America (CV 66) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1976

Page 1 of 304

 

America (CV 66) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1976 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 304 of the 1976 volume:

sk ,A WQYTB lx 'LU 01 11117 X FW 5 -, Y ,uef Uslf. ' if V.. A' ,.p,..!,1f , Y W 1 'X' 'iw- K If xi JJ , X. Lp- H "1 A K Qiwk W i wb kt Q Q . 'K " SRT iff :Qxxx X 53684 , ' X 'M"P'W-wwxm.,.,.,,, 3, i voxsaawv - Tfx:.,iW,g.-X1g,q,L. A V , Q -X K L.,. iw- A V Q E, A 3 jf imp, ni K m Q! E E B 9 QA ' M , .,. , , f H, A , , ,. . " 1,1 I 1 4 X 4 ff 21' 'l1'f7 93!HO SJWHV 3!lqnd '9L6l Q 9L6L -' 95!n-'D ueauenelgpew 499-ADD QD!-'Swv 's's'm x, ml V., ' Www' ,t rv., I v -V W ,- Af V, 41,5 ' 1520" A X l . 3 I a 'GW' lt. ' I 4' -n 0' A-L... K4 L ogg- on fsi at '. W 't u xx -'H 32 ' gr., My . -. JM , i. ...,.',,,,, 5 N 'K U " 4,--AL ,,-- - , ,-fe-"-.1'a14+q L-T-1 .hz "' 3 ' fm' 71:49-fr-:rata , V :XT :- s - '99s 'XX-. It started so quietly 1 january 1976 3ld09d ' Ie !j9.dS ?lg1UQASh,IEQDIACIS Szl. . ... . . Q. . . . . K. S9JmEa:I 9S!nJ3 1591 pauma-Ham -.1031 s1 O d 55 1LI8!JQ L9 .... . . - .......... ........ .... Smojjsuod 1! OP SM MOM 'OP SM wqfvx . . .,.. .' ..... r . . . 5 . . uog13aJgp put uogspag sz " ' ' PUEWWOD 40 ulwn S141 1!.i!dS 9LI1k 'ua-aw aql 'ees aql 17 f . .... ...... ........ uongnponulu I gs., -x Y .k '- 3slm13vaos1Na1NO3 11 April 1976 bringing aboard the weapons of warg the safeguards of peace X I -1 xr 04- p. E 'f I I X X. f lf' ff ' figs'-"'f" x X 'S 5 . , .,.,1,1 .. 313124. K -mmm: 3' 4-P a bi ui 9149 4 u i3,15 A,,k ,,XL. :ij 9 ,Q A ,, 5 '3 09-5',4A, J W5 'W AVWC x SSESBQ gr: 1' ,SS ay .1 A' r-'-'ww 1- , ,- , V . . ,. -141 v' ', --.AS-,Q . . '.-' -. -. -Q.. . N, , , , '1-15' - 1-f',"-ff: sv.-.3 .8-cl ..7f'..-gn, -,---6:6 -"P ' 1 ' ' r X -v ,Q-32-.'571uz.q::5b' , L L, f 5: 1 - J QQ Q . ' - ri , , kv G ,A ,. Q X n . . U xx I. "'s..,J-4' Li A A' I - ' 5 'Vim 1' Q 51 c-: - Lgyff Pier Twelve, twillight i At anchor East of Crete 6 mi na nc 4 preparing for long days in unfamiliar places North Africa as AMERICA transits Stra fG b I aamm . 'sf Nw. b' '43 5, ' L ' " V Lg, 90 1 'A A4 ' - 'Q5Q"?' . .wwf 2f'52a?2gg1z1gf ,.A, 1 VY -- Af' 15 April 1976 . . .goodbye agal n . . . a lump in one's throat, a beginning and yet an a time to go to sea. . 4 A 4 - . . . a time of temporary alliances and life-long friendships . . . but still the time for personal moments v 1 1 ,558 ,NT 213: F J :QFFIQ ggi. -Ln. V -EF- ,. ,. b L X: ,, -..... ,,,- .. :hm V If K A y Q L' "q55ES"""' ' 3- ' nb, I ,h 14 H, 'mx 'nf' :gg 1 11 '-1 a.,g,1.- '-fr 'fe:.:,:. . -1.41411-',.4u.: 4 -. 35 2 Q3 4 N4 f-+- T Q-9 f+ U7 'IZ 1 FD U7 'U FD 0 f-1- Cn f-l- 1 9-3 Q Ei 0 3 1- -. 1, f Q n 0 I a r ..rr -0 Q .4 S xx ,,. "Q V Q73 X5 Cl 'JH . . --AX Y - is-:4:z,.n, ,F Comm.. Q O ,V ' 4-,X dS .5554 Cv' 'QS l ru..-.lm WP- , -- YT..-,,,,,,, - ' . ,,.,'T!f.'Y I- Z'-' '-"V '!"-ff I ""'1'-'vw-'P-1'vr11s:'-zffx-'ar.wfr. zum , - , m..,...,............ uaslague ..,.., an "old" Navy that sees daily change U' Sunset near Crete t 1 1 ' 3 '4 ' . 1'-3 T 31 2? ' 'I :V fr:::2'31g:,rjijftiffiq-y , '12, ff A . . . there is a certain peacefulness found in this Mediterranean Sea . . Ceuta, Morocco ' ' ' '1-2'-""'?1 .,. V,,4,, I .-EH2::1.?iv:SrE.3Z:szS.f-,f' A gag ., o but undercurrents told of discontent and hinted at Change . . . . . ff'vH'1A . I' ..,.,:. 11 1 Y,- MA- .444 - ,,4,,.ge4 '-1.g.3a.a4g:.:.a.:.:..Q4.:Q-,'f"-15-1,25'r1-",:i' 125 - is 131211422 'drain-:-2: Q 1 sa -Y ig 1- . . - R fP?'i'fA5S?1'sLYbQQ-Q is N i if fm ' ' . -3 if .rg 1, 1 1 I ' ,P ' xy sf-:iz 3613 , P ' if e I , m.,,, A ,, A Q , - ww ff X H- - swim s ill Graffiti: Bari, Italy I I JL A4 ' J' , -l 11 ,ef ' h,..w aw 141 "r-'15"""'H49- T in 'V 2 We -so-1-.bv ' 1 A f,,, 4' ff 'f Rhodes, Greece: days of fiveefinger salutes and stones ' ' ' 'Q - ' Q F, -,-'-:4f,,,,f:-,-,.--'fn-51351, .I-L- ,7 rv.-.Jr-.f .. . .A, A , , V an s e . W ,. - A .ff?f.3f fQ'.-Q-:n'sff2f2 'e . , As -4-'-f-ww... 1 V' - M 199 VH uegfvx K- Y -I ,-- W T . . . changes whi hcreated strife' Rowland Evans and Robert Novak U .S, The Homeless Sixth Fleet As the U. S. aircraft carrier America pproached the Greek har55r of thodes on May 24 ready for overdue hore "liberty," carefully planned polit- :al rioting ln the streets of Port City frevented anybody from coming a- hore-a painful and humiliating inci- .ent signifying the constraints, some elf-imposed, on U. S. power in the world today. The success of the rioters on Rhodes 1 denying shore leave for hundreds of ankee sailors has received no publici- 1. Nor are official spokesmen in either ie State Department or Defense De- artment anxious to talk about the ugly ttle affair. But it dramatizes this fact, oth depressing and dangerous: Lack I liberty ports in the Eastern Mediter- can ls making the powerful U.S. Sixth leet virtually homeless This condition epresses' morale, reduces reenllst- .ents and may eventually make that a a Soviet lake. Here is a classic case of how blunders Washington subtly undercut na- Jnal security throughout the world. tat a superpower's capital ships can ad no port forhrest stems from tragic isjudgments in the White House and ate Department and iron-headed ob- inacy In Congress. Overdue for liberty, the officers and en of the America were ready to de- rlr for the storied isle of Rhodes May -when they were halted by word of itlng in the streets. 'I'he Americas of- ers, easily seeing every move on ore with their binoculars, noted that e demonstrators were exuberant uths but that older men were stage- inaging the proceedings. hi fact, the riots were directed by An- aas Papandreou's left-wing party and e Communist faction for the overt rpose of keeping the America from iding. Government police were on nd but did nothing to stop the dem- strators, partly because the conserva- e government of Prime Minster Con- ntine Karamanlis does not feel ong enough to crack down on any- ng so popular as anti-American dis- bance. The inability of a U. S. carrier to land the ports of its once steadfast ally is 2 bitter fruit of the mistaken U. S. WY of intimate friendship with the mer Greek military dictatorship at cost of alienating the Greek people. 2 demonstration at Rhodes -.was the ation of the far left, but it was trly popular with Greek public opin- t lor is it politically possibletodat. W. carrier to visit Turkish per-is, Ig case, the senseless congressional .oi UL military aid to Turkey, result- NTI Qf 'lofi Vwi'i'-if-w- iw- - - . ..l.. .fi 1 V, 1,1 ' -, -jyK',51.i,L. and tolcraaion of li-to 'l'-gy. ' n of Cyprus. lSt0ry, Page gk ing from its invasion of Cyprus, has cooled previously warm relations with another ally in the Eastern Mediterra- nean. Adm. Frederick Turner, commander of the Sixth Fleet, has quietly proposed bringing his carriers into the Egyptian port of Alexandria. But here again dip- lomatic tangles intervene: The State Department says no. Nor do the diplo- mats want carrier visits to the Israeli port of Haifa. Although U.S. destroyers have recently visited both Alexandria and Haifa lgreeted by cheering crowds in both placesl, the State Department feels the Mideast situation too fragile for anything so noisily obtrusive as a carrier visit. Beirut, so long a haven for all Americans, hasbeen off limits ever 270 fro Beir itlio t 'nciden AS50ClBl8d PFESS 1 IRUT ... A small U.S. Navy vesse' evggia-te-d -about 270 Amegicaxe 535 other foreigners from the Le an-th 0 er' war yesterday in a .swii.t,. 511100 , .ip ation guarded by Palesuman guerrillas' its pas-senrgezns, -their baggage and 3 ,ew pets at a is-easid-e bathing club, than tram' ported them to the USS Spiegel Grove, W.aii,in,g three to five miles offishore, for a off without any sense of panic, said, since most were long-term: of Leba-non. : For some the evacuation. wasg of convenience. A German st, called lit her "vacation," and H woman left for two weeks to a mot-her's funeral. Ain En-glirshman declined to -told he could-n't take his dog. - And others still preferred to il Joslin Cobb, a constil.t-inf: 1--1-'V since the Arablsraell war of 1967. 44.nour sail to Athens. l . h A q, I H Vw-",,,., is A Week after the replllse at Rhodes, "The evactration. -opg-r-asgtgipiigegegxtr 5315- 1 A I the America paldatwo-day liberty visit 105247 fyesleldafgl. glgents Said R Saw., - ' " ' he Ce tral Medi- cessfully Wltllou In l ' . D- 'I' A to Taranto, Italy, in t n D mem issued m Was,hmgmn bt, lilllrtgllsalrl'SBl!1gr11lle1l'tSleaflBa3l?JIdI:2llxIll?llfl.?1Ilf Ford, wh0 liayed HD "Mu l i I , an A I. N' ttxilrw' Dutghmen, unable to land for political beta?-1 am Q reasgns carrying grievous consecu- ences. The worst of the listmcnt, down to rate on the America. too many single four- 1 sidering the two-yeai for today's highly teci ' - , , permits only two year. ' .moe or Sn? V ice for enlisted men. Ti Hoiv'ffTi'1', The 55h Fleeffvail way to run a navy. D -Sh .inyilitafy S3518 Ollcia Nor is there any doub 'Mai Bfizsmi mllflfe 2,Z,f2,fS'aQvlf,?, magma the lai low morale on the Sixth was in cgamy. P Uwe' ,.,.g,,-,Q were not permitted to carnfl The Navy's official spokr UY13 f B-gm p,irp0Yl'Brm5y1- mt cg gyms .Or Weary-helniets. I , ute this to the protractet BE-ARUT K around Bel me for 3 Brmgh that fn swift. help was avail-a-ble lf 'ii fleet has been "on alert" be banon 2-Hd he egcave 'OVW andfhe mst lt awe l.o-new-e-r. some Jet fighters were ll Lebanese crisis the last ft UB bioclted xacuation Cflflghx be lv loiiicia on "snort ale-rt" -on the degli if But naval officers say pr. dg1ericaH9R5undali m u Amari- 0 Dan 'Cglgggf h2y0uC0u1,d' problem preceded civil wari metal Sal tout.. mixing fmt-Sh em' gf pm - . . ' ' tes. and stems from the unfriend. 0mnce"Y09e people. as at theBl'l.l-H the he leafhedbQ19.beacllq?ell:n3llluevef!U"'i conditions ' th E t C ut 390 tdawn 1 t0 301 d l dtYY a of?-an tore take In e as eff' Il Awe-aemblelliaeide Nile nf buses an ?E'f,Olxm-,t Collfwand mfclifaenci to U.S. may carry our 2nd eveicucili from Lebanon if situation worsel From press dispatches WASHINGTON -- The State Depart- ment said Monday a second evacuation of Americans from Lebanon may be underta- ken if the situation there continues to dete- riorate. Although precise figures are not avail- able, it is believed that over a thousand Americans chose not to participate in Sun- tlmfs evacuation of 263 U.S. nationals from Beit ui to Athens aboard a Navy landing Clirllun Upstairs 7' Arwen? spokesman Frederick , QV ' ,V ef- Si-ii ui no immediate plans ill' " q-I--I-3. 1 - i--1.0.4 1 E rl f'l-A-Jffltif? 1 I if Wi the situa- il ill Cleteriorates. we to assist the remaining Americans to leave Lebanon." Meanwhile, high winds on the Mediter- ranean Monday .pushed back the arrival time early Tuesday of a Navy assault ship ferrying 267 evacuees from Lebanon to Greece. .A U.S. Embassy spokesman said the time of arrival at the ancient port of Pi- raeus about six miles south oi Athens, was rescheduled for 9 am., nearly three hours later than previously announced' . ' Thats the only hitch so far," the spokesman said. Meteorological sources in Crete report- ed high north winds on the Mediterranean. which caused the delay :fl west to Greece from Belnl ' 4 The ship. the USS 59125, carrying 110 Af1flel'lcan5.' na and other foreign namzm transported from the a Sunday. i Related story OH Pk The spokesman, afterjnd sultations am0HE, U-S' Ida mats, said the ship WWW of Keratsini, 3 Gfeek mla 5 by American SYHPS as bout 9 a.m. i 3 Back in Beirut Msgs? Arab peacekeeping U0 ' if lContinwed UF PM and strife vvhi h created headlines i l lldl Y Voters, Mi? lnirts one LEBANON c?2s.'.::::::s,i, d fl i F ' ' A l , yf'i3'3 ' , I E to th e . I ' 215161: PI'0teStS ,arms inslgwaslon backf' . ead redss pw ' Associated Pre I of bringing ettlng ' S' r es Staff Peace D ROME IAPJ -- Italians ATHENS -- Protesters clashed ,with . repgrt ennls and Monday in go ti? the pon: Greek police yesterday over labor leais- S on the d that could ro I Eamamentelri lation and anti-Americanism, leaving: one 5, A angers govemm pt P? t e Csmmumsw person dead, more than 120 in,i11ved and ' ' 'K massive - . DAM epercussioilg with possible inter- 110 arrested. ,gov turned a rm vasion 0 AS Us could 404 'minion Rai- . The injured included 60 Polif'sins1',,J, W1der'conHiem0feciv1 W ebanon ho nt U .iWGreel2?deny onoilierdgtla Fleet S 'ANlA, Crete 'ZAPJ --1 A 6th Fleet de- r n-we prewrni from paying a cour- asii :ie this southern Aegean Greek 'iinirssday by demonstrators, "i312i'2iiiLlf. ,ks X , , 1 n u n - time ine tinrd such incident in as fs. ' said the destroyer, whose name l not identify, was one of several 'essels currently on maneuvers Aegean Greek islands. 3 the vessel appeared offshore, police said, several youths gathered at the port shouting anti-American slogans and trying to mobilize other inhabitants. The ship consequently withdrew. The local municipal council also assem- bled and, in a unanimous vote, declared the U.S. sailors "not welcome." , Two days ago, other U.S. vessels were prevented from. visiting the islands of Rhodes and Mykonos. On Rhodes, bloody riots ensued, suppressed by police inter- vention. trom tne -center oi? the city. Theiworker- dactig uu::f11'3b W0 "' 'nat Wa ' a . . . n. Th 1'1d flied . 3. . i . L 'R if - ' 3 . refugee QS lC"?lCl,fJCl by'lliI'0W1l"g' stones, bucks ,ll Arab nat, e Foreign M, Leban galngt ,L-man mf. ' sticks, setting up barricades and setting :Bd Ions In I ln. th 011. It W nd Pales l time Saw-me debris afire. Hiiwand-run skirmishes a 'gf Cfease-H,.e'i eetmg in W e Syrian mo QS an 5113016 fl About fb? ,D yeaileg ,Mig continued lQl'll'OLlS'flYl1'llll. the day. J'01f1f Seffuritn Lebanon S The US' WV?-y vie 'vs' . 'Ykf e o y fflfce fo' 5' T 14138 inftf' I lnchshad l i 'serie .C Ude r inf' A US E rt oo y rs s is to 1 flew the PQ, ATfJL 1 root-,O r A continued from pagel troops on Cyprus. ei.. a an A V W ' 3 we learned of Meloy's disappearance after The Defense offimfns let? a call from Sarkis. Carlson said the Aw- ' iii 'ili ' T' ff ' , .,.,i -:wi A lf? ' " i' it by es- m 1 lll' mments 01' asked qsu XS ,v tif., in .5 5, the 0 . asS9d 3111 QU 155475 every mg was was Room, mgwnding the Gill which remained gxu .1 if AUDYS, it . v,.,,.,.n.1. 'lhipl 5"nQ1r fnrce' ' 'i"""nne-n P a W if no si naive QW QQQQ i31ei.t'Z3w iwfifliieiifl 'irlmvsfwlfaw Ml Qld Nl .. .. .-....e..s............m..f" ..... W .ls - -., .... ,.... i f ,, , W, n ,. Q Ei n fi o . ii ff! 29 fa K-an L- ez? is ll -new-i at Wml it ii' in fr is ABOAHD THE SPIEGEL GRCWJE ifiPl burden onliis downstairs' jzghor. room lounge littered with the bodies of -- When a shi with 548 sailors and Soieael Grove ' filo 'UQ an in an sleeoine said one woman. "We con- . p . , , , , . " U. , , 9-, ICM, 143 , . 1 A fi . - vw U m rines takes on 267 visitors, most oi them since it nr Ajay Jliilfilrf efmsople a panty raid. d 5 ' women and children, changes. "nt of Cyprus dnl and sailors gave niothgrs azillfll since evacnations are of its ztnissioi, to gienziiil is pf, as lwfal: oy Playing Wlth t e C 1' ggvgy as well as assaults, this amphibious sh' to law 21435 Played gunner DH 3 U was ready with a storeroonz full of i is 'ill p J fs ffl ilffm Mmm. vimlga Seaman who V dffimd iwbv formula and E911-:w3,'2?'fT3 5 fNw,T,T'fTj 'XF-we i'-fgzimfl-i21l2lC Slilllwlmalump rope- 1 vin U3 warg Dlgfl J gil Q mf ,ij I in wifi? l,'Ul,l,H one Marine an t - N ,e..q3,-.,.33 fi Tgeifzxyi ' , M215 bouncing on his knee. "l've lg dabf Of' fp .,,,...-3fW,. X , it i4?gm.iL3,foni'size myself." , - I-I: ,, .Y JLN' , H,.i se- 'X U7 D ' Sltlsnrr-15 nip -3335 1 int. wavy nould have done well to f0f GHS! 1 fi recruiter aboard before the ship .79-YEDOT li .T s:2aal'ied Athens. V1 Y Oasis careful of the stairs dear," one benign 1 ., any list mother told her young son. Mlsadderf' he corrected her. My son used to ww it io oe a soldier ow ne iiants to ne a lol aid anotier , ,. . . ,, . . , .. P W,-1. fe,-1 itzsaiiii1f:L?'f"'fl""UQ"L"""L'L'::""" "W-'YY' -- - 'W -L-,mn .5-31.1.3-35 ...a 1.5 :-:r:'v5f'.-' A sg- -.,,, , .A, sw- ... ,LL--1 -A there was hard work behind these events i t if Q , Q E L? ' Q i' A 3 , 3- . I 4,4 i 'tif' i"uK Q., yX ji ,A . mlm-H e e te U M M mi but never So much th 9 2 O 3 O0 is at one couldrft relax i fW 20 2 D an .N . . fr . ,VA .'-px". ,f,nf.ha U-25-a 4 1 ,hgl , ww K rwf A ,kan Ns.,,m . and that is the way AMERICA lived MII 2 CAMPBELL ., 1 f 'H S 'Tj - - A 's.? " ' 1- ' f' '.-,. .-, L . .- ll V . 3-'f 3 ' ' ' '5, 1.5.1 ' fm! Photos by HJ. Gerwien ' ' ' ' f - . ' ' '. . , . ' , .:, . 1 .' ' ' , :1.1,'.'L'.'.'..x. :L -3.1 '..",'.::5.:L:'........"' " iL1LLiL.::::1Li.Z:J::!i,.L..." 'ugittiiillxllillixliliilitlzifixLI1l'llLLLiiLUjltllA5iitx1.l1.I.n-I iifwa . W e 4- 1 uw-,. . x 'Wi '-4. B., 59? ,, 5? W. Y- f"" ,-134, The Chain of Command -R 'Y aww W., :fi ...JH-:Wal figs 5 x mf:-.,-. I-:,,,-V., I .. . L. 1 Qjii. 1,-,Q .5ww.- v .5 Y-, . E, ., - - 'Z' 1-,-9 ,rj .. 'kg-5: ', --1 I.,-'-4. '.:w-'- -, . ' ' , 'g , ' , ,, .1 ,ff mv-, . ,.... -f .-7 .' . Y W, ,V ,, "-.1-.e".f-'Z' f.:.-+:1q'4"" " L4 :-,ti-f ' v.-x .,.-'g .. -T15-W ,ri . ... ' .2 -'t .mn ,-. rf, ',,' J'-3 9. , k - L , f-, --. .. .. - . ' 151- .Tx . i ,IT .qv.A,,:..f5A-u V, 7,25 -3 .1 .Je -:Q 4 v 21. f 5 A ri .., ., ,AA , . .., H -- . . ,,, w 'F' tri' '71 --. ff.: 'P .-sv-'l??':'g-242: if 1.7 rflmclr. ..9wg..'c-aw m .1-.161 ff-H' ' :,-Q ' U ' Y-.M E k..-EngI., ' " 5 ,B COMM NDI C OI-I-ICER Captain Daniel G. McCormick, III September 1974 - September, 1976 The Commanding Officer of an aircraft car- rier wears a variety of hats and is known by a variety of titles: Captain, skipper, the "ol' man," and Sir. Captain Daniel G. McCormick lll joined AMERICA in September, 1974 and departed two years later. During Captain McCormick's tour as Commanding Officer, AMERICA underwent an extensive 11-month overhaul in the Norfolk Naval Shipyards, the ship was converted to the new CV-concept and the new F-14 "Tomcat" and S-3 "Viking" were added. Leaving in mid-September, Captain McCormick commanded AMERICA through- out most of this Mediterranean cruise. s sf 'ir - xxx.. 753 f' 'T t In tsss as , ,n:--'nmmum-nmnnzws 11-.V - . . ,g - :,' ...J 3. .1.:.. .z '. '... . : '. , 1 ., :....' Commanding Officer C Capt. Robert B. Fuller Captain Robert B. Fuller became commanding Officer of AMERICA in early September while the ship was at an- chor in Palma de Majorca, Spain. Captain Fuller's experiences have included fighter and attack squadrons on both coasts, Combat Information School, Aide and Flag Lieutenant to Carrier Division Seven, Armed Forces staff college and the Bureau of Naval Personnel. Captain Fuller was serving as C.O. of Attack Squadron 76 when he was shot down in july of 1967. He was held as a prisoner of war until his release in March 1973. On August 6, 1974, Capt. Fuller became Commanding Officer of USS DETROIT KAOE-41 His decorations include the Navy Cross two Silver Stars Legion of Merit four Distinguished Flying Crosses two Bronze Stars eleven Air Medals three Navy Com mendation Medals and two Purple Hearts .fw- 1 N.4n. . ....... . 'sts ttziaez--:w:z 11sft -x ll 4 fl Commander l.C. BREAST lleftl and Commander T.N. FORTENBERRY 2- 5' L- Q' f""7 If Executive Gfficer Captain jerry C. Breast took over duties as AMERlCA's Executive Officer when he re- lieved Commander Thomas N. Fortenberry on 5 june 1976. As nearly everyone knows, the Executive Officer has practically nothing to do, except decide what is to be done, to tell somebody to do it, to listen to reasons why it should not be done, why it should be done by somebody else, or why it should be done in a different wayg to follow up to see if the thing has been done, to discover that it has not, to enquire why, to listen to excuses from the person who should have done it, to follow up again to see if the thing has been done, only to discover that it has been done incorrectlyg to point out how it should have been done, to conclude that as long as it has been done it may as well be left where it isp to wonder if it is not time to chew out a person who cannot do a thing right, to reflect that he probably has a wife and large family, and that any relief would be just as bad and probably worseg to consider how much simpler and better the thing would have been done if one had done it oneself in the first placeg to reflect sadly that one would have done it correctly in twenty minutes, and as things turned out it has taken two days to find out why it has taken three weeks for somebody to do it incorrectly. X . N 1 ' ',, ,"f' V 'X -Z X l,,. ll L. 1 -, an - 1 ji Y. - -3 . -- . ..--.,, ,..--4.--V 1 f , 5- WJ, WV? 4 .gf A ' "' W' " ' A' " Y- '- " " ' 11'+'-1'- ' f- -+11-w-iw--.-.ge.L.,.wL'......4z-.-.W....a.:-L5g , '..z.....,.gt5gj:z:':2f,1Qilg::-:5:.g.gf,1141211:r.'g1:'.Zr2s2-.-1-.1 'g:l:i."gIg'7' 4.44. I I ' ' Carrier Air Wing SIX was originally commissioned as Carrier Air Group 17 on 1 Ianuary 1943 at NAS Norfolk, Virginia. CVC-17 participated in combat operations in the Pacific during World War II against Rabaul, the Gilbert Islands, New Ireland, Marshall Islands, Truk, and the Mariannas aboard USS BUNKER HILL. CVG-17 again deployed in 1945, this time aboard USS HORNET and participated in missions against Iwo lima, Tokyo, Chichi Jima, Okinawa, and Kyushu. For actions during World War II, CVO-17 was awarded two Presidential Unit Citations. CVC-17 was redesignated as CVBG-17 and CVGB-5 before finally becoming the present Carrier Air Wing SIX on 27 july 1948. In late 1962, CVW-6 participated in the quarantine of Cuba aboard USS ENTERPRISE and in 1964 took part in Opera- tion Sea Orbit aboard ENTERPRISE. This was the around-the- world cruise of the Navy's three nuclear powered surface ships ENTERPRISE, LONG BEACH and BAINBRIDGE. V1 ' N . .5 ,kj .4-,,, , ., . , , ,f Ta.: -' f ""1L1-4. ...if ,af 45.7 aff" A I ilh Y 'ini' Commander, Carrier Air Wing Six Commander C.E. "Skip" Armstrong, Ir. In 1965, CVW-6 was assigned to USS AMERICA and partici- pated in her first cruise, a deployment to the Mediterranean. A second cruise aboard AMERICA in 1967 put CVW-6 in the Med during the Greek Crisis and May-june Middle East Crisis which culminated in the USS LIBERTY affair and the Six Day War. In 1968, CVW-6 again deployed aboard AMERICA, this time to Southeast Asia for combat operations against North Vietnam. During 112 days of combat operations, Air Wing SIX dropped over 18000 tons of ordance logged one MIG-21 kill flew 11 081 combat sorties totaling 22 592 flight hours 40 per cent of which were flown at night. Following their successful combat cruise CVW-6 and USS AMERICA were awarded the Navy Unit Commendation. During their Med cruise of 1973 ROOSEVELT and CVW-6 were in the Mediterranean during the Arab-Israeli Yom Kippur War. CVW-6 was reassigned to USS AMERICA in Iuly 1975 and the composition of the Air Wing was changed. VA-15 and VA-87 transitioned from the A-7B to the A-7E and VA-176 traded in their A-6 -I s for updated A-6E s. VF-41 and VF-84 were replaced by iff-142 and VE-143 flying the F-14A and VAW-121 was ref l I V QU by VAW-124 and their E-2C s. CVW-6 also gained three ni in gnu orons I-IS-15 flying Sl-I-3H 5 VS-28 flying the new 9 M s and VAO-137 flying the EA-68. CVW-6 departed Pier 12 n I5 April 1976 as one of the newest and mightiest Air Wings -fi r assembled. 27 I I I I I I l l All , f lid 1 I A I X '55 Y- O of ' I ,tn .J Gs. , X 'W I I Q ' C1 , 1 I D Jr , 1 O J . 1 3' S ,1 I 'N' . 12621. ff: - ' 'luv V- 'I .. ?7-517'-il' -i3T'5E6w..b " Commander Carrier Group Four I-QQ' Rear Admiral .2222-'7 . V james B. Linder 2 ' ' -,.." In The organization currently known as Commander Carrier Group FOUR was first activated as Carrier Division FOUR on 12 March 1943 as an element of the FIFTH Fleet in the Pacific. The staff saw extensive action throughout the Second World War aboard some of the most famous aircraft carriers to come out of the Pacific Theater: USS BUNKER HILL ICV-171, USS INTREPID ICV-III, USS INDEPENDENCE ICVL-223, USS FRANKLIN, USS CABOT ICVL-281, and USS LAKE CHAMPLAIN ICV-391. Carrier Division FOUR was a major participant in the Marshall Islands campaign, the Battle of Leyte C-ulfg the battle off Cape Engano, in which planes from the USS INTREPID sunk the japanese aircraft car- riers ZUIHO, ZUIKAKO, and CHIYODA: the Doolittle raids on Tokyo, the sinking of the battleship YAMATO: and the battle of Okinawa in the final drive towards the defeat of the japanese. In recent years the staff has concen- trated in two specific areas of carrier op- erations: the training and preparation of Atlantic Fleet aircraft carriers for deploy- ment, and the actual operational employment of the carriers in deploy- ment to the Mediterranean SIXTH Fleet. At one time or another the command has become involved with the training or op- eration of every carrier assigned to the At- lantic Fleet, ranging from the World War II ships USS SHANGRI-LA and USS FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT to the nu- clear carriers ENTERPRISE and NIMITZ. The Commander and his staff partici- pated actively during the Dominican crisis of 1961, the Greek-Turkish tensions of-1967 and the middle-east crises of 1967 and 1972. In the areas of new de- velopments, the command was involved with the introduction of the SH-3 helicop- ter into the fleet, the Interim Sea Control xx I2 2545 1-E9ll?lll?'f5lllli':fEii1,iii-1? .. Ship Evaluation aboard USS GUAM and introduction of the new F-14 "Tomcat" fighter, the E-2C "Hawkeye" early warn- ing aircraft and the all jet S-3A "Viking" anti-submarine carrier aircraft to the At- lantic Fleet aboard USS JOHN F. KEN- NEDY in 1975. On 1 july 1973 the name of the staff was changed from Carrier Division FOUR to Carrier Group FOUR. At the present time Commander Carrier Group FOUR maintains administrative command of four Atlantic Fleet carriers: USS IN- DEPENDENCE, USS AMERICA, USS IOHN F. KENNEDY and USS NIMITZ. Thus, the commander has at his disposal an extremely potent arsenal to fulfill whatever mission may be assigned to him over, on or under the sea. The aircraft carrier remains the primary element of defense for this country on the high seas throughout the world. Carrier Group FOUR remains today, as it was in 1943, a major element in the total defense pos- ture of the United States. All is not paperwork and decision-Making: an occasional hop in AMERICA aircraft or a light-hearted farewell dinner break the routine g..t, I Carrier Group Four ,,,t...N....x,-xww..x+1v'-v+X"'4 CHIEF QF STAFF Q2 ...3 Captain E.B. ACKERMAN tstandingl August- present, Captain j.A. LYONS tseatedj january - August. 'i ,, K A Ln- , U ' N f ' X 2 f Gerwien HJ. STAFF QPERATIGNS OFFICER Captain R.K. SHEA Cleftl ? LCdr. William W. Deck Officer Department Heads Commander LC. Gehrig Air Officer Griffis 1 r LCdr. Paul P. Keller Administrative Officer -,Y-AMW , H L WLL4 i -M1:L:.f1.71- - -. iiiilikhizzz-g .:1LiHj5,jg3lr,:,.::.- 1:..g1::giigl:,: :i::::::Q:.:ziz1m1:,xu.:m,m,,m,,,,:,,,,,,,L,,,uv, ,.. K u Cdr. james M. Hickerson Cforegroundi Operations Officer ' Cdr. W.F. Wagner Strike Ops a s t as if 1 E Il- 'lgiq Department Heads iCont.J .C A. .at 1. Y Q! it X' .""-N Cdr. Richard Walsh Cdr. David Andrezjewski Cdr. W.P. Dunn Supply Officer Dental Officer Dental Officer l H ar-""" l' w,,,,,.,.., Wg,- 1 Cdr. lack Burrows AIMD Officer l .. . .. .- . .f 444. .14 C.:CL.LLL4g,, . :,.'::-.V x utzgzgfggg Cdr. Richard T. Vosseller Navigator Manu ,X .,,,.. :gig Y N if f""X Cdr. Robert l. Esker LCdr. E. Dean Cook Catholic Chaplain Proto-siaht Chaplain V , - . , i .,..,,, , .Zi .Q xi tins. 'v .L se!-4-X!!:!fae.a5ssl.!.slr!!!I-...fl-'f-A...L 2 we V --A Q--s' ..r..--ur-nr... .geexvm mv-..!.1.ziu..-.-........ 36 'ff-Q Department - Heads tcon'tD i Cdr. AJ. O'Dvvyer Cdr. S.P. Dunlap Medical Officer Safety Officer I' 1 'X ,V Q zll F' ON '4tiit I Kia. I -. X 1 - X I , , Xi! Cdr. D.L. Mares Chief Engineer Cdr. LJ. Drude i Combat Defense System Officer 'X f' Y ff -4 xr ., mvmvmnun: , . ,A . .. . . . ,: :w-.-::'.f.:.E.- :,:1:i:1:11':1'Efi:iEvZ:!ELZ5EEl'iE.E' . ' Y "-9 f' ., ., ' -dw fu 1 4 , f,...,....,.......,.....n.......4mmm......... 1 ...e..4. ,-1 tl Cdr B B Weber Weapons Officer "1 LCdr Roger Kammerdelner A " Q 5' 5' Communications Officer W L l D , r ,rc,c c A I I I E' 'ff'f"5 f I X I I .1 - . I W ' r ,Vfc c ' efre free Vrerr - . - - I! Q--ylfgvzvkhoa , A N I 1 ,1 A K rf ,.,. 5 X A . . A. iv 2, rrcr 5 f r ' A Fa or ' cl' 'Of f""""A' ' If 'P 'sv' v .v nr v r, I Q 4 Q, A, ' rm f , -,J 4 e MAC L.L. Sackrider Chief Master-at-Arms Rfvii CM. THQMAS AZT j.H. Davis I Division Equal Gpportunity Asst. 2. Q ' 1: I 4-f 5.1 x k, ,. -ein 1 ,K rs nh IU? S..! 44" 27 W I. 'XY v fx K 38 l MACS FB. Derby Senior Enlisted Advisor livin- 3 gg. 1 fx I . 1 if 'W A , X f . ef H .f ,-.,1 . ,,,.5 -4 ..,' ex ""' M if ' 'E :'2 Q2 2 ' f:i11?PP?w'1ff-3'-5' A ' 5' Q' Kia FE TURES :J .-3.. ,Ta - .1:.,,3--.5-e. 'J r 'f - H 4, -f,3f,L,X.-, f- V .-:fry-.,-1 .. -T".-T' " .Il-'bf fi Eff' 5'1- ' , ' 't xt 1' -"ff--' '47-'K Cl' -"'3'H"fb--uv I 1. 1,3 5-T 52 If, EE iii. Q1 5? if . Gerwlen f Underway Replenishment means An All-Hands Evolution Replenishment at sea for fuels and supplies is more than a simple maneuver performed at the spur of the moment every seven to ten days. The planning and execution of an "unrep" goes on days, weeks and even months before the actual event. Long before AMERICA comes alongside a supply ship, messages must be sent requesting different types of fuels or specific supplies, including the number of heads of lettuce desired, how many pounds of flour are needed and how many gallons of IP-5 or Avgas are needed. Once the availability of these items is assured, actual preparation begins with most departments aboard AMERICA becoming involved. What course will the two ships steer? The Navigation Department takes care of this detail. First, the course must be smooth and as free of turbulence as possible. The currents, sea state and the existing wind must all be taken into account. Now, what if the ships needs to launch jets or recover helicopters during the replenishment? That too, must be considered and the course must provide sufficient wind over the deck for flight operations. Lastly, is there enough room for the exercise? Traveling three hours or more at twelve knots means that at least ' thirty-six miles of the Mediterranean must be free of islands and major shipping lanes. The Deck Department has a very major role in any underway replenishment. What kind rig will the ship use? A Burton rig? Double Housefall? Highline? Probe? The proper rig for the proper job must be determined and then assembled. Each rig has its own characteristics and each is suited for a specific job. After assembling the pulleys, blocks and lines or cables, Deck's job is far from being over, as that department must man the rigs, winches and serve as safety observers. Weapons Department puts in its two cents as the ship comes alongside. A marksman fires a shotline from AMERICA to the supply ship, establishing the first physical connection between the two. This thin line is pulled back abroad AMERICA, hand over hand, after the delivery ship has attached to it a telephone connection for intership communication. If bombs or other ordinance is involved in the replenishment, Weapons monitors their flow from ship to ship and into AMERICA's magazines. While the Communication Department is hoisting appropriate signal flags and dayshapes, bridge watch officers are insuring that AMERICA maintains the proper distance from the delivery ship. Too far and the lines and hoses are strained and could possibly break, too close and a suction is created which could cause the two ships to slam into each other. A.. -Ll -Z--. .-17-1-if f Q.. - gg- 1 .f--.u.a.,a-.a,1f,vff..s- ' np.-t ..g,.,,. rf- .. -,:-ann.-..:-..f-K-fr-'...1n J-.. , -.1 ..,- . 4. -f ... . ... . .as L........ .. .:.:.- . 5- - - . .. . Q L . f . -A , , X A ,tw - A In -. . .ri f .f . 15 nf it . 14 5 X, . C f siTif4Q.af'. N . If ,,,, I ,rf V, ,.,?V,xXxX, , K: I .V X ,x!f..1X 'V 'u ,Kit I H 3 H 1 I af- V, ,. 4 -,., , IW. r K '11 'vyf Q i -Q, ',', ,f,"', z , L ' 1 .yy ' ff fy ' I w,,. .,..,4 gif ',AV 'T .ya tts. z?4f+2..-isftittg .2 vX 4 If 1 1 I he 'f - -3 rw-r'E.T1ffgf'3 if yfg'l5f, if V, A . ' .. --hvfrrf-,-..w .N E1 fa. ,., .,A, "1 .. ' -1 Ni"' -------.....-r-m fa. 1 l ' A Q "5 ............................. Y. Loads come aboard via winch-operated rigs . . . or by helicopter borne pallets If the evolution involves a Vertrep tVertical in hand as the hangar bays fill with boxes of goods These Replenishmentj, count in the Air Department. Many flight men monitor the flow of Items from the supply ship to quarters stations are to be mannedg Primary Flight Control AMERICA and then to the onboard storerooms just how directs the movement of the helos and air department much has the ship brought aboard in the way of supplies? personnel guide the landing and placement of pallets of If the amount of food consummed is any indication, the material on the flight deck. combined work of AMERICA s many departments has Supply Department reps are bustling around, clipboards been both substantial and worthwhile A ' '- Q. A', ' 4' at xl. a-- lr Y O N K N 4 , Q! 1 4 W Mm M231 . ., U W X , . 'viga- ' 4 f.- ':iV u p 1: "Blueshirts" scramble to remove nets from cargo so the box if es can be moved. ' -' -A-fr -HJ -'M-'.4'+e WV A 1f,: .w g',.f4 :1-L., ,J-up . . , '-:LT j. -' ' - . . , , L14 'Gifs "phage- .-fgmgmg.,-aa.11w.a.-.M-Lx-Mf'-f+-i-u----------- u4.m5i3E?7.:,L1:.f.3gigQg111144-..4,Ya,4.:.,.4LY, ze, i-J!" .'.:i ., .Q ,. it .., Deck department pt '- ' ' " :ig FM' -NIH -KLAE-Y - r .. - 1- Hf'Nw?'!'?,, . r , Q 'N A yellow blur of movement results as forklift operators move cargo 1 l At the midpoint of the Med cruise, nearly 40,000 dozen eggs had been brought aboard. More than 36,000 gallons of l milk had been stored aboard and 19,753 pounds of hamburger had been eaten. Nine thousand pounds of hot dogs went a long way and 5,500 pounds of steak had been grilled. Count- , less loaves of bread had been baked with the nearly fifty l l l thousand pounds of flour. l Coffee was a popular commodity, with 19,220 pounds 1 being consummed and if you mixed all the lettuce, carrots, cabbage and tomatoes that the ship ate, you would have Created a tossed salad weighing in at 36.8 tons. Bon Appetit! . A ' ta L ' ' I 5, f , , Iii? .74 - . 11 - -:-440' , 4 J' Q 3-gif 7 ' ' -1' x WON 10" CGVQO from pnllt,-is fiom' n to storeroomg. --an-wsfsui ,Qu . A T. Decaire It may not always seem this busy . . z ,, , f 7 , 0 V , y - Aaya ayaf y a . , . .a VV I I ,, Vi!! zllgyf. ' Vi?" yy ' f gn, N 1' f . , , -ra Q , , vi . Q -"1 , ' ,,.. , 'S The Medical Department insures that There is a doctor in the house Since the start of the cruise the Medical Department has been charting a daily in- jury graph to spot and record any notice- able trends which may occur. The graph, titled INIURY: BY SPACE OF OCCUR- ENCE breaks down the number of injuries tusually burns, contusions, lacerations, eye foreign objects or fracturesj accord- ing to the type of space it occurred, eg. flight deck, hangar bay, berthing com- partment, etc. lt also distinguishes be- tween accidents occurring while on duty, holiday routine or liberty status. Not so surprisingly, the graph reveals that the number of ship-board accidents progresses upward the longer we are at sea without a holiday routine. On May 22, a day before the ship held holiday routine, 17 injuries were recorded, which plummeted dramatically downward to five the following day. The next holiday routine closely paralleled this trend. Eight s lo - i1 injuries were registered on May 30, a striking difference from the 20 recorded the day before. Seventeen accidents dipped to six during the holiday routine on june 5. But the number abruptly skyrocketed to 24, the highest so far of the cruise, the following day. The Medical Department insists that this is not so surprising, since the men are physically, as well as men- tally exhausted following a day of holiday routine. Such a day is similiar to a typical blue Monday, a day of adjusting back to the grind. Resembling skyscrapers on a city skyline, the number of injuries recorded during liberty soars right off the chart. During the two-day liberty period in Rota, the number of injuries wasn't too high, but five of the eight occurred during liberty status, as compared to one in berthing and two in the galley. Four of the 13 injured on May 24 were members of the advance beach guard during the "rock concert" at Rhodes. During the four-day Taranto in-port period liberty-status accidents numbered 11, 13, 18 and 17 respectively. While in Taranto the second time, seven men were injured on june 6 and another seven on june 10. In Naples nine wereinjured while on liberty on both August 14 and 15. just for the record, the highest number of injuries recorded on the flight deck since the cruise commenced was on june 14 when six men were injured during Operation 'Fluid Drive' preparations. july 15 was an equally bad day for the galley force as six were injured there. Three men had troubles with the hatches on july 18, and eight injuries recorded dur- A Q Ax -, . . afpenirizi I i ing the vert rep underway replenishment on june 14 contributed to 24 injuries for that day, equaling the record high set on june 6. Has a day passed since the Med cruise commenced without a single reported in- jury? Yes, On April 25, the day we pulled into Rota. The Medical Department also keeps another daily chart, this one recording the number of sick calls. judging from the graph, entitled "HOW GOZlT", it's a wonder how they find the time to graph the number of sick calls at all. An average Of 100 patients visit sick call from 6 to 9:30 daily. One noticeable trend which appears immediately to even the casual eye is the large discrepancy between the number of sick calls during an in-port liberty period and at-sea routine. During liberty the number plunges, resembling a dagger pointed downward. While in Rota on April 26 and 27, the numbers recorded were 58 and 50 re- spectively, almost half the number of the previous day. In Rhodes we recorded 45, which rose sharply upward to 120 the day we pulled out. The number of sickcall patients dipped from 100 to 60 in the time span of two days while in Taranto. Thelnumber fell to 35 while in Naples on August 15, only to rise to 130 the day after pulling out. One can almost visualize men, who seemingly in the Common accidents as well as near catastrophies are handled by the Medical Department. Left, a minor flight deck injury is treated and, below, following a complex operation following a helicopter crash on GUADALCANAL, Medical and Dental Officers try to catch some sleep before continuing treatment. i throes of death only hours earlier, racing in wheel chairs and hobbling on crutches to catch a place in the liberty line. Plotting graphs and preparing other paperwork, although necessary, is of sec- ondary importance to the'Medical De- partment's primary task, looking after the physical welfare of AMERlCAmen, a flesh and blood, responsibility. The thirty 4, . V-.----,qq- i General Quarters drills call for first aid and mass casualty instruction. 45 tOpposite pagei With a corpsman close behind, a man just recovered from the sea is rushed across the flight deck and taken to Sick Bay. 'f "TJ "f"'1jT':"" F !,'!:gP ""d.'f F IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIIIllIIllIIIIIIIIIIllIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllunlllll Injuries by space of occurance based on AMERICA Medical Department records Other injuries 10 8 6 1 4 j 2 Liberty injuries I 8 6 4 2 l l Galley injuries 1 8 l 6 c 4 l l 0 L 24 30 1 5 10 15 20 25 Ladder 81 hatch injuries 8 6 5l4 l S2 li il Machinery space injuries l 8 6 4 . 2 1 Hangar 84 Flight Deck injuries 1 8 6 1 4 7 2 I 24 30 1 5 10 15 l 20 l 25 l-1-MAY-5 J 5. -----JUNE-' -e - l ........ Rh0deSllE- Medi----fTaranto-1-jj 1: - -1... Fluid Drive ..........,.,..,.,-.....l j 46 l 2. , 2 3 vammfwmynw. N- ., -- . sf-:f:f?'i't? -1-1 ' . l ,-- a5.s..,,s- s as s nf corspmen and three doctors in the ships company, plus the 17 men and two offi- cers attached to the air wing provide bas- ically any type of medical service avail- able at a shore dispensary. Their facilities include a pharmacy, laboratory, emergency operating room, a 65-bed dispensary, and the equipment necessary for physical therapy as well as a physical section to perform X-ray's, EKG's, eye tests, eye refractions, ordering glasses, audiograms, and complete aviation phys- icals. These men face a myriad of related tasks and responsibilities. While their co-workers are examining the 100-plus sick call patients, and treating 18-plus live-in patients daily, four other corpsmen are permanently assigned to flight deck duty, working 12 hour shifts. Another two corpsmen are readily available during underway replenishments and refueling, and one corpsman is a permanent member of the nucleus fire party. Each division has an assigned corpsman to administer shots and give first-aid training during safety standdowns and general quarters. 4 The Medical Department also boasts the first and best Medical Response Team in the 6th Fleet. Setting a precedent for other carriers in the Navy, this team, composed of three full-time corpsmen while at sea, can respond to emergencies anywhere on the ship within three-and- a-half minutes, from the signal bridge on the O10 level to the auxiliary rooms on level 7. This not only allows for travel time, but also includes time utilized for setting up the equipment until they are ready to treat their first patients. From abrasions and contusions to eye glasses and bacteria cultures, AMERICA's Medical Department fullfills a variety of roles. I 47 Deck Department mans the boats Ever since there has been a Navy, someone has had to ensure that the crew gets ashore for rest and relaxation. The titles for these men may have changed, but lib- erty is as old as the Navy itself. Today, on AMERICA, the 153- man Deck Department is assigned to get the crew to the beach and back with a minimum of stress and strain. From the minute the ship gets underway from a liberty port, these men set to work preparing Y 1' 'fr s the ship's ten boats for future liber- ty. The Admiral's "barge", the Captain's "gig", the two officers' boats and the six utility boats for the crew must all be seaworthy upon arrival in port. Constant maintainance aside, actual preparations for liberty begin three hours before dropping anchor in the ship's "showplace", or "foc's'le". The "foc's'le" is also the home of the ship's two 30,000 lb. anchors and 1,080 feet of an- chor chain. Long before dawn, a crew is standing by in the "foc's'le" wait- ing for the announcement that the "special sea and anchor detail" is to be set. First, large metal locks or "stops" are attached to the an- chors. It takes 7 to 9 men to lift each stop from the ground, since they weigh a bulky 580 Poumls' Later, when the command is SW' en, a specially-designated man wearing safety harness and 808' gles, removes the stop from the anchor chain with the thrust Of H , .,.., -F? W, V M, lm", Q yu I Ah -.- y 4, ..,-... -ng 6 all a , I W WW.. '- - fl:-s 31 ,. , ,, ff? , ,H -T NIMH 'm"'1if:.i"' r,,r ' ,n , ,,.,g..- .....,.,,..., - l 5 ' W ,U mf ,. -, nv "9 up L.. is 'U 'fzlyv P X ...., T W n1 i i U 1 If i l i l ,, ,.,r-:uw-nwfvg-:33qgggggvjq3QL331j.1,:.-,Lg sledgehammer, while a man stands ready behind him to apply the hydraulic brake when enough anchor chain has been paid out. A Deck Department Officer will pass the word to the crew as soon as he and the Captain determine the number of fathoms they will re- quire. With the call of "let's go", all hands man their stations, the sledgehammer hits the stop, and soon, sparks fly from the chain as it rumbles by. Smoke is everywhere. This process takes place about ten minutes before the appropriate number of fathoms have been let out. Actually, there are two steps in setting the anchor. Dropping the anchor is done at considerable depth, so that final anchoring may be achieved by pulling up the slack in order that the anchor lodges firmly in the muddy or E. .,,,, s . VL - f 4A 'FM 2 F., N T. I R ', 4 ' V S 4 - . .aww . 0 .S-ay. , 4 , , , ,, . ,,,,,,..ur-snurwvillif' f""""' ' Q rocky bottom. Roughly three hours from the onset of this operation, the anchor has been set and the department can turn its attention to getting the liberty boats outfitted and manned. The ship's hangar bay is always a bustling scene on the first day in port. This is the time for inventory and minor touch-ups of the ship's boats, which must be equipped with the right number of life jack- ets, boat hooks and assorted paraphernalia. At last, the chains and chocks are taken off the dol- lies and the launches are taxied to the elevators by tractor. Prior to liberty call, all boat crewman are required to attend lectures, where nautical charts are passed out and the rules of boating safety are re- viewed. The degree of hardship the boatcrew undergoes depends on many factors: the state of the seas, the distance from anchorage to fleet landing, and the previous up- keep of the boats. To ensure that all goes well, a boat crew consists of three and sometimes, four men: the cox swain, an engineer, a bowhook ities and unties the boatl and at night, a boat officer. The bowhook is a resident knot-specialist and maintains order in the boat, the engineer calibrates the boat's instruments and keeps the engines running smoothly. It is the coxswain who navigates the craft through the harbor. A boatmember must possess good hands, keen eyesight, a sturdy pair of legs and an even temper. He gets used to the sight of the sailor who has overindulged on the beach, stands by for some pretty harsh criticism of his work and takes responsibility for the welfare of the entire crew. Crowded conditions and hot tem- pers he must learn to ignore. Forty-minute rides in the black of night are rare QBarcelona7 but they do happen occasionally because an aircraft carrier must anchor in deep water. Boat cancellations generally occur when it becomes dangerous to board or leave the ship and a sea height of five or six feet plays havoc on the ship's ac- comodation ladders. More than once on this cruise, a coxswain has received a standing ovation from his crew for executing a fast, tricky hookup. A ship's crew is tolerant of many situations, but nothing is so sacred to a sailor as his liberty. If i i m S x Q E f V , X- -' 2' . , M J- ...., r w W fm-1 YA W V, .,..-.W wa, -V M. X gff ggx- ' VW. .N-f-:sv xv- ,,.Nr"3J .,,.,wf-4 ,A ,. , I M X, W ,,,, as " ' . . , -4 V-PNN, V-, V M W K. W. ,gif 'M --, q .,,. nh T.....,. , ,, - ,,, W- ,,,..,. ,. M Q, ' lv- Uh X k ..... M. -M, vw 'f-V A-4-0... V -4-nw, In -1, N .. - ,B W ' V-W X' -A W, ,. on TM Kfnpn- 4, , f,.,,, ,X '45 .V ha W A ' A, , Q - A Q ,, ,. MW ' --- L.. ' - ' f ,,, '? 'Y ,,. ,. V I ,h -. , irQ"i'- .,. , ,, ,f - V ' ..-WV? ,"-u. - , 'M ,, .,-,,- 5 , ,y.,, 1 4 - . -1 ,ns .- A, ' .V .xc ,.-"",..,. ,. j... ' ,,. Vw M ' ..-I A 'VV' ' " ' -,' vw' M- ml , .W , , vm ' ' 'V 1 fb- -, - -. ,.., . """'f ' X ' . ,Jsif - 6: 5 4 ,M . Q 5 , ,, ,, -ees... .. . . I . ' Av., ' -., ,, ........... , ' .--. 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AllvlD: Versatile, complex, precise Day to day adjustments to elec- tronic components and engines are normally made within the in- dividual squadron, but it is nor- mally beyond the capabilities of a squadron to make major repairs to its equipment, due to the daily vvork needed to maintain constant readiness for flight operations. For this reason, the Aircraft Inter- mediate Maintenance Department QAIMDJ has been established on board aircraft carriers and naval air stations to perform specialized testing and maintenance on virtu- ally all equipment used within the Air Wing. Under the leadership of Com- mander jack Burrows, AMERlCA's AIMD services everything from the giant, rolling flight deck crane to micro-miniature electronics com- ponents. Hundreds of work orders are received daily throughout the thirty vvork centers of the depart- ment. The department consists of five officers and 430 enlisted men, both ship's company and TAD personnel from squadrons. Re- quirements and specifications are located in the eight thousand technical publications held in the departmental library. And the nec- essary repairs are carried out by highly-trained technicians. Lack of equipment to make the repairs is rarely a problem with over ten thousand items in stock. Anything from aircraft tires, bomb racks, tractors, or a perfectly running air- craft engine to a tiny allen wrench or transistor may be found within this system. b l-.- Having the Navy's newest, most sophisticated aircraft on board has created a need for extremely com- plex and precise electronics test equipment. AlMD's Versatile Avi- onics Shop Testing CVASTJ area has admirably filled this need. Ap- proximately twelve million dollars worth of equipment may be utilized in making electronics tests and repairs. Precise engine repair is a major function of the AIMD jet Shop. Under the supervision of ADH D.E. Morrison, the forty men of this work center have repaired more than one hundred and twenty engines, fifty of which have been calibrated on the test cell, a system enabling the engine to be tested as if it was actually mounted onlan aircraft. All en- gines must be tested after sched- uled periods of usage, however, occasionally an engine is brought in for repair because of foreign ob- ject damage CFODJ. A small piece of wire, a nut or bolt, can destroy many internal components of an engine. Petty Officer Morrison and his team are familiar with, and can repair, any of the hundreds of parts making up the engine. All squadrons of the Air Wing have agreed that not enough can be said about AIMD. As one spokesman stated, "We have the most complicated, sophisticated and best AIMD in the Navy to- day." pt I I m ,A .M x '-4 5 4 r W A '35 I nun: " i K' Ever hour The Air Department'5 QjQb K: QM kee pl ng the .xv -Nl v , 4, 0 I -Pm.: . .-,L .a ,K Abigail , U, ng vu' uf 1 'L ,..X ww - X ,Q ' .-W. rzf " ' ,shui -. 4.43 10- Haw . f, X .1 .4 V ,Q 'f 'wr f A xA.. X A "Q , 'sw f f -Q4 ul' 1n."'!"A' 'F VAIVN, 9",4ff 'Ty' YM?" That's the home of the Air Boss, Com- mander I.C. Gehrig, his assistant, Com- mander I.S. Paul and the tower crew, who vary in number according to the time of day this operation takes place. The Air Boss is the man responsible for the safe movement of aircraft on the flight deck and the corollary upkeep of the vaSf catapult and arresting gear system found aboard a carrier. The Navy calculates that a safe stan- dard of operation is a maximum of one accident every 10,000 flight hours. The Air Department has successfully guided the ship's aircraft through more than 20,000 safe hours. During the day, the Air Boss is respon- sible for the airspace in a five-mile radius around the ship and Pri Fly is a beehive of activity. Officers from each squadron stand by, manuals in hand, to give land- ing instructions to a pilot having trouble landing. Single-engine landings constitute trouble, as do hydraulic failures aloft. What constitutes an accident? lf any part of an airplane breaks, it is considered a major accident. In the event of a crash, the Air Boss and his crew must still keep the landing area free for other airborne aircraft. The pilot may indicate, for example, that his flaps are only one-third of the way down, and the Air Boss must consult the arresting gear bulletin where he learns, the recovery headwind tin knotsi that is required for the landing of the specific craft involved. Aboard AMERICA there are seven major types of aircraftg each one has a different weight and subsequently re- quires a different amount of tension on the arresting cable. Pri-Fly dictates the exact length of cable in accordance with the oncoming aircraft. It takes 420 men and 14 officers, re- presenting four divisions, to get the air- wing off the deck, making it the second largest department aboard AMERICA. The moving, handling and spotting of aircraft CV-II is assisted arresting gear and catapult KV-21, elevator and hangar deck crewmen CV-31 and the "grapes" of V-4 who refuel all aircraft. By day, these men are distinguished by the colors of their jerseys and at night, by the color of their flashlights. From the primary tower, the Air Boss and his men gather all of the in- formation he needs from the galaxy of different-colored "wands" below, making it easy for him to pinpoint a movement out of sequence. For example, blue flashlights indicate maintenance, amber signify directors and red or green are the sign of a catapult officer, whose job it is to call for full or reduced engine power. At night, the main responsibility for safe flight within that five-mile radius wisely shifts to the radar people. ...sw ..-:-.iwzezr -:sa-:-:sz-:1:s:s::f:f gi:-,A I. Whatever the mission, whatever the equipment, flight ops mean people. Watching a launch and recovery at night is an exciting, complex stage drama for the onlooker, though it is hard, dangerous work for the flight crew. Porta- bletractors with- an air start unit, called "huffers", give the jets their initial injec- tion of air pressure. The Air Boss gives plenty of advance notice prior to launch time, to "get the directors thinking". A recovery follows a launch, so that planes are constantly airborne. It is a thrilling sight to see a "Tomcat" CE-147 taxi to its launch site and take a kneeling position while the "redshirts" tordnancemenl load her with missiles. The telltale greens and reds of the Catapult Qfficer follow, and then when the pilot is ready, the planes running lights add their glow to the spectacle. A white light indicates the catapult is open anci a tinai fed ii at means "stand by". With an inctei' 1 burst of power the plane is in thi' jets accelerate from zero to 140 knots in two secondsl All of this happens so fast and with such intensity that it takes a trained eye to de- tect each sequence in the unfolding ac- tion. j Steam from the red-hot catapults blows over the flight deck like sand in a duststorm. Later, prior to recovery, as the plane begins encircling the ship, you can't be sure if the stars are beckoning somewhere in the night, or planes are waiting to come in. Roughly 150,000 gallons of IP-5 jet fuel are consumed daily aboard AMERICA, which means 550,000 is spent on fuel alone per dayf The cost of operat- ing an A-7 for one hour of flight is esti- mated at 213200, the bulk of which goes towards fuel expenditures. At night, flight operations are slower, and the maximum launching rate is one plane per minute. During daytime opera- iContinued on page 583 - ' '- Tl '. 'fi' ' , ' - .'- -'- t-Q---?:.::,::'-'--st'zz',,----,-,':--r - -.-,- .. ,. , A. K , , - . V - v ' -A -. :V-'-"L,:1f.'.:', p1:if'f'fTvP- " ,5-4'1" fff' :ni -93.--1 ' .. f safe ight Flight the culmination of skill and teamwork "Ai :ugh lr unfold wings" ecaire D T. -5. 'V -C' .- , fg9??3rf.vm4 it - f ,, f 5v,,.. . A . ,z :qua Agn. T 4. ik Q .il . n, if Jia. , - , fvfwr- . -vs fs-'fi --A, i' 2' iv.: fqifgg . . -- ...Q u faSr..t 'T ,Q .r-as -f . . " 4' -1 ' ' " - - L - " 1 '. "'f5T'?.,"""f-" 2... --M.. c I ---Q, A-a,,,fgl5-4-.L---.1 "tri- J ' ' gg 1" 'ij-.f.-l4?'T' ,- . -.Lg , L ' 4 .-T2:'.... , N . " 1 " ' -is-3"?'-.1..f5f-0--6 ,Q--1-'iff -. - , ., rnpgg- V.,-. ,J 3,74 In I ,,.. ,, - l -- "" " -4171215 ---. .S-'-lffit-'X' r- ' , ml: V . gi- 1, A - - C .C,.., A - - -J " - s-4....,L - - - '---'N-, Mr 9 f -f .. '11 4 --...,.-gt-3'9- -gulf' ff' Air Department lCon'tJ tions, planes may be launched simul- taneously every 45 seconds, but there is really no set limit. As expected, night- flying is more dangerous since it is done strictly by instrumentation and one helicopter and destroyer stand by for res- cue, if needed. During the day, a variety of landmarks are available to the pilot, and only one unit, a helicopter, is needed. One half hour after sunset, the center- light strobes are turned on to simulate an airfield, making the runway look consid- erably longer than it actually is. The pri- mary landing instrument for night land- ings is the "lens" or "meatball", a large light panel that tells the pilot whether he is high, low, or on target in relation to the flight deck, as he approaches. The lens merely gives the pilot a mirror of where he is in relation to the flight deck and if he is unable to correct his course, a series of red lights will "wave him off' to try again. ln addition, the Landing Signal Of- ficer keeps constant communication with the pilot by radio, and the squadron ob- serves who stand by in Primary during the day can now be found in the Carrier Air Traffic Control Center, where radar takes precedence. One-hundred-and-fifty feet of landing area does not leave much room for error, however, and there are other variables, like wind speed to con- sider. Contrary to a much-believed myth, the carrier itself does not have to be mov- ing for flying to take place. If the wind is blowing, flight is always possible. The S-3, for instance, requires only three knots of wind to become airborne. Flight operations at sea are rigorous and on some cruises, flight will often con- tinue during heavy seas or snowstorms. -.53 The "12-on 12-off" schedule is generally adhered to, but in some cases the flight crew will go 24 hours straight, as they did earlier this cruise while tracking enemy submarine contacts. "The heart of the mission" for AMERICA is the Air Depart- ment, and the heart must never rest while in international waters. X '1 V S I I U - .057 7'.,,..,,,-1 '3 V- ' , 'cf heya Af-. ' ' .fi 'iw ..-,,- -..4, .,.f. , it Hu M, A plane-guard can come in two forms Copposite pg.D: either a snip's helo or the ever-present frigate or destroyer. .-f' ,4-'N WW ff nr wtf ,N an f f fr V U I 3vjfif?fW ,, ,V T , Y TZ 'ff,f:w7 ,'g'ff, , , ' f" ff-'f4,aQLf4ifzjfz,fwmwnywwm 43 ff it f X V, f, I V, N M ,,,, ,,,.W,,,.,,.,,,,,f-wsu, , f f ,, ,fg,Wm,f ,,f,, is rrrr Q ,.,' fff4,i:4f.g41,mf.f ff: "f"-'UQUQZW Wrf,fz4,zff.,Wwuw ' f Lfmkfffww Of Constant ciriiis, stick as emergency barricade A Vtgging Eesti? necessary to ensure that tlignt ogsreraiioiws 513 ' ,rr' fitnotst complication. f -s '-i'i MAR DET: Soldiers 0 Th Fleet The history of United States Marines on U.S. naval vessels begins 10 November 1775, the date the Continental Marines were established by a resolution of the Continental Congress - commencing a long, close association of marines and sailors. The Marine Detachment's KMAR DETJ primary function aboard AMERICA and all Navy ships is security. Aboard the large carriers, nuclear weapons security is the main concern. ln addition, the maritime Marine is responsible for guard- ing the ship's brig, serves as an orderly for the Commanding and Executive Of- ficer of the ship, a backup force to the ship's Master-At-Arms, a specially trained color guard and member of the silent drill team and, of course, a fighting man in the landing force. Led by Commanding Officer, Captain P.E. Prince and Executive Officer, Cap- tain S.H. Brighton, the 67 men of MAR- LMA., , -Q...-Nm ' "nf-1 DET comprise a highly qualified and elite group. Besides possessing all the qualities of their shore-based counterparts, the sea-going Marine is also a competent seaman. Before embarking on their nor- mal two-year tour of sea duty, they attend a special four-week sea-school in San Di- ego, California, learning basic seaman- ship, shipboard nomenclature, damage control and fire fighting techniques. Although the Navy has only 35 ships with Marine Detachments tthis figure re- presents about one percent of the total manpower of the corpsl the Marine Corps emblem signifies the Marine is, first and foremost, a maritime soldier who wages war on and from the sea. As some old-timers contend, "You aren't a real Marine until you have served on a ship's detachment." .. -'ff' v JN' '-'BB . - -fb 7 A, f r MQW' " 7 f JM! fdbhfff 1+ I-.1--... .. V ,.J.s-- '-....q-f - ..,,.--V5-1,,,:,a.0 ..,, Q -,- '32, - .i j'- 5 1" .1- f' HB3 :..:- '... .. While the role of the seagoing Marine may appear largely ceremonial, their major committment is still the security ofthe ship 1 A,-'Q' -- "QI ..1:--""":I'g- 1-.H-"'. gf --Yur: :Hx-,s' ' rf"-,.-yr f -- ,-Wf ' I - . ' H-.- - . " 3 1 L 7' ,, - - V5-..ffgf'.'fg,-"i'1"f :1'.:5Ei'g'f.5' 'I Af,-6:5 , x - -' " 4 1 ' - .-' :.- :. - r-L1-.5 .4 r 1 1 .J ...fjif-' 11355 ,-.TEWPQQQ-+2?aiiEQ2 i MARDET lCon'U Physical fitness and flawless appearance remain the order ofthe day. pp-ww--., M'.,,, ,,,,., "" 1 N - -J Y l i4U5ivfff' 1' 1 itil! Despite the atmosphere of "spit and polish," there is always the time for a quick game of Cards, a run to the "geolunk" or a letter home. ,Q . . ' ' Y J " 1. " - '--,'.'-'.'gT' . -' ff---T4 X 'I f...1' -., "jf, -'g U 2.1. 1" wifi' f,:'-2 fr' 'A-IQ,f.I.'gJ. E1 'x W .-',5T7'f?i3'5.f5'i"f:j1-. yggv -.QV A 1 v-,,-, ,, ' ' ' ' ' " " ' ' ' " " ' 'Tw' ' ' "Y "W" ""' "1 -'5'E"" ?-26' -1' s 'fifi iii 64:73 -I ff" 7356- in ' WV' 'W " V" iii iii it Photos by R. Wright get I SEXTANTS A THE SINGLE MA Admittedly, there was a certain nostal- gia to the days when a navigator's sole means of guiding a ship safely through the seas was his sextant and the starlit sky. Still, the bridge of an aircraft carrier remains a supreme challenge with the advent of sophisticated electronic machinery. The new navigator must be more accu- rate than his forebears. He must be a draftsman, a button pusher, and a data technician of sorts, capable of tireless vig- ilance. Because he is surrounded by computers, he must readily gather, as- similate and interrelate the data that they record. AMERICA relies on Satellite Navigation System, OMEGA, LORAN tlong rangel, piloting tvisual navigationl and uses ce- lestial navigation as a tertiary backup sys- tem. The ship's bridge is a highly complex nerve center and a continual scene of ac- tivity aboard an aircraft carrier. The satellite navigation system is essen- tially a computer which determines the exact position of the ship and is used as its primary navigation system. A gyrocompass yields the true and rela- tive bearing of the ship's position in rela- - .....- .....-v. .,. ........ ,A hFLom visual observation and radar bearings relayed from l 9 Ombat lnf0fm8lIOf1 lrighth the Navigator can determine whether or not the ship is on course. 64 lflflr M55 j X :ft tion to the horizon. The helmsman standing behind the helm guides the ship with hairline accu- racy and the adjacent lee helm translates any projected changes in ship's speeds to the engineering department, where the engine speed is adjusted. The deck department supplies helmsmen and lookouts, while the opera- tions department contributes specialists to aid in interpreting the computer findings. On a normal, seagoing day, boatswains'- mates from the deck department serve as helmsmen, but in evolutions requiring ex- treme precision, such as special sea and Radar or visual bearings and ranges, once plotted on 3 - ' on harbor chart, indicate the need for the ship to remain its present heading or make adjustments. W anchor detail, the navigation department supplies a quartermaster at the helm. Aside from this technical skill, possibly the most important job the quartermaster performs is to keep the ship's logbooks accurate and up to date. At times, he also assists the officer of the deck in determin- ing new courses and in identifying impor- tant navigational landmarks. Behind the Captain's chair, an opera- tions specialist plots all of the ship's con- tacts on a vertical plotter, one of the few mechanical "machines" on the bridge. The junior officer of deck and the surface watch officer from Combat Information Center, work collaterally on this task and make necessary updates to the plotter. Unidentified contacts are recorded as 'IN , "skunks" and the first of the day is called "alpha." The assistant A navigator usually plans the ship's course with the aid of naviga- tional charts, corrections are made by the Captain, prior to the onset of a change. While at sea, the assistant navigator ensures readings of the ship's positions are taken hourly. Another essential arm of the main bridge is the signal bridge one deck above. "Big eyes" thigh-powered binocu- larsl aid the lookout in identifying enemy and friendly contacts while at sea, and signal flashes answer them. The lookout, relying on the raw resource of human eyesight, keeps constant communications f f, 'A X - V ' y Lf fi , 54-f, A L, , ,,, i with the vertical plotter below, who will correlate his board for the identity of con- tacts. , 4 The navigation system is assured smooth and continual operations because men and machines perform overlapping duties, serving ultimately as safeguards for one another, in the event that any source is put out of operation. - To achieve a high degree of accuracy AMERICA makes full use of the 28 men assigned to the navigation rating. From the seaman standing watch in the aft' steering room, to the office in charge on the bridge, all 28 play a vital role in keep- ing the ship on its true course. ,E is.. K4 , 53 Q - The bridge is full during the sea and anchor detail as inputs from a The end products ofthe Navigation Department'sjob are correct courses myriad sources are compared and utilized. and speeds for the helmsman and lee helmsman tabove rightl and confi- dent decisions for the Officer of the Deck and his assistants. 65 ff'f.7'! !IFl'f 1 if-. :.1:1.':.-Lmgig -LQggflEf7'?lf'.s'31:25'f" 3 22-1T3i'5f55'Z.?5f-'Sail-l flwi 2 ' . 1, " .. " f 31'i - " "auf--fa .-Ja.:-'..11-L.f4-ties:-:2'i2 iid ., -4.1- g-152' 5. ' . 1-,514-,,gQ::'.,-:z 1pgglf,-iT'.'.1'5i'QR'.':4Qg1j ' 'fffguggvlgg - i-.L --,sxI.z....- -it-..a:.1.r--11--L----1----- lv' .Pal Each incoming COD tCarrier Onboard Deliveryl brings with it the possibility of mail BRAV QR THE QRKI G P RTY! I would like to tell you this story before I'm eaten. l've gone through many changes recently, oh by the way, l'm a box of cookies and I was asked by the cruisebook staff to explain to you how l got here to the AMERICA. My fate is similar to that of anybody on board - I was sent here. But, my travels and arrival here was quite unlike that which any homo sapien would experi- ence. I was mailed here. Yes, good ol' U.S. Mail, Uncle Sam brought me to my present location. I know that a lot of you guys wish that you could have been mailed home right during mid-cruise, am I not correct? It all started back home when Mommy got that brain storm of sending her smil- ing sailor son who is somewhere sailing on the seven seas a box of chocolate chip cookies. Anyway, after I was brought into this world with the help of Doctor Baking Yeast and the Pillsbury dough boy, love- able Mom pampered me and then packed me in a plain brown box to be left in the unknown and fateful hands of the U.S. Government and U.S. Mail. -bf jr -1 ,AV X I ejgf , 5 ,., , 2 -, ann The job of sorting, cancelling and delivering mail for nearly five thousand men falls on the shoulders of fewer than a dozen men, So once the 'friendly neighborhood postman' had me I was on my way: only one problem - I wish that Mom had put windows on the box I was ing I couldn't see anything. My trip to FPO NY at 90 Church Street in Downtown Manhattan was quiet and uneventful, but once I. was there, things started happening. I was now in a total military environment with new friends. One box of brownies at FPO I'll never forget. His zip code was wrong. Poor guy, by the time he gets to his correct destination he'll be a box of mold, poor old fella. There were a lot of good packages to make as aquaintances there in New York. If Mom had only sent me first class like all those neat letters. I would have arrived to CV 66 much faster. Letters, for your in- formation, make interesting friends. They are sometimes so one-sided like those 'Dear john' letters that they are fun to lis- ten to. All they ever say is,"I'm sorry john, but I'm afraid we can never see each other again." Back to my journey: myself and several other packages were bundled up together in an orange sack and taken to john E. Kennedy International Airport in jamaica, Queens New York. Here we were sched- uled to fly on a commercial flight to Roma, Italia. l've never been to Europe let alone being outside of Mom's kitchen '-.xref --W-- ...,,W but the thrill of being a traveler was en- chanting. In simile, my boot camp was over and I was going out to sea. The flight over the Atlantic was pleasant but a wee bit chilly for me as we travelled in a lower com- partment on the jet. On the way over I talked with a package of books and a jig saw puzzle both sent by someone's aunt in Connecticut. The jig saw puzzle didn't have much to say as he didn't feel all that well or to- gether, however, the books were great conversationalists. Rome International Airport was hot and very calm in comparison to its American counterpart. The Italians are very interest- ing people. Seems as if the books were very well informed about Italy being that they were printed as travel books about Southern Europe which would help the intelligent sailor. Our transit to Naples was swift, via motor truck. Strange thing but some Ital- ian roads are called vias. just an interest- ing fact I picked up from the books. I overheard one of the postal clerks that handled my sack say we were lucky. One of the planes from the USS AMERICA was there at the air field when we arrived. They had enough room for us and some green mail bags. The green bags held all the personal mail and letters. Rumor has it that the delays in getting to the aircraft carrier occur in waiting for a flight that can handle us. Some time delays last sev- eral days depending on where the ship is. Ah ha, home at last. The flight by Miss America was rather fast and before I ever realized it I was on board an aircraft car- rier. I was a visitor and for a visitor it's a real thrill to even be on an aircraft carrier. Most guys on board don't think it's much fun. It's only as much fun as you make it. I met some really nice people when I arrived. PC3 Rivera greeted me on the flight deck then someone from the Bravo working party brought me to the post of- fice. There I met PCI Hall and several other postal clerks. The phone rang and PCI Hall answered. He told the person, "You want to know when mail call will be, well if people would be patient and not call, mail call would be a lot SOODGY. Thank you for calling." You know, he's got a point there. Here I am now, right before you. I got here as soon as I could. I'm ready to be eaten. I hope I'm good. 'Gooble. . .gulpl 67 The men ho make AMERICA move The Engineering Department is com- prised of more than 600 men, whose daily efforts contribute to every function of the ship. Almost half of the six-hundred men of the Engineering Department work down in the "holes", as the machinery spaces are nicknamed. There, in the heat and noise, M and B Division operate, maintain and repair the boilers, main en- gines, generators, distilling plants, pumps, valves and other equipment. M Divison's main engines are efficient high-speed steam turbines, which can produce 70,000 horsepower in the ahead direction and the resultant horsepower can move the ship at speeds well above 30 knots. M Division and E division operate the ship's six turbo-generators, each capable of producing 2,500 kilowatts of electrical power or enough to light more than 25,000 average light bulbs. In addition, B Division maintains the steam systems associated with the catapults, while A, E and R Divisions handle responsibilities from stem to stern. A Division is well known for its versa- tility. The A-1 shop attends to the opera- tion of all hydraulic machinery including the anchor windlasses, aircraft elevators, boat and aircraft crane and steering gear. A-1 fixes the underway replenishment winches, galley and scullery equipment, laundry machines, ship's service high pressure air compressors, all ship's ser- vice compressed air distribution and eleven electric fire pumps. The A-5 shop is responsible for some equipment near and dear to everyone: air conditioning plants provide chilled water for environmental and electronics equipment cooling. A-5 repairs every- thing on the ship that uses FREON re- frigerant, including "reefer" plants for cold storerooms, water coolers, ice machines, galley refrigerators and mess deck salad bars. The coldest spots on the ship, though, belong to the A-6 shop, who operates f"rf1'i.141-'i'?3ii?--QTT' ' TT' "TTT 76' fF'?71Zffflf??"Qff7-FJ' ""55r 1 ...S-I-V 2 Ei ,-YZJ: lt ff' page 3. Above: MMFA Bullock mans throttles in No. 2 Main Machinery Room, Below: Hull Technicians weld a metal cart using the Tungsten lnert Gas process. Right: EM2 Clark replaces windings in an electric motor. and maintains the two oxygen-nitrogen plants which produce liquid oxygen and nitrogen. These liquids are stored in insu- lated tanks at temperatures of 200 de- grees below zero. Liquid and gaseous oxygen and nitrogen are issued to many different departments for a variety of uses. Another shop whose activities are of direct interest to the entire crew is A-7, the boat shop, responsible for overhaul and maintenance on the diesel engines of the ship's boats. Boat engines are small fry compared to the giant V-16's of the emergency diesel generators. Last, but not least of A division's re- sponsibilities is the machine shop which makes and provides finished machine parts. A lesser known service they render is the custom engraving of plaques, placards and souvenirs for official use. E Division is responsible for electrical gear of almost every description. The lC shop of E Division repairs and maintains all of the various internal communications systems: sound- powered phone circuits, headsets and handsets, the three digit telephones sys- Qfa :QT -M 'l""A""4 gate. 'ia f f W .J tems, the general announcing system, flight deck and hangar deck announcing systems and the station to station MC units. 69 Engineering tcon'tl K Right: FA Sylvester inspects burners in 2A boiler. Below left: MM2 Gable replaces the bear- ings of a lube oil pump. Below right: FA Shampoo leaves a boiler steam drum after a dirty -shift Inside "punching tubes." I IC men are also responsible for the ship's gyrocompass, repeaters and virtu- ally all indicating and alarm systems throughout the ship. The Distribution Work Center operates the power switchboards for each generator, and maintains all electrical gear such as switches, controller, generators, motors, bus ties and circuit breakers. They don't get much variety, but are kept busy in air-plants, machinery and pump rooms. The Catapult and Elevator shop repairs and maintains essentially the same kind of equipment as Distribution, but all of their gear is associated primarily with the aircraft and weapons elevators. Their job is to supply 450 volt power to hangar and flight deck outlets for use in aircraft maintenance and start-up. The Power shop is responsible for the electrical repair and maintenance of the steering gear, anchor windlass, underway replenishment winches, gallies, sculleries and incinerators and operate the electri- cal motor rewind shop. Although electric 70 C, -15, as ,fr ft" I I ' 24 ' ,i w l Q? Z 1' . by , , L fl motors are reliable and relatively uncom- plicated devices, there are a lot of them aboard AMERICA and sometimes they burn up. When that happens, the motor is delivered to the rewind shop where the old windings are pipped out and new ones installed. The Flight Deck lighting shop main- tains the controls, power supplies and circuits for the runway lights, deck-edge lights and flood lights for the flight deck and nearby navigation system. The Main Lighting shop takes care of the ordinary lighting systems and the installation of and repair of regular lighting throughout the ship. They contribute to the availabil- ity of our liberty boats recharging the boat batteries and servicing the electrical systems. E Division's smallest shop is one of the most visible: the Movie Booth, responsi- ble for issuing all motion pictures in stock and when the opportunity arises for showing movies on the hangar bay. In the Engineering Department, R stands for Repair Division. Aboard a ship 'lg 1 ll? of steel, much repair means metal work, the job of the shipfitter shop. They per- form a wide variety of repair and fabrica- tion tasks, such as machinery founda- tions, chairs or light fixtures. If it can be made by cutting, bending, welding, saw- ing, grinding, drilling or shearing, the shipfitters will do it. Pipe welding is something of an art, and the Pipe shop handles this detail aboard AMERICA. Miles of piping and plumbing require constant' maintenance and no one enjoys the unpleasant chore of unplugging plumbing. The Carpenter shop doctors boat hulls as required. When the boats are all in working order, the "woodchucks" find time to fashion plaques and picture frames. The CO2-Lightwater shop maintains fixed fire-fighting systems on the ship in- cluding carbon dioxide flooding systemS for store rooms, the hangar and flight deck sprinkler systems and smaller AFFF stations for machinery spaces. They also are responsible for maintenance and re- ,,,v,,,..i ff Eg, Q ga' AH-h- '- pair of locker stored oxygen breathing apparatus units throughout the ship The Damage Control shop assists them in the latter task also providing technical advice and parts for Damage Control equipment such as gas masks, radiation detectors tdosimetersl and fire hose ap- paratus. In addition to the daily routines of each shop, approximately half of R Division personnel are assigned responsibilities which provide a special service to the crew, they are the Nucleus Fire Party, recognized by white jerseys emblazoned with a "fire triangle". Fortunately, they are not called upon often, but when the fire bells ring, they quickly demonstrate a thorough understanding of fire-fighting. 'Ve I an - at-...,, 1 A .. xt, md ZA- -Q 'Q I-T' - - K. N: , Q N l . 2115- K A, ... vi AX sc .- A Bombs and Ordinance demand . . . g ' . . d.1. ,r ' , . . - . . ' , l l ni at . L Z"-xi' " 'll' t A High Caliber Crew i ,",,i'i:',JjiLiM.' V X - as i Lk: .:.:...g. sq 5 .. .-3, , The ordinance story begins when an ammuni- tion ship pulls alongside AMERICA. Two, four or six 500-pound general purpose bombs can be highlined across at one time or the bombs can be brought aboard by helicopter. Inside the hangar bay, where bombs will even- tually transit to magazines for storage, Ordinance personnel take control. In the magazine, bombs could conceivably remain for six months with se- eing action, or the bomb may be called for duty the following day. When it comes time to "break the bomb out," it is done by electric fork lift. A bomb is designed to withstand high temperatures under crowded conditions, as must their human custodians. Sev- eral pallets can be hoisted onto the fork lift at one time. At this point, they are transferred with ten- der loving care to portable skids, two at a time. A lot of muscle and a steady helmsman on the skid now guide the projectiles into their desig- nated elevator shafts, where they rist on "flat- beds," awaiting the journey to the assembly room. The elevator shafts in no way limit the number of bombs that can be escorted to the most critical phase of their odyssey, the assembly room. From the elevator, the bombs are hoisted di- rectly onto a table which can accomodate up to six at one time. Ideally, one bomb can be assem- ble every minute, a process which includes ad- ding pairs of fins, a fuse and a booster. - Then it's back to the elevator again, to proceed to the "bomb staging" area on the flight deck level where the bombs will await their launch. With their change in altitude comes a change in management. The men who handle them still wear the familiar Red Shirts, but they are desig- nated as part of the air wing. , M -rs X l 1 llb N Removed from racks, ordinance is prepared for assembly. z..,....-K. f"f "Q Almost completely assembled, bombs move on skids up elevators and ei- ther to a specific plane or the "bomb farm" on the starboard side of the "island" v,--vw! ,mai .1-ff-r.-af -Hr ' l--N-l-!'-"' ' i l Once on the flight deck, the bombs enter their final phase before becoming airborne. Four five squadron ordinancemen combine efforts to make them ready for flight. The bombs must first be "humped up" or loaded onto the aircraft manually and then fused, so they are ready to be activated. Below, the cycle continues, a never-ending process. Strength, coordination, a cool head and knowing that all hands are responsible for the success of each launch. Seven or eight cycles of 120 individual bomb units makes for a high-caliber day of launches at sea. -v l '4 1 its Squadron personnel make pre-flight adjustments on mounted ordinance 57 ' ' -,-H., ' "'4,.,,,' gif' In ' '- America's Surface Missile System Group, comprised of the Gunner's Mates of GM Division and the Fire Control Technicians of Fox Division, provide the ship with a quick reaction capability against any type of enemy weapons in even the most severe weather conditions. The many long hours of maintenace and daily systems testing necessary to maintain operational systems was demonstrated during the successful missile firing exercises conducted during May, july and September. The Gunner's Mates load, store and prepare the Terrier Missiles for firing. They maintain the complex electro-hydraulic Guided Missile Launching System and Handling Systems and work in conjuction with the Fire Control Technicians in testing the entire Weapons System. In addition to just "loading the rail" the Gunner's Mates verify that the missile and launcher orders generated by the fire control computer reach the launcher and the missile during the performance of systems tests by using a Terrier Missile simulator. The members of Fox Division are responsible for the operation and maintenance of the . . -.--'Y " " - . . . .. .- - J Y "'li'1'g,'1,,Q'13 ' ' ANISPS-48A Search Radar, the three ANXSPG-55B Fire Control Radar Sets, the Mark 119 Fire Control Computers, and the Weapons Direction Equipment in CIC. The task begins with the location of the enemy by the Weapons and Combat Defense Systems trackers, then the lock-on and tracking by the Fire Control Radars and computation of a firing solution by the computers, and finally the evaluation of the firing solution and actual firing from the Weapons module of CIC. The Terrier Standard Missileis a one ton, two-stage missile which leaves the rail in less than a second after firing. It achieves speeds in excess of the speed of sound in the first thirteen feet of flight. The missile must exceed four tons of thrust just to override the restraining latches on the launcher. It flys a ballistic trajectory until the booster burns out after about four seconds and the missile begins the guided portion of the flight to target intercept. The long hours of the Surface Missile System Group in maintaining the Terrier Missile System provide America with another "All Weather lnterceptor" in her arsenal. l - .1?'f'.: A Terrier missile is launched amid a cloud of smoke from AMERICAS starboard battenx. Safety Department Humor sparks safet Program on Laughter is the best medicineg espe- cially if it's you laughing, and the other guy nursing his injury . . . and his wounded ego. This "other guy" approach is exactly what Commander S.P. Dunlap capitalizes on when composing the daily Safety Shirt Specials. These popular one-page publications print recent Medical Department admis- sion reports which include the patient's statement fthe patient may be doctored, but never his statementl, rank, depart- ment, and type of injury. This information is followed by a caustic comment from the unsympathetic, piercing pen of Commander Dunlap or another Safety Team member concerning the patient's intelligence quotient, and sometimes a suggestion on how he could have easily avoided his plight by using a little com- mon sense. A couple of examples are: PROBLEM: Patient states, "I was leaving the Ship's Store when someone kicked me in the head." Ilaceration to the headl COMMENT: Next time pay your bill. PROBLEM: Patient states, "I was running and fell off my platform shoes." tsevere sprain to anklel COMMENT: Darling, while you may look simply ravishing in high heels, I think that a plain, open-toed sandal is the "real you." These pithy but poignant comments are usually flanked by the equally penetrating cartoons sketched by SN William Seibert, depicting in exaggerated terms the pa- tient's sad predicament. A sailor nearly amputating his finger while opening a can of pineapples may find himself cari- catured in the following day's Special clothed in Hawaiian attire while holding an over-size pineapple from his nearly severed finger. Another sailor may be portrayed sheepishly holding a swollen thumb after "tying one on" in a liberty port. One patient stated, "I was connect- ing a thermal bulb when I brushed a piece of flux into my eye." Seibert drew an accompanying picture of a sailor with bandaged eyes marked "HIS" and "HERS" to supplement the written re- mark that the same patient did the same thing to his other eye a few hours later, "perhaps wanting a matched pair." Commander Dunlap credits the art as the vital "attention grabber" for the Spe- cial. Together, administered in just the right dosage, they normally force most patients to hide their faces in shame under the hospital sheets. So much so that, when a Commander tno one is sparedl spilled scalding soup on his hand, resulting in first degree burns, he hesi- tated going to Medical because he feared it would be publicized in the Safety Shirt Special. It was, with the equally scalding comment: "Great Goldilocks! That's not such a swell way to see if the soup is warm. Next time try some of whatever Baby Bear is having." The purpose of the Special of course, is not to intimidate its readers, nor to keep them from seeking medical help. The primary purpose of the Safety Shirt Spe- cial is to prevent accidents by helping the reader become more aware of potential hazards. To accomplish this goal, read- ers' suggestions on safety improvements are also printed, as well as safety tips and accident statistics and trends. "Attaboys" are also given to shipmates who have demonstrated safety awareness by thwart- ing a potential accident situation. In explaining the Special's format, Commander Dunlap believes that using a serious "thou shalt not" approach tends to be a "total turn-off" to the reader. "The idea is to make the reader laugh at the other guy's dumb mistakes, while vowing to himself that he'll never be caught in such an embarrassing situa- tion," he stresses. "This way, he suddenly becomes safety-conscious, all the while believing that he alone is responsible for this change in attitude." But Commander Dunlap's belief unfor- tunately has to compete with two other very popular philosophies prevalent in American society. One is the belief that if anything bad happens, it will happen to the "other guy". And the other is the American trait of risk-taking. "This machismo thing is very evident in our culture, and is directly responsible for a lot of our accidents," he laments. But the two main reasons for most ac- cidents on the AMERICA are inattention and lack of supervision, according to Dunlap. And young, inexperienced non- rated personnel are most vulnerable to such accidents. The Safety Special is pro- duced primarily with this audience in mind. "Very seldom do you see a petty officer injured because of an accident," Dunlap states. "The reason for this is that your average petty officer is usually older, more mature and experienced, and doesn't do as much manual labor as your non-rate," he explains. The Ships Safety Team itself is com- posed of experienced senior petty officers who know their rate, as well as their ship. "We have five experienced petty officers who have the necessary background, and most important, know their rates," he points out. The five meng two ABH's, one AO, one EM, and one BM are not merely armchair philosophers and wits shut in their ivory tower. On the contrary, they are very "visible and responsive" onboard the AMERICA, two key traits for any Safety Team member. They are most visible on the flight deck since that is where the greatest potential for a major mishap exists. While three men work full time there observing flight deck operations, the others are busy checking refueling and replenishment stations, as well as galleys, main and auxiliary machinery rooms, all sponson areas and OBA lock- ers. They also inspect all ship's boats immediately prior to hitting port. While in port they troubleshoot all fire stations AMERICA and storerooms for hazardous material. All bunk lighting is given a "thorough semi-annual inspection" and OBA lock- ers, as well as all ladders and hatchways are checked monthly. "But even though troubleshooting the machinery is an important aspect of our daily routine, we're people, not machinery-orientated," Dunlap stresses. "We're proud of our safety record since AMERICA has not had any recent major mishaps, but we can never really be sure if we're effective or not. There's really no objective way to view or grade our suc- cess," he says, shaking his head. "But we can sure tell if we're not," he sighs. ci- u guf' 1.g.., gm Ag.. . at-...af-.-.-.uaef.-gg,-3112531L-ggafmiara' ai . The Ships Safety Team must be doing something right. The Chief of Naval Op- erations recently announced that the USS AMERICA has been selected the winner of the Admiral Flatley Memorial Safety Award for fiscal year 1976. The annual award, sponsored by Rockwell Interna- tional, Columbus Aircraft Division, is separated into three categories with the AMERICA taking Type I tfor carriers with large decksi. The safety award is presented for a superior performance in aviation safety, and the Type I category is "especially prestigious" according to Dunlap since more ships fall into this category. . ' 1 at Commander M.R. Edwards, who re- lieved Commander Dunlap as Ships Safety Officer in September, hopes to continue AMERICA's safety trends, with a new emphasis on industrial safety while in the yards. Commander Edwards be- lieves that prevention is the real goal of a strong safety program. "Reporting, inves- tigation follow-ups, etc. are all part of the Safety Team's daily routine," Edward says. "But trend evaluation, personnel habit correction and especially accident prevention are the real life and limb sav- ers," he' stresses. Commander Edwards adds that we can count on continued publication of the Safety Shirt Special. xklf I I Q X Q I ,im- i, KAN A fx! 77 sq: we QSM mmmwst sw. X. K Q- is X .V . .,M-Mmm i ct. il' ' --. , A F, X Y E 'Of Qc. mi X 2 A .. . J 'ff 1 -V v E 1,-.4??45'- Operations X CDS TUT H1152 ESSENTI L MEN BEHI D THE Balloons, radar, televisions, secret codes, photographs and many valuable people compose the Operations Depart- ment on board AMERICA. Operations, means just that, a department that is in- volved in nearly every important phase of shipboard life and its continued opera- tion. The OPS Department is composed of five smaller and more specialized divi- sions. OC, which is the division in charge of CATCC tCarrier Air Traffic Control SCENES Centerl, is responsible for the safety of all aircraft from the time plane is launched until its recovery. Air Controlmen work in CATCC by manning radar scopes and maneuvering pilots in for a safe touchdown during night operations and reduced visibility. They are the behind- the-scenes people who have a very quiet importance on an aircraft carrier. OE, the electronics division, controls maintenance of electronic, computer, and navigational equipment. Much of the ship's operation depends on the capabil- ity of its electronic equipment. From OE division, several men are assigned to op- eration and maintenance of the ship's en- tertainment systems, VVAMR RADIO and VVAMR TV. OP is a very popular division. Everyone enjoys have his picture taken, including the many and assorted Russian vessels which are photographed by OP and diagnosed by the intelligence division, OZ. Numerous pictures of Soviet ships must be identified and analyzed. Unlike "OZ" in a fairytale fantasy, the Soviet ,fs fi r 5+-S fit 3" fW',4x Righ lwputs from weather balloons wind speed indicators satellite photographs and visible trends all go into making an accurate xx eather forecast by the weather guessers in OA division , . -4, 1 .. X . , ' ,v 1 if ' I 7 1 I C I' 4 I , V ' '-.f i- + . ll Mg- ' L . nf. 5 'P 1 ' ' ' .f ' ' 3 E ' N A - Y' " -A ' if -21 AL K' ' 78 f ti r . ' ' , f E . . if H ' ' ' ' 1 f , I" ' ' 4" A . - .- ,-Y. .,-..., .. . -W .. s -- . -..- - - , Y .., . Y . Q- . -, -...:,-,-, -,:--- A - A -:ni - - ---1, -. s - -- M-I -- 1 .---- Q- - . -vfdk-..:.n-.-.1nLn.w ru.-...K1-'-.--shaun-1-f--.-...1.-'.x.rv.....,.... .:..- ,',L.4,,.-.q,...,5 ..-.:,1.f..,:. ,Q ' jj . , .,-, -ni , . . . . . :.:...-.-,- -.::.- -.55.,zyzqzp:mrzzuugzgzgigitlggucruzai:xznrv-ctzr''Q :'a-4 .-nr : . -ru .' - ..': - - 1.3.1. ' 35.353 344.-i,-:-gg-'Ar-'1 5.1,---'.gg:g::9:.:.:.:.. - -wtf----'53-'f Y When the call goes for "Away the sighting team," personnel from OZ llflfelligemel and Ol? IPhotographicJ rush topside in an effort to identify and analyse foreign merchant and warships. threat is very visible and real. OZ contains the ship's Intelligence Specialists who compile information and data that predicts the naval and military balance in the Mediterranean. The mission of OS Division is dealing with Secret and Top Secret information. Communications Technicians decipher coded message traffic that passes through OS, on which security depends. One division that does not delve into the secret is OA, affectionately known as the "weather guessers". These men are AMERICA's weathermen. Twice a day, OA sends up a weather balloon equipped with a transmitter which relays 'meteror- logical data to the ship regarding atmos- pheric conditions at all flying altitudes. The balloon ascends to a height of 70,000 feet in a mere hour-and-a-half while it transmits information on temper- ature and humidity changes at any al- titude along the way. On its travel, the balloon expands from five to twenty-five feet in diameter, due to the upward de- crease of atmosphere pressure. The transmitter itself is never recovered and data received from it takes three hours to compile. ' fs-.g .-9 EQ gg '75 'aft "THE EYES AND EARS SEE ALL" Whate'er in her Horizon doth appear, She is one Orb of Sense, all Eye, all aery Ear. - Henry More The Combat Defense Systems KCDSI Department, the "eyes and ears of the USS AMERICA, has just ended a one-year trial period, passing the test with flying colors. Immediately following AMERI- CA's yard period on September I, CDS separated from its parent Operations De- partment to form its own department. The separation makes the USS AMERICA the first ship to have its own CDS Depart- ment. I .- 79 Z r. 4 j A ..--, - 5 , .,,, . ,,,., , .. . -f --. A4,vv'5I?'---5-,,,,,,-a -4-..-.ar--2n'.ug's-'4:-'9.-,:-,'.- C-.---:s...v rv,-.- 41 -z f -b4..,17'Y:'..f: 'E-1-'F",53 " ' 1-V: if-Er -1-'fifa 3?:f??Y2fLf:.f?.- 13" "5"-Sf- 15.12 Right: negatives from photo-reconnaissance missions are analysed by D' ' ' . B low: Photo raphers from OP division prepare i0 C0Vef 3 ,, lvljlglf ani a techniciin in OE division di-HSVIOSSS the PfC2IlZliz'25Tl2'!'lSlg5 A Reasons for this split were many, in- The CDS Department intercepts any- C-1, along with CIC, manage the air con- cluding: the idea that one department thing emitted electronically On the Sur- trol and also handles surface radar and I should have sole control of all the ship's face, sub-surface, or air before reaching air tracking while C-3 Division Peflolms defense and information systems, co- us. Its primary responsibility is to handle electronic warfare. ordination problems would be minimized all search-type radar, control-aircraft and Whether charting the course ofa storm with the elimination of all other control air surface tracking. AMERICA is one of front or an enemy ship, the men of Oper- elements, and the move would re-define the few carriers to have sonar capability, ations and Combat Defense SY5tem5 are the capabilities of the USS AMERICA early in the cruise C-2 Division tracked constantly attuned to a sometimespeace- since her conversion from a CVA to CV, and kept under the water a Soviet sub for ful, but always potentialli' hostile ellvl' In short, the move was an excellent almost 40 hours. C-2 is one of three divi- ronment, forming the vanguard of pllvl' example of the more specialized, modern sions which makes up CDS Department. leged information. U.S NAVY. I Ei 80 N ll. 4.--zur,'L:1:e-c'zz-'mugs-15.5515--ummuimmf - ,mm , . ,, f.,f,, , , UECI :VH -. uaslag 1 C5 ru E. ru :x HJ Gerwien ,- uns.. .N-A V f .f R" ' -111 , XN....u.m.-.., ,,,x.f,X A , , Port and TS 'N' "3 'fl-f..' .r,-vf' 'f" ".1"f"' -- "'F-2 'fhfzx--.ff iii ",g,.,,1'z'?ggKlQ 5'-,-yj- I ff, 81 mu . fi' .. ' W X , 4 May 1976 Transit the Strait of Gibraltar Civilizations rose and fellg pirating fflgates ran ralnparx in her vvatersg frail wooden ships left her protection els search of new landsg navies battledg merchant VZ55n quietly shuttled from shore to shore while she looke 23 Midafternoon, 4 May. AMERICA transitted thelStraithe Gibraltar, marking AMERICA's formal entrance into Mediterranean Sea. .t to Seldom is an American warship given the Opportunlllors View the magnificent rock in daylight. Hundreds of sjl ay svvarmed the flight deck to catch a brief glimpse an p homage to this looming figure. ' The Rock remains - a landmark for all marinefS- vvdfkfmu vm- A ' fbqlvfi 'Cnr' -nv,-W ,.-, mn- . g L i H X ' gc l ' ' Y y 5 , J 'H N N . , 5 - if .1 HW ...., . Q. , wha, 1.6 E Q .K Q?L-?W" "3 95' - A1 ,X 1 'P igiufa , ,JJ- avg 25 April 1976 Rota, Spain "Welcome to the Med" The Spanish town of Rota, one of many gateways to southern Spain, was essentially a little bit of Norfolk all over again - with sev- eral important exceptions. For the men who had duty during our short visit, Rota remains just a name, but for most AMERlCAmen, Rota was a town of restaurants and tourist beaches, featuring a public mar- ketplace, lovely senoritas, native wines and brandies. It was in Rota that many of us educated our tastebuds by eating squid for the first time. AMERICA's "inchop" took place in Rota. Of- ficers and representatives from USS INDEPEN- DENCE met and swapped advice and informa- tion as AMERICA prepared to assume "lNDY's" duties. Vice Admiral TURNER, Commander of the Sixth Fleet, met the ship and briefed the crew on the political situation in the Med and had private discussions with AMERICA's Captain MCCORMICK and Rear Admiral LINDER. WY l nwmdfaalaamafei i f ' .A ein li 1 11121 UHKXK' 54:01:03 1 NS, Qmmeiw? . ' 4 YU H 3 gvf 11.- bail , l Q n , Aa ,flu . ,. :fe A31 , A f f- i ,v f- , :f'1- S--. .1 ,. - VFW"-'4-F. - ,, , .3 f . 49 -'Yi'-'Lf ,N . .. ,ez , -fy, i'3',"-7 - ., fl' X X 9 fr 4 Photos by HJ Gerwlen 353, A if For 78 AMERICAmen, Rota liberty meant Travels on the g - ,- Road to orocco After the ship's ten-day Atlantic crossing, AMERICAmen were look- ing forward to setting foot on land. The opportunity for a tour to Morocco became a reality and 78 sailors eagerly accepted. The most memorable sight in the Spanish Moroccan city of Ceuta was that of thin, weatherbeaten men and women, coaxing stubborn burroes and wearing multi-colored rough clothing. Many sailors learned the hard way that these - "mountain people" do not care for "touristas" taking their pictures. . ,. fi" , TffTf.Tff.'Z., .,,,EE:i.lfE:E3::i?Z 'ipllliilffElQE'1'1if:!'l''Til':37E'i:fS25'ii3Lfi1'i5l i22Y5fK'?"'i i' "'4""' 1 lg . 911+ Ceuta, Spanish Morocco if S 3 KTA cm , nb 12.5 I X 1 Pa f 1 to f .' 5 JV' .. n. , .F 1 ,.,,w rm. In-,.,1A. - I pi ' --"f n , -5 Q ,,,...f.M..,,.,.,,,k I , rf , 3- . -q., 63' .4 . A ... ,. . , ,, . V1..,. , 3.-4 7 .. 2- -I,-WM , ..-, v. ,,,,, , ,,, - : ' F 'T' -V -7:1 v:-H f ","1'f-'ha .25-Y?-Cii FL" QE'-5'5" -' '- ' " 'W' -f-.J J . ' l f ' '. . .:: -, 'iw T'-Q'-r:"f"'1" ,,r1v' '-'-6 .49-21--., ,v -I' x A m.. - ' M ,-tv X, -f' ,z - ff.-.,:'.,.f..-,i ,-ff-I.-.-.'-: , ' Ihr 'EL' ' .if-E25 . 3 4 1 3- X za.vngj?i3w,LB 1,121 R S Arnold THAT RCJCK CQNCERT RHODES ig Xwi .3 X L ' .milf 5 5 L --'-"5'l'-q,i 1 """"', E' Fl ..-f. 'J' f-4sn4"""""v- tl., .-Q, Demonstrators lined the piers and landings ofthe ancient Greek port whose pillars marked where Colossus has once storgrl. 4 Crewmembers filled both hangar bays awaiting the commencement of liberty. "Rhodes is in store and will be in view tomorrow morning at this time. . ." - PAPPY BURNS. An understatement. AMERICA did indeed "view" Rhodes the next morning. Unfortunately, the distant shoreline with outlines of the famous windmills and wall surrounding the ancient city, remains the only memory of the island. Founded in 407 B.C., conquered and reconquered time and again throughout history, the resort city waited for yet another invasion: from friendly invad- ers on friendly premises - liberty. AMERlCA's liberty launches eagerly headed to- wards shore, receiving an unexpected shower of gifts upon arrival. Without hesitation, the launches re- turned to the ship, displaying the bounty of Greek hospitality. A student demonstration and an ample supply of rocks, erased our hopes of visiting this en- chanting land. The rest is history. . . W1 littered the Beach Guard boat. - ,A Q: wx ,, 75324 . zzgh'fZ,fl'Py2 Af M, ,V ,aa 89 Y . - v ' - 1 - . 1+ . -i 'Eli'-.1:fP'. , fi fvfrr-'rgif ,-3:,tJe"f.. 1.1-x-v-gvs-iff::-v ' '. - ,J .11 Rl-IQDES Continued -119 B' Ji 'ww ' QE RSSB: left to their own devices, crewmembers came up with Coolcouts, talent shows, wrestling and basketball games with USS MCCANDLESS. " "ix , , s .-,,.,,,-, 5 0 1 , . .. . . , S. i'1f'fi:4',:. 5 .-.-an '.-p5,'.A55.:,:l1: ' u 'L 'j ' 11,1 -Q ,U S A , 14-fuifiivififik-.1: 1 f r 1' 1, "V , , I, V117 ,V ,YW A Safety Shirt Special 'ZW- LJSS AME!-2uc3A cv EES QMS., 25 May 1976 k ll n " 0 'I A rom: p s Safety Offic al X To: Commanding Offlcer f 55C!'asnKLovf L.. , , I subj: "LIBERTY" E4-ll, ' N , fe' S ' N Q "7" " S " ! fl: ll Jglullui, -gi 7:.e': ' !25,m5SE!'.'a'S'.'frl"'rl:""'i'1:7 -4 of S' . ' , 2 .. QL . Inf. it I 5 I gg .... i ? lffggigs 4rfE.W!e'm p+j!74- f-QS'2'-f"1?'-g,ef,e'f 2 evg':-ff.:w7fS'Na!:g.e'?-Ifg?z1Zfm," -I ,,gg,3,J, " fi? 1.5 g,54,m9le-,. fr.. rfdyvfgtfi, g2L?+:,e- -wi'-See gi'!"y,S I 1 W I I' gl ' .1 4 If 'S ' ,S f :xi refs. I fxfld :Z S - Wg - Q 6'?if".e +4 471' 7 S I V , F: - L' e-'S-Wieff-szfs S e S S',S f.sf'n"-H 1 '.SJf35Q : Y ' faq"-rf Q. , gyyg5m,u1fufn' .. I f 5' V ,Q .1,3.I.i ,I, MEI- V b U A Tf- . V 1 ...f'x,,'- ..- My - 1 7 fx-. Q ff 4, J v----x-- ----x, .M--Mm..- ' -- -"-- --US.. ' 0 K ,Q S 4, 0- ..,f- X-M -X,,,,,.,,.,-..V X ,.,A -,, XX., , o ll, . . ,.. ' ' wil?---we -fe 34 X 0" P ,. ,1..Jx '-""X,..-. , l x Q ...de MX, I fffx,-X- L-"X, ,,S 0 N- A X1- fl x,!Y'iY,T .. , X V A 9, - X' 'X A' r Qfv ' 'I 'V in 2 bi gird- 'Q -u L "'4 1 j i7 M BEVARI ox F96 6 Mfg GREZKS BIANFG GIFKI' tfully X --' v 0 f ,Q ff S F X ' 1, A f M V Q fp ff 5, EQ. ' i, ' ,W' 1 aa-My 1.-. dk . 1 A! A A . I 5.4 A V .Ag ...Lnl-sp N.---mi --f'x. . If 1 42 ", S 3 ', , 0 S Q- f , . 1 X X' 1 , ' V : e e ,f S V 4 e 2 ff' gf fggyl M, ' J' fy - 4 ,,., ,-I 1 ! ff Cf? All f, Xff 'I V , ,I J ,W ,J fqi ,Tl Iv If . . N -o I AP .4 f f ,f w' f if , ,.,fe-.ffXx CDR USN ,ui . .A,,,,,,,, -Mk' , Y... --.-V V - - Taranto, ltal 2 - 5 june 3 - ll july . . . a foreign city with different ways .-4-.f lm f. if-', 4-4 . 'f E555-L li' 'T' Q-512513. I I . '... ! , ,ffl ljfig- JN -.x. i WF' Taranto is a small shipping town near the arch of Italy's "boot" For some, this was the first foreign liberty. True, the town did not offer the sea- weary sailor much in the way of night life and entertainment, but for many it provided the perfect spot to sit and relax at a sidewalk cafe with a cool drink. Time to reflect. A town of friendly people, inviting parks, a colorful mar- ketplace and beautiful women. Many new friends and memo- ries remain in Taranto. PZQL "The Bridge of No Return" LC. Callison f 5 fr cf, - .ri ' l . XX Li . HJ- Gefwief' Rr. Danielsen - - -- A, - Q A1::::.' v.:-l!::'2:Z":1ff3: av :tw -41 .............. 1' lout a frienoll face met you on every Corner ,M .,.,A N , f V QE: f 5 ', if--E, r 3251 , ,- 4 ." "fit ' r t',.""f'7" 4 -5 'i I4-4. 4 92, .Ev -1-if-:iz-5, r- 3 eg 41,-s ' ,A .T i-'?F??i2T' ' .. 'VjfLi!5ij+:.15i' . 1 ,ggi , . .f 'e4g,i'f1!f 1T?'::I" ,.- ',z1'v 1 - -' 'f 4: .lyfie ' - .,. ,W , .g ,Q ..'.' 'A" 9- - 'X IAA..-fn,-if' rv- Q .5H'f'fxf5" ff ?'5f?f'i1r+f:'Z1 1-gf:f14fE:.1-.zxli Q, . "1- fg igp -1' . i - Augm' -'? ',f3'ffQi'.1:li1 Photos by HJ. Gerwien VYHM - we I a tour to Alberobello . . . In the early hours of june third and fourth, three liberty boats shuttled ashore groups of AMERICAmen to buses bound for the popular Grottoes of Castellana and the neighboring city of Alberobello. Alberobello is one of several regions known for its "trulli," a Commonly-seen stone dwelling with a conical roof. . and the Grottoes of Castellana sqf-vggs.-15, 9.35 Q ,- - -f-M, ..: + xr. .' cwvi- 2 'lv- -Q- Ji.-Q.. mam -.. 0 in P ,ci 7' HT! , M, -wa Tw f, 1 J 1 TH . .- .sg fiit-gg-Yargg, wi -2. xfiieiff-1 ,igaf-uw W if ,1,,x-.Y-.-...,.-,Y Y , .. , 1 A ff' ' 'L , --' .5 ggi M 'time'-v" 4 A 4 1 -,f2.3'3'l--Rise lsr, f Q. , 5 ! s ,, ' ,, I. x X as ,A . . , . , , ,N , X N ' , i X i V , I X , --',.,f1,fQOQs.y-, Q- vi 1.1, s W .f-fL,,' ,,,-s sggsjc, 'X i 1 .-- v . " s, c . " "' fr A 6 , Q , ' , " ' XNRS ,xi ,V I a ,- ,V h , I 1 n Y. W A h Q 5 X gf ,Kwik Q N Q ' . Q ' -a t 4 t K V S' v" Y ssv, 'ii 9 . X ' 3 , w, ,V ' - K, X ,. Q ' T , ,, '-. v,. Vg ,w ' as 1 x . 11 Q .V X :,,: I Q- E .Z ix, L 5- gg 3 Q . 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A city of 350,000, Bari is just north of where the boot joins the heel on the Adriatic Sea. Rich in history, Bari is also a city with an eye on the future. Those who walked along the Lungomare, or Bari's "Great White Way," probably saw the statue of Saint Nicholas, the city's patron saint, which stands in tribute to the days of rough seas and wooden ships. R.F. Danielsen 3 , Z I- fli p ... ' ' ' ' ' M , H ,- v .. ,. . 1 11 -.X 1- :i"71-'-1 2121211 Ei-5:1-ZQ.l,lIE1:2:: , 4"'bmiii9255332225ifiiiiiiifjlii55,i'.i.l5g.li5H uaslagueg gg Of 1 ll' - -f--vu M ., f r , 1 r, t ff 1 5723 A at , t 1 t,lr , fl , . 1' , ' u ff f' A ,..k y ',', L5 3 , ,. X.V,,h 1 ,',. ' T -, 1 5, 1, ,xx , , , , . , H ,I - ,, I ,,,, , , ,V ,, 0' fn 9 V' pm M lmsm., VV ,,kV , , fgwilygig, , I I V,,, I ,, , I V, ik7k , f,V,VV f .M -is A f"' W .:" . ,,,, . ' f, ,, .. Y- L 2 , ., , .kh' ,'7'f"f H19 , l r l ll if fp f 1. 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A A V67 , Um 4,w?fg,...,,,,.akv,,,H:,:.,,,.,,.f.?,,.5ft5,f,s,.f,.,9Z,ggy'1g1.-QM.-'A-f, ,Z QQ, -f.f v ,- f-ff -, 4,4-1:,sW,t-wwf.,-v' ,gist 147.11,'1Y2fiJf,i'ffa,"'viwi-f',",f::,:'i ""' 1 -552,1 .,'1-vi"1v2i1f"-T129:Z-7,12'1-V:2EzQ'23fpaig5.ilLfi3i'g S, ' g a, ' " "t""f'N""Q'f-ifA-isme-s:1?::vg?3YG:fa.-,Lf5,Qr,j'f,1f-1,:'.,1g,'f,p3..7,g,3'g1,gfffw -, f, ,gil152,4,g:-pr,,'gf3f,2f'f-,eff-:,,:wMy-2-g.,g1.5', S f , " ,,f- ' J1-Vsdfgf -MV., .,,, , ., H l 'll 'll 'i "k" " - 3-512F5-,i'fii1':i'ffil-,7i?,i",1L'ff fQ'7'Qii152l1v14725-ffVf'i1"2l125tif'if-"QSf5i::,2-f,,?1"''ifii' m1 'W' . . . ' ' ' ' 'J ' A ' i' T L itll 4-,,. L IZ- Q,:'-MQ: -if .f: '3-"C -S.: 1 'uw-A tr" A ' - 6 '- A 1:32-"'2.fiT"7"'.-'Y-'YTTVY",EV5','iii.. 'fi-Y ,.,, s.,,,1f-I W' ,, tr- f- - '-fi 'T -fr , fvtj wy' , j.,.jgjzigtg5,5,",:f,'1,'.'2.,-,212-'ffff,.v,gfi:fry-W 2"".Qff2Qr:,s:, pgriff WQ1-w,y5:: ..,, , J 7,217 . ,,,,.,,. ,, , .,,.X f .,,,,, ,M ff ,V ,f-, f, ,,',,. t ,.-,.. ,V ,,,, fl ,,,,4,,. , s I KQMKM X . ,,, -',. if f- H f HAZ v ,tb ,pf k,.k , l,kf,,,?,,g , K, lf' 'v"' f-T , K W ' " ' X, Q-'f2,z,,,',fQ '., ',,,.w,vff:,'Q, Ifffl,1,g,,x..gs,,-11.,'ff,,.,.ffffw,t,,..,1:'Tt',.,5,,3,i,i' rv, ggj if f'2-,f:,gjg13ggg'z , , M ' I , f .Q , ff. ,sw , we " 'QT' " ' f , W' ' , ' " ' "-'.f.,.f: .,,. '.,s,.,t,m an f - V N , swf, ,W-'V ' f' ' , -L ' ' I 3 , , ,KW i,tf,5,i , ,Q ,:1,j,,-M-ggajjr,fzfbg5'-73,5,:.'f,,,g:1:1:Q, 491 . N - , ,,,,,.,,,, M,,M,.. . H , ., . . . A ,,, Those AMERICAmen who crossed Bari's well-lighted Corso Vittorio Emmanuelle, which sewes as the dividing line between the old city and the new, walked down sleepy streets in thegdirection of the railway station, towards the university and the shopping plaza. On the other side of town lay a sports center and several beaches where sailors could rent a bathing suit and beachchair and soak up the Italian sun. 97 Hi. QQQEH I u - --'- V-4--...-x- - n" A LLL -"""T'.T'--I ,.:" '-' A .. --..-L - 'I ' I . - - Y, - gg..r-- - . 207. ' 7 -' vv: 2: " ,I ' I. If ' I, -I . 7 . FL, v X N E ..--.ML gitfh' A 'N If 4 I' I ,J .I I. H v 4 4 "H"--4. ' I! ' A . -su' ,F W ' N pin- ,'-f--'.,4- . I- A I --. ,. ...M II h .I., r ..,,' .I ,L J -III ,. .1 L .I - M217 " -- .5 K. ,,..,.- ,N-A' o S., ,I 0 1 ii! --S.- ll I sk II 1. ask-:'-31, .um .-,M-7.4, L. -. 'z 1 .4 t long last: BELL POLI "See Naples and die", or so the saying goes. Roughly translated, this expression testifies to the eternal beauty and proud history of Naples. To understand this statement, it is necessary to realize that until the reorganization of Italy in 1860, Italy was made up of a number of independent states. Southern Italy and Sicily were linked together under one rule, with Naples as its capital. In the centuries before Christ, the seafaring Greeks built a city where Naples now stands, but an earthquake shook the bay and the city was partially submerged. Subsequently, the Romans moved in and reconstructed the city, giving it the name of Neapolis, or "new city." After the fall of Rome, the name was shortened to Napoli, and a succession of other peoples tried their hand at ruling the provinces of Southern Italy. In 1860, it was Garibaldi who eventually sealed the unity of Naples, with the aid of a volunteer army. Today, Naples is an important seaport, as always, and is bolstered considerably by the tourist trade. The city has been blessed, as well as cursed, by its loca- tion. Naples has the distinction of occupying the most mag- nificent site in all of Italy. Nearby are Pompeii, Her- culaneau, Mount Vesuvius, Sorcento, Amalfi, Salerno, Capri, Ischia, and Rome. Naples boasts beautiful parks, ancient catacombs, various museums, numerous churches and cathedrals, and seven important castles. For most of us,,Naples meant Peroni beer, sidewalk ven- dors, musty basement bars, and a visit or two to the USO. For the first seven days of our stay there, buses ran hourly to two Naval Base exchanges, enabling us to get that long- awaited stereo equipment. When high seas twice put a temporary halt to boating, the Naval BEQ provided us with overnight shelter. A large percentage of AMERICA men made pilgrimages to Rome, Capri, Ischia, and nearby Pompeii and Mt. Vesuvius. Those lucky enough to get 5-day leaves granted, migrated north to Munich. Proof that Naples was good. to us is that tour ticket sales while we were in Naples easily outsold ticket sales in all our previous port visits combined. If it was history we longed to relive, we made the mecca to Pompeii-Vesuvius or repaired to Rome. If sun and fun was all we sought, with a possibility of that chance interna- tional encounter, the islands of Capri and Ischia met our demands. Pompeii and Mt. Vesuvius provided gl i m pse of a nti ol u it Besides a quick trip into the past, the bus ride to Vesuvius and Pompeii meant a chance to see just how out of shape we really were. The very rich soil at the base of Mt. Vesuvius, coupled with a long growing season, has resulted in a cornucopia of such crops as almond ries, and apples. At the foot of Vesuvius, there also lay a cameo school, where experts worked on shells and ivory imported from Africa. There were rings, earrings and broaches, and sets of cameo jewelry, making most men wish they had brought more money along. The road to Vesuvius was graced by umbrella pines and lava heaps, making the destruction of Pompeii seem more real as we rode in the shadow of the sleeping volcano. S1 Chef- MI ., , I ,' ' AA ' ' I I ,-.lied 'Ju ' o -ol J Q Fa nf+'-s ' Q , , - 4 4 . . v' 1, ,,, Q' . ,. fa-A The steep climb to the top of Mt. Vesuvius was rewarded by a spectacular view inside the crater. 'P " A 453441.-1, ' ' ' 4 4, ,ds xslt., J',f?L1ElfLl4 -tgfg. gig-for . , , A my H1 .Y I ,KI If .' ' Jr , as ' TYZEATU ggi!!-I . .3 ,ff -.lY:,g"? 1 .M , Q .N VY I A ? - P sf P as Q so 2 ' ' Tis. ' 1 ' QS "2 - ' .171-'I l T00 Ascending Mt. Vesuvius, Capri and the mainland of Sorrento became visible on the righthand side of the tortuous moun- tain road. In the wake of nine eruptions over a span of 2,000 years, it is hard to understand why the natives challenge the lava-monster by living on its slopes. Perhaps it was the knowledge that a modern observatory is constantly moni- toring volcanic activity further up the slopes and can effectively warn 95W of the population in the event of an actual recurrence. The most recent stream of lava has left its trail of desolation, scarring the vegeta- tion and stunting the trees. When the bus could go no higher, the men began a 20-minute climb to the sumnnit, r,'-mich provided a breath-taking view of islagjrrrjers Bay, but left us breathless as well. Having witnessed the agent of destruc- tion, we were eager to see the ruins of Pompeii. En route, we learned that Pom- peii was once a prosperous town with a large population before its demise in 79 A.D. According to legend, the entire population had been warned of the forth- coming disaster, but only the poor sur- vived, because the aristocracy was loathe to leave their rich city behind. Within the labyrinth of Pompeii's ash- covered streets and houses, many clues to ancient living were discovered by AMERlCAmen. Everything from lupiter's t ""' 'liliilgiillllllllilliilim Temple to public drinking fountains are still intact, although all the original statues are preserved for history in the Museum of Naples. Most memorable was the "Veal House", formerly owned by two wealthy bachelors, whose living quarters were decorated with pornographic art. After a full day of mental and physical exercise, AMERlCAmen were satisfied to return to the ship's in-port routine and rest for more liberty. l .- ,V wg ,Q 1. .u ,- V ,V , , 1 , ' eh, ' gt gg- "'-'fi.:f.-f if r ' l 1 --4 Fl Eating or walking amid the remains of Pompeii left an impression ofquiet stillness in the minds of AMERlCAmen who visited the site. I' ,-ll ' I 14133 ,J Une in every eight AMERlCAmen visited THE ETER AL CITY The derivation of the name "Rome" is debatable. Some scholars insist the origin lies with the two babes, Romulus and Re- mus, and the life-saving She-Wolf. Others believe the name comes from the River Tiber, known in earlier times as Rumon. Still, many place their faith in Ruma, 'or breast, the name given to the Palatine Hill for its mammary-like St. Peters Basillica geological form. While this question remains un- solved, the founding date of the Eternal City is recorded as 21 April 753 B.C. During this prehistoric period, a Latin population established itself among the hills surrounding the Tiber Valley. Adopting the lifestyle of the natives, the Etruscans, these Latins flourished to the point of ul- TN , V . iiexi Fountain timately dominating the Etruscans, forming a social structure that re- mained a part of Roman history: the ruling aristocracy and the working plebeians. As the young Roman empire grew, desire and conquest led themto overpower the imposing Greek colonies and numerous enemies. The Sistine Chapel The grandeur of both the past and the present was evident throughout Rome. The vaulted domes of Rome's 140 churches and the ruins of the Forum spoke of past elegance and faith. The traditional garb of the Swiss Guards are still worn by those protecting the Pope. th . . -4 N . f --X . A 1 X? 1-. '. 3 'x 5 f. T fx . 15. C, 'i 1 - , -:mr We--:f F- Q .' . Q bf '.':.1 "-X II.. -, f I , 'W j-,g VBCSQQ r X-, fJZ15v'.0.-, ,' , t, ,zig- ' 9 ' V If? "if?t'5L- M3 , Il. .. up T--. 'V . , V -A 1 I 1 L . .- .- in-t if ff If , f ff .. -f'7.-iaei--,N,f.t1.ff,+f w - H - 'f a n ,tt-. " : g , 4:1 'f V., 4-My :,..,,.j.,., me Q 5 .f -5 fgiqw :js k Q. th 2' 2 gi t -A 35 . J. f 4'iF,Js3,,,lz-:3",'Y ' f- ,, .. V ' 4 5, - 1 .. Q "' ' .M 'H' " gif' Q1 l ff' . 'v. 1, .. .3 X4-,Wwe,.-w",7',-1-,ll-'xl eg. 1 H- 4. . r 1 , ' H- Q rg 11: wi, f , Qu .. .1 ri a' 1 ul ' . c :it - ' .f.,Mf-aff. .ts Y -ft'fL323.s4!-ltflstlfiit216311tifs L any ' 5. gt- he t 2 -: 2 3 Q1f.i+':51tm:,gfff.ew-455 1 . F -u' "H ,lm-1. ' , A ' T A iw-1-'4-SS'f..,'.tf., FU 5' ,.,. ' 'v i I - at-fin ' fr- . . ... '. - .1 2 . "L -J-- tv r.fl" w A " rf' -A . ""m.v' ' 3 -T ss-' . .- W- -r"fi'?T-vf"f'ffi"-t' "4 V " - .- ' ' ' J T23 fsreifzfw-, 555271.-igljl ,j,gfs,'.,3Q 4il usa Q fuw, ,5T ""?1-7.5 P qs- .cf -52112232 35.592127 -if :iw 5 if, , , .. ':,,8 .5-'-w Q. f 1 " 1 3gf,3,1,j,,tggt:,Z,fiqpaaa. ff 52121-543'-f,f,1j.,,-'ff f, , ,' LL . '7 i 537 ' 1-'L I- 'i'gQ"4 I i"'il"lk ""L" T"'!"lM YV.,....., ,f,, - 1-A-'zweawgj' 1 ri-fl-'7,177"-1-'7 ' 'f "- ' ' 1 7' I t 'f f I 4229-1 r-'NV f'f:w':E7f!5'Q9.' . f. -La.,-, J -,,,,,,.,..... --a-.f'- 1 - ,W . r t, - f ,,. 3 . , V, ,,4, ,"j14f.yy-t.ft,f,,.tyf-.lgwf., ---s---ff i V , 1 ,,- 1, v .1 --5 5- 1' ,,,,,.,,-.,,,,.,,1-.asf,.ff1,y:,av.fig55 .-,.".1w.-- Q1-,V-fri' i fr' 1 'iv FM' .iq S2 A :Af-gs "Wi-Litvf'-.f'2r'.,ff '?.f.4,ff-I it is ' ft .l .4 It p45-:if-'f-4..41i"t.'3 . 1 - f fi az l 'F sf lf-I Sslfffaiiifkse21:Qexits-L'sasiizlfz-f?fzL2'9wtier ,g,,-Ji. -:Ze ff-.z,Lfrf . -rf ..., ' 'Z T ,gr ft' 142- -1 1 . Q,-. V , , , "-tio-:wwfzftzxgg-:fs1L+3'f7ift:,:!.tq':f4.Zevs'2ff 1 -- LIL f1:g..z.4' 11' rfgf 'ffJ:a,-M--M V -1.,.i1givf:fv:--,,,...:5Ilx.?1 -'wfrr2Pr,:'w ff" -1,g,- 'K+ -713.234-4f-srisqfviffirfx'-lgfsfimwq ':':-T '- 3 -3 '1 f' rg '1 -, M, 'nga , ., snag- ff' -.,::-1,f1"' 4 mi-'9tavt.fAtfg.: ' ' ' P M -'.a.,--312142-14'ff'-779 .1 " "r " ' pf' -fn" -155-1'-ef AZT- :aff-,:.J---2,11:'x':f9-'i43IJL-Aw-wi' L:,'5.".:"BfZ:7'H-"...m,,42,gle-xc M'igN"x'1.r-rs-'Ras-,2--4151 ,A "4- 'T , . 'ff-'--31' "gLf'T'T-,-if-M' ' ,K "f'i.:"rif"Y'2??f-,'--ff'5:-'-2151?-f:..s.zuv,, -'Q Y-:"-4?-V, 1"g5t:5..g:f:"f-.. I , . , , 2:1 A - T T In the centuries that followed, the empire grew massive but not without political and social up- heaval In time a nobelman, Gaius lulius Caesar, entered Roman his- tory. Striving for edual land dis- tribution for the plebeian society, he eventually became emperor of the great domain. A military genius as well as a great states- man, his rule ended abruptlx on 'i 5 March 44 BC., murdered bi. con- spirators. Caesars successor and neoiwer 'cf-7 Gaius Julius Octavian, became fa- ther ofthe country. And during his rule C8 BC. to 9 ADJ Rome en- joyed peace. ln Palestine, one of the more rest- less provinces, a young man emerged: a man who changed the course of humanity Nazareth. - jesus of During the Ven W a new spiritual if if the nation, l ,:fi5Dl:'f1' began to .Qi lfifgiti Empire mtiwei' T000 years, the Western Empire crum- bled in less than 100 years. Sub- ject to barbaric invasions, it finally perished in 476 AD. As time progressed, Rome be- came the seat of Christianity as well as the cultural and artistic capital of the world. But Christian- ity, too, faced peril. A new breed of man, the enlightened man of the Renaissance, challenged the old doctrines of Catholicism. A revolution ensued - the Protes- tant Reformation. - i - - . '. -1 : 1-- i -'f' 'lf' .,'f:'3lY".'::k-53' ,":' ' 5" ' Udfl 4-3 'J iTf".g?f: :LJ J Rome lCon'tl The empire ceased . . . A zealous Frenchman named Bonaparte invaded the city in hopes of creating an em- pire of his ovvn. Hitler, too, found his way into the capital bringing his dreams . . . The great Roman empire is long goneg the Eternal City remains. From Naples, many AMERlCAmen took advantage of Public Affairs' two-day tour of Rome. A two-hour bus ride through the peaceful Italian countryside brought the men rflflllw ffl Ji ififygl 4 K fzl f ul 1' 'fi IN' 'l f 5 ' ff 'Q A it, 1 437 , N, QQ' df? J- 5 fi 41 X I i'k 'yy tj,2?1 fy". fl V it 1' ff!-f,i+' if if ., j ',.'fA5 Sit iffy Y, ' for ' ' , ' X - 1 1'f ,f "' I r ! 'Q I ly A: 'Xu , I3 5. .Jn 'fg y Iffg Jr gy . 9 I f 1 , 1 'I ff -' f : 1 A " f- ff i-Af, ,Lvl ff"E:5 - fax- i f J f ' 9 I v ' K , . jsp xgfy f ' F i . N ar-, J :W T .. . . , . ,. .Lai-'gina' 'ig ' rg'-5 A ", 'gfgrw 'qt ' A 33 L........, i 5 if -E S Q The atmosphere of days gone by remains in the third-century Arch of Constantine, a columned foyer and the many works of Michaelangelo. to Rome's USO and to the monu- ments of the centuries-old Italian Capital: the Vatican, the Sistine Chapel tits ceiling emblazoned with the biblical frescoes of Michelangelol, the awesome Catacombs of Domitilla, the fourth century Basilica of Saint Paul tone of Rome's largest and more impor- tant churchesh, the Church of Saint Peter in Vincoli twith the display of chains once bounding him as prisonerl, the Basilica of Saint lohn in Laterno and, finally, to the hotel for an invigorating supper. Then, back to the seat of the ancient empire for an evening to spend by oneself. The following morning, AMERlCAmen browsed through shops and relaxed in the city be- fore boarding the bus to visit the remnants of Caesars great do- main: the Ancient Ruins and Forum fl? e meeting place of ROiTTU3'E 13p:1l,Li5'igmri and socialitesl, the Pantheon, the fabulous Foun- tains of Trevi, the Circus Maximus and, ultimatley, the Colosseum Conce the sight of fearless gladiators, blazing chariots, doomed Christians, hungry lions and merciless spectators? Another supper at the hotel, back on the bus and a long ride to Naples. The weary travelers leav- ing behind them a timeless city . . .Veni, Vidi, Vici. rf? . 2?1iiZ2':i'i Ti- n:'41,iy--- -1 .-Qi,..,,3fg f irq. I Capri and Ischia Ital off the beaten path Any day, at almost anytime, there was a ferry or hydrofoil leaving Naples for the islands of Capri and Ischia. In Ischia, you were totally on your own, but once you had arrived in Capri, you were greeted by an expert van-driver, who, through arrangements already made by the USO, acted as your tour liason. With five or six others in a van, you made the treacherous climb to a hilltop hotel, which served as both your points of origin and return. From here, a designated bus escorted you to lunch by a swimming pool, where the food was plentiful and the bikinis were skimpy. Directly below, lay the world-renowned Blue Grottoes, where you could cash in a coupon in return for a rowboat ride through the caverns. Burly natives in t-shirts were constantly piloting boats through the entrance, which could be entered only at low tide. Inside, the waters were sky blue, and a silvery light created the illusion that you could see clear to the bottom, 60 meters below, If your oarsman broke into a chorus of "Santa Lucia" during the ride, you were ex- pected to give him a tip. Refreshed by your Cave-tour, it was time to mount the stairs and await the bus to Mt. Solaro. Following a bone-chilling ride on a narrow road that put you cl0S6 to the edge more than once, the bus stopped at a small piazza, made festive with bright floral centerpieces and rows of small cafes and giftshops. Another coupon bought you a ride you would not soon forget, a 20-minute trip to the top of Mt, Solaro in a chairlift, so far removed from the bustle of tourism below, that it instantly altered your state of mind, One glided bY elss- tric cable, noiselessly over forest glade and gorge, at times so close to natlve houses below that one could actually hear conversations. When you reached the top, you were treated to a sweeping view of the entire island. Boats below seemed no larger than large aquatic beetles on the surface of a pond. From here, it was easy to see why people from all nations flock annually to this island to mend their health and spirits, by taking advantage of the Pure air, tranquil pace, and healthful sea breezes the island affords. '5-Qtr? f,'zfi!'a.ge - I Krabi :agua I QM M41-ns... ,Q --..f,, -ff, q 1 my ir .JU 'ALR '45 +7 e The relaxing atmosphere of this small resort Island made the long hydroforl journey worthwhile r ' . 4 M .V V ,, , 211' .- , 1 , is -xi-L: '53 x ss- , fx 41 ' W LEW, , rf we P UZ ga. 4 -15, V 42 0,5 .A ', fbxy, x 5 Lx! tk-.f - X , ," 1 L-V ,'!1,x'L:l'hil F S '3' X , f , A-asf' 4,54 J ' H . -,-.- . -- .--': .-r1a,..: If ' -' F- FT -'--f , f----..--f .-f -W . -. , , . L .' ' '- - ' '--.f-1 sh.:-'. . -V1 --?'4'?"k:f-'s lr -- r 'f ' z , - . - ,- . , -..- -1- f- -. .- :-v:'::..:- if-V .f. -f.- ff: 5 -r N 1--' ffi- -Ei ff 5 'L 'Taj 'Er This port caused one man to remark: 4 You can close heaven, so long as you let u have PALMA Palma de Mallorca is a paradise to say the least: the very best of Europe set in an ideal climate and location. A meeting place for vacationing Germans, Scandinavians, Italians, Spaniards, Britons, French and, of course, American sailors. After five months in the Mediter- ranean, Palma's unmatched charm quickly captured AMERICA and crew. Gone were the familiar cries of the "Hey Joes" and panhan- dling children. A' ' Q.. V v -. K .gi xo' E ,.f -X ?"N- N, For many, the discotheques and night life of Plaza Gomilla held the answer, for others, escape meant any of the numerous beaches for an afternoon of sun and solitude. Some found a Bavar- ian refuge with the Germans and British at El Arenal, but for all, the Spanish hospitality, incredible food and flowing Sangria proved incomparable. During AMERlCA's short, two- week visit to the Balearic Island, we shared medieval banquets with 501 1 53, su calorcillol , 'i+g--gf 12 E 1 3 1 K Q! -. U l . N, I N X I . the old count as our host, de- voured roast chicken and suckling pig at the vintage ranch at Val- ldemosa, scorched our throats in American chili halls, joined the Spaniards in watching their favor- ite sport - bullfighting, discov- ered paella trice, seafood, chicken and vegetable dishl, made new friends from all over Europe and caught a glimpse of the Castillian Spanish culture through the fiery magic of flamenco music and dance. ?57??"'nN Qur hosts in Palma xx ere as beautiful as they were traditional with an unlikely blend of old Spain and the culture of the let Set. ' 1-,y-Y HJ. Gerwien . If H, rv ,...e. N ,rw I i"'.f. fa.-if '-4 2 1 . , u f"-2, lf? I ., H" RIS ' E .20 L 3 of 'Nx A friendly, old and welcome atmosphere prevailed during the carrier's September visit fff X X If L u-f 5. Q 2' Y 5 -,,55,,,7kagj..a3 rjxyz..- V, ' I' Q 'S Q r G 4iXi'Xf::'.f,l 2 5' A 1, l -:f:,"Qf1. gf",'Y.'i' sf,-fftf, " V r l Y ':ffF""fT'5-i?" 1 1 :'- ff, N 4'f'1'?lf1'lf's?L'1'35ffI." '1."' 'z..- " . . ,wiv ,gr , ,f -f ' L wks, , PALMA tcorrti The ruggedness of the Palma Cathedral front conceals the light and softness of the interior. Its stained-glass windows cast rainbows of light on the powerful fil- lars. The construction of the Cathedral lasted nearly 400 years and today the structure serves as a landmark both night and day. 5 HJ. Gerwien xl, 1 ft, 'Ga F1 4 its 7' - . . . an afternoon at the bullring "Kill is the tragic epilogue that ends the fight." -- james Michener To a Spaniard bullfighting is an art. A portrayal of man versus beast, the superior mind outwitting brute strength. Reverence and nationalism surround the sport. Part of the Spanish culture, its lure baffles many. To insult the bullfight is to insult Spain her- self. Palma boasts the third largest bullring in Spain - Plaza de Torros de Palma. And here several hundred AMERICAmen viewed this spectacle for the first time . . , Each Sunday afternoon avid fans and curious tourists crowd the arena. The atmosphere, festive. First the procession: matadors, banderilleros, picadors, and the two horses who, inevitably, cart away the defeated animals. A horn is blown and a matador reenters the arena in regal costume. Moments later the bull charges in, snorting and furious at the world. Twisting and turn- ing, the matador evades his challenger's advances and piercing horns. Another trumpet sounds and the matador is replaced by horseback riding picadors. Wielding long poles with sharpened steel tips, they repeatedly stab the bull's strong back, tearing open the thick hide in an effort to wear him down for the fiml challenge. QA figmal, the picadors leave, job completed. Bleeding tc 'w xxeakenecl and furious, the bull waits. Enter the banderilleros. With gaily colored, razor-sharp barbed sticks tbanderillasl these men test their courage and skill by attempting to jab one pair in the bull's shoulders - a dangerous job re- quiring precise timing and unfaltering agility. Suc- cessful, they leave the ring. Tired, wounded and dec- orated the animal remains. The final horn sounds as the matador returns, red cape and sword in hand. An enraged bull charges an instinctual enemy, the red cape, while the brave matador plans his tactics: facing the bull head-on he must plant the sword firmly between the beast's shoulder blades for a clean kill -failure could re- sult in being gored or crushed. Eye to eye with his opponent, he glides his gleam- ing sword smoothly between the bull's shoulders, piercing the massive heart along the way. Exhausted and mortally wounded, the animal staggers and, legs buckling, collapses. Victory and defeat. The gallant matador receives a shower of flowers, seat cushions, a fluttering of white handkerchiefs, either the tail, one or both ears from the slaughtered creature and unmatched admiration for his bravery and performance. While parading the bloodied arena, displaying his severed trophies, the two horses enter and drag away the huge carcass. Two more matadors and five bulls await their challenge during the afternoons time For many, a Sunday afternoon passes to quickly, for others , , , t g an Q 4 1 lui, , M' f "".mQ-Yzf' " f H 1 , , Mary' .. .. ,. .,. ...., . - L.,-,,., df 1 2. , n xi I , XF' - '..f.s.4 - ,h.,, . n,.., N-X13 at K I. ' -vu. , Q ,, f " x f, 'Ax -4 - -mf. "- A. If N A ,..,t,,j '. L ' ' x ,X . 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Ti I- .6 , J J . , 1 I , . f A - f i! , - x Pi"-4 1 ,, ' '-Y - f 5- " 'f - V 14' l , K Y ff' A f. if lg , gift? f' , M- - , , ' , X- I ,IL IN,-, vi' "iw - I fl: , 5 V ""--:ffm "'f'2v - 1 I 1 ' , ' - -1, . , iw 3,15 NZ? ,. C , 45 r x L- - " 'X iq., X .. ',," ik , L- ' J.. ' -wry N ' 'L wg' in 4. ff 4 ,, . ef " 'F 'A "- ' 2 f A Y- af-, ,Q Tyr: ' - pi -' K- . I - ,Q -ix . V in 1' ' ' Q? . , V Y - ,, .-, V . 35- --1 -1.1 .. t-9.-1: -.jj -avr, . '. ' ff'3?l"1tfi:"?.--i':--41- ..f:5.g. rg: . :yu Q,-:,1p..Z+-.."gy,ff-.':,, , ' 1-. V... , -, . . I -A ' ' ' rf ?'?l'7?71 f177ff'23?' if ''WiZ2-2211f'1f4Zdf?ii2,"+f'f5?-l ' '9qi5'55 ' t '. .w,1fg,,. 'ff MEASURE FUR EASURE Captain Robert B. Fuller became the tenth Com- manding Officer of USS AMERICA in ceremonies aboard the carrier while the ship was at anchor at Palma de Majorca, Spain on 7 September 1976. Vice Admiral Howard E. C-reer, Commander Naval Air Forces - U.S. Atlantic Fleet, was the 65' - it f .I ,IQ :i-5eff'S+ '-f' Uri' 'ai-, STA V 'Ri ADC k .,.,.,,!, , f 'N 'X 'iq X v , P H , fji f Ifwj V145 . f f ff ff,,fff"f,4,g , J ,'f' fZg4:','f,4Q ,,,,,j,f Q 3,74 gwffkd ' m 42fwi?g. f Ifmvzfgmf .. . ,g.... M U -I :A A--.,, s . ...L .... - Barcelona: pride of the Cataluna "When Columbus returned from the New World, he reported to Fernando and Isabel there. Barcelona was the first city in Europe to hear the official account." - james Michener "Iberia" Malaga-born artist Pablo Picasso liked Barcelona so well that he left major works for the establishment ofa museum in his favorite Spanish city. The museum is second-rate in that it bears his name but few of his prints, because Picasso's artistic impact on Spain was muffled dur- ing most of Franco's reign and like most Spanish artists, has been felt more strongly abroad. Walking down one of the most famous of European avenues on a sunny day, it is easy to see why. The Ramblas, as it is called, is a tree-lined boulevard alive with bird vendors, newspaper stands, and flower merchants. Plaza Cataluna, at the avenue's end, is the transportation hub of the city. Buses, taxis, and subways combine to make a rel- atively inexpensive and efficient mass transit system. Efiyfimt fluff ji 1 MY? .1 ' -. .. f' " tif ,-,.. .. rf ,we -. -V- -.1-. gm- ' - ' A-., , . fri' - Mx,- ,,i.x. ..V,i, V' ,-K-V14 X, . ,. A, 1 ,. X .. . ini gf, bu W ll. fQf"'3ggQ3wril 'l- ., LM,-'S S The of Barcelona . A I . 7 . - . li t . , t CFIHHQGS with the hOUr, with aTHsfW'4Q-r iv-2 lf -V 7 . ' E K ie- gitfxgirv Gtr !,. K .V JQ,jx'R 5 lwvle I .W the day 1 'V ' EL V.,1 rf, gx tlLu'v'b'p . 1, .Rue -L.Y- ,,1'.?rL-f-fyrqi. ' xl yy x'l ngE?f':?,gyf.: 'nf--P .. ' ' ' ,,'i 5. All . TQ 'i.,i1,,g':,.,,,f sa' " . nfiqfglil 'f--, -74' lull , aQ1exH'.lf?- .43 . ,ggf4fgf2f.w:i??i. f.f 1,1-f fri . 1 I d f The IOVG Y an 3m0U5 - ,, ,, b h RHmlOlHS C Offflml HS 3 - myriad ShODS and CHfGS- T. Decaire Taxi is the best way to see a lot of city in a short time. High on the list of choices is the amusement park at the top of el Tibidabo, a mountain that overlooks the city, where, according to legend, Satan tempted Christ with the pleasures of the world. . From here, it is possible to take a tram ride dovvn the mountain and walk to a park designed by the city's celebrated ar- chitect, Gaudi. Bright mosaic-tiled wall sculpture and a surrealistic setting con- tribute to making this place a Disney-like adventure. Many Americans are eager to sample Spanish architecture and two good spots to do this are the Gothic Quarter and the Pueblo Espanol, a recon- structed village in the Western sector that features at least seventy shops selling ev- erything from handblown glass to bam- boo prints. Not far from the Gothic Quarter, stands a six-century-old church, a blend of medieval and Renaissance architectural design. On Sundays, the elaborate sar- dana, a Spanish folk dance, takes place in front of the Cathedral. Good entertainment can be found throughout the city, especially on Aribau and Tuset streets, vvhere modern and even futuristic bars feature live folk- singing by such groups as "Uruguay," a brother and sister team that play and sing everything from sambas to Inca love songs. 1' f- ' ff f -....4- :M .JJ .... ...v.,g:"--..,.,,-.,.. N .. ,- ,,.1- -4 .. .,, . -, 3 .,. 2 ,.m,m...,.. V Barcelona tCon'tl Everywhere one turned vvas evidence of Spanish craftsmanship in handblovvn glass, leather goods, vvoodcarvings and the traditional gold and silver of Toledo jewelry. T? 1 -ff n . 3, p n , 4, be Sf The Sardana This famous folk dance was frequently dis- played as the city celebrated the holiday of their city's patron saint. W, . , ,. v 1 1 U ' .'. 4'.".-'.'.".", '-"".' ' , ,- . u .'. , "u,',.".n' n,-',. ',".' , 1, .r,n,1,u . 'HI' , . ',".-'n',f'.". ',.'- -',v f- '..'n.,al,f.,-. 'J .1 ',1' , 'n ,u,1,.' v,' .Q 'Q ."' '-'.-'4' ,"n':' 4.,.A'.-1 .'-.'.'1'....,.4.,.,': . - . . -'..- .u',' ,',"n' 4... av". ', DU.: -l -.u u,-',.',u"n -"1 -v s"".s".l'v' 4 -'4..'p.w N,- u " .'u','n 1','. .-',',u'v-'I' "U" 0' U' ".":"'1"." "0 " v' .I '."Q'4- , 1' ' u - .' 1 . o,. 1' ,' ,v .4 ,4,.. f..'.,l,s', un-J". 'n 1' .',u ',',.' - -', an 5. a , .l - .. - Isl X ,,.,..'.' .'-.-..-I, .I ."l'.'. ".-""' WF' vw? 5 "f, A- 'fmw ,qt we-M, ". . ,, , y 4 1 , ' .,. , . , . - 1 'L - -.M ',,-fi.,-1 xv rf'-51,14 ', 1. H fp - , Q i Ak 1 -'-"T Q ,-, -:,,'- 51- ,,-g,,,'3,,.:..-'1- 4 i"'f?'?'. e"Cr'fr4g7rv'7:7't17 ,. ,. 'f- . ,. -- : 'H -,..- ,-wif' L-'-7l7f1.f'v'-f '....4'g yi lgfyl t. XXX ls MALAGA TORREMOLINQS: A SPANISH "ls it a good spot - Torremolinos?" joe asked. "See for yourself!" the excited German said. End- less beach. Mountains cut off from the cold winds. lt's not a city. lt's not a village. lt's nothing seen on earth before. l'll tell you what it is - a refuge from the world's insanity, except that it's totally in- sane." james Michener - "The Drifters" Fourteen kilometers K8 milesj northeast of Malaga, Spain, a conservative Spanish port of 300,000 there lies a haven for the Briton and the Dane, and for two days at least, the omnipresent sailor. Turning onto the heavily-trafficked Calle tstreetj de San Miguel, one sees backpacked youths, braless imports from Scandinavia, almond-eyed contessas from the Spanish heartland and American shoppers, virtually all of Europe is drawn to this European playground made famous by james Michener's epic, "The Drifters." A barrage of different-colored signs assault the eye, making it necessary to pick carefully through the maze of ships, bars and eateries. At Quintapenas, pick through a plateful of SMCDRGASBGRD shellbound shrimp for less than a dollar. At the Mayfair, a British pub of sorts, the distinguished-looking couple next to you you will probably sport an Oxonian accent and there will invariably be some Danish secretaries arriving on their way to a flamenco show. Betty's Bar, owned by a former bullfighter, is a rollicking good time, likely to have spontaneous en- tertainment with a Spanish flavor. Round the corner, and eat fried meatballs and red cabbage at the swanky Viking restaurant. Follow the Calle San Miguel down to the sea and rent a beach chair where you can watch brave waterskiers skim 200 feet above the water in parachutes. Or choose your favorite sidewalk cafe and watch the nightlife stroll by. Savor the human circus that unfolds: natives selling roses to homesick sailors, bands of college students playing songs for a hand- ful of pesetas and roving photographers charging 200 pesetas tabout S39 for the rare treat of having your picture taken with a lion cub or baby chim- panzee. L I I I "ia-gEf.:mI-- , 'ff i' es. By American standards, Torremolinos is now rather tame, but it is a far cry from being a typical Spanish scene. lt is just as Michener described it, a place for the young and restless. V X I I x 5 K ' M - , 3 if xt? 1. "'- ea HJ. Gerwien f mg .Y1-,..-.-.:31::,.:..u::.5gi5gia5x-z-:5E!mh- ' rm-41 ngmgguggy . YN i. f Eff, ,, . 'nun ,Ko V , -1 h ,. ,, ,rm lu 'n" n ' .iff ,' E3 ' 'J 'TQ x fa .I - ...- " ff:,.I3' , N. ,. . V' ..- iff'-I 'Iv ."'Q Ll 1 Q v , f ltfQf.i1s i' , if 1: P" A, gfhf. 'Pi ,"vf' vfy' N 212 Uxq: Y I -I f, I ff. " , - Q, , 7 fumfr 1 ,524 lj' si ' ,-frrpw ga ' ,' -' , .' ,L f . z :tif " ' 'V na ' 1 ' .V A , f. if W. 1 , x ' . , X3 in bk U.. w . Q . A, . .gf flu:-n 4!"1'i:?w ' V' Q CJ., " ., Mi .ix ,',Q?'f ,A , b xvhf' 1: ,,,.,. . . Q: I , YEX K ' ' D D -is ' - ff -- sg , p I .f ,,...., , , . ag I s gk x M . ' , . ' u if ' , , f ,ff '.sf'i 4 4-F 'T V3 N J P: V' Y, X . .4 Q ff -,n ' ' - ' 1- F u r t Q-'va-vu. .- I 1 53 flllru .s,., ' -A n,""1 4-v 'ra 'VV U 'wtf'-nv ,prev W1 vs 'vo -lk 2' , -wr ' , .Q ...,.:- ,, U f Iffgi , H- iw f 43 '-is , ..f.f.,, ' ., f"" IT, , " , ' - EL vm 1- wkv , ,W if I J' .,, :Sr .gi rvfvfw.ff,,- 'L' 311' V-.' '. '.., ',', . N--' ' " '-fi' ' " 1" 84.7 7 .VR V ., b .49 Us, .,.44..v.., .A X-4 ,V . l. , - V .1 L '. " 2:.'g2gZI1:j,5'gf,Lg'.: '.2'f.',f'.'Q.:jg ,'S,1 1:-fi 2-.51 -', 3.5 . , 1 . A 3 21:-r 3v,1gf3:,,zg. .. . . '- - ' Z: ' vi- ' ' -17,7 1- lfP12"'-31:7-rxff-'l'f f"L'?4'r' -I f1"F3"2'3' Sunil' ill' 2:1 .27 -fi' ,",-5.1 'f 1- , -"5 -if 'QL ' 5 1' -'f ' LQ? ,Q '- T-.fig .ax-11 ,.., J, , fwqmmf 'x 'X 'V' ZZ? RICA off-loaded 1 208 tons of ordinance to the USS SEATTLE. The coordingt efforts of 120 men from AVORD Division 30 from the Marine Detachment 3 from GM Division, and TO from Weapons Department prepared and transferred munitions in 2V2 days. -.lk-5 . ,Blu ' . xligki . A 1 .af 2 'T . f f' Ai ' . s if , , f 1- , , N? , ' 1 i 51 5 I --I' :ts sf.: Af 'A +12 "' A mites The Last Leg It's almost over. October 14th: Rota, Spain. And with it most of the major highlights of a cruise: the shower lines. The chow lines. The taxis. The liberty lines. tThe only things we didn't stand in line for was work.J The field days. Now the changing of the guard. Welcome to the Mediterranean, "Rosy!" There were many good things "over there." Forgotten just then in the anticipation of home were the tasty, exotic foods, new brands of beer, new friends to help drink it, historic sites, and fresh scenery. lt was business as usual when the ship prepared to pull into homeport. The 80-plus aircraft flew to their home fields, 1200 tons of ordinance were off-loaded. As AMERlCAmen neared the end of their 3603 nautical mile C4093 land milel transatlantic voyage, ' visions of family, friends and MacDonald's danced in their heads. lr , '514:1-fe1':f.'.:f."flfE'5':fff'?555i?1 25'15F'fQ--314:-'ffff -1 25 October 1976 the homecoming Hey, it's good to be back home again Sometimes this old farmfeels like a long-lost friend Yes, and ain't it good to be back home again. sccs H - '-,,,,,,,,., ,. john .Denver W R52 7 + fare tsf1F4 Q '5jcwEHoq 'Q ' ,J.Ql'lANEY'll .fs Back H Aga Hymn: UNUEHE r f 'A V if f'f- A. . ll lcl 1974 Cherry Hill Music Co. K2 3 . i.,. Em ,H VA-I7? LT 5 r-mfr--.-- , ,E .qvunq 5 vmtizis 'W " +7 I 1 1'-+'Q.o.f-uhhgpsrv. .. ,,N-,'.-L14 if il' S 'l"'Tf If , 31511 Rf' 'efQ ,.4b X . ,. Ig ' U 1 4 ' F , I v'.w',q-M 5, I 2 , ff g,f,1w-SA- .'f3'e L-.h 15,1 ,GQ , "5 - '- A gi sig ,: i'3,w 2-wiv' A-U71 k,l x 'W -gy V. Qi' va ' Y' -J :P I ,tm R ,vig 59-5:1-QV' 5, if , 6 V fc b , . " V, , A ,, 121' Q'i7255b"5 an . ' -0 T41 av " JX4., "' 'H' J, "5 I F L Xl - 'f"N 52 i1'f' , 1 ' 4 ' 1, 4,1 , sk.: 1 , 'X .. -5? , ' I " "ill-' " 5 i: ??gT,,g-- 1 - . - . V 5, vmrr 'V' 'yi' j ,-if nwg' 4 21 if 'f 'EM VSW- ja it "'L.j: ..':'fYfZ'-gwlf K R " ' f:f'k'i .. . , .f ,mfzfzfzqa , Y . -,.-. 7 I. ,,.,:4fV:,.5,g',.g.rQ,,, ' ' ' ' ' ' , "1--.'l"1f Alf- ",-"'- 1'1.T:Yl' .-'f 1 -' Q ' Y --- 1- -'- -1 . M.-. .-:,:.j,.3g, rv .LL .. - 1 ' ' iTf1IQ1I1'.Zl t Q- """' "Mk l The six-month cruise Completed, AMERICA entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyards in early November to begin a three-month yard period. Photos by HJ. Gervvien , i +'pf,'!. Una? n . .a . Fri. 1 -e-,,9f I Many men new to the ship participated in the firefighting school at Naval Base Norfolk. 'Lux as . Y- ----' , Ai!-b0f!01l!i1lP2f:w1'3 1 1 511.- 15 - A ,,::-'eil .15-11.-':,,.:fL ?1'W'E .A 'K A .i.v r I. ....- ,. ,.., ..-.,...,,,,-u....-,A,,4L.,1:n.:,. .......u-... . . dk... W ,J A " R I X 214 Wfvifg FEATURES f z ,if Xffx- E GQ eff: .vf 5 we-x , ?- ef: . if .13 ,,,- ALI H wp X X , f 1 'l , f f . Q 9' l . .M H X - Z? wif N V,,, My -Xi 5' 'W ' 'w " A X : I I is QE . fl ' I x 1 NL A.. x A . S V Aiuu AA V ,vfv f. L, ff A ' w 1- ' -Q . f 1 V K 1 . ' - 5 I?'2f'5f-'5 is " A 1' at I A - . b ' ' Q' ' . f 1 it 'ffi 1 ' T H, ,K mlfm A ' . Q22 :zu f WTIQQSU f- ' L. C W. -,glfggfgg ,f ' w,,1ijgf gj3 "" :ii I ' X 1 A 5 3 ,. 1, b 4 - 'TN-X 1. ,,'--.. ' ' V' S' 'h 1-'Gamma-f1ff f' af-.-Lf I V " ' , , Y ,.-. .-1.5 ,M-, -ff' -.-, Y -- '- 'r M -' . ,. .,:,:.. , -. -pw, --'1 -1.3"-3 ..,,, . ' , . - A 'L ' , .3 "ji f. wg". W -1'-Sig?T,gJ.-.2.g,:11'f. -'3-"-Q51-1' - The Bicentennial was reflected in . i l hite and Blu it seems as it the Bicentennial brought all AiViERiCA's artists out of the wood- work, which certainly brightened the paint companies' Bicentennial year as well. Each of the squadrons decorated their aircraft in their own distinctive way. Perhaps the most painstaking of all jobs was the one that took place on the aft mess decks and around the galley spaces. Air vents, fire mains and bulkheads re- ceived a new coat of red, white and blue vertical stripes, atterwhich white stars were stencilled in some inaccessible places, assuming an air of permanence and adding new dimension to the over- abundant grays, greens and blues. T l l I 4 J .-1.131-.1-:,..:1.,.--S-V1 ,Lay-1b.f..,f.-L 1 - -A 7 .L V-VfQf:i,gg.T' t -fr 'S' B ---' '.gf ..,a.m ,, . . , 2 2 2 G. 1. If '. 14 Zi -: 4 ii as Li .11 - Ia' Q! ,N ..a.,,. -g..,........-... .-.. ,,..-..L ineteen Seventy-Six: IANUARY 1 Postage increases from 116 to 13gt 9 Chou-en Lai dies, Prime Minister of Red China 22 Concorde goes into regular service today 24 ANGOLA: Soviets and Cubans provide aid in African civil war MARCH 2 Lockheed admits to playing bribes to foreign officials and military men. 7 Navy Secretary announces building of first nuclear Trident submarine 9 Monte Carlo night while at anchor off Florida coast. 9 Navy pushes building of more NIMITZ-class aircraft carriers 12 U.S. firms plans to train Saudi Arabian troops MAY 2 Italy's 38th government since World War II collapses 3 "Bold Forbes" wins Kentucky Derby 4 AMERICA transits Gibraltar 10 Anchor east of Crete, Talent Show 14 BELKNAP skipper found innocent 16 Helicopter crashes aboard GUADALCANAL 24 Arrive Rhodes, greeted by stones 128 I I I I I I I FEBRUARY 2' 4 Moynihan resigns as UN Ambassador to U.S. 4 Winter Olympics open Innsbruck, Austria 4 Northeast U.S. paralyzed by blizzard , 13 Martin Luther King memorial services aboard AMERICA 21 Patty Hearst uses fifth amendment 19 times in trial APRIL 5 AMERICA visited by CNO, ADM, james L. HOLLO- WAY , 13 Two dollar bill re-issued 15 Underway from Norfolk 18 Sunrise services on flight deck for Easter 24 Soviet "Bear" attempts to overfly AMERICA ' 25 Arrival Rota, Spain, Turnover with USS Independence 27 Humphrey announces that he won't run for President IUNE 2 Inport Taranto for three-day stay 5 Cdr. FORTENBERRY relieved by Cdr. BREAST as ship's Executive Officer 7 A-7 from VA-15 lost at sea. 13 Frazier vs. Foreman fight 16 Lebanonese Ambassador reported 'missing in Beirut 18 President Ford orders U.S. evacuation 18 AMERICA heads for Lebanon at 27 knots 20 AMERICA accused of bombing Egyptian positons by Assad 26 Inport Bari for four-day port call HI Memon held -- Carter wins enters Norfolk Naval Shipyard Corps birthday istice Day r 13th anniversary of john Kennedy's assassination. AMERlCAmen celebrate Thanks ivin 3 8 27 Army!Navy football classic Day They work while others sleep . . the n ight people . . . All around people are asleep. lt's just play acting, an innocent self-deception, that they sleep in houses, in safe beds, under a safe roof, stretched out or curled up on mattresses, in sheets, under blankets, in reality they have flocked together as they had once upon a time and again later in a deserted region, a camp in the open, a countless number of men, an army, a people, under a cold sky on cold earth, collapsed where once they had stood, forehead pressed on the arm, face to the ground, breathing quietly. And you are watching, are one of the vyatchmen, you find the next one by brandishing a burning stick from the brushwood pile beside you. Why are you watching? Someone must watch, it is said. Someone must be there. Frank Kafka fir ,av-5 -w 'Z -:ag ' lx' 5 b""'i:., Left: A TV plays to a dwindling crowd as breakfast is prepared. Below left: The Officer of the Deck writes his midwatch log entry. Below right: The AMERICAN SPIRIT goes to press. b s,s isi, , fi .,.- , , 2. I A ,W Far left: Lower deck patrol team wanders through empty passageways and an aircraft handler motions with lighted wands as he "spots" an aircraft. Left: The seemingly endless chore of swabbing decks goes on around the clock. 'il " 1 1 1 723995 I 416' as ' . ir- ,,5,,. 'ina A-so-q x 4 'H '2i:"T"?M"' -' .. , ,. .,. :-,.- .---:V .---gggg, 1 1 ' - ,Z cggkva-,f-1-,W -..-Q 1 ,:f."'a,--.Q ..-nr.. .r-,,ra:' ,,... ... ,..'-hd ,rg '-1 iw?-: .gy ,A . , N . ,z .. , H J, .X-Q. , ',:..,5,:.,,,-4.:,,r"gfq. ., gfg- ,V -1.11.-I, ,L L, .J y - f. 1 r 51-1-f .' aP: 4"r.- " 119-Ls'.:fr--1 ' i .I 'I 'I3'I ..1: .121 35:15 ffeggzgzgzggigi i l l !, i il i i l l l "Amateur Night" in Naples Q ow, muster Shore Patrol teams , 6and7 The night begins early and runs late for the Shore Patrol when AMERICA anchors overseas. This story is about one night in Naples with a Shore Patrol team. The duty section Cthere are three sec- tionsl assembles on the hangar bay at 1700 at which time they muster, sign their orders and have the forms endorsed by the Officer of the Deck. A utility boat is usually reserved to transport the shore patrol ashore and since there are between 70 and 80, the boat is nearly full. The ride ashore is calm mt -A--, .git ' ' A 1 , 9. U 0 B Qf?iC3QsfVT' as the men savor the last time they will be sitting for the next eight to 12 hours. Arriving on the "beach," the teams equip with both brassards with the famil- iar "SP" and the long black nightsticks on white web belts. Now, armed to the teeth, comes the walk through the streets of Naples to Shore Patrol Headquarters. In Naples, at least, the Navy maintains a permanent Shore Patrol. Because of the frequency of ships anchoring in the har- bor and the U.S. facilities nearby, a full time, highly trained force can be justified. The ships in port supplement this force. The Shore Patrol Headquarters in Naples is located about six blocks from fleet landing in what appears to be the basement of an old brownstone office building. The men at the headquarters are hard looking men, veterans of long nights tolerating rowdy liberty parties. The teams are briefed all at once by a Shore Patrolman, a second-class Boats- wains Mate who sounds as if he haS given the same brief every night forthe past six months: "No alcoholic bever- v"'W 1" Kkxu. .,, Q-. - S 41353 .x .'-v .Y Y J T 4 v tOpposite pagei: After mustering in the hangar bay ttopi, orders are signed and endorsed and the different teams file into a waiting utility boat. tAboveJ Equipment is distributed and fastened and the walk is made to Headquarters trightl. tBelowi: The crowd at the Swiss Bar is far different from the crowd and surroundings at the Naples USO canteen. ages, no drinkingp after 2200, do not leave your post. You can handle most problems, but call us for the serious cases. We will explain the situation to him and he'll see it our way, l'll assure you. Any questions?" There were no questions. Specific assignments are yelled out and members are paired off, coming forward from the group to get a slip of paper with the headquarter's printed phone number. - .i"' ll . ' l --' W 1-rg, ,iv . .Q-it-v' AOC Thomas Cleghorn and AZ3 jerry Pinson drew the duty together on this par- ticular night. Cleghorn would be the supervisor for a "strip" of bars and night- clubs and approximately four other two-man teams. The job was more than administrative as the pair had to rove, checking on the activity at the Bluebird EM club, the USO, the Swiss Bar and Club El Morocco. "Hey, let's go for a drink," shouts one f .li . ..,... - ,.-1 of Cleghorn's friends from a crowd. Rec- ognizing the source, Cleghorn can only smile and say, "No, you go have one for ll ITIS. The nickname "amateur night" refers to a night when even the timid come out of the woodwork. This had been the first payday since AMERICA arrived in Naples. On this night, it was not unusual to see drinks paid for with S1550 bills. The amount of change returned depended on s , Q . - f J -Wa Et siksgtxiii .Q - J ll. l llltllgm--Ng ay ' r " il22. A lli rlim TK'-fi , if N- , ,42 1-Xxx U A fl V W.: 'Mil ge- ll --- : -----rl' -tsl. H .-if . ' P L' 'fl-,T , 1 -W 2' A . 7' 'TEA'-1 i3"TlTN'ilTx iff' ft 'fi :Qu-ull, xg' l , 'l Qflfpv' "TN A4 Q11 gi 2 X N 5. 1 1, . ' 14 5214. '..' I V A .gm no A N' l i1ll"l5 'fs . :sig liggjf - -- -f ...........1A-, . - . . v-- .E ,,T,,, ,,- 1 J' -r' f"!Q3L5E-?:1,+.L, 2e+fg"I,'-':::'gijag" "":f ' -fir.-.fZ1-:'?2'fI2 12' .. -.-xp-, , 2-,-,5f.:,,,,.t.A Shore Patrol: night brings more activity CRightl: Teams swap experiences and advice as they meet each other on their rounds. tBelowJ: "Taxis cause most of our problems," says one Shore Patrolman referring to problems with the variable price of fare. the waitress. Cleghorn and Pinson knew that this was one of the roughest beats but weren't apprehensive as they wan- dered from bar to bar. Chief Cleghorn let each of his teams have a break at the USO before it closed at 2200. There was a clean - and cheer- ful - atmosphere at the USO and no en- terprising young ladies asking to share a drink. A ham sandwich and coke later, the team is back on the streets. The clouds have gathered since entering the USO and rain looks certain. Drops are falling as they reach the , ' , r 'W'-'-Q furthest extent of their beat: the Club El Morocco. For a while, the two stand be- neath the eave with another team staying dry. The teams swap their night's experi- ences with one another. "We've been on Broadway and the place is like a church," says the first-class on the new team. "That's unusual for amateur night!" Eventually the rain and wind became too much for standing outside and they duck into the Club. The air hung heavy with smoke and loud music assaulted the ears. Even com- ing in from the evening dusk, it took the eyes some time to adjust to the darkness. lfiliehlll X. . ! I .V 1, Well-endowed waitresses with heavy makeup rush back and forth carrying trays of cheap champagne to sailors sit- ting at the small tables lining the walls. The hubbub at El Morocco is noisy but there appears to be no problems. "Go into a place like that," mentions Chief Cleghorn, "and you'll" start more trouble than you'll stop." Even in a city the size of Naples, some Italians seem familiar to those who had been there be- fore. Pointing to one of the women talk- ing with a sailor, Chief Cleghorn says, "Her name's Dominic, been here since at H fltfi.. irfiff I I 134 if,rLliM,.ff!i57 f ,Im "muff , 'i - -'v4A A' , . R J, -f . .v . 5..:'-fJ"In'o'A, 1 . J r l :j.f'..'qe,i-4395: ' e if in r l H f Q H it ' ' I , r 4- -' ms'-: 's ,sum , rw, ,., ,,,t ,., . . .1-5 -Sl . 4.1, v A , ' ' .. ,lfggyfi , -Q - , A .f g --,Nr .1...Q-,mix , 5 4 gf . ,fs -Zag' f -L ,Ht it , .x . 1 .s .. . . gy ' - X '- 'ra W., 154:--,JN 1 f . ' 'Hifi ii l least '68." Leaving the club, the fresh air smells good, as the rain has cleaned and cooled it. Beer had risen from 500 to 800 lire with the ship's arrival and taxis were charging more than ever. The air may have cooled down but the night was just now warming up. e - .. .--W . ,..,. ., .1 4, - .' 1' .ffii .-'jf .- "ff u "".L1Q' X ,"-' . J J 4314- . 22:54-1125.1 '-151: 2: tLeftJ: A chuckle in the ribald poster shop and a wary eye and ear for trouble at one of the bars along his "beat" occupy the night of a Shore Patrolman. 135 MRM the I1 I Of the tens of thousands of photographs D h g p e r S taken during the cruise, some became favorites of the cruisebook h ' photographers. Those pictures are C 0 I displayed on these pages. f 1 5 if 72 , 5 Mg Photos by HJ. Gerwein Rota, Spain ji 'shy' g ..,t,,- ,f 'i' ' Q vsiiaei l1 f 1:1 f ill 42 Y At sea 136 V , f, 4, -W ff f X ' 7 , ' , U ' ' A Taranto, Italy Alberobella, nal? Isen R.F. Danie - -QVA . .,,..,,. . .A .... .,... . ..... x.-....,.......... ..... .. ,........ ...,. ... LZSITLZ-T.Z..g ' ""::"'.:2::m.x.--as--n-'-......-...' L. I. - ,---. Palma de Majorca, Spain A X av U, as ,V I - I Fw, ,xf'ff'C"i ,. - ,WMV f ':"""- +V, K ,,. :?':.s4-,Q-,,, , ' . , qymmi ,gm --.hm , .ffm 9 , QW ., g . Vdlllld Ut! IVldlUlL.d, .Jpanl If?-N ,,,Qi+3g? 91,233 5 XXX ff? 4. 'gv Naples, Italy Naples, Italy E O fi - - .,?T'ii1,'.::.1f,::'. .xggg551-5:5:3'q'r4:5:.::155:-my-15-:5-Wu' F515 M ' ' 21153 '.-1' - y lv 51 an G SCH Barcelona, Spam an 8 SGH Naples, Italy . l l , X R.F. D i l l l l l l l CS .D il You know ou've been at sea too long when. . . - . .. F? i f 1 ' 99 f M! . . . when you don't mind it . . . 'fig Q someone sitting in your way qi-31' because you've seen the . ,Q show four times before I 1 J . . QQ ' , W iv N I pi W4 eowzewe 24 5 K-. ini! is i' 4 ' Kecsggji i lm: U ' .Q F A, 11 EET o we i r ..-.. 131553 'M -' E ' jug I' , X S ' Ll ,, al I' C 297621 . Q' 9' . . . when every time you hear the I captain, it means another extension at sea " i qi If E 4 A KA. N34 , A x 1' v . . . when you don't mind Q ' x 5-mx X standing in line to dump garbage 5 xx from Sponson six X kg ll ETB' o X 1 K 5 Jil-:M . . . when you can't think of Q' i j! 'Q' anything to write home f about , It 5 I 'I' 1 'VTX Sf' it 1, f .. . !,.'. , ' vf K 1 A :Q 1 f y ll Tx 031 X f M-if' 'fist fffiie . e- - -i -Ig '- ,ffm-:.v V4 dh . . v-r':'r'f'1:-:-:V-'--:"" "" " ..-1: :A - . ..- - , . . . .. . .,... .. .,,. . . L-.r. ,.1-...1.us:.L:,:.:.:.1-,:.:.1:-g-----.:::gg-gr.-1-WL:--W.-. . . .....- ,N - . ' A -f-- A- -4-- - N Y ,.,. . . ...v....., , .. f .... - - ..n--.'.. -. ... . . J. .., . . -. .. -I I - A - lA4 - A- -' -- H -- 4- -1- A- "Q f 9 .L Jig, , ---.M 'gy U' B9 Ag . . . when a big Saturday night ' NX 'H means buffing a passageway Y ! I, for zone inspection A x fa ' . 113 'J " JSF' ' . Ji Z sn- l 5 11, N- l I f 5 ' i f Auf' 2 6 9 9 if " Q 2 IA' h in nm: g will . . . w en you put on Ci ii P ! , your civvies the day before -- lf i "V il - Ag ' 'Fig' ff -'-X 5 pulling into port -1 Eg? 4- if Q1 i i r - ' A I Q r ll 5 4., ,g fi . . . when you are finally the first person in a line and you are not even sure what the line is for A pl Ci 536 ifrifi' gr tl! 1 J V ' lil when you don teven bother to cash your pay check 1-1-4 . g I gf 1 f iii! ii A qs i lla i U 9-egg ., ity? ' if WX ifsmfa l is L . " - 1'-lvmll -"'1"t'f-,."a4 i i e lily 4. . . . when gltiu know exactly bow long it takes to make a pot of coffee i i -'H'-vw ft r 511'-'F .. 'fr--fa 1 -Tw-.-..,-.., Artwork by William Seibert 52 'I' '. A .- h . t "- - P l if If .i , ' L' , is-,YR -1 , iw l y i I X. l"'iI N U i . . . ' 1 1, Ti A ly! J . Of I 1 l l t fn - .. fail- if or is sig 3 l 0, i' If J i LU 5 . ll! il ha , A z"-22 i Llluili ' B1 E1 V i 'gl 9 Z f X f U .o 9 I On the nation's birthday, AMERICA celebrated AMERICA celebrated the Fourth of july while at anchor in the Central Mediterranean port of Taranto, Italy. Special activities were scheduled throughout the day and began when the ship held colors and rigged full dress ship at 0800. After both American and Italian guests arrived, ecumenical patriotic services on the ship's flight deck were held. Both chaplains presented portions of the senfice along with parts by Captain MCCCRMICK and the airwing commander. More than 20 crewmembers presented parts in the services. More than 200 Italian guests shared the service with the crew. Following the morning services, Cap- tain MCCORMICK officially opened the afternoon's activities by cutting a giant cake ta pastry representation of the De- claration of lndependence.I An all-hands picnic began at II00 in the hangar bay featuring traditional hotdogs, baked beans and ice cream. During the party, music was provided by groups aboard s ip, playing a variety of folk, rock and soul music. At the same time the picnic was going on, a games competition was tak- ing place on the flight deck. Following the format of the TV-show 'fAlmost Anything Goes," teams from squadrons and departments battled each other in zany competitions like blindfolded obs- tacle courses. A twenty-one gun salute was fired by the ship and answered by the Italian Navy at exactly I200 while several a special da in a special wa 3 3, ,, 6.fify A! Us vas' P., Q9 1- 51345, f ' 51:3 14,3 Choirs and souvenir envelopes were two projects used to celebrate the Fourth. """ Qz rm g nm. .J .1,. ls ffl! 44 Tc' i I 1 , .jn x v'- sb' Holiday Routine, hangar bay picnics, cake cuttings, twenty-one gun salutes, Marine Corps demonstrations and a bell ringing were all part of AMERlCA's bicentennial festivities. hundred AMERICAmen and their guests obsenfed. The Marine Detachment presented an impressive example of precision close-order drill, going nearly fifteen minutes without a single order. Liberty commenced following the Marine's performance. For stamp collectors in the AMERICA crew, a special envelope was printed and made available for cancellation aboard on the Fourth. Nearly 10,000 of these envelopes were cancelled. The final activities of the day occur- red during evening colors and at 2000 when the ship's bell was sounded for two minutes, coinciding with the na- tion's 1400 bell-ringing ceremony. 143 X the Eastern Med was the memories of even the smallest gunboats. This The Soviet buildup in the Med . . . more than hadows on the horizo .gr-any l .S , . . l -- ,-rw ':"Vs4-.0 ' .A " ' --, '-M' fl , new i ?-F., .Sq ..:,t:... . M, Av.- .Jv"'4O-f .L -- --vs . S- 2 -.4 ff '- - - fl. '- gy -fy QW A Wi, h A A ., M, -.. - - - . Q W-M . T F' - , '-AUM, "3 S '- -n -5. -,.:':5" -I ws.- . Lf-, ' 'F ,, -Q... --" A " " ' -Ml-at 'Q-4' -' -an . 1 e.,. .Q '- ""- Q-'jg-S-....f1: pk.. s D ,Tig ln-My . ,,,- ':X -, s..-A-. -,.' x 'ef P- .1 - 1 as QT-..--"'t' if :W-'lnrwwial .. " "- -, .. . N -S Q .. an .I' 1' :..'f--N -f- , s..-N -. "-"Mile M.--Q.: S , - -6' '7"t'm,'1j-'QL ...W -:fy f-wi .., f--t ' ,' a"'a- sf :fi 4 . T fr 1 i an Q1 A ' rl . - S",-Q37 - ll l',, - -tif" Ltd V -nf Sift Exp , - Ei : !:Q T - eq . F . ll :Q V- -'L Y ' . 2.',,..iL .W1 . - f L inI1Cp1,l,.,t,E T.. HHHIZ T r v f Q- ' -- s r S+' - f fr 'ttf T, ifi t r t , 7'-., ' ' Yi" tmlfiifr , .. V M-,F ,jrff-'15"! tazvz, .M - L- -3...-ag, Q. . 1 I, - E-TP it ' . , ' V ,4.:"ii7"t'fYif - -, "-- , . ,-,,4-- .-.1-', .L 11-4- .,, .- , f , , ,"f'1',',.-fr-,V ,,,,, - ,, i l ,.,. -. wi- rpm!! QL- L' :'1.,:71gs---A gQ"r-4.1a.3, , ,- 'TM ..,:.,,s,- ,b i . , by A , , ,' .,,'.. , r j LXTZAZ, 1,,.,,QQ2,-if W " wg 'N . . -' Y! ',,-q.Sff'lZI,g,f'--5-N -,WF X - f -.5-:rig -gf' .nr ' s,,,y:.,. ... Wg-1 rr ' , I ZLQJLUQ ,,,'i ,4'u.,'LL4Z,f75ws:,: T . ff:-' .L -if: .1142 M- f-if -f 11 , 5-,1,g4:. s.gf.4.i'fg-1-'F'-!'fQ', - -V ,,g,f,,,w V ffm5aW31'?2f'jQ5.a.eW,.g,, S we 2 One of the memorable impressions boast a concentration on advanced that AMERICAmen took with them from missilry - placing such weapons on Soviet vessels - both warships and merchants. This impression reflects the apparent buildup of Soviet surface and subsur- face forces in the Mediterranean which had been predicted and observed re- cently. ln many categories, in fact, Soviet vessels outnumber their Ameri- can counterparts in what was formerly referred to as an "American Pond." The new construction Russian sur- face ships reflect Soviet attitudes in both shipbuilding and military strategy. Large and heavily-armed, the ships technique makes even small coastal craft a threat to large surface combat- ants. The larger destroyers, cruisers and brand-new helicopter and aircraft car- riers are said to be "built with one pur- pose in mind" and are in size a bit re- minicent of the heavy battleships and cruisers of the World War ll Navy. I-labitibility may be sacrificed, sleek- ness perhaps, but the new Soviet Navy is a distinct challenge to American Naval strength and our Mediterranean influence. , 3 , IDENTIFICATION I 1. Kynda - class cruiser at anchorage 2. Mod Kashin - class guided missile destroyer alongside AMERICA 3. "The Admiral Dzerzhinskij" 4. Russian AGI taking pictures alongside AMERICA 5. MOSKVA helicopter carrier near Kithera anchorage 6. Foxtrot class Soviet submarine on surface fx . 4 V " . A A I-I J ,126 ., 1. is , , ,M tw' N y--,,, ' U ,j ,, 1. - f Lf QM ' In 1 if ' vm ' , . Maw 6 Photos courtesy of CVIC. l if The Miss America Show 15 August 1976 Miss America, meet USS AMERICA. No further introduction was needed as the two ladies immediately took a liking to ' each other. Miss America visited the AMERICA while the carrier was anchored in Naples, and for most of the crew the curvacious figures of Ms. Tawny Godin and her equally lovely and talented entourage symbolized the first glimpse of America's shores in four months. Captain 1.C. Breast, Executive Officer, and the ladies' seven enlisted escorts welcomed Ms. Godin and her party aboard: Miss Connecticut tMs. Mary Cadorettel, Miss Georgia tMs. Seva Daylg Miss Kentucky tMs. Marsha Griffithlj Miss Utah tMs. Barbara Hanksi and Manager tMs. Helen E. Signayl. They then visited with Captain Daniel G. McCormick in his inport cabin and were given a tour of the ship. The Miss America Show tFrom topbz Miss America, Tawny Godin, Miss Georgia, Miss Kentucky, Miss Connecticut, Miss Utah, Miss Tennessee and Miss Maine. I W sswgss l as ' 4 J' kat, 1. , l Q f ix A , N 5, -ll. .' H ' " . is'Q,! s V .lr y 5,-.1 .5 X ff' gf. J I r A sire E i 1 - ,, , ll ffwffz 1 ' Miss America is welcomed to the Quarterdeck by Captain McCormick who later introduces her to the crew trightl, l 146 13'- i sf 51 ll The Miss America 1976 USO Show officially began at 3 p.m. on Hanger Bay One with an hour-and-a-half musical variety show. Mary Margaret Harris, USO Fleet Director introduced the team who started off the show with a Bar- bara Striesand number "Let's Hear lt for Me". Miss America s whispered concern, "I hope they like us proved needless as AMERlCAmen applauded and whistled wildly after each number. V 7 1 15 ,f- i' 1 5 ji 'M' f 2 f if - i V A f L -. ' -, LW1-.4.-if':-.""'4f-A--3'tl-'fiL il: 'T c , - n tf '-2:-if P "N VV FACE FOR THE FLEET" welcomed aboard Vice Admiral Harry D. Train ll relieved Vice Admiral Frederick C. Turner as Commander of the Sixth Fleet in C-aeta on 5 August. Gen- eral Alexander M. Haig, the Su- preme Allied Commander of NATO forces in Europe, was the guest speaker for the midday - s' event. In his remarks he termed command of the Sixth Fleet "one of the most awesome respon- sibilities of the free world today". The formal ceremony was at- tended by several hundred visitors, including the US ambassadors to Italy, Yugoslavia, Tunisia, and Greece. Vice Admiral Train came from Washington, D.C., where he had been Director of the joint Staff Or- ganization of the joint Chiefs of Staff since 1974. T ,,,.z .,...., .. iq. F? ,mf 5' -gs.-nr-an Uwe.. xx 3-. fear- as ' Xa? ,. Q' if t . s Q wt, i . , . X , rv 1' if 5 Sf The dignitaries present included four ambassadors and foreign leaders from many countries. QM -.., .f gsm.- , iqciv 5 Vice Admiral Frederick C. Turner fleftl . ill 5,2 i Vice Admiral Harry D. Train ll lrightl K Q-t,Y,,, .. .,, r 5 S ,K -..- ,, :td by , - 'Q'--..-1! -gh --- 'T "'f"' ,1 -l -ef f 'QC E. .U -' , ,, b -f aa :eg N- - n f 'i - x N ag, ' QQ' . W r- -.1 Qt""E '...1:'x"""- e Asst, R A ,ul 5 - V Q - s 47 ws. fi- 1 -jivw1: ." 5"57k N 75 Lg fev5?"'T"" ' l , an A , Q M fx' - A W jg if ' 4-if M 'z 5 .- I: 'A 'hffxg -wi m?'v'.'-f'- fy ' i igalrvn ygliid why: U ,V , X2 4. ff Xi, l 'Zu 4513 l '-'27 2'1'E:l -'tL3l'2':l:l!,i.E'3l""llvrll. 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"The liked what they saw Among the countless visitors to America in 1976, these pictures represent some ofthe more distinguished visitors. ,I .r,rr W i Hon William Middendorf, lll Secretary of the Navy is Adm. james L. Holloway Chief of Naval Operations ,Q A Spanish High General Staff Italian Air Force Aviators Miss America and Court 74' f',,'.,.., :.gr."1 . H77 1,-gp c::':- :gum 'X 'Wil 5'1?Kh:l?5n , J .3 ygffwv-A , it V- ,V-,V A 1 A if - i gif-1 r ' . ' W. .Q 4:1 Vice Admiral Train Commander, Sixth Fleet August - present Vice Admiral Turner Commander, Sixth Fleet january - August 'F' Q" lv' Fl A Uv Italian General Officers pr' General Alexander M. Haig CBSXNBC Film crews Supreme Allied Commander, Europe Talcott Seelye Special envoy to Lebanon X A ' X ,Q ' f Q . . ,R I ,E E. C? . x t ' A I 5 i n 3' . r 4.1 ,f in-4 .F x . 0 X , x I qi' ik' -L v " 'T'- N. Adm. Stansfield Turner 151 Commander, Southern Forces, Europe 1? 4' ,T A Cake for Every Occasion It seemed every ceremony, recent milestone special occasion and holiday shared a common denominator - cake. The Michelangelos of the rolling pin, Food Service De- N VVS CAPSULES partment, created such 'masterpieces as the bicentennial 541 pound edible relief map of the United States, fifty cakes representing each state of the union, nightly del- icacies iced with thought provoking quotes, and countless improvised pastries to suit any and all occasions. Because of the confectionary skills of Food Services Department AMERICA received her just desserts. These activities during 1976, both humorous and otherwise, rated special attention. PERB ' , ii ,N , f ff -s. us., , M, cg-bf ,, ,- .mf ' 09, -ik ' 4 f, , ,f. ,, .-,, 4-5, ,, -' ' ' M W. ,QL ' 'in 9-.WW .,, f ' MV M" ..yy-Qaas . "rf , , Mm j f,Vf, A ,,!?'Zxlg1g:vLf'f-f..4,..,4w 4 V .t f .m.L'w, M' , . , SV. 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Wp M .N Mah, ,,..,, W , A ,,5,g,,,, , ,, . ,, , ,A , . ,,., , ,,, ,W , , , V , , , V ,, , - M -ff lf, , i" , ' - " V, . 4 3 fy, ' ,,,, V, W, , V, ,- fr 2 11, Q.: ,N ,f,,. , ,,,,.f,,,, Suk , ' ,gp A 1 ,, 1,9 K , -4,49 , ., - ff, H, ,,,,V-,, .4yV..,-f,,V,, W , 1, 9 4 ,V f 4, :..,1 1V r'f1rw,1.a:e, , , , "3 'wffa--:iT Hffzwgfw V ,,, f,,w,f,3a,,,gG2f, 7, ,ff Q fr-,xj Y ,gm-r. V ' I ff- , f' g " t.7V'f'Vvff"s' ' V xgg Yr A " '13 .f Lia, X .,1r,.:,,,,,' ,, ,V n-A-M, ,, QTL, hale of A Race While at anchor in Augusta Bay, Sicily, AMERICA, and other Sixth H93 5lW'DS present, staged one of the more exotic operations observed dufmg thelcruise: The Great Bicentennial Motor Whale Boat Race. EVSVY Shlp contributed one standard Motor Whale Boat along with 3 threeiman crew, decorated and garbed in whatever manner the ship SHW flf. AMERICAS entry sported a red, white and blue race stripe and the hand-picked crew represented the ship's best. i . - . .. . ... . .. . ,. L'1.m..a.::...----wx..--awe..-v--.w..ma. .g:uutw.m..1.- K ta V . K eutschland Uberalles "Germany, the diseased world's bathhouse." - Mark Twain To write of Germany, and of the German peo- ple in particular, is nearly impossible. A land of beer halls, bratvvurst, stalwart frauleins and im- peccable precision. Forty AMERlCAmen and dependents left the security of the ship and familiarity of Naples to venture into Bavaria, via rail, past the towering Dolomite Mountains -of Austria. During the 18- hour train ride AMERlCAmen marveled at alpine villages, clear mountain streams andthe relaxed Bavarian lifestyle. The site of the 1972 Olympic Games, Munchen ttranslated: the Monkl is a romantic and enchant- ing city with its "Old-World" flair. And during the brief stay, AMERlCAmen visited the city's famous Glockenspiel, the Palace of King Lud- wig, the "refreshing" Lowenbrau brewery, as well as the grim reminder of a bygone era - the World War Il concentration camp at Dachau Time passed all too quickly in Munich 0 Q.. 952, , SK -...S 7 Memorial services held for lost aviator One of the inevitable statistics of an extended deployment are the men lost at sea. On Monday 7 june 1976 Lieutenant tjunior gradel Josiah Flournoy from VA-15 perished along with his A-7 aircraft after colliding with an A-6 from VA-176. AMERlCAmen joined in memorial services and dedicated their newly finished crew's lounge to the aviator's memory. Hello, Darling Over By the end of the cruise the ship s ham radio shack had made approximately 950 phone patches back to the States The busiest day was 18 October when 30 calls went out but on the average 10 15 calls were made per day except when adverse conditions such as Radio Silence toff the coast of Lebanon! and bad radio cond: tions toff the island of Cretel made radio contact impossible There was a direct correlation between incom ing mall liberty and the frequency of phone patches during the cruise according to radio operator Dave Gipson The ham shack located on the O6 level of the island is manned about five hours a day at sea by a volunteer force of four men 'IW V, ,I uf? SCRUB A-DUB-DUB A two-hour telethon marked the eno of a suc- cessful fund-raising effort which took place during the latter part of july, designed to continue AMERlCA's traditional support of young Casa Materna children in Naples, ltaly. The telethon, which triggered a last-minute flurry of funds, was emceed by Lt. jerry Raines of VF-143 and sponsored by CDR. Armstrong, both Climaxed by a banjo duel between Lt. tjgj Mike Harris of VA-15 and Lt. tjgb Bruce McCampbell, the event netted far more funds than previously anticipated. 1 A contribution to the Casa Materna fund meant a vote for any enlisted mans' favorite khaki to par- ticipate in a wash-a-thon of aircraft on the morn- ing ofthe 28th. On that rare morning, enlisted men flocked to the flight deck to witness a rare sight: the Captain and a team of scrubbers and soapers hard at work representing Carrier Air Wing VI. on their "birds". .Q- . FIELD DAY O THE FLIGHT DECK as wt, m ,A On the morning of july 28th, ships company and squadron personnel had an excellent oppor- tunity to witness 15 of our "favorite Khakis" wash down two planes and a helicopter. At the finish of the eventful wash-a-thon the Air Boss, CDR. Cehrig commented over the flight deck SMC, "That's the fastest wash job I've ever seen." A 4 - . ., ., I '!f"'Allll"IlZ.i 1 star ff-.:w,-,rein 31 :.45f.:, - E51 flkffsililszera:.te.s.e2-we- .--afQ'111lz- -fi-will-1e.l1f:i. ON TARGET: THE BATTLE GF AVGO NISI While we anchored near the Island of Crete, several AMERICAmen viewed an impressive show of firepower as the airwing practiced bombing and strafing maneuvers on the small target Island of Avgo Nisi. A-7s, F-14s and A-6s showered the Island with 20mm cannons and 500, 1,000 and 2,000 lb. bombs. The results? Successful, of course. . - . -i an -:A if Y I srartfieino our THE EOURTH OE IULY Who wou d think that nearly I0 thousand en- velopes could be sold in less than two days? That is exactly what happened when the Bicen- tennial Committee offered the crew a Fourth of july souvenir unique to AMERICA. Printed in red, white and blue, the envelopes featured a revolutionary motif on the left side and were stamped and cancelled aboard the ship dur- ing the celebration activities. U 3 A Y., C ,RIS f , as -,. f ,w-gI,....:.9 ff 3 -ner' R 'fwfr 3 I Q I s iN H,g,-gz- 4,'-1' V , ,, r gg f Y , ,V ,ffj2,g7if2' , - ,,,b, ,IQ 'I .,.,,, . 4. ' ' , ' " at ,f ' A SPECIAL FLAG EOR A SPECIAL YEAR While 1976 marked the two hundredth an- niversary ofthe United States, it marked the 20Ist anniversary of the Navy. One of the many ways this milestone was marked throughout the service was the temporary replacement of the traditional Union lack Cblue field, white stars? with the Rattlesnake lack of rev- olutionary origins. Every time AMERICA an- chored, this flag was flown briskly and with pride. 'I55 AMERICA lends support Can't Break Habit AMERICA lends support in in Lebanon evacuation AMERICA evacuation As the nation of Lebanon became torn by civil war and both internal and external strife, the citi- zens of foreign countries began to be increasingly threatened. When nations began to close embassies, foreign nations were warned that their departure was imperative. Great Britian and the United States initially or- ganized an overland evacuation to take their citi- zens to Damascus. When the Palestianian Libera- tion Army could no longer promise protection along the overland route, the United States opted for a sea evacuation. USS SPEIGEL GROVE served as the ship which ferried evacuees from Beirut to Athens during the first evacuation USS CORONADO served during the final evacuation. AMERICA remained "on watch" during the entire evolution, her planes readied for whatever decision was made. One of the side-effects of AMERICA's partici- pation in the Lebanon crisis was a certain un- predictability in scheduling from port to port. This in turn, created uncertainty when the time came for the Dependent's charter flight sched- uled to depart Naples on 3 August. Would the ship be able to make Naples on time or not? As deadlines grew tighter and tighter with little re- lief in sight, a novel solution was discovered in the form of the USS PUGET SOUND. This destroyer tender met AMERICA at an an- chorage near Crete where the personnel sched- uled for the stateside-bound flight transferred by utility boats aboard the PUGET SOUND and began their journey towards Naples. Making the deadline by hours, the planeload of happy - and relieved - AMERICAmen de- parted Naples and headed west. wr? NW'-1-,sf 156 -f .- -i - " ' ' l ' H- -'V Y "- lri::l:::,x1liA,El l , . i . . -ax -is va ie.-nil.-ips.-1 .... ...- ' Stl-'Y A ' -- me-wan .:. lui.:.:.',-.lm 11:21.-, - .':1t...., , mti!iQL,5,,, V...., w..l .. 1 ... ,.1 . .. . . - A - -8- f- Y 1.. '.,g .5 ,f.-- - THAT's E TERTAI ME T AMERlCAmen were treated to three displays of talent during their 1976 odyssey, two which fea- tured the carriers' own resources and one in Palma, which hosted local TV and radio per- sonalities of Mallorca. On 10 May, Chaplain Cook teamed up with Dr. Dunn tof Dentall and Dr. Mineham tof Medi- call to form a "Dixon Brothers"-style trio, Fran- cois jackson mystified the audience with a poetry and song selection and a host of guitarists, aspir- ing comics and an amateur magic skit all shared the spotlight to boost the spirits of a sea-weary crew. But it was in Palma de Mallorca where we wit- nessed the imported talent of the lovely blonde TV starlet, Bettina, and a cast of magicians, com- edians and flamenco dancers, which left us beg- ging for more. AMERlCA's Underworld AMERlCA's Aqua Men found it's beginnings as a club through the efforts of Mr. lohn Lovisolo, Grumann Tech Rep during the first two weeks of our Med Cruise. The Club quickly grew in size to a membership of 37 people, most of whom were fully equipped and certified divers. AMERlCA's Aqua Men enjoyed many dives beneath the beautiful clear waters of the Mediterranean Sea. CDR. Dunn, AMERlCA's Senior Dental Gfficer captured an un- usual underwater treasurep a very old Green amphora urn in the waters near Taranto. , gw3,f,?r,ge'f, ,. ,if-Iwi: i- f- , frffiff 'jf ' , if M' ,wif a'4.,4g"t f .-3 lil, 5- -gz- f'i!2f.f-F -' : 1 ,f -wi-'-ff Ig'- , , z c ,yy ' ,milli- f. 1241631 4-,X an f Ui! ' ii 1 A special thanks to the "small boys" USS CANISTEO USS KUELSCH USNS PAWCATUCK USS CQNNOLE USS MCCANDLESS USS VQQE USS CONYNCHAM USS MCCLQY USNS WACCAMAW USS COQNTZ USS MOINESTER U55 YARNE1-L 158 N I V . "viz: 1 3-1112. ,.v ,X.., ,. 'Y f ' 'I 'f.E,g. , :sy 5- Alfa? vi I X A F' , L11 x X X f P0 RTRAITS 17 I, KJV' ' X J-. x X ' e 7,1 f 99' . , 1 - . x . : - ., L. ,. 'lg N3 ',,,, "' . .Y 1il?':,, " LZ. 1 - 5 3 ' ' Q1 7' tx' i . . , ' ' . "4" f , ,Ji , 2 ','3j.i " f'F'31?7-T95 xTW2?'7'E!"J-'S?726S'f.T-f,fT:'f,:1 -vw-1 45.11. 3- -, , . .. -,. 1 H-, . A,g, ...A .,., M, 'M -'-rk1-ff'.:- '--gg---,:. ff.fff-,- "fi '.. ff' VJ. . ,' 1 fi:-5' C.. 'T' 51"-Ag, 'gt :. f--' .If ag- .gif- Q '-.39-' :S.f:,f1- f-15:15 CDR N.B. Dyer CDR P.R. Evans CDR T.H. George,1r. CDR B.R. Glasgow CDR D.B. Linehan CDR VV.F. Martin CDR F.A. Olds CDR V. Sylvester CDR HM. Walters CDR G.H. Wigfall LCDR 1.P. Gay LCDR j.L. Harford LCDR D.M. McDonald LCDR1.E. Ramsey LCDR F.P. Roll LCDR M.N. Schaller MAJ I. Ueland LT j.D. Austin, jr. LT B.B. Culmer ENS DM. Cebulski ENS R.B. Putman ENS MJ. Randolph Carrier Group FOUR art'4:-':::::a:::'::.:"1:'.:gz:::::::f:':::,:13 r.. :...' - .. , , -. . . 4 . 1 .. I .5FIBPJJ1-A1515-'Lt'l'g?'11'i:I!'cE1Lg2-Qgilg 5' i v-"1 ,W .1 gf ,,,f L., XIII! 3.1 ix-if ,-..- - CCG-4 Staff MSCS C. Bersamina RMCS G. Candy YNC 1. Trotter BM1 R. Ferguson 1S1 F. Hazlett RM1 F. Hubbard YN1 R. Nolen MS1 R. Ramos -QM1 M. Savoy RM2 D. Brown YN2 D. Crump RM2 1. Schimek RM3 E. Bates RM3 j. Phillips MS3 O. Santos MS3 M. Tennity SN L. Martin YNSN P. Szostak MSSA W. McDonald YNSA D. Mowery MMFA 1. Phillips AIMD CDR 1. Burrows LCDR 1. Hall LT R. Moeller LT A. Rossiter CVVO A. Tullus MCPO A. Yancey AFCM K. Dowdy ASCS L. Mitchusson AMSC D. Cervantez FRC G. Flenner AOC G. Kauffman AQC B. Draus AQC 1. Lloyd ADIC E. Sims CPO M. Smith AEC B. Thomas AMHC S. Thompson ASC 1. Weese ASC R. Winegarner AQ1 D. Arnold AT1 B. Bristor AZ1 C. Clayton AS1 S. Dabrowski AT1 H. Erhart ADH 1. Killough AS1 1. Lawhon AE1 H. Harris ADR1 W. Howie AT1 G. McDaniel AMS1 T. Miles 162 2, V :S 4 , B A A M L ' Afaf , Q i X Q? I ,ni , C R' . ,fl .4 . f 3' f - -' W an K YT' if' .a 'r 2 u if M jf ., , ai I 4' 8 ,,. 2 ,.,' vw' ' . f v Q. ffqgfi ii .x . K, up . . N as I W6 s,s..,, 4 '-A. f IM' V l ,V LL .r,- gi kkk. i V, 'N-' i 1 K .2 X5 as as . -W A EW X. A '.B1 lfilflzftl 'S H- ias A w A 5 ' ' B .. 1 5 k L. K Q 2 A . .T ..s..s. . - V- ' "" , fx A : Ce .i 4, . -M , . .. . , an " R . , .. 1 -s .1555 ' 7" , . 'X 'V-f Q' .fgxhf . . ,f 531 X! . , we f ' li . ff' A Cels as S+' . L E . K 'lk Aw nvhq ixfzixv. L+ 4 k.,x .4,.,. N.,4. ,..,, N. ,AX A a . . .. s . . A R S f . . .. T 'fo . fg s s , A like . Q as 4 .. . . l s -5 . s s l ' C 1. C ,'l",'ll...l-N1. A A If . N l'-' . X . : X 2 N Q Q N so .gixlil Z min, . . I in ll . A i '4 Q as 4 sl Ty AAN- C 5 7 A li llll s A llll C AQ" L R ' 'ff ' l N . si- ,A,.., 'lss"s 1 lls X - if f A L Z .s f f g . I . 1 girl. 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Nash AS1 W. Nedell AS1 C. Perrault AE1 E. Rigdon AZ1 D. Rodriguez AT1 W. Sheridan AT1 P. Smith ADR1 C.. Sperry AE1 K. Stevens ADR1 1. Waldroup AS1 N. Wilson ASH2 L. Abraham AZ2 W. Bainto 4 K. 5,1 ,Qi Q- l , .YW ,U , , ,Q , V413 . x- Alf' 1 a xaivfa 6' . - vu...-:gg -9 any A AE2 C. Calhoun AMH2 P. Calima ASE2-R. Callahan AT2 j. Carlet AZ2 1. Coffee AE2 I. Davis AT2 J. Dilliplane ADJZ 1. Douglas AT2 D. Duty AO2 R. Fenner AQ2 M. Ferry ASM2 C. Fox AK2 1. Friend AQ2 D. Gipson AT2 W. Hall 163 ' AIMD AE2 j. Hamilton AT2 R. Hammell AMS2 G. Hartland AT2 C. Harmon AO2 R. Heitman AE2 W. jansen AT2 M. Kerr ASE2 T. Kueny ADR2 H. Mollohan AMS2 G. Mulee AE2 A. Malo ASE2 C. Presa ASM2 I. Ramkawsky ASM2 E. Simpson AT2 M. Smith AT2 M. Sonntag ADIZ R. Sucqamg AX1 N. Turner AT2 M. Vincent AZ2 R. Wrench AT3 D. Anders AT3 E. Brown AE3 O. Chapman AMS3 1. Cordero AZ3 M. Crawford AMH3 M. Daniells AX3 1. Hahs ASM3 L. Hermel ASH3 B. Hicks ASM3 R. johnson 164 .,f ,-.5'Z:Qf.1 ,Sgi vb. K Nk . . A R 3 ..hC 4 . 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Sadler AE3 R. Snow AT3 1. Soltysiak SAM3 M. Walker x AT3 T. Wells AT3 E. Williams 'E it - e. 1 'S AT3 M. Zatz AXAN 1. Alexander AN 1. Aragon AN D. Beabout AMSAN D. Bennett AN T. Bentulan ASMAN W. Bosworth AMSAN S. Bradley ASEAN S. Brodie AN J. Burleson AN D. Byrd AXAN F. Cross AZAN C. Davis AN W. Dickens ATAN 1. Gonder 165 AIMD AN W. Hall AZAN B. Harper ADIAN R. Harris HN R. Hopler ASMAN S. House AMSAN V. johnson AN 1. Kollock ASHAN M. Matthews AN R. McNeal AN R. Memo ADJAN C. Morris ASMAN M. Nicklas AN H. Ormsbee ATAN 1. Posey ASMAN B. Richards AN E. Robertson AN A. Romero AZAN R. Sadler AEAN W. Sarfielo AXAN K. Simpson . AN R. Stanton AEAN D. Strickland ASMAN W. Suplee AN W. Valenzuela ATAN R. Vasquez AZAN D. Watson AZ3 F. Weilbacher AN D. Wieland AN A. Zajac AA D. Cardwell 166 Q., 0 Y t F 4 ' 1 f W' r .K - X .1 ,r.. qs um 1- K.. X . 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Griffith AA A. Hasler AMEAA R. Maples AA A. Miller AMSAA A. Smith AA N. Williams Mr. W. Daniel Mr. L. Long M L Suri G Stelljes R Sticklus W Brite 1 Burke C Lucarelli Mr R Matthews Mr L Nevala CDR I Gehrlg CDR S Paul LCDR H Diel LCDR W Miller LCDR B Rosedale LT R Elliott LT. M. jonas LT. S. Karcewski 'I67 AIR LT. I. Reid LT. L. Smith CWO2 M. McHenry CWO3 W. Leavings CWO3 G. Leonard ABCS D. Day YN1 G. Laughing AK2 R. Goldberg AK3 L. Gibbs YNSN X. Darbone AN S. Perrotti YNSN R. Perry AA A. Holcomb AA M. Holmes ABHC D. Diamond ABHC 1. Ross ABHC R. Warren ABE1 L. Blankenship ABH1 W. Deane ABH1 R. Kilmer ABH1 R. Pieper ABH1 K. Sande ABH1 A. Starline ABH2 K. Brown ABH2 L. Cattles ABH2 T. New ABH2 O. Otero ABH3 W. Bailey ABH3 R. Bean 168 , . am, yf .133 ffl X.,, Q ,QM . 13 . , . 1 iw ,ge , , ':',xg , . I W W 4 .6 'X Zi 0 x W' 'H' mu Y X W. N. L in X"""J ' w 5-.,fp.,?.f lf. ', . . -' f , M ' 'X ' " -v ,- J f I sf Y gn. M f 'Vi ,V qi 1. v 2, . 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Barrick SN T. Barrick SN 1. Bridges BMSN T. Brown SN P. Clouser SN R. Collins AA F. Cordero SN l. Dillon SN M. Dulac SN M. Durham SN D. Endl SN L. Fortier BMSA1. Gates SN G. Glaze T86 , Deck Department H5 ' EW, it J X ly X 5 v 'nf as ' 1 5 T A ff 5 ll? . -Q - ff G- T - at E -V A' 1 ' f .L , w ifxgjtf ,X .gf u . 'T if . 'fT:ff1. X ' I Q Q , S T ' .rsss .1 T i T 4 is.lis 5 T T T . ,'.. fig. I I In f K - 'i.r ' -. ' 4 .r.l TTT. .... . . 3 , " 4 E. S .Sl. .... Q9 v S an - QS, T. wt . Wu, ,sy T T . - . S w .- fsllr.. . ...r.t. ft A -... T rrs' . ..s. .Q T rsnl Q T TT Sym. V . T 1 'V . Q2 V ' t ET . . f . r.l E ".' T T T T TTTTTT T T '..- T T T TT p p - T T' , T it T T' ' T STTT T T ,- ., TTSTTT TT . . ' . Trs.t f TT? T T f -1 - 1 T . , ,.,k, N W -I , x , . ' 2 ' ."'. g f - S, C .uf . .-ee . . ,T" ' ' 4 .- ja .s1k, 40' X1 r wk. rw: r . l. ya 'T '1' 1.4 I A 1-f me f uiflg if' l 1 ,a ' 4 , , Afhy lvl ' Wfj. 1' f .f ,f X 2 X A T r T - 1 A YV' 5 ,W W -A - - 'T wif, 4. ., - - T .... 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We - aaa.-s wf'--ew -f-a 'lnb 3212. - ' , , . , ,4f,,w,,,.,,f4 , 7, V .Xb N I L ,A- ll r.: 1 5 S ggi l 'l ll' f , . . . lb , I r -I ll 6 VJ 4 A.. f , N- ft-- . . " 1 h -A AJ, rvwkbi' if 6' it I '76, in 1 ser gg 1 42 , i T . i ' it l 4 ' I f ' 1, 4 A N! f V A K-xj 6 f, l X1 th , I 1, A lf' I M 1 li.-...A-.ls 'lllhl "L.31.L,QmuI ci! .ggj rf -f-W-A Ae--is DECK SN P. Griffin SN C. Haley BMSN S. Ingalls SN W. johnson BMSN R. Kincaid SN D. Kirk AN E. Lao SN A. Martin SN D. Martin BMSN R. Martinez Q. FN T. Marusak SN W. McCall SN M. McEntee BM3 D. Middleton SN R. Mortiz W? SN- K. Morton SN R. Noss SN R. Proctor BMSN F. Rice SN B. Riddell BMSN C. Scott SN L. Thompson ABHAN R. Ward SA M. Gallagher SA R. Meyer SA R. Oques SA A. Ordanio SA M. Panis SA W. Plaisance SA S. Pruitt 187 DECK SN K. Ruskin SA M. Strazzer CDR W. Dunn LT A. Cltal LT 1. Krochmal LT G. Rounsaville DTC D. Sampson DTT D. Wertz DT2 R. Hefner DT3 M. jackson DT3 R. Oldham DT3 A. Saragosa DT3 1. Soles DN M. Bowens DN R. Cosme DN A. Harris DN T. Kelly DN 1. Stewart CDR W. Houk Uan.-Aug.J CDR A. O'Dwyer fAug.-Presentl LCDR 1. Barone LT F. Smedley HMCS R. john HMC K. DePlanche HMC L. Fitzgerald HMC 1. Fradsham 188 V 'X-'faq B - X... A V? ' li .. -Q . rrrr rt A I Department A Q T ...., . C I, it ,wh vy A rw gg K so A f J' :C KQTASS -N . gw- 'S Wt 1 fa . A -' t .'... i. X t f" . Q. A WE Q5 'f ff N . , N A ' 1 ... f f '... f '--Q S , W Am-S . n . XT? ff " A ' 1 't1"' , Yf Q .A W 1 . . 1 L li K V . f - ' 1 if Af- -. f.',f. Q fi. ,l','f 'V J Q" 5 5 ,fra fl .,.. Y ' ,, ,.,f. 4 , hr . V 3. L VV. If if., , , ' A VL .4 I., . , l It f 4 . I x ,W -.ni .vt - ,.,- MESA . -f fr? 9 mtyxi ...Z 1 X Z V .4 -.1 l 4 I A li ' lf, Medical - lff. Q 4 . 1 .. A A , ,M ft ,' -. ' A M .. ., , V . Depaftment ' 1 Trtl T ' "1 l"' 1 3 ffl M 1, W t.r, 'Rb' t Q - r.-a--t ..... sr C 'T-. O S ify CWI! L .l.. L A Q -- ' ... A T ' Nr Y L fm. S A qw r . . 44 A., ,.., .,.t T "Vr gut? . Z MEDICAL HM1 1. Nejman HM1 C. Robwette HM1 1. Root HM2 R. Garcia W' HM2 T. Greenwood HM2 S. Meier HM2 D. Mussara ' HM2 G. Strickland HM2 C. Vermillion HM3 L. Blutler HM3 S. Dawso HM3 M. Gerstner HM3 D. G u it HM3 A. ,Santos HM3 S. Schuler HN D. Cruz HN 1. Blidy HN R. DeWitt HN K. Dorow HN W. Eberlin HN C. Harris HN G. Hayes HN D. King SN R. Spaulding HA R. Sullivan HA 1. Coyle D. ENGINEERING CDR D. Mares LT C. Bannister LT K. Nichols LT R. Smith LTJG R. Allen LTJG G. Bangs LTjG L. Bolding LTJG M. Keen LTJG 1. Ramsey LTJG W. Rust LTJG M. Wilson CWO2 M. Ansich CWO2 T. Leighty YN3 D. Kirkpatrick YNSN R. Rinehart MMC D. Alexander MMC 1. Gardner MM1 R. Allen MM1 C. Atkins EN1 E. Barangan EN1 E. Hargrave EN1 1. Huggins MM1 1. Newsome EN1 L. Peak MM1 G. Thebeau MM2 W. Clark MM2 1. Hicks l 190 Engineering Department Q .. . V . . C o r g , g We i fx " E E , WM . 'T' 3 N P 1. :er-1 ' Q . I if-5 , xl M A N 5 - - ,wif 0 K . A V - - "' C. we ' . - . . WkV fP1,Q.J'g if 4 G7 .V g 3 Vx .b 5 f , .... . W . Q, f P 1 . ll Q T' ' 'MMI an fl , " '--,i i ' 3 -Q --'. 5 : ' E ,u . , .. Q: . ,Q . " C. , ' f . f .na - " . . M . 0 1, slg. , ,ff V Z .I N: V. . W V f'...gw , .V A K f 1' ' ,gvgzf ,... I , rf X 'v S A if 524' 1 4 , . ...... ,I K VEY. . 3, 1 g Y., -, N A 'K' A . A ...T 4 Tya. T A X I gl.- , llll pi lg L 1 V V f . , fx J-Z' ' ,VV I f 4 . f ,H fri 3 ' ww " ' ' K., if l K ll i f 1 '- ' K 1 Y ' Rae. . . TW' . . 54 A My A 4 V, I H47 I , I V, . If f A 1 . . Vivl l ' ' - ' 7a ll l a al f ' l K . ag. 1 L Mind .arf ax-rirffl 15 ll iw, if L A rsl. V 1 M A27 Lev v..S2 , l Af .. I -. ' ' f V' C, '- 77, . W lQf'+:lLk2 , ll E ,,, f,, l lx I 'V , l '. Z C' C is l W l Y I .V H 5' Xu! Cm If M. M. gl ...,.. lg, . ig? .. V!2l . - .M . T 'sa 4. .T i 1 . ,... . ..ar ENGINEERING MM2 R. Moore MM2 G. Ping MM2 W. Sellars MM2 T. Vickers MM2 S. Wood EN3 R. Altice MM-3 R. Biggs EN3 R. Delke MM3 R. Flack. EN3 M. Hendrix Dl.2 MM3 C. MM3 Sloan MM3 R. Snyder MM3 L. Sporlecler MM3 L. Wesolg FN j. Alexander FN E. Amayao. ENFN F. Barber FN W. Birk MMFN K. Boland FN 1. Bolland FN D. Ciborowski MMFN R. Dowling MMFN A. Edge 191 ENGINEERING MMFN R. Eltus FN 1. Lewis ENFN W. Lewis FA M. Lott MMFN C. Morrill MMFN D. Munn FN 1. Paglivca ENFN R. Reder FN M. Rule MMFN R. White MMFN W. Williamson MMFA B. Becknell MMFA M. Bradbury MMFA A. Ceven FA K. Chapman FA 1. Considine MMFA K. Cornman MMFA M. Crowley .FA C. Dearring FA B. Harris FA R. Harve FA D. Humenili FA 1. Ibanez MMFA B. 1ohnson FA 1. Kemssies ENFA C. Lockwood MMFA T. Magoon FA F. McNeice MMFA C. Morgan MMFA 1. Nicholas 'I92 all Z. ' 'I 3 QQiQ.2gij'9fgi.f fig. f 2, A f .- f f - , ft' l wi?-V.3'1p'i. 1' T f. sw.:-M 4 was .mi 4 - nf! ,wo . 2.4.4, f uf ' -ff L All '11 'ff' li lllll Aww lli. A wx J! 7 W ,f 'fa X , il W ' Zz . f 4 i .1,. VVk.k,V. , 1 Qlb n . Q ky 'W X .2 X X X 5 ..... . 2 f ,M I X I l ff is 5. p 33 , if -gi . , I W7 A X , ,.,, f l 11 V 1 ' , f ii X . i Y L mm -Jef a AVE V , 1 ix vi u 4 A4 ny! I iv ig gf 'tffy 3 Q7 ,Mr 4 , .4 , ENGINEERING ENFA A. Panfil FA D. Peltier MMFA 1. Pudsey MMFA 1. Royce FA 1. Sheneman MMFA J. Thom son ENFA D. TompEins MMFA R. Treen FA E. Wiley BTC R. Humphries BTC G. Southerland BT1 R. Desantell BT1 B. Snyder BT2 N. Rank BT2 A. York BT3 C. Allen BT3 1. Carter BT3 1. Crossland BT3 W. Daniels BT3 R. Dialino BT3 1. Drummond BT3 T. Fairman BT3 H. Cali BT3 T. Hickman BT3 M. Kendall BT3 GJ Lucia BT3 T. Miles BT3 G. Moore 193 ENGINEERING BT3 W. Morphew BT3 F. Palacio BT3 1. Sims BT3 M. Suminski BT3 W. Wurster FN C. Brumbaugh BTFN W. Burton FN R. Goetz BTFN S. Hilton FTFN 1. Kethley MMFN K. King BTFN K. Kitterman BTFN L. Lake BTFN A. Lajiness BTFN T. LeBlanc BTFN A. Mack BTFN L. Nelson BTFN A. Nichols BTFN W. Seagren BTFN R. Smith FN R. Storms BTFN W. Thomas BTFN C. Tipton BTFN 1. Valente BTFA j. Banks BTFA A. Beister BTFA S. Clariday BTFN O. Davidson BTFA H. Davis BTFA R. Decola 194 I , -A . ...WM .s, . gy, f . 1 .Vg . Jw ,f , : Myxlwiwr I :I I K . . . ,f ' ip.. . . i 7 ,A-L :,. P I l .Q 'GW' A ' X . 3 I V, L' . ,.,, . .gg, V L . lg s ....,,.,f 1 ,.f-,. .as ' M X - '.... A .... if f N' 472 M M fl 12:11:53-6 1- .ig -. 6 W... A M, aw, .,f. - f. f...f.. V... . . .....s-. ya-..,Q S5 K ,F s Q7 sf. . ' ': , X f . 727 'V 6.749 ,. .Q 5,55 .fi L-,-?'nM.C'f ' , 90 1191 4,3 Q,-ea , 'X A x wif' " a. 1 A wg . M ll W X -. f 5 X 91Qfgf.fg:. , QR. . - . . 2 N 2 L 1 ' ' f 5... . J "1V,i lsi. 1355 5 f Q' f . W f,,, . f 5' ,ah ...... I. Y A ' ' F 9 f if 1,"-f -L., . . mM,,.f.,.,. . .- ..-, .Q if 1 ,M-M,-.fm-e.f.. . f . .X .f..f.ff..1 ff f azeiwfp- -wif V I .Q-,mw,:f,QA45z y "55Cf2.af::..:'..6 .. if - ., . A . 3 .K , 9 Q' V , H ' "-- z . X V . ,"." " IM . FX . L. . f gf L A n 'sf' ' - ' 7 Qg ffgwgiw 0. f . 'f - ,f -. 15 . f. wi S ' .-.. " K ' ' . fa I WH K E. I Q K' 5 1 , . ,. , W wif! ' Z I, a QI. Aff, , ' QQ, - 1 , ' " aj. H ' Q in if 'M' K 2 'Q We ' f 'X 1 Y Ig .U I f 'gf xl 4 Y X Z . , . ,.,., , 5 1 'V g .f . A 53 1 V 4.4 7 ' W , A f I i,li li E 7 S-EL.. i.i.. A 5 l ' .. YQ. 'li , X 1 M , .4 . ENGINEERING BTFA 1. Diaz BTFN A. Freeman BTFA S. jarose BTFA A. johnson BTFN J. Kelly BTFN R. Kos FA j. Martinez BTFA M. McDonald BTFN D. Mundell BTFA M. O'Brien BTFN 1. O'Connell FA M. Strickhorn EMCS G. Constante EMC L. Bavsas W EMC P. Hall EMC C. Lorenzo EMC R. Mills ICC R. Prince EM1 C. Castro EM1 L. Holman EM1 T. McLennan EM1 L. Pabustan EM1 H. Salles EM1 R. Suarez ICC j. Toledo lC2 K. Bader lC2 M. Basham EM2 R. Caldwell EM2 M. Christie 195 ENGINEERING EM2 B. Clark EM2 E. Gamez EM2 L. Guzman EM2 T. Holliday EM2 T. Noel EM2 R. Osborn EM2 T. Reyes EM2 T. Rini IC2 S. Sippel EM2 A. Vasselo EM3 B. Bridges EM3 A. Brown EM3 1. Cenese EM3 D. Clements EM3 T. Davis EM3 M. Garrison IC3 K. Kindborg IC3 L. Laskey IC3 F. Lekich IC3 1. Perkins EM3 R. Marcin EM3 R. Marcin EM3 C. Marsh EM3 J. Miller EM3 E. Mrazek EM3 A. Nevado EM3 1. Nygren IC3 A. Pechin EM3 P. Poels IC3 M. Poteete f X 'W K f V':W . 53 "" a .-V. if T 0 eff. ,.f4n . 74135: l' f f 5 llrsffi M . 4 ,Y m , . 2, ,fi . X x T lil .4 ll , A fav 9 4 C, M ll! C A L+., ' if , if 61 i v, ,. A , E, f Q , . T I , 1 ... ... . r. T 2 . '.'-g if frsr .'f.r T ' f A X '.f- fy I I H X if A I 7 6,1 1 ,f , A f a f . as, .Z Q . . W--1 is E- 'HE -4 My f.... .ff +178 N, ,gn 4 4 ,.,, f films . , at , 'L , .JZ X , 7 2 a , ENGINEERING EM3 R. Schneider EM3 L. Sizemore EM3 R. Smith IC3 B. Thibodeaux EM3 l. Yates EM3 K. Williams FN F. Angeles EMFN l. Barber FN 1. Bautista ICFN G. Blanton EMFN D. Bucher EMFN B. Busby FN' R. Delacruz EMFN P. DeMarco EMFN R. jones EMFN E. loslin ' EMFN W. King EMFN A. Kutzko EMFN R. Love EMFN A. McCants ICFN R. Moreno EMFN R. Naylor ICFN K. Pratt FN 1. Probert EMFA 1. Robinson EMFN 1. Schukow ICFN B. Sutton ICFN W. Tune EMFN M. Wessel EMFA L. Bokuniewicz 197 l l l V l ll il l l li ll l i i l 1 i il ii l l l 1 l Ll Hu ENGINEERING ICFA D. Came FA C. Carpenter lCFA T. Falck ICFA 1. Garrabrant FA M. Hewitt FA K. jones ICFA D. Kiley EMFA D. Locascio FA 1. Sox EMFA L. Spero ICFA 1. Stevens FA M. Tafoya FA S. Ware ICFA 1. Wier FA G. Williams MM1 1. Grimm MM1 C. Holmes MM2 S. Leohner MM2 K. Payne MM2 1. Southwood MM3 C. Amacio MM3 R. Bitondi MM3 R. Nieves MM3 F. Paige MM3 M. Sims MM3 T. Swearengen MM3 M. Vadnais MM3 D. Watkins MMFN R. Allen 198 A- ff' s. X X7 ' 4 -I .. rl iv. gl .mn W 'f Aan s - . V A Ye 5, V , L - if 1, " 1 , f ' ml 3, w -it . . . ..... . . ... V si Y 1 gg, .S 1f fy A 4 , Q r W we ....l1 , E. , 1 . "iff A 'V aff M . y A . . A ' M f Ii E! GH . illl N3 4 W4 MMZQMK rw ' I ENGINEERING MMFN D. Boivon MMFN C. Brown MMFN T. Brown MMFN F. Burrell FN j. Cocoba FA B. Collins MMFN K. Curle MMFN D. Green FA K. Griery MMFN 1. Harris MMFN R. Hartman FN M. Hermes MMFN T. Ingalls MMFN G. Kincaid MMFN D. Lindsey FN 1. Mandeville MMFN 1. Martin MMFN M. Mayo MMFN R. Sanders MMFA M. Schimming MMFN L. Senter MMFN H. Sexton FN L. Smith MMFN M. Smith MMFN C. Tagliani FN W. Vaughan MMFA 1. Brigman FA 1. Derby MMFA B. Gillin MMFA G. Haynes 199 :zu--H ENGINEERING FA R. Hoffman FA 1. Horn MMFA B. LaBelle MMFA D. Lancaster MMFA D. Laudig MMFA R. Samrnartino MMFA M. Tucker MMFA 1. Wiggs HTC R. VViles HTC R. Wolak HT1 R. Gassaway HT1 l. Gray HT1 H. Laws HT1 S. Mitchell HT1 B. Morris HTl C. Terry MR1 1. Vines HT2 E. Boggs HT2 T. Corbin HT2 D. Kraus HT2 1. Sims MR3 G. Aureli MR3 W. Burton HT3 L. Cantu MR3 L. Deskeere HT3 E. Epling MR3 A. Everts HT3 D. Galla HT3 1. Grainger 200 . fa? V f if .- 5 ' fe ' 1: -wi!!! z.....f - . . Zfni IV., AMf, fuf jf wwf? 15 ,r ., E,f ..:i Vrrf I . . x V. 41 I- A . . 'af '-,F1Q, HWWij '," f?mN i...l " f - ,... . 1 Q "7l"ig..11 " ' ',',,, - , ,f " Qi 'fe 1.g331g 1 " ,..r 1 V T 'Vlf A E Q. .P , ' . . f .2 L ' f - K -Lf 'fgwgkxff H735MWZ' ..M Mwimwffwmw' i-'. i is 'V' it 1 .,glg f-g- 5 b - Q ll B 2 gy. Q' i I - ., .- B. rsr . It Vlll ll llll if ,.- ., 'T ff .,.., . . . 1. .- A - "" I N- Q' fi. ? 1 X xx av' f. mi. M- 1 f 7 X "" ' , 1 if If ..,,.. M A, I .,.,... . M7 . ., ga' 'E 'gf ' - . .. . .l. T . Nmap. "N V? -as ' Q , if 'V' V .. . ,I V .. .,,f V . . , g B . L . .. .ji 3, W. ., I' f iw ' ff., ' f . , ff 1 I, Ni X, V ' " 'I ' elf Q ,, Q' ffjfwfe 4 T . ,QV .44 V ., -Q . s, , f 9 Fw ig! A f. f V I IV.. g 7 X V V ,. gr ' .if if cgi , fr 7 X 41 3 I W4 J VV I 'V K , f J P4 ,, ' . gf., Q- 1' fv I ., ' A f , ,y r fijfw j' A 4 1 45 . . g -5 Avy ..., 1-I ,,.f,, ,, if ...9 5 2 03- Q- 4.-zliwrgqikkiz' 4 . . X 1 F-Q 0 , . 'Q ll x ......., l nz.. if A Jr.. f 4 P 'A 1, r S x Sr- 'X ...,,,Ei.g1.:.4..,.L,. .gr r,,., .. l ' -J 7 hixxg-6 5. X ...lf A . ff -.3 A Q-----f' 4 nf. ' rw ' , 1' "y.. .y ,- . MD., . 1. . Af-...Q Xl has l. l- .. az Q 4 I A' ll 4 A Ng! xp ...A ENGINEERING HT3 R. Harris MR3 S. jones HT3 G. Loewen HT3 W. Lord ' HT3 G. Lusk' HT3 G. McCoy HT3 K. Morrison HT3 W. Okelberry HT3 P. Olson HT3 T. Purcell N MR3 D. Siravo HT3 L. Smith . HT3 R. Reince HT3 D. Rocha HTFN j. Aponte . -5,2124 , " 1 . A:3:,,4'i1X ' l ' - . .mv -Lawfu- , N- free. M f4.,'131i3.fm:. - ' r .S ug "i- f 1- M me HTFN R. Atlee FN C. Batteaste FTFN H. Bean HTFN D. Blackburn FN j. Bowens FN B. Cruse MRFN W. Coffey HTFN W. Glowatz FN C. Graham FN F. Howell FN 1. johnson HTFN C. Mates HTFN D. Melton HTFN R. Newkirk HTFN P. O'Connor 201 ENGINEERING HTFN D. Osborn HTFN D. Ploussard HTFN C. Poston FN S. Puckhiser HTFN G. Rose HTFA F. Sainoff HTFN l. Seitz HTFN D. Stofel HTFN 1. Taylor FN R. Washington HTFN M. West HTFN j. White HTFN C. Whitson FN E. Wright HTFA D. Bernier MRFA G. Brewer HTFA M. Dalton HTFA R. Elliott FA G. Frueh MRFA D. Landry HTFA L. Henson FA M. Huff HTFA W. Nicholson MRFA K. Niswonger FA G. Novak FA M. Randall FA D. Samu HTFA R. Sanders HTFA 1. Saylor HTFA R. Schultz 202 X , 1 ,..-3-V-"V, , . K I A I fa ' 53 N. Q ff V' A l ft- X I F v 'R iai if V .I . . , , .Wg , ,ff e , f -Ji. , .. Q., .A .5 GPU' a 1, Q E 1 I 'Sty ,EW I ax ax oi I l ' i.1fQQf f X 4 X x 1 'X X 1 fs fs i x qw ' 4 .. A -f .y Xu, K f F M52 l 'ii uf f 4 R f ff . 'NN' -,nf 1 X - l N 'ff 4 sv I, f 5,91 ..-" V. m and V .. 2 wffS4f.4 f f s 1 if . , , hx, MA ..,. ,,,,,. 9 . .. as fi V.,, 3 V V Ha ,, , Si X. .. if . ff? .V . '. '41 N.. Nl ' FWZ J . lm 1' 'VP- Qf i - Q. fr f 4. - .r 'e Av, 3 f pf' , Z . 4 Q5 f I Z. 5 f K MM J . ,,,, , -for K , .X XM 2 A f Y Y l ll j r lx F -., K 'vi - ' 1' H! ! . .I ' , . a 1 J 4 . ""2 fi ' , K Exim? 5. K rf. 'Z 1, si F! .-., , ww X-- - 'f ' 1 : I 'iff 4 ,E A ' ' f 3 V .M X . Hn lj ."l V l'f. .'.A, . ,.., 6 515 t.,,,A, 'Q , , I W it if 'I . f 7 fx 5fzf2'f1Q4v f, , ' ' g 97 r I ' ,V I 4 . -V-f 'fi Y I cv. 'ik '-1 f f Mn ff' 1 ,'4 QW' 1 'X ' I, .7 , ., , ...rf ' f 'fl' wif' f vi hw 7 f,.,,f94, Q ,. u J " A , f. . 2,1 ww. f f gp ,i f 9- 1, ff f ' gf, f, . , n , n 1 ,. W", ,uv 'f w, ZW 1 Z ff I f . la Q Illl i ff i if ""fll! 7 'Z Q ll H ,,AA ' V . .g '91 -.F -- ENGINEERING MRFA 1. Sellers HTFA C. Shull SA P. St. Louis MRFA R. Vogl FR 1. Lewis YN1 R. Leonard YN3 S. Grenfell PNCM F. Wallace PN1 Brandes PN1 R. Pratt PN2 G. Allyn PN2 R. Fayloga PN2 J. Groth PN3 W. Barahan PN3 R. Curl PN3 R. Kelley PNSN A. Rhodes PN3 F. Stepp PN3 L. Thomas SN N. Manosing PNSN D. Saunders PNSN 1. Winston LCDR W. Leonard MMC S. Copeland SN M. Golub YNC Ransom YN2 F. Quinn 203 EXECUTIVE YN2 1. Gamiao YN3 R. Fisher SN C. Thomas YNSN D. Seelow NC1 D. Lander BM3 l. Kildunne SN M. Holmes AA W. Marsar BMT W. McCray SA G. Fotovich SA R. Gregg AA R. Hartley ISSN D. Hernandez SA C. Howard PCSN K. Mitchell SA S. Moffitt SA 1. Ninal SN D. Swafford AA R. Thompson ENS D. Riley JO3 R. Arnold JO3 1. Callison lO3 P. Mullikin JOSN G. lochum IOSN W. Winter SN D. Schmidt MACS F. Derby ADH l. Aurelio MS1 A. Cocal 204 g. .. , f i . Q l.r is i s ,E li 'Q f S A , ji .. k 3 J ' I xr l 3 I 'Engl I L , Y j , mv ' . 3. h ,.,vV .myr A isi- T 4 13 . .J I. I ,V if E 4 I Z. Ur' Mi x . 111. x .ki . J, XR YY? ' , . 'ww :.. .:,,- J K.-Q.. - 4 . .,.., .- I ,K VV.iV ' H E.. . X af, it 'S S ...V T rils . " f . f 'L- C. fm! 9 f. , , . ..., jg, ,.....,f . f .. ,.g" g. W, no. S 44 s T f , 4 ff 1 QM fp .. f new 1 1- -' 1 J S ' ' ,Qi . y in f, . 3- . 5 l If If y K ,I W 77. - , , 14 . 5, f' 4 fm ' g, ' I. C ' .C ' Cl! -f 4' Z l C 1 2 P F' F f' r L' , X 3 if WMV , C792 -f 1 , . 1' X ,f 4 I f Ima fd. ,yy iw X 4 f . 7 T 9 Z ' 'T-xg 6 T' ll' ' . , , 5 ,wx , i'- Q32 4 " - 2 ll A TEM by ugg EXECUTIVE EM1 D. Hoffman MA1 R. Hyson EM1 R. Reyes MA1 1. Robers M52 E. Atangan ASHZ M. AMH 2 1. ogy PH2 1. Grave:v...1 MM2 E. Kqliislwl BM2 j. Marlfs' AZ1 1. Davis is RM1 C. Thomas SA W. Lancaster SN E. Davidson ENS S. Summers PNC 1. Parmele PNSA F. Cunfin PNSN W. Killion PNSN W. Kraemer PCC Strickland PC1 R. Hall 205 EXECUTIVE PC2 E. Colmore PC3 R. Rivera PCSA K. Krick PCSA1. LeFave LI1 B. Pinkus LI2 D. Wells SA W. Bonar SA V. Williams NAVIGATION LCDR M. Ford IAsst. Nav.I QMCM D. Burns QM1 D. Finn QM1 1. Trotter QM2 W. Mildenberg QM2 D. Pearson QM3 1. Hoben QM3 A. Kaufman QM3 V. Manzari QM3 M. Romaro QM3 T. Plyler YNSN C. Bosley QMSN M. Brinton QMSN R. Davis QMSN S. Gatlin QMSN I. Gordy QMSN D. McCoy QMSN W. Scheeler AN S. Serig QMSA A. Blanculli QMSA W. Carter QMSA D. Humphrey QMSA T. Philbin QMSA D. Tyrell 206 'Y 3 f. as ggi, K im if I A my ,flf Q- SR I 'E A 3 by ,R t if 1 ' 1 n V t if! , 2, F an gt, V W , . -. ns- 'f'. It ll w 'I w 4Q'3"'-Q g I V4 9 ,via " 1 ff ff' ell! t. ff. 0 ..'.. - - .- A V- . . ,vi 1 . 53" .. ,xbfgv . Y, f Sf 'rs 'r Navigation Department I .zl . X -1 VT' 'B' 1 is . 1 I Q . ...yr X ZW. . "'f.mss 5' "4 I A I x Q ., I A V A - 5 A g',,l ., kk Q I rf - Mr it "Y ff' , . 'f s'r 'f f 1 ""ii I i . ' 4 ..V, fn V .. j '.,' , V . f V . , 2, - :V I as I I . QQ ,fin ,V Hd :V R! V, X .ll , - V .YQ N -,I , E tr, - .71 .-., , I 4' I Q A -Q V,',, f ' A A me s . ' A W 1 I Avyyy r ' , .f ,- I V QW' I lil "Ei, I Q r Ir, , is 3? 'Q ' ,away X 22' If ...wi fx -: ' f ,' 7 f. f ...f 2 I 'Q' , sf, I ' V , any A2466 ri 1 2521 hi w :I ' . 4 7 , , , 1 V If 19 , wi V C f 1, ff , ,MEM f , ,,,. f, , .4 N., W. if f 'Q Q 2 if is I ofa , .mx x' , KAI: , 'iw' .vw -if Z7 OPERATIONS CDRJ Hlckerson CDR D Baker CDR D Hackett CDR W Wagner LCDR J Childs LCDR l Cook LCDR E Harrlson LT M Korba LT R Lakarl LT B McWaters LT E Schelner LT P LT B LT T Trethewey LTlG M Langston ENS M Clark ENSJ Tull CWO3 E Thomas YN1 W Owens SNI Vnlorla AGC W Orvis AGU Bartlett A611 Llnaburg AG1 M Tann AG2 G Gould AG2 T Henning AG2 R Lawrence 207 OPERATIONS AG2 D. Voigt AC-3 P. Dennis AG3 T. Lund AGAN R. Bergeron AGAN R. Currin AGAN M. Ferdock AGAN R. Martin AGAN T. Matheson AGAN G. Peterson AGAN W. Zentmeyer AA S. Antkowiak AGAA M. Slater ACC W. Wilkirson AC1 R. Dratz AC1 L. Homan AC1 F. Peterson AC1 1. Trekell AC1 W. Yackel AC2 R. Bailey AC2 T. Gannon AC2 R. Haines AC2 E. Nakamura AC2 G. Rudick AC2 B. Williamson AC2 1. Yarbrough AC3 R. Arndt AC3 R. Frisbie AC3 l. johnson AC3 G. Pawlusek 208 ,Q ,, f. ,,', ,, T f T P ,srar 1'-V f-5. P 1 5 c A , ..,,. , . if "i" 'H ik: ,f A . .- E i iili T ' .. . "t' . 1 f-'4i""Til- f". , 35' "7-' 'T .1 .FA , ' l V -, JW' - ' ,. A nts: 15.1 I 4 I 'VZ 'iff A . . T A .T .. .- Q' r" ' , f . A is ,..- ' ' ""'i 3' W9 E WN' i"i 7551. ,- '79 1 --Q-Z, . 'ff G "r' K' ff fizl' -X - ,Y x K' S K 2 K i"f "" K 1- . . fl ' ' f QV f ri.t 1 - 2 . er 'lf' if u fr A ssir W A .srsr it ,ef 1 498 ' H .V . A ' s ..., . jf , i , '13 Q ,f t Q , ' 1 C! . 3-,fe Ig I - a t 177 K I 4 I .,,7,V 51- If is :V I V L . il 1 4,4-afafmmzm - ,mum f .ff 'Yiffxffdg ' M Q W. f 1 is , 4 , in V Y I A A . ' a ,if ggr.. gg 51 .EK . g. 2 . .. r .... g If I . 2',y,. ,K,' ' K, . , L? " X I ir, . , -' ' ..,.. f,.,...., ' , 5 'figs 2 WV ,f .- f 1 Of I s .-V7k, 4 ,i ,, . ' 'X , , 1 2 f ' ' ' , Wag , f , Ulm ld , Q W 33 ,f .V 'lm it -'Vf' i5f?? 1 .M 'H-...Z at T.-1 W if-'W ' ' 'ff if T " A f w . - V477 V955 , ' gf l 4' 4' f i .5 ff Q V . L y l Q.. f, 1 . f ,Zh ., P ' ,, 4?.:a,. ,X ,Myra LQ!! Z: 4,-' , I z! fluavf .JJ Q ' 1. W, ' ris. ff 1 .. . . . is . , 4' 1725. . .Q- A f " - ,'f7,f!f -V l 4 .fifgfgfj .1 , x f fn, ,144 X ,V tw ' H , W Z f 1 52 'N , ' ' za 1 - . f. 1 Q27 Q f ' W2 M SZ' W f , 1,. Z M f K 254. 2' ., 5 , .iv If mf! X , sf f QW, s i , in K -.....,, Y B Y 41-I N. 11 I . 'if , 'K ,fff 7 L -mm.. -17 i 1 1 1 I l l l l 'lj i I. . :Z A --: 52.-:4:.LL: A- x.,-S.. ...-- 1: ., ' . 'i Fr. . AQLA5 W. T .A V, if f .X . .M T A ? A g 1 s ff ill? f .Q S i A ai rss T 2 -- ..w. . - ,.,,'. X x o N iw U T va- . in fi :F y ! . R, X4-. rr. K I Vg? V ig In Y 4 E ," HHH X. f""W. ,g,9" Af ' . U 1 al ia. Tl' V- . . -gs 55 'sf I '-if 1.-.f.. - .igf V' OPERATIONS AC3 L. Smith AC3 R. Svenson AC3 A. Watson ACAN M. Anderson AN G. Bock - AN 1. Coyne AN D. Fenske ACAN C. Frick ACAN 1. Gibson ACAN K. Hudson f AN S. Nelson - AN R. Pierce ' ACAN T. Riffle ' ss AEAN TR! ACAA M. Cabage ACAA T. johnson . ACAA O. Pitcock ETCM L. Richmond DSC 1. Bauldry ETC E. Harvey DSC R. Wilson DST S. Beckman ET1 F. Severance DS2 D. Arkfeld DS2 1. Ballentine DS2 R. Bubert IC2 M. Condit DS2 W. Duquette 209 OPERATIONS DS2 C. Engel ETN2 R. Hamilton DS2 G. Harvey DS2 1. Howe DS2 R. jackson ET1 M. McGrath DS2 A. Ray OS2 L. Yesalusky DS3 T. Edwards DS3 P. Garland OS3 D. Henry DS3 1. Hickey ETR3 R. Holtz ETN3 S. Kundinger DS2 1. Sagida ETR3 G. Williams DS3 M. Willkie ETR3 H. Woodworth ETN3 C. Wright ETN3 A. Young ETSN B. Ayers ETSN R. Echols ETNSN D. Nelson ETSN L. Rountree DSSA L. Wallace DSSN E. Wellington PHC B. Long PHC l. Therrien PH1 1. Arranz , 7,97 Q. frfffl f f f, wif' ' f W. . , fy-, ., x X, ,ff 1 If ' 1" YA ,f ,, v W f yy , . . f' Q l- '-.l . 1 hp f ,' ' . :3 . f -I 134' ' 4 if I g Y .xl W S ix N 4, I nv rang- ' rn I . . 'Q I xg . EA 'i W L, .. ... 2 : .. yr 4 X si tab Q -,,,', f W 5. l....... f f 1 A N Q f -11077 . f f K 4 1 ,, mf f 4 Q.- .., 4. f Ly 2 . . ..-. ' 5 E 1- 7" . , ? If 1. F '25, s . my ,,.. 7. 'W . IMI!!! Q f.1:f.:.. gif. I I K ' .. . . .,,. . . ff .M . . . .. . . K, - iff-nw V' FI' " -. yfff 6' y f an Aw. ..... A , f. ,Wop . f I f fi. 7 w .4 ,,,.ff. sw. f - 'I -. R 1 srir slri . -V X. J ,...V, y ,.... S., ' ' Att' ,.f.,f... ll' Mi ' lt: gf , Z p"li'lI I V A l'is' . . 7? .,l.i a 7 ' I pei l -i" . f. L. . ,..., X .ifiklffyb . A A 1 ' fffw 5 , fp f .s.., L 'i-,- 1 ' ' .ZW - ii ' a "-' ti." I ' 1 I f.,. uhm- 1. L , .- V. . E G ",l " mar- , ff " 'V ff f I I M2 V ,QTV f.r. E 5 1 f".' ll A -P Q1-':::.1'73Zi?47 WV' 'P' if . .14 .. E. 13512-7:-1 " 1 f ' I .jj fvyig-gyjpfgvg P ' I iff. .. - ' ' ii-',pfl 1 1. fn L 'ff "kk' E N. . L. CEM 'X t Lama X 'In . , . Wham! X r f 210 I hl3j", .:,.,--1 OPERATIONS PH1 F. Burtt PH1 T. Decaire PH2 V. Marshall PH2 C. Owens PH3 R. Cohen PH3 G. Dubose PH3 H. Gerwien PH3 R. Wright - PHANN. Miller PHAN R. Daniels PHAA A. ACCS E. jany CTOC G. Orrell CTR1 l. Twohig CTO2 C. Casad CTM2 R. Spiller CTO3 T. Coppola CTO3 Ci. Humes CTA3 G. Mills CTO3 C. Woodall CTOSA D. Matson SA K. Sauer ISCS 1. johnson DPC H. Morin ISC M. Ziegler 211 OPERATIONS ISI D. Morris CTTI R. Neylon ISI W. Orr DSI E. Vandeberg YN2 N. Freeman DS2 I. Kirkland lS2 R. Lankford DS2 I. Palmer DS2 D. Stout IS2 D. Yaun IS3 W. Adkins DS3 W. George CT3 G. Rawson DP3 S. Tipps IS3 W. Williams SN R. Graham ISSN V. Gregorek ISSN G. Michaels ISSN E. Moon ISSN M. Neapolitan ISSN G. Paulette ISSN F. Polle ISSN N. Radich DPSN S. Roelke 212 . hh Q3 3 ja ' ww if -f -N '45 s ff? I ft A ,. . M - fhfw,-V "I 71' if ' '54 7 iid "' . 1 ' . 'i-'.. . i. . 1' ,PY it AQ' '35 E 5 90 gf """. ..i . g 4 . . . , J . A, V M Q ,'V. . ' S, " I mqil . it rj I Y' jii- . 1.4 . 5' Q . ' ..,' g 'Sf 'Z :Q is af N sg53Q?f's . fd .Q 5 , ' gf ' Q' W as 42, f , W: in f Q I Q f fglf fa J .1 . 3 1A an gf S gh' 5, 3 IN, vt 1 I . QQ" 21125. 72.143 -1 1 I Q.: -f,,f 2 . fj g422Y2S1fpiS'I..,.. , . , If X f Q f - -1 , .. . I '. sfegfxwf. , . ,. ' 1 K ik. ' . 1 . '- .mga ,Q .A , 17 .1 4 ' i. I 'I s I' f - " ' ,- 'Y I f I . f ' - " '11 'I ' . .LZ . fiiili I ' sms 5' Vi ' 51 7 ' ' W - ' U 5:'1.-is, 5 T .. f . . ' . . N 11 f . .- I I ' ff' ,. , I T A ,rf .I ' ...u f ,. , K Vg gr . , Q J . , A J . lg Il' . as I . S I A .4 3. I 'S - 535 of ..i. s I Q f .E .g 'fg . I ...gg rsf .r. up fha f - -. . f A If .. A4 ., s 1 iil 89 M- 4 " f X I , fy, :Zi Supply tt? . Department 4 JI?-I bf X. 5 9 I 1 Q, A A Q -11 X... ' H ""' 332 N V rr ... w lg! Q4 L+ PJ N' V 'P - - I SUPPLY LCDR R. Ebbers LT N. Malcomb LTJG D. Adams LTIG R. Witt ENS M. Lobasz ENS R. Johansen CWO2 E. Aban MSCM C. Morrow SKCS j. Snyder DKC B. Amaba MSC R. Green MSC C. Metts ' W - QSUTI.. DPC R an MS1 D. Baela MS1 A. Bravo MS1 A. Gega SH1 C. Genkins MS1 F. Gibson MS1 R. Isip AK1 S. Jacobs M51 W. Key SK1 A. King AK1 A. Kummert DK1 M. Mendoza MS1 A. Montoya MS1 R. Placiente DP1 W. Rees MS1 1. Rodica SUPPLY M51 R. Rudas M51 G. Stafford M51 1. Smith AK1 5. Teer MM1 R. Walsh AK2 E. Arquero SM2 R. Badiang D52 M. Bohenek M52 1. Bugayong SH2 E. Castaneda DP2 W. Comer M52 R. Constantino M52 F. Dimapilis M52 E. Duncan SK2 E. Eblacas SH2 D. Edgardo AK2 1. Edquilang M52 L. Enrile M52 H. Fernandez M52 N. Flores AK2 T. Fuqua DK2 C. Gifford SH2 W. Goehring 5K2 1. Graham SH2 R. james DP2 1. Mayo M52 R. Manuel SH2 C. McCoy DK52 5. McKinney SH2 R. Nouzovsky 214 , W .w,,.,fW A, 1 , v fi 'GW 1 I 5. x x, f 1 . 'I .412 .r.... rf5r.r.. fffn if 1 2 Www! 1' f f f f f ie . r5E3?m5Yf ii? umemif f V , , -Q, lim w 2 'QQ . 0' Zi YN' Q, f M K 7' 4 WHQ YQK xx was ,f .,,.,,, ,Q A 4 .AAAQ L ,.'AA. L .. 7 ,, 4 . . :v i f ...,f5 'im 'i ,. N2 , -.Za -. 'Q i n 'v'., gr . V ff.,kV .Vp 'V I .. 'lu af. X I X I I , . I-gg... - gg, , 5 Li 1.7 Vkr, . . V . 1 F' Qi . rerfarnr lrr. wk. 'V,, , ".-.. ff ' I V H AV ,. fy 9 .W ji 'Qi ,, ' ' "'f ,f , .Qf ill Ziff ' ,iw LL. if., V V K, Y . I V, Vkrr' I V V. I i is - F xl . bd . 2 - ' 5 ., . , ' . 'IL , ' 0 fur yi ,f , I x Q , 5 'P f, ' f' . 1 ' F r..5 F ' ' F ' , ,. f i 9.41 F 72' ' .we he 3 , gf!!! KVI! iygfi ff 5 -Sum.. if 4 -ff.. 1 1, ,' f 1 4 . 'N' '61 . 4-aff Ziwffgiil ' Q ' . , - F ff F ,. i,'gZ5wf'g,2,, Y' .4 . 3 f ' fl , if 5 ., -. F F . I , ,.,.i,,.. ' 1 The ,W 'f 2 . F . ,, .ff .1 , , , e - , 4 ,, ,,,W g F F ' ag gm' 2 -wwf agar A f f X x ,,:..:L, H i, I X . 2 , ' f ' ' ' ,,., 1 .r :neun ,, 5 2.2! f V. f S, 2... . , ' ,.,' f M if SUPPLY AK2 R. Padilla M52 E. Paje SH2 B. Paule SH2 M. Pinkney AK2 R. Ratliff MSZJ. Reyes M52 R. Reyes SH2 R. Salgado SH3 R. Angle DP3 S. Biatowas MS3 E. Blonkowski MS3 F. Braun DK3 C. Carey PO3 T. Cianciolo AK3 W. Cole DP3 E. Cramer MS3 F. Ebete SK3 C. Elliott MS3 L. Enrile MS3 J. Fiesta DK3 B. Gangcuangco SH3 R. Garrett M53 S. Garcia MS3 D. Granger SH3 A. Guinto SH3 A. Gunto SK3 L. Herron MS3 L. larvis MS3 W. johnson DP3 A. Kuhlmann 215 SUPPLY MS3 A. Liberato SH3 L. MCClinton M53 F. McGlory DP3 D. Miller M53 l. Nichols M53 D. Poppy M53 M. Ray M53 A. Sacalanutao M53 S. Sahagun ABE3 5. Skill DP3 R. Sizemore MS3 W. Taylor M53 C. Torrijos SK3 G. Villeroz AK3 M. Voss AK3 G. Walker SH3 1. Wells DP2 R. Worthan AKAN F. Arjona AKAN 1. Arnone DPSN B. Arradaza - SN C. Baker SN L. Bond MSSN M. Boucher MSSN 1. Brichetto SKSN T. Briggs SHSN D. Brown SHSN 1. Brown DPSN W. Brunson DKSN 1. Burch 216 g . 4 EA M f ...ff ff' 5 In ,F fx -M, ,. SQ Q HEw. :tab cnet. xl-fir' ei' r""f Q f i 713 R I ,,j -.Y ,Q 'lie V 'sl ei. in f ,SIU 2 I ,,..1.... 1- .wif .967 .,..,,Qz ?f f ,flg ' fg Jw, fn ,. M- 'Q Q E . 2 ? Q, jg K 1 615. ,f f. 1 . !A. 1 4 , L 'T '2- f my T Vr., 5 . 4 . ,.,, X 'ii'i wi l L W N .f ri H ,, V .., 'Ga li ... Z 53 Z 95 fs in X X. , 6553, ' if Y. mf 5 f-had wkKe '." i Ni J .A A if 'I W4 if f Z! f 'fi 5 f - , f I X , gg ,N f 7 Inv S f lfff. 2 ,,, , yQwwW2? V , fir, V ...gf 1 yu--. ' 7 f ' Q QQ 1 1 A fs. -obo gb Yu 4 . gf, , f L, 7 E. , f , M f ...AL is on of Z f , , A llr.L l Q fl mc Lf az! gm -abit-be--fi-n N ll - ..-, -L 1 ""' 4 4.9 x --I-rg... ,Q - -f ... SUPPLY MSSN M. Cain SKSN M. Campbell SN B. Collins . SHSN D. Core SMSN M. Cuervo DPSN W. Daigneault MSSN L. Demus SN E. Deocampo DPSN R. Gagltano SHSN S. Garbe MSSN D Gonzalez IMSN L Haase SHSNJ Hodges SN T lanes DKSN K Klnney MSSN M Klemke MSSN M Kolarlk DKSN 1 Krueger MSSN R Labeef MSSN M Lavole AKAN R Levlen SHSN R Masstas AEANJ McCrea AKANJ Mldgette FN C Montgomery SHSN L Moore AKAN D Moravec DKSN G Mott FN D Murray 217 W 5 , I 4 , 1 5 5' ' . V ' .'V, A V",.w.ff . 4 ' X ' e 1 X L L"k- ff' f . . . ' 3 . f y l L y SN P. Lord . 1 1 53. , fr f Q f A L ! X VLAL A 'N I r 0 .' 4 f, 3, Q, CA J ix 4 ,W W" X 'I K X as lg X A - ...J X s. .',, A Liwijg 'fllu uf' X 1 LM i 'I ,Nw ! J Q D. I . X I L J 1514 'url e' ' A 5 X L 5 " 1 Ji - X 4 A f 'V V 4 A x' A V K K ' 4 iii "?.PQi4::.r: R--'-----H -' - on -S SUPPLY MSSN C. Oberg AN B. Peterson DKSN A. Pintor MSSN M. Porter MSSN R. Powers MSSA C. Qulne DKSN E. Raboin MSSN R: Regni AKAN 1. Roberts MSSN 1. Rogers SHSN D. Rommell MSSN R. Rosty SN K. Russman SHSN O. Sabale DKSN 1. Sekulo MSSN T. Shelters SHSN 1. Silber MSSN R. Staten SHSN F. Tillman MSSN F. Tschantz SHSN 1. VanBuskirk AKAN S. Vann SHSN L. Wallace MSSN K. Watson MSSN L. Whelan AN 1. Zenke SA E. Bermudo AA W. Brown SHSA 1. Cary SHSA 1. Cary FA W. Cortez AA E. Dlnn AA D. Doyle MSSA D. Eller FA 1. Errlco 218 Z! If Q92 . .--ff A .Lb ,gli ir..-,Av .,...a..1., SUPPLY ABEAA 1. Farr FA 1. Giacomlicci SHSA V. Gillespie SHSA B. Goble MSSA M. johnson AKAA G. Keigh AA S. Krugen AA G. Lewis AA H. Limbright AKAA 1. Maganja AA W. Meredith ii AA R. Mitchell ' ADJAA R. Moore SA A. Morris SA F. Neal L AA S. Peterson FA S. Robitaille FA R. Rodriguez AA G. Schmieder MSSA E. Schrumpf AA M. Sharpe AA S. Silva SA L. Stephens AA G. Thompson ACAA C. Towns AA 1. Vaughan SKSA D. Walsh AA J. Watson DKSA A. Williams AA D. Woon AA G. Yearsley 219 WEAPONS LCDR M. Awood Weapons LCDR R. Rajaniemi LT 1. Kane LT M. Harwell LT E. Sievers LTJCI S. Becktel LTJG M. Rath ENS T. McDougall CWO4 L. Reid CWO3 T. Best CWO3 1. Hicks CWO3 R. Mitchell CWO3 R. Mullinax FTCM C. King GMCS 1. Guerrero AOC E. Cruse GMMC W. Denny FTMC R. Gowans GMCS 1. Kennedy GMTC P. Markin GMTC 1. Penrod AOC B. Sanders C-MM1 C. Allaire AO1 R. Bryant AO1 1. Craig AI1 j. Ellegood 220 . H' 5 ..'. 5? ' Vrizwg: 7 V, 'M V, , 1 -f"ft1g,N. ' - X X .pf i- ' " 'X . . X 5.11 4 Q r ff- Q ' . ' ' . .1-,K Mg.. ,, ,h N 153' -, Q, Q 7 . - I Q ' T E A . 1' 5 4 , Alyw f h Q an J I f X 1 . ,N X Q . -4.-. -i X3 X ' 3 N . Q7 V , ..,, f , X X . 5. 4, .4,3,il5:t U':ff"Q'5 'Ti' Y, p y2i,fF...,xw"-xg ,f?e:Lf:w.g'.'.-5 , if .K 2' .,'. ,,., ',4Q - Q " "-::Qksie. 515' " 9 ' - "" X ' ' f , v ...-, J ..'. ff , . .4 . .,.. Ygbgkkbxf ,- ,4 . X, .. . . ..,.., ., .Vw ,.., ,t.,.,.,, iaie A M A N' R 3 . . . a . . ee K Benn f .Q T . . ...tr ',', . i s A ' T' 'E A t .. K Qin N N . 1 . . ' L . A - P' X . , . ' "if , wg 'QW Vi i f Fixlifv L ,, L' A N , , Q .,".N'N f Q r,,, .Q R. M .M - -1-'K .f,..' 'W3I'i:21j5,,.,l , , ' ft. ...,, N ,Q 3: ,,.- 5 Q . ..,. . ,. , S 1 V E.. ..,,. N . ., yi ,. Q X Q, Xl . Y N ""' 9 .. 'N iw ' A f. L A f K . 3, M N ., wi. at , . .. .. A Q may Rf Ya, f 2 MS, . . ' X-.fr N X - h' A if ' 'rt Q..-1 xg i - A '1' .-', 4 'N 1 it ' 1. ' X' . ' . A . if ' " . 1 ' V 1,179 it Z mf' ' X, , 1 f .04 , . 1 iiii 1 J' , 5 ff 7 1 f f is , 1 p f , . Q, . . . n f 6 iii if f I 411493 ff , zfff ,oz tr W f , af f 3 Alnf !'w ?7C,f 1, Qi M65 ff , 4 1 f , lsgijv X 5 ,LE ff ,ff 46 f fr 0 ff f X ff N M Q f 1 1 ,..- ef . . YP' f 1 1:13 5? of ' Z, f " 'fu if J W? 0? 'Y 1 1' K ff if R ,,,. y L, X .M 0 .1 f 4.2 , ., , ff ff. it . " , , f f, y .9 Q ,- yer ., Z l 1 " ,ff A --kf ,L 1 ,Q ,3 f , ' .z V- gh-A 5 ww. ff: if J, x ' W2 t fy w5f'2f9 j"Q,, '-', V 1-nuff, .4. L !.,1,z.f,'.b.Qz i W! 'ja if ' Qi 1' 1 1 I 1 ' .. me 2 ,LIQ2 fm ff" ,f my n. 4, f I' Av fff J K ,f ,, f fhfa' . X' U 1' 5 If it .,,.,' ,, ' - :J . T ...T i.t. ' ' Q 7 I 4 1 T ' . if .te. 1 T , A f . A--... W A if? . M.. ' 2gz1,1-2 V i't-',i V ' riiri W A A 'LN L. X E A ' " i 1 ' ,W ' 1 ' K ' ' vi . i t-fi' ' "' " 1255-5 ,I i 1 S , Ni Q. ' 'W ,af 5 ' 4 .5 'I N. 2 . XNJ . .,..... . . - -iz-:fan - . ' xf..NQi- . f . ., ,". if H . 4 N V l i..i . f iiri. , .. . .. 'r f .,.. ' 1 ,," i, f'.:,!'v':, :S , 751597 4, ...If - ff t.v,:,f1 ' A X V .,,. .,4. I , . . . U Q f, - I A, fx , I X ff f fri 5 ,T ,gf L 1.4 ..,. . , , ,I ., m e it 1. Q ,,.,,:'. 7 1 qi if ' ti 45 an if L -ff 7' J' ff min i ' AW 2 gi ' 5: 1 A , ' 7.,1,., , I f . I H ,f . - f x ,.,,,. ' , L ' '12 'i" A , f' ' ?1y54if' if3i1SiQ A ' ., ,, ,. f Viffffwv if, M , 'U f i Z yi.-fffff r ff, .-ffeit ' my , 1 f . .4 W ,if fy .4 'f ll V - . . " ,. .J . V M m ., gig!-. 1:5 i . . Y Q Q .A . . . . . .. igggliagei-E,3a....a R EEL,-,., ,1,..V, 1 . ...,, .. ..... . , ., A '- 'QL 4-1 3 , ....... -mv! Q-A 5 ,EQ M NI E? li i . I 1 K Vilfx M' . ,, ...Sf Z ,' . -. fv Y. .-U4 fi' F' --gm r .rg I .LL I Y uY!!'fLY -l-.-.....- .... ., w .5 1-. ' J: g xx f-.1 L s WEAPONS GMG1 W. Evans AO1 R. Green GMT1 1. Harrell FTM1 S. Kipphorn GMG1 1. Mathis GMT1 D. Nicholson TM1 R. Riely FTM1 D. Schaeffer GMT1 D. Stratton AO1 W. Stephens AO1 1. Trott AO1 M. Wilson AO2 1. Braun 7 FTM2 J. Brenneke . GMM2 G. Dill . , Q- ,.'vf..a V - nf' W GMT2 F. Hofmann AO2 W. Lippy AT2 C. Miller AO2 J. Misenhelter FTM2 B. Oliver GMT2 T. Read GMG2 1. Scammahorn FTM2 R. Sharpe FTM2 H. Sondblad AO2 S. Stanley FTM3 D. Anderson GMT3 L. Beavers AK3 D. Bonifacio GMM3 M. Caskey CMT3 C. Chambless 221 WEAPONS GMM3 M. Church AO3 1. Civiello AO3 1. Clark AO3 M. Cook AO3 E. Copeland AO3 D. Coyne FTM3 D. Cummings AO3 W. Davidson FTM3 M. Edgecornb AO3 F. Feibel C-MM3 E. Guerra GMM3 D. Hall GMT3 R. Haynes AMH3 A. Hancovsky FTM3 C-. Hanson TM3 R. Hogan MM3 T. Holloway AO3 M. Lyons AO3 D. McSparen ATM3 M. Metternich FTM3 1. Morris GMT3 M. Morris GMT3 1. Newton AO3 W. Parison AO3 R. Pearson AO3 C. Phillips SK3 C-. Richardson AO3 R. Rowe AO3 M. Scott FTM3 D. Segers 222- . 3 'Q w.. pew rv- - .ws 17' I 6 2. i 5 Fil' l y , -. yy UQ rili fgyigif 35.41 . xxx Q V I 4 I Q D ll X ' e Q W ...X . 4 ,' WEAPONS AO3 W. Sharp AO3 T. Sinsel GMT3 l. Sheldon FTM3 D. Watson GMG3 D. Wright AO3 G. Young AN C. Adamski AN W. Baker AMHAN M. Beam AA R. Bochmeier AN R. Burtis AN R. Burton AOAN R. Campbell SN R. Cerrillo AOAN T. Charmely' fv- AN W. Cooper SN W. Cooper AOAN F. Crawford AN G. Cunningham AOAN D. Currier AOAN R. Davis AN R. Davis GMMSN R. Deitenbeck GMTSN D. Ellinwood FTMSN R. Fair AOAN A. Geralds SN D. Glass FTMSN G. Goble AN B. Goodlow FTMSN D. Groves 223 I, . , WEAPONS L lk A .519 . ,. . ,,L: - 'rr-1.1:-2. w,e1-y, f. -Lfyw My-mf A ,V . ,V ,V . ff ,- -,,k - , . . ,fffff.fy7,y1,7f . .: .2 . . . . ,, 1 A L' . ' V. .- .- 'fg,h 1 2 -1 1 ,, , S K 1 922-Y " V "9 Q 'k"' 7 .1-1, . - , gl-I-:pi f.', - , yn-if fi f cf- pix? ff ' A. V fx.,-Wv4zf" . . 'f-L I l ' I S ' 7 ,l Hanson 'wr . f . .1 .L"- H I sf: 1 " sz '-L'..- " -- 1 .,,' . I ,, - . fl A' ft if ',," wie. ' "' I V u i' '," H I fl, . I , A ' "'A ' - V 5.437i,QLfi,5.Lgli,Qi.y Piijv gxg C. e -, .- .V W ' L ,k,' 43' "'V X222 "!' . 'fri - w S j f A ,A. GMMSN HI-llrdmg L A S ' GMTSN . aynes 9 1 f A N s.ts 1 f . W 1. K . "h' 'f ,V ,K Q I ,. , SN Holland , A V 3 it NJ 1 y.,!,'k ,! ,,,' . Q, , ,gy ., 'V-hi ig . K . i. ,rj kk', f ilk, k..,VV kk 5? .krr fy V it A ,, , - L .,, , , , ,, ,,, A ,c 1 A - A . 'M' A 7 J K A , . at fs ..ll 7 f 1 3.2. 12,5 -1, A gy: f ' Q 55' if J. ' 112 . gg.. 'I ff 3522.1 ,,,,. -rf J 2 ez? h,,, .,, J ' N' A 6 ' ,,' f 4. ,, MMFN K. Hollen .Sf Q 'A I ,.. My Vi' AOAN 1. Holsornback R ffm, AN F. Kanavel nf c SN R. Kuchenbrool , AN P. Kuster AOAN B. jackson GMTSN M. Lane AOAN 1. Leeper GMMSN B. Lewis AOAN G. Lockhart GMTSN l. McLean AOAN W. Miles AN N. Moore AIAN R. Morgan AOAN C. Lowry , Lr,A 3' A., ' ' f V.'4 ' '-'f ' "'., ' . , . .' Lr" , . .rrr GMMSN l. Morrls F AN M. Murphy Y . ',.. A A A ' ' , - J... ' ' 'V f FTMSN K. Nash 1" A f"' . V - GMMSN D. Meeks Nl f A AN G. Nicholson . .r,,.. A. 3 , r A us? .... 5 fwffh 7 frrrr it ff" WQ' l.3f'7.f' . SN G. Nobles A ' GMTSN D. Parker M llsl Q X. V A 1 f, A TMSN D. Patton ,Avy " ','1 . ' FTMSN R. Paulsen A SN E. Porter lf l '2qifQ1Q f W 4.4. M 2 'N I 224 41:f:.- .. . - . . i - ' - -- :LL1-:.A.k-':.'.- -4 " 1' :ESL Z-Z1..1--42...2f-'1'.-ff'f-.1131.v.15iEiii'51.252353-ll5?fE'.:!?'53l1ia'?.'EH i5 A 2 ... . AY.- f L AN-of fl A f 'fi A "' , 4 sr, W ca-i C' iw l , 1 ,K 4 Wwe AA X 5 f A i 45- ax, WEAPONS SN R. Powell AOAA P. Powers GMTSN F. Pridgen AN T. Rachal GMTSN R. Richardson AOAN 1. Rivera SN D. Rodgers ATAN M. Ryan FN G. Sesz GMGSN H. Sheldon AOAN L. Shook . SN R. Sleesman l SN W. Smith ' FTMSN D. St. Onge AOAN D. Strain AQAN -R. Teel SN D. Thornton AN j. Troutman GMTSN 1. Unverferth SN A. Urban GMTSN D. Willis AN A. Wilson AN P. Wise AA R. Angle AA D. Baney MSSA D. Bonaventura AA G. Bucchi AOAA T. Bulger 225 l i VVEAPGNS SA R. Chase AA 1. Clardy AA 1. Cunningham AOAA N. Dieterly AA E. Edoria SA W. Entwistle AA R. French AA A. Garza SA S. Glynn AOAA S. Gunn AA 1. Harrell SA G. Hathaway AIAA 1. Heskin SA D. lasman AA T. jaynes SA D. johnson SA B. Lajoie SA j. Lajoie GMMSA D. Leatherman AA M. Lee FTMSA R. Lee AA L. Lewis AOAA F. Martin AA H. Pettigresw AOAA M. Rosendahl FA M. Russell AA R. Schmidt AA S. Schwanbeck GMGSA W. Shafer GMMSA 1. Shaw 226 'nv 2 9,,',,-. , X, fwb X Ns "' fu ..., . 6 f, I' 7 y 1 , 4 3 'Y ' ""',.,.f y r . X, V J "" .... it Si . ,. . T .ii' S .15 7 " fri .',n f 3 . zine . ,fi 1 ,gf " A ' ,. . A A ., 1 . 2 , AV - y S . . ,K X Z ,y y t ff 1 X ff, mf , ,I 7 Y . M f f X X X i X , fhff g f If l 'f'7,?i7f'ffZ' .a , A ' Z 1 Q IN MARINE DETACHMENT rw, :' 14 np-65 , xi'- 5 A x XII. 1 Sv' X EJ If ll if L u . , 53 i " ', si f'n.i.. , 44.131 WEAPONS FTMSA j. Shoup AOAA S. Staples AA R. Ulm AA K. Uuelbs SA E. Varisco AA R. Walton . SA E., Williams SA j. Wittrock AA K.. Yaresi A s SM1 QM3 R. Leslie CAPT R. Prueitt CAPT P. Prince CAPT S. Brighton USGT A. Rhode SISGT M. Embleton SGT A. Darbyshire SGT R. Fontenault 227 WEAPONS SGT P. lnnocenzi SGT R. Maldonado CPL C. Bayer CPL G. Bowman CPL 1. Chavis CPL H. Cordero CPL T. Dillen CPL K. Fields CPL G. Frazier CPL J. Gumin CPL T. Malloy CPL R. Huckaby CPL E. Mason CPL j. Spray CPL B. Williams L!CPL'A. Ashley LXCPL C. Baez LXCPL R. Brock LXCPL K. Bruns LICPL A. DeMarco L!CPL D. Dilinovich LICPL F. Donailson LICPL R. Etienne LXCPL C. Garcia LXCPL P. Glynn LXCPL D. Grey LXCPL 1. Hawkins LXCPL M. Heath LXCPL 1. Howard LXCPL A. lsherwood 228 A 'P 3 X Mft' .3 - mf Ig ,:.. I XV ..,.., , f 1 , Qi: , :J fl g ' , A , -'Y . . gg-,sl ik V..r, ,. V I K kk It If .i.. A is . f yi A 9 -1,' , il'. T f . ' 'F G ','l ,I., ii.. ,V 4, ,K P- ,, I frky i . 1 .il.. f' .'a' "r.-- A A F sin 1 'P' X' 1 " I 1 .,.u f W' Z J I ' Q 4 .. . yo. f,. 1 I-7 ,V I 1 f 5 s 'f "" f ' 4, L l f I fmt - . rfsr -il' L. ff f 2 K. A ' 1 ,f,- .3 1 ay' -. i - ,,, ,, , . ,I f , I , 'V K f ,".g,m -L is i.r. . . . . - . F fs ,'.ll L, .,,.. 4 C ii ,X ,..4.f f-if 7,172 fi ff x. , V2-P .. , f, ,V ,ff . ' ' W fs - f -of 4- -my 94 j My I' I 7 W I , f is f l K , J 4 X l f f f ,f 1 f 3 f fi f 0 f iff W -z-:A w . of ,, 'ff " -SHI! - f.: -.1-2 V ' .V .i f . X ,V ff' 1 Q I 4 1 if 9 X X ' l'.-. , X ' 4 2 , i . 322 X ,., ,,VV ff' ,L fo X J' 2, f I f 1 5 ' .., X ' f 1 1 f X4 ,V 'fzw fgf , M . R . , W, 5 , if Q4 'ff f 4 , 54129, ,. " X ., I .. f 5 ffff? , - i zkiii gf f ji, ,,, ' f wx? X, W V, , . if , , , f Q , A ' ""' ' NY 9 F f ev' 74 Q21 4 , ' ' My 2 if 1 I ' 'fi xi , U . H 4 ,HA . h. - E H-L-.,3:,:,H41142!,j1e1f5f3fg51g:3t:i31lr.gig'1.5.gfiy3,5.gZ31:.lM.'l- W: i 17.-.2122 1 , .' .i .. . . . .. .-. .-- - A-.f.f.e.:a s 2-5542122412 vi . 4' -Ai : -.-ar w zff--1:-Nfl:-erm ,. h A . . . . .. ,,,. .. -1. ..,....5....,,3...,n---:- 1.52.--A -Q -,N-..........:::. .. A -Q r-x5A w .a. 5 1 . l lg ll i, .6 A ' fl x 'IL l A . fi,i. 4 D Aiif k fV4Q . . ll I ' ' A -6- l ' F - lf . ' i . 7. if Q , ffl! , .1 A 'FF X - y A M 5 if A .1 A A lil 'lwrxw lv I l ll la 'rm '5' ' F - F s ' 8 ' ' 54. "+- X f lg WEAPONS LICPL K. Ludwig LXCPL D. Maxwell LICPL D. Miller LXCPL G. Nunnally L!CPL T. Overby LICPL M. Reilly L!CPL C. Springer LICPL R. Taylor LXCPL j. Thomas LICPL S. Waligraski .., W L!CPL A. Welch if' LICPL R. Winkelmann PFC G. Anderson 5 PFC G. Arnold fi PFC C. Boyle' PFC B. Bell PFC V. Bennett PFC D. Bilinovich PFC j. Castelloe PFC N. Crowley PFC M. Dunne PFC R. Farias PFC D. Fietz PFC K. Gable PFC F. Green PFC S. Harnist PFC M. Hellard PFC T. Lebetter PFC S. Krapko PFC C. Mason 229 WEAPONS ' , , ',., P' , A, P fb P PP f PFC R. Moody Y , 1. A P Q PFC P. Naumowicz P P P A? ? 5 ' PFC T. Rex Pi f P P P PFC VV- Riley ffffiii P','P i 'PP'P'PPf 'f PPP fi PP ' P if PP PP P Y ' P PP 245 .LP'A L P ' " EK ,-v M LLLL. V Vh VLKV iVkAh, CXI PP ,P x Vyk, VK,VV K I ..1:, PPPf 'If' " ff4P If 'PPf i PP PPP ' f 230 ,,f,... . A v W., ,, -.. ................-... I 1 1 i i 5935 I 1 i-Ti' . Ai f - -W Lamnanznezunmmm-nr-W -W.:--X-L-9------,.........,,,,, '12 ..,...'uEEE..H"" - -- ,...--g.n U - -A -- ' A' W' X LCDR R Drake xx 2 1 1 1'- X ' Gamer 'V 'ng . .. 1 LCDR s. Foltz six staff il 5- . k -SE.. kx-x x.L. x , F if-di' R M main N"""3 ' 513' ..Qii.rif. fx . - . Qi 1. ' R .Yi cel' ' '4' 7 .X X XS in I 5 If 'Q i . ., ji' T'7f"'i I - .sf 1 vi ,f -.,,. ., , I . g N! LCDR R. jewell LCDR G. Webb LT R. Curry LT 1. Hicks LT1G C. Williams AOCM 1. Westbrook AECS R. Moore AD1C K. Boatright AMSC 1. Henry YN1 1. Fink AT2 D. Castaldo AME3 A. james YN3 A. Plotkin YNSA B. Armstrong MR. 1. Wouters 231 H MlfV1fV'V,V,J: ga. V :. VV 'lwii I Y V 1Vv:"M -' L, " I .V ,. ,X 5.5 .4-,,,V,,f,, ,., . M we vm" -L. WX, .Af:,. . .. bU.HIf"fV ,, . whiz!-Q www :AV ' Nik- V N f as fo:-r' :AVG :iw 'Q ,nu-q,:,1.-,ya qw. ., . -nw'-L91-IV::wNe'2r1tVL-'-'P' .A - ,. 9 '.Mw1,f,f,,-wx um' A. ,- -.Mal :M SQTQ-HM T2:w::V-w:f-1- , " , .QF?,HziikizS5:1Linl'l:'Mhfr??l . K V, M LgWA.VV,V,Vf,V.gg1435:-Dua-Q. , . . .VwV,V,,-:Vp-1V.zfV:V-r,:+ M-J 'V-wg.. , g gp- . Y ,uzfil ,:- 1.q.--.-,mwmfff C 1. -rf. , . ,L 1 Y5xVV.,m,,n.,1. A21 ,117 X f 'Vf gy: , 'f 6 4 .,y.f,f,, .-- V K::V A':g::,,:1:',V12:Va?Q'fQ"-'W , ,,W,5V.-.mm W, KV,,,, . ,, 4.,, MQ-TTIFZ G-.N ' 'M.'.v..'H'n' " Q- r-Q Q-fu,zVh1,g if 'VG ,55'?f.'1:J?J' .V '-:-:W-f V'22ifffvi??5bf:4i1:-ia Z:V:5:Vff 4 IQ?-'1,2'l?fi,fI!v 2,1150 12. L"1'fVP'fl'?'l,'5-C' ' ,,,, ., , , ,V. . If. Nw' :V': ' 'Wi-F'.ffIJ7'Cs El"'Tf'i?HFf9'f V. 'MW -Jw 'Af-. ' vu: w:Vf,V:m-' ,M V, K. ,M V, 1. 5,,,,- .,, , ,E,E,5.wNV , f,VV.,.,m.,,w .- -:3,iiiV5-4223 Q-1V2:?:5L EVE-F.,-: Am.-.V V I V4 . :VnW,r,V,,- V, ,-.Mr VM l . , . "RED LIONS" Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 15 was commissioned on 29 October 1971 at NAS, Lakehurst, New jersey. Its assigned mission was to conduct training to insure combat readiness of aircraft and flight crews in support of the Sea Con- trol Ship Concept. By the end of December 1971 the squadron accepted its full allowance of eight SH-3G helicopters. On 20 january 1972, 80 days after commissioning, HS-15 deployed for the first time, on board USS GUAM ILPH-9j. This initial 10-day deployment was conducted under the auspices of Commander,AOperational Test and Evaluation Force, in support of evaluations of the Sea Control Shop concept. On 20 july 1972, the squadron had its first Change of Command when Commander William P. Franklin, USN was relieved by Commander Burdell F. Doe, USN, Executive Officer since the squadron's commissioning. Also on this date, the squadron received its first SH-3H, the Navy's newest and most sophisticated anti-submarine helicopter. On 27 july 1973, HS-15 held its second Change of Command when Commander Burdell F. Doe, USN, was relieved by Commander james V. Davis, USN, who had been the squadron Executive Officer since 21 October 1972. On 1 july 1974, HS-15 was administratively chopped from HELSEACON Wing One in Nor- folk, Virginia to HS Wing One based in jackson- ville, Florida. At its new homeport of jacksonville, the squad- ron performed its third Change of Command on 25 july 1974. Commander james V. Davis was relieved by Commander Kenneth R. McCarty who had served as squadron Executive Officer since September 1973. On 15 july only one day prior to sailing with the USS NIMITZ to Guantanamo Bay Cuba, HS-15 held its fourth Change of Command. Commander Kenneth R. .NicCartx was relieved hx Commander William S. Renner, who had served as squadron Executive Officer since july of 1974. During the 1976 Med Cruise, HS-15 carried more than 225,000 lbs of mail and cargo and over 2000 sailors. The squadron has been respon- sible for seven man overboard rescues while on- board. As a final note, the squadron was awarded the CNO Safety Award for 1976 while deployed onboard AMERICA. CDR D, Brown CDR G. Thompson C.O. X.O. i i I I l Tl ii i i i i .. HS-15 LCDR T. Cash' LCDR 1. Puffer LCDR G. Wilson LT T. Brake LT D. Coleridge CAPT C. Dalley LT S. Fontana LT P. Gimer LT 1. I-lrenko LT R. Lambert LT F. Robbins LT D. Crocker LTJG H. Kircher LTJG N. Ross LTIG 1. Sheehan LTIG D. Wilcox ENS W. McAuliffe ENS S. Richason CWO R. Davidson CWO M. Gieck ADCS 1. Brand AEC L. Chambers AMSC F. Echols 4 1 L 3 ,. A ,,,,... f--f ,P 5 9' S rv W aff A T r '23 1 f ,V 'z, . .. T :-,'. . ,f-. , . A A . . . 1' W fl J W -Vx MM I I fda?-.Gr 5 aww 'X iv V J V I NM. V I .. . .. , ., .. , K kk , 1 T .. L ' S vi- . ...'. Q A H . sf L 6 . . f "' , '- rr'r T .Fish M f--ra-I R .ry S - r A 5 C-.SEL A ,i . . v . . ,Q s --if . t. i my "i . 7 . '91, 07,5 3 " "' ii fr pf: W' 5 Q . r. M f i V' gif f V+ ' , l ris. A Q 3 , 9? T L ..-. ' T H Q T rg -C . . ' V . ,,,,r ' 1 'X I' A r 4 - ' K 7 . J "'r' in ', 5 i . I s Eng - I r - 'W' K3 ' 1 f" n ,gf ' 5 X 5 'Q is 'hi' f fl.-W. .5 fr- .- Vffri- . .1 . ..f,: fzf gr.. - -4. f .v f - X . 3 4. f- ..'.s f ff . .4 V Y 1' "4 , fig - 3 L -V N . f af r..' 23 .X . Q , 1 E .... in . iiii I if . .. I 3 S r K f V, I. I f f .y, 5 , A J '7 KN . , " . . ,. 'gg' Q V' li.: V. A M, ' . , V' 'i'.. ,f 1 ..r. , 3 f fr . . . . T 671' nf ' Liljl'f"' . Q mv 5 5 . w... 5 . if 5 9, "im, .13 7 5 1' t K' 1 49 . .1 ,Cf A ' ' N .4 A 'iw 'T' -Q MT' hihfff , 41 J- '- .-fri . f... 1 X .A '41 .,, V ' CB f A 2 W", . . 2 M 5 mm .X N. , W ' . Asia R K z 6' f . Z2 f 'wb 59, 4 V f f ll 1 9 Agfa ? if f , ,X W E ff. Way af f 1 5... ...rr f 7 vat uf' rf X . ,az .,.. , ,.,f"'Z f if WZ' X y f .ff we , 5 X , ff , 1 K If - --- r-.- ,.:,., ... ,.. h.-,......- HS-15 AMHC W. julius ADJC W. Kill ore AWC G. Lobgell ATC D. Minon AWC K. Muller ADJC C. Overby ADJC F. Renckert AX1 L. Anderson AX1 T. Best AX1 W. Bonner ff 'E AZ1 R. Carroll YN1 G. Decker MM1 L. Fritz AE1 R. Gaucher AT1 C. Haggins AT1 1. Kistner PNL T. Lee ADJ1 J. Mill-er AMH1 R. Voisin AWL R. Wagner ADI1 H. Watkins AE2 1. Alford ADj2 R. Bothe PR2 H. Bowen AMS2 M. Bridges AE2 1. Coho AW2 D. Croxton AWH2 S. Davis ADj2 M. Feiner AMH2 W. Foster 235 HS-15 AO2 T. Freeman ADl2 H. Fritz AT2 R. Garcia AX2 M. Harwell ADj2 A. Mann AT2 T. Meyer AZ2 l. Morris AE2 K. Paulin YN2 R. Salas AX2 S. Smith ABH2 W. Walker PR2 1. Watson AW2 R. Worthington AX3 W. Bridges ADj3 1. Bowlds ADj3 1. Brooks AW2 1. Ceder AT3 L. Flynn AW3 T. Froats AW3 M. Emerson ADJ3 M. Hude AW3 K. Nash AZ3 R. Orosco AMS3 A. Plante AT3 M. Reier AW3 P. Rogers AE3 B. Sarchet AT3 R. See AT3 D. Spencer AD13 S. Stone 236 S ' A rt W . . . er t 5 x ps. . . Xi A Ns. f 1 .'S. 7 ' .ff A I, 5' NJ' .wha .ka ,Nt , in A. .1 .KN A, .st - YVQW uf I gi , , mf . 401. Wffwrf ' 2 , x f. f E. ii! l V tr 57 fv.. 4, .". f I .Wm , I I X Y f ' W f . 'VT .ffm wf,Vwfwf.iw 'ff ' 'H . I f f' ,f Ny? f6m:iwy,f?f,z Vf f , ff pj f W . zwfff' ' f , , . ,gg ' ,ag-f 4 1. ,, , 3,51 f , -Q flt. 5 ' W Z .f .',, . .V V , f ,. ,Z fWmfzic'M,f4w.fr 'ff W ,3 jffLZy.Zyfp 729 llfyyw 07, Z, www ,. . ,ff www fr f ., , , .ffl f Cf3if!1XV'f if? ff va , . f , , -, I My V f f 37, ,gf J A, . yy 5 f ff ,ff f f jf QM ff ff f f WU Z' f Qffdffy I K , , X 4 5 Q7 ? W X ff? ff ff a vga, ' .1 ff f ff . Af? f.if, 2 .m-.4 3 . -I. f if V iii, . , fn? . X ,. .I E. , X , .7 7 ,,' ' i"- -ft"r it I , , pw 1 I . I 4 J e X K 1 ' N f A-Jil T' A 'H+ - if ' N 2 A ,fe 4 f vf. I .. . .... . - ug, uizzglly it ' -'f QQ-2,5 iz, Q-ifliliiliiii51-33251-135 12521312234 .2i5.'.131 A:-i 2 'tru llYQx"f"nai"' F I , , . . .-.,.....-.----... ..ff-.,-5:..-- f, dm 'K F-1 R523 "' AW ' x ..,, -. .-., ....,., ...,, . me.. .... m...--.,,LL,,.--- .1.., .-...,,..-..,.-.. . -I -will - ! l 1 Wm-:NQ7 -1. ..- f. 1 ff? 5 ,- . 4 'x K X Q Q v lf ,- if X K. 1 T qi- f I A I !..3e.Egj,E, 3:3 l.':Af'fl1iZ.-4112: HS-15 AK3 T. Stronghart AX3 G. Stulb AE3 1. Trafficanti AX3 1. Trites AW3 T. Walker ATAN L. Albano AEAN G. Anspach AXAN C. Blackburn AXAN G. Cockerham AMHAN E. Crouch Paseo ' AWAN S. Peterson ATA-N D. Powell AN j. Radausky ADJAN M. Resnik AN T. Rutherford AWAN R. Sipila AZAN D. Stanton AWAN C. Weber AA P. Fabra AA D. O'Brien DSSA M. Passafume AA 1. Watson 237 Vey 1 As W 'n -X 4:11 -, Y 3. K ,ul .5 .. Tn . W u , . ., 1 . 4 uf ax, -Y N x 4 4 . ,fu n,. Y Q A - ' 'V Q 1 'iw ,V if , , w 2' 1 4 ' Y -f , ' ,W ff ,fff " 'UZ A ' Q ' V' 1, ' aww, av! , 'f ,f, M' If 4 'f A , 4 j -'V ff, ff ' 4 V A if ,f gn ,5 l . Q' ' ,, Q A ff, fhf, w ,Q 1 , v 1, r , ,V . , , .1 I 111: A-7E CORSAIR Il f "-- .-. A ' 111: g rt: 1: .a. :. J., ,,.:,.w if-,,:j:3 ,1, ji ,iz-3. . , .Y . ., X. 'A .... l?..'xf.'..., ... ..-..... . V l . l,.., ..., , . ' ' - ' . A .,.. ..- -r. . v LZZZI' " "' ' 1.2 ' .." 1 ..."'7.1' L'-3.7413-'-'-' '-T-'.'. Jiflfdi' 7i'l'!1.1,', .Z!' V.' T12 --'-rf. -'4 - - I -r ,. . , , . ,. .- ..E-.-.e. 1. u.f.a. .ess-.:safe-eff.sf1fss2214215225:25-:1:1f,1'aa:a..Mf1...fHL+.QE'5's -2- -f"f- -eeL-'f-4'-'----- Y A' f , ' " ' , ,gja 7,5 ,''.,.:":"-.L-IX'l.1':.::.221L1 CIQJITJ Z"::-"'M5I4'I'l,'3' "Tr" 1 zu" ' """"""""4-' - T -i qv Q A Q-,W 1-., - wa nu .1 ' gcxxalfla-1A:.,:,,KJ2-...-L A 57 Y, W, ,Y ., ,-,., , ..- - , - 4.0, , 1L,...11... -4- ..- W4 .,., L. L - - - -..-.-5 ,,,,. 1 ..,.-mananmflf:-. I l " LIONS" Attack Squadron 15, one of the oldest attack squadrons in the U.S. Navy, celebrated their 34th anniversary on 10 january 1976 Since its inception barely a month after the de bacle at Pearl Harbor in 1941, Attack Squadron 15 has flown six types of aircraft, operated from the decks of over eighteen different aircraft car riers, and made 21 major deployments to all parts of the world. Few naval aviation units can match the 34 years of service to the Navy and our coun try in the proud "None Finer" tradition of the VA-15 "Valions." Commissioned as Torpedo Squadron Four 10 january 1942, the squadron saw its first action in November 1942 against the Germans in North Africa. Flying SBD "Dauntless" dive bombers VT-4 participated in Operation Torch, which in cluded strikes against Nazi airdromes, capital ships and submarines as well as covering the landing forces. Almost a year later the squadron was dive bombing enemy shipping hidden in Nonfvegian fjords. In late 1944 VT-4 was again engaged in combat operations, this time in the Pacific theatre. As signed to USS BUNKER HILL CCV-173, the squad ron flew missions in support of our troops at Leyte and Luzon. Early in 1945 Torpedo Squadron Four struck lwo lima and Okinawa from the deck of USS ESSEX iCV-9l. At the close of World War ll VT-4 was transi tioning to TBM "Avenger" aircraft and homebased at Quonset Point, Rhode island. A year later, in july 1946, the squadron moved to San Diego. On 15 November 1946, VT-4 was re designated Attack Squadron Twenty-four. In Au gust 1948 the designation was again changed from VA-24 to VA-15. ln March 1949 VA-15 moved to NAS Cecil Field, Florida and in August received eighteen AD-4 attack type aircraft. From 1951 through 1965 the "Valions" flew their "Spads" from k ..,. iff: ti'--' ..:uFT3" L ,-fi' l3"LT1f LLTEQIEZZ E112 1Z?Z.2.':::'1il: - - ' ' decks of several carriers and made 11 extended deployments VA 15 was disestablished as an A 4 squad ron on 1 june 1969 The squadron transitioned to the A 7E aircraft in late 1975 The 1976 cruise marked VA 15 s 16th Mediter ranean deployment Jw 15 'W me CDR G Evans CDR K Huehn . , . - .1t1, ki A f ' - ir'iZ'?2iffi f ' A ' 1 j1efi'?? r't, aboard USS RANGER at Grassy Bay, Bermuda, on fi , gif ,,,-f, 5 .wr ..'k?y:H,Ad1Qg 3- 'aa-WT, 'A f .. 7 ,fu it yy , 1, g ' 1 r 1 i, 2 co. xfo. I - the VA-1 5 LCDR T. Mitchell LT G. Grimard LT M. Moffit LT l. Oliver LT VV. Pearce LT 1. Zeoca LTlG M. Harris LTJG C. lohnston LTJC l. Krygiel LTJG R. Nolan LTJG R. Yakeley ENS P. Gray ENS 1. Hodgkinson CWO2 F. Moultrie ADCS A. Cannaday AMCS O. Young AMHC L. Boutwell ADjC R. Kukucka AQC D. Lower AOC l. Lund AMSC D. Mosely ATC B. Riley AEC l. Venables ADJC 1. vvyhlidko 240 T Q 1' W-gif, I "ii" "" ,L 'E'- Y g A , rerfl- I A 1 A 'r l iff 4 . ..,. X Q z bv at I TZ' 1. .,,..,..2 if 1 . i mx K ,f l Q gf Q. fi' ww vc' lim 1 'Y' V Inj., ,X lm .. .1 . 4: E ami' A' if ' f f vw 4 f 9 f fx z f J if f , E . 'C r ri 47540 T ,L is . rg "-f - H. . f f 4.-,f ,. .- fhk, If , I K U f N W4 . 41 Aiii ,. i 5' .f fill W , -ILM! ff 4 A g , Q ,. .. ., ,, 4 , .1 , r 545 ly W A W xml 4 1 A . 2. . , ' . A f , ji? 'fxfrv' if " , ' ffl... U f my f Aa X ff Q24 , I g 1. f,. 'iri , eff' f , 9 -5' , -if ami.. If 5 Q Y Um! 'Gb Wm: M f A W I f P lf squmuv " . .1 : 552' 1 - 1f" ' i ,,.,, M V . L- ' iam! . .. 4 .Mr . X . .4 '1..: 11"-xr-.:4 , , , , ,, ..,..-.A .....r.-:.--1.1.::.-.e.-11:52:15f1fze:i1f21,.:L2fHifa:..2k? -4-- --smuggle: -. ---- ---M V- A- A 'AW' ,.:E an i , 5 W! Frm! ..g, lsff . Y! A ii 1 W 5: 4' S- g " wel ' L- ., fe . .iff if '35 S Liga... W iz ll , Q. 1. 1 'K rg. 'r 'l F1 E! L . l ' f I . .FN-Y :ff --15 VA-15 YN1 G. Alexander AT1 O. Booher ADJ1 R. Burkett NC1 B. Chambers AE1 H. Chandler YN1 R. Fletcher AE1 D. Dries . AO1 W. Kremser PR1 R. Lange AT2 D. McCall' AQ1 PN1 PN2 C. AMS2 R. YN2 L. Bradish AMS2 D. Cleveland ADl2 F. Doyal AQ2 1. Marms AT1 A. Healy AMS2 F. Kates AD 3 Kirst J 1- HM2 1. Lawton AE2 D. LeMoine ADJ3 1. Noble 241 VA-15 AMH2 1. McCurry MS2 M. Padayao AT2 M. Pierce AT2 E. Roberts AQ2 F. Schultes MS2 R. Tingin AE2 A. Wilson AMH3 R. Austin AZ3 1. Brown ADJ3 1. Burkhart AME3 1. Camardo AQ3 S. Chase AO3 R. Clements AMH3 R. Cox AT3 G. Denning AE3 L. Franklin AO3 L. Gangre AO3 1. Grant AO3 1. Ham ADI3 R. Leathhardt AMS3 M. Litwaitis AO3 G. McFarland AMS3 W. Tharp AQ3 W. Thorsen AT3 G. Vernon AZ3 S. Ware AMS3 T. Watson AZ2 D. West AN R. Berger AEAN 1. Brown 242 'Q '-W.. Y Nh 42 W 5 4 1 iz. Sw' gi-:gEz,2U,.ff!1.'i ' ' ' f ,r 4. ' X , ' A ' . Eb' ,..r fooii A f , ff,,wf,4,5f..A Mm,-f .QVMAW ,4 . f --Y 9 1 3 f ' M svi f 71 fii..o fix-.4 his J"r VV, 5, Z- 'A AA ' ,"t V Q f' . I 53 'L ,'.' V. -.Kr I ..KL.V E53 if 0 f X .. . .lik if , 2 . 2 ' f A K .V'f V rm y A as V Mx , jxmw I ., Y , Q . . I f X ff ily-t,Qf:7.-,Afffyyffyfwgfcf f - X ,,, .--- g .. -A -if:-f VA-15 AN R. Brown AMSAN R. Calhoun 'AMHAN j. Campbell AOAN W. Carter ADjAN D. Chadwick AN G. Cofleld AMSAN M. Cornwall YNSN G. Coston AMHAN C. Crance AMSAN D. .Ford YNSN E. AMSAN G. AMSAN P. Gal M. Godbey AN D. Harbor AMEAN M. jones AN j. Keeling AMSAN W. Kennedy AN 1. LAMBERT AQAN j. Lepinski AQC D. Lower AKAN B. Macintosh PNSN 1. Munroe AN D. Norton AMSAN R. Ormson AQAN B. Rythy ADJAN S. Spears ATAN W. Wheeler 243 H, f 5 if ' f 44, 1 1 Q 372322 we 9 M 1 VA-15 je, H I e + '-'P:- . . 5 ' AA C. Barton 'A . W M " AOAA1. Hakes ADIAN K- IOFWSOH UQ - A "" AMSAA P. R055 5 f AOAA A. Shoemaker ' , L V x A ' , sk" 391.55 ,,, f f ei ' ' X Q. V , m. ,: Qm,k AA D. 'xr inf" , 4354 ,Ik I VVVV ADJAA B. Watkins - ' AA E. Welch 1 ,.,. A ' QV 5 Q il 7 '-f, 4 , ' 244 l IS X I . . . Y . . ,, ,,.,. Y..,, .... ,,.. . ..., . . V ,... ,,, 3mua1 nmam.vn xm -i - - V .1 - V-,Y - W- q- ,,.v Fx . A .- , i V WA Below: VA-15 Commanding Officer and two VA-15 Landing Signals Officers receive the Air Wing Six "Colden Tailhook Award" from CVW-6 Commander Armstrong. The award signifies the greatest percentage of successful "traps" of all CVW-6 squadrons. wh, 1555 ,,ee if 7 Tram ff? 5 e, eL,Li,Q ali? E I i 5 Q Q si 5 Q 5 3-.ggfsaiiaasa , 's.,W,w':,-3 r . I -I 4' 1 A - - . N -:. 1.-. -.-.a---.'-' --'... -. .-. .'.. - - . Q A - - ,r .. 1,-1:1 ,Z A - .. mai 'Z-i 24' vit' l lg Ili vi 1 , Y 1 I 1. i 17 tie . I 1 . 1 HS Y Y, ,r lr 1 J -1 11 JZ, , , vt' if ' "" an 'AI - , 'f'a?.- f "1"-1'-1 ' ' -- 1 " ' ' 141' ',.- . 1. . lil" 1 '4 an - 'fa-3 'I'f"J.',AH VS-28 " UKKERSH during In Guatemala as well as In of the quarantine of Cuba The also provlded surveillance services for Mercury launches and the recovery of spacecraft In the Gemma series ln 1971 VS 28 was selected to evaluate the all purpose carrler KCVD concept aboard USS SARATOGA lCV 601 as part of Carrier Arr Wlng Three Tests and exercises were conducted throughout the summer In the Mediterranean Sea In 1967 VS 28 began the accumulatlon of an Impressive number of awards and crtatxons wlth the receipt of the E for excellence In combat On 12 September 1972 VS 28 marked 10 years of operational fllght without an avlatlon ac cldent representing a record achuevement for an Atlantic Fleet VS squadron In june 1973 VS 28 deployed to the Medlter ranean aboard the USS INDEPENDENCE QCV 627 to further evaluate the CV concept The squadron was also land based for a short penod of tnme at 4 VS-28 LCDR 1. Curland LCDR A. Harris LCDR M. Loy LCDR L. McMenimen LCDR G. Pfaff LCDR D. Powers LCDR A. Wittig LT 1. Bellflower LT D. Buderjko LT H. Conner LT C. Dodd LT 1. Eckert CAPT K. Eliason LT 1. Faulkner LT F. Carrick LT T. McKee LT 1. Milanette LT M. Nevins LT K. O'Connor LT 1. Reddinger LT 1. Smartin LT E. Warres LT1G O. Beaulieu LT1G S. Bisbee 248 sw 4 I iff., v I , ' J , -'E ,M L. ,m f "" 5 f f Q- 1 - Ls ' Q f- S l'f' f7?f ' 5 3" 3 If - Hf4f75fX?5F?w-?- 'uv V " ., " 1 .' .5 ' 4, - 'f-. . ' ' A . T ..,,.,,. ' .Q . . . 552-my-mff.v Q, 'K' LK 1- ' " T' ' I 7. , . ga .. l V ' f . ' ,121 .,.,..,. . ,. - U R za Q f " L N P .L.. . I .,...LL K. -, rw- -"f' P . wg., , A ..,. . . 4, ,gc "M X , f ' V' ,...,k A-if-5 X I V g +V - 1 2 2- . f . Y". K .. f . C :fa I -' lp .f me W 5 :fs - ' fm K , sivmn f , ' f Nw W iv:f:.w':..yg-v. ,- ' f "i, , V ' , 1 2 M Q 1 u .1 '...i".,a ' 'ef i' f ,.-.... 4, p VZ f M 1 J W 1 , ,f : -N f n",'.f'7,' nf., f , X , . ,... , f, ,W f X,- 'vw' f'Wf ?f5?a . ifr - "1 fu: 9' f 2 rnirf , Q V ,.,l A .. ,,, eirl' 77 if l Z l 1 . r . k ".' ., ',.,.- if f"i . L f V... A ff . . , , fM,. .fn 1 " ll 44 ,pf , .4 1 ,.',, 2 r , f Q, ' iff . ,f , if 62 X Q' f I X if ff A WW w.-4, X f V f 1 y f 4? i 552. 1 W .91 4" FEM wg, NY.. 3' Q . .f 1-2: Wav .1 . sag , 1- 4,-2,-w Q? gf M21 75 4 f L .:.,fz.fz7. ...W ...,,. f,,,.. 7 74 X X 3' M i' 'nz Q I' f 4? H 4 2 1 -f 1 if 9 . . av' A ,' n f A , .eww-, in , , .. -"' r A - -Q 'iaziii ' ' . ' mf. " 424 ' f 1.44 I P X 4 X!! , 4 M, vw df J ff. .f ,c A f , , f jx V, . Iii . , ' '7 .' Q .1 3 . f , 1.7, .. f VW JC , f I if f ' 0 I , Wx X f f 1 . .. ff. "...-' XM 5 1 f ff 1 4 . ' 'mf If-.3 V ' r if gy ,g J X f if T , row- W f,fWW J! 4 f X r , y ! X gf! , fi ff f ll fzfhi ff? -11 ff V, ff '..'.f ' V ffl. .ffffl fl fy' ,af ' 'V ' Z , ffflfy 1? .L ,wi 4 41 2,3-?,,.,., ff , ', 7 1' I fflllldff ' , X, ,J,?.w,!4..? 1, V ,1 , A K. f . , .., N., . X 1 7 I ,J 4 if 115515215211 Y 'aww' 'Os Wi 'Nz . A 11 NN YQ va, Tn: Y . 5. 4- H' , 'ff :fa Y, --v f", 4: ", . VS 28 LTjG M Charles LTJG N Conner LTJG R Edwards LTJG P Farmer LTJG L Goreham LTJGJ Isager LTJG T Lee LTJG W Marshall LTJG W Mortlson LTIG K Raysm LTJG D Reppert LTJG C Sandel LTJG D Spannagel LTJG E Watson CWO H jolner ADCSJ Edens ADCS P DeVlne ADCS K Mclntosh AECS T Undset AXC M Benner AMSC E Russell AT1 L Barbato AMH1 D Bebout AK1 D Chase ADH R Gaither AMH1 R Gavin ADH G Gonzalez AX1 G Hall ADH R McGaha AK1 D Plude 249 VS-Z8 AX1 I. Smith AO1 E. Thomas ATZ C. Abbott ADIZ C. Allen AE2 C. Amrnerman AWZ M. Annegan AMEZ I. Best AMHZ D. Bratlien AMSZ R. Bretz ATZ B. Carter MSZ T. Cirilo AWZ C. Coleburn AMSZ L. Cook AOZ F. Hardee ADIZ I. Higgins AOZ F. Iensen ATZ K. Drostosky AWZ I. Kaniecki AE2 A. Layton ATZ S. Malloy ATZ A. Mayotte ADIZ B. McCollum ATZ I. Margan ADIZ R. Obenauer AT2 R. Pinkney AMEZ G. Reupke AWZ R. Rutledge AXZ M. Seamon ATZ S. Serrano AZZ I. Sierra Z50 lifwxi ' r . ik' "t' A , V,. - k r V k .. I u m m f. . ,. q X 7 k ' ..s. s4 . :IZ . .. A ...M 'is Wu Al' vw,- 'Ql ' .l.i X . w g, YY vyry 1 M y - ti ' I HI 4 7 52' A . Wm I 41. I . ' q f f 'ff W, - .- Mx l W.. is .---1, 1 iii VS-28 AME2 G. Sones ' AT2 D. Sucker YN2 C. Taylor AMS2 j. Vivirito AMH2 G. Walker AMH3 A. Armenta AMS2 M. Bergeron AX3 A. BionDolille AMS3 S. Bookout ADH R. Camacho AMS3 K. Dial Q AMS3 M. Dymond AO3 1. Flores AME3 C. Fowler AMS3 R. Fuqua AM3 D. Garner AMS3 T. Gray AZ3 G. Hanes AW3 D. Hokenson AX3 R. Hopson ADJ3 G. Jacobs AMH3 C. Leadley AT3 D. Lee AMS3 1. MacKenzio AE3 M. Maloney AMH3 H. McNair ADJ3 V. Mondier AX3 R. Nash AMS3 1. Padgeu ASM3 T. Parks 251 VS-28 PN3 R. Perez AZ3 1. Pinson ADJ3 K. Richter AMH3 B. Stockdale ADI3 S. Suminski ADJ3 D. Thompson AMS3 P. Tomlinson AT3 l. Weigue AMS3 G- Woodward AD13 D. wyau PNSN K. Appleby AMHAN G. Arnolds AA R. Biggerstaff ADIAN E. Britt AMSAN C. Coker AMSAN T. Coley ADIAN W. Daniell ADJAN L. Duke AMEAN E. Goforth YNSN R. Herring AMSAN j. Krause AMHAN G. Lewis HN M. Lipstein AN B. Pittman AN T. Samples AZAN B. Shepard AMHAN R. Stewart ADIAN 1. Travis PRAA C. Alvarado AA M. Baker 252 4, Q..,,,.,x, . .... W 1 W .,...t.,,....L..Q-5.-,.3. 3, KJ.. f -- .. rw: ,4 Q X x 2 f sf , Y N352 yt: '3 Mr 1 'Z' 5 ya .. fr.. - . .- ..f.... . . A fx 1."i'1f,2,yj U., ' 7' V V. 3 ff..' T Z", V ff JJ. . K ,wa 5 ya . "lm 'I ' 5 4 . ff: ff f f fy f , A g Aw. . f, uf' 'iff f gg if ,Z Z V. V , . M gw "' f M yy? qw, f AH f .12 4- - 45.454 51.2 '5 2 ' 3 ' . ., . . W I .ff V Q .ffiiilt ' 41 . -- . ,...-- .- ', VS-28 AA F. Griggs ADjAA 1. Peabody Mr. J. Bautista Mr. A. Dinnell Mr. W. Gideon Mr. j. Sanders VS 28 Pilots and Naval Flight Officers 253 I l 4 mix A-7E CORSAIR H l - . . ,--'- i i t l -V - . . . . .--..,. - . -M v A -"' fe- - I ..... .. -..Q-...L..5..3msnm3,,:l------1-------------------V. -- A V- - - -V - f ' -- --4'-A---1-A - . -.'.-:A'::-- :i:"1:zL':':1-,'-mu. ::.-::::g:.,.-:nf-1 Y. Q ,ft QqV,V so , we 1.-. N M , T ff. B f..v s s . ,Q - ,. .. sc X- . LN . Jews. l I r f 1 if .5 'T . . . B . . T Q ai fi W W ,. fp .T 1. W y -Az. V ...fs-: Q w "" . .xx 1 . N l l A x. 2,4 X N wig A 4f"l!lFg- 'Jr K " ll' 'Q i I Q , lffklfiili J If . fx I., - 1 'M if 4, A W X . H Q-if 'id f 1 E . T Q .S f f Hg. I' - 7 0. i .lmlh H145 I X ' , 5 all " E -N ei r Q l -fy E I l lla li V V NB, t' K, . T fx VA-87 LCDR L. Conaway LCDR R. McKinney LCDRD 1. Vomastic LCDR J. Watford LT. B. Bradley LT G. Lane LT D. McPherson LT W. Phillips LT W. Rodgers LT F. Schaad LT M. Wilson t LTJG R. Christensen LTIG G. jones LTJG j. Shaffer LTJG l. Strinier ENS M. Luet emeyer CWO3 l. Howard AVCM B. Murr AMSC B. Williams ATC D. Bryan ADCS G. Cahee AMI-IC R. Carr AMCS 1. Elder AEC l. l-lorner 255 3' . -wffm ---. . A - . . - H- - - V f ' i5f'.- 1 " - ' " :Y , - . ,. f . - -..- -... .' . , . ' "":. ,E-T' .',1.ji '-1 ,5-.11 .".E1i.,' -"li,-' j-1,75-f'ff..Q:.lf, Y ' ' - - " ,- .' -7 .'.'. . Q-'. :- 1- .ct -' . 'M 95 , 1--' 47,721 ..1,1, 1- .4 --2 -I-. . '12, H. " , VA-87 AMCS L. Plaisted ADIC I. Parker YNC 1. Shofner CPO T. Cleghorn AMS1 1. Atkinson AME1 E. Biel NC1 A. Blevins ADJ1 W. Cleveland Hfvll R. Cruz AT1 1. French AME1 1. Helm AMH1 H. Hobbs AE1 R. Hogue AQ1 R. lohnston AE1 B. Pair PN1 Ci. Olegard PR1 C. O'Rourke AK1 O. Ricks AMS1 S. Rozier AMH1 R. Smith ADH C. Stroud ADH W. Thompson MS1 R. Torres AK1 R. Van Meter AT2 D. Allen AZ2 R. Anthony PN2 W. Cartwright AD12 A. Cate AT2 C. Estenson AO2 G. Harwell 256 mam l 4 ? '.1' X-I i Y! ... ,,., tab -' . . , 'Rv V 33 .,. My. . . it '34 t' A l V ' f- A 0- . " ,. ' s. uf D t ... Y C ......., . . to A 1 M it srrttf t .C A gi.. Q C ..s.i stisi lilii if Sf f. . . . A A A A ' P A rrr A ar a f C A ff?2'? tfll 3 ., 3: A - , V. . X f, 11, ,kkh. 1 - . " , .V '- Q ',. V. .f 'V iltl- , , , , r W 1 a , 'it' 3' V 'll . 1 ,,.. mg? . . 4 gf 41 A f . f . .X .l xi I its ,.,, L A N! sk 5 in ' A 7.-S' . 'll' f' f ' Flat' , ' 2:9 . l 5 is R , L. l Nl K K 'yu 1, '34, li VA-87 AME2 C. Herron ADj2 H. jones , AMS2 F. Leonafdi AE2 N. Millefiej ADj2 C. R'ider'eiSi's 1 AMS3"R. Cufenton AQ1 R. Forshee ADS3 G. Goings AK3 D. Hand AMS3 D. Hormann PR3 S. jones MS3 B. Lajom AZ3 D. MacKey ADJ3 R. Mitchell AMH3 K. Motsenbocker A03 R. Rea AO3 S. Richardson AO3 L. Rodgers AO3 R. Samples AMS3 W. Shed 257 VA-87 AO3 C. Taylor AN D. Bass HM R. Bone AOAN A. Brimm AMSAN P. Brother ATAN R. Castleberry AMEAN 1. Crawford AMSAN R. DuBois AMHAN R. Dwiga AN M. Freeman AMHAN l. johnson AN R. Leypoldt AN D. Kulp AOAN R. Lowry AQAN s. McAdams AN W. Merrill ATAN E. Merriweather AOAN B. Meyer AN 1. Plumley AQAN D. Poor ADIAN 1. Sheely ADJAN L. Starbuck AEAN V. Thomas AMSAN T. Tremper AN S. Villaruz AN R. Warlick AN C. Weber AMSAN R. Wigfield PRAA T. Beavers AA 1. Begley 258 1 . piigzl srr.. pf i . 11 iv lzfviaf ' Q41 gy M Y 1, 1 " '11-5 V.,. , Mfg, W ,k,.. K I - T 521 2577 rl'- A ix. .rsss A . 3 ., A M 1' . . , , . W 4 "Wi 2 iq' I , , !,.m,um 4 NC. . , 4' '70 of f 4 .0 Xb H I , W f f f f 2 ff" ' ' W. - my-4 4.-f A ..,.. , . .-.f J 2 , , 2 I ff Q , f X 'Z 1 ' X GM 2 1 2 si 51.71 fs-4w,.-ff'2:,:v.f f- W! A. if Z + T? ffffi V' 4. 42112 Yi X' Z 7547! 5 5 . .. 6f . at H i Mfg ,. . ., ..,. L .3 ' -mf! ' '. 7 J' ' , .sf Q51 VA-87 AKAA R. Bergeron AA 1. Carothers ' A AMEAN K. Faber AOAA M- Gfefiiifz- , . AMEAN Wi ll l B , , , , mwmmi ff L 4 Zf Q H 1 4 V I' ' 53 Z xg VV 2, I ,V V, 7,71 ,. ,. f 3 Wg , 5 3 vjg. , i , 2 A f m., Q VA , , l : 3 A 4 4 if , VVVV ,, if f WW ' ff 3 f ff -"- ff 1 rs A . "" ! 5 :I ww, ' X ,if,,, , .,.V , CDR J. Fulcher CDR 1- Condon V -, 1 2 co. x.o. E-2C HAVVKEYE ,--r n........., . . .. ,.L 3:-.jgjgggg 337311951 11342.-ir -ir: iff.-11-.A ri-ef .4-ar W D .mgg-L1 ,J rr . . ' V. i. .' .J-"'-!:Z1IZ'.'.' ' 1'::1.i'14.'?,Z.tT 2'7'TQ.Q ?jEQ21f32'Zu-'ll1......" ' ""f::' 'LLL' v-v v-1-' . .. . .. ..,....r..:.:e.u-.::--- f.3L.g::g4..:L:::.::g...:.g:.-....L:...-,........ v- L '- A A- A i xx'-M if ,- ,Nl , - - -K.. g,-.-V A --A - - -- . .. .... ..2......,...........- M. 3 ,- .. , .- 4 A x 4 .1.,r. 1.- , . . , VAW-124 R 7. ,W we Q' X 4' li D LCDR W. Hollingworth L' L E !, L. fri, I ,A 5, . . LCDR B. Loveu 25 - I ,L , ,. 'f LCDR A. Scroch 3 ' Q :gf 'Wf - . Q LCDR D. Tootle M 5 HX 7 A4441 - Q .R LCDR G. Wilber 1 f ' -L' f 1 abil , . h , ' 'A' . Xa 'N xi . T . J. V. - . ' in , 5 ' .. . ,x,X "' . X , Y V L 1 -...lL .... . max. .4 .... .. 0 s H L 3 , T Q4 -' f f f r LT A Lai - ' A W 1 , X 1 LT D. Muehlen , . ...gf Mfr' -X, LT M. Murray A ' f x, 'iT , LT R. Schweitzer N A N ll f E LT R. Weidman ,V A 2' .A Q dv T- 1. Til "-. I X Q J L , LTJG R. Greczek LTJG R. Harrell LTIG R. Mollet LTIG D. Mullis .H "" I -X ' '- '. 0 -4? L L, ' 4. 7 , L LTJG M. Opbroek '- 'E' 1' .h . .f I ENS H. jarrett 'Ei ff ' !s59" ' T' 5. ,X ENS P. Shaw I ' A 7 " ,f J ENS K. Wyge T . . A J L -, cvvo4 C. rt . XL, 1 Ifrx, Q A . a er . N, X ,X I I Q x T. .N Z' at 1 I f L in -r L. I Lk--. 4 1. ff. S, .... 1 .4 f-f 3 AVCM R. Martin -A F "1 A ' Q A Q' f CPO 1. Casto -. ,.--- , L xxi-331455 T -, A AECS 1. Greenway X.. X 1. . ' AEC L, Delbaugh ' ' A f - ' ADIC T. Harden i T55-f, 61,3571 lg srfllfs Q : S 261 VAW-1 24 ADIC B. Harlen ADIC A. Lajewski ATC W. Larsh AMEC R. Pound AEC G. Quam ATCS 1. Scrivner PNC 1. Sharrah AK1 A. Baladad AT1 P. Boerlin PN1 E. Claiborne AMS1 N. Collins AT1 R. Freshwater ADJ1 W. Lewis A21 R. jolly ,AMS1 1. Kennedy AD11 A. Martin AT1 D. Miller AMH1 D. Park AT1 E. Perrin AMH1 S. O'Dell AD11 R. Williams MS2 T. Ba uer AE2 D. Bicktlord AMH2 D. Bohall AMH2 C. Casey AE2 D. Crockett AMS2 M. Duffy AT2 A. Helton AT2 B. Kennedy AME2 1. Langlais 262 gi -. . - .- -..-1,-. , ,L Q.- .1... .. M- -4 , .. .. . ,Sanz ..m,i.1:'.-..1:.i.u::::4u' A: , ' 13 .l iianerul . -,Vx N-, 1' 4' ' 4 ., -9 Q Q f' li I xx 5-5 Y l' 1 . Q ,P 1. . N X.. f Q . ' E x 1 N 5 Xffrj . 1. .. x . N Y lt 15.3. " l.-1 oil' N. L ' x . Rf .I 0'O L '. -I A . If lu l ll V V R V 'ff .. I -. ,.fl44 it,,,. . . VAW-1 24 AE2 R. Marchewka AT2 1. Nifong AMHZQR. Parker YN2 T. Pearson AT2 1. Pillow HM2 1. Puzzini AT2 1. Sammons AT2 M. Shea PR2 B. Speilman MS2 N. Thagtibay ADj3 D. Bellet AMS3 M. Burdette AT3 D. Clark " ADJ3 W. Clayburn ADJ3 Donoho M? AT3 R. Gengenbach AT3 G. Hernandez ADl3 D. Jester AT3 L. Maier' AME34D. Murren ADJ3 1. Nickerson ATC3 C. Norton AT3 C. Powers AT3 P. Roberts AZ3 D. Schuler AMS2 R. Sterling AME3 G. Tallman AK3 M. Veilleux AZ3 R. Walker AN 1. Andrews 263 VAW-l 24 AN R. Austin AEAN W. Boren AKAN D. Borst ATAN A. Bryant ADJAN D. Cote AN R. Criner YNSN H. Cunningham AMSAN L. Dale AEAN D. Dasilva AMSAN M. Day PRAN M. Edwards AKAN W. Fuller ADIAN 1. Hamilton ATAN R. Harbuck AEAN W.AHayes AEAN C. Hench AEAN 1. jones AMHAN D. Lykins HN N. MacLennan ADIAN A. Malone AMHAN D. Natale AMHAN H. Noll AEAN 1. Peackee AZAN E. Pilapil AEAN F. Shrewsbury ATAN R. Smith ATAN S. Swinford ADjAN L. Tunstall AMHAN R. Brown AA 1. Eiler 264 l .. . . f figs f mai , 5 if 4? i .,. if " if W A f .af if M 2 3 "" Z l f 4 wif ,1 f 1 , f , : ,fv . 4 yn! v fy? ' 1 f ff ' ' , 'IWZQ X 4' X 44 fff 4 X . . W . ff , . fl X I af' f . 4' . X5 if ff .. 7:23 2 X1 l' ff! ,frvff ' 1 y 'Q' ',.. ff if ff' . ff ' X wi qv nv'- ! .vi ,, 1 ,AQ I X .Aff ' f 'ff .2 xc , JW "Necessity is the mother of invention" or so the saying goes. When AMERlCA's aviation gas system developed problems, outbound CODs were unable to refuel. Five gallon containers in hand, personnel from V-4 division refueled the aircraft by hand - a long but necessary job. , Y u,..p..n.,.:::z:: ..':'::j'E?f':iE5l3 Elif'Wil?7'?3l"l5u:'llllllllwig? 32 4 l VAVV-1 24 ATAA M. Fernandez ATAA R. Grevier ADIAA Rogers AMHAN M. Silverhorn 265 VAQ-137 . .,tL, , .,,, -,...-.-------------- ' -'H' "ROCKS" Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 137 was commissioned 14 December 1973 and tasked with providing the United States Fleet with state of the art electronic warfare support for strike air- craft, ships and ground forces. It was the first squadron to deploy to the Western Pacific with the new, expanded capability, EA-6B "Prowler" jet aircraft. Commander R.M. McDivitt, the squadron's first commanding officer, saw the "Rooks" through ,initial build-ups and qualification aboard USS ENTERPRISE and was relieved by Commander CLK. Flyum, 23 November 1974 while the ship was deployed to the Western Pacific and at an- chor in the harbor of British Royal Crown Colony, Hong Kong, China. During the ENTERPRISE cruise, VAQ-137 was twice recipient of the "Golden Tailhook" award for carrier aviation excellence and is justifiably proud of its non-stop support efforts during Oper- ation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon, Republic of South Vietnam. Additionally, the squadron was able to contri- bute its specialized knowledge to ENTERPRISE and Carrier Air Wing Fourteen's formulation of fleet air superiority tactics. The squadron returned to its homeport, NAS, Whidbey Island, Washington in May 1975 and succeeded in winning the "Golden Prowler" award during Prowler Stream, the yearly intra- community professional competitive exercises. Since then, VAQ-137 has contributed an "Elec- tronic Countermeasures Environment" to such di- verse interests as VX-5's chaff tests, operational testing of the PECASUS weapons system, NORAD, the Marine Corps' 3rd MAW, and Brave Shield XIII, a joint services readiness test. In November 1975, word was received of the squadron's reassignment to Carrier Air Wing SIX aboard USS AMERICA. In less than two weeks a detachment was aboard AMERICA for aircrew carrier qualification and integration into the new I - . - - -- 4 ------ - -I '-'- -V - ,n....m. Zm..,,,-.1-,wig . -. ' . .zz . - Q 1-1J-'l1-'-'-'.-':::.11::2:::..4:z:':.a"-' 21. ' ---4 - if-21 air wing. On 19 December 1975, Commander G. Miller assumed command of the "Rooks" and the squadron's efforts were directed toward opera- tional readiness examinations on board AMERICA. The "Rooks" flew a variety of training sorties with missions varying from SSSC to ESM, ECM and FASX flights. f f.. sl , ,,4 CDR G. Miller CDR R. DeWalt C.O. X.O. VAQ-137 LCDR 1. Moore LCDR L. McCrlothlin LCDR 1. Kennedy LCDR R. Harrison LCDR R. Crodon LT R. Berg LT C. Bruce LT C. Hartman LT 1. Nichol LT W. Petty LT H. Wynne LTJG C. Cawealy LTJC. T. Gardner LTJG C. Haas LTjC- T. Plunkett LTJG 1. Tatarsky CWO2 E. Fend AFCM D. Hayes AVCM T. Luehr ATCS 1. Olmstead ATCS 1. Payne AECS 1. Tomisser ATC D. Clarck AMEC D. Irons 268 . 2, fi4:'F'?7?ZS ff fi f Q.. ' ff X' . uf -'A L. V' ff? Q fs 'ff' Q? 4 f Z jf Q A X fl 'xv , Y ff Q, fy an , J Z " A 5 '23 4 sw f 7 yn f 0 f wr f . . . fgf K. ,. ,, .. ff .H ii 1 1 f f f f ' f f f Aw 7 1 i Q -fzgv 4 f 41 . , , A mfqylmmy .L . . 1 st, wa- if 1 r,.' 'gy . silt Q4-of i ' ,.... J. , k A N. ' wp., .v .QIV V V A A . ..'f' - R s ' 0 f,.... . , ' x . . f M V .7 . K 4 ' 2 W , . 5 -.g, pn Z ' W1 . '22, , X jg V' 'f., 1 m rw- "-Y' 2 r . Y , fi 'P ...I A ".. x '...,r ac., r..,L in I JW?-vii' I Ipit? V f H ' "ff' f reiifyfifs- f 1 ,. f. .0 . 'R" ' 'QQ92 r 112. f. 2 1 ."..... .." . z ' ' ."- . at ' ,gy-1, ' . , - I 4, . fw.7fw::nf.f. . - 7 M,2fv.s,fe, ' . .MV ,W 7. 'l,' .V . WWI, as 45' P .gf 'M I f f , New 2 .fi X, .fr f '-I , ig. 1... A , ., ' ' Gu" ' V- fx X ga. J f ,Z ' . ,',., , ' V Q 29 ' ' tif , " ' . f ' 1 . H 1 If ' A' 1 ff' H V N . A xy I if if 75 k I Q , . 'Q . 1: 4. " if ' .Y f Y , ' ., f xi . L. . F ,, ya C 1' ,.,,,, ., . . , til, - f wgfydf . J , .,,,, 1 4TQ45 ' ' . . 2 , V , , A . ,ff ' Y. 3 .- ff " ' "rP T' ,Q I . 'ff ?' Y ff T f f . f f .Q Q' XX R '9 . K' ll Q lx N, X EV' in nr rr., f , Q i N , , W K T i ' 1 , w :H v K ' ' , , ...W 'V N. 7 4' Y K. 1 4 ,, ' M 4 R., I ,,,, L Nw XM. f 1 ,-'vit 1 ff f f 6 f. J H . . in J... fl" . s' ' ... - .R K... ji . ' 1"- . wif, . Q DIR-sys' . J I .A , i ' D: ,K 1. .. - frffw' 444 Z f MQ 'f f fa f E , f . J ...V 5. 4. :V 77 kv? .3 sv I cf, ' 'lv 7 f V f . fe ,zwffpff 2 C' , f W f 1 , ff X sf. , X f ff I -nm y W . VAQ 137 PNC E Starr ADlC D Scott ADIC J Prlde AEC R Pauls ATC P Lipscomb AMSC R Stotek ATC E Stout AMSC E Weaver ADJCJ Lam ABH1 R Blake A D. Iverson ADJ1 M. jones PN1 E. Manansala AO1 T. Marx AK1 C. Murr AE1 R. Osland AMS1 H. Reynolds MS1 E. Abueg ASM2 W Baer AT2 R. Berry AT2 W Blelefeld ADJZ C Brown AK2 E Cruz 269 VAQ-137 AT3 P. Geiger AMS2 N. Garza AT2 R. Floyd AMS2 D. Fair AME2 S. Davis AT2 C. Grandahl AO2 S. Hall AE2 W. Hagadone ADIZ G. Hibbard AE2 B. Hileman AT2 R. Hine AT2 G. Hoyt ADIZ S. Ida AE2 1. Jansen AT2 1. jenkins HM2 R. johns AT2 E. johnson AMS2 R. Koon AME2 L. Leigh AE2 R. Mapp AT2 1. Monroe AD12 C. Mullin PR2 1. Parnell AQ2 D. Pollock YN2 B. Reed AME2 1. Robinson AZ2 G. Sarter AT2 E. Senior AMH3 R. Smith AMH2 M. Stanler 270 - "aw if in 1 'f if .. A i 1 kkry g,i,?.kF., , ik, , - K U 1 , , . , ., s yy 5. ' .1 . ,ar .- .X A fw- Wf y W' . o fi.. AJ i W' E I I ,,,f,lXg 1 . vw. "Q 'Wi -. .hjwi f Ab . A... Af! if 4 f , ri' ff? ,gs 5,4 G32 J . R 'vu , ' V f 4.3M Q' 1 , . a 3 A r i ....i.f my --.. W1 'R' 'W Y 'raf M Y. - we VAQ-137 AZ3 R. Backer MS3 B. Agot AMS2 N. Yeagley AT2 G. Wooteg AO2 S. Webster . AT3 R. Berr ADJ3 N. Bilig AMH3 P. Boriaf r ADJ3 B.jBoshaviZ" AT3 E.iBrasweIf AE3 jr. Garrison' ADj3 R. Goes AME3 C. Gohr AMS3 D. Guenzler ADJ3 R. Heckt AT3 R. Heinrich AT3 G. Hoopman AE3 G. james AE3 R. Lindmer AT3 D. Littel AT3 T. Martin ADB T. McBride AZ3 M. McGIumphy 271 VAQ-137 ADl3- T. Polk AMH3 M. Petricka AT3 l. Perkins AME3 1. Millard AT3 D. Mclntyre AT3 D. Schlipf AT3 S. Scott AT3 1. Spence AT3 R. Stone AZ3 D. Thatcher AT3 R. Tripoli PN3 S. Volz - AT3 D. Wilson AT3 Z. Zakimi BM3 L. Amurao AMHAN K. Barber ADJAN B. Bridgewater AN 1. Confalone ADJAN R. Croan AEAN M. Croft AN R. Darnall AEAN l. Drakulich AMSAN M. Falvey ADJAN V. Freenfield AEAN M. Haley AMSAN L. Harris YNSN G. lsaksen PRAN R. jackson AMHAN A. Kildow AOAN G. Kollman 272 ,W 4' f , . , ? , S if W ff M f f ffl X ES. 4: 3 4? 5, 'f 'ff' if ff l J fpo f f 'Yr 2 f r f X if E Y 1 'ff . .rg if '. l Y -1 . . , .fY. X. . ,L . ,.... .. .... ... . ,..-. .f. .. . ..... ---...,,L........v.......-.....,,.m::... i r V- - ,-" . ... ... ...,.-., .,... ...... --4-... ....-...u3:5.....f, . . . . W . . . .- L- . ... ,- . . . . ....,. ...-....g....,. ..... . ,.,... .... ... . . ..4...y1: :Q .:. 1---fr' 1:v"-f---'-- -A -- I- .,,..,.L A- , kr- A ' f I . -Ma- 4 , , A . . ll? ' A ' W V- ,' . F A A . A L J ,I A A -if N .- I 34: '." Q, lil: lk l . A X if . 5'gk.V'kQ gg. , ' .A .',, 1 . , .. ,. fill., ... riff .. ' mms Vi ,OP JF L. 1 , 1-wv--fwnmmw-l-1--- ----- Y' , A . , V vi. w VAQ-137 AN H. Muirhead ATAN R. May ATAN K. Linn AN 1. Link A AEAN M. Lewin AA M Muluaney ATANJ Nagy ADJAN R Nollan ADJAN R Pentico AZAN R Phillips YNSN R Radeck AMEAN C Ritchie AA W Switzer AMSAN R Uthe AN L Wansley ATAN T Zehr AMSAN L Alsupll AMHAA R Armstrong AA T Berge AA N Boyden AMSAA W Coward AA L Elbert AA V Keller AA D Luther AA M Moore AMEAA P Mullins AA C Pierce AA M Rumsey AA S Salazar AZAA W Simmons 273 Q VF - 142 F-14A TOMCAT Combat cruise TION. "Fighting" 142, the squadron second Vietnam tour aboard the in December of 1965 and returned of 1966. During a 1967 cruise the flew 1,663 combat sorties and amassed 2500 combat hours. The squadron received its second Navy Unit Commendation and another Battle Efficiency "E" for the 1967 cruise. In 1969, the "Ghostriders" transitioned from the F4-B to the F4-1 and later that year deployed to the Western Pacific onboard the USS CON- STELLATION. In early 1973 the squadron flew continuous strike missions and were engaged in intense com- bat operations until the cessation of hostilities on 24 january 1973. In September of 1973 VF-142 flew twelve air- craft to the East Coast to begin carrier qualifica- tions onboard the USS AMERICA in preparation for its first peace time cruise in 10 years. In janu- Eii' -SK- VF-142 LCDR E. Brown LCDR P. Cruser LCDR 1. Myrids LCDR D. Sharer LCDR D. Walker LT T. Avera LT K. Baker LT S. Brown LT 1. Bumford LT D. Davis LT E. Dorsey LT S. Gilbert LT 1. Gwyn LT R. Holt LT R. Myers LT 1. Seddon LTJG C. Bueker LT R. Franklin LTIG R. Herman LTJG M. jones LTJG 1. McHenry LTJG D. Snoclgrass LTJG A. Swiereng AMCS 1. Dewitt 276 M 'fx M 5 E ..., 6 fs 4, X3iy,,,. wiv Kilim :er ff X 3 .f V M, f ,f yfimf 0 ' X , .,,f.y..y. . f '1 . V' 22. 'T W I .. I - f . . , M.. f ff' A . ff.. N- ,.1 73 03 Zin ' . q,yxQSlRlDER NL l ' il J . . . If . "r' R T V an ......,, A if f 7 .... ,. 3 TG if iff - ,Q5ZQ1ig,iygfz!. cf W ff ff ,v f-wg 44,9 , , ' y, 4'-f .. ff , V Z7 , f 4 K 7 X in f W X ff X ff 4 6 vffyregificrlff. , ' f ' , . If . , , f l l i ir X f4 ef 1, . xl l H - - . A, "fT'fr':T1:':r11.'.::::Tw.-In-.. .. -.' 1-1.15: ::::if 'iii ..,. .- , -1' 53:35 4,513.1 i ly. ,-2-111.7245 '-'L-.:::r:.-f ff...-.1-.V-f.:,f 511:21-:.:.f'--A -.ff'sf12211s1 1-'f"-W H -ea-:Ll sf, we ....-.s....., -, d L A G Q 'mm l A :V ' . ,K x. A.. ...KX Sw. "byf N 'E X-.Jr PS3 ,ns :Ll XX :'.. - N., X. mm , V '-'?'. is X1 fa, if ,,.. 4 ' ' f V - V 1 ,Yj,j 'V 1' ' "1- ' -"T-"..',.f.'i'-,-'+"K'Lf1zn:v:--A---xr,-I, . VF-142 AQCS S. jaworski AMHC W. Burns AOC T. Chapman AMHC M. johnson AQC W. Lucas AMS1 B Holms ADjCj Standrldge AMSC R Sehn AMEC K Schmidt PNC D Sargent ADHC B Tabor AQC B Vlvlan AT1 R Bagle AE1 W Briscoe AO1 J Carroll AE1 M DeBeuhl ADI1 B Evangellsta AQ1j Ford AMS1 W Gomes ADH E Gravelle YN1j Grove AMH1 G Hamon A011 Herndon AO1 S Hughes ATlj Kendall AT1 R. King ADJ1 W. Mason AZ1 P. Minnix AE1 G. Odekirk AE1 G. Perkins -277 1 VF-142 ADH R. Pontin AMST D. Puckett AQl S. Rhinehart ATT R. Sabin AE1 Serran AME1 L. Shondel PRl 1. Startt AE1 B. Stegemoller ADH T. Taylor AQ1 J. Thomas AQ1 W. Thomas AME1 B. Turner AMS1 D. Williams NCl R. Whipple YN1 R. Wismer AMS1 C. Hood AQ2 T. Avery AMH2 R. Bowens AMS2 E. Cabrera AZ2 K. Copeland AQ2 C. Cranen AT2 C. Crawford MS2 A. Devera AMH2 1. Garcia AE2 M. Hayes AO2 C. Hoeg AT2 D.iHolder AT2 E. Holvick AT2 C. Hoyt PR2 R. Kelley 278 L Y all J I 3 .I in --M -q uf if 1,lYiiil5l C V f I , i ' Z- fav A W7 ii H2 '-fr' 4 Q ?.v , :g."p , 0. ' ij ,kf K I -,f f Ll'-Q lil llill " fjf! Q F l I., . 1 tg. I K K Ly .ff 4 . V -'sl . .s.l f Nei ..', fl if' ' I if ,l ' , 43 ,-'. f,'h v r -,.' -1 f W f ZZ. T - SZ-fy, ff , f, 1 .lT' T T ' - M- N-'Q-.1 I f as f I b A ' - . + ? A 4' ,L '- f V '- I fy I ..r, , 6, 1 ,Q all K lf Q 1 , ga 5' 'vzif Hman. la Qi ,,'l ,V,, f QQ 'Q , yy QW f I , .- , ' f Mraz '.,' , I , , ' - ' . ' 1 , -f jj, ' . y g ,if .1 1,15 A , I ' M T p W . . z' ,, . f f , ' p , ' - . 'ff r' 5 , f, .5 4 Q t , . V. f,L..a, f I , y , , 1, l X . I unizaru Y '.!,, x X ' - YV! we Laf r-VFW' VF-142 AMH2 R. Lawson ADj2 W. Lee MS2 E. Maneja AMS2 C. Markus AQ2 D. McCarty AMH2 1. Nave AME2 S. Nelson AO2 A. Pitts AME2 1. Rosinski AQ2 D. Sargeant AME2 L Slmonsonn AMH2 F Smith ADj2j Stephens AK2 L Thomas AE2 H Wllllams AME2 R Wlsptzkey AK2 G Yeager M53 Allen ASE3 G Bayllso AMH3 A Barker AE3 R Benton ADj3J Blebl AMH3 P Bonslgnorl AT3 L Borg AE3 D Bowen AO3 D Brown AE3 K Brown AE3 L Brown AT3 D Browning AE3 T Campa 279 VF-142 AMS2 L. Chavez ADI3 G. Cooley ADI3 T. Crawford AQ3 l. Davis AE3 D. Cockter AMH3 R. Dunlap AMS3 G. Espersen AMH3 S. Fenter AE3 j. Franitti AMH3 G. Gonzalez AQ3 D. Hall AME3 L. Hill AT3 C. Hilton ADJ3 1. Hollingsworth AMSAA C. Hobb AZ3 R. Hornung AMS3 S. Larson ADJ3 T. Lascelles AMH3 P. Karlsson ADJ3 C. Kays AE3 R. Kipp AMH3 C. Marlow AQ3 1. McCord AMS3 R. Murray AK3 E. Neal AT2 S. Otero AE3 J. Poole ADJ3 E. Pruszynski AZ3 1. Reeder AQ3 A. Reiremeyer 280 5,22 iff 221 la ' ' dawg . - 'fr ., 3Vf ,VV . ...af . , 2. .VV , - My ish f 3 ' 'la , ,ir 2 If i W 5 Vgl.Q,"e.3.3.1V fi" ' SY 2 ',.. .'lr Vf ll.... H a"t '-l' Q if f , , ' ' V ' ' ' r ff- f f f I l ' 'V V VgV Jbfi i.,Vi, ' f' " ' , I will fffiigalz-ff f.Vri'Qi':':'jf,gV,z. V .1 ,V - V, -5112.5-'f.4f,'V5g . . . , V, V ,V.,V.,1wV.,,,,.V.- 'f " 1 V ' . V .:V V' , 4, V 'f t: ffl'-'iVV2Vff'::.. V -f. ' 1 2- V V , . ,V,:V.:'V :Vf25VVf'f:fff2 V V:-V" '1V"1'2fVi,'1Vf'f1V2.1efVzVxZQs , , , .f , ,, .. .. ,f 4 M., V. Q f , , . ,,,. f,V.W,! 5, , , X ,, , f. f. . , 1? ,g , ,V f 0 . V , VV V. - , -414-f.-v 7 :Vw rv: V . . , . as . . ::1,a!V7ff4f.M A f' ' ' 'V f ' ' ' I . .f , . K ,V V J .. ff Y. V, A I ?...V,V.f..: 'iff I V V . .. ,f,..,.w.,f-, V V , V! - .. . , ,wry , ,.,, ,. ' 'VV ' f..- -2 I. A fgjfgjfy , " V.. ,V,' QV? V. m-,. VV,,V 5 , fVV f . . X -V , ,f.x, . I5 V , .7 I 1 a., Q an . w,,,, .... . . . 121252. f . ,. f f I 1 ,I rg 4 , tif Q . V -XIV 4 Q... ..-.. - f 2 .fig J 9' H 2M'gfV3gV,y,gVf 4 V jyma , ag, I f fy X W f ' ' 7 s f..- ,.,. ,M 'V 1-V1 , . 4V -V fgvii-Z VL X 0 .,,,.,.,.', ,. ,, , ., or-V,..g.fV.f.z 'Q ,, V -V l V..V:p.z,1' 3 - ' V ' f "u.2:f.iL3V V ff. I4 V 7, , M W I W4 Q-3 ra 1 1 I 3 l .5 f A . V , , 1 ..'. ,,., 4 , f 155 .,'. V 2 "" 2. Ja.: . ""' f .V x, ,'r' V .V ' V, K. , V 'K' 'l V 515:,.4.7, ,I .CV V f?V,:,,,f4i , , lV ',V, VVV7 . MV, '5 54? XV M I M L :Q -A I-V .-,. V H Q I .'.' V V '.f- . V f ,.'V V' , 'V V f,,' r,-.', ' ff f , .LV V . V ,,h, V.V.1 f r ' Vk-r L , yu, A4 VV L ..... ' L L ' 'ya V . , 'g C l yn V,'. V 4- mae,-.V 1 ii ' ' 7 ' f 1 ff T' , ' ' MV., . lv , , fy 2 - ' 'V V .fzfVf.,,LzcW 1, uw ' " .V Ill f 1-ww. ay, -- iffy rr L f'.fVf2WVfffA'2 ul 1- .1 7 -' 4i, gla,.'-I ff Q . V'V. ' ' . , I V, if , X X , Y, .V I , f ,ff ff 1 a . gi ilw fff f V . V .'V' ' Z ffizwfzili? .. .Z V V,"" V , "' J ' 5 1 ffzgfgyif , VV.. ,, V V ' .fn '1f:,,fff " . , V .... 11 . , Z , . N ' f -"' . VVVVVL V4 I V aff L I L., L' 'V ' Qw fi-.j?Vr' ' 5 ff?VQfrT ' , 'L-' ' zZ':f:fVfVf - .I -A .. 1 V lg f LW " A 'df ff X H- l I Xl fl an Q QR' s Y M53 , ,, V Y , ef-4 ... of 1. A may .... ...-L. - -eg g. 9111211-wife?-i1xi1EY'slilz-i1:'1-mi 1.-Q rx'-wfsv :fn i 2' x QA hu . l3E ,E,jig Q' l i l ': i f " ,I ' ol' D 'O a F' X . M N I 'hi A "f af. R C J! K ,p ' I K 1 f i l .af A. y lol df' , f 4. ,1. ex f ...AJ f. f ,X VF-142 AT3 M. Ritch AMH3 C. Robinson AE3 E. Sanders AME3 R. Sasko HM3 1. Scheck AT3 D. Seigrist AMH3 R. Stanberry ADj3 A. Stanners AE3 M. Storer ADj3 D. Tollerson f L D. Wil AMSAN 1. Booker AMHAN M. Browning AN A. Church AMSAN W. Copeland AMHAN K. Corrie YNSN D. Decker AKAN R. DiClaudio AEAN G. Ellington AEAN C. George ADIAN C. Goodwin AMHAN T. Griner AMHAN W. Hagstrom AN W. Havlicek AEAN j. Lacobs AMHAN K. lensen 281 gf '2f..e.-1-.2?Q:2ig.'+si'YE T mf-Y-..m... n w x- . .m I-i VF-142 AMHAN 1. Kinney AEAN R. Koger ADlAN M. McCardle MSSN G. Mielenz AN l. Perez AEAN D. Plummer ATAN M. Regan AOAN 1. Richardson PNSN 1. Rosenberg AEAN G. Scott AN B. Sentes AEAN B. Sheets ADIAN A. Taylor PRAN F. Womack ADJAA B. Corey AOAA j. DeStevens PRAA W. Enslen ADJAA A. FAIRCLOTH AA 1. Faulkner AMHAA 1. lgnatowicz AMHAA 1. lurutka AA L. McLeod AMEAA D. Morgan AZAA 1. Newson AOAA D. Patgo AOAA A. Pulz AA W. Rogers PNSA M. Shamberger AEAA E. Wingerter 282 A 0,4.gfy1,'z. ,.-f. A uf... :w . .ff - Qin. .M 0 24 ,f . 91 144 If, , Mir "f - 5' , .1 , ,,- V., 3 ,f ' vw f . lg ffl-. I M K ff V 'f if ' H . If '?f2f,Ef11:?g2' 'f - Jififf' rf" 'fy ,. -' ffff ' -.- f , ' '2'LI' v, , .4 4,ff'4fY'f f L3 'f',, f ,3.Lf',j 5 4 .f Q 2 4. 1 554 -4,1 f A ' , Aa.. 1 . ' V. ' 5 A ff' fi Q 315015, 1' 1 f ' . ,,f Lif' X Z V f rrrr A f X. f f 1 ' f 2 zff , .4 N .f - f f f f f X v , .43 , f . . -if la . ,,,... .L A X 2 'Vx VF -143 ,X x .wa-X F 2 K, f .. Q53 Q R ,-,ity .Eg FRA. -I! ' 3 In R RR FW R Q ff 'WW . . -F CDR R, Schaffer CDR 1. Lusk C.O. X.O. --ll F-14A TOMCAT 283 .T..1. ..- ...........-..--- QV , nn-.v on QQ . . -f'.1':pf.:,:1:y,..'lvf.T' .. VF-143 LCDR R. Bird LCDR D. Borchers LCDR 1. Bowen LCDR 1. l-lohlstein LCDR L. Dawson LCDR D. Eberle LCDR D. Lefavour LCDR VV. West LT 1. Branum LT 1. Brooks LT M. Emmert LT M. Grissom LT 1. Harrison LT C. Henry LT W. 1ohnson LT D. Leslie LT. 1. Maloney LT M. Matetion LT R. Nell LT R. Phelps LT G. Raynes LT G. Stevens LT K. Volland LT1G L. Beer 284 at V I. . ... T p LM Mrf R. ' i s W T 5 rr . we i T f 'Z 1 L 'rif' ' ff 'P ,. . ' 1. - . ' we .- 5 - . e.2ammm2 er T R e r '. . Q r . . 1 To we pffl. .. f ' T... ri ., VV -R ',.A i f vv:,vv Y T . B. 'ff 1 f -' 'f 'QW' W I . 1 g' EQ '. g ii . we bww fi 4 gm if fs'i T 1 iss..iiT .s.i 1 1 .sfi iiiii . is . - ' K sss. l.sT srr rnrrl f B an f M.. fill. ' ..n1f 'S+ . . . gs 1,3 'gi ir', 1 ,i ,i J . I, . .. E , ,.,. T , 1' '1' ff Q A fiss ' f'L.- 1 ..fV' VLV.V 1 f. I im' ,"". rs.. sg. M.. f V. VV., .sm 0 mix A REPR .,. 1. . I M f 1 JSI S f f Y 1 m emi f B xifd rwf42v Wn,1 2e . - 2Q ?2wm f ' ff , fiff' 2 , ' ' 2 ,f' . 1 77, g h ,V K, w l .W if z 5. , 1 V 54. lL" jg . f, , 7 ' ' QV " A A , M Q lv , X i . V f I .. 1 L f 1 ' f A ff ii ' , - f .wi ,V X. .,... ,V . , 2 .6 T f . ..r. 4 fi L . Q2 Z . 'fy " . ' ,M :Z ' ff f If 6 ' I : V., if 9 3 1 . , .. , "i . ff 'f ' lx ' or f. if is . +rilQQ .ff TM 3' niffwf I7 Q 42 . if .fro WE? 'Hfg' 9 ' " 15 v WV 1 0,427 iw nv, H rg Em? 'X 1 'N "sf T , 1 , A 17. .xx 7 . 1' 'F f Q 1 f ff , ' . .. .wif ' ' VF-143 LTJG D. Turpin LTJG G. Woodward LTJG D. Bostich LTJG B.'McCampbell LTJG j. Dykes ENS C. Gloria CWO D. Beyer AMSC A. Gokey AQC C. Allen AEC D. Austin .:, - 4. V' " lil V. Q? , .M AMCS E. Boyd ' D. Brew' - AZC R. Hollingsworth AOC P. Hoppe MCPO 1. jones AEC A. judeen ATC j. Kleber PNC N. Rimbocchi AOC S. Whelpley AME D. Woodall ADH C. Hewitt A51 F. Akridge AMS1 H. Anderson AME1 D. Belisle AT1 K. Butterfield AMH1 T. Diaz AT1 G. Dillrnan 285 'R VF-143 AE1 D. Gladden AMH1 1. Fury ADI1 C. Fitzwater ADJ1 R. Edwards AZ1 V. Duckworth AQ1 P. Goneau PRi R. Green AMH1 G. Groman AE1 D. Herrman AS1 1. Hildreth AMH1 R. Hoefle AQ1 W. Honohan AMH1 P. Hosek ADH H. Hunter AMS1 1. jackson AE1 M. jones AT1 R. Lister AME1 D. MCC-rew ADH E. Manning DK1 R. Nave YN1 B. Simpson AQ1 G. Smith ADJ1 1. Smart AE1 A. Yarina AMH2 R. Aceovedo AE2 D. Adkins ADj2 j. Aldrich PN2 B. Alvarez AK2 R. Abuan ADIZ R. Beck 286 I iz .2 R. i t -.. ' A s. ..' sirl ' , . 'x 4 f. 4 .A - B .1 . , X , Y .si M :,.. I Q .. ,121 , ,X ",x A M f B . 1 . . A . L V.1Bi.f ky' 3' X b A A' K ', d 'tid a' ', . . p F Q4 r ti , rriii "'- 5..f ' mid . S B L.. ,... as B '11 - - .V .........,. .. ln -iv f P5 " 4 . A s'. sf ...f ...A , wiv' Q ii' ' i l y -VV. ' 'W A it tt" vi .4a:..-f 'fm .-if . f f 41.97 ? . . ,fs y V FW .f . . :B , ,,. 4 I 1. I ' if-5 'i 771,71 f"' M ..- .I . Miz., B Q X f X 1 f ' - Q vw , 1 , g y . A 54 wlmhi 1 ,,,,,, .. raw , 5B CWA: . 1 B .fa 1 B 9' f Q 4 4 f y f bf 3 f 4' .ff 6 f 49 f f 4. . . 66 1. 441 f B. 1 A lllf. ,M . .. lx ' ' 4 2 Q fl X . V ff 0 f X J X 99 X . . if 'SW , ff L Wi' ' n M22 ' J ., 1 1 ' wg ...ry M 1, a . ,., . rt lla?- 'li ll UW B. - B .,: ,,,.., X z ,. , , ,,., Ev? 255 . ,-.- Q-v Lgzim-A-B4-we I , B , .5 ,wk ',', ,'... . . ' ,, ,,,.. , , ,,,. ,, , A,,,q.,, :,. ,4.. k . , .4 ,.,. V ,. 4. "g f .',' B 2 . , B' 1 H V, . A fair. B 'tr' dttri dr . . utc. Q B ' ', "i' ' A v f . i .AVB . " b B f'-" IB 2- - 'Bf B .,,.. B.,' B.ffYB'1B'H- Y "Lvl W , B -,BB ' Vw Bl- V V , XB B... 1 '." fr ' . if ' J A nw ,.B , . .BB :B gf :rf " ' , . ., , . A B 2 5 BB'B i r B. 5257? VL,', r I ,K , Y j krky K V Bw? ...A 1 , .',', . . ' t , i.,.A , is A V B. : If .I B fir.. ,B i u . i 3 ff 42 A Q - rf ' B,, V,B ,, , ! .iffy I , , V V Ox. ir f,.ff, f-yi ' f i45Bivf7BfV ' , if B A - ., f .rB, S. S, . gf Z Vg tv Q f b ,,V 1 Y 'Z hi S B A Emmy WM.. Y, f A r-., ,,B f BB Ag arm.. Y A ' B B -4 u I X ' Y iq -M4 ,, fy , V7 --JY' 1 M f Bw , 2 ,V L, X 1 f , ll. hxvtx ,Wy . A - Q,,ffLz,,f5'AxW ' , IWJX? : ..- 3--V .1 r H -f-- VF-143 AMH2 1. Edwards AE2 1. Dunkin ADJZ 1. Clark AMH2 S. Campbell AO2 R. Caldwell X in IWW 'fm rx! 'Y :ff 'bv 90' MXWNAN re A-'N 42' va. X In N bd D- AT2 G Lewis AME2 Klewrs AE2j Lundsten A021 Muller AME2 L Nelson ADj2 N Overman AMH2 S Patrick AMH2 R Peavy AQ2 C Perry ADj2 R Plan AME2 M Raymond AE2 A Rudzrnskl ASH2 W Small AQ2 T Thompson MS2 A Velbls 287 VF-143 AQ3 C. Bellacera AME3 L. Banks AT3 T. Arseneao AO3 1. Akers AMS3 G. Adair AE3 S. Gore AMS3 1. Hargroder AT3 D. Hanson AMH3 M. Bowser AZ3 L. Branch AMS3 E. Bravo AMH3 D Carrel AMH3 T Casrrllo AE3 D Cowles AE2 D Fischer AK3 D Francis AK3 E Gapud ADJ3 R Garcia AT3 D Gordon AT3 K Hodges AQ3 W jefferson AT3 T johns PR3 R johnson AMS3 R Keen AQ3 A Krenzler AE3j Lopez AMH3 M Lane AT3 G McCormack MS3 C Manchester 288 ww... 2566 Z 2: , v 7,3-,,rn.:Qr,4-Q-2g , . . . ffff ' ' V 40+ QD :V 27 fSt'4f"5?.7' -S fx 1z.s2.iy1-f't2:p 0-pf : ,. if 'f.' .D 1' .r.B arr Ei5J1f'L1:5 .v , , .M .25 iz Q7 'Z PZWfg? " I .Wf ,ff ' iff VV i V ,, ., . an me X f 4 W 1 , It ff! ff Kiw i 4 1.241 '12 ,' 1,,,,, , 26 . Z? 'WJ W Www ffm!! W? '25 f 2 W OO' lx V 62? rw W ' . ,w:.g.:n.- V' . 5 f ,m,' X X I asf A . y I f,W, , .3 LQ ' ' of X be A rrrr AE3 S' I-'eby 3 . V 5 Ll ' ' , A u P , 1 V 'ia ,U 'fy fx X 6 Sl L Q2 X f A . 9 k K x X.. - xv . rg Q D, 'J P4 aw' .X I 1 ,'y', i Z, V Is f' ul x4'f-K1 14 , I l l .11 .I . If . 1 VF-143 AME3 A. Popp MS3 R. Petty AQ3 R. Pelton ASE3 M. Mattingly AME3 D. Martin ADJ3 R. Pritchard ADj3 D. Ross AMH3 M. Rother AMH3 S. Sanders AK3 S. Sorota A013 R. smith AT3 W. Smith AE3 G.'Strong' f ' AQ3 1. Sullivan f AT3 D. Swanson AMH3 D. Teleky AMS3 F. Tolliver AE3 L. Wagner YN3 D. Walton AT3 1. West AE3 1. Whitworth AZ3 D. Wilson AE3 C. Wilde ADj3 W. Wilson MSSN P. Artstein AMHAN R. Baskin AOAN R. Brown AQAN M. Burke AMHAN M. Cassidy AOAN D. Chafin 289 I I I N-'S 'B 715111 'H ' ' ' - - H I pi q. I ... ,- --. . , ,. VF-143 ADIAN M. Denney YN3 D. Danzo AN M. Corkery AEAN M. Cook AN S. Chewning AEAN 1. Dillman PNSN P. Fajardo ADJAN 1. Fitzpatrick AMHAN T. Flatray AOAN M. Fry PNSN D. Hicks AOANL. Holden AQAN S. jeczmonka AEAN R. johnson AMSAN B. Kelley AMHAN 1. Koening AMHAN L. Lindgren ADjAN D. Littlefield AEAN D. Market ADJAN M. Mortero AMSAN K. Morton ADJAN R. Mueller AMHAN j. Mulrenin AMSAN R.Munley AMSAN T. Nalencz AEAN M. Nash AMHAN D. Nehring ADIAN G. Richardson AMHAN D. Richey AZAN S. Riese 290 ,. ry-,.. -.,f Q, ,av-f iiii ' i 7 . . .. ,W H4 . 1 fy 1 Q X X , ff ,, ff I .,, 4554? , f. Y., .t 2 .Q 'K Af 'S R M ,QQWW ,W 4' I 4 7. .g I - . . , . gf 1 , 5 2. 13 ,. K ,V" 7 f. , ..... IQ.. M 5' f fi fir! . In . . . .. ,4 ' 4. Q-Ly gg... - ..i .mpg ,. gr . ,. 5 3. f..-...M-4 he 3 -4.5, , ., gg f .p. . ,,.-fi-ms, . .V , , 'I' . 2' 'X l 2 fi ul f Vi In ,. W. L 5 A.,,,. ,.. Q4 L , 4 fl M wi f ' ff QW --V:',..,,q:s r, W 7, f f 0, .. Y 1 Q 3 f 1 1 I Q., I , .5 Q M ,,, 445 2 I f Lge 'vi L y L Kfif' L fiivfii 5 V H 5 'A . ,M . AC ,f uf' 2 --ww?-v--:v'wmz-iw-r-1'gxLgg1:gp.3g3ngxw:-:nr1:---1-'.--.m.g:.5-msaes-.nuxlnre"-L- '1-7 """"'-""' l M . .X 1..-,. 1 ,., N- a 'x R1 5 X l pi' A' .x ll , .L K..-J -.. H , .H VF-143 ADjAN W. Turner AQAN D. Thompson AMHAN S. Setzer ADJAN R. Schofield AMSAN R. Sayer AOAN T. Walker AEAN A. Watson ADJAN 1. Webb AEAN J. White AMSAN D. Young f 12 ADJAA B. Bouvier AA M. Garden ' AA D. Carey AA' M. Gaines ' AOAA D. Leach 3 if ,1 .gp , vEiH ' ll . , r 3 l. mat V A . ':.. .ir A15 4.1 Y- f 'W u A' A -fsqawsiglff Q? iq xi-Arg V - .I ADJAA S. Luebe AA M. Mammino -MSSA 1. Mealy AA W. Morley ADJAA 1. Murphy ADJAA j. Newcomer AMHAA M. Osborne AA R. Phelps ADJAA 1. Reiche ATAA D. Risius ADJAA 1. Rutkowski ADJAA W. Schumm ENS M. Feclak 291 .Z lvl .1 1. li ., 15' VA-176 LCDR T. Beard LCDR A. Lynch LCDR 1. Pieno LT O. Boucher LT G. George LT 1. Hawkins LT G. Kalman LT P. Mansfield LT T. Morandi LT K. Pedone LT H. Smith LT Stambaugh LT R. Taylor LT S. Warrell LT K. Zimmerman LTJG C. Carlson LTjG R. Cochran LTIG B. Davidson LTIG T. Deyke LTIC- L. Emerson LTjCr D. Fischer LTIG R. Hultburg LTJG D. justice LTJG H. Mclvlorrow 292 CDR R. Ferguson C.O. CDR M. Howard X.O. N I 4 r 1 'D .,, 'f R 0 N T 35 ..,. 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Drobac PN2 G. Ellis AQ2 C. Haddad AMS2 T. Hawkins ADj2 R Henderson AZ2 G Howell AZ2j Humblr AQ2 L johnson AQ2 S jones IS2 D Long AT2 P McGreevy AQ2 K Mills AE1 D Meyers AMS2 A Ong AMS2 C Sample AT2j Schoolfleld AQ2 G Schulthels AQ2 W Smith PN2 H Warford AO2 W Webster ABH2 W Wheedleton AO2 C White AO3 M Addlson AQ3 C Archer ADJZJ Arnold YN3 S Bradley AE3 H Black AMS3 C Brown AT3 D Cannon '3-T' , W . ', aka' f . so 1. K.. ..... .Ni ar. ll., W. .....-Mg, ' D ' - R I 'V . I .si 5 I Q ' . X ,, x . A 1 if .Q xv x . -.. if S4 , Y in X. ...M WW . C, ,ssqs C, , " ' 5 CQ v A+ 1 X A , ' N 1 . Y' N L Y 4 295 ,.. my as A ' A 4'S' ' s's- W VA-176 AQ3 M. Cantrell AME3 A. Clements AMS3 P. Daniels A03 P. Datlon AK3 R. Dillion AT3 D. Finch AT3 L. Fischer AK3 W. Frost AE3 D. Gilbert AMS3 E. Gilmore ADJ3 G. Goins ADl3 Gonzales AQ3 l. Hayden AK3 M. Herndon M53 W. Hinton AMS3 T. Hurley AT3 E. Lang AZ3 1. Larscheld AO3 D. Lepard AMS3 1. Libengood ADI3 C. lacquemain AMH3 W. King AO3 T. Kreischert ASM3 1. MacEuitt AO3 1. Martin ADl3 M. McClure PN3 1. Minutilli AO3 C. Muncher AO3 R. Nestler AME3 W. Odom 296 T 'J ' ff 45 Y. , - QW 1 1 X . , f Z f VU' ' .1 :-' V ,t , ' X' 2 :.. 1 . M4 ' 171 f V ' 451 1 ' 5 . . 4 . 5 4 gf ,W 4 if X if 47 ,L .... W, same m..... ,. -' ,,.....u -" 'Sal' !3-S , pf. ' . X91 14: s lx J 3 . KILN X ' XR -1:23, fkstfv l 1 lm ,,. 1 W' N K J? .11 .. 27 , ,,,A f' I a . 7 . Y' N T I .4 . S-A" 4 'W' - 'cn' -v 1:37 '1 X !,4 ...f is yg' F VA-1 76 ADJ3 1. Ostgard AE3 D. Pitney AMS3 1. Platt AQ3 R. Reynolds AQ3 M. Roemmich ADI3 R. Shelley :ggi AE3 W. Shinn AM3 C. Slinker AZ3 M. Small YN3 R. Smith ADj3 D. Sorsen AMS3 L. Thompson ADj3 T. Thomson AQ3 T. Tiller AMS3 M. Welsher AMSAN M. Abrams AN H. Allen AMSAN D. Ashbaugh ADJAN H. Baisden AEAN H. Baker AMHAN R. Barnett AMSAN T. Barth AMHAN 1. Bates AN W. Brown ADJAN M. Bulger ADJAN G. Coleman AN G. Conn ADJAN B. Cross PRAN K. Cummings AZAN G. Davis 297 VA-176 ADIAN S. Davis AMSAN G. Dowdell AQAN G. Eakes YNSN M. Ernan AN B. Flora ADjAN L. Followill AMEAN P. Ganzer AEAN T. Given AQAN C. Goodwin AQAN K. Hargrove AN W. Hatton AMEAN D. Hopper AMSAN T. Hubbard AEAN 1. Hughes AMHAN L. Ivey AMHAN D. johnson ADjAN S. jordan AOAN D. King AOAN 1. Ledger PRAN R. Martin AN D. McCartney AMEAN V. McCoy AZAN 1. Mince ADjAN S. Montgomery AOAN M. Moren ADJAN D. Nace PRAN 1. Niemi PNSN V. Obermark AN T. Osborne AOAN D. Pawlak 298 JNL, , ,ff Z f J., X I sw f My if I 4 I if Ji if W sf x, -, .iff 6, .V Q, X T I , s 5 2 15.55.15 . . " ' ' . 1 k' s ,V .V , V , Q , -I , LL4,, . ,,. .'. ..' ..- ..-....' - -' 1,:L:::Qr3u-wif,-2.2.1 . s ji ., i4rP:+if!i'iiia:5:gx51:Vg:5.5 ...A 5. ,. 1'1" J xx, f Y ff V, I f s 5 ga af' el K 11 . X, , I X , a-.f....1. .. fs- n' r "' x it Nl ' x A x47 I.. Y Q 1 VA-1 76 AMHAN A. Petrosil AEAN 1. Prejean ADJAN D. Pickett ADJAN R. Ruhl YNSN M. Sachs AOAN G. Schattenhand AMSAN R. Shires AMEAN 1. sjigh AMSAN D. Speake ADJAN D. Thomas ADJAN D. Thomas ADJAN Ef THQFIELSS AMEAN D. Rep. a AKAN s. vazqgfgg f 3 35' AN A. VilIafane,f.gf f-ft. ' 1 -' --'4'fqg...1! SME , . - .N , ' ' 'ff v.v"r.:5v21rl'..',. N .l A .-.,.,.A ' ', X 1 'k:. I 3. '.-i+1f,,f',,t 4 I 'JK - , V A.. . -, th.. AQAN AEA .. , a . ax - X - ,' ' AMSAN D. Zimmerman 1 AOAN R. Wisda AA T. Andrews AA G. Castagna AOAA G. Darden AMHAA H. Estes AEAA D. Morales ISSA D. Palmer AMHAA W. Parks AA j. Pitts AEAA D. Schoenin AMHAA R. Sterbaci l PNSA P. Storey T AA 1. Westerman ,rm ml 15+ rin AR F. Crooks Elm? ,,.4 .nur ma- lm :Rf ihiv in N Q 299 ' . Z1 'ug Y. J USS AMERICA 1976 CRUISEBOOK STAFF: EDITQRZ D.L. Riley BIT PLAYERS: R.S. Collins TJ. Decaire GJ. Dubose GS. Ellis M.P. Keen D.L. Long VV.C. Winter SPlRlTUAL GU l DANCE: Estrella l-lannen Alt Lovvenbrau Peroni MAJOR VVQRKHORSES: ...ii-I D.L. Riley!Editor!Pl1otographer!Writer R.L. Wright!Photographer Raffo HJ. Gerwien!Photographer San Miguel 1 es L, 1 l P.T. Mullikin!Writer LC. CalIison!Writer G.H. lochum!Writer R.F. Danielsen!Photographer Arnold!Photographer ,f 4' W vwfiwfwl-J,Q , nf, . nT'fffL:!, arp: 1 A l Y Nw. 1?4,.:, J 5. '4 1


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America (CV 66) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1977 Edition, Page 1

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