AOAA Kendric Creely AOAA Darl McGee AA Dwayne Taylor AN Buddy Turner W ,Jill - .4 I LTJG Norman Pettis CWO2 J. Miller WTC William Bailey WTC Kent Barnes WTCISWJ Daniel Willis WT1 Randy Daniel WT1 Eric Roach WT1 Gene Shannon WT1 Gary Spevak SK2 Victor Crayton WT3 Derrick Clauson WT3 Richard Crook WT3 James Dorris will 'H-,H will Sflllllfflli -1 SQ I A P V 6747118 er PRN9 V Vwxfl - Ili' 'U' if ,Zur-K 'WHL IBM LCDR Ed Rosequist LCDR Gary Sandala LT Stephen Brennan LT Tod Harbach LT Mark Kohart V4---Z CDR John Hampton LCDR Carlos Lozano LCDR Ronald Rice LCDR Harry Robinson w-'Cf' Jw . ' 'Q' ""'4'i1wn.m.2,?-,H K . .M M"W,, yn: fw x 431 -7 J J' gvigq' 'Mg ffffmf J' V may f' , V, . ,Ly , . If ,ma ,Selig-L3e.,f1, 5 ' - 'f'1fT:fiff.f11:1f'. 5 'wiEifia-j4s::ffef.z:5fff R . 'fi FM, ?' E2i'1:W' if 4 ,iezkiffzfs-::+Lpf: mf' ' gigs' A, 'Y' , 'gi,-':ff.f1L.4: figyjyg .4 -.V '.f,.--aff' 1e'4wf4 1 " ,2J.wzg?LS:L. 1? afrwgr-iv.f.g,giwfw,,, 15 2'-nl-1'f'E',r.' f" HPF!-'fr "1 r:f'4:',-I-ri'-:JA1-WS' 'B ' 111132521 .- - lg- gf,fj3f?ffifff2f'WZ CDR Anthony R. Reade CIDR I.m'13' H. Schmidt QDR Steve SChliCnlZ Commanding Officer Clmmugmclmg Cjfbfiffl' k , e Executive Officer 9 XINYSVQ-Prese I ' f ' ' " ' I1 AI-dmil-NXp1f92 Fighter Squadron Thirty Three's mission is air superiority. Addition- ally, as part of the aircraft carriel-'S primary role of power projection, the fighter's mission is to protect the strike element against any airborne threat, In the maritime environment, the fight- ers provide long range defense for all fleet forces in support of national policy. During the deployment, the Starfighters continually trained for their offensive and defensive responsibilities. In the "real world" environment of the Persian Gulf, the 'Fighters have provided constant combat air patrol protection, ready to respond to any threat. Even on deck they maintain alert status capable of launching fighters in minutes. The officers and men of VF-33 stand ready. We are proud to serve this mighty carrier, our Navy, and this nation. Anytime. Anywhere. We'll be there! , 1 2' 2 ,I AMS2 Miehael Bradshaw AO2 Timothy Brown AK2 Eliseo Bundoe AE2 Adam Chappell AE2 Steven Cobb MS2 Charles Deveto AMI-I2 Kevin Dow AMS2 Dwayne Eneoleman DK2 Robert Ewelish AT2 David Flack PHO' 111 run il amp- f' 2:5 N ' Vt:,,, Ea! WW' n".,, nf Q V f Nl s 4 S 9 Q., W1 ,....- :Q 1 ,,,..f, AQ3 Erie Sagelniel PR3 Miehael Sehneier AR3 Jose Torres AOI3 Jonathan Waid AK3 Chad Weisinger AD3 Chad Zimmerman MSSN James Alexander ADAN John Allison AMSAN Traus Andrews AKAN Matthew Baudry PNSN Arthur Bernal -XNIHAN Stephen Bernard ATAN Terry Bevis AKAXN Kirk Braun .-XOAN Aaron liutsko .-XOAN Brian Carleton AEAN Rafael Colon ADAN Robert Coueh AMSAN Douglas Crouse AN William Cunningham AN Clayton Hindman AEAN John Hofman AN Lawrence Horton AN Gary Keturakat ATAN Robert Kneaul AN Brian Knipes AMHAN Lawrence Kohus AMSAN Jacques Lirette AQAN Eric Lucero AN Ricardo Malia AN Charles Secord ATAN Stark Brad SN Michael Tarth AMSAN James Taylor AEAN Carl Thomas AKAN Daxid Titus AN Alejandro Torres AN William Wagner AN Chris Wilkinson AN James Wright AN Bradley Zipprich AZAA Christopher Bean We l-1...-.-u., 1" sl In .M- sq.. , J J . .ww-ur A ..,..A by-'wx U' '- 'W x 4 .7v..f1 ,A ll ., ' 1 . 3. ', 611. ,Q-, 3 Q, Y ow: wwf.-f 2-' ' Q'-,J c-x. A -ff' yy.-ysi,-,,. ,"fwg,+. f - Mn., :ffggf 4 x 1 , 'iff 3, ,ggi ' 1 ,gy sn , 1 , 4, I I JU, , . r ln' , , ,, Y , , ma, , fuk .J xffili r'-v VF-102 "Diamondbacks The Fighter Squadron 102 Diamondbacks are AMERICA's premier fighter and reconnaissance squadron. T hirty-five officers and 220 enlisted men - working together in maintenance, administration, safety, and op- erations - collectively set a goal to keep the squadron F- 14A Tomcats fully mission capable and combat-ready. Diamondback pride runs deep. You can feel it in the squadron spaces and work centers, and see it in the faces of the men as they go about the work at hand. Established on July 1, 1955, in Jacksonville, Fl., the Dia- mondbacks have a history of excellence. VF- 102 has participated in combat operations in Vietnam, Libya, and Iraq. With numerous Battle Grand Slam trophies, and other meritorious accolades to their credit, the Dia- mondbacks have earned a reputation for being at the forefront of the F-14 commnity. The squadron has flown numerous aircraft since it was established, including the F -2H Banshee, the F-4D Skyray, and the F-4B Phantom before transitioning to the F-14A Tomcat in 1981. In today's Navy arsenal, the Tomcat is still the Fleet's most formidable aircraft for air defense and superiority. The AWG-9 radar and Phoenix missile system allow enable the air crews to launch missiles simultaneously at up to six different targets, while tracking 18 others. The Sparrow and Sidewinders missiles, along with the six-barrelled 20mm Vulcan cannon, fill out the Tomcat's weapons suite. Diamondback Tomcats also carry the Tactical Air Reconnaissance Pod System ITARPSJ for gain- ing valuable photographic reconnaissance information for the battle group and other intelligence commands. After a stellar combat deployment and numerous other exercises that kept the squadron away from their home base at Naval Air Station Oceana, Va., for 10 months during 199 1, the Diamondbacks are not resting on their laurels. The 1991-'92 Mediterranean 1 Arabian Gulf deployment provided the Dia- mondbacks the opportunity to demonstrate their desire to answer the call of duty, and to live up to the Diamondback-Tomcat motto: "Anytime, Baby!" LCDR David Pine LCDR Michael Sottung LT Robert Dreher LT Mark Dunham LT Kyle Engel LCDR Richard McKee LCDR Luke Parent LCDR Nels Petersen l 1 LTJ G Chris J oas LT J G Gerald Leekey LTJ G Adrian Marengo-Rowe LTJ G William Marple LTJ G Scott Raveling LTJG Howard Woods ENS David Harris ENS Jerry Rice CWO4 Charles Williamson CWO2 Thomas Poore ASCM Melvin Allen AVCM David Jones YNCSIAWJ William Janke ATCS Stephen Modzelewski 57 5 'qf5'4.- I E I 31. fW"'5f ' 7 V . V um. -L 1 :ill ' . nl ss hw, K-7 X. XX fx ww, " if ' iii 1 I j 6 1 A .gbr A A-V. L- l . ,I W- ' ,ftgi V W v.. 1' -1 yff, 1. 'F QQ , ,QM Wu , Elf mmwvw ii -11 '95 -,iw ' e M ,f Jn .., . .,.: .Q ,W - X f, -nm. , Z--1 W , '?iiF'!. - www Q' 1 ..- -,Q 1 ll W5. . ? Q y ..,,4. "Q , ,? Hi -a ff v STHKFITRQN 'B 4,7 vff Zpzrfu' 'M Y M .rf if D L,LL1L , .gm Wff 35?-?W"'f,2, J Q nd, , L . if VA- !! H Marauders The Marauders of Strike Fighter Squadron 82 provide USS AMERICA and Carrier Air Wing ONE with the most versatile aircraft in the world, the F X A- 18C Hornet. During the Persian Gulf war, both the FIA-18 and VFA-82 proved themselves in combat. After returning from their highly successful Desert Storm cruise, the Marauders enjoyed a brief, three-month turn- around before beginning preparations for the next deployment. In May of 1991, CDR E.L. Standridge assumed command of VFA-82, with CDR L.D. Childress as executive officer. Prepa- rations for deployment began soon thereafter in July 1991, when the Marauders took part in REFTRA aboard AIVIERICA. Immediately after return from REFTRA, the squadron departed for Fallon, Nevada, for air wing strike training. Three weeks after returning from Fallon, the squadron again deployed for the North Star Exercise in the North Atlantic. Shortly thereaf- ter, the Marauders flew with FIA-18s of the Canadian air force, with U.S. Air Force F- 155 Off Iceland, and participated in a joint sea sh-ike exercise with a British task force. The highlight of North Star came when VFA-82 flew with the Norwegian air force, including numerous sor- ties flown through the Qords of Norway, provid- ing excellent training for all involved. The end of October and all of November found the men of VFA-82 back home at NAS Cecil Field before deploying again to the Mediterranean on board AMERICA in early December. Not long after moving into the northern part of the Persian Gulf, the pilots of VFA-82 re-entered the skies over Kuwait. Throughout the stay in the Gulf, the squadron flew numerous simulated strikes with the U.S. Air Force, and participated in joint training with the Kuwaiti air force. Throughout the cruise, every Marauder's performance was superb, once again serving with pride at the "tip of the spear." LCDR Martin Paulaitis LCDR Terry Rains LT James Cusick LT James Harris LT Carter Harrison LT Tom Hole LT Kurt Honbarrier LT Milton Merritt LT Michael Peoples Lt Patrick Quigley LT Robert Simeone LT John Wiegel LTJ G Ken Hutchings ' Wrs. 1 Kf"z:3K:, ' .We-'f2.'5Y'1. 114111:-Lire 7,1 4 qv f 22:3 V -0... , ., , 14.3.-, 1 V N K ' X. I AMHI Damel Tycohz ADI Patrlck W1thhart AD2 Pedro Amaro AK2 Donald Bay AO2 Christopher Barlow AO2 Ralph Bohlmann AD2 Raymond Bradley AMS2 Robert Briscoe AZ2 Samuel Coleman AD2 Jim Cunningham , ' ,SV xqi gr: fp Yi n r I 51 '? r, gm I H M rw! , 'L i 1 W :N 'im QM af, 4, 'Hi 4E f, 11' 'N pl W1 ir, IT' 41 M xi: .sl 4 111 i1'3 45 '11 ' 1 ,VS 4 , , 5 LCDR Dennis Fitzpatrick LCDR Stephen Laukaitis LCDR Rodger Welch LT Thomas Bacon VA-6 H ' o yy Sidewinders The Sidewinders of Strike- Fighter Squadron EIGHTY-SIX proudly j oined the USS America I Air Wing ONE team for their sec- ond major deployment of 1991. America deployed Dec. 2nd for the Mediterranean, following a short, eight-month turnaround after the historic Operation Desert Storm cruise. VVhile operating in the Mediterranean, Sidewinder j ets participated in freedom of navigation exercises in Libyan waters, and saw frequent overland operations in Turkey. In Febru- ary, America transitted the Suez Canal, once again enroute to the Persian Gulf. The second part of the deployment included Side- winder Hornets flying exercises with French forces from Djibouti, Saudi-based U.S. Air Force units, and Kuwaiti Air Force units. Side- winder pilots also won the Air Wing ONE Bombing Derby, the Strafe Award, and the Tailhook Award for carrier landing competition. Such displays of naval aviation ,,,.A-. 1 -. .D K I :-,g,.!Q.1 excellence were possible only through the superb training and readiness program established and wholeheartedly supported by the VFA-86 maintenance team. Side- winder maintenance personnel continuously provided fully mission-capable aircraft, which are critical to overall operational readiness. Squadron maintenance and support personnel logged hundreds of hours of professional training during the deployment, evidenced by more than 20 neW sets of Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist IEAWSJ wings being earned by squadron personnel- Even so, Sidewinder sailors still found time to participate in community relations projeCtS, such as painting and refurbishing an Italian homeless shelter during the ship's visit to that country- Meanwhile, VFA-86 SidewinderS continue to maintain their high level of battle readiness, and The squadron ranks among the best Of Air Wing One! Q M mf .Q M. .u.. I wmv' J,-1 . 3 1' ' ,,,'.,s'iLu 5!,,,,.gLr MW ann, M ...... X -9 if 'we .L'!'f. aQ. X R 5' l' M X N MS2 George Erwin AMS2 Kevin Everung AMSZIAWJ David Gonsalyes AD2 Mike Gonzales AO2 Michael Hurley AO2 Charles Jinright AE2 David Kinsey PR2 Kenneth Kiriazes AZ2 James Laughlin AME2 Thomas Lee AMS3 Mikeal Jensen AMH3 Louis Johnston AME3 Wayne Lawrence AT3 Joseph McKenzie AD3 Harold lVlims AME3 William Moore AME3 James Noland AO3 Pete Padron AMS3 John Picrcc AK3 Paul Provenzano YN3 Richard Pugh PN3 Kirk Rauch AMH3 Randy Smith AO3 Steven Snay A03 Kenneth Thornton AOAN Richard Ackerman AN Alvin Baker AN Jefferson Barnette, IV AIVIHAN Ron Betts AOAN Kevin Hinson AEAN Craig Hurt PRAN Undrey Jones AZAN JOseph Kennedy ADAN Eric Lee AN Tommy Lee AOAN Russell Mann ADAN Merdzie Paulite AOAN Clinton Pennell AMSAN Ernest Raemer AMEAN Rex Raffelson AN Dominic Rakvin AMEAN Steve Remer AEAN Roberto Rivera AN Jason Roozemond AEAN Roberto Silva AOAN Jeff Sughrle AN Kevin Smith AEAN Sean Stevens if "Wah ga, ' ' .. , ,. . g """"'7, N 4f:771r"f'i" ' aan., 2 x As Y'f4"4ft?w:,if-25 J 'l" VA- "Black Falcons" Attack Squadron EIGHTY-FIVE's Black Falcons have been an integral part of the USS AMERICA !Air Wing ONE team since January 1988. The all-weather, medium attack squadron flies the A-6 Intruder, and its 10 A-6E TRAM lTarget Recognition At- tack Multi-sensorl bombers can carry up to eight and a half tons of ordnance. Along with the Intruder's multi-mode radar, each aircraft is also equipped with the Forward Looking Infra-red Radar IFLIRJ. Such ad- vanced technology aboard each aircraft enables the pilot and bombardier-navigator to detect, classify, and attack - with pin- point accuracy - virtually any target in any weather, using a variety of weapons. The Intruder's arsenal includes "iron bombs" weighing up to a ton, mines, rockets, laser- guided bombs, cluster munitions, and Harpoon anti-ship missiles. In addition to the bombers, VA-85 airplanes include four KA-6D aerial refueling aircraft, adding flex- ibility to VA-85's muscle. In 1991, the Black Falcons again showed their stamina by vig- orously preparing for an early summer work- up cycle, following their return from Opera- tion Desert Storm. In August, the squadron flew aboard AMERICA for advanced phase I F LEETEX! North Star'91. Around-the-clock operations were commonplace as AMERICA and her air wing steamed eastward to greet NATO compatriots. The Black Falcons conducted long-range "strikes" against British naval forces and thus again gave notice that the Intruder was a force to be reckoned with, and stood ready to meet any challenge. This two-month at-sea period also included low level flights and training over Iceland, Scotland, and Norway, which highlighted an extremely busy but suc- cessful work-up cycle. In December 1991. VA-85 again pulled up chocks, this time embarking upon MediterraneanfArabian Gulf 1-92. During the first months of the six-month deployment, squadron air crews aggressively pursued search radar terrain clearance X night vision goggle qualifications with low-level flights into Sardinia, Sicily and in Greece and Turkey. The squadron also honed its bombing skills at multi- national targets, and demonstrated addi- tional prowess when successfully firing six AGM-123A tSkipper Ill and two AIM-9H lSidewinderJ missiles. As such, the squad- ron was able to sustain maximum combat readiness. Halfway into the deployment, AMERICA was once again in familiar posi- tion: preparing to transit the Suez Canal. While the ship steamed from the Red Sea into the Arabian Gulf, VA-85 maintained an unrelenting operational pace which inspired the entire embarked air wing. Interdiction exercises in Oman and Saudi Arabia were highlighted by VA-85-led,joint strikes with the U.S. Air Force. Overland training was once again maximized in the Kuwait theater of operations, when air crews flew "opposed" strikes against the Kuwaiti air force - these sorties often included aerial combat engagements and were the most recent addition to the Black Falcon bag of tricks. None of this could have happend were it not for the 120 Black Falcon men who Mkept their birds flying' Through their untiring efforts, 150 maintenance personnel enabled VA-85's 36 air crews to break countless operational records. thus giving the Black Falcons the combat edge so critical in today's turbulent world. The squadron amassed 1600 sorties and delivered 4200 weapons during the Dec.2, 1991 -June 6. 1992 deployment. As Med 1-92 drew to a close, the AMERICA battle group steamed westward to waiting loved ones. Wherever the ship sailed, rest assured VA-85 was there in force, ready at a moment's notice to deliver the Intruder's offensive punch at the "Spearhead of the Attack." LCDR Philip Blair LCDR Michael Hayes LCDR Paul Lynch LT Matthew Aaron LT Andrew Caldera LT Robert Carey, Jr. LT Tony Fox LT Douglas Franks LT Barry Hackett LT Patrick Heye LT Tod Hickerson LT Richard LaBranche LT Russell Lindsey LT Douglas Minion LT James Nesheim T r X 3 I X F I r I f ..- K 7 F. r 'i 1 1, I I K I P V E AOAN Boris l-Iarris AEAN Anthony l-lart AMHAN Frank Hendrickson AN Julio Herrera AN Johnny Hull AKAN Michael Jackson AN Granville Jeffrey AN Michael Kappler AN Dave Kesvormas ADAN Joe Knilans AN Brian Tyson ATAN John Wyatt AOAN Justin Wysock ATAA Travids Albertson AMSAA Brian Bakke AMEAA Mark Clayton AA Ty Dion AA James Dotson AA Flint Faulkner AMSAA Jerry Fenn AMEAA Travis Haragan AA Antoine Harris AA Michael Klinner AMSAA Christopher Kulik AA Marvin Jester AA Stephen Lake ATAN Keith McAdams AA Mark McMonamon AA Craig Samanske ' I1 .f 1' I 'V v' Q., MX 1'- fl- Lm, 'qgj fl f .1 f ,, ..,r 5 ' ','41-PM f v v L f -, 1 ' 1 v ' V t 1 , i F r J . 1 Q K , 1 . A I lf' VS-32 "Maulers" Throughout North Star '91, and the Mediterranean-Arabian Gulf de- ployment of 1991-'92, the world fa- mous VS-32 Maulers led the way. Tireless, dedicated, hard working, and their commitment to excellence ensured the Maulers would meet and surpass every challenge placed before them. As the fleet steamed from the Arctic circle to the deserts ofthe Middle East, the Maulers set the pace. As the first S-3B squadron to deploy with only six aircraft, VS-32 achieved unparalleled success in every mission area. On-target bombs, exceptional surface surveillance and protection, unsurpassed electronic support, and anti-submarine excellence were as- sured when the Maulers demonstrated their versatility by passing over 400,000 pounds of fuel to the air wing, including the first-ever Spanish Harrier!S-3B in-flight refueling op- eration. The Maulers were integral members of multiple war-at-sea exer- cises, providing vital targeting data to other air wing aircraft for the powerful punch of their own Harpoon missiles. North Star '91 was a proving ground for the S-3B. Tasked with continuous 24-hour- a-day operations in the harsh environs of the North Atlantic, the Maulers excelled in every facet of their operations. Working closely with NATO allies, VS-32 honed their skills and shared their expertise through continuous training missions and interactions with allied and U.S. as- sets. The squadron's maintenance crew was awarded the coveted "Golden Wrench," signifying the best maintenance record in the air wing during the at-sea period. Cruising the high seas on the 1991-'92 Med! Arabian Gulf deployment, VS-32 Maulers demonstrated their S-3Bs' multi-mission capabilities by conducting low level operations over Kuwait, anti-surface surveillance, over-the-horizon targeting, live and inert ordnance drops, and mining ex- ercises. In cooperation with British and Turkish allies, the Maulers led numerous anti-subarmine warfare IASWJ exercises, with squadron members "crossdecking" to involved submarines to get a feel for being among the hunted, rather than being the hunter. Other highlights included bombing runs north of Kuwait City on the Udari bombing range, gulf surface search missions, and precision mining. Throughout this arduous time, VS-32 Maulers maintained an exceptionally high state of readiness, along with high morale. These are the world famous VS-32 Maulers, the ASW leaders of the Fleet. ...l - LCDR Brule Bole LCDR Raymond Davis LCDR Jeffrey Ellwood LCDR Frank Gianino LCDR Bradley Smith LT Mark Bayly LT Jeff Britton LT David Bush LT William Crawford LT Darrell Edwards All shea - AVCM Douglas Howell ATCS Terry Hayes AECS David Hughey ADCS Douglas Jeffrey ATCS Walter Morrison AECS Rodolfo Santiago ATCS Gary Woodhams YNC Robert Ball AMHC Mark Billings ATCIAWJ David Carroll AOC Pablo Cotto AMEC Jon Ely AMEC William Frazier AMHC Michael Michell AWC David Polanco AMI-IC Kenneth Ravenscroft AWC Steven White AMH 1 IAWJ Russell Anderson, Jr. AMS1 Andrew Bogacki AT1 Charles Corley F z H ,1 f. 1. I nu if IS-Sufi-, 'UMW 1 'H lyfifk F5 E.. Um if -- -, - hifix Ii A' ,. 7, . - X in .4 ',- 1 . It ' 1' ' 1' 1-:Q wt ff, VAQ- 1 "Rocks" THE VAQ-137 "Rocks" are the electronic warfare experts aboard USS AMERICA ICV-661. They are the only West Coast squadron at- tached to Carrier Air Wing ONE, and have been part of the CV-66fCVW-1 Team since 1987. Homeported in the Northwest's Puget Sound at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, the ROOKS have been providing the fleet with state-of-the- art electronic warfare, flying the EA-6B Prowler since their commissioning in 1973. The EA- 6B's electronic countermeasures CECMJ system degrades the capabilities of hostile air defense networks, while its high speed, anti-radiation missile tHARMl targets specific enemy radars for destruction. The squadron has five EA-6B ICAP-2 aircraft assigned, and is commanded by CDR Ken Krech. VAQ- 137 was recently awarded the 1991 CNAL Battle Efficiency for excel- lence in electronic warfare, and a 1991 CNO Safety "S" for completing its mission with an outstanding safety program. The maintenance department is the largest within VAQ- 137. Re- sponsible for the upkeep of the squadrons five Prowlers, the maintenance crews work long hours to make sure all aircraft systems are up and ready for any situation. The effort and expertise ofthe ROOK maintenance team make ROOK jets the finest EA-6Bs in the fleet. The operations department handles the "big pic- ture" through optimum use of squadron assets, air crew, and aircraft. By keeping an even tempo and making sure all squadron and air wing requirements are satisfied, operations ensures the ROOKs will be where they are needed to achieve both their mission and the air wing mission. The folks in the electronic warfare department are the undisputed EW experts in VAQ-137. The EW team ensures the correct tactics for the employment of the EA-6B sys- tems are provided to air crew. By making sure updated intelligence and effective radar jam- ming techniques, and HARM tactics, are always available, the EW department keeps the ROOK5 and Carrier Air Wing ONE one step ahead ofany enemy. The administrative department pro- vides the paperwork 'backbone' of the ROOK team. Since the key to VAQ-l37's organiza- tional excellence is the communication link between its parts, the admin department is central to the ROOKS success. Last and eer- tainly not least is the ROOK safety department, Safety is truly "JOB ln with the ROOKS because no program could be considered successful ifits members get hurt. The ROOK safety depart- ment has taken on a large responsibility. Not only do they monitor shipboard and aircraft maintenance safety, they also ensure air crew follow correct operating procedures and use their aircraft in the best. safest way possible, LCDR Roy Smith LCDR Doug Terry LT Burton Anderson LT Allen Assel LT Timothy Biller LCDR Stephen Hassett LCDR John Lockler LCDR Michael McNellis Af WMM -E"a's' . fp . ATl John Wangelin AMSl James Williams AT1 Jeff Yoder AMS2 Wendell Bacon AZ2 Paul Barnett AD2 Eogar Bernardo YN2 Jose Capellan AD2 Alfredo deLaGarza AT2 Michael Fleury ISZIAWJ Jere Gates AK2 Edwin Goins ATZIAVVJ Joseph Hurley AME2 David Hendrickson AMS2 Edward Lane AE2 James Lasalle X dr Y f 1,- I U , I I N 4 ,- Q. Asxxxxxxsxsxxxsw., v 5 'Qu QXXXXXXXKXXXXXSX gxxxxxxxsxxxxxsx N. 11.4 XX 12 -ia- rxxgii 1 XQQXXXXXXSXR, x Q 15' N 1f?5xxxKxxxxxssxxxxFe55'x35x5xxx'x'xe 5 U arf x Q. 4, rw A .Lp aux .U AMHAN Mark Hougen ATAN Jeff Howard AMSAN Mario J ones AMSAN Donald LaGrone AN Robert Mayo AEAN David Noble AN Jose Ramirez AMSAN Christopher Realme AN Jose Rodriguez ATAN Bryant Rowe ATAN Patrick Sheeks AKAN Christopher Smith ,pY. ill: 53 ugggzlllllaag, w an g'E11111l1111111 1. D W ll g1111ll111111111lQ2q 'Q I Ni N N . N' is VN ' N Nu N .EJ Nw hfe' he 9' 'I 'lo "" ' , Xxxxxxxxxx v - AMHAN Christopher Hewsori I 1 F' 1 j X x ll I 4 5 ' k f , 1 f , : , , , ,Nu . ,. ,N Y, LCDR Christopher Gregerson LT Glen Ackermann LT Michael Carambas LT Alan Carlson LT David Greer LCDR John Bowser LCDR Martin Church LCDR Larry Etter VAW- l 2 H H Screwtops The Screwtops of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 123, also known as VAW- 123, provide the AMERICA battle group with airborne early warning IAEWJ, command, control, and communications and battle management. Using powerful sensors, the squadron's E-2C Hawkeye aircraft extends the battle group detection ranges far beyond shipboard ranges, and assists the battle group commander with tactical planning. During the recent deployment, the squadron provided numerous services to the battle group, including AEW, close air control when in the Arabian Gulf s constricted waters, and guarding against possible attack when AMERICA and her accom- panying ships were in the Gulf. Highly trained and skilled Screwtop squadron members also played key roles in the success of numerous exercises the battle group engaged in throu h g - out the deployment. Despite the dedication of the air crews flying the Hawkeye, the aircraft doesn't launch from AMERlCA's deck without many skilled professionals who comprise the squadron. The avionics division maintains and repairs critical electronics systems: the aircraft division maintains the mechanical systems necessary to keep the 53,000-pound E-2C safely airborne. Line division "rats" handle aircraft during critical launch and recovery evolutions, while quality assurance division certifies that all work meets the highest standards possible. Material control provides the numerous parts and supplies for the squadron, while maintenance control orchestrates and priori- tizes all production so the Screwtops can meet all their commitments. The administrative di- vision provides for all the personal needs of the squadron, ranging from the always-welCOIHC mail call, to the cleaning of squadron spaces. Overall, the Screwtops run smoothly because of the dedication of every member of the VAW-123 team, from the commanding officer to the youngest airman. The squadron consists of 36 officers and 122 enlisted men. Through all hands' efforts, the Screwtops remain the finest ASW squadron in the world, as exddenced by its earning the 1991 Battle Efliciency Award. and earning the 1991 ChiefofNaval Operati0I1S Safety "S" Award: both awards are proudly displayed on each of thc squadrons aircraft. AMERICA stays strong because the Screwtops keep watch! AF CM Robert Reed AZCS Jack Bryant ADCS Kenneth Dalton, Jr. ATCSIAWJ David Huber AMCS Barry King AMHC Allan Beane ADCIAWJ Leonard Dunlap AMHC Roger Harrison AEC Ronald Lanham AXCIAWJ Richard Sheffield ATC William Weiss AEC Durward Womack YNCIAWJ Mike Young AE1 John Bales AZ1 Frank Bass AT1 David Brown AT1 Sean Brown ATI Trent Buckner AMH1 Scott Fick AE1 David George AZ2 David Warman AE2 Walter Williams AE2 Joe Woods PNQISWJ David Yavin AK3 Ramon Amarines PR3 Robert Bartlett AT3 Derek Brown AD3 John Chuba AD3 Corey Coon AT3 Matthew Edgin AME3 Glenn Cawley HM3 Donald Gaines AT3 Dion Hansen AMS3 David Hendrix AZ3 Michael Johnson AZ3 Roger Kleber MS3 Ronald Leavell AK3 Jeffrey Leiner AMS3 David McCollum wi I Vi 4, I ,, sv AMSAN Timothy Frazee ADAN Richard Fredley ATAN Thomas Fuller ATAN Blaine Gleason ADAN Santos Guzman AZAN Travis Hackney AKAN Sean Hall AMEAN Fred Hemme AN Robert Hook, III ATAN Marvin Hollingsworth AMEAN Thomas Kreinheder AN Robert Krug YNSN Anthony Moore AN Craig Osborne ADAN William Packan AMSAN Edward Peck AEAN John Ralicki ATAN Donal Ranney AMEAN Kelvin Rogers DQ-6 IISQIIKIII V121 F? r 1 E 1 'xnxx K F qw' . . X 4 Q! FP .ay -4 -...., 5 W1 mi 4E-'fe FV-ll' -af! 1 s "ful l Q- - SA I . . - . I 9' ' . xxx. I ffi I ' I" . ' : 'H LT Joe Cabriera LT Edward D'Angelo LT Edward Donohoe LT Matthew Hemple LT Joseph King i. - -ll Q "Dragonslayers" HS-11's Dragonslayers fly the SH-3H Sea King helicopter to perform a variety of missions, even though the helicopter's primary mission is all-weather, anti-submarine warfare IASVVJ since it was the first helo develped specifically for ASW. The Sea King was also the first helicopter to have a coupler system, which enables it to change from forward flight to a 40- foot hover above the water so it can lower a dipping sonar to locate and track submarines. Along with the dipping sonar, the SH-3H can tow magnetic anomaly detection IMADJ equip- ment, and can process and relay acoustical data from sonobuoys back to the aircraft carrier. Once a submarine is detected and classified, the Sea King can attack it with hover-launched torpedoes. Along with ASW, the Dragonslayers provide avalued search-and-rescue ISARJ plat- form for the carrier battle group. During North Star '91 and MedfArabian Cruise 1991-'92, the Dragonslayers performed an unprecedented seven rescues, and numerous other lifesaving medical evacuations. The most prominent rescue was that of three civilians who were shipwrecked at sea for 10 days as a result of Hurricane Bob. Initially spotted by a U.S. Coast Guard C-130, the civilians were ulti- mately rescued from shark-infested waters by a Dragonslayer helicopter and its crew. They were then evacuated to New York City, where their rescue was covered by the national press. Meanwhile, the SH-3H Sea King helicopter is also a vital logistics platfonn because of its ability to operate from a variety of platforms, including cruisers, destroyers, and frigates. One important Sea King capability is that of being able to hover over any ship for personnel and logistics transfer, and to recieve fuel while hovering above specially configured combatants through helicopter in-flight refueling IHIFRJ, which greatly extends the endurance and range ofthe Sea King during extended ASW and SAR missions. North Star '91 and Advanced Phase gave the Dragonslayers a considerable amount of training with NATO allies, including British, Spanish, and German forces. This was highlighted by a 10-day, 'round-the-clock ASW exercise during which submarines tested their skills against the carrier and its ASW capabilities. While some submaiines were able to penetrate the carrier's outer screen, when they attempted to move into the optimum firing position, HS- 1 1 Dragonslayers would detect them. There were thus no successful attacks against the carrier, thanks thanks the Dragonslayers' ASW exper- tise. Med '92 also afforded the squadron rare opportunities to work on ASW training with British and Turkish diesel-powered subma- rines, at one point being surprised when a submarine was discovered threateningly close to the carrier. While the submarine had been ordered to "shoot" the carrier, HS- 1 1 was there, thwarting the attempt. Along with ASW train- ing, the Dragonslayers were also afforded the opportunity to practice low level training flights in Greece and Kuwait. Kuwait also presented the opportunity for Dragonslayers air crews to use some advanced tCCl"Ll'10lOg7 in conjunction with their daily combat search-and-rescue missions. They used night vision goggles, a new "down air crew" locating system, and the global position system to locate simulated downed aviators in the Kuwaiti desert. Arabian Gulf operations also enable Dragonslayer crews to hone their newest skill: counter-mine detec- tion. During these missions, HS-1 1 crews worked with AMERICA's Explosive Ordnance Disposal IEODJ team in simulating a complete mine-detection scenario. Throughout it all, HS- 1 1 Dragonslayers had a 100-percent completion rate, thus remaining, "Double One, Second to None." LCDR Ronnie Burton LCDR John Langmead LCDR Jonathan Winters ADCS Bruce Martindale AECS Robert Williams AMHC John Braun YNC Garry Coston AMSC Darrell Garner AECIAWJ Kenneth Hicks ATC Anthony Parks AWCIAWJ David Peters AMSCIAVVJ Patrick Porter ADC Miguel Sanchez AXC Timothy Williams AMSI Robert Armstrong AEI David Aube PR1 Robert Baker ATI William Bland PN IKSWJ William Brown ADl Delbert Cody ASI Lawrence Dieter AEIIAWJ Timothy Frantzen AZl Ray Holder AZ2 Charlie Goodin AZ2 Terry Gore AE2 Joseph Helsley AW2 Andrew Hughes AW2 William Johnson AMH2 Alfredo Martinez YN2 Brian Moore MS2 Ricky Osborne AE2 Socorro Pereira AW2 Bobby Powell A02 Dean Robinson AE2 Robert Salerno, IV L V I F Newcrroments CDR Maurice Gallagher CDR Scott Kee CDR Philip Puckett CDR Robert Russell LCDR Donald Calloway LCDR Carlos Del Toro LCDR Ernest Dobson LCDR Stephen Foster LCDR Anthony Galanides LCDR Michael Mulcahy LCDR Gregory Nosal LCDR Robert Ryan LCDR Eugene Valendo LCDR James Wirwille LT Christopher Gallagher LT Julio Gonzalez LT John Livingston, Jr. LT Norbert Melnick LTJ G Carl Hoy LTJG James Parker CWO2 James Gipson ABCM Philip Duby AVCM Nelson Evans AZCMCAWJ Gene Jette Sl-ICM Rolando Salvanera IS1 Joseph Winfreyi SK2 Kendrick Alfred AT2 Jeffrey Althof AO2 Jay Blakeslee CTO2 Lawrence Channel AT2 Tom Crawford AK2 Joseph Elliot MM2 Robert Galante PH2 Jeff McConnell AO2 Lawrence McElroy PC2 Roger Northwood DP2 Richard Orr AS2 Eric Purainen AW2 Troy Rankin MM2 Israel Santillan AE2 Jon Smith AT2 John Stoughton AT2 Ross Walls AO2 James Watkins RM2 Rodney Welch WTSN Michael Danko LCPL Willard Dickey RMSN Donnell Edwards EMFN Marvin Heath AN Gregory Jones, Jr. ISSN Charles McMillan AKAN Dedrick Middleton RMSN Jean Roberts AEAN Bernabe Rosario SMSN Timothy Turner RMSA Michael Arbuckle RMSA Binie Blick AKAA Kenneth Bousquet ATAA Jonathan Cassidy PFC William Clark WTSA Michael Colton RMSA Shawn Cutting ASAA Roy Fajutrao DA Robert Kyres, Jr. FA Anthony Landingham , . 5 , '21-:LPQ '29, t - A ,W - z y A 1 Homeward Baund Suez Canal Transit .i , , 4 - .- .-.rf ...,. A- ., -c N ' ' 'rn 3 -'. Q .f- - x 3,119 vii I 304 'fa af -gnpwosvycv-M Ditch Views ,Q imsfryah VHWUZW . A Q , will 'ffwrrfsfwx Hsfwifgtf A f . ,w.., Il 'wav -xx X f Aan.-W - ---- 1...- , . V , 4 L I I 14' H . ,rf l Q 57 'vi' , m 1 Q . .,.- ,rg ef,-" i 1:2225-f -. .. ' . Enlisted arfare Specialists MedfPG I-92 X ICCS ASC ABHC ATC ICC MMC MMC ICC BTC BTC MMC EWC AGI ETI AZI LN I AMSI ATI ATI AZI AWI AKI BMI BMI BMI HTI MMI ENI EWI DSI OSI DSI DPI EMI RM2 BM2 surface qrswsy Leo M. Blake Stephen D. Dugan Reynaldo M. Marin Christopher L. Rick Marty A. Oakley Robert D. Borowski KennethJ. Margetak Mark B. McNeill Kenneth R. Marchant Lee A. Noriega Kevin M. Sheerin Stanley M. Thomas MichaelJ. French RondleJ. Keffer David P. Stanton RonaldJ. Pieper Gary L. Hardnett Larry M. Pitzer EricJ. Babin WilIisJackson,Jr. James R. Vaughan Kenneth L. Richmond RobertJ. Abels William P. Hooper George Jarvis,Jr. Paul Burnette Howard A. Shiver Timothy Tregoning Timothy M. Duncan John O. Gibson Harold Herskowitz Daniel G. Waymack Winfred T. Robinson Steven G. Sorenson Paul N. Nadeau Cesar R. Gelle AO2 AT2 AE2 IS2 AT2 BT2 HT2 MM2 DP2 FC2 ET2 FC2 DS2 DS2 FC2 ET2 SK2 AMS3 AT3 A123 PN3 QMS rcs Hrs MAs HM3 DS3 res MontyJ. Nixon Ransom Culbertson James E. Schuermann Virgil G. Cataldi C.E. Broussard Quincy L. Baker ClarkJ. Hill Spencer E. Martin Lawrence H. Alder Michael Childress Keith M. Daye Robert D. Griffith Robert E. Miller Brian L. Patterson Craig S. Rotarius Dean A. Schamore Herman A. Frazier Johnny Baez Eric B. Baker Emigdio Rivera Kirk R. Rauch Dustin W. Weist Marcus S. Smith Raymond V. Clark Mark A. Taylor Richard E. Clements Clyde C. Bender Anthony F. Wiggins Aviation QEAWSJ SMCM SKCS AWCS FCCS HMCS HMC AOC HTC MMC RMC AZC ABEC NCC ISC AKI DMI SMI PRI ATI AOI OSI ABFI ABEI OSI ATI LNI AKI FCI RMI AWI ICI ISI ADI AOI BTI MichaelJ. Weiner Edgardo Evangelista Mark A. Effinger Ricky Barrows Clinton J. Adams William C. Constant James E. Greene Larry W. Tankersley PeterJ. Bloomfield Ricky Mclver Ruben A. Watson Stephen N. Palmer Martin Ray Kesner Anthony A. Castner David E. Lee Leslie A. Crooke Jack S. Peterson R.F. Williamson Robert H. Banner Charles W. Ensinger J. Williams Ronald W. Weber LarryJ. Wainscott Geoffrey C. Decker Emmett F. Tedesco Carlos Saldivar Warren A. Rainey Timothy S. Shipman Franklin M. Beech GeorgeJ. Cost, IV Darryl D. Eldon Wyndel F. Hedrick James R. Toscano Ronald Carpenter William A. Fisher ABH1 Aoi Aoi Aoi AT2 IS2 AT2 AD2 ABH2 sM2 ET2 QM2 AT2 AC2 AC2 ET2 MA2 AT2 AT2 AS2 A123 QM3 PN3 AT3 AMS3 rcs AD3 Ars rcs AT3 AEAN AN Sidney M. Foggie Paul Bradley Donald R. Wilson James A. Carter Brian A. Harding Virgil G. Cataldi John A. Krisciunas Roger L. McClure Jon A. Larson David Kaiser Alfred E. Harmon Jervis L. Bennett Kevin F. Martin Paul Kite Lee R. Weatherbee Paul Stephens John R. McNabb C.E. Broussard ReginaldJ. Bolton Jorge Cifuentes Emigdio Rivera Dustin W. Weist Stephen G. Connally Joseph M. 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America (CV 66) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1983 Edition, Page 1

1983

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