Altoona High School - Horseshoe Yearbook (Altoona, PA)

 - Class of 1940

Page 1 of 182

 

Altoona High School - Horseshoe Yearbook (Altoona, PA) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 182 of the 1940 volume:

R . A x N ' Q . H 1. v. - dr, x V, A W 1 ' , 'Z .V .. A M xx gr, xifxda-A ' f. 'I-,S ,Q ' 1 'gd "T, , - H."'?,n, .. 'fl I' , ...ng J-in W -MQ.. V . ..,..d.'1 ,, . ' gy... " L xg. mmf I , A5 'I-.Y J A 1 f at rf 1 I fy Zxigff S H' V -Q , Mfg, .,-5.,'a.., .- 1, M. L -.r '-.f 4' E N . N f A 'i N ' K. ffm 9 ex:- x Y- .. M. 'F--Lzffwqwba. ' I ' - 'v ,...h X, X , A , N ., , Y ,s h -'3faq,. , .,mM .H H3 N' A ,' x 'MV N9 A ...V 11, 5 fixk' XS-Lkfq' " X-1145 xm?xKS'gg1kM'A,wp,,,43b, ,N X M., X .,'1"X X39 A-fn . VM. 'tw x 7- ' x . . , , A 9.-X'?:-'N QS.. X?-vw, . ,, Q-1 .S,4,".,,'--'fn NSAQLLYQM-:,f,'f..,!fLL-,H vw.. t !1.,,,, .5 ,v r f Q, . - ,wg A- ..,7,., ,-, w mf. ,K-,mv bf--M-1 .- Q., Q I 'j' "-Qfi"xQQ5Q431yi 'QL -,st . Q N , Y . J 1 . . , Q, . . . M-.,gx,,. 9,2- X H'-:."f X s ..Vx.. RmXif"q5f.. .fw ,. .. ' ' i'Nf'MIw'--X NA v, 'g'x,Q"f::Q:QN-' W WW --. iq dsx, su. 'WEN I -3 'Su 'V-7.1 5 N 5.'i A ' za-qxifx 5' ' -Nr.-sw, "-. ' - 'N . X 1 :Q +A- L 5 f K, Q 5 sz 5 E 5 E il 2 ? E 3 a s 5 OF THE FUTURE HORSESHOE ANNUAL PUBLICATION BY THE STUDENTS OF THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL ALTOONA, PENNSYLVANIA ir uk THE SUBSTANCE CF DREAMS k the past. As we gaze into the crystal of the future, we see youth advancing into greater spheres of life. A tradition of our school is to present, in an t annual publication, a record of the events of each school year. ln publishing this 1940 Horseshoe as a stepping stone to your visions of the future, we endeavored to grasp the spirit of an institution ,k with growing ideals and principles. BOARD OF EDUCATION . . . Front Row-Mr. Meek, Mr. Leh mann, Dr. Gilbert. Second Row-Dr. Ray, Mr. Hite. Third R 0 w - Mr. Bowen, Mr. Zern, Mr. Thompson, Mr. Rey- nolds, Mr. Decker, Mr. Wilson S. C. BOWEN recently retired from a long and successful business career. As a member of the Blair County Motor Club, he is especially interested in its safety program. He has been a member of the Blair County Poor Board for four years. W. N. DECKER, a former teacher, a past presi- dent of the National Association of Public School Business Officials, and retired Secretary-Business Manager of the Altoona School District, is well qualified for Board membership. PARK S. HITE, a prominent business man, is vice president of the Blair-Bedford Council of Boy Scouts, and an active member of the Y. M. C. A. and the Chamber of Commerce. WILLIAM F. LEHMANN, president of the School Board, is keenly interested in the welfare of young people. His foremanship in the P. R. R. Testing Labora- tories has familiarized him with industrial conditions of the city. He is an active member of the Y. M. C. A. J. FOSTER MECK, who has served con- tinuously for twenty years as a member of the Board, is a lawyer by pro- fession. He has a wide knowledge of business and industrial conditions and is a director in the First National Bank. Mr. Meek is a golf enthusiast and a gardener who specializes in roses. DR. L. N. RAY is president of the Blair County Historical Society and a past president of the Central Penn- sylvania Dental Association. Coin and stamp collections and agriculture are his hobbies. PAUL R. REYNOLDS, a foreman in the P. R. R. Shops, is familiar with local conditions. Mr. Reynolds is interested in the Ameri- canization program of the American Legion and in the Y. M. C. A. He is a member of the City Park and Recreation Commission. BENNER M. WILSON, owner and manager of the William Penn Hotel, is a past president of the Baker School P. T. A. and now serves on the P. T. A. central council. Mr. Wilson is a member of the American Legion. Hobbies-avia- tion, music and art. WILLIAM R. ZERN, a well-known insurance repre- sentative, is a member of the Y. M. C. A. and the Chamber of Commerce. His hobbies are swimming and tennis. LEVI GILBERT, ED. D. Superintendent of Schools lt is interesting to know that the threads of the theme, Vision, are found running through this yearbook. Would that this yearbook were an open window. Would we want to look? Our anticipation, our vision through the misty future, will be brightened because of the successful activities of this class and the individual members of this class. Our hope is based on the fact that the members of this class represent a select group of American youths. We like to look at them as courageous, fearless, unselfish, capable and eager to find the best place in life for their service. A strong faith in the youth of today drives away the mists of doubt and helps all of us to see a better Altoona, a better America, because the Class of l911-O caught the vision of success in the Altoona High School. if in ff' Thx w x ..4 N. vii l X JOSEPH N. MADDOCKS Principal We are living in a world that is on the march. The present generation seems determined to set up a whole new scheme of things. Throughout the world there is a sense of aspiration. Mankind is in quest of a fuller and better life. lt is not easy to live in such a World. We are not sure that change will mean advancement. The question therefore arises: How can we live successfully in such a world, and how can we play our part so that the world of tomorrow will be a better world and change will be improvement? To youth falls the challenge. The opportunity and the need for making worthwhile civic contributions has never been greater. Now is the time to make adequate preparation for meeting the many problems which will soon face you as voting citizens in our great democracy. PAUL A. ZETLER Assistant Principal The members of the Class of 1940 are going out of the Altoona High School, going out to follow their visions-visions of a future Where they shall continue the Work of their predecessors in our American democracyg visions of a future Where they shall make life a little more enjoyable for their community, more satisfactory for all because of their Work. May the vision of the members of this class be a vision of service and of a more abundant life for themselves and others. Each in his own Way and in his own place can find pleasure in his memory of what has been and follow his vision of what might be. Xl 4 1 v 3 I 1 1. r W, W L- 74 1 5-iff If k Ax 12 I 5 ,J rf 7 .,, Y, fp L6 vigqg 4 1 s ,M fl 4-' : A FuLLER LIFE if T1 5f,f ffff'f1i'..' gg ff fg ff' f y N. 'J WX 'Wh ah, .Ia 33 1 Q:Qb'LY"' LN XR? f V X R K 5 E .iw L if vi . i , gg, Q , T F Q, 'Ik .GW 5, "" M- I .sei 3 As "-3. yn. nk f ' 2,: . in R A VA QL ,,.1 u S 7 aggkmmg l f ? Q 2 95 xl. mf si as :Q W, ,sw 8125? P 2 2 U E H f .. Maw-YK .qu in , u 91, i E + SL 'r 1 Q new f E ! 5 153. -in . 'IJ-+,gggZ?k ..z ,, -E My E i l A I E a L 7 F 1 T I F 5 E 2 ! 1 3 i 1 4 S E i i a i i ! 1 FACULTY .. . . DIRECTORS CDF EDUCATION ir J ' - ,'-'. f Q. 4 4,5 , V ii .4 5 is 3 Q 5:25 4? 4 www . Q gif? I F f Q gif? 'Z f g , , Ji fb 5 ff? 22 X N iiigjjg-ggigzfiv . , . . .,,,3 .' ' ,522 SUPERVISCRY STAFF Marion R. Bancroft, B. A., Attendance Director for Girls, Faculty Group Leader. Annie C. Campbell, B. A., M. A., Head of English Department. Earl W. Dickey, B. S., Attendance Direc- tor for Boys, Dire cto r of Student Activities, Faculty Group Leader. Elisabeth K. Eyre, B. S.. P. E., Physical Director and Athletic Coach, Girls. William Gibbons, B. S., M. E., Director, Vocational Department. Irvin S. Gress, B. A., M. Ed., Dean of Boys, Faculty Group Leader. John L. Hoover, B. A., M. A., Head of Commercial Department. E. Marie Lentz, B. A., M. A., Head of Social Studies Department, Dean ,of Girls, Faculty Group Leader. Howard W. Lindaman, B. A., M. Ed., Head of Music Department. Maud Minster, M. Ed., Librarian. Addison E. Pohle, B. S., M. Ed., Director of Student Participation in School Gov- ernment, Faculty Group Leader. Zitella B. Wertz, B. S., M. S., Head of Home Economics Department, Director ' of Cafeteria. George B. Williams, M. S., Head of Math- ematics Department.. Harold C. Wimmer, B. S., M. S., Head of Science Department. Robert H. Wolfe, B. S., M. Ed., Physical Director, Boys. BUILDERS OF CHARACTER . . . FACULTY Front RowfMr. Wimmer, Heller, Miss R. Krouse, McGuire, Miss Heiss, Corle, Miss Cherry, Mr. verstick. Second Row-Mr. Yoder, McCauley, Miss Woomer, Bancroft, Miss Morrison, Rollins, Miss Faust, Mr. Hoffman, Mr. I-larbaugh. Third Row-Mr. Geesey, M Hoffman, Miss Campbell, Krick, Miss Kitts, Miss Lewis Miss Roberts, Frederick, Miss McCartne ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Annie C. Campbell, B. A., M. A., Head Marion R. Bancroft, B. A., Josephine L. Corle, B. A., Bernice E. Dunn B. S., Charles A. Faris, B. A., M. A., Edith G. Frederick, B. A., Scott S Geesey, B. A., M. A., Elizabeth Heiss, B. A., M. Ed., Mildred E. Heller B. A., Raymond N. Hoffman, B. A., M. A., Elizabeth V. Holley, B. A., Anne E. Krick, B. A., Ruby G. Krouse, B. A., M. A., Elsie M. Lewis, B. A. M. A., Fannie E. Magee, B. A., John McAfee, B. A., M. A., Margaret J McCauley, B. A., Anne E. McGuire, B. A., Beatrice D. Morrison, B. A., Hilda M. Orr, B. A., M. Marie Ritts, B. A., M. Gertrude Roberts, B. A., M. Florence Rollins, M. A., William A. Whittaker, B. S., lda E. Woomer B. S. HH- SCIENCE DEPARTMENT Harold C. Wimmer, B. S., M. S., Head Francis B. Barr, B. S., Helen Cherry, B. S., M. S., M. Verna Faust, B. A. M. S., Ruth P. Grove, B. A., M. A., H. Edwin Harbaugh, B. A., M. S. Wilbert H. Hoffman, B. S., Litt. Ed., Helen K. McCartney, B. A., M. A. Wilbur K. Rung, B. A., Reiman J. Shaffer, B. S., Harold E. Stong, B. A. M. Ed., Harold D. Yoder, B. S., M. S. Fourth Row4Mr. Stong, Mr. Shaffer, Mr. McAfee. Fifth Row-Mr. Whittaker, M Maman Ann Phil, B' A' Barr, Mr. Faris, Mr. Hung, Mr. Pohle. NURSE ir Elsa M. Paul, R. N., H. S. V. 9 LEADERS GF THOUGHT . . . FACULTY SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT E. Marie Lentz, B. A., M. A., Head A Paul C. Adams, M. A., Richard H. Bartholomew, B. A., Sarah E. Bell, B. A., Hugh C. Black, B. A., M. Ed., Earl W. Dickey, B. S., M. Ed., H. Marjorie Downes, B. S., Emma C. Eberle, B. A., Paul A. Foster, M. A., Irvin S. Gress, B. A., M. Ed., Nellie M. Crimminger, B. A., M. Ed., Ethel M. Henry, M. A., E. Marian Hoffman, B. S., Anthony F. Lamont, B. S., Eugene L. Lantz, B. A., Marie N. Lauver, B. A., Ralph F. Marshall, B. S., M. Ed., J. Franklin McDermitt, B. A., Nelda Miller, B. A., M. A., Jean- nette Stevens, Ph. B., B. A., M. A., E. Joel Strawn, B. S., M. S., A. Angella Unverzagt, B. A., M. A. VOCATIONAL DEPARTMENT William Gibbons, B. S., M. E., Head Edgar H. Blatt, Walter E. Bracken, Willard C. Cross, Alfred H. Dietze, Walter A. Dietze, Charles S. Fleck, Walter H. Grove, Earl J. Haverstick, B. A., William K. Heiler, Harry K. Lantz, Carl O. Lundegren, C. lrvin Metzger, Jacob C. Miller, Andrew D. Moore, Charles C. Plummer, Ceylon S. Homig, James C. Ross, Samuel B. Smith, C. Elvin Thompson, B. S., M. Ed. MUSIC DEPARTMENT Howard Lindaman, B. A., M. Ed., Head Alma M. Eberle, B. A., M. Ed., Frank Krivsky, B. S., Francis C. Wood, B. A. LIBRARIAN Maud Minster, B. S., M. Ed. EXTRA TEACHERS Audrey N. Blake, B. A., F. Grace Breidenstein, B. S. lk Front Row- Miss Grimminger, Miss Unverzagt, Miss Lauver, ell, Miss Holfman, Miss E. Eberle, Miss Stevens. Miss B Second R o W - Mr. Thompso Mr. E. Lantz, Mr. Gress, Mi YI. SS N. Miller, Miss Henry, Miss Lentz, Mr. H. Lantz, Mr. Fleck. Third ROWNML Black, Mr. Adams, Mr. Haverstick, Mr. Dickey, Mr. Bartholomew, Mr. Blatt, Mr. Marshall, Mr. Bracken, Mr. Smith, Mr. Gib- bons, Mr. Metzger. Fourth Row-Mr. W. Dietze, M. Moore, Mr. McDermitt t M St er, r. ' rawn, Mr ' M r Mr. Fos Miller, Mr. A. Dietze, r Cross, Mr. Lundegren. OUR LEADERS WITH VISION . . . FACULTY Front Row-Miss Truax, Mrs. Lingenfelter, Miss Givin, Miss Lowther, Miss M. Miller, Miss Dunn, Miss H. Krouse, Miss Buck, Miss Swartz, Miss Dun- bar. Second Row-Mr. Williams, Miss Blake, Miss McGinnis, Miss Paul, Miss P u c K e y, Miss Gould, Miss Crist, Miss I. Lewis, Miss Minster, Miss Johns, Miss Gorsuch Miss Sauserman, Mr. Sheetz. Third Row -- Mr. Wear, Miss Eyre, Miss Breidenstein, Miss A. Eberle, Miss Duncan, Mr. Graf, Mr. Dejaiffe, M Zet- ler, Mr. Maddocks. Fourth Row-Mr. Krivsky, Mr. Bashore, Mr. Wood, Mr. Hoo- ver, Mr. Brooks, Mr. Yost, Mr. Lingenfelter, COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT ,Iohn L. Hoover, B. A., M. A., Head Iva G. Batrus, B. S., Edgar I. Brooks, B. S., Ida H. Buck, B. A., Sarah E. Duncan, B. S., Nellie E. Givin, B. A., Carl E. Graf, B. S., Eleanor G. Hare, B. A., Hazel G. Krouse, B. S., Irma B. Lewis, M. Ed., Mrs. Rose- mary Lynch Lingenfelter, B. S., Addison E. Pohle, B. S., M. Ed., ,Iohn G. Yost, B. A. MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT George B. Williams, M. S., Head Ernest Dejaiffe, B. S., C. E., Perilla R. Harner, M. A., William D. Ling- enfelter, M. A., Irene J. Sauserman, B. A., Herbert S. Sheetz, B. S., M. A., Bertha A. Swartz, B. S., M. Ed., Elizabeth E. Taylor, M. S., Wendell W. Wear, B. S. HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT Zitella B. Wertz, B. S., M. S., Head Hazel V. Crist, B. S., Kathryn Gorsuch, B. S., Myrtle Gould, B. S., Alberta Johns, B. S., Mary E. Lowther, B. S., Margaret A. Miller, B. S., Marian R. Puekey, B. A., Mrs. Anna M. Young. LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT Charles M. Grimminger, M. A., Head Mrs. Janice Kauffman Boyer, B. A., Mary E. Dunbar, M. A., Edith R. Fleck, B. A., Una E. Small, B. A., Marian V. Truax, B. A. PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, BOYS Robert H. Wolfe, B. S., M. Ed., Head Kenneth R. Bashore, B. S., Paul E. Morse, M. Ed. PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, GIRLS Elisabeth K. Eyre, B. S., P. E., Head Helen L. Bloomfield, B. S., Frances E. McGinnis, B. S. I GuARDlANs OF :DEALS . . . FACULTY The scholastic program of the Altoona High School may be compared with the wheel of a wagon. The hub is the student body, the spokes represent a Wide variety of interests, the iron-bound rim symbolizes the unity of the school as effected by the administrative staff, and last but not least, is the axle, representing the teacher, the power around which the entire system revolves. Most invariably, at some time in their lives, students remember their teachers as builders of a better world and a happier, freer humanity-remem- ber them as individuals who could help youths as they moved into grown-up patterns. lt seemed only natural, when teachers indicated quite freely and openly their interest and concern over our daily problems, that we should turn to them with their good basic intelligence for help. We think of our teachers as friends filled with sympathy, not as dictators. In our large group of instruc- tors in Altoona High, there are individuals with special skills, copious general information, and integrated personalities-and they are willing to share these qualities with us. They also have a faith in a scholarship which is the search for truth, a faith in an education which can be used as an effective tool for solving problems. Hence they labor to broaden our horizons, to fit us to meet life's battles with victory on our side. Due to their great store of knowledge and their interest in our welfare, our faculty has made possible a broad curriculum from which to choose. No matter what the field of interest, some group of teachers is capable of giving guidance and inspiration, some one of them can awaken our latent interest or put to shame our indolence, some who will gladly and willingly share with us the treasures of a cultivated mind. We can gain knowledge from books, but only by personal contact can the love of knowledge be transmitted. Only by a friendly attitude toward the pupils can a teacher instill a feeling of mutual interest, the members of our faculty have this quality, and as students march on, leaving patient, coopera- tive advisers behind, they remember the teachers as they were, and now are- friendly. An anonymous author has expressedlfor the members of the Class of 1940 their hope that they may pass on "the flame pure and true.', For those who give their knowledge to you, And help you to think, and more wisely to act, Expect you will pass on a flame pure and true To enlighten the darkness of spirit and fact. '4And if I refuse?', asked the youth bright and bold. MTO freedom of thought you your knowledge now owe, But freedom will stifle and knowledge be cold, Unless through its use you permit it to grow." Page Eighteen .1 SENATORS SHARE RESPONSIBILITIES . . . Our student governing body, the Senate, is comprised of twenty-three students of Altoona High School, representing the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior classes, and various other organizations of the school. Some Senate members receive their positions by popular election, while others obtain theirs by appointment. No matter which way a student receives his seat in this body, he must have recommendations from his home room teacher, his subject teachers and other members of the faculty, as to character, leadership, and scholastic achievement. Also a scholastic average of at least eighty per cent must be maintained. To take care of the various duties of this group, committees such as welfare, ticket, 'aSenator,77 legislative, luncheon, auditorium and College Night, are formed within the Senate. This group participates in welfare work by providing families with baskets at Christmas and Easter, and conducts special welfare programs, the benefits of which are received by needy students of Altoona High School. Our successful ticket campaigns, some of which were the sale of activi- ties tickets, P. T. A. tickets, and tickets for special assemblies, were handled by this able body. This year, the Senate originated a new idea-to maintain a special bulletin, called the uSenator,H for the purpose of conveying its activities to the student body, by means of each Home Room. This was done to keep the students informed concerning Senate activities. In addition to this bit of journalism, a column of this same nature was run in the Mountain Echo, also to impress the happenings of the Senate on the student body. Many students were unaware of the doings of the student government, and this column helped to enlighten them on the activities of their representatives. Difficulties arose in previous years, in the misplacing and losing of articles, and the Senate again took this matter into their hands by establishing a lost and found department to aid the students in recovering their lost prop- erty. During the vacation before this school term, some very convenient additions were made to the Senate Office equipment. A compartment was built in which the uLost and Foundi' articles could be placed in very con- veniently catalogued sectionsg also a wardrobe, which was used for the convenience of visitors. All legislative problems, in the form of petitions of the students, were dealt with in the Senate, and were treated with due consideration by the members. Cleanup campaigns and campaigns for better assembly conduct and good Page Nineteen Mr. Pohle Pennock, Scott, Haines Front Row-M. Sharer, P. Shaw, S. Sender, J. Beeler, B. Harris, D. Maddocks. Second RowfT. Ferguson, R. Simpson, D. Ritchey, E. She- raw, D. Brallier, G. Butler. Third Row-W. Smith, K. Kane, L. Earon, L. Ca. n o n, H. Gleichert. conduct at football games were suggested by this group, and the result of these drives was pleasing to everyone. The Student Senate, along with its many other activities, sponsors a special uCollege Nightji session which gives students who Wish to attend college an opportunity to interview representatives from the schools of their choice. A poll is taken of all the Altoona High School students to determine the colleges these students wish to attend. With this list as a guide, representatives are invited to be present on College Night. This year College Night Was held on the twenty-fifth of April and only representatives from Pennsylvania colleges Were present. Please don't think that membership in this group brings all work and no play, because on various occasions during each year the Senate office is attractively decorated for a luncheon. One of the most enjoyable social occasions is a Senate banquet held annually near the close of the school term. This able group participated in the State Convention for Student Par- ticipation in School Government, which was held at Lancaster, Pennsylvania last fallg Altoona was honored in having one of its members selected as second vice president of the state organization. Our local president presided at the luncheon and another of our members spoke on the organization of the Student Senate of Altoona. Page Twenty SENIORS . . . LOCK FORWARD if SENIORS CONFRONT NEW HORIZONS Standing - Mr. Lamont, Mr. Lundegren, Mr Wood, Mr. Morse. Sitting - M i s s Krouse, Miss Gould, Miss Hare. For three years the Class of 1940 has worked and played at the process of education and now graduation opens before the group a new and untried gate. Gallant spirits integrated with hopes and dreams seek to comprehend the new freedom that is theirs. Twelve hundred pairs of eager eyes discern that the road is broad, the horizon unlimitedg twelve hundred pairs of restless feet set out on the journey into the futureg twelve hundred pairs of groping hands reach toward the full moon of success. Upon looking back, these three years should mean something to each individual Senior. If they were spent only to secure compulsory credits toward graduation, they are wasted. On the other hand, if they were used as an opportunity to gain tools of knowledge, ideals, and inspirations to build upon the great heritage given by the past, they will become the basic foundation for future achievements. That twelve hundred Seniors could spend three years in an educational institution without contributing something to its improvement is impossible to conceive. Yet to determine the worth of these accomplishments, they must Hrst be tested by time and weighed in the balance of coming years. The value of the courses adopted in recent years depends entirely upon their adaptability in life by the students who pursued them in high school. Then, too, 194-0 marks the close of a progressive experiment of which Altoona has been a part -pioneering that may change the entire system of secondary education. Therefore a challenge is put before the Senior Class that is best expressed by William Somerville: Hail, blooming Youth! May all your virtues with your years improve, Till in consummate worth you shine the pride Of these our days, and succeeding times A bright example. CLASS FLOWER-Sweet Pea CLASS COLORS-Old Rose and Royal Blue CLASS MOTTO-Be Doers, Not Dreamers Page Twenty-two OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES President, Cyril Ramsey, Vice President, Marjorie Brynerg Secretary, Mary Matryg Treasurer, Florence Patt. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Eugene Banks, Eleanor Conrad, Peggy George, Ruth Haverstiek, Jane Hinman. DECORATION COMMITTEE Eleanor Conrad, Chairman, Joan DeLe0, James Fisher, Eugene Ianuzzi, Miriam Kuritzky, Marjorie Owens, Chester Pfeffer, J. Gregg Royer, Jack Russell, Jeanne Sawtelle, William Stouifer, Richard Weakland. FINANCE COMMITTEE Richard Wynekoop, Chairman, Harry Akers, Meade Baker, Hilda Gruber, Ralph Harrity, Mary Hobson, Louise Nichol, Jane Seward, Valetta Warsing, Ruth Reighard. ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE Peggy George, Chairman, Connie Beck, Luella Boliski, Virginia Conrad, Lillian DeLeo, Jane Haupt, William King, Kenneth McCormick, William Renner, Lloyd Stilfler, Martha Jane Taylor. RECEPTION COMMITTEE .lane Hinman, Chairman, Vivian Bigelow, Cheerful Mae Criswell, Faith Farber, Peggy Gonter, Ellen Gilmore, Lois Hahn, Elizabeth Himebaugh, Ruth Hughes, Dorothy Koush, Rita Kibler, Glenn Leonard, Betty Strawmire. REERESHMENT COMMITTEE Ruth Haverstick, Chairman, Mary Alice Brophy, Ray Clugh, Dean Delozier, 'Walter Lantz, Harold Meyer, Martha Jane Moflitt, Ethel Sheraw, Betty Suckling, Helen Quay, Rosemary Weamer, Charles Zong. PUBLICITY COMMITTEE Eugene Banks, Chairman, Jeanne Beeler, David Bray, Mary Cherry, Martin Cornelius, Audrey L. Crist, Catherine Luckner, Dorothy Ritchey, Agnes Wolfe. Page Twenty-three ELI , H G Abdallah M Abraham H. Adameck A. Adams E. Adams E. K. Adams R. Adler R. Ainscough T Ainsworth K Ake H. Akers E. Alberts A. Albright C. Albright P. Alexander J. Aller G Allison W Allmond M. Amhelser H. Axnmerman F. Anderson VY. Anderson R. Antes M. Archer GEORGE ABDALLAH General fSeptember 101 Vivo Club 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Vice President 2, President 3. MARY E. ABRAHAM Academic CNovember 261 G0 to College Club 2, 3, Treasurer 2, 35 Intramural Sports 15 Home Room, Sales Manager 2. HELEN M. ADAMECK C0m- mercial Uanuary 1? A Cappella Choir 2. ANN SLEP ADAMS Academic CMay 85 Social Service Club 1, 2, Secretary 15 Learn to Drive Club 3, President 35 Statesmanship Club 35 Intramural Sports 1. EDITH ADAMS Progressive CNovember 95 Corridor Patrol 25 Future Teachers of America Club 25 Horseshoe Club 35 Horseshoe Staff 35 Girls League Honor Roll 1, 2. ELIZABETH K. ADAMS George-Deen CJanu- ary 213 Knitting Club 1, Secretary 15 Travel Club 25 Chemistry Club 2, 35 Traffic Patrol 35 Social Serv- ice Club 3. ROBERT C. ADLER Academic Uanuary 111 Go to College Club 1, 25 Statesmanship Club 3. ROBERT W. AINSCOUGH Academic CSeptember 145 Dance Orchestra 35 Band 1, 2, 35 Orchestra 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 2, 35 Home Room, Attendance Director 3. TWILA R. AINSWORTH George-Deen lOctober 165 Social Service Club 25 World Friendship Club 15 Art and Craft Club 35 Chemistry Club 2, 35 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Corridor Patrol 25 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. KATHLEEN LOUISE AKE Progressive CJu1y 47 Girls' Chorus 35 Horseshoe Staff 35 Go to Col- lege Club 25 Home Room, Representative 35 Horseshoe Club 35 Girls League Honor Roll 2. HARRY JAMLES AKERS Commercial iApril 115 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. ELMA M. ALBERTS General CDe- cember 147 Knitting Club 15 Intramural Sports 1, 2. ALBERT ALBRIGHT Academic lNovember 157 Magic Club 2, 3, Vice President 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 25 Home Room, Treasurer 35 A. H. S. Ping Pong Champion 3. N. CATHARINE ALBRIGHT General Uanuary 255 Home Room, Secretary 1, President 35 Social Service Club 1, 25 Typing Club 3, Secretary-Treasurer 35 Girls' A Cap- pella Choir 2, 35 Girls' Chorus 25 Annual Show 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1. PAULINE G. ALEXANDER Commercial CAugust 119 Needlework Club 1, Treasurer 15 Secretarial Club 25 Social Dancing Club 35 Home Room, Attendance Director 3. JOHN A. ALLER General Uuly 281 Track Club 15 Art Metal Club 25 Squad Leaders' Club 35 Jay Vee Football 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Baseball 25 Ushers' Club 35 Home Room, Vice President 2. GLADYS FRANCES ALLISON General fFebruary 99 World Friendship Club 15 Entertainment' Club 25 Geography Club 25 Social Service Club 3. WILLIAM ALLMOND Vocational CNovember 67 Ushers' Club 1, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2. MERRILL K. AMHEISER General 6March 279 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Band 1, 2, 35 Varsity Baseball 25 Dance Orchestra 3. HELEN M. AMMERMAN George- Deen CSeptember 263 Needlework Club 15 Entertainment Club 35 Corridor Patrol 3. FLORIEN ANDER- SON George-Deen CAugust 115 Library Guard 15 Knitting Club 25 Travel Club 3. WENDELL ANDER- SON Progressive 4September 85 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Boosters' Club 35 Home Room, Treasurer 25 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Annual Show 2, 35 Boys' Chorus 2. REBA LEONA ANTES General Uanuary 195 Knitting Club 25 Learn to Drive Club 3. MARY ELIZABETH ARCHER Academic CAugust 309 Elmira High School 1, 25 Go to College Club 3. Page Twenty-four P. Ardizzone C. Arseniu l-I. Ashburn L. Ashburn R. Askey C. Augustine M. Allman G Bafdwey J. Bmlwey D. Baer J. Bailey K. Bair M. Baker M. L. Baker W. Balestlno R Balsley R. Balthaser D. Banks E. Banks G. Barcaro J. Barger J. Barley I-I. Barnes A Barnhart PAUL FRANK ARDIZZONE Vocational CJune 193 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Sports Club 2. CHARLES JOHN ARSENIU General CFebruary 113 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Ushers' Club 1. HARRY B. ASI-IBURN Commercial Uanuary 233 Sports Club 1, 25 Statesmanship Club 35 Executive Commit- tee 25 Intramural Sports 25 Home Room, Secretary 3. LOIS V. ASHBURN General 4February 13 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Learn to Drive Club 25 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Treasurer 3. RAY- MOND G. ASKEY Vocational CJuly 53 Art Club 35 Amateur Wireless Telegraphy Club 2. CHARLES L. AUGUSTINE Vocational fMarch 143. MADALYNNE ROSE AUMAN George-Deen fApril113. GEORGE BADWEY Vocational Uune 43 Kodak Club 15 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. JACOB BADWEY Vocational CJune 43 Kodak Club 15 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Varsity Baseball 2. DONALD BAER General CNovember 123 Intramural Sports 2. JAMES R. BAILEY Academic CJanu- ary 193 Hi-Y Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 15 Corridor Patrol 2, Secretary 2. KATHRYN LA RENE BAIR General iFebruary 83 Tap Dancing Club 15 Dramatics Club 25 Geography Club 25 Knitting Club 3. MARY MARGARET BAKER Commercial C.Ianuary 263. MEADE L. BAKER General CMay 213 Cor- ridor Patrol 2, 35 Intramural Sports 2, 3. WILLIAM BALESTINO Vocational fApril 293 Sports Club 1, 25 Football Club 35 Varsity Football 1, 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1. RICHARD T. BALSLEY General fApril 143 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Sports Committee 35 Nature Observation Club 2, 35 Ushers' Club 1. r RICHARD N. BALTHASER Progressive fSeptember 143 Band 1, 35 Academy of Science 2, 3. DOROTHY CAROLINE BANKS George-Deen Uuly 223 Needlework Club 15 Social Service Club 25 World Friendship Club 3. EUGENE BANKS Academic fJuly 153 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 English De- partment Play 1, 25 Annual Show 1, 25 Newswriting Club 15 Art Club 25 Statesmanship Club 35 Class Executive Committee 3. GUIDO BARCARO General COctober 163 Band 15 Trombone Choir 15 Italian Club 3. JAMES BARGER General fJuly 23 Mathematics Club 3. JAMES RICHARD BARLEY Gen- eral CJuly 13 Band 1, 2, 35 Orchestra 2, 35 Dance Orchestra 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 2, 3. HELEN C. BARNES George-Deen Uune 133 Knitting Club 1, 2. ANNE L. BARNHART George- Deen fOctober 173 Knitting Club 15 Social Service Club 2, 35 Home Room, Sales Manager 2. Page Twenty-five V. Basclani J. Beeler F. Benson M. Baum C. Banumgartner L. Beals R. Bearr C. Beck M. Beck A. Becker M. Beers M. Behe W. Behm L. Bell I. Belllzla. G. Benner W. Bennettl R. Bentley E. Bergsted P. Bergstein W. Berkey D. Bernazzoll C. Berry M. Berry VERA MARIE BASCIANI General CNovember 49. MADELINE BAUM General fAugust 189. CHARLES MAX BAUMGARTNER Vocational CApril 289 Sports Club 1, Hunting and Fishing Club 3. MARY LOUISE BEALS General CMay 209 Intramural Sports 1. RICHARD BEARR Vocational fMay 49 Stagecraft Club 1, Ushers' Club 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Baseball Manager 2. CON- STANCE C. BECK Academic CNovember 149 World Friendship Club 1, Social Service Club 2, Vice President 2, Forum Club 3, Statesmanship Club 3. MARJORIE LOIS BECK George-Deen Uuly 59 Knitting Club 1, Social Service Club 2. ANNE G. BECKER General CMay 39 Social Service Club 1, 2, 3, Drum and Bugle Corps 1, Intramural Sports 1. JEANNE M. BEELER Progressive fAug11st 259 Dramatics Club 1, Secretary 1, Forum Club 2, 3, Senate 3, Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, Annual Show 1, 2, 3, Class Executive Committee 1, 2, A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Home Room, President 3. MARJORIE J. BEERS Academic C.Iune 159 World Friendship Club 2, Social Service Club 3, Intramural Sports 1, Home Room, Treasurer 1, Vice Presi- dent 2, President 3. MARGARET M. BEHE George-Deen Uuly 29 Knitting Club 1, Needlework Club 2, Dramatics Club 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Treasurer 1, Attendance Director 1. WILLIAM BEHM General fMarch 309 Chemistry Club 2, Art Club 3, Mountain Echo Staff 3, Home Room, Vice President 2, Representative 3. LAVINIA M. BELL General CMay 249 Social Service Club 3. ISABELLE C. BELLIZIA George-Deen CFebruary 119 Learn to Drive Club 1, 2, Intramural Sports 1. GEORGETTA BENNER General fAugust 199 Intramural Sports 2, Learn to Drive Club 2, Travel Club 3. WILLIAM BENNETTI General fOctober 279. FRANCES BENSON George-Deen CJune 259 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 2, 3, Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 3, Circulation Manager 2, 3, Newswriting Club 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Rep- resentative 3, Social Dancing Club 3. ROSETTA BENTLEY Progressive CJuly 39 Library Club 1, Horseshoe Club 2, 3, Horseshoe Staff 2, 3, Physics Club 3, Girls League Honor Roll 2, Quill and Scroll 3, Academy of Science 3. EMJVIA E. BERGSTED General fAugust 39 Needlework Club 1, 3, Tap Dancing Club 2. PEARL DORIS BERGSTEIN George-Deen CJuly 289 Social Service Club 1, World Friendship Club 3. WILLIAM E. BERKEY Academic CSeptember 119 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Vivo Club 1, 2, Home Room, Representative 2. DIANA A. BERNAZZOLI Commercial 4Septem- ber 139 Forum Club 2. CLIFFORD DANIEL BERRY General CJune 159 Nature Observation Club 2, Travel Club 3, Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2. MADELINE BERRY George-Deen COC- tober 259 Library Club 1, Needlework Club 2, 3. Page Twenty-six J. Betz L. Bldoll M. Biel C. Blenlek V. Bigelow E. Bishop G. Bistllne M. Bittner R. Black W. Blackbum B. Boal K. Boggs C. Bohn L. Bollski M. Boltz K. Bookhamer M. Bookhamer M. Bookman A. Boorman W. Bowersox H. Bowser JOEL H. BETZ Vocational fSeptember 93 Physics Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 National Student Graphic Arts Society 2, 35 Home Room, Secretary 3, LEONARD L. BIDOLI General CFeb- ruary 83 Band 25 Vivo Club 1. MARIE LOUISE BIEL General iSeptember 293 Social Service Club 15 Typing Club 3. CECELIA T. BIENIEK Commercial CSeptember 113 Typing Club 3. VIVIAN I. BIGELOW George-Deen fOctober 133 World Friendship Club 1, 25 Knitting Club 35 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Corridor Patrol 2, 35 Chemistry Club 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Girls' Octette 15 Home Room, Secretary 1. EMMA C. BISHOP General CJuly 23 World Friendship Club 2, Vice President 25 A Cappella Choir 35 Intramural Sports 1. GLENN C. BISTLINE Academic CMarch 53 Band 1, 2, 35 Orchestra 35 Trombone Choir 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 A Cappella Choir 35 Intramural Sports 15 Vivo Club 1. JUNE CAROLINE BITTNER General CNovember 13 Needlework Club 15 Social Service Club 25 Travel Club 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2. MADISON ROMESBURG BITTNER Acafdemic CNovember 193 Handicraft Club 25 National Stu- dent Graphic Arts Society 35 Intramural Sports 1. ROSS E. BLACK Vocational CAugust 13 Future Craftsmen of America 1, 2, 3, National Vice President 2, 35 Hunting and Fishing Club 15 Intramural Sports 2. WILLIAM BLACKBURN Academic QFebruary 13. BARBARA ALBERTINE BOAL Com- mercial CMarch 33 Home Room, Representative 35 Intramural Sports 25 Dramatics Club 25 Secre- tarial Club 35 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 25 Annual Show 1. KENNETH S. BOGGS Academic COcto- ber 273 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Traffic Patrol 2, 35 Chemistry Club 2, Treasurer 25 Stagecraft Club 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Secretary 15 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Squad Leader 2, 35 Tumbling Club 2, 3. CHARLES W. BOI-IN General CMarch 213 Intramural Sports 25 Handicraft Club 25 Vivo Club 35 Home Room, Attendance Director 2. LUELLA BOLISKI Progressive CSeptember 283 World Friend- ship Club 25 Dramatics Club 1, Treasurer 15 A Cappella Choir 35 Horseshoe Club 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Intramural Sports 2, 35 Class Executive Committee 2. GLADYS LOUISE BOLLINGER George-Deen CAugust 53 Needlework Club 2, 3. MARGARET BOLTZ George-Deen CAugust 23 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Dramatics Club 1, 2, 3, Sec- retary 1, President 25 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Intramural Sports 15 Home Room, Secretary 1, Presi- dent 3. KENNETH BOOKHAMER Vocational CSeptember 253 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Track Club 25 Basketball Manager 1, 2. MARGIE L. BOOKHAMER General 1November 43 Tap Danc- ing Club 15 Tumbling Club 2, 35 Home Room, Treasurer 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MAXINE M. BOOKMAN General CDecember 83 Typing Club 3, President 35 Social Service Club 25 Home Room, Vice President 2, Secretary 15 Annual Show 25 A Cappella Choir 2, 3. ADALINE BOORMAN Gell- eral CNovember 223 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Learn to Drive Club 1, 2, President 25 Social Service Club 25 Home Room, Treasurer 25 Girls' Chorus 25 Annual Show 2. WALTER E. BOWERSOX Voca- tional CDecember 173. GEORGE HAROLD BOWSER Academic fJanuary 113 Nature Observation Club 15 Rifle Club 35 Intramural Sports 15 Band 1, 2. DORIS BOYER General fOctober 213 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, Treasurer 35 Knitting Club 2, President 25 Entertainment Club 3. Page Twenty-seven J. Bittner G. Bollinger D. Boyer D. Boyer G. Bradt R. Brent D. Boyle M. Boyle E. Boyles F. Boyles B. Boyles I-l. Bradfield C. Bradt E. Brady R. Brady R. Brady D. Brallier W. Branln G. Brantllnger D. Bray L. Bressler H. Brice W. Brogden L. Brooks M. Brophy K. Browand D. Brown DOROTHY V. BOYER General CMay 253 Social Service Club 15 Learn to Drive Club 25 Typing Club 35 A Cappella Choir 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Sales Manager 2, Vice President 2. DANIEL BOYLE Vocational fSeptember 203 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Ushers' Club 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Representative 3. MARGARET BOYLE George-Deen CDecember 53 Social Service Club 1, 25 World Friendship Club 35 Home Room, Vice President 2. ELIZABETH J. BOYLES Commercial Uune 193 World Friendship Club 15 Secretarial Club 2, President 25 Girls League Executive Committee 25 Intra- mural Sports 15 Home Room, Representative 3. FRANK H. BOYLES General CDecember 83 Boosters' Club 15 Intramural Sports 25 Social Service Club 2. WILLIAM BLAIR BOYLES Academic CSeptem- ber 13 Jay Vee Football 1, 25 Varsity Football 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Secretary 1, Attendance Director 35 Sports Club 1, 25 Football Club 35 Boys Federation, Treasurer 3. HERBERT BRADFIELD General COctober 313 Art Metal Club 15 Intramural Sports 3. CLARA F. BRADT Gen- eral fFebruary 133 Intramural Sports 1, 2. GEORGE HENRY BRADT Vocational 4November 303 Intramural Sports 2, 35 Boxing Club 2, 3. W. ELLSWORTH BRADY Vocational Uanuary 93 Intramural Sports 2, 35 Home Room, Representative 35 Ushers' Club 1, 3. REGINA JEAN BRADY George-Deen fMarch 233 Learn to Drive Club 25 Needle- work Club 3. ROSE JANE BRADY George-Deen tMarch 233. DOROTHY J. BRALLIER Progressive fSeptember 303 Horseshoe Staff 1, 2, 3, Editor-in-Chief 35 Horseshoe Club 1, 2, 3, Vice President 35 Senate 35 Home Room, Representative 2, 35 Annual Show 1. WILBUR BRANIN Vocational Uune 33. GEORGE BRANTLINGER. Vocational CApril 233 Amateur Wireless Telegraphy Club 1, 25 Science Club 35 Home Room, President 35 Wrestling Club 1. DAVID WILLIAM BRAY Progressive tFebruary 193 Boosters' Club 35 Annual Show 2, 35 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Cheerleader 35 Boys' Chorus 2. ROBERT BRENT Vocational CJuly 163 Camera Club 15 Rifle Club 2, 35 Photographer for Horse- shoe and Mountain Echo 3. LORETTA BRESSLER General CAugust 153 Needlework Club 1, 2, 3. HAZEL ELIZABETH BRICE General Uune 203 Intramural Sports 1, 25 A Cappella Choir 35 Annual Show 2, 35 Forum Club 1, 25 Learn to Drive Club 3. WILLIAM H. BROGDEN General Uuly 123 Drum and Bugle Corps 1. LOUISE D. BROOKS Commercial Uune 283 Audubon Club 15 Needlework Club 2, President 25 Home Room, Attendance Director 2, President 3. MARY ALYCE BROPHY Progres- sive COctober 193 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Sales Manager 15 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 35 Newswriting Club 1, 2, 35 Forum Club 2, 3, Vice President 35 Dramatics Club 15 Quill and Scroll 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. KENNETH BROWAND Commercial tDecember 283 Boosters' Club 15 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. DONALD LEROY BROWN General CMay 133 Stamp Club 1, 25 Rifle Club 35 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. Page Twenty-eight D. Brown E. Brown G. Brown J. Brown B. Brown V. Brown W. Brown R Brown M. Brubaker P. Bruckmau W. Bruestle J. Brumbaugh S. Brumbaugh V. Brumbaugh B. Brungard M Bryuer W. Bryson I-I. Buchanan M. Bucher N. Bulick B. Burchinal A. Burgoyne F. Burket W Burkett DOROTHY ANNAMAE BROWN General Uanuary 267 Forum Club 2, 31 Intramural Sports 2, 33 A Cappella Choir 2, 33 Annual Show 2. A. ERNEST BROWN Vocational i.Iune 237 Sports Club 1, 21 Football Club 33 Jay Vee Football 13 Varsity Football 2, 33 Varsity Baseball 23 Intramural Sports 1, 21 Home Room, Vice President 3. GLORIA JANE BROWN Commercial CFebruary 207 Secretarial Club 3, Secretary 33 Home Room, Treasurer 2. JEAN M. BROWN General Uanuary 267 World Friend- ship Club 33 Intramural Sports 13 Home Room, Secretary 3. BERNADINE BROWN George-Deen fFebruary 167 Learn to Drive Club 13 Needlework Club 2, 3. VIVIAN Z. BROWN Commercial CDe- cember 67 Learn to Drive Club 23 Home Room, Treasurer 13 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. WILLIAM P. BROWN General CMay 87 Intramural Sports 1, 2. WILLIAM ROBERT BROWN Vocational iMay 87 Art Metal Club 13 Agriculture Club 23 Intramural Sports 1. MADELINE MARTHA BRUBAKER General Uanuary 117. PAUL R. BRUCKMAN General iAugust 117 Ushers' Club 1, 2, 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. WILLIAM BRUESTLE General fSep- tember 207 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Safety Club 13 Sports Club 23 Drum and Bugle Corps 1, 2, Safety Patrol 1. JAMES D. BRUMBAUGH General Uune 117 Nature Club 13 Physics Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. SHIRLEY E. BRUMBAUGH General fMay 297 Learn to Drive Club 33 Intramural Sports 13 Home Room, Attendance Director 3. VIRGINIA ARLENE BRUMBAUGH Academic CMay 147 Corridor Patrol 2, 33 A Cappella Choir 33 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, Dramatics Club 1, 21 Go to College Club 33 Home Room, Representative 33 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. BETTE C. BRUNGARD General CApril 117 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 21 Learn to Drive Club 13 Journalism Club 1, 23 Home Room, Vice President 2, Attendance Director 31 Social Dancing Club 3. MARJORIE BRYNER George-Deen Uanuary 57 Audubon Club 1, Needlework Club 23 Dramatics Club 33 Home Room, At- tendance Director 1, 3, Vice President 23 Class Vice President 3. WILBUR BRYSON General CMay 37 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Jay Vee Football 2, 31 Track Club 1, 2, 31 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3. HELEN E. BUCHANAN General iDecember 237 Travel Club 3. MARY FRANCES BUCHER Commercial CMarch 207 Dramatics Club 2, 31 Forum Club 33 Attendance Office Force 33 Home Room, Secretary 2. NEVIN BULICK Vocational fAugust 307. BETTY L. BURCHINAL General CAugust 37 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 32 Squad Leaders' Club 1, 2, 3, President 2, Varsity Hockey 1, 2, 31 Varsity Basketball 2, 33 Home Room, Vice President 23 Tap Dancing Club 11 Tumbling Club 1. ANNA MARTHA BURGOYNE Commercial Uanuary 297 Social Service Club 2, Library Club 3, Girls' A Cappella Choir 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2. FLORENCE C. BURKET General 4May 147 Social Service Club 1, Forum Club 29 Home Room, Sales Manager 2, President 35 Knitting Club 3. F. WILLIAM BURKETT General Uuly 157 Corridor Patrol 23 Moun- tain Echo Staff 23 Annual Show 2, 33 A Cappella Choir 2, 33 Home Room, President 3. Page Twenty-nine L Burkhart V. Bussard G. Butler M. Butler E. Butterbaugh D. Byrne N. Cadle M. Cain A Calabrese A. Calderwood R. Calderwood M. Caldwell L. Callahan R. Calvert W. Camberg J. Campbell L Campbell M. Campbell D. Capece M. Caporuscio J. Caraher R. Carl M. Cam R. Carothers LORRAINE BURKI-IART General CMay 133. VIVIENNE E. BUSSARD General fOctober 273 Intramural Sports 13 Home Room, Vice President 15 Home Room, President 3. GLENN EDWARD BUTLER Academic Uuly 243 Boys Federation, Vice President 35 Jay Vee Football 1, 25 Sports Club 1, 2g Football Club 35 Home Room, President 35 Varsity Football 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MILDRED BUTLER George-Deen iOctober 63 Learn to Drive Club 3. ETHEL MILDRED BUTTER- BAUGH George-Deen CApril 123 Knitting Club 1, Learn to Drive Club 2. DELORES BYRNE General CAugust 93 Intramural Sports 15 Home Room, Attendance Director 2, 3. NORMAN WILLIAM CADLE Academic Uanuary 63 Boys Federation, President 33 Home Room, Vice President 2, Varsity Football 2, 3, Intramural Sports 3, Track Team 2, 3, Squad Leader 2, Sports Club 1, 2, Football Club 3. MARIE CAIN George-Deen CSeptember 23 Tap Dancing Club 15 Forum Club 23 Dramatics Club 33 Home Room, Vice President 2. AMELIA FLORENCE CALABRESE George-Deen fOctober 33 Travel Club 2, Art and Craft Club 3 5 Traffic Patrol 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. ARTHUR CALDERWOOD Commercial Uune 23 Stage- craft Club 1, 2, 3, President 35 Stage Manager 3. ROBERT T. CALDERWOOD Commercial fMay 153 Intramural Sports 1, 25 Sheet Metal Club 2, President 25 Corridor Patrol 3, Band 1, 2, 3, Hi-Y 35 Home Room, Vice President 2. MELVIN CALDWELL General CNovember 53. E. LORRAINE CAL- LAHAN Commercial CMarch 293 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3. RALPH BOYD CALVERT Vocational KNO- vember 93 Ushers' Club 1, Amateur Telegraphy Club 2. WILLIAM G. CAMBERG Academic Uune 133 Stagecraft Club 1, Baseball 2. JAMES B. CAMPBELL General fJuly 313 Vivo Club 25 Intramural Sports 3. LOIS M. CAMPBELL George-Deen CApril 233 Social Service Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 33 Girls League Honor Roll 1, 2. MARY E. CAMPBELL Commercial CNovember 123 Knitting Club lg World Friendship Club 2g Learn to Drive Club 3g Girls' A Cappella Choir 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2. DANIEL JOSEPH CAPECE Vocational iJune 163 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MARY A. CAPORUSCIO George-Deen KNO- vember 253 Needlework Club 3. JAMES C. CARAHER General CAugust 223 Kodak Club 1, Vice President 1, Handicraft Club 23 Orchestra 2, 32 Band 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 13 Home Room, Treasurer 3. ROBERT W. CARL General fApril 263 Stage Crew 1g Chemistry Club 25 Geography and Travel Club 3. MAR- GARET E. CARN Progressive CJuly 163 World Friendship Club 13 Travel Club 2, 3, Secretary 35 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 A Cappella Choir 23 Annual Show 1, 23 Home Room, Attendance Director 3: Girls League Honor Roll 2, Traffic Patrol 3. RICHARD CAROTHERS Academic CJu1y 153 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Vivo Club 1, 2. . Page Thirty A. Carrlero H. Carrlg l-I. Carrolus M. Carson G. Carson R. Casclottl A. Cassidy K. Catalano A. Cataldo L. Catherman H. Cazen C. Cerullo I-I. Chambers M. Charters M. Cherry M. Ciamhotti A. Ciocca F. Clocca L. Citro J. Claar R. Clabaugh ALBERT JOSEPH CARRIERO Vocational Uanuary 17 Vocational Band 15 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. HELEN E. CARRIG Commercial 6April 57 Learn to Drive Club 2, Geography Club 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, World Friendship Club 3. HARRY CARROLUS Vocational Uanuary 257 Ushers' Club 1, 33 Safety Club 23 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 31 Home Room, Sales Manager 2, Vice President 2. MIRIAM CAROL CARSON General CFebruary 167 Flask and Beaker Club 3. GLENN CARSON General COcto- ber 77 Forestry Club 2, Secretary 2, Track Club 1, Intramural Sports 1. RUDOLPH CASCIOTTI Gen- eral 4May 317. ANN LOUISE CASSIDY Academic CDecember 137 Home Room, Secretary 15 World Friendship Club 1, 2, President 23 Social Service Club 3, President 3, Traffic Patrol 3. ELEANOR CATHERINE CASWELL Commercial CAugust 297 World Friendship Club 2, Geography Club 2, Typ- ing Club 3. KATHARINE E. CATALANO General fMarch 77 Squad Leader 1, 23 Corridor Patrol 1, 2, Social Service Club 15 Needlework Club 2, Travel Club 32 Intramural Sports 1, 2. ARMANDO LOUIS CATALDO Vocational CD-ecember 127 Jay Vee Football 25 Varsity Football 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Football Club 3. LLOYD P. CATHERMAN, JR. General CSeptember 307 Nature Observation Club 1, 2, 3, President 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. HELEN CAZEN Progressive fFebruary 267 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Needlework Club 1, 25 Travel Club 3, Annual Show 1, 2, 3. CARMELLA CERULLO Commercial CMay 147 Typing Club 3. HELEN M. CHAMBERS George-Deen fAugust 57 Library Club 1, Needle- work Club 23 World Friendship Club 3. MARY J. CHARTERS General CJuly 217 Tap Dancing Club 1, A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3, Mountain Echo Staff 15 Intramural Sports 1. JANE CHATHAM General 4June 17. MARY M. CHERRY Progressive fMay 307 Home Room, Secretary 13 Trophy Case Manager 2, 3: Horseshoe Club 2, 35 Horseshoe Staff 2, 32 Traffic Patrol 3. MELVIN A. CIAMBOTTI Vocational fMarch 87 Ushers' Club 3. ANTHONY CIOCCA Vocational fNovember 197 Intramural Sports 2, 3: Ushers' Club 1, Amateur Wireless Telegraphy Club 2, 3. FLORENCE C. CIOCCA General CAugust 67 Italian Club 1, Needlework Club 2, Home Room, Attendance Director 3. LUCY MARIE CITRO George- Deen fJune 137 Forum Club 2, Needlework Club 3. JOYCE CLAAR George-Deen CAugust 107 Social Service Club 2, 3. GEORGE RAY CLABAUGH General CDecember 167 Football Club 1, 2, 3, Varsity Football 1, 2, 3, Varsity Baseball 1, 2, 33 Jay Vee Basketball 15 Home Room, Vice President 1, Presi- dent 3. ROBERT JAMES CLABAUGH General lMarch 37 Track Team 2. Page Thirty-one E. Caswell J. Chatham R. Clabaugh 1 ' D. Clapper M. Cochran R. Conlon A. Clark J. Clark L. Clawson E. Closson M. Clouse R. Clugh V. Coble J. Colbert E. Coldwell R. Cole J. Colllllower J. Columbo P. Condrln F. Confer L. Conner E. Com'ad V. Conrad M. Conslgllo I-I. Coogan N. Cooper L. Corl DOROTHY L. CLAPPER George-Deen CSeptember 163 Library Club 15 Needlework Club 25 World Friendship Club 3. AVANELLE CLARK George-Deen CAugust 83 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Library Club 1, 2, President 15 Squad Leader 1, 2. JOI-IN A. CLARK Vocational fNovember 173 Golf Club 15 In- tramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, President 3. K. LOUISE CLAWSON George-Deen Uanuary 23 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Learn to Drive Club 15 Social Service Club 2, 35 Traffic Club 35 Glee Club 15 An- nual Show 1, 2, 3. EVELYN JEAN CLOSSON George-Deen CApril 93 Needlework Club 15 Knitting Club 25 World Friendship Club 3. MARY ELLA CLOUSE General QMarch 43 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Dance Orchestra 35 Orchestra 1, 2, 35 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Audubon Club 1. RAYMOND CLUGI-I Academic CAugust 253 Stamp Club 15 Art Club 25 Home Room, Vice President 2, Secretary 1. VIOLA BARBARA COBLE General CFebruary 263 Social Service Club 25 Intramural Sports 2. MARGARET PEARL COCHRAN General CFebruary 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. JOHN A. COL- BERT Vocational CApril 113 Vivo Club 15 Future Craftsmen of America 25 Physics Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2. 3. EMILIE K. COLDWELL Academic COctober 153 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 A Cap- pella Choir 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Learn to Drive Club 25 Knitting Club 15 Go to College Club 3. ROB- ERT COLE Academic CNovember 283 Jay Vee Football 1, 25 Chemistry Club 35 Football Club 15 Squad Leader 2, 35 Home Room, Vice President 2, Secretary 1. JOHN A. COLLIFLOWER Academic CDecem- ber 63 Jay Vee Football 15 Intramural Sports 1, 35 Home Room, Secretary 1. JAMES COLUMBO Gen- eral fSeptember 123 Italian Club 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice Presi- dent 3. PAUL F. CONDRIN General COctober 223 Football Manager 1, 2, 35 Squad Leader 25 Home Room, Vice President 2, Secretary 1, 35 Sports' Club 25 Football Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. FLORENCE A. CONFER Academic CJanuary 183 Knitting Club 15 Social Service Club 25 Needlework Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Basketball 2, 35 Squad Leader 3. RITA M. CONLON George-Deen CDecember 203 Knitting Club 25 Social Dancing Club 35 Intra- mural Sports 2, 35 Squad Leaders' Club 35 Mixed Chorus 3. C. LOUISE CONNER Commercial CDecem- ber 53 Girls' Chorus 15 Girls' Octette 15 Needlework Club 15 Home Room, Secretary 15 Annual Show 15 Girls League Honor Roll 25 Horseshoe Staff 35 Secretarial Club 3. ELEANOR L. CONRAD General Uune 33 Social Service Club, President 2, 35 Go to College Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 25 Home Room, President 2, 35 Class Executive Committee 3. VIRGINIA M. CONRAD Commercial COctober 113 Tap Dancing Club5 Entertainment Club 2, 35 Corridor Patrol 25 Home Room, Secretary 1. MARY A. CON- SIGLIO Commercial CAugust 93 Italian Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2. HELEN LOUISE COOGAN General Uanuary 23 Knitting Club 15 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, President 3. NORMA R. COOPER George-Deen fMay 143 Needlework Club, Vice President 2, President 3. ANNA LOUISE CORL Commercial CJanuary 193 Tap Dancing Club 1, 25 Home Room, President 3. Page Thirty-two .pu-up nm ,. -.-1-m....... ,-,..,,. ,, - ,-...-.- -,., ...H f. ..,--..,. qv- v.-.V-.vw .. V -..- YW.-..-.......--...., ru- ., .. .. A. Corle L. Corle M. Comelius H. Corrado E. Corso J. Courtney I. Covert VV Cox V. Crabtree J. Craig D. Cramer W. Creamer B. Crlder A. Crist M. Criste C Crlswell R. Croft F. Croll J. Cross D. Crozier D. Crozier E. Crum E. Cunningham M Cunningham ANNE E. CORLE Progressive fAugust 73 Knitting Club 15 Intramural Sports 1, 25 Learn to Drive Club 3. LENA M. CORLE Progressive fAugust 207 Knitting Club 2 5 Corridor Patrol 35 Travel Club 35 Home Room, Secretary 3. MARTIN C. CORNELIUS General CJu1y 19? Jay Vee Football 15 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Vice President 2, President 35 Art Club 3, President 3. HELEN MARIE CORRADO George-Deen CApril 57 Needlework Club 3. ELIZABETH M. CORSO George-Deen Gan- uary 225 Needlework Club 1, 25 World Friendship Club 3. JOHN H. COURTNEY General Uune 183. L. ISABELLE COVERT General CSeptember 21? Typing Club 3. WILLIAM E. COX General CFebruary 101 Ushers' Club 15 Hunting and Fishing Club 25 Home Room, Secretary 1. VIRGINIA CRABTREE Commercial fSeptember 19 Learn to Drive Club 25 Corridor Patrol 35 In- tramural Sports 1, 25 Home Room, Sales Manager 2. JOHN CRAIG Commercial fNovember 7? Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3. DOROTHY J. CRAMER Academic CMarch 25? Knitting Club 1, 25 Social Dancing Club 15 Corridor Patrol 15 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 A Cappella Choir 1, 25 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Attendance Representative 3. WILLIAM CREAMER Academic CFebruary 129 Vivo Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 2, President 35 Skippers' Club 35 Squad Leaders' Club 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Jay Vee Football 2, 3, Captain 2. BETTY CRIDER General Uanuary 10? Needlework Club 1, 2 5 Intramural Sports 1. AUDREY L. CRIST General 4May 233 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Entertainment Club 2, 35 Dra- matics Club 15 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Secretary 1, 2. MARGARET J. CRISTE George-Deen CFebruary 165 Needlework Club 1, 35 Learn to Drive Club 25 Intramural Sports 1. CHEERFUL MAE CRISWELL General CMarch 157 Girls League President 3, Secretary 25 Class Secretary 15 Home Room, Vice President 2, Secretary 15 Corridor Patrol 25 Go to College Club 2, 35 Annual Show 2. RUTH E. CROFT Commercial CJuly 203 Girls' Chorus 15 Girls' Octette 15 Needlework Club 15 An- nual Show 15 World Friendship Club 25 Secretarial Club 3, President 3. FRED L. CROLL General CMay 317 Safety Club 1, 2, 35 Corridor Patrol 35 Intramural Sports 1, 3. JOAN M. CROSS George-Deen CJune 155 Knitting Club 1, 25 Entertainment Club 35 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Treasurer 2. DORIS J. CROZIER Commercial fJanuary 275 Audubon Club 15 World Friendship Club 25 Home Room, President 3. DOROTHY JEAN CROZIER Progressive CFebruary 135 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 35 Quill and Scroll 2, 35 Entertainment Club 25 Social Service Club 35 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2. EUNICE CRUM Academic fDecember 179 Dramatics Club 15 Social Serv- ice Club 25 Go to College Club 35 Traffic Patrol 3. EVELYN LOUISE CUNNINGHAM Commercial CApril 243 World Friendship Club 15 Social Service Club 25 Typing Club 35 Home Room, Secretary 1. MADOLYN BETTE CUNNINGI-IAM Commercial fMarch 77 Orchestra 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. Page Thirty-three FRANK CUZZOLINA Academic Uanuary 127 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Sports Club 1, 2, Baseball 2, Home Room, President 3. L. JANE DANIELS George-Deen fOctober 127 Intramural Sports 1, 2, Dramatics Club 1, Social Service Club 2, Social Dancing Club 3. WILLIAM I. DANIELS Vocational fFebruary 127 Vivo Club 1, Safety Club 2, Physics Club 3, Drum and Bugle Corps 1, 2, Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2. ANTHONY JOSEPH DE ANTONIO General CMarch 237 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Italian Club 1, 2, 3. EDITHE LOUISE DAVIS Commercial CNovember 227 World Friend- ship Club 2, Typing Club 3, Home Room, Representative 3. FRED C. DAVIS General CDecember 47 Jay Vee Football 1, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Vivo Club 3, Squad Leader 3. LOUISE DAVIS General CJanuary 157 Learn to Drive Club 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, Home Room, Vice President 2. ROGER DALE DAVIS Vocational CMarch 67 Chess Club 1, Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2. RUSSEL A. DAVIS Commercial CMarch 167 Cheerleader 1, 2, 3, Corridor Patrol 3, Safety Patrol 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Safety Club 2, 3, Ushers' Club 1. ROBERT ELWOOD DEAN Voca- tional CJune 187 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Hi-Y 1. JOSEPH N. DE BERNARDIS Vocational Uanuary 87 Vivo Club 1, Physics Club 3. MARY DEBO Academic CMarch 257 Mountain Echo Staff 1, News- writing Club 1, Social Dancing Club 3, Corridor Patrol 1, Intramural Sports 1. HAROLD DE BRAY Vocational CDecember 37 Safety Club 1, Track Club 2, Drum and Bugle Corps 1, 2, Amateur Teleg- raphy Club 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Home Room, President 3. BERNARD DECOSKEY Vocational fSeptember 187 Safety Club 1, 2, 3, Golf Club 1, 2, Stagecraft Club 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. ANGE- LINE DEFIORE Commercial Uanuary 47 Knitting Club 1, Typing Club 3, Intramural Sports 1. JOHN DEFIORE Vocational CApril 67 Vocational Safety Club 1. FLORENCE T. DEGAND Commercial CAugust 277 Travel Club 3, Home Room, Attendance Direc- tor 3. JOAN DOLORIS DE LEO Commercial 4July 167 Orchestra 1, 2, 3, Social Service Club 2, Typing Club 3, Girls League Honor Roll 1, Annual Show 1, 2, 3, Knitting Club 1, Horseshoe Staff 3, Corridor Patrol 3. JOHN DE LEO General COctober 237 Vivo Club 2, 3. LILLIAN ESTHER DE LEO Com- mercial C.Iune 47 Knitting Club 1, Future Teachers of America 2, Typing Club 3, Library Guard 2, Girls League Honor Roll 1, Corridor Patrol 3, Horseshoe Staff 3. ALLEN DELOZIER Vocational fDe- cember 217 Art Metal Club 1, Safety Club 2. DEAN K. DELOZIER Academic CFebruary 17 Band 1, 2, 3, A Cappella Choir 2, Track Club 3, Sports Club 2, Corridor Patrol 2, Home Room, Representative 3, Art Metal Club 1, Intramural Sports 1 ,2, 3. BERNARD DEMBERT Progressive CMarch 107 News- writing Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary-Treasurer 2, Home Room, Treasurer 3, Chemistry Club 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 3, Class Vice President 1, 2. JULIA ANN DENTE Commer- cial fFebruary 87 World Friendship Club 2, Typing Club 3. F Cuzzollna J. Daniels W. Daniels A. DeAntonio E. Davis F. Davis L. Davis R. Davis R Davis R. Dean J. DeBernardjs M. Debo H. DeBray B. Decoskey A. Defiore J. Deflore F Degand J. DeLeo J. DeLeo L. DeLeo A. Delozler D. Delozier B. Dembert J. Dente ETTA R. DE SHONG George-Deen fJune 35 Chemistry Club 23 Knitting Club 23 Social Dancing Club 33 Intramural Sports 13 Girls League Honor Roll 1. JOSEPH DE STADIO General CFebruary 25 Vivo Club 1, Assistant Secretary 13 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. DORAN E. DETWILER General CMay 25 Band 1, 2, 3, President 33 Orchestra 2, 33 .Annual Show 13 Home Room, Secretary 33 Intra- mural Sports 2, 3. EDNA CORINNE DETWILER General CApril 265 Learn to Drive Club 1. ETHEL DETWILER Commercial CMarch 135 Home Room, President 33 Annual Show 1, 23 Forum Club 1, 2. MARGARET ANNA DETWILER Commercial QDe3ember 285 Knitting Club 13 Social Service Club 2, 3. WILLIAM DEY Academic CApril 195 Amateur Telegraphy Club 1, 2. MIRIAM DIAMOND Commercial fJune 145 Secretarial Club 23 Typing Club 33 Intramural Sports 3. CARL W. DIETZE General fOctober 65 Jay Vee Football 23 Track Team 2, 33 Handicraft Club 13 Corridor Patrol 3. MINNIE GRACE DI NICOLA Commercial COctober 235. JOSEPH LOUIS DI PEPPE Vocational CFebruary 75 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Jay Vee Football 13 Sports Club 13 Ushers' Club 2, 3. NELLIE DI SABATO General Uuly 125 Knitting Club 1, 23 World Friendship Club 3. LUTHER H. DODSON Vocational CMarch 45 Boxing Club 1, 2, 33 Science Club 3. GEORGE W. DONLEY General CFebruary 225 Ushers' Club 33 Home Room, Representative 13 Intramural Sports 3. PAUL DONNELLY Acadamic iMarch 285 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Ushers' Club 1, 23 Stamp Club 3. EDWARD DONOWAY General Uanuary 265 Art Metal Club 13 Geography Travel Club 3. PATRICIA MAE DOUGHERTY Academic fSeptember 205 Dramatics Club 1, 2, 33 English De- partment Play 1, 23 Shippensburg Play 23 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, 3. BETTY DOUGLASS George-Deen fMarch 185 Library Club 13 Social Service Club 2, 3. MARIE PEARL DOWN General CApril 275 Social Service 1. M. AILEEN DUBBS George-Deen CJune 235 Needle- work Club 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 3. ANN DULLINGER Commercial COctober 15 Dramatics Club 23 Li- brary Club 23 Intramural Sports 1. MARY ELIZABETH DUMM George-Deen 4March 135 A Cappella Choir 1, 23 Girls' A Cappella Choir 2, 33 Social Service Club 2, 3, Secretary 23 Chemistry Club 2, 33 Knitting Club 13 Girls League Honor Roll 1, 23 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. ROBERT J. DUMM General CMay 165 Intramural Sports 1, 23 Band 1, 2, 3. JACK DUNN Vocational CNovember 195 Forestry Club 1, Treasurer 13 Hunting and Fishing Club 2, 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. E. Deshong C. Dletze P. Dougherty J. DeSta.dl0 D. Detwiler E. Detwiler E. Detwiler M. Detwiler W. Dey M. DiNicola J. DiPeppe N. DiSabato L. Dodson G. Donley P. Donnelly B. Douglass M. Down A. Duhbs A. Dullinger M. Dumm R. Dumm M. Diamond E. Donoway J. Dunn J. Dunn L. Edwards J. Emswiler JOHN L. DUNN General CMarch 113 Ushers' Club 1, 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, Home Room, Presi- dent 3. JACK BARRY DURBIN General CDecember 223. PAUL J. DURBIN General 4February 253 Sports Club 1, 2. VERNA DWYER Commercial CJuly 33 Dramatics Club 2. MARILEE EARDLEY General CDecember 73 Home Room, Vice President 1, Secretary 1. LARRY EARON Progressive 4Octo- ber 163 Class President 13 Sports Club 13 Boosters' Club 2, Senate 3, Athletic Council 3, Home Room, Representative 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, A Cappella Choir 2, 3. JEAN EBERSOLE George-Deen CAugust 263. RICHARD ECKART Vocational Uuly 83 Rifle Club 13 Hunting and Fishing Club 2, 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. LOIS EDWARDS Commercial CJune 153 Library Club 1, Secretarial Club 3, Treasurer 3, Home Room, Representative 3. VIVIAN J. EICHELBERGER Commercial CJune 53 Social Service Club 1, Secretarial Club 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Social Dancing Club 3. M. ELIZABETH EISENBERG Commercial fDecember 203 Dramatics Club 1, World Friendship Club 2, Travel Club 2, Learn to Drive Club 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2. RALPH CLAYTON ELDERS General Uanuary 43 Hunting and Fish- ing Club 1, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. THEODORE J. ELLSTROM General COctober 43 Band 1, 2, 3, Orchestra 2, 3, Corridor Patrol 35 Annual Show 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. DREW L. EMERICK Academic CJuly 23 Home Room, Attendance Director 3, Representaive 3. ELAINE EMERY General CDecember 123 Social Dancing Club 3, Knitting Club 1. REBECCA EMERY General QMay 243 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 3, Social Dancing Club 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2. JOSEPH FRANCIS EMSWILER Vocational Uanuary 233 Vivo Club 1, Treasurer 1, Stamp Club 2, Forestry Club 3. EDNA MAE ENGLISH George-Deen Uanuary 103 Social Service Club 23 Home Room, Treasurer 2, President 3. GEORGE ERMIN Vocational CApril 243 Hunting and Fishing Club 2, 3, Vice President 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2. JEAN EVANGELISTA Commercial CJu1y 233 World Friendship Club 1, 2, Typing Club 3, Intramural Sports 2, Girls League Honor Roll 1, 2. JELDO JOSEPH EVANGELISTO Vocational CApri1 283 Future Craftsmen of America Club 1, 2, 3, Art Club 1, Baseball 1. JOSEPH L. EVANS Vocational fJanuary 13 Home Room, Representative 3, Safety Club 1, 2, Vocational Safety Club 3. GLENN LE ROY FAGAN General fAugust 253 Rifle Club 2, 3, Treasurer 3, Band 1, 2, 3, Vivo Club 1. MYRTLE M. FAGLEY Commercial fFebruary 23 Girls' Chorus 13 Knitting Club 1, World Friendship Club 2, Treasurer 2, Secretarial Club 33 Home Room, Attendance Director 3. J. Durbin P. Durbin V. Dwyer M. Eardley L. Earon J. Ebersole R. Eckart V. Eichelberger E. Eisenberg R. Elders T. Ellstrom D. Emerick E. Emery R. Emery E. English G. Ermln J. Evangellsta J. Evangelisto J. Evans G. Fagan M. Fagley -,.' I - . ,., ' K lg Es 'ii BERNARD JOSEPH FANALE Vocational CJuly 147 Safety Club 1, 25 Art Club 3. M. EDITH FARABAUGH General CSeptember 137 Intramural Sports 13 Annual Show 1. FAITH FRANCES FAR- BER Academic Uanuary 317 Social Service Club 15 Statesmanship Club 35 World Friendship Club 2, 3. KARL FASICK Academic CJune 197 Safety Club 25 Amateur Telegraphy Club 3, Intramural Sports 12 Home Room, Vice President 2, Treasurer 2, 3. ALBERT A. FEBBO General Uanuary 97 Band 1, 23 Football Manager 1, Intramural Sports 1, 23 Art Metal Club 15 Home Room, Sales Manager 1. EN- RICO DAN FENELL General fAugust 57 Vivo Club 1, 2, 3, Football Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. THEODORE S. FERGUSON Vocational CMay 37 Jay Vee Basketball 1, Varsity Basketball 2, 3 3 Sports Club 1, 2g Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, Representative 33 Varsity Baseball 23 Shop Safety Representative 1, 2. MARIANNA MARY FERNICOLA General CAugust 207 Knitting Club 1. WILLIAM FERRIS Vocational COctober 187 Safety Patrol 1, 2, 35 Safety Club 1, 2, 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Secretary 1. MALCOLM FESTENSTEIN Progressive fMarch 197 Academy of Science 2, 39 Class Executive Committee 2, Newswriting Club 2, 3, Vice President 23 Chemistry Club 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 3, Sports Editor 3, Home Room, Representative 3 5 Kodak Club 1. ROBERT FICKES Vocational CMay 287 Golf Club 13 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. RUTH P. FICKES Commercial COctober 167 Social Service Club 1, 23 Secretarial Club 25 Social Dancing Club 3 5 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. WILLIAM R. FIESTER General CDecember 167 Ushers' Club 1, 2, 35 Drum and Bugle Corps 1, Intramural Sports 2. HELEN JULIA FIGARD Commercial Uune 297 World Friendship Club 15 Knitting Club 25 Typing Club 3, Home Room, Representative 3, Girls League Honor Roll 1, Traffic Patrol 3. BETTE ARLENE FIGART Commercial 4December 247 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 31 Annual Show 1, 2, 3, Dramatics Club 2, Home Room, Representative 3. JAIVIES A. FIG- ART Vocational fApril 137 Camera Club 1, 2g Hunting and Fishing Club 3. DANIEL H. FILER Academic CNovember 57 Stagecraft Club 1, Chess Club 2, Agriculture Club 3, Corridor Patrol 13 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MARTHA FILER General 4October 57 Social Service Club 2, 3, Learn to Drive Club 1. PHYLLIS JEAN FILLMAN George-Deen iNovember 237 In tramural Sports 1, 2, Knitting Club 23 Forum Club 3, Corridor Patrol 3. DOROTHY FINK General Uune 187 Dra- matics Club 1, Secretarial Club 2, Typing Club 3. VIVIAN JANE FINNEY Progressive CMay 287 Needlework Club 1, President 15 Travel Club 2, 3, Chemistry Club 2, 3, Vice President 2, Physics Club 35 Home Room, Secretary 15 Girls League Honor Roll 25 Academy of Science 3, Girls' A Cappella Choir 2. JAMES W. FISHER Commercial COctober 207 Traffic Patrol 2, 3, Track Club 1: Geography and Travel Club 3, President 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Attendance Representative 3, Secretary 3: Compass Staff 33 Track Team 1, 3. MELVIN K. FISHER Academic iSeptember 87. NELDA L. FLICK George-Deen Uanuary 67 Needlework Club 1, 3, Home Room, Vice President 2, President 3. B. Fanale E. Farabaugh F. Farber K. Fasick A. Febbo E. Fenell T. Ferguson W. Ferris M. Festenstein R. Fickes R. Fickes W. Fiester H. Figard B. Flgart D. Filer M. Filer P. Flllman D. Fink V. Finney J. Fisher M. Fisher M. Fernicola J. Figart N. Flick .41 E. Flicklnger B. Foust J. Gallace EARL DRESSLER FLICKINGER General CAugust 215 Band 1, 2, 35 Orchestra 2, 3. FREDRICK FLUKE Vocational CSeptember 115 Ushers' Club 2, 35 Baseball 25 Intramural Sports 25 Home Room, Attendance Director 3. KENNETH PAUL FLUKE General CAugust 205 Track Club 1, 2, 35 Intra- mural Sports 15 Track Team 1, 25 Home Room, Secretary 2. ALBERT FOCHETTA General iApril 165 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Vivo Club 1, 2, 3. MILDRED E. FONNER Commercial 1February 85 Learn to Drive Club 25 Typing Club 35 Home Room, Representative 3. DOROTHY MAXINE FOOR General CMay 185 Learn to Drive Club 1. LORRAINE E. FORNWALT General CJuly 125 Knitting Club 15 Dramatics Club 2. HARRIET FORSHT George-Deen CJuly 105 Tap Dancing Club 25 Intra- mural Sports 1, 2. BETTY MARIE FOUST Academic CAugust 175 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Knit- ting Club 1, 25 College Club 3. NORMAN R. FOWLER Vocational fAugust 15 Safety Club 1, 25 Home Room, Attendance Director 3. WILLIAM A. FRANK Academic CFebruary 185 Football 1, 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Vivo Club 2, 35 Safety Club 15 Squad Leader 35 Basketball 15 Home Room, Secretary 1. BERILL FRIEDLAND Academic fNovember 135 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Sports Club 25 Vivo Club 15 Boosters' Club 35 Annual Show 15 Home Room, Secretary 2. GEORGE FRITSCHE Academic CFebruary 195 Track Club 2, 35 Home Room, Representative 35 Intramural Sports 2, 35 Track Team 2, 35 Senate 3. DONALD EUGENE FUOSS Academic fFebruary 195 Varsity Football 2, 3, Captain 35 Jay Vee Football 15 Home Room, President 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Sports Club 1, 2, 35 Track Club 3. AIWELIA MARY FURGIONE General fAugust 205 Home Room, Secretary 25 Needlework Club 25 Typing Club 35 Italian Club 35 History Office Assistant 2. EDITH F. FUSCO Commercial CSeptember 45 Dramatics Club 1, 2, President 15 Social Service Club 3, Secretary 15 Forum Club 25 A Cappella Choir 1, 2. JOSEPHINE E. GALLACE Commercial CMarch 245 Knitting Club 15 Girls' A Cappella Choir 15 Social Service Club 25 World Friendship Club 3. ROBERT GALLAGHER General fApril 195 Intrau mural Sports 1, 2. JEAN E. GALLOWAY General fAugust 175 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Intramural Sports 25 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. SHIRLEY JAYNE GAMPE General 1November 85 Intramural Sports 1, 25 Knitting Club 15 Home Room, Secretary 1. EMMALINE GARMAN General CDecember 185 In- tramural Sports 1, 25 Knitting Club 15 Social Service Club 2. JOSEPH JAY GARRITY Commercial CMay 155 Intramural Sports 35 Kodak Club 1, Vice President 15 National Graphic Arts Club 3. ALMA GATES Commercial fSeptember 145 World Friendship Club 15 Social Service Club 25 Typing Club 35 Girls League Honor Roll 15 Home Room, Secretary 1, President 3. ELLEN SUZANNE GEIST General CSeptember 165 Tumbling Club 1, 2, 35 Squad Leaders' Club 35 Annual Show 2, 35 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Knitting Club 15 Home Room, Attendance Director 3. F. Fluke K. Fluke A. Fochetta. M. Former D. Fool' L. Fornwalt H. Fcrsht N. Fowler W. Frank B. Friedland G. Frltsche D. Fuoss A. Furgione E. Fusco R. Gallagher J. Galloway S. Gampe E. Garman J. Garrity A. Gates S. Geist TESSIE CARMELA GENTILE Commercial Uanuary SJ Social Dancing Club 33 Italian Club 2, 33 Knitting Club 23 Intramural Sports 1, 2. PEGGY ELIZABETH GEORGE Academic CSepbem- ber 22J Home Room, Vice President 2, President 33 Dramatics Club 23 Forum Club 3, Treasurer 33 Statesmanship Club 33 Chemistry Club 33 Executive Committee 3. MARGARET MARIE GEORGE Commercial CNovember 113 Social Service Club 13 Vocational Club 23 Social Dancing Club 3. MIRIAM ELLEN GEORGE General COctober 89 Intramural Sports 1, 23 Dramatics Club 1, 2, Vice President 2. MARY LOU GERMANO Commercial Uanuary D Intramural Sports 1, 23 Social Dancing Club 3. HELEN R. GERST Commercial CSeptember 243 World Friendship Club 13 Newswriting Club 2. HANNAH KATHRYN GETZ Commercial Uanuary 77 Dramatics Club 13 Social Service Club 23 World Friendship Club 3. M. JACQUELINE GIBBONS Commercial CAugust 45 World Friendship Club 1, 2, President 23 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 33 Annual Show 1, 2, 33 Social Dancing Club 33 Home Room, Sales Manager 33 Traffic Patrol 3. RUTH M. GIBONEY General COctober 129 World Friendship Club 13 Social Service Club 23 Needlework Club 33 Orchestra 1, 2, 33 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. ELIZABETH ANN GIBSON General Uanuary 115 Intramural Sports 13 Dramatics Club 13 Social Dancing Club 3. MARJORIE RAE GILBERG Commercial Uune 115 Social Service Club 13 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Annual Show 23 Tap Dancing Club 2, 33 Basketball 2, 3. ELVIN GILLASPIE Progressive CMay 99 Home Room, Representative 33 Track Team 2, 33 Intramural Sports 2, 33 Drum and Bugle Corps 1, 23 Cheerleader 33 Forestry Club 13 Nature Observation Club 23 A Cappella Choir 3. E. JEAN GILMARTIN George- Deen 4December 275 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 23 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 33 Dramatics Club 1, 23 Cor- ridor Patrol 2, 3. ELLEN MARIE GILMORE Commercial 4April10l Dramatics Club 13 Home Room, Secretary 13 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 33 Social Service Club 23 Statesmanship Club 33 Annual Show 1, 2, 33 Horseshoe Club 33 Horseshoe Staff 3. SYLVIA ANN GINDES Commercial C.Ianuary 75 Dramatics Club 1, 23 World Friendship Club 3. VEMA EDITH GINGERY General CSeptember 287 Learn to Drive Club 2. GILSON C. GINNICK General CSeptember 173 Art Metal Club 13 Squad Leaders' Club 2, 33 In- tramural Sports 1, 23 Art Club 33 Home Room, Secretary 1. MARIO GIOIOSA Vocational CSeptem- ber 12l Jay Vee Football 33 Intramural Sports 2, 3. DOROTHEA MAE GIOSA George-Deen Uanuary 227 Italian Club 23 Intramural Sports 1. ELEANOR JANE GLASS General CFebruary 113 Library Club 13 Social Service Club 23 Entertainment Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 23 Squad Leaders' Club 3. JUNE GLASS Commercial lMay 293 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 33 World Friendship Club 2, 33 Needlework Club 13 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. LAWRENCE J. GLASSER General CMarch 295 Ushers' Club 13 Art Club 33 Intramural Sports 3. IRVIN GOLDBERG Academic Uanuary 37 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Newswriting 'Club 1, 2, 3, President 33 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 3, Managing Editor 3. DOROTHY J. GOMERSALL Academic CApril 265 Intramural Sports 1, 23 World Friendship Club 13 Go to College Club 2, 3. T. Gentile P. George M. George M. George M. Germano H. Gerst H. Getz R. Glboney E. Gibson M. Gilberg E. Gillaspie J. Gilmartin E. Gilmore S. Gindes G. Ginnlck M. Gioiosa D. Glosa. E. Glass J. Glass L. Glasser I. Goldberg J. Gibbons V. Gingery D. Gomersall PEGGY GONTER Commercial CDecember 213 Social Service Club 1, Secretary 1, Secretarial Club 2, Social Dancing Club 3. JANET GEORGIANA GOOD General Uune 73 Social Service Club 13 Knitting Club 1, Vice President 1, Intramural Sports 1. MARJORIE A. GOOD Progressive CAugust 43 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, Business Manager 1, Dramatics Club 1, 2, Home Room, Treasurer 2, Secretary 2, President 3, Annual Show 1, 2. CHALMER NEALE GORDON General fNovember 13 A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Stagecraft Club 1, 2, 3g Intramural .Sports 1, 3, Annual Show 2, 3. CHAR- LOTTE L. GORITY Academic CNovember 303 Social Service Club 2, Travel Club 35 Girls' Drum and Bugle Corps 1. EUGENE G. GORMAN General CJune 303 Stage Design Club 1, Intramural Sports 1. NELDA GORSUCH Academic CSeptember 83. NINA GOSHORN General fApril 103 Travel Club 3, Home Room, President 3, Vice President 1. MILES GOTTSHALL Progressive CSeptember 153 Nature Observation Club 2, 35 A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Annual Show 2. TRESSA VIRGINIA GRABILL General Uanuary 223 Forum Club 1, Travel Club 2, 3. INZA BEATRICE GRACE Commercial CMarch 83 Knitting Club 1, Needle- Work 'Club 2, Typing Club 3. OLIVER I. GRAFFIUS Vocational CApril 303 Hunting and Fishing Club 13 Ushers' 'Club 2, 3. WILLIAM GRAHAM Vocational COctober 263 Sports Club 13 Jay Vee Football 1. HAROLD C. GRANNAS Vocational CMay 243 Track Club 2, 35 Ushers' Club 15 Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 35 Track Team 2, Home Room, President 3. GEORGIANA M. GRANT Academic CApril 63 Intramural Sports 2. HERMAN ANTHONY GRASSI General CApril 223 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Vivo Club 1, 2, 35 Jay Vee Football 25 Annual Show 2, 35 Home Room, Vice President 2. MARY JOAN GRASSI General fAugust 23 Knitting Club 2. MURRAY GRAY Vocational Uanu- ary 273 Home Room, Secretary 1, Intramural Sports 1, 2. WILLIAM M. GREEN General CJuly 133 Intramural Sports 2, 3. EUGENE A. GREGG Academic CJune 243. PAULA. GREINER General fSep- tember 303 Ushers' Club 2g Vivo Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. ROBERT EUGENE GRIFFITH General fJune 253 Hi-Y 23 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Sales Manager 2. ROSEMARY E. GRIMMINGER General CFebruary 213. A. FRANCES GROVE George-Deen KSeptember 173 An- nual Show 1, 23 Dancing Club 2, 3, Learn to Drive Club 1, President 1, A Cappella Choir 1, 2, Home Room, Secretary 1. P. Gunter J. Good M. Good N. Gordon C. G-ority E. Gorman N. Gorsuch N. Goshorn M. Gottshall T. Grabill I. Grace 0. Graffius W. Graham I-I. Grannas G. Grant H. Grass! M. Grass! M. Gray W. Green E. Gregg P. Grelner E. Griffith R. Grimminger F. Grove JOHN GROVE Vocational fSeptember 127 Varsity Baseball 2, Stagecraft Club 1, 2, 3, Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3. ROBERT GROVE Academic iJune 37 Ushers' 'Club 1, 2, 3. HILDA E. GRUBER Progressive fNovember 187 Astronomy Club 1, 2, Home Room, Secretary 1, President 2, Learn to Drive Club 3. LOIS MARIE HAHN Academic Uanuary 287 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 3, Learn to Drive Club 1, Social Service Club 2, 3, Girls' Glee Club 3. CATHERINE HAIGH Commercial CAugust 67 Knitting 'Club 1, Needlework Club 2, Squad Leaders' Club 3. E. JANE HAIGH George-Deen CMarch 117 Needlework Club 1, 3, Home Room, Vice President 2. JAMES ROBERT HAIGH Gen- eral iJuly 67 Band 1, 2, 3. CHARLES WILLIAM HALL General KNovember 257 Intramural Sports 2, 3,,Band 1, 2, 3, Home Room, President 3, Vice President 2. FREDA E. HALL George-Deen fJuly 137 Needlework Club 3, Social Service Club 2. GEORGE A. HALLER General CApril 287 Intramural Sports 1, 2, Stagecraft Club 1. GLADYS HAMILTON George-Deen fNovember 117 Learn to Drive Club 1, 2, Athletic Club 1, 2, 3, Squad Leaders' Club 3, Dramatics Club 3, Intramural Sports 3. WILLIAM C. HAMILTON Vocational CSeptember 227 Kodak Club 1, Forestry Club 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. BLANCHE E. HANCOCK Commercial CNovember 277 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, Audubon Club 1, World Friendship Club 2. BETTY R. HANKS Commercial CNovember 207 Social Service Club 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Attendance Director 2. DONALD C. HANLEY General CNovember 277 Football Club 1, 3, Varsity Football 1, 2, 3, Varsity Basketball 1, 2, 3, Varsity Baseball 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, Na- tional Athletic Honor Society 2. EDITH C. HANSEN Commercial 4February 117 Dramatics Club 1, Typing Club 3. PATRICIA HARBAUGH General fJune 47 Home Room, Sales Manager 2, Learn to Drive Club 1, President 1, Travel Club 2, Secretary 2. DONALD W. HARDER General CNovember 37 Home Room, President 3, Statesmanship Club 3. EVANGELINE RUTH HARE Progressive CJuly 127 Needlework Club 1, 2, Travel Club 3, Home Room, President 3. MARY LOU HARKEY Com- mercial CApri1 237 Social Service Club 1, 3, World Friendship Club 2, Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, Treasurer 2, President 3. MARY P. HARKEY Commercial KMay 127 Annual Show 1, Learn to Drive Club 1, Girls' Chorus 1, Dramatics Club 2. JEAN MARILYNN HARKLESS Com- mercial Uune 147 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Learn to Drive Club 2, Home Room, President 2. GEORGE ROBERT HARMAN Academic CAugust 227 Band 1, 2, 3, Orchestra 2, 3, Annual Show 2, 3, Blair County Band Festival 2, 3. ROBERT C. HARNISH General iAugust 197 Sheet Metal Club 1, Chess Club 2. J. Grove R. Grove H. Gruber L. Hahn C. Halgh J. Haigh J. Haigh C Hall F. Hall G. Haller G. Hamilton W. Hamilton B. Hancock B. Hanks D. Hanley E Hansen P. Harliaugh D. Harder E. Hare M. Harkey M. Harkey J. Harkless G. Harman R Hamish CLAIR CHARLES HARPSTER Vocational CJu1y 317 Intramural Sports 1, 2. FLORENCE L. HARPSTER George-Deen CMay 137 Needlework Club 1, 2, 33 Intramural Sports lg Girls' A Cappella Choir 3. RALPH D. HARRITY Academic CJuly 247 Stamp Club 1, 2, Vice President 1, Secretary- Treasurer 21 A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Annual Show 2, 3, Boosters' Club 3, Secretary 3, Corridor Pa- trol 2, 3, Home Room, Secretary 2, Representative 3, Intramural .Sports 2, 35 Cheer Leaders' Club 3. DONALD T. HARSHBERGER Vocational fApril 97 .Sports Club 2. R. SIDNEY HART Vocational CFebruary 277 Ushers' Club 1. MARY JANE HARTEN George-Deen CJuly 217 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Social Service Club 25 Needlework Club lg Annual Show 1, 2, 3g Girls' Chorus 1, Home Room, Vice President 1. ELIZABETH HATCH Commercial iSeptember 157 Travel Club 33 Girls League Honor R011 1, 2. BETTY JANE HAUK General CAugust 187 Intramural Sports 1, 22 Needlework Club 2. MARY JANE HAUPT Academic CSeptember 47 Social Service Club 1, 2, Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 31 A Cappella Choir 33 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Go to College Club 3. JOAN R. HAUSER Commercial CAugust 297 Intramural Sports 13 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, President 3: World Friendship Club 2, Treasurer 2, Typing Club 35 Traffic Patrol 3. RUTH ANNE HAVER- STICK Progressive fJune 307 Class Executive Committee 15 Academy of Science 1, 2, 3, Vice Presi- dent 2, Horseshoe Staff 2, 33 Traffic Patrol 2, 3, Physics Club 35 Chemistry Club 2, Dramatics Club 13 Carnegie Nature Study Group 1, 2, 3. JEANNE M. HAWK General fMay 297 World Friendship Club 1, 2, 3, Vice President 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Squad Leaders' Club 3, Newswriting Club 1. ROBERT HAWN Academic CFebruary 157 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Sheet Metal Club 2. KATHRYN E. HAYS General CMay 127 Needlework Club 19 Social Service Club 2, Travel Club 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2. HARRY H. HEACOX General CMarch 177 Hunting and Fishing Club 1, 2, Secretary 2, Rifle Club 33 Intramural Sports 3. MARGARET A. HEBERLE George-Deen 4No- vember 217 Social Service Club 1, 2, 3, Girls League Honor Roll 1, 25 Home Room, Vice President 2. ROBERT L. HEINBAUGH Progressive Uanuary 277 Mountain Echo Staff 15 Hi-Y 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Varsity Baseball 2, 3, Traffic Patrol 3, Corridor Patrol 31 Class Executive Committee 15 Home Room, Vice President 2. GLORIA J. HELLER Progressive CMarch 287 Home Room, President 35 A Cappella Choir 33 Girls' A Cappella Choir 2, Corridor Patrol 2, Social Service Club 25 Entertainment Club 3, Annual Show 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. L. JOSEPHINE HELLER General CDecember 67 Social Service Club 2, 33 Needlework Club 1. HARRIET HESTER HELMS Commercial CMarch 317 Girls' Glee Club 1, Girls' A Cappella Choir 2, Annual Show 1, 2, Learn to Drive Club 1, 2. JANET HELSEL Progressive Uanuary 67 World Friendship Club 19 Needle- work Club 23 Travel Club 3. BROOKS NEAL HENRY General fDecember 297. JOHN HENRY Academic CAugust 117 Statesmanship Club 3, Traffic Patrol 3, Intramural Sports 1, 21 Handicraft Club 1, Orchestra 1. RUTH HEPNER Progressive Uanuary 77 .Social Service Club 2, President 2, Home Room, President 39 Dramatics Club 13 Forum Club 3g Statesmanship Club 33 English De- partment Play 2g Traffic Patrol 3. C l-larpster F. Harpster R. Harrity D. I-Iarshberger S. Hart M. Harten E. Hatch B. Hank J Haupt -I. Hauser R. Haverstick J. Hawk R. Hawn K. Hays H. I-leacox M. Heberle R Hembaugh G. Heller J. Heller H. Helms J. Helsel B. Henry J. Henry R. Hepner Has! . if DAVID WALTER HESS Vocational fOctober 153 Vocational Safety Club 1, 2, 33 National Stu- dent Graphic Arts Club 2, 3. LENAMAE HESS General Uuly 93 Social Service Club 1, 2, 33 Enter- tainment Club 3. BURTON HESSER Academic fMarch 293 Stamp Club 13 Senate 13 Home Room, Attendance Director 33 Intramural Sports 1. KATHLEEN L. HESSER Academic fFebruary 263 Social Service Club 13 Knitting Club 23 Travel Club 3, President 33 Corridor Patrol 23 Traffic Pa- trol 3. FRANK HETTLER Progressive iJuly 223 Chemistry Club 2, 33 Physics Club 33 Academy of Science 2, 33 Chess Club 23 Home Room, Attendance Director 3, Secretary 1, Treasurer 1. ANNA MARIE HEUSTON General CJune 83 Needlework Club 23 Intramural Sports 1, 23 Home Room, Sales Manager 2. WILLIAM FRANKLIN HEWITT Vocational CJuly 303 Chess Club 13 Ushers' Club 2, 33 Intramural Sports 3. BLANCHE ELEANOR HILEMAN General CSeptember 43 Knitting Club 13 Social Service Club 2. WILLIAM GEORGE HILTON General KApril 113 Hunting and Fishing Club 1. ELIZABETH HIMEBAUGH Academic CMay 83 Library Club 13 Go to College Club 2, 33 Compass Staff 33 Home Room, President 2. JULIA VIOLA HINE General CMarch 273 Needlework Club 23 Intramural Sports 1, 2. DAVID C. HINER General CSeptember 243 Agriculture Club 3. MARJORIE JANE HINMAN Academic Uanuary 243 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 33 Annual Show 1, 23 Dramatics Club 1, 2, 33 Traffic Patrol 2, 33 Home Room, Secretary 13 English Department Play 33 Class Executive Committee 3. H. ELIZABETH HITE Commercial CFebruary 173 Needlework Club 13 Social Service Club 2, 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MARY K. HOBSON General fJune 153 A Cappel1a.Choir 1, 2, 33 Annual Show 1, 2, 33 Dramatics Club 13 Social Service Club 33 Corridor Patrol 33 Learn to Drive Club 2. MIRIAM I. HOFFMAN General Uuly 13 Needlework Club 23 World Friendship Club 33 Squad Leader 23 Intramural Sports 1, 23 Traffic Patrol 3. GERALDINE ANNA HOFFNER Commercial iApril 63 Tap Dancing Club 13 A Cappella Choir 2. BETTE G. HOFMANN General CJ'uly 303 Intramural Sports 1, 23 Needlework Club 2, Treasurer 2. GENEVIEVE MAYE HOLDEMAN Commercial CApril 143 World Friendship Club 1. JUNE ELIZABETH HOLLAND General fAugust 273. JAMES ROBERT HOLLEN General Uuly 203 In- tramural Sports 1, 2. M. MARJORIE HOLLISTER General COctober 303 Needlework Club 2, Presi- dent 23 Go to College Club 33 Home Room, Representative 3. BERNARD MILES HOOVER Voca- tional Uuly 183 Art Metal Club 1, 23 Amateur Telegraphy Club 33 Home Room, Secretary 2. HAZEL MAREA HOOVER General fFebruary 103 Learn to Drive Club 13 Forum Club 1. D. Hess L. Hess B. Hesser K. Hesser F. Hettler A. Heuston F. Hewitt W. Hilton E. l-Iimlebaugh J. Hine D. Hlner J. Hillman E. Hite M. Hobson G. Hoffner B. Hofmann G. Holdeman J. Holland J. Hollen M. Hollister B. Hoover B. Hileman M. Hoffman H. Hoover L. Hoover K. Houck T. Huber I . f , J. Hopkins M. Homer P. Horner M. Horton J. Hosfield D. Hostler C. Houck D. Houpt D. Houseman G. Houseman M. Houseman E. Houston D. Howser G. Huber R. Hughes L. Humbert J. Humm J. Humm H. Humphries E. I-Iurliman M. I-Iurm LEONARD GEORGE HOOVER Vocational Uuly 187 Art Metal Club 1, 2, Vice President 23 Amateur Telegraphy Club 3, Home Room, Secretary 2, Attendance Director 1. JEANNE O. HOP- KINS George-Deen CDecember 217 Library Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, President 33 Chemistry Club 2, 3, Annual Show 15 Corridor Patrol 2, 3, Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2. MARY PATRICIA HORNER General CSeptember 107 Annual Show 13 English Department Play 2, Penn State Play 2, Forum Club 1, 2, Dramatics Club 1. PAUL LEROY HORNER Vocational fOc- tober 97 Golf Club 13 Science Club 33 Track Manager 13 Home Room, Sales Manager 1, Vice Presi- dent 2, President 3. MARY E. HORTON Commercial CAugust 87 Typing Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. JEAN HOSFIELD General fOctober 17 Central High School, Harrisburg, 1, 23 Spanish Club 2, John Harris High School, Harrisburg, 3, Altoona High School 3. DOLORES HOSTLER General CAugust 127 Forum Club 1, 2, Vice President 13 Typing Club 3. CHARLES FRANCIS HOUCK Vocational CSep- tember 127 Ushers' Club 1, 2, 3g Int-ramural Sports 2, 3, Varsity Baseball 2. KENNETH J. HOUCK Progressive fAugust 177 Stage Design Club 1, Traffic Patrol 2, 33 Boosters' Club 3, Horseshoe Staff 35 Horseshoe Club 3. DONALD R. HOUPT General CFebruary 217 Band 1, 2, 3, Orchestra 1, 2, 3, Trombone Choir 1, 2, 3, Annual Show 1, 2, 3. DONALD E. HOUSEMAN Academic fSeptember 177 Band 1, 2, 3, Corridor Patrol 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. GLENN VIN- CENT HOUSEMAN General COctober 237 Band 1, 2, 3, Orchestra 2, 3, Annual Show 2, Intramural Sports 2. MARSHALL L. HOUSEMAN Academic CAugust 317 Forestry Club 13 Go to College Club 2, Poetry Club 3, Home Room, Vice President 2, Squad Leader 3, Track Team 13 A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 3. EARL EUGENE HOUSTON General CFebruary 97 A Cappella Choir 1, Orchestra 2, 35 Band 1, 2, 3. DONALD WILMOT HOWSER, JR. Vocational CJune 257 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Future Craftsmen of America 1, National .Student Graphic Arts Society 2, 3, Secre- tary-Treasurer 2. GLENN W. HUBER Vocational CMarch 217 Ushers' Club 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. THELMA MAYE HUBER Commercial CSeptember 57 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Social Service Club 3. RUTH L. HUGHES General CMay 197 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3, Horseshoe Staff 2, 3, Horse- shoe Club 2, 3, Statesmanship Club 2, 3, Annual Show 1, 2, 3. A. LORRAINE HUMBERT General CFebruary 177 Entertainment Club 1, Go to College Club 2, 3. JANET HUMM Academic CNovem- ber 27 Forum Club 1, 2, 3, President 33 Home Room, Secretary 1. JOHN W. HUMM General CApril 137 Sports Club 2. HARRY A. HUMPHRIES General COctober 27 Ushers' Club 1, Rifle Club 2. ED- WARD HURLIMAN General 4May 147 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MELVIN LEROY HURM General fJuly 67 Intramural Sports 3. Page Forty-four J. Hyssong P. Iacovella M. Ianleri P. Iannlcelll E. Iannone E. Ianuzzi F. Imler A. Ireland G. Ireland C. Irvin W. Irwin B. Isenberg R. Isenberg E. Jackson C. Jacobs C. Jarklewlcz K. John M. Johnson W. Johnson M. Johnston R. Johnston JOHN FREDERICK HYSSONG Vocational 4August 285 Intramural Sports 1, 2, National Students Graphic Arts Society 2, 3, Editor 3. PASQUALE IACOVELLA General CMay 55 Band 1, 2, 3. MARY DOLORES IANIERI George-Deen 4May 215 Knitting Club 1, Social Dancing Club 2, 3. PAUL RICH- ARD IANNICELLI Vocational COctober 295 Home Room, Secretary 2, President 3, Jay Vee Basket- ball 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Sports Club 2. EDITH ADELINE IANNONE General CSeptember 205 Knitting Club 2. EUGENE J. IANUZZI Academic CMay 255 Sports Club 1, College Club 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Assistant Track Manager 1, Italian Club 3, Secretary 3, Riile Club 3, Rome Room, Treas- urer 2, 3, Representative 3. FERN IMLER Academic Uanuary 165 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3, An- nual Show 1, 2, 3, Social Service Club 1, World Friendship Club 2, Leather Work Club 3, President 3. LOWELL E. IMLER General fSeptember 155. ALEXANDER IRELAND General CSeptember 185 Traffic Patrol 33 Ushers' Club 1, Boosters' Club 2, 3, Hi-Y Club 1, 2, A Cappella Choir 2, 33 Annual Show 2, 33 Corridor Patrol 3. GRAHAM IRELAND General CSeptember 185 A Cappella Choir 2, 33 Ushers' Club 1, Boosters' Club 2, 3, Annual Show 2, 3: Hi-Y 1, 23 Traffic Patrol 3, Corridor Patrol 3. CLAIR E. IRVIN Vocational CApril 85 Safety Club 15 Future Craftsmen of America 2, 3. WILLIAM A. IRWIN Vocational fAugust 85 Ushers' Club 1, 25 Intramural Sports 1. BEATRICE FAY ISENBERG George-Deen CMarch 305 Social Dancing Club 2. ROBERT ISENBERG Progressive CJune 125 Home Room, Vice President 2, Corridor Patrol 33 Chem- istry Club 2, 33 Radio Telegraphy Club 1. ELLEN M. JACKSON Commercial CApril 205 Social Service Club 2, Knitting Club 3, Intramural Sports 13 Home Room, Attendance Director 3. BETTY JEANNE JACOBS General CDecember 175 Social Service Club 1, 25 Travel Club 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, A Cap- pella Choir 2, 3. CATHERINE JANE JACOBS Commercial fSeptember 15 Mountain Echo Staff 1, Newswriting Club 1, Dramatics Club 23 Social Service Club 3. CATHERINE E. JARKIEWICZ George-Deen CNo- vember 55 Needlework Club 33 World Friendship Club 2, President 23 Knitting Club 19 Intramural Sports 13 Home Room, Secretary 1, KENNETH R. JOHN Academic CNovember 295 Handicraft Club 1, Jay Vee Football 1, 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2. MARJORIE LA RUE JOHNSON George-Deen Uuly 35 Knitting Club 15 Social Dancing Club 2, 3, Annual Show 2, Corridor Patrol 3, Girls' A Cappella Choir 25 Home Room, Vice President 2. WILLIAM L. JOHNSON Vocational fSeptember 135 Varsity Base- ball 2, Safety Club 13 Intramural Sports 2, 33 Home Room, Vice President 2, President 3. MARJORIE L. JOHNSTON George-Deen iApril 115 World Friendship Club 2g Needlework Club 3, Home Room, Attendance Director 2. ROBLEY JAMES JOHNSTON Progressive CAugust 255 Horseshoe Staff 33 Horseshoe Club 33 Mathematics Club 33 Home Room, Vice President 2. DOROTHY HELEN JONES Commercial CDecernber 95 Knitting Club 1, Treasurer 1, Corridor Patrol 2, Intramural Sports 1. Page Forty-five L. Imler B. Jacobs D. Jones R Jones J Joyce G. Kahcllo C. Kahle R. Kane R. Kantner J. Karstetter P. Katcher M Kaftouf G. Kauffman M. Kauffman W. Kauffman E. Kaufman B. Kaylor G. Kaylor L. Kaylor R Kcnrns E. Keen G. Kehoe C. Keim V. Keith A. Kemberllng W. Kennedy T. Kenney RITA JO JONES Cormnercial CJuly 173 Intramural Sports 2, 32 Typing Club 33 Needlework Club 2, Home Room, Vice President 2, Secretary 1. JOHN W. JOYCE Vocational lNovember 39 Future Craftsmen of America 1, 2, Treasurer 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Safety Club 1. GENEVIEVE LOUISE KABELLO Commercial CJuly 119 Social Service Club 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1. 'CHARLES R. KAHLE Vocational CSeptember 283 Safety Club 1, A Cappella Choir 3, Corridor Patrol 3. RICHARD W. KANE Progressive CMarch 187 Statesmanship Club 3, Hi-Y club 2, 3, Presi- dent 3g Horseshoe Staff 3, Corridor Patrol 2, 3, Senate 3, Chemistry Club 3. RUTH KANTNER Commercial CAugust 189 Knitting Club 1, Social Service Club 2, 3. JANE KARSTETTER Progres- sive CJuly 299 Forum Club 1, 3, Knitting Club 22 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, Presi- dent 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. PAUL G. KATCHER Vocational fApril 279 Home Room, Secre- tary 1. MITCHELL KATTOUF Commercial CMay 183 Ushers' Club 13 English Department Play 23 Girls League Play 25 Safety Club 2, 3, Street Patrol 2, 3: Home Room, Representative 3, Sales Manager 2. GEORGE L. KAUFFMAN General CMarch 155 Varsity Football 1, 2, 3, Track 1, 2, 31 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Squad Leaders' Club 1, 2, 3, Sports Club 1, 2, 3, Tumbling Squad 1, 2, 33 Home Room, Vice President 2. MAUDE A. KAUFFMAN Commercial CSeptember 215 Social Service Club 1, 23 Learn to Drive Club 3, Treasurer 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Home Room, President 3, Vice Presi- dent 2, Secretary 1. WILLIAM KAUFFMAN Vocational fAugust 269 Intramural Sports 1, 23 Science Club 3. ESTHER KAUFMAN General CAugust 305 Vocational Club 2, Knitting Club 2. BETTY JANE KAYLOR George-Deen CSeptember 175 World Friendship Club 1, 2g Entertainment Club 3g Orchestra 23 Intramural Sports 3. GEORGE LAWRENCE KAYLOR Vocational Uanuary 95 Ushers' Club 1, 2, National Students' Graphic Arts Club 2, 3, Vice President 3, Intramural Sports 1, Jay Vee Track Team 2. LOUIS EUGENE KAYLOR Academic Uanuary 133 Stamp Club 2, Chess Club 15 Band 3, Intramural Sports 1. A A. ROSEMARY KEARNS Academic CFebruary 20? Home Room, Vice President 2, Social Service Club 2, Treasurer 2, Forum Club 3. ELIZABETH JANE KEEN George-Deen CJune 145 A Cappella Choir 2, 3, World Friendship Club 2, Annual Show 2, 33 Needlework Club 3, Home Room, President 3, Learn to Drive Club 2, Vice President 2. GENEVIEVE A. KEHOE George-Deen Uanuary 233 Social Service Club 1, Girls' Glee Club 1, Knitting Club 2, Social Dancing Club 3, Home Room, Vice President 1, Secretary 2. CHARLES WARREN KEIRN General fJune 25 Intramural Sports 1, 35 Home Room, Sales Manager 1. VIRGINIA ELLEN KEITH Progressive CJuly 303 Corridor Patrol 2, Horseshoe Staff 2, 3, Horseshoe Club 2, 3, .Annual Show 1, 2, 3, A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Statesman- ship Club 35 Home Room, President 3. AUDREY MARIE KEMBERLING Commercial fMay 267 World Friendship Club 1, 25 Library Club 3, Iniramural Sports 1, 2. WILLIAM J. KENNEDY Vocational COctober 35 Ushers' Club 1. THOMAS B. KENNEY General fMarch 297 Track Club 1, 2, 35 Varsity Track 1, 2, 35 Jay Vee Football 1, 2, 3. Page Forty-six w. 4. L. Kern G. Kerstetter H. Kesselring R. Klbler H. Klmberljn M. Kimberlln H. Kimmel E. Kimmel M. Klnch VV. King E. Kinsel E. Kinsel E. Klslelnicki H. Klslelnlcki R. Kjellman S. Kleffman N. Klobetanz H. Klotkowski R. Knott M. Knouse G. Knox H. Koch B. Kocoloski A. Koll LOIS J. KERN General CJune 235 Social Service Club 1, 3, Knitting Club 2g Home Room, Repre- sentative 3. GENEVIEVE KERSTETTER Commercial fSeptember 305 Tap Dancing Club 13 Social Service Club 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2. HORACE D. KESSELRING General CSeptember 205 Dramatics Club 15 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. RITA A. KIBLER Commercial fApril 235 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Social Service Club 23 Entertainment Club 1, Travel Club 3, Library Club 13 Home Room, President 3. HERMAN F. KIMBERLIN Vocational fApril 175 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Art Metal Club 1, Model Airplane Club 3. MARGARET V. KIMBERLIN Progressive fDecember 245 Tumbling Club 2, 3, Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3, Squad Leaders' Club 2, 3. HAZEL ELIZABETH KIMMEL George-Deen iOcto- ber 275 Orchestra 1, 2, 3, Typing Club 3, Annual Show 1, 2, 3. M. ELIZABETH KIMMEL Commercial CSeptember 85 Tumbling Club 1, 2, 3, Squad Leaders' Club 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MARJORIE J. KINCH General COctober 195 World Friendship Club 1, 2, 33 Intramural Sports 3. WILLIAM K. KING Academic fJuly 285 Dance Orchestra 1, 2, 3, Leader 3, Band 1, 2, 3, Orchestra 1, 2, Annual Show 1, 23 Intramural Sports 13 All-District Band 2, 3, Home Room, President 3. EMMA R. KINSEL General Uune 135 Forum Club 2, Audubon Club 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. ESTHER N. KINSEL Progressive fMay 45 Knitting Club 1, Intramural Sports 1, Home Room, Attendance Represent- ative 3. EDWARD KISIELNICKI Vocational CFebruary 205 Camera Club lg Art Metal Club 2, Vice President 2. HENRY JOHN KISIELNICKI Vocational iApril 105 Art Metal Club 13 Vocational Safety Club 2, 3, President 2, 3, Home Room, Vice President 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. J. RICHARD KJELL- MAN Academic fJuly 85 Band 1, 2, 32 Orchestra 3, Intramural Sports 2, 3. SHANNON T. KLEFFMAN General CFebruary 125 Vivo Club lg Rifle Club 2, Physics Club 3. NORMAN LEROY KLOBETANZ General Uanuary 65 Squad Leaders' Club 2, 3, Vivo Club 2, Annual Show 1, 2. HELEN T. KLOTKOWSKI Commercial CJuly 185 Intramural Sports 2, 3, World Friendship Club 2, Annual Show 2. RAYMOND W. KNOTT General CJuly 115 Dance Orchestra 3, Drum and Bugle Corps 1, 2. MELVIN E. KNOUSE General Uanuary 145 Band 1, 2, 3, Trombone Choir 1, 2, 33 A Cappella Choir 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. GRACE ELEANOR KNOX George-Deen CSeptem- ber 135 World Friendship Club lg Social Dancing C.ub 2, 3, Annual Show 1, 25 A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2. HAZEL J. KOCH George-Deen CApril 305 Corridor Patrol 13 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, World Friendship Club 2, Newswriting Club 1, 2, Intramural Sports 1, 25 Needle Work Club 35 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2. BRUNO L. KOCOLOSKI General CSeptember 55 Intramural Sports 2, 3. ANNE R. KOLL Academic CAugust 75 World Friendship Club 1, Social Serv- ice Club 2, Travel Club 3. Page Forty-seven D. Koush M. La-mancusa M. Launi J. Kraus D. Kucharek J. Kuhn M. Kuhn H. Kunik M. Kurltzky V. Kwolek F. Lamb G. LaMoi-te M. Lang W. Lantz M. Laratonda D. Larnick E. Lalmchl R. Laws P. Lear Z. Leasure B. Lebo W. Leedy G. Leiden I. Leiden DOROTHY T. KOUSH Academic fAugust 267 Forum Club 1, 23 Go to College Club 3, Vice Presi- dent 33 Chemistry Club 23 Physics Club 33 Carnegie Museum Group 1, 2, 33 Compass Staff 3. JUNE KRAUS Commercial C.Iune 57 Typing Club 33 Travel Club 23 Intramural Sports 1, 23 Knitting Club 13 Home Room, President 2, 3. DOROTHY A. KUCHAREK Commercial Uanuary 207 Knitting Club 13 World Friendship Club 3. JAMES SAMUEL KUIIN General Uune 277 Intramural Sports 2, 3. MIRIAM RUTH KUI-IN General fFebruary 267 Social Service Club 1, 2, 33 Home Room, Representative 3. HELEN KUNIK General fApril 227 Tap Dancing Club 1. MIRIAM ANNE KURITZKY General CMay 217 Knit- ting Club 1, 23 Go to College Club 33 Home Room, Treasurer 1. VERNA FRANCES KWOLEK George- Deen CAugust 57 Travel Club 23 Go to College Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MARY ELIZABETH LAMANCUSA Academic fSeptember 57 Needlework Club 13 Social Service Club 23 Travel Club 33 Italian Club 1. FRED LAMB General fDecember 97 Band 1, 2, 33 Orchestra 2, 33 Model Airplane Club 3. GENEVIEVE ANN LA MORTE General fMay 287 Knitting Club 13 Go to Col- lege Club 23 Dramatics Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 23 Home Room, Secretary 1, Treasurer 1. MELANIA GERTRUDE LANG George-Deen fDecember 307 Knitting Club 13 World Friendship Club 2. WALTER JOHN LANTZ Progressive fSeptember 87 Corridor Patrol 2, 3. MARY LARATONDA Gen- eral CNovember 147 Knitting Club 13 Dramatics Club 23 Italian Club 2, 33 Corridor Patrol 33 Typing Club 33 Home Room, Treasurer 1. DORIS MARY LARNICK George-Deen fDecernber 207 Knitting Club 13 Social Dancing Club 2, 3. EDITH J. LAUNCHI Commercial Uanuary 267 Go to College Club 2, 33 Italian Club 2, 33 Home Room, Sales Manager 1, Vice President 3. MARY ANN LAUNI Conunercial Uuly 217 Social Service Club 23 Needlework Club 3. ROBERT EARLE LAWS Vocational CJanuary 187 Home Room, Secretary 33 Ushers' Club 1, 2, 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. PEARL EDITH LEAR General CAugust 207 Home Room, Vice President 2, President 33 Social Service Club 1, 23 Travel Club 3, Treasurer 3. ZETTA CAROLINE LEASURE Academic CAug- ust 97 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, President 33 Dramatics Club 13 Learn to Drive Club 2, President 23 Social Service Club 3. BETTY L. LEBO Commercial 4May 117 World Friendship Club 23 Typing Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Home Room, Representative 3. WILLIAM LEEDY General CMay 297 Rifle Club 33 Hi-Y 1, 2, 31 Squad Leader 2, 33 Jay Vee Basketball 13 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Home Room, Secretary 1, President 3. GERALDINE ANN LEIDEN General CMay 67 Learn to Drive Club 13 Social Service Club 23 Travel Club 33 Home Room, Treasurer 3. IRENE M. LEIDEN Academic CJuly 67 World Friendship Club 13 Social Service Club 23 Travel Club 33 Home Room, Sales Manager 3. Page Forty-eight A. Leonard G. Leonard J. Leonard M. Leonard M. Leonard E. Leoni L. Leopold S. Lingenfelter E. Linn M. Lettierl C. LeVa.n M. LeVan E. Lewis R. Liddle R. Lloy T. Lloy D. Little J. Little H. Lockard H. Logan B. Long ALBERT P. LEONARD Vocational CJanua.ry 213 Vocational Safety Club 33 Home Room, Vice President 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. GLENN RUSSELL LEONARD Academic CFebruary 213 Chem- istry Club 2, 3, Treasurer 23 Nature Observation Club 13 Track Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Track Team 33 Sophomore Tennis Champion 1. JOHN F. LEONARD Vocational fOctober 103 Uslrers' Club 2. MARGARET LEONARD Commercial lApril 133 Learn to Drive Club 13 Social Dancing Club 23 Forum Club 31 Intramural Sports 1, 33 Squad Leaders' Club 3. MARTHA LOUISE LEONARD Pro- gressive CJanuary 43 Girls' A Cappella Choir 13 A Cappella Choir 2, 33 Social Service Club 13 Forum Club 23 Annual Show 1, 2, 33 Horseshoe Club 3. ELVIRA E. LEONI Academic CJune 23 Social Service Club 33 Italian Club 23 Knitting Club 1. LOUIS E. LEOPOLD Progressive fDecember 193 Compass Staff 2, 33 Statesmanship Club 1, 32 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. JAMES LEORAS Commercial CMay 103 Rifle Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MICHAEL LETTIERI General CMarch 23 Italian Club 1, 2, 33 Traffic Patrol 2, 33 Squad Leader 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. CARL E. LE VAN Progressive fMay 23 Corridor Patrol 2, 33 Horseshoe Staff 33 A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Treasurer 33 Annual Show 2, 3. MARIA GERTRUDE LE VAN George- Deen CApril 193. EVA GERALDINE LEWIS George-Deen COctober 243 Learn to Drive Club 13 Needle- work Club 2, 3. RUTH ANN LIDDLE Academic CNovmber 83 Audubon Club 1. SARAH J. LINGEN- FELTER George-Deen CSeptember 183 Dramatics Club 13 Travel Club 23 World Friendship Club 33 Intramural Sports 1. ETIHEL ELIZABETH LINN George-Deen QDecember 163 Knitting Club 13 Social Dancing Club 2, 3. PHYLLIS LINN General fFebruary 43 Home Room, Secretary 13 Needlework Club 2. ROGER A. LIOY General CDecember 143 Safety Club 13 Intramural Sports 1, 2. THOMAS LIOY Vocational 4September 93 Safety Club 13 Kodak Club 3. DOROTHY A. LITTLE General Uanuary 23 Needlework Club 1, 2, 3. C. JANE LITTLE Progressive CJanuary 143 World Friendship Club 1, 23 Horseshoe Club 33 Horseshoe Staff 3. HELEN LEONE LOCKARD Academic COctober 43 Horseshoe Staff 2, 33 Horseshoe Club 2, 33 Quill and Scroll 2, 3, President 33 Girls' A Cappella Choir 2, 33 Annual Show 1, 2, 33 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, President 33 Dramatics Club 1. HELEN L. LOGAN Commercial Uanuary 33. BETTY J. LONG General CAugust 133 A Cappella Choir 2, 33 World Friendship Club 1, 2, 33 Annual Show 2, 33 Glee Club 1. BETTY JANE LONG General fJuly 193 Needlework Club 1, 2, 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 32 Squad Leaders' Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 23 Home Room, President 3. Page Forty-nine J. Leoras P. Linn B. Long N. Long E. Lower V. Lukens R. Long I-I. Longenecker F. Lopresti P. Lotz A. Louder A. Love J. Lowe A. Lowey J. Loyacona J. Lozlnak L. Lucas T. Luclana K. Luckner E. Lukens M. Luther J. Lykens T. Lynam M. Lynch M. Lytle G. McArthur K. McBumey NORMA LONG General iNovember 27 Corridor Patrol 23 Audubon Club 3. RICHARD LONG Gen- eral iAugust 217 Nature Observation Club 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Manager 1. HERBERT LONGENECKER Vocational CDecember 27 Art Metal Club 1. FRANK PAUL LOPRESTI Gerieral CMarch 57 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Italian Club 2, Forestry Club 3: Jay Vee Baseball 23 Ushers' Club 1. PAUL K. LOTZ Vocational fNovember 17 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Track Club 1, 2, 3, Track Team 1, 23 Jay Vee Football 15 Home Room, Secretary 1. ALMA LOUDER Academic 4December 197 Forum Club 1, World Friendship Club 2, Treasurer 23 Handicraft Club 3, Secretary 3, Annual Show 1, 2, 3, Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3. ARNOLD I-I. LOVE Vocational CJune 147 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Manager 2, 33 Sports Club 1, 2, Football Club 35 Varsity Football 1, 2, 3, Assistant Manager 1, 2, Manager 35 Track Team 29 Home Room, Secretary 1. ADELAIDE JEAN LOWE George-Deen fMarch 67 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Entertainment Club 1, Learn to Drive Club 25 Social Dancing Club 3. J. EVELYN LOWER George-Deen CAugust 107 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Handicraft Club 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Chemistry Club 2, 3, Knitting Club 1, 2, President 2, Home Room, Secretary 25 Girls League Honor Roll 25 Corridor Patrol 3. ANGELINE C. LOWEY Academic CNovember 27 Knit- ting Club 13 Social Service Club, 2, 31 Italian Club 2g A Cappella Choir 2, 33 Annual Show 2, 3, Home Room, Treasurer 3. JOSEPH LOYACONA General fAugust 97 Italian Club 2, Physics Club 3, Intra- mural Sports 2, 3g Home Room, Representative 3. JOHN LOZINAK Vocational fMay 257 Amateur Telegraphy Club 1. LE ROY LUCAS Vocational COctober 267 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. THEODORE E. LUCIANA General CDecember 257 Boys' Glee Club 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Treasurer 2. KATHERINE M. LUCKNER Progressive iOctober 47 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, Treasurer 2, Repre- sentative 33 Corridor Patrol 25 Entertainment Club 25 Learn to Drive Club 3, President 3. ERMA JEAN LUKENS George-Deen COctober 67. VERNA LUKENS General CMarch 67. MARIE LUTHER Commercial fFebruary 257 Knitting Club 1, Secretarial Club 2, Typing Club 3. M. JUNE LYKENS Commercial fFebruary 97 World Friendship Club 2, Secretary 2, Learn to Drive Club 35 Glee Club 1. THOMAS LYNAM General CSeptember 217 Football Manager 3, Mountain Echo Staff 35 Home Room, Representative 3. MARGARET LYNCH George-Deen CSeptember 157 Learn to Drive Club 1, 23 Knitting Club 3: A Cappella Choir 2, Annual Show. 2. MARJORIE LYTLE Commercial fDecember 87 Social Service Club 2, Handicraft Club 3, Girls' A Cappella Choir 1. GEORGE W. MCARTHUR Academic CMarch 87 Intramural Sports 2, 3. KENNETH S. McBURNEY Commercial fMay 307 Sports Club 23 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. Page Fifty H lg E. McCann R. McCarl N. McCartney R. McCartney J. McClain M. McClain N. McClellan R McClellan R. McComble W. McConahy H. McC0ol E. McCormick K. McCormick A. McCracken B. McCracken F McCready E. McCurdy J. McDonough D. McDowell R. McDowell R. McDowell M. McFadden C. McFarland M McGam-vey EDWARD B. McCANN General CApril 13 Home Room, President 3, Vice President 2, Secretary 1, Representative 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Hunting and Fishing Club 12 Agriculture Club 2, 33 Traffic Patrol 3. RICHARD L. McCARL Vocational 4May 243 Ushers' Club 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Representative 3. NANCY ELIZABETH McCARTNEY Academic CJune 103 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Dramatics Club 23 Travel Club 3g Annual Show 1, 2, 3. ROSELYN C. .McCARTNEY General fSeptember 163 Travel Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2. JOAN LILLIAN McCLAIN George- Deen CAugust 93. MAE M. McCLAIN Commercial CNovember 213 Social Service Club 2, 3, Secretary 2. NAOMI McCLELLAN George-Deen COctober 313 Home Room, Secretary 1, Treasurer 25 Tap Danc- ing Club 1, 2. ROBERT F. McCLELLAN Vocational KOctober 13 Intramural Sports 1, 25 Stamp Club 2, National Students' Graphic Arts Club 2, 3. ROSE MARY McCOMBIE Commercial CSeptember 153 World Friendship Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 3, Home Room, Sales Manager 2, Representative 3, Secretary 1. WILLIAM R. McCONAHY Commercial Uanuary 43 Track Club 1, 2, Track Manager 1, 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2. HELEN R. McCOOL Gen- eral CJanuary 13 Knitting Club 1, Social Service Club 2, 3. WILLIAM EUGENE llIcCORMICK General CJuly 233 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Squad Leaders' Club 3, Secretary 85 Radio Club lg Model Airplane Club 2, Track Club 3, Baseball 3. KENNETH R. McCORMICK Commercial fOctober 103 Statesman- ship Club 1, 3. M. ALBERTA McCRACKEN George-Deen iSeptember 213 Knitting Club 13 Needle- work Club 2g Handicraft Club 33 Home Room, President 2. BETTY EILEEN McCRACKEN George- Deen 1February 103 Knitting Club 13 Home Room, Treasurer 3, Attendance Director 3. FLORENCE OLIVE McCREADY Commercial CAugust 133 Social Service Club 2, 35 World Friendship Club 1. ETHEL N. McCURDY Commercial fFebruary 63 Girls League Honor Roll 1, 2, A Cappella Choir 1, Annual Show 13 Needlework Club 1, 3, Knitting Club 2. JOSEPH McDONOUGH Vocational CFeb- ruary 193 Intramural Sports 2, Home Room, Vice President 25 Mountain Echo Staff 2, 3, Art Editor 3. DALE W. McDOWELL Progressive Uune 163 Stagecraft Club 1, 2, 33 Home Room, Representative 3. RICHARD GORSUCH McDOWELL General 1March 243 Nature Observation Club 25 Geography Travel Club 3, Secretary-Treasurer 35 Intramural Sports 1. ROBERT E, McDOWELL General CJanuary 183 Handicraft Club 2, Jay Vee Football 1, 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MARY MARGARET McFAD- DEN General CMay 243 World Friendship Club lj Go to College Club 1, 2, Treasurer 15 Entertainment Club 3, A Cappella Choir 3. CALVIN A. MCFARLAND Vocational CNovember 243 Rifle Club 1, 2. MAY BELLE McGARVEY Academic CFebruary 93 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3, Annual Show 1, 2, 33 Social Service Club 15 World Friendship Club 2g Handicraft Club 3, Home Room, Representative 3. Page Fifty-one R. McGough O. McManamy W. Maier A. McGrain R. McGrath C. McGregor D. McGregor J. McGuire G. Mclutire R. Maclntyre E. McMlrm J. McMullen E. McNulty M. McQulllan R. Macedonia B. Madden E. Maggiore G. Makdad B. Malady M. Malagese R. Mangiacarne M. Marascia G. Marinuccl R. Marlett ROBERT L. McGOUGH Vocational fAugust 193 Track Club 1, 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. ARVILLA KATHRYN McGRAIN George-Deen C0ctober 183 Social Service Club 1, 2, 3. ROBERT McGRATH Academic CFebruary 133 Kodak Club 1. CHARLES C. McGREGOR Academic CDecem- ber 303 Boys Federation, Secretary 2, Skippers' Club 2, 3, Secretary 2, Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, Basketball 1, 2, 3, Stagecraft Club 1, 2, 3, Hi-Y 1, 2, 3, President 3, Annual Show 2, 3. DOROTHY R. McGREGOR Commercial fFebruary 223 World Friendship Club 2, Social Service Club 3. MARY JANE McGUIRE Progressive CSeptember 113 Horseshoe Staff 1, 2, 3, Assistant Edi- tor 3, Horseshoe Club 1, 2, 3, Traffic Patrol 2, 3, Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2. GRACE MARIE McINTIRE General Uanuary 93 Needlework Club 1, World Friendship Club 2. W. RUS- SELL MacINTYRE Academic CDecember 223 Band 1, 2, 3, Orchestra 2, 3, All-District Band 2, Squad Leader 2, Annual Show 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Dance Orchestra 2, 3. CARL E. McMANAMY Vocational tOctober 213. ELEANOR JEANNE McMINN General CF'eb- ruary 283 Audubon Club 1, 2, A Cappella Choir 3, Annual Show 3. JAMES P. McMULLEN General CAugust 223 Dramatics Club 1, Vivo Club 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. EUGENE C. McNULTY Vocational lDecember 193 Kodak Club 2, 3, President 3, Radio Telegraph Club 1. MARY LOUISE McQUILLAN George-Deen fSeptember 193. ROSE M. MACEDONIA George-Deen CSeptember 63 World Friendship Club 2, 3, Italian Club 1, 3, Intramural .Sports 1, 2, 3. BETTY JANE MADDEN Progressive CFebruary 253 Go to College Club 2, Needlework Club 3, Attendance Director 2, In- tramural Sports 2, 3. EVELYN THERESA MAGGIORE General COctober 293 Italian Club 2, 3, So- cial Service Club 1, Go to College Club 2, 3, Squad Leaders' Club 3, Needlework Club 2, Home Room, Sales Manager 2. WILLIAM C. MAIER Academic 4October 163 A Cappella Choir 3, Annual Show 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Stagecraft Club 1, 2, 3, Boys' Glee Club 2, Home Room, Treasurer, 2, Stage Crew 1. AMEENE GEORGE MAKDAD General CAugust 103 Band 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 2, Orchestra 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 2, A Cappella Choir 3, All-District Band 2, All-District Orchestra 1, Annual Show 1, 2, 39 HOIHG Room. Representative 3. BETTE CATHERINE MALADY Academic COctober 303 Knitting Club 1, Needlework Club 2. MARIE LOUISE MALAGESE George-Deen fJune 53 Knitting Club 1, Social Service Club 2, 3, Italian Club 1, Intramural Sports 1. ROSE MARIE MANGIACARNE Aca- demic CMay 53 Italian Club 2. MICHAEL A. MARASCIA General fJuly 43 Italian Club 2, 3, Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3. GRACE MARINUCCI Commercial CJuly 23 Tap Dancing Club 1, Learn to Drive Club 2, Secretary 2, Go to College Club 3, Italian Club 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, President 3. RUTH ANN MARLETT General CAugust 23 Social Service Club 3, Needle- work Club 1, Intramural Sports 2. Page Fifty-two C. Marschak R. Marschak E. Martella D. Martin J. Martin R. Martin K. Maruschak B Masciarelll H. Mastos P. Mathieu R. Mathieu J. Matley M. Matty L. Matulnes R. Mayer J Meadows R. Meckley J. Meckley P. Meehan J. Meek B. Mehaffle W. Mengle K. Mentch H Mentzer CHARLES F. MARSCHAK General Uanuary 337 Rifle Club 2, President 25 Corridor Patrol 25 Traffic Patrol 35 Stage Crew 2. RICHARD LANGI-IAM MARSCHAK Academic COctober 297 Jay Vee Football 15 Varsity Football 25 Home Room, Vice President 2, President 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Agriculture Club 3. ELEANOR C. MARTELLA Commercial QFebruary 115 Knitting Club 15 Social Service Club 35 Girls' Glee Club 15 Home Room, Attendance Director 1. DOROTHY M. MARTIN Commercial CSeptember 79 Dramatics Club 1, 25 Entertainment Club 3. JAIVLES EDWIN MARTIN General CAugust 22? Hunting and Fishing Club 25 Band 3. ROSELLA MARIE MARTIN Commercial CDecember 159 Travel Club 35 Intramural Sports 2. KATHERINE MARUSCHAK Commercial fApril 301 Dramatics Club 15 Typing Club 35 Home Room, President 35 Intramural Sports 15 Girls' Glee Club 1. BETTY MASCIARELLI Commercial CSeptember 165 Knitting Club 1, 2, Vice President 15 World Friendship Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 25 Social Dancing Club 2. HELEN A. MASTOS Commercial CNovember 151 Knitting Club 1, Vice President 15 Secretarial Club 3, Vice President 35 Home Room, Secretary 1, Attendance Director 2, President 3. A. PAULINE MATHIEU General CSeptember 235 Needlework Club 25 Social Service Club 3. RAYMOND F. MATHIEU Commercial fMay 315 Ushers' Club 1, 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Jay Vee Football 1, 2. JEANNE MATLEY Commercial CFebruary 111. MARY MATRY Academic CMarch 73 Dramatics Club 1, 2, 3, President 35 English Department Play 25 Class Secretary 35 Statesmanship Club 35 Traffic Patrol 35 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, President 3. LORRAINE C. MATULNES Commercial iSep- tember 287 Knitting Club 15 Social Dancing Club 3. ROBERT T. MAYER Vocational Uanuary 30? Agriculture Club 25 Ushers, Club 35 Intramural Sports 3. JOEL E. MEADOWS Vocational COctober 185 Art Metal Club 25 Art Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2. C. RAY MECKLEY Vocational CDecember 235 Handicraft Club 15 Track Club 2, 35 Varsity Track 1, 2, 35 Mathematics Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Vice President 2, President 3. JAMES O. MECKLEY General 4April 265 Band 1, 2, 35 Orchestra 35 Home Room, Vice President 2. PAUL MEEHAN General fMay 83 Nature Observation Club 2, 3, President 35 Home Room, President 3. ELLA JOAN MEEK Progressive CApril 79 Needlework Club 35 Corridor Patrol 25 Annual Show 1. BETTY RUTH MEHAFFIE General COctober 73 Orchestra 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. WILLIAM O. MENGLE Academic Uanuary 109 Track Club 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Mathematics Club 35 Jay Vee Football 2, 3. KENNETH MENTCH General Uanuary 239 Ushers' Club 1. HELEN KATHLEEN MENTZER Academic CDecember 147 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Knitting Club 1, 25 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. Page Fifty-three L. Merrltt C. Miller M. Miller LOUELLA MERRITT General CMarch 157 World Friendship Club 25 Science Club 25 Social Service Club 3. MARJORIE JANE MERROW General CDecember 87. DONALD D. METZGER Commercial Uanuary 157 Band 1, 25 Travel Club 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Drum and Bugle Corps 1. HAROLD M. MEYER Commercial iJuly 277 Home Room, Secretary-Treasurer 1, Sales Man- ager 25 Travel Club 15 Corridor Patrol 35 Intramural Sports 1, 3. MARY MICHAELS General CAugust 97 World Friendship Club 25 Intramural Sports 15 Annual Show 1, 25 Corridor Patrol 35 Social Dancing Club 3. JOSEPH LEONARD MIGNOGNA Vocational fOctober 57 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Ushers' Club 15 Italian Club 25 Physics Club 3. ALMA MAY MILLER General Uanuary 87 Social Service Club 15 Travel Club 35 Girls' A Cappella Choir 2. BESSIE MARGARET MILLER General CJuly 207 Knitting Club 1, 2, 3. CHARLOTTE L. MILLER George-Deen Uanuary 287 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Girls' A Cappella Choir 15 2, 35 Chemistry Club 2, 35 Social Service Club 2, 35 Learn to Drive Club 15 Hockey 25 Basketball 1, 2, 3. DAVID SAMUEL MILLER Academic fJune 47 Jay Vee Football 1, 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Kodak Club 1, 25 Sports Club 2. DONALD ROSS MILLER Academic Uanuary 317 Band 1, 2, 35 Nature Observation Club 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Secretary 1, 2. EDWIN W. MILLER Vocational CMay 167 Track Team 1, 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. JACK RAYMOND MIL- LER General iMarch 147 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Travel Club 25 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2. JOHN O. MILLER General fAugust 277 Boosters' Club 15 Intramural Sports 2. JOHN WILLIAM MILLER Academic CNovember 157 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Corridor Patrol 2. KEN- NETH T. MILLER Academic fDecember 207 Golf Club 1, Treasurer 15 Drum and Bugle Corps 15 Statesmanship Club 35 Intramural .Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, President 3. MARION LORRAINE MILLER General fMay 317 A Cappella Choir 15 Girls' A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Knitting Club 2. NORMA M. MILLER Commercial CDecember 167 Learn to Drive Club 15 Travel Club 35 Home Room, Vice President 2. ROBERT MILLER General Manu- ary 37 Ushers' Club 1, 2, 3, President 3. RUTH ELINOR MILLER Commercial CApril 197 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Dramatics Club 15 Travel Club 25 World Friendship Club 3. JOHN MILLIRON General CJuly 17 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MARJORIE lVL MILLS George-Deen CJune 137 Learn to Drive Club 25 Art and Craft Club 35 Intramural R. MILLS George-Deen fApril 257 Annual Show 15 Knitting Club 15 Friendship Club 25 Handicraft Club 35 Library Guard 15 Home Room, dent 2. CHARLES E. MILTON Commercial fDecember 227. Sports 1, 2, 3. MARYETTA Corridor Patrol 2, 35 World Representative 3, Vice Presi- M. Merrow D. Metzger I-I. Meyer M. Michaels J. Mlgnogna A. Miller B. Miller D. Miller D. Miller E. Miller J. Miller J. Miller J. Miller K. Miller N. Miller R. Miller R. Miller J. Milliron M. Mills M. Mills C. Milton F 3 i ,,, : . llix f "': . t,4f,325T'i HARRY MINSTER General fNovember 37 Intramural Sports 1. HELEN MARIE MIROBELLI Commercial CNovember 67 World Friendship Club 25 Travel Club 35 Intramural Sports 2. ANTHONY MISCIAGNA Progressive 4March 27 Art Club 25 Physics Club 3, Treasurer 35 Band 35 Home Room, Representative 3. PHILIP J. MISITANO Academic tJune 287 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Vivo Club 35 Baseball 25 Squad Leader 25 Home Room, President 3, Treasurer 1. WILLIAM G. MITCHELL Gen- eral iSeptember 237 Ushers' Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 2, 3. MARTHAJANE MOFFITT Progressive Uuly 297 Traffic Patrol 35 Go to College Club 35 Forum Club 2, Secretary 25 World Friendship Club 15 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Girls' A Cappella Choir 15 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. JACK MOORE Progressive CSeptember 137 Intramural Sports 1, 25 Hi-Y 2, 3, Vice President 25 Senate 1, 25 Statesmanship Club 35 English Department Pla.y 2, 35 Home Room, President 3, Secretary 15 Horseshoe Staff 1, 2, 3. PAUL D. MOORE General Uune 27 Ushers' Club 1, 35 Band 15 Home Room, President 3. PAULINE E. MOORE Academic fAugust 67' Social Service Club 15 Entertainment Club 2, 3, Secre- tary 25 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2. THOMAS C. MOORE General tJuly 187 Nature Club 1, 2, 3, Vice President 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MARGARET IRENE MORGAN Progressive Uanuary 27 Needlework Club 15 Go to College Club 25 Intramural Sports 2, 35 Corridor Patrol 35 A Cappella Choir 25 Future Teachers of America 35 Home Room, Secretary 1, Representative 3. G. JUNNE MORRIS George-Deen Uune 147 Dramatics Club 15 World Friendship Club 2, Vice Pres- ident 2. JEAN ANN MORRONE Comlnercial CMay 137 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. JOSEPH WEDDY MOSCHELLA Academic CJuly 167 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Vivo Club 15 Art Club 2. IDA MAE MOSES Commercial fJune 27 Knitting Club 15 Entertainment Club 25 Newswriting Club 2, 35 Mountain Echo Staff 2, 35 Compass Staff 25 Quill and Scroll 35 Social Service Club 35 Intramural Sports 1. SHIRLEY MOYER George-Deen CApril 157 Social Service Club 3. FRANK L. MURO Vocational CApril 47 Hunting and Fishing Club 15 Safety Club 2, 35 Mathematics Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. GERALDINE G. MURRAY Commercial COctober 257 World Friend- ship Club 2, 3, President 3. WILLIAM WALLACE MURRAY General COctober 187 Forestry Club 1, 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Basketball Manager 1. GERALDINE L. MUSSELMAN Commercial tJuly 87 World Friendship Club 2, 3, Treasurer 25 Glee Club 1. MARY ELIZABETH MUSSER Pro- gressive fJune 107 Orchestra 2, 35 Annual Show 2, 35 World Friendship Club 1, 2, 35 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 35 Newswriting Club 1, 2, 35 Treasurer 35 Quill and Scroll 3. GLENN THOMAS MYERS General CMarch 137 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. JOHN MYERS General CMay 317 Intramural Sports 1, 2. ORVIS G. MYERS Academic CJanuary 77 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Physics Club 3. H. Minster H. Mirobelli A. Mlsciagna P. Misltano W. Mitchell M. Moffltt J. Moore P. Moore T. Moore M. Morgan J. Morris J. Morrone W. Moschella. I. Moses F. Muro G. Murray W. Murray G. Musselman M. Musser G. Myers J. Myers P. Moore S. Moyer 0. Myers . .. , . i,qr,.7yj A1 I' P. Myers J. Nedimyer V. Nickola PAUL MYERS Vocational CJuly 115 Intramural Sports 2, 33 Sheet Metal Club 13 Hunting and Fishing Club 3. RICHARD T. NAGLE General CApril 125 Intramural Sports 2, 3, Safety Club 13 Dra- matics Club 1, 2. NELLIE MAE NALE General Uanuary 25. ROBERT VALENTINE NALE General CJune 165. ALEXANDER NAPERKOSKI Vocational CFebruary 225 Hunting and Fishing Club 1, 21 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. THERESA W. NARDELLA Commercial CMay 235 Social Service Club 1, 23 Secretarial Club 3, Home Room, Secretary-Treasurer 1, Sales Manager 35 A Capella Choir 1, 2, 33 Annual Show 1, 2, 3, Italian Club 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2. BETTY BELLE NEAL George-Deen CFebruary 45 Home Room, Treasurer 3, Vice President 2, Audubon Club 1, Learn to Drive Club 2. WALTER LEE NEARHOOF, JR. Commercial Uanuary 185 Kodak Club 1, 2, Vice President 2, Band 1, 2, 32 Home Room, Sales Manager 13 Archery Club 3, Dramatics Club 1. JOHN J. NEDIISIYER Progressive CNovember 185 Home Room, Representative 3. JANET LOUISE NEGLEY Progressive Uanuary 265 Social Service Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 23 Home Room, Attendance Director 2, 3. TESSIE NEGRI George-Deen CDecember 245. MILTON NEUMAN Academic fMay 155 Intramural Sports 1, Home Room, Secretary 2, Vice President 3g Safety Club 1, Boys Federation, Class Historian 3, Jay Vee Basketball 2, Varsity Basketball 3. JOHN FRANKLIN NEVITT General CJuly 15 Drum and Bugle Corps 1, 2, Home Room, Attendance Director 1, 2, Hunting and Fishing Club 2. JOHN NICHOLSON Vocational COctober 175. D. LOUISE NICKOL General 4April 265 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 25 A Cappella. Choir 2, 3, Corridor Patrol 35 World Friendship Club 1, Dramatics Club 2. HELEN M. NICKOLA General CDecember 225 Needlework Club 2, Social Service Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Annual Show 2, 3. VIRGINIA A. NICKOLA General iFebruary 215 Learn to Drive Club 1, 2, Vice President 1, 2, Social Service Club 35 Annual Show 2, Home Room, Treasurer 3. ETHEL RUTH NICOLACE George- Deen 4April 285. GEORGE NICOMEDE Academic CMay 205 Intramural Sports 3, Band 1, 2, Track Team 1, 2g Sports Club 2, Stamp Club 1, Vivo Club 3. HELEN P. NISEWONGER George-Deen 4March 45 Needlework Club 1, 2. RAYMOND E. NOBLE Progressive 4November 95 Horseshoe Staff 2, 35 Horseshoe Club 2, 3, College Club 23 Statesmanship Club 3, Secretary 33 A Cappella Choir 2. ALBERT NOLE General fNovember 265 Band 1, 2, President 1, Orchestra 1, 2, Secretary 15 Dance Orchestra 1, 2, 3, Trombone Choir 1, 2, Squad Leader 3. PAUL WILLIAM NORRIS General CAugust 245 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. PAULINE M. NORRIS George-Deen CAugust 245 Knitting Club 1. R. Nagle N. Nale R. Nale A. Naperkoskl T. Nardella B. Neal W. Nearhoof J. Negley T. Negri M. Neuman J. Nevitt J. Nicholson L. Nickol ll. Nickola R. Nicolace G. Nicomede I-I. Nisewonger R. Noble A. Nole P. Norris P. Norris CHALMER L. OAKES General CSeptember 145. CLARENCE ANDREW 0'DONALD General CJune 215 Intramural Sports 2, Track Team 2. BETTY JANE 0'DONNELL General Uanuary 135 Intramural Sports 1. MARJORIE 0'DONNELL General Uune 215 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, President 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. HARRY S. OLEWINE General CMarch 195 Safety Club 1, 2, 3, Street Patrol 1, 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. WILLIAM OLEWINE Com- mercial CJune 55 Cheerleader 2, 3, Boosters' Club 2, 3. TI-IELMA H. ORANGE General CMarch 95 Dramatics Club 2, 3, A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, Annual Show 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Representative 3. MARTIN ORNER Vocational CDecember 245 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Secretary 1. SALLY M. ORNER Academic fMarch 85 World Friendship Club 2, President 2, Travel Club 3, Learn to Drive Club 1. FRED ORR Commercial CMay 195 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. ROBERT GRANT ORR General fDecember 315 Rifle Club 1, 2. NICK J. ORSENA General CJanuary 315 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Baseball 1, 2, 3, Manager 1, 2, 3, Jay Vee Basketball 1, 3, Italian Club 3. ARTHUR OSTRANDER Commercial CJanuary 15 Jay Vee Football 1, Varsity Football 2, Annual Show 2, 3, Ushers' Club 1, 2, 3, A Cappella Choir 3, Boys' Choir 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. QUENTIN OTTO Vocational Uanuary 145 Hunting and Fishing Club 1, Home Room, Attendance Director 2. WARREN OVER Vocational CJune 15 Student Graphic Arts Society 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MARJORY MAE OWENS Academic CMay 135 A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Girls' A Cappella Choir 2, Annual Show 2, 3, Library Club 3, Home Room, Secretary 2. ALFRED PACIFICO General 4September 185 Sheet Metal Club 1, Secretary 1, Stagecraft Club 2, Vice President 2, Italian Club 2, President 2, Magic Club 3. LENA PHYLLIS PACIFICO George-Deen CJuly 25 Travel Club 2, 3, Social Service Club 1, Annual Show 1, 3, Home Room, Secretary 2, Italian Club 2, 3. BOBBINA PAGLIARA Commercial CJune 85 Social Dancing Club 2, Learn to Drive Club 2, Italian Club 2, 3, Needlework Club 1, Social Service Club 3, Intramural Sports 2, 3, Home Room, Treas- urer 2, Vice President 3. SHIRLEY ARLENE PALM Progressive CApril 175 Home Room, Secretary 1, Class Executive Committee 1, Class Secretary 2, Girls League, Secretary 3, A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Corridor Patrol 2, President 2, Horseshoe Staff 3, Chemistry Club 2. GIOVONNI PALMA Academic CMay 295 Italian Club 1, 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. PAUL M. PANNEBAKER Vocational COcto- ber 165. EMMA C. PANNONE Academic tFebruary 225 Audubon Club 1, Forum Club 2, Typing Club 3, Corridor Patrol 3, Newswriting Club 3, Mountain Echo Staff 3. JANET GERTRUDE PARKS George-Deen CAugust 205 Dramatics Club 1, 2, Learn to Drive Club 3. C. Oakes C. 0'Donald B. 0'Donnell M. 0'Dormell H. Olewine W. Olewine T. Orange S. Orner F. Orr R. Orr N. Orsena A. Ostrander Q. 0tto W. Over A. Pacifico L. Paclfico B. Pagllara S. Palm G. Palma P. Pannebaker E. Pannone M. Orner M. Owens J. Parks N.. Pasquino D. Pennington C. Pfeffer NICKOLA EUGENE PASQUINO Vocational fAugust 133 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. ANTHONY J. PASTORE Vocational CAugust 173. FLORENCE L. PATT Progressive Uanuary 13 Class Historian 25 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, President 3, Sales Manager 25 Traffic Patrol 35 Horse- shoe Club 2, 35 Class Treasurer 3. GERALDINE LOUISE PATTERSON Colnmercial Uanuary 123 World Friendship Club 2, 3, Vice President 25 Needlework Club 15 Girls League Honor Roll 1. ROBERT A. PATTON Progressive CApri.l 53 Horseshoe Staff 1, 2, 35 Horseshoe Club 2, 35 Hi-Y 2, 35 Boosters' Club 35 Quill and Scroll 3. ROBERT B. PATTON Academic CAugust 103 Home Room, Treasurer 3. MARION E. PAUL General CFebruary 123 Knitting Club 1, Secretary 15 Dramatics Club 25 Social Dancing Club 35 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, President 3. ROBERT H. PAUL General fAugust 23 Sheet Metal Club 15 Ushers' Club 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. DORIS MERCEDES PENNINGTON Commercial CApril 83 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Knitting Club 15 Travel Club 25 World Friendship Club 35 Home Room, Secretary 2, 3. BETTY PENNOCK Pro- gressive CDecember 73 Senate 1, 2, 3, President 35 Girls League, Vice President 25 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 25 Class Executive Committee 35 Corridor Patrol 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Horseshoe Staff 2. JON P. PENSYL Academic CSeptember 223 Class Treasurer 15 Art Club 3, Vice President 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Captain 35 Skippers' Club 3. ALEXANDER PEROVE Progressive CJanuary 293 Jay Vee Football 1, 2, 35 Basketball 15 Vivo Club 1, 25 Hi-Y 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Secretary 1. SHELDON PETERMAN Vocational COctober 123 Track Club 25 Intramural Sports 25 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2. GERTRUDE LILLIAN PETERSON Progressive CMay 273 Forum Club 1, 2, 35 Girls' A Cappella Choir 25 Annual Show 2. DANIEL A. PETTA General fJuly 53 Band 1, 2, 35 Italian Club 2, 3. HELEN EDITH PETTA Com- mercial CMay 273 Social Service Club 1, 25 Go to College Club 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 25 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 25 Italian Club 2, 3. CHESTER FREDERICK PFEFFER General 4February 83 Art Metal Club 25 Squad Leaders' Club 2, 35 Jay Vee Football 25 Varsity Football 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Football Club 35 Baseball 2, 35 Home Room, Vice President 2. JOHN ALBERT PFEFFER Commercial CSeptember 73 Stamp Club 15 Travel Club 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2. CLIFFORD A. PHEASANT, JR. Vocational iOctober 53 Home Room, Representative 3. JOHN ERNEST PHEASANT Vocational CMay 313 Drum and Bugle Corps 1, 25 Intramural Sports 2, 35 Track Manager 1, 25 Archery Club 35 Track Club 25 Home Room, Secretary 2. MAE MADELINE PHILLIPS General CMarch 73 Knitting Club 15 Travel Club 25 World Friendship Club 3. BARBARA MARIE PIELMEIER Commercial COctober 73 Squad Leaders' Club 3, Vice Presi- dent 25 Needlework Club 1, 35 Learn to Drive Club 2. ESTHER LOUISE PIERSON Progressive Uan- uary 33 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Girls' A Cappella Choir 15 Audubon Club 1'5 Chemistry Club 2, 35 Physics Club 35 Home Room, Secretary 3. HERMAN GEORGE PIETROLUNGO General CDecember 313 Art Club 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. A. Pastore F. Patt G. Patterson R. Patton R. Patton M. Paul R. Paul B. Pennock J. Pensyl A. Perove S. Peterman L. Peterson D. Petta H. Petta J. Pfeffer C. Pheasant J. Pheasant M. Phillips B. Pielmeier E. Pierson H. -Pletrolungo PAUL PINE Academic CAugust 183 Riile Club 13 Nature Observation Club 2, Intramural Sports 1, 23 Baseball 3. MARCELLA MARY PIOTROWSKI General CJanuary 183 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 31 Typing Club 3, Tumbling Club 3. JAMES PITTMAN Academic 4August 193 Band 1, 2, 33 Chess Club 2. ELSIE MLAY PLETCI-IER General COctober 253 Intramural Sports 2, Social Service Club 2, 3. GENEVIEVE GRACE PLETCHER Commercial CMarch 223 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Knitting Club 15 Social Service Club 3. STEFE M. PODGURSKI Commercial CDecember 203 Travel Club 3 5 Intramural Sports 1, Annual Show 1, 2, 33 Girls' Chorus 13 Girls' A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Home Room, Secretary 1. ALBERT POLIGNONE General CFebruary 213 Sheet Metal Club 1. BERNARD POLIGNONE Com- mercial CAugust 253 Art Metal Club 1. VERA LOUISE POLLARD General CFebruary 33 Travel Club 25 World Friendship Club 33 Knit- ting Club 1. ALBERT M. POMPA Vocational CMarch 53 Art Club 2, 35 Vivo Club 1, Vocational Safety Club 2. BETTY PORTA George-Deen CDecember 113 Learn to Drive Club 13 Typing Club 2, 35 Home Room, Vice President 2, Representative 3. H. FRANCES PORTA General CApril 273 Needlework Club 15 Learn to Drive Club 2, Social Service Club 3. ROBERT ARTHUR POWELL Vocational CJune 303 Future Craftsmen of America 1, 2, 3, Nature Observation Club 25 Intramural Sports 15 Home Room, Sales Manager 2. ROBERT S. PRICE Vocational fDBC6II1bBF 123 Student Graphic Arts Society 2, 3, Vice President 2, President 35 Intramural Sports 2, Home Room, Vice President 2, Attendance Di- rector 3. ANNA D. PROIETTA George-Deen Uuly 243 Social Service Club 2 5 Learn to Drive Club 33 Intramural Sports 2, 3. ROBERT R. PROSSER Commercial CAugust 203 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, Boys' Chorus 2, Annual Show 1, 25 Home Room, Secretary-Treasurer 2, Vice President 33 Safety Club 2, Vice President 2. MARILYN ROSELLA PROUGH George-Deen CFebruary 213 Dramatics Club 1, 3, Learn to Drive Club 2, Vice President 25 Home Room, Secretary 1. EVALYN JEAN PRYOR Progressive 4February 13 Girls' A Cappella Choir 15 A Cappella Choir 2, 33 World Friendship Club 13 Forum Club 23 Go to College Club 3, Secretary 3, Traffic Patrol 3, Annual Show 1, 2, 3. JOSEPH J. PUFKA Commercial fMay 113 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Varsity Baseball 2, 3. KI SANG QUAN Conrunercial CAugust 303 Stage- craft Club 1, 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. HELEN KATHRYN QUAY General CAugust 243 Knitting Club 15 Dramatics Club 2, Entertainment Club 3. WALLACE QUINN Progressive Uanuary 123 Art Metal Club 15 College Club 25 Mathematics Club 39 Compass Staff 2, Intramural Sports 1g Band 1, 2. RAYMOND QUIRIN Vocational Uuly 213 Forestry Club 1. MARY LERNEN RABER General Uanu- ary 63 Needlework Club 1, 2, President 23 Home Room, President 3, Secretary 2, Dramatics Club 3. P. Pine M. Piotrowski J. Pittman E. Pletcher G. Pletcher S. Podgurski A. Polignone B. Polignone V. Pollard A. Pompa B. Porta F. Porta R. Powell R. Price A. Proletta R. Prosser M. Prough E. Pryor J. Pufka K. Quan H. Quay WV. Quinn R. Quirin M. Raber 8, 1- ,Q E. Radwanskl B. Reader A. Reslg EUGENE JACK RADWANSKI Commercial COctober 179 Varsity Football Manager lg Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3, Sports Club 1, 2, Magic Club 33 Home Room, Secretary 1. RITA RAFFERTY Academic fMay 39 Social Service Club 19 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, Literary Editor 3, Quill and Scroll 3. IRENE V. RAIBLE General 4October 189 Knitting Club 1, 2, Attendance Office Force 2, 3. E. CATHERINE RAINELLI General iAugust 159 Needlework Club 23 Italian Club 33 Intra- mural Sports 1, 2. CHARLES B. RAMSEY General 4April 309 Rifle Club 1, 2, President 3, Hunting and Fishing Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Varsity Basketball 2, 33 Home Room, President 3. CYRIL A. RAMSEY Vocational CAugust 309 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 2, President 3, Varsity Football 1, 2, 3, Track Team 1, 2, 35 Intramural Sports 2, Sports Club 1, 2, 3. SHANNON WILLIAM RAMSEY Vocational QMay 289 Forestry Club 1, Intramural Sports 1, Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 25 Agriculture Club 2, Secretary 2. ELEANOR M. RANCK George-Deen fAugust 149 Needlework Club 1, Entertainment Club 23 Corridor Patrol 3. BETTY E. READER Commercial CMay 309 Learn to Drive Club 1, World Friendship Club 25 Typing Club 3. MARY JANE REDLINE Home Economics CFebruary 99 Dramatics Club 1, 29 Tumbling Club 2, 3, Squad Leaders' Club 3. NAOMI K. REED George-Deen fFebruary 209 Home Room, Treasurer 1, Secretary 2, Representative 3. RUTH REIGHARD Academic fOctober 79 Knit- ting Club 1, Social Service Club 2, Social Dancing Club 35 Annual Show 2, 31 Girls' A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Home Room, Treasurer 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. HUGH REILLY General CDecember 119 Intramural Sports 2, 3, Jay Vee Baseball 2, Ushers' Club 3. H. RUSSELL REIIVEER Vocational 1September 199 Art Club 1, Students' Graphic Arts Club 2, 3, Secretary-Treasurer 2, 3, Vocational Safety Club 2. LOIS EMILY REIMER General QAugust 219 Entertainment Club 1, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. WILLIAM W. RENNER Progressive Uanuary 49 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Sports Club 1. ANNA RESIG General CAugust 109 Intramural Sports 1, 2. ALICE L. RHODES General CAugust 129 Knitting Club, Vice President lg Social Service Club 2, Treasurer 2, Entertainment Club 3. DALLAS L. RHODES General CAugust 129 Sports Club 1, 23 Football Club 3, Baseball 2, 33 Jay Vee Football 1, 2, Varsity Football 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Home Room, President 3. DOROTHY RHODES Academic CApril 129 World Friendship Club 2, Social Service Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, Home Room, Sales Manager 1, 2, Attendance Director 3. RUTH S. RHODES General lSeptember 79 Knitting Club 15 Learn to Drive Club 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Secretary 1. DAVID C. RICE Commercial CMay 189 Mountain Echo Staff 1, Newswriting Club lg Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Band 1, 2, 3. FRANKLIN M. RICHARDS Vocational CMay 119 Radio Telegraphy Club 15 Art Club 25 Jay Vee Football 2, Physics Club 3. GERARD RICHERS General CSeptember 209. R. Rafferty I. Ralble Ralnelli C. Ramsey C. Ramsey Ramsey E. Rauck M. Redline N. Reed Reighard H. Reilly R. Reimer Reimer W. Renner A. Rhodes D. Rhodes Rhodes R. Rhodes D. Rice Richards G. Rlchers W ,3,, qv- f 1- JACK RICKABAUGH Commercial iApril 63 Dramatics Club 35 Stage Crew 1, 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2. ELMER RIDER CNovember 23 Hunting and Fishing Club 15 Nature Observation Club 2. DOROTHY MAE RIGAS General COctober 153 Forum Club 1, 25 Social Dancing Club 35 Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3. ETHEL JANE RIGG General CAugust 293 Needlework Club 1, 3, Secretary 1. ROY E. RIGGLE Vocational CMarch 153 Safety Club 15 Stagecraft Club 25 Football Club 35 Jay Vee Football 1, 25 Varsity Football 3. MAE RINER General iMay 183 Learn to Drive Club 1, 25 Forum Club 3. BETTY JANE RINGLER Commercial Uanuary 263. BEULA M. RINGLER Commercial CJanuary 263. CLYDE BLAIR RITCHEY General fJuly 13 Ushers' Club 1, 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. DOR- OTHY J. RITCHEY Academic CMarch 263 Class Treasurer 25 Girls League Vice President 35 Senate 35 Traffic Patrol 35 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Social Service Club 35 Forum Club 2. JAMES M. RITCHEY General CApril 223 Horseshoe Staff 1, 2, 3, Managing Editor 35 Horseshoe Club 35 Traffic Patrol 1, 2, 3, Floor Captain 35 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Quill and Scroll 35 Board of Publications 35 Statesmanship Club 2, 3, President 3. HOWARD DALE ROBB Academic CSeptember 193 Ushers' Club 15 Handicraft Club 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. ESTHER R. ROBERTAZZI Academic fDecember 33,Go to College Club 2, 3, Vice President 25 Intra- mural Sports 1. J. EDGAR ROBINSON Academic CNovember 283 Track Club 15 Handicraft Club 25 Intramural Sports 1. JOSEPI-IINE ZELDA ROBINSON General CFebruary 163 Knitting Club 13 Social Service Club 2, 3. BETTY JANE ROBISON General CMay 113 World Friendship Club 3. DORIS R. ROBISON George-Deen fOctober 273 Intramural Sports 25 Knitting Club 1, 2. MARGIE WINNIFRED ROBISON Commercial CDecember 73 Tap Dancing Club 15 World Friendship Club 25 Social Service Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2. MARGOT R. ROBISON General CNovember 173 Knitting Club 15 Needlework Club 2, 35 Home Room, Representative 3, Secretary 1. CHARLOTTE A. ROCKEL Progressive CJuly 273 World Friendship Club 15 Future Teachers of America Club 25 Needlework Club 35 A Cappella Choir 2, 3. ARTHUR ROCKEY Commercial fSeptember 33 Geog- raphy Club 25 Intramural Sports Manager 1, 2, 3. HELEN ELENORA ROLLASON General CApril 293 Dramatics Club 1, 2. JAMES MICHIAL RONAN Commercial CSeptember 193 Home Room, Sec- retary 1. GLORIA ROSSI Academic CFebruary 173 World Friendship Club 25 Home Room, Vice President 3. J. Rickabaugh E. Rider D. Rigas E. Rlgg R. Riggle M. Riner B. Ringler C. Ritchey D. Ritchey J. Ritchey D. Robb E. Robertazzl E. Robinson J. Robinson D. Robison M. Robison M. Robison C. Rockel A. Rockey H. Rollason J. Ronan B. Ringler B. Robison G. Rossi J. Roth D. Rupert J. Sawtelle JOHN G. ROTH Vocational CMarch 297 Safety Club 1, 2, 3, Street Safety Patrol 1, 2, 33 Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3. MILA J. ROUZER Academic fJuly 17 World Friendship Club 1, 2, Travel Club 3, Library Guard 2, 3. RICHARD CLAYTON ROUZER General Uanuary 287 Jay Vee Football 13 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Sports Club 1, 2, Home Room, Sales Manager 2, Treasurer 2. WILLIAM WALTER ROUZER General fFebruary 147 Track Team 1, Magic Club 1, Amateur Telegraphy Club 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. J. GREGG ROYER Progressive fSeptember 217 Horseshoe Staff 2, 3, Business Manager 33 Corridor Patrol 2, Statesmanship Club 3. NELLIE N. RUBINO Commercial fDecember 317 World Friendship Club lg Forum Club 2, Social Service Club 3. CHARLOTTE JAYNE RUDASILL George-Deen CApril 27 Home Room, Secretary 1, Treasurer 3, Knitting Club 1, 3, President 1, 3. RICHARD MERLE RUNYEON Academic CAugust 247 Stagecraft' Club 1, Drum and Bugle Corps 1, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. DOROTHY LORETTA RUPERT General fDecember 117 Learn to Drive Club 1, 2, President 29 Forum Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. ROBERT F. RUPP Vocational COctober 27 Track Team 1, 2, 33 Track Club 1, 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. JACK F. RUSSELL Academic CMay 17 Annual Show 1, 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Captain 2, 3, Home Room, President 33 Football 1, 2, 3, Squad Leader 1, 2, 3, Vivo Club 2, Vice President 2, Football Club 35 Basketball 1. PETE D. RUSSO Voca- tional Uune 277 Ushers' Club 1, 2, 33 Baseball 2: Intramural Sports 1, 2. EDITH T. RUTOLA Gen- eral lNovember 137 Travel Club 3, Needlework Club 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2. JOHN T. RYEN Vocational 1May 97 Safety Club 2, Intramural Sports 1. BEATRICE L. SANTILENA General CJuly 27 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 A Cappella Choir 3, Needlework Club 1, 2, Entertainment Club 3. ANTHONY SAVINE General CNovember 117 Vivo Club 1, 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Vice President 2, President 3, Physics Club 3, Vice President 3. JEANNE SAWTELLE Progressive CNovember 297 Social Service Club 1, 2: Newswriting Club 1, 2, 3, Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 3, News Editor 3, Traffic Patrol 3, Forum Club 3, Quill and Scroll 32 Home Room, Vice President 23 Intramural Sports 2. EDNA M. SAYLOR George-Deen 1November 17 Girls' Glee Club 1, Girls' A Cappella Choir 2, 33 Dramatics Club 1, Annual Show 1, 2, 3. LOUISE C. SAYLOR General fAugust 137 Embroidery Club 1, Library Club 3. ROBERT FRANK SAYLOR Vocational fNovember 267 Jay Vee Football lg Vivo Club 1, 2, 33 Vocational Safety Club 1, 2, Intra- mural Sports 1, 2. GRACE SCHADE General lMay 177 Orchestra 1, 2, 3, All-District Orchestra 25 Annual Show 1, 2. ALICE R. SCHANDELMEIER Commercial CMarch 57 Home Room, Representa- tive 3, Learn to Drive Club 1, Travel Club 2, Typing Club 3, Vice President 3, Girls League Honor Roll 1. DOROTHY N. SCHMELZLEN General CFebruary 257 Knitting Club 1. PEARL A. SCHMELZLEN Progressive Uanuary 197 Knitting Club lg Social Service Club 2, Typing Club 3, Intramural Sports 23 Home Room, Representative 3. M. Rouzer R. Rouzer W. Rouzer G. Royer N. Rubino C. Rudasill R. Runyeon R. RIIDP J. Russell P. Russo E. Rutola J. Ryen B. Santllena A. Savlne E. Saylor L. Saylor R. Saylor G. Schade A. Schandelmeler D. Schmelzlen P. Schmelzlen NORMAN ALFRED SCHMERBECK General CMarch 205 Track Club 1, 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1,'2, 35 Varsity Track Team 1, 2, 3, Home Room, President 3. FRANK SCHMID General tOctober 75 Sheet Metal Club 1, Treasurer 3. THERESA SCHMID George-Deen Uune 35 Learn to Drive Club 13 Social Service Club 2, World Friendship Club 3, President 35 Home Room, Vice President 2, 3. LOUIS CHARLES SCHMITT Vocational lMarch 55 Sports Club 1. WILLIAM A. SCHOLL Academic CDecember 145 Band 1, 2, Altoona High School Tennis Champion 3, Home Room, Presi- dent 3, Corridor Patrol 2. ROBERT SCHRAFF Vocational CSeptember 265 Boosters' Club 2, 3, President 3, Intramural Sports 2, 3, Manager 33 Cheerleaders' Club 1, 2, 3. ROBERT E. SCHREIBER Vocational Uanuary 245 National Students Graphic Arts Club 2, 3, President 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Sales Manager 2, Representative 3. LORRAINE SCHUI-I General CJuly 245 Social Service Club 1, Learn to Drive Club 25 World Friendship Club 3. ISADORE J. SCHWARTZ General CSeptember 225 Newswriting Club 1, 2, Physics Club 33 Acad- emy of Science 1, 2, 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2. RUTH SCI-IWARTZ Commercial fSepternber 155 Social Service Club 3. HARRY SCHWARTZBART Progressive Uanu- ary 35 Newswriting Club 1, 2, 33 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 3, Associate Editor 35 Academy of Science 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 3, Chemistry Club 2, 3, Orchestra 2, 3, Annual Show 2, 33 Quill and Scroll 2, 3. BRUCE A. L. SEABERG Vocational CAugust 25 Camera Club 2, 33 Home Room, Attendance Of- ficer 3. WILLIAM GLEN SEESE Vocational 4July 295 Ushers' Club 1, 2, 3. GLENROSE SEIGLE General Uanuary 195 A Cappella Choir 3. G. RAYNOLDS SELDERS Academic CJuly 15 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3, Band 1, 2, Annual Show 1, 2, 33 Boosters' Club 3. SHIRLEY SENDER Progressive CSeptember 35 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 3, Feature Editor 2, Editor-in-Chief 3, Newswriting Club 1, 2, 35 Senate 35 Dramatics Club 1, Forum Club 2, Treasurer 25 Quill and Scroll 2, 3, Secretary 3. DOROTHY EVELYN SEWALL Academic CJune 185 Home Room, President 3, Horseshoe Staff 2, 3, Girls League Honor Roll 1, Horseshoe Club 2, 3, Library Club 1. JANE PATTERSON SEWARD Academic fJuly 155 World Friendship Club 1, Dramatics Club 2, Go to College Club 3, Home Room, Vice President 2, Representative 3, A Cappella Choir 1, 25 Annual Show 1, Traffic Patrol 3. JOSEPH J. SGRO General Uanuary 245 Band 1, 2, 3. LLOYD S. SHADE Vocational CMarch 265 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. WALTER G. SHADE General Uune 265. WILBERT DWAYNE SHADE Vocational CFebruary 95 Boy Scout Club 2. BETTIE JANE SHAFFER Commercial CMay 115. FLORA EMILY SHAFFER Commercial iJune 265 Home Room, Secretary 1. N. Schmerbeck F. Schmid T. Schmid L. Schmitt W. Scholl R. Schraff R. Schreiber I. Schwartz R. Schwartz I-I. Schwartzbart B. Seaberg W. Scese G. Selgle R. Seldcrs D. Sewall J. Seward J. Sgro L. Shade VV. Shade W. Shade B. Shaffer L. Schuh S. Sender F. Shaffer P. Shaffer L. Sherman J. Shiro R. Shaffer F. Shaner M. Sfharer A. Shaw E. Shaw P. Shaw E. Sheraw M. Shields M. Shields W. Shields W. Shlffler N. Shlifler B. Shiplett M. Shlrk D. Shoemaker M. Shope R. Showalter E. Shultz C. Slegler P. Simms J. Simpson PAUL SHAFFER General fJuly 87 Band 1, 2, Orchestra 1, 2, Intramural Sports 2. RICHARD E. SHAFFER Academic CSeptember 113 Home Room, President 3. FRANCIS IVES SHANER Aca- demic fJuly 159 Track Club 1, 2, 3, Track Team 1, 2, 3, Squad Leader 2, 3, Home Room, Treasurer 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. MIRIAM C. SHARER Commercial CJuly 83 Senate 3, Stenographer 3, Home Room, Vice President 2, Tumbling Squad 2, 3, Squad Leaders' Club 2, 3, Corridor Patrol 3, Dramatics Club 1, 2. ARIEL R. SHAW Vocational CFebruary 153. ELIZABETH JANE SHAW General CFebruary 139 Girls' Glee Club 1, World Friendship Club 1, Learn to Drive Club 2, Treas- urer 2. PATRICIA B. SHAW Progressive CNovember 193 Forum Club 2, President 2, Go to College Club 3, Vice President 3, Compass Staff 2, 3, Editor 3, Senate 3, Annual Show 1, 2, 3, A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Sales Manager 2, World Friendship Club 1, Secretary 1. ETHEL F. SHERAW Progres- sive CMarch 105 Senate 1, 2, 3, Secretary 2, Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Annual Show 1, 2, 3, Horseshoe Club 2, Horseshoe Staff 2, Statesmanship Club 3, Home Room, Treasurer 2, Secretary 1. LEOLA MAXINE SHERMAN Commercial CAugust 13 Knitting Club 1, Social Service Club 2, Typing Club 3. MARGARET J. SHIELDS General CFebruary 125 Tap Dancing Club 1, Learn to Drive Club 2. MARTHA SHIELDS General CMay 155 Needlework Club 2. WINIFRED A. SHIELDS General CFebruary 225 Orchestra 1, 2, 3, Annual Show 1, 2, 3, A Cappella Choir 1, Home Room, Sec- retary 2, 3. WARREN ELWOOD SHIFFLER Vocational CNovember 29? Ushers' Club 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Vice President 1, Attendance Director 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. NEIL F. SI-IIFFLER Academic CAugust 153 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Vivo Club 1, Sports Club 2, Class Executive Com- mittee 1, Basketball Manager 1, 2, Home Room, Secretary 1. BETTY VIRGINIA SHIPLETT George- Deen fMay 205 Intramural Sports 1, 2, Knitting Club 1, World Friendship Club 2, Needlework Club 3, A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Annual Show 2. MARIAN MAE SHIRK General CJune 97 Intramural Sports 1, Learn to Drive Club 1, Travel Club 2, Typing Club 3. JAMES W. SHIRO General CDecember 247 Home Room, Secretary 3. DONALD K. SHOE- MAKER General CJanuary 15 Physics Club 3. MILDRED SHOPE General CMarch 155 Learn to Drive Club 2, Secretary 2, Dramatics Club 1, Social Dancing Club 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Squad Leaders' Club 3. RUTH C. SHOWALTER George-Deen CSeptember 13? Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Home Room, Treasurer 2, Needlework Club 1, Dancing Club 2. EDITH CATHARINE SHULTZ George-Deen fFebruary 117 Knitting Club 1, World Friendship Club 2, Annual Show 1, 2, 3, Handi- craft Club 3, A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3. CHARLES JOHN SIEGLER Vocational CAugust 279 Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3. PAUL E. SIIYUVIS General CApril 105 Art Metal Club 1, Intramural Sports 1, Vivo Club 3, Home Room, Attendance Director 3. JOHN S. SIMPSON Academic CMarch 263 Stage- craft Club 1, 2, 3. Page Sixty-four pf R. Simpson A. Sinisi R. Slpe R. Slagle A. Slee H. Slogenhop D. Smawley I-I. Smith P. Smith R. Smith C. Smithmyer L. Smithoover A. Snavely S. Snoberger L. Snyder M. Snyder R. Snyder W. Snyder D. Sonefelt A. Surge V. Sorge ROBERT SIMPSON Progressive CApril 33 Ushers' Club 13 Chemistry Club 23 Physics Club 3, President 31 Home Room, Vice President 23 Corridor Patrol 2, 3, Senate 2, 3. ANTHONY SINISI Vocational fJuly 313 Safety Club 1, 2, 33 Safety Patrol 1, 2, 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. ROTH F. SIPE Academic Uanuary 93 Rifle Club 2, 35 Ushers' Club 11 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. WILLIAM ROY SLAGLE Progressive CJanuary 83 Physics Club 3, Drum and Bugle Corps 1, 23 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Horseshoe Staff 3g Home Room, Treasurer 1, Vice President 2. ANNE MARIE SLEE General CMarch 253 Learn to Drive Club 1. HARRY A. SLOGENHOP Vocational Uanuary 123 Intramural Sports 2, 33 Home Room, Vice President 3. DONALD L. SMAWLEY Vocational CJuly 243 Forestry Club 1, Track Club 25 Hunting and Fishing Club 3. DOROTHY M. SMITH General CMay 133 Intramural Sports 1. HORACE B. SMITI-I Academic CMarch 63 Home Room, Representative 35 Track Club 2, 3, Man- ager 2, 3g Band 1, 2, Chess Club 1. PAUL SMITH Commercial CMarch 63 Vivo Club 1. ROBERT MELVIN SMITH Progressive CJuly 83 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3 3 Track Club 25 Jay Vee Basketball 25 Forestry Club lg Corridor Patrol 1, 25 Traffic Patrol 3. CHARLES JOSEPH SMITHMYER Vocational Uanuary 83 Ushers' Club 1, 23 Track Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, President 33 Varsity Track Team 1, 2, 3. LEONA SMITHOOVER Commercial CJuly 233 Learn to Drive Club 13 Social Dancing Club 3, Home Room, President 3. ADA FERN SNAVELY Commercial COctober 183 World Friendship Club 25 Social Dancing Club 33 Girls League Honor Roll 1. SARAH K. SNOBER- GER General CDecember 253 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 39 Social Service Club 1, 2 5 World Friendship Club 3. MARY EVELYN SNYDER General CMarch 273 Knitting Club 21 World Friendship Club 33 Needlework Club 1. LORRAINE SNYDER Commercial COctober 113 Knitting Club 1, 33 World Friendship Club 3. Vice President 3, Social Service Club 2. MARIAN VIRGINIA SNYDER George-Deen fAugust 123 A Cappella Choir 2, 3, Annual Show 1, 2, 3, Girls' A Cappella Choir lg Knitting Club 15 World Friendship Club 2, Handicraft Club 3. ROY B. SNYDER General Uune 153 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Magic Club 15 Track Club 31 Hi-Y 3. WILLIAM SNYDER Vocational CAugust 63 Intramural Sports 1, 23 Art Club 1, Boosters' Club 2, Physics Club 3. DONALD SONEFELT Vocational CMarch 33 Boosters' Club 1, 2, 33 Cheerleaders' Club 1, 2, 32 Home Room, Treasurer 1, Representative 3. ARTHUR L. SORGE General fMay 243 Varsity Track Team 1, 2, 3, Sports Club 1g Track Club 2, 33 Jay Vee Football 1, 2. VIRGIL P. SORGE Academic CMay 183 Sports Club 1, 23 National Students' Graphic Art Society 2, 3, A Cap- pella Choir 3. HAROLD RAY SOYSTER Academic CMay 193 Magic Club 3: Corridor Patrol 2, 3. Page Six ty-five D. Smith M. Snyder I-I. Soyster E. Spearlng W. Staufter J. Stoke . Af .el 5 'W I A ' Q l . A 5 . - kk4.k .. Z1 , ? E:' 5 , , A tzz- M , . 5' H. Speece S. Speece G. Spencer J. Spinazzola. 0. Sponsler G. Sprlngman F- StaDlet0ll K. Stein J. Stewart J. Stewart R. Stewart L. Stiifler M. Stine H- Stitt C. Stoufler W. Stofufler J. Stout E. Straesser L. Straw B. Strawmlre B. Strayer JAMES EARL SPEARING Vocational COctober 255 Future Craftsmen of America 1, 2, 3, Secretary 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2. HELEN SPEECE George-Deen CFebruary 165 Social Service Club 25 Home Room, Representative 3. SARA JANE SPEECE Cornmercial CJanuary 29 Knitting Club 1: Needlework Club 25 Typing Club 3. GEORGE T. SPENCER Vocational CMarch 275 Future Craftsmen of America 3. JULIA SPINAZZOLA George-Deen CMarch 127 Social Service Club 25 Learn to Drive Club 35 Intra- mural Sports 1, 2. OTTO A. SPONSLER Vocational Uanuary 73 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Ushers' Club 1, 25 Squad Leaders' Club 1, 35 Agriculture Club 1. GERARD FRANCIS SPRINGMAN General fJuly 203 Safety Club 2. FRED A. STAPLETON Vocational tAugust 227 Home Room, Attendance Director 35 Chess Club 1, 2. WILBUR J. STAUFFER Progressive CDecember 63 Art Club 3. KIRK STEIN Academic CMarch 93 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Traffic Patrol 2, 35 Sports Club 1, 25 Squad Leaders' Club 35 Track Club 1, 2. JACK ROWAN STEWART General Uanuary 295 Varsity Football 35 Jay Vee Football 25 Annual Show 1, 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Varsity Basketball 35 Stagecraft Club 1, 25 Football Club 3. JUDITII LOUISE STEWART Home Economics CJune 185 Girls' A Cappella Choir 25 A Cappella Choir 35 Knit- ting Club 35 Annual Show 35 Home Room, Vice President 2, President 3. RICHARD WILLIAM STEW- ART Vocational CFebruary 157 Intramural Sports 15 Home Room, Representative 3, Vice President 2, 3. LLOYD E. STIFFLER Progressive fDecember 171 Art Metal Club 1, Secretary 15 Forestry Club 2: Statesmanship Club 35 Corridor Patrol 35 Dramatics Club 2. MORTON M. STINE General CJune 83 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 3. HAROLD GLENN STITT Academic CAugust 83 Forestry Club 1, 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. GLORIA JEANNE STOKE Academic fAugust 259 Annual Show 1, 25 Forum Club 2, Treasurer 25 Home Room, Sales Manager 2, Vice President 25 A Cappella Choir 35 Girls League Honor Roll 1, 25 Go to College Club 35 Corridor Patrol 2, 3. WILLIAM CHARLES STOUFFER Vocational Uanuary 203 Stagecraft Club 1, 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 25 Vocational Safety Club 1. WILLIAM STOUFFER Academic CMay 245 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Manager 1, 25 Jay Vee Football 1, 25 Varsity Football 35 Annual Show 1, 25 Squad Leaders' Club 1, 2, 3. JANE LUCILLE STOUT Academic CAugust 313 Annual Show 1, 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Library Club 15 Mathematics Club 15 Dramatics Club 15 Corridor Patrol 3. EMILY M. STRAESSER General CJune 65 Knitting Club 1, Secretary 15 Social Service Club 2, 3. LOGAN ROSS STRAW Commercial CAugust 37 Stamp Club 15 Kodak Club 35 Intramural Sports 15 Home Room, Vice President 3. BETTY C. STRAWMIRE Progressive fNOV6II1bSF 259 Audubon Club 1, 25 A Cappella Choir 35 Horseshoe Staff 35 Horseshoe Club 35 Intramural Sports 2, 3. BETTY E. STRAYER General CNovember 295 Intramural Sports 1. Page Sixty-six M. Streight M. Stroh D. Strohman D. Strohmyre B. Suckling I-I. Suckling R. Summers W. Sunday F. Sutter B. Sutton W. Swan P. Swartz H. Sweeney R. Swope M. Taylor R. Taylor 0. Tedeschi H. Tharp W. Thayer A. Thomas F. Thompson V. MAY STREIGHT General CMay 137 World Friendship Club 2, 3. MARY JANE STROH General fSeptember 117 World Friendship Club 1. DON D. STROHMAN Commercial CMay 257 Band 1, 2, 35 Handicraft Club 1. DOLLIE MAE STROHMYRE Academic 4August 287 Annual Show 1, Knitting Club 1g Glee Club 13 Home Room, Secretary 1, President 3. BETTY JANE SUCKLING George-Deen fAugust 297 Knitting Club 1, 25 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 3, Annual Show 1, 2, 33 Orchestra 2, Travel Club 3. HARRIET SUCKLING George-Deen CJune 27. ROBERT R. SUMMERS General CMay 247 Rifle Club 1, 2, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. VIRGIL SUMMERS Progressive CMay 37 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Track Club 2, 33 Ushers' Club 13 Cross Country 2. WILLIAM WALKER SUNDAY Progressive fSeptember 297 Band 1, 2, 3, A Cappella Choir 2, 33 Dance Orchestra 31 Annual Show 2, 3, Home Room, President 3, Boys' Chorus 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Kodak Club 2. FREDERICK SUTTER Academic fSeptember 297 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Sports Club 13 Nature Observation Club 35 Home Room, Secretary-Treasurer 2. BETTY LOU SUTTON General fNovember 37 Social Service Club 25 World Friendship Club 3. WILLIAM BLAIN SWAN Vocational Uanuary 297 Rifle Club 15 Hunting and Fishing Club 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. PAUL A. SWARTZ Academic CJuly 127 Ushers' Club 1, Track Club 2, Physics Club 33 A Cappella Choir 2, 33 Track Team 2. HARRY EDWARD SWEENEY Academic CJanuary 37 Hunting and Fishing Club 1, Rifle Club 2, 3, Vice President 2, President 33 Intramural Sports 1, 2. ROBERT CHARLES SWOPE Progressive CSeptember 217 Varsity Track Team 1, 2, 35 Varsity Cross Country 1, 2, 35 Track Club 1, 2, 33 Intramural Sports 2, 3. JOHN L. TALBOT Vocational CApril 17 Vocational Safety Club 13 Kodak Club 2. MARTHA JANE TAYLOR Progressive iDecember 47 Chemistry Club 3, Secretary 3, Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 3, Traffic Patrol 2, 3, Newswriting Club 1, 2, Forum Club 2, 3, Physics Club 3, Sec- retary 35 Class Executive Committee 2, Academy of Science 3. ROBERT E. TAYLOR Vocational CMarch 297 Intramural Sports 13 Home Room, Secretary 1. OLIVIA TEDESCHI Commercial KNO- vember 67 World Friendship Club 2, Social Service Club 3. HELEN MARIE THARP Commercial CSeptember 67 Needlework Club 1, Astronomy Club 23 Social Dancing Club 3, Home Room, Repre- sentative 3. WILLIAM H. THAYER, JR. Vocational CJuly 107 Track Club 1, 2, 33 Safety Club 1, Track Team 1, 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, Cross Country 2. AUDREY J. THOMAS General CAugust 267 Knitting Club 1, Traffic Patrol 3. FLORENCE LOIS THOMPSON George-Deen CApril 197 Learn to Drive Club 1, Knitting Club 2. WILLIAM RICHARD THOMPSON Academic CApril 207 Varsity Football 1, 2, 3, Captain 3, Traffic Patrol 2, 3, General Captain 33 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 29 Track Team 2, 3, Senate 3, Sports Club 1, 2, Secretary 1, Football Club 3, Hi-Y 1, 2, 3. Page Sixty-seven V. Summers J. Talbot R. Thompson L. Titus L. Tromm B. Vaughn it 0 D V .aaa A. Tornatore J. Treese Z. Tremmel P. Trimarco R. Trindel L. Trivelas H. Tromm l-I. Troutwein A. Turchetta V. Umbower M. Utley I-I. Valentino J. Vance I-I. Van Tries M. Vaughn R. Vaughn J. Veit J. Veleno O. Ventre A. Ventresca B. Volk LOUISE ANN TITUS Commercial fMarch 55 Social Service Club 15 Travel Club 2, Vice President 25 Geography Club 25 World Friendship Club 3. ANDREW A. TORNATORE General CMarch 95 Magic Club 1, 25 Italian Club 35 Intramural Sports 1. JOHN A. TREESE General CMay 295 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Hunting and Fishing Club 1, Secretary 15 Chess Club 25 Stagecraft Club 35 Boys' Glee Club 25 Drum and Bugle Corps 1. ZITA J. TREMMEL Com- mercial CDecember 95 Home Room, President 3, A'tendance Director 35 Horseshoe Staff 3. PHILIP DONALD TRIMARCO General fMay 215 Vivo Club 15 Italian Club 2. RITA MARIE TRINDEL Gen- eral Uanuary 205 Learn to Drive Club 2, Vice President 25 Forum Club 3. LULU CARY TRIVELAS Commercial fMay 165 Typing Club 3, President 35 Intramural Sports 15 A Cappella Choir 25 Girls' A Cappella Choir 15 Annual Show 1, 25 Home Room, Secretary 1. HAROLD F. TROMM General CNovem- ber 275 Vivo Club 15 Sports Club 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Jay Vee Football 1, 25 Varsity Football 35 Football Club 35 Home Room, Vice President 2, Attendance Director 3. LA RUE M. TROMM General CJune 245 Knitting Club 1, 2, Secretary 15 Travel Club 3, President 35 Dramatics Club 1. HELEN L. TROUTWEIN George-Deen CJune 85 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Needle- work Club 15 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Newspaper Club 25 Chemistry Club 2. ARTHUR CHARLES TUR- CHETTA General CNovember 205. VIOLET ELIZABETH UMBOWER Academic 1June 25 Social Serv- ice Club 15 Travel Club 25 Geography Club 25 World Friendship Club 35 Home Room, Attendance Di- rector 3. MARY UTLEY General Uanuary 285 Knitting Club 15 Needlework Club 2. HELEN A. VAL- ENTINO General CSepte1-nber 145 Learn to Drive Club 15 Travel Club 2, 3. JAMES H. VANCE Voca- tional CAugust 45 Stagecraft Club 1, 2, Vice President 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Manager 35 Track 1. HOWARD A. VAN TRIES Vocational CMay 295 Chess Club 2, 35 Track Club 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Track Team 2, 3. BETTY JANE VAUGHN General 4October 75 Knitting Club 15 Needlework Club 25 Social Service Club 35 Home Room, Vice President 2, Representative 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2. MILDRED JUANITA VAUGHN General CApril 135 Knitting Club 15 Needlework Club 2, 3. ROSE K. VAUGHN George-Deen fFebruary 235. D. JOYCE VEIT George-Deen CMarch 95 Knitting Club 15 World Friendship Club 2. JOAN NANCY VELENO General CMarch 215 Social Dancing Club 2, Secretary 25 Italian Club 1, 2, 35 Learn to Drive Club 15 Forum Club 3. CARMELLA LOUISE VENTRE Progressive COctober 85 Social Service Club 35 Audubon Club 1, 25 Physics Club 35 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2. ARTHUR VENTRESCA General fJune 225 Home Room, President 25 Varsity Football 1, 2, 35 Varsity Baseball 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Football Club 1, 2, 3. BETTY M. VOLK Academic CDecember 245 Home Room, Representative 35 Future Teachers of America Club 25 Intramural Sports 1, 25 Social Dancing Club 3. Page Sixty-eight l C. Wagner E. Wagner G. Wagner P. Wagner W. Wagner W. Walker H. Ward J. Warner V. Warsing V. Wa.:-sing I. Watson I-I. Watson J. Watson W. Watters R. Weakland R. Weamer R. Weamer J. Weaver S. Webb D. Wehrle V. Weible CHARLES W. WAGNER Vocational CMarch 207 Golf Club 13 Track Team 2, 3. EVELYN G. WAGNER Academic CApril 167 Home Room, Treasurer 33 Girls League Honor Roll 13 A Cappella Choir 1, 23 World Friendship Club 23 Knitting Club 13 Learn to Drive Club 3. GERALD S. WAG- NER Academic CApril 237 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Sports Club 1, 23 Jay Vee Football 13 Forestry Club 33 Squad Leaders' Club 1, 23 Annual Show 13 Home Room, Vice President 2, President 3. PHYLLIS WAGNER Commercial fApril 217 Needlework Club 23 Intramural Sports 1, 23 Home Room, Vice President 2, 3. W. WILLIAM WAGNER Progressive CFebruary 207 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 33 Annual Show 23 Dramatics Club 1. WILLIAM G. WALKER General CJune 117 Hunting and Fish- ing Club 1, 2. HELEN LOUISE WARD Commercial CSeptember 217 Knitting Club 13 Needlework Club 23 Social Service Club 33 Geography Club 2. WILLIAM H. WARD General CFebruary 137 Track Team 1, 23 Track Club 2, 33 Home Room, Secretary 13 Sports Club 1. JOHN W. WARNER General iAugust 57 Chess Club 13 Home Room, Representative 33 Corridor Patrol 33 Mountain Echo Staff 33 Rifle Club 2. VALETTA WARSING Academic CApril 97 Needle- work Club 13 Knitting Club 2, Vice President 23 Entertainment Club 33 Chemistry Club 33 States- manship Club 3. VIRGINIA MAE WARSING Commercial CAugust 147 Knitting Club 13 World Friendship Club 3. HELEN IRENE WATSON Academic CJanuary 97 Travel Club 23 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 33 World Friendship Club 33 Annual Show 1, 2. HAROLD KENNETH WATSON Voca- tional iDecember 87 Varsity Football 1, 33 Varsity Basketball 13 Varsity Baseball 1, 33 Sports Club 1, 2, 33 Home Room, Secretary 13 Squad Leader 1, 2. JOHN O. WATSON General CDecember 167 Handicraft Club 23 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. WILLIAM E. WATTERS Vocational COctober 247 Ushers' Club 1, 2, 33 Intramural Sports 1. MILDRED CRAIG WATTS Commercial CApril 257 Knitting Club 13 Social Dancing Club 33 Girls' Glee Club 13 Girls' A Cappella Choir 3. RICHARD J. WEAKLAND Commercial CJanuary 137 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Band 1, 2, 33 An- nual Show 23 Travel Club 23 Home Room, Vice President 2, President 3, Sales Manager 2. ROSE- MARY T. WEAMER Commercial Uanuary 107 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 33 Social Service Club 1, 23 World Friendship Club 3, Secretary 33 Home Room, Attendance Director 3. RUDOLPH CYRIL WEAMER Progressive Uuly 287 Orchestra 2, 33 Band 1, 2, 33 Drum and Bugle Corps 1. JANET L. WEAVER Progressive CJuly 167 Traffic Patrol 33 Girls' A Cappella Choir 13 A Cappella Choir 2, 33 Statesmanship Club 33 Dramatics Club 1, 33 Social Service Club 23 Class Executive Committee 1, 23 Annual Show 1, 2. SARAH EDOLENE WEBB Commercial CSeptember 247 Library Club 13 Needlework Club 23 Knitting Club 33 Intramural Sports 13 Home Room, Attendance Director 3. DAVID WEHRLE General CJune 197 Chemistry Club 2, Vice President 23 Physics Club 3. VERNA A. WEIBLE General CAugust 227 Intramural Sports 13 Hockey Team 23 Geography Club 2. JOSEPH A. WEIDEL General CMarch 147 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. Page Sixty-nine W. Ward M. VVatts J. Weidel B. Weldley M. Weyandt I. Willis J. Weldley R. Weight H. Wenner J. Werner P. Wertz G. Wertzberger E. Westbrook A. Weyant L. VVhite B. Wlble M. Wiedemer C. Wiesinger B. Williams J. Williams D. Wills H. Wills M. Wills A. Wilson M. Wilson P. Wilson P. Wilson BETTY JUNE WEIDLEY Academic CDecember 233 Needlework Club 15 Learn to Drive Club 25 Forum Club 3. JOHN EDWARD WEIDLEY, JR., Academic QFebruary 93 Art Club 1, 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1. ROY WEIGHT General CAugust 293 Jay Vee Basketball 25 Track Team 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Track Club 3. HAYES ELLSWORTH WENNER General Uanuary 103 Drum and Bugle Corps 1, 25 Dramatics Club 25 Home Room, Vice President 2, Sales Manager 2. JACK B. WERNER General CMay 253 Sports Club 15 Stagecraft Club 2, 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. PAULINE L. WERTZ General CMarch 313 Learn to Drive Club 25 World Friendship Club 35 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 A Cappella Choir 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. GERTRUDE WERTZBERGER Commercial fNovember 13 Home Room, President 35 Dramatics Club 25 Typing Club 35 Class Executive Committee 25 Mountain Echo Staff 35 Intramural Sports 2, 3. EDITH MAE WESTBROOK Academic CApril 273 Knitting Club 1, 2, 3, President 15 Home Room, President 3. MARTHA MAY WEYANDT General CJuly 63 Tumbling Club 1, 2, 35 Squad Leaders' Club 35 Intra- mural Sports 1, 2, 3. ARTHUR GARFIELD WEYANT Vocational fMarch 93 Agriculture Club 3. LOTTIE A. WHITE Academic iNovember 163 Social Service Club 1, 35 A Cappella Choir 35 Girls' A Cappella Choir 1, 25 Traffic Patrol 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 3. BLAINE E. WIBLE Academic Uanuary 83. MARTIN WIEDEMER General CNovember 33. CARL J. WIESINGER Vocational fSeptember 13 Camera Club 15 Sports Club 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. BETHEL L. WILLIAMS General fApril 243 Needlework Club 1, 2. JOHN WILLIAMS General CFebruary 233 Basketball Manager 1, 25 Intramural Sports 15 Magic Club 1. A. IRENE WILLIS Commercial CApril 223 Typing Club 3. DOROTHY M. WILLS Academic Uuly 303 Girls' Drum and Bugle Corps 15 Travel Club 3. HAZEL LORRAINE WILLS George-Deen lSep- tember 23 Needlework Club 15 Italian Club 2, 35 Chemistry Club 2, 3. MADELINE E. WILLS George- Deen fDecember 113. ANN MARIE WILSON George-Deen fAugust 253 Dramatics Club 2, 35 Entertain- ment Club 15 Squad Leaders' Club 2. MARIAN HAZEL WILSON General COctober 33 Learn to Drive Club 25Forum Club 35 Annual Show 2. PAUL B. WILSON General fMay 223 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Attendance Director 2. PAULINE WILSON Academic CMay 223 Knitting Club 1, 25 Travel Club 35 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. Page Seventy , 'Q 'ti' ,.., tw 625' I SET' R. Wilson W. Wilson E. Wingard M. Wlngert I. Woleslagle A. Wolfe L. Wolfe D. Wood G. Wood J. Wood R. Wood W. Wood J. Woodrlng J. Worrell M. Worrell R. Wynekoop C. Ylngling M. Ylngling M. Ylnglmg M. Yoder E. Yohn G. Yon N. Yon R. Yon ROY EDWARD WILSON General CJu1y 77 Band 15 Orchestra 15 Home Room, Vice President 2. WILLIAM WILSON Academic QOctober 307 Chemistry Club 2, 3, Mathematics Club 3, Kodak Club 3. A. EULALIA WINGARD General tFebruary 237 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 35 Learn to Drive Club 1, 23 Social Dancing Club 3. MARCELLA ELIZABETH WINGERT Progressive CAugust 137 Academy of Science 1, 2, 3, President 31 World Friendship Club 1, 2, 33 Physics Club 35 Orchestra 2, 33 Mountain Echo Staff 1, 2, 35 Corridor Patrol 2, Traffic Patrol 33 Quill and Scroll 2, 3. IRVIN LYLE WOLE- SLAGLE Vocational COctober 157. AGNES G. WOLFE General tAugust 47 Travel Club 2g Typing Club 33 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 1, 2, 35 Home Room, Secretary 1. LUELLA MARGARET WOLFE General CSeptember 137 Dramatics Club 1, 23 Girls' Glee Club 1. DOLORES ANNABELLA WOOD George-Deen Uuly 167 Knitting Club 13 Tap Dancing Club 25 Entertainment Club 33 Intra- mural Sports 2, 3. GLADYS MAE WOOD George-Deen CNovember 257 World Friendship Club 1g Learn to Drive Club 2. JEANNE W. WOOD Commercial CNovember 37 Knitting Club 1, 2 5 Typing Club 39 A Cappella Choir 1, 2, 35 Girls' A Cappella Choir 23 Home Room, President 3, Vice President 2. ROBERT WOOD General CNovember 177 Basketball Manager 1, 2, Sports Club 13 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Manager 2. WINIFRED E. WOOD General iAugust 37 Dramatics Club 1, 2, 3. JACK W. WOODRING Commercial 6February 207 Safety Club 1. JOHN E. WORRELL Progressive CDecember 267 Forestry Club 2, Chem- istry Club 23 Physics Club 31 Home Room, President 3. MILDRED VIRGINIA WORRELL General CFebruary 157 Knitting Club 2, Social Dancing Club 35 A Cappella Choir 33 Tap Dancing Club 1. RICHARD C. WYNEKOOP Progressive CAugust 67 Academy of Science 2, 3, Secretary 35 Quill and Scroll 2, 3, Vice President 3, Compass Staff 2, 3, Business Manager 35 English Department Play 1, 2, 35 Annual Show 2, 3, Chemistry Club 2, President 25 Physics Club 3, Class President 2. CATHERINE YINGLING General 4November 17 Intramural Sports 1, 2, Social Dancing Club 25 Entertainment Club 3, Tap Dancing Club 1. MAHLON YINGLING Vocational 4January 87 Boosters' Club 2, 3, Cheerleader 1, 2, 33 Intramural Sports 1. MARGARET N. YINGLING General CJuly 27 Social Service Club 2, World Friendship Club 1g Girls' Glee Club 1. MARY CATHERINE YODER Progressive CJanuary 117 Home Room, Secretary 1, Vice President 25 Future Teachers of America 23 Horseshoe Staff 33 Traffic Patrol 33 Horseshoe Club 3, Girls League Honor Roll 2. ELAINE YQIIN General CJune 57 Learn to Drive Club 13 Social Service Club 25 Entertainment Club 35 Home Room, Sales Manager 1, Representative 3. GERALDINE LORRAINE YON George-Deen fMarch 27 Knitting Club 1, World Friendship Club 3. NAOlVII R. YON General CFebruary 177 Knitting Club 1. ROBERT EUGENE YON Vocational fMarch 227 Track Team 2, 35 Track Club 3. Page Seventy-one JOHN GLEN YOST Academic fFebruary 95 Band 1, 2, 3. BETTY YOUNG Commercial COctober 169 Social Service Club 1, World Friendship Club 2, 33 Mountain Echo Staff 3. PAUL J. ZEHOWITZ General CJuly 123 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Jay Vee Football 2, 3, Attendance Office Force 2, 35 Home Room, Attend- ance Director 2, 3, Sports Club 2, 3. EMILY JANE ZEIGLER General fAugust 25 Audubon Club 1, World Friendship Club 23 Travel Club 35 Annual Show 1. ROBERT PAUL ZIMMERER General CNovember 287 Drum and Bugle Corps 1, Band 2, 3, Trombone Choir 2, 3. ELAINE ZINN General fJanuary 135 Knitting Club 13 World Friendship Club 2, 3. CHARLES MURRAY ZONG Commercial CDecember 129 Rothsville High School 1, 2g Science Club 1, 2, Secretary 25 Camera Club 2, President 2, Newspaper Club 1, 2, Advertising Manager 2 3 "The Belle of Bagdad" 25 "The Scarecrow Creeps" 2. HERBERT GREINER General Uune 97 Sports Club 1. JOHN SHOCK Com- mercial CJuly 183 English Department Play 1, 2, 33 Senate 2, 35 J Y0St B- Young P- Zelmwitl Stagecraft Club 1, 2, 35 Shippensburg Plays 1, 2, 3, Home Room, E Zelgler R. Zlmmerer E. Zilm t 1- B F d t. P1 1 2 3 C Zong H. Grelner J. Shock Secre ary ' Cys e era lon ay ' ' ' A candle, tall and slender, Burning with a virgin light, So little burned when the Hame breathed outg Yet lingers long the afterglow, A laughter, full of life and fun, A smile, a promise of eternal youth, A spirit, warm and brave, Templed in a loving heart, Gone is the gleaming candle light But still remains the living glow. ELIZABETH ANN CASSIDY LADS AND LASSIES WHO ESCAPED THE LENS Earl A. Ansman, Ann F. Bergstein, William B. Bratton, Daniel D. Carey, Robert C. Cashman, George H. Ceglar, Anna L. Colasante, Edgar W. Conrad, James G. Corbin, Kenneth C. Craver, Pauline Dyczko, Richard H. Furry, Arthur E. Gailey, Clementine R. Galardi, Robert S. Garis, Richard W. Gibson, Betty J. Graham, Robert C. Harter, Charles S. Kearney, Robert J. Lamertina, William C. Laret, Michael J. Lattieri, Clair W. Leamer, Bernard D. Levine, Robert R. Meintel, Lester L. Moore, Paul E. Mosser, Robert G. Myers, M. Frank Negri, William G. Possumato, Mildred V. Powell, Mar- jorie M. Prosperi, Melvin E. Reese, Danny T. Rubine, LeRoy A. Schroth, Clair W. Sessler, Donald C. Sickles, John J. Sigrist, Charles E. Smith, Robert C. Socey, John Sopato, Lee E. Stillman, Robert H. Suders, Thomas R. Taylor, George F. Viola, William D. Waugh, Herman L. Wicker, Donald R. Williams. Page Seventy-two JUNIOR MEMCJRIES LINGER Do you remember the Saturday afternoons, When we shivered, almost froze, the whole game through- And then a Junior boy would run and score a few? Can you forget? Can you forget productions of the high school plays, The characters the Junior Thespians portrayed, The glorious beginning of their footlight days? Do you recall? Do you recall the Christmas Carnival? the Prom? . Successful dances that the Junior Class put on- Some swung and jitterbugged while others walked along? Remember that? Do you remember when we tried with zealous care To find an able president to take the chair, And all the other officers who ruled so fair? Do you recall? Do you recall how many games of basketball We watched with glee, as Junior dribblers short and tall Each played a game that never failed to please us all? Can you forget? The talents of the Junior Class just simply soar, The novelists, the orators, poets galore, The nightingales with voices that we all adore. Remember that? Page Seventy-three E. Speacht D. Shock S. Scott M, Daubenspeck Standing- Mr. Barr Mr. Black Sitting- Miss Miller Miss Grove Miss Buck Mr. Hoftman OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES President, Richard Shock, Vice President, Evelyn Speachtg Secretary, Muriel Daubenspeckg Treasurer, Shirley Scott. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Shirley Ellis, Peggy Heaps, Elayne Little, Gene Thompson, Donald Whitesel. ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE Shirley Ellis, Chairman, Irene Berman, James Donaldson, Lor- raine Gayman, Jack Harkenrider, Phyllis Kiser, Helen McNichol, Helen Mackey, Kanalla Marcus, Nancy Musser, Wilbur Pensyl, Louise Snyder, Marjorie Wolf. FINANCE COMMITTEE Don Vlfhitesel, Chairman, Dianne Cohen, Elizabeth Flegler, Dottie Grove, Helen Gundel, Antonette Bubino, Bob Slutzker, Jane Stoudnour, Jean Teeters, Bob Titelman, Virginia Williams. PUBLICITY COMMITTEE Peggy Heaps, Chairman, James Clinger, Robin Forbes, Jeanne Grove, Betty Belle Harris, John Ihm, Arnold Levine, Martha Schauer, Elaine White. RECEPTION COMMITTEE Elayne Little, Chairman, Jane Burns, Martha Jane Conrad, Helen Davis, Marjorie Deffley, Madolyn Forsht, Betty Jane Greaser, Irene Kantner, Harriet Kromberg, Bette Manspeaker, Marjorie Mat- tern, Erma Jean Morelli. REFRESHMENT COMMITTEE Gene Thompson, Chairman, Gertrude Annal, Jean Brought, June Cunningham, John Earon, Ruth Eleig, Eunice Granville, Wanda Helsel, Allene Hill, Paul Kleffel, Betty Mackey, Betty Mathias, Betty Reid, Bay Smith. Page Seventy-four SOPHOMORES WANDER AND WONDER He gazed around in sort of disbelieving wonderment at the sight which met his eyes. Spacious corridors, crowded stairs, and people every- where were within his vision. He was the picture of bewilderment as he dazedly walked from place to place trying to figure out where he, the sophomore, was going. The first few days in Senior High were marked with events never to be forgotten and with various experiences which even now bring blushes to the faces of many members of the Class of '4-2. Some, who were former members of Roosevelt and Keith newspaper staffs and previously were considered as future Walter Winchells, assumed positions as reporters on various publications. After hours of seeking teachers and writing the unimportant story, the big moment arrived when the paper was published-only to find a story unrecognizable because it had been guillotined by the editors. ,lunior High Clark Gables and Hedy Lamarrs who expected to have leading parts in plays found themselves in dramatics classes learning to Walk, sit, and talk correctly. However, they soon could fit characteristics to teachers. When they heard "Friends of the vast public address system," they knew Scott Geesey was speaking, and they understood that the most handsome man, accord- ing to uPop', Lindaman, was uKen77 Bashore, the head football coach. They also began to associate student leaders with different school activi- ties. In their class meetings, the Sophomores learned to recognize those teachers who would be the sponsors for the Class of '42 during their three years of Senior High life. While the election of class officers was of course iilled with keen competition, the Sophomores were pleased with the outcome. The execu- tive committee, With the complete cooperation of the class in the year's program, made social activities, especially the 4'Hop', for which the Sophomores were responsible, a huge success. Finally arrived the time when the Sophomores realized that they must assume new responsibilities, acquired with the junior standing. They knew that all the helpful and even the unfortunate things that had hap- pened would better prepare them to meet the obstacles and enjoy the pleasures to come in following years. Page Seventy-five Piper Lafferty . Gilbert Shryock Standing- Mr. Sheetz Mr. Foster Sitting- Miss Batrus Miss Puckey Miss Crist Mr. Yoder OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES President, Robert Shryockg Vice President, Patty Laffertyg Secretary, Ruth Piper, Treasurer, Marie Gilbert. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Phyllis Bland, Ruth Evaline Biddle, Myrtle Crawford, Vernon Miller, Louise Wood. ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE Audrey Baker, Olive Jeanne Brisbin, Jane Butler, Mary Clarke, Leon East, Betty Jane Fauth, Larue Lane, Betty Elaine Sickles, Mildred Marie Williams, Mary Jane Yorgy. FINANCE COMMITTEE Bette Brophy, Florence Gable, Esther Kauffman, Ann Marie McDonnell, Ann Marie Miller. PUBLICITY COMMITTEE Patsy Astore, ,Ioan Beam, Ann Blackburn, Betty Marie Gesser, Faith McGregor, Dean R. Rotz. RECEPTION AND DECORATION COMMITTEE Annetta Brande, Betty Mae Chappell, Betty Jane Cross, Eleanor Foster, Shirley Grove, Richard Mallow, Peggy Penman, Erma Louise Starchville, Vivian Tilson, Mary Grace Wertz, George Wiesinger, Helen Louise Wood, Dorothy L. Yingling. REFRESHMENT COMMITTEE Virginia Appler, ,Iean Cole, Mary Crain, Ted Fasano, Thelma Irvin, Robert S. Keller, Helen Michaels, Stuart Perchy, Eleanor Rigg, Beatrice Ross. Page Seventy-six xl Y I I 1 I J Mgfgf .- ' 'J , ,. , 6, 5' rf' 1' ax' 'M ' 1 9 g I i SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 1 x gg! ff'f"'-'I cq ffif, X 'N f 'if fx 'I' gi., I , ,f 'H-I. 1 1 A 5. L . " , , Q nag fi, .,..I.:7"1' ' -. i. K, . 1 N54 gf:-I S fax 5 s , ' 1 2 '- G: Q 3 Ag . 1 S iF Y ' ' . 1 ' A i E 52 3 Q i l W - av i - R . ..,.-.,? ....e. ,.,,.. .,.:... . ::i.: Q : M gl. SAW -- 5 1 "'. E '55 T ' ' s:'5a.5:1'?sa5jiQQf:55r' 3 if -li, .as 3 X gi! ,wwf 4 ,. N 4. v SS S X 5 1, ww, . A gg. Ve L ff S K 2 Si Y If Kyiv ' - 4 W, 3 M I. .L -'v.. 'f .':.':v1 ' -e w s-.siawz QQ -en:-:,,. ,E wwf:-Q .affi- ,f xx As Q , , 4 M is fffix- S 43, n a fsil kzf' - 1 , f. 2. '55 -Q fs fm N -M A-wi. Q , ,Z , S S , .2 . ISL. 5 E951 .K'f'3Lii5'Y.N 'VW ' lfiwgifvg, 2 'af g.Qlsf2:,, My -'.m-Urfzieag V 9215 5 ,. Nw V, KS an V t W 'Zigi-g m il 2-5,5 'X K Q -S L k f k1.',-jiivgf, Q, . , f 'U .4 S' S S Af ., V Wg. -new ,. Aw f. M, - ,Q-f1f.N .4 9 ' 2 W S Seatedfwfxss Heiss. Nfxss Caxnpbek, Y. Shaw, Mr. L-amz, Nh. XNKXXX-aims, Nh. Dkckiey, 3. Ritchey. Nbr. Ywoxmg, Mr. Faris, 1. Goxdtoextg. Smnamgf PUBLIC ATIQN s-JOURNAUSTS if ROW PAGES FROM YOUR ANNUAL . . . AS WE VISIONED THEM G. Royer, J. McGuire Standing-Patton. Sitting-Hughes, Patt, Moore. Standing-DeLeo, Conner. Sitting-DeLeo, Tremmel. Standing-Mr. Lingenfelter, Mr Moore. Sitting-Mr. Rornig, Miss Givin Mr. Williams, Mr. Hoover. Standing-Houck, Haines, Cherry Sitting-Ake, D a v i s , Lockard Hughes. Standing-Strawmire. Sitting-Bentley, Gilmore. HORSESHOE STAFF Managing Editor-James Ritchey, Co-editors-Dorothy Bral- lier, Mary Jane McGuire, Business Manager-J. Gregg Royer. Art Editor-Mary Cherry. Business Staff-Carl Levan, Robert Titelman, Howard Wallace. Personnell Staff-Helen Lockard, Chairman, Kathleen Ake, Helen Davis, Kenneth Houck, Ruth Hughes. Clubs-Edith Adams and Raymond Noble, Chairmen, Jane Bentley, Vivian Harnniaker, Roy Slagle, Ruth Snyder, Betty Strawmire. Administration-Dorothy Sewall, Chairman, Jean Carl. Music and Dramatics--Virginia Keith, Chairman, Jane Little, Dolores Brennecke. Boys, Sports-Walter Scott, Chairmang Russell Smiley. Girls? Sports-Evelyn Speacht, Chairman, Betty Greaser, Eunice Granville. Photographic Staff-Ruth Haversticlc, Florence Patt, Robert Patton. Calendar-Robley Johnson, Chairman, Shirley Palm, Mary Yoder. Historians-Rosetta Bentley, Mary Haines, Betty McAllister. Theme Committee-Rosetta Bentley, Robert Gleichert, Helen Lockard, Raymond Noble, Florence Patt, Walter Scott, Ruth Snyder. Typists-eLouise Conner, Joan De Leo, Lillian De Leo, Ellen Gilmore, Zita Tremmel. Advisers--Mr. Williams, Miss Givin, Mr. Hoover, Mr. Lingen- felter, Mr. Moore, Mr. Romig. , . Y N J. Ritchey, D. Brallier Standing-Wallce, Ti- telman, Levan, Kane SittingfRoyer' Standing-Sewall, Carl Sitting-Johnston, Palm, Yoder Standing-Scott Sitting - Smiley, Ham- maker Standing-Snyder, Noble Sitting-Slagle Standing - McAllister, Bentley Sitting-Keith, Little ECHO PRCMOTES STUDENT INTEREST Mr. Faris Miss Heiss The Mountain Echo, Altoona High School's bi-weekly news publication, attempts to promote interest in school affairs and to keep the school informed about interesting and important events. The staff and reporters are carrying their English training into a practical field, are getting experience in newswriting, are learning some of the problems of newspaper work, and are developing their powers of expression. Perhaps some of them will be famous news correspondents or editors of the future. Each semester new reporters for the Mountain Echo are chosen by competitive examination. After one yearfs service as reporters, writers of outstanding ability may be appointed to the staff positions. Such appointments are made by the sponsors, Miss Heiss and Mr. Faris. The managing editor is chosen from those who have been staff members for one year. Both interest and ability are considered in making selections. This last year, the paper was streamlined or modernized, the make-up was changed and informal balance was used. A new feature, 4'Success Storiesf, introduced some outstanding students of the school. "Echograms" continued to report the unusual, 'Tashioniai' continued to tell how the high school student should dress, and "Walter Windchill" continued to snoop among the graduates. In January the Mountain Echo, answering the call of the camera fiends, sponsored a candid camera contest. Awards were presented to the winners in each of the sea, landscape, animal, still, and candid classes. ln the spring they sponsored a spelling contest, the finals of which were broadcast over the public address system. The Mountain Echo is also interested in the publications of other institutions, and has exchanges with many schools all over the country. Delegates from the Echo attended the convention of the Pennsylvania Scholastic Press Association in the fall and the Colum- bia Press Convention, held in New York City in March. The Echo was well represented at the Blair County Scholastic Press Conven- tions. At these sessions the delegates met other newshounds, some of them professionals, who discussed problems with them. Such contacts gave the delegates fresh inspiration and new ideas which made the paper better than ever before. Page Eighty-four Benson, Sawtelle Festenstem, Grlffith, McDonough Moses, Brophy Bathurst Sender, Goldberg Schwartzbart sm long sentfs the moth oi 1 Lugz Lo Les: that has grading 2, sy-hools. , :em I UFQI. en 0 0 0 yy 201 Repiesentaiiiw es to the as secretary Eker, English Standing-Himebaugh L , eopold, Hepner, Koush Standing-Nedimyer Sitting-Wynekoop Sitting-Fry, Matry, Lantz, Snyder Standing-Fusco, J. Eichelberger Standing-Robison, Archer, Lola Sitting-Fisher, Fagley, M. Eichelberger ' ' Slttmg-Shaw, Editor Page Eighty-six THE COMPASS POINTS THE WAY The Compass points the way! To your innumerable questions of when, where, why and how, a look into The Compass will set you on your right course. Although this little book was compiled chieHy for Sophomores, as a guide in their early careers in the Senior High School, Juniors, Seniors and even the faculty find the information set forth in this guide exceedingly useful. But what does The Compass tell us? lt tells us how to find our classrooms, or the hard-to-find department offices. lt offers cur- ricular assistance and helps us in making many adjustments. Through it we are able to adjust ourselves more easily and to become better citizens of the school. The staff, consisting of about twenty members under the super- vision of Mr. Lantz, revises and adds to the material provided by editorial groups of former years. Cooperation among the staff members makes possible the perfecting of an up-to-date manual. The Compass contains certain information both necessary and helpful to the student body. Many students find this handbook valuable because of its school calendar of events and holidays, its English reading list to which all students may refer for book re- ports, and its program of required and elective courses. It contains floor plans of the entire building, school songs and cheers, and a review of student organizations for participation in school activities. This pocket-size manual is always handy and proves to be an indispensable guide for every student. STAFF MEMBERS Editor-in-Chief-Patty Shaw Business Managers-Dorothy Koush, Staff Members-Mary Archer, Ruth Hepner, Walter Lantz, Louis Leopold, John Nedimyer, Miriam Johnson, Mary Robison, Sally Matty, Betty Lola, Lucille Rockey, Ruth Fry. Typists-James Fisher, Edith Fusco, Jane Eichel- berger, Margaret Eichelberger, Louise Snyder, Daunis Fagley, Eliza- beth Himebaugh. Page Eighty-seven Mr. Lantz FUTURE JOJRNALISTS DO CREATIVE WRITING Miss Heller Front Row - Wynekoop Benson, Sender, Lockard Second Row-Brophy, Saw- , telle, Shaw, Moses, Win- gert, Penn-ock, Dauben- speck, Musser Third Row-Detwiler, Ritchey, Swartzbart, Pat ton, Crozier y , HYou have been listening to the weekly presentation of the Quill and Scroll Club of the Altoona High School"-As the strains of the familiar Alma Mater fade away, there has been represented once more the achievement of an ambitious A. H. S. student. The re- sponsibility of writing and producing a fifteen minute broadcast is a thrill and an experience never to be forgotten in the lives of twenty-one young journalists, who, as honorary members of this society for high school journalists, did this very thing throughout the term of 194-O. But that is not the only creative work done by this organization of young writers. Local contests sponsored by the club itself as well as those sponsored by the international organization and by the American Magazine have uncovered many talents. During this year a number of prizes were awarded to talented Altoona High School students, and honorable mentions were not few. However, serious as all this has sounded, the 'iScriveners," our local chapter, do not confine their activities to work. The informal initiation party in the first semester, when new members "rode the goatf, proved to be hilarious. That was fun, but not nearly so im- pressive as the formal program held at the beginning of the second semester for the incoming members. It is felt that much has been gained by the experience and guidance offered by the club and the local sponsor, Miss Heller. Per- haps the members of the Altoona chapter of the International Honor- ary Society for High School Journalists will some day be repre- sented in a higher literary world. . ' A 4 Page Eighty-eight CLUBS . . .TOMORROW'S LEADERS f I ALTOONA'S 4,000 STUDENTS PROMOTE GIRLS LEAGUE BOYS FEDERATION uLet us think of this new year as a challenge to us all. In our scholastic records, in the work of the general organization, in our club participation, let us feel that sense of individual responsibility which alone makes progress possiblef' With these words Cheerful Criswell, president of the Girls League, in presentation of the past president's picture, struck the keynote for the work of the year, and the individual member's responsibility in promoting it. Since its founding in 1922 the aim of the Girls League has been to fit the girls for their future life by encircling their high school days in a cultural, educational, spiritual, and social way. This four-fold policy is carried out by special programs in the general meeting, club activities, and awards for scholarship. As a part of the educational program the League, each year, gives three hundred dollars in scholarships to two deserving girls. This year, in addition to the scholarships, the Girls League presented to the Altoona Penn State Undergraduate Center one thousand dollars as a voluntary gift. This gift will aid many students who take advantage of the opportunity to secure a college education in their home city. So, another page is added to the Girls League record of loyalty and service. A strong body, a sound mind, good citizenship-such qualities are the passports upon the road to success, and all are included in the high ideals set forth by the Boys Federation of A. H. S. Every boy entering the high school automatically becomes a member of this organization and has the privilege of participation in the many activities sponsored by this group. The thirty Federation-sponsored clubs offer to the boys of A. H. S. an opportunity to pursue varied extra-curricular activities. Assembly programs presented throughout the year at the regular bi-weekly meetings were both interesting and educational. Noted speakers, movies, and athletic demonstrations furnished entertain- ment. Throughout the year the Boys Federation sponsored several utown hall" meetings at which the problems of youth were discussed by the boys themselves, their parents, and other qualified speakers. As a result of a closer contact between the home and the school, through diversified activities and friendly guidance, this organiza- tion has developed many leaders, active both in school and out. The Boys Federation has for its motto, '6Every Time a Boy Goes Bad, a Good Man Dies? Page Ninety EXTRA-CURRICLILAR ACTIVITIES Standing-D. Ritchey, M, Pa- tronick Sitting-C. Criswell, S. Palm Miss Lentz, Mr. Gress Standing-G, Butler, M. Neu- ITIHI1 Sitting-R. Herr, N. Cadle, B Boyles GIRLS LEA fer, Gionfriddo. Second Row - Baker, Keller, Filer, Binkley. Third Row - Cover, Sponsler, Hiner, Marschak, Weyant. Front Row-Ressler, Cornelius Pensyl, Claybaugh. Second Row -- Hamer, Oswald Weidley, McDonough, Glasser Stauder, States, Pietrolungo. Third Row-Meadows, Morgan, H F b s G' 'k Mc- ogue, or e , innic , Call, Engle, Marabella. Front Row-Werner, Pute, Bush Slep, Miss Cherry. Second Row-N. Long, Hershey s. Long, E. Hanley, Milleri Carl, Stretton, Notopulos Clapper. Third Row - Thompson, Cross Samuels, Carolus, Buchanan Bingham. Front Row - Ball, Harrity Schraff, Sonefelt, Loechner. Second Row - Faris, Kemmler Houck, Cummings, Turnbaugh Schulman, Astore, Rieger, Burl g0DI'1, MF. Wood. Third Row - Clabaugh, Ying- ling, Selders, Kleffel, Olewine, Dively, Anderson, Patton. Fourth Row-G. Ireland, A. Ire- land, Gundel, Pensyl, Harken- rider, Bray. 1 v GUE ORGANIZED IN '22 Aealcutiuma ctus To boys interested in modern, practical ideas of farming, the Agriculture Club, under the sponsorship of Mr. Shaffer, offers concrete and down-to-earth advice. The club endeavors to discover through discussion and research the best, cheapest, and the newest methods of the old art of husbandry. Each member throughout the year contributes something to the club discussions and takes his turn in conducting the programs. The members took a trip to the model experimental farms at State College, where, with Doctor Ferguson as their host for the day, they toured the barns and received many useful and helpful agricultural "tips" ART CLUB To students interested in art, the Art Club offers an excellent opportunity for development of talent. This group has a free range of work, anything from lettering to sculpturing. Among the outstanding accomplishments of this year was the scenery for the Christmas pageant and the Girls League play. Havenit you often noted the effective posters and cartoons displayed in the halls in celebration of some special holiday or school function? This is just another service offered by the Art Club in co-operation with the Boosters, Club. The artistic talent of the members of this group has been invaluable in many activities of our school. AUDUBON CLUB "Conservation and Protectionn are the keywords of Miss Cherry's Audubon Club, which is composed of the bird-lovers of Altoona High. The girls were taught to know and cherish each bird by its song, its nest and habits. Each member was urged to feed Hour feathered friendsw during the winter. f' To become further familiar with the birds, the girls played bird-lotto and bird-guessing games. They not only took individual field trips, but they also went as a group. The entire program of the club covers a period of three years, so there will be no repetition for three-year members. BOOSTER CLUB Letis give three cheers for the Booster Club because of their fine co-operation in arousing and promoting in the student body a wholesome high school spirit in athletics and other school activities. This organization had charge of decorations for special occasions. They led the school in advertising football games, basketball games, pep meetings, all-school dances, and the various plays presented by dramatics groups. Of special note were the advertisements for the Annual show. Y Remember the cheerleaders? Not only the Varsity but also the Jay-Vee squads of cheerleaders were trained by Mr. Wood, sponsor of the club. Page Ninety-three FOUR CLUBS IN LEAGUE'S FIRST YEAR BOYS' ATTENDANCE DIRECTORS This organization, under the leadership of Mr. Dickey, is fostered with the idea that these representatives will organize committees in their home rooms and act as advisers to individuals not getting along well in school. This group made a study of the causes of poor attendance and tardiness and gave suggestions for improving each, the members gave reports from magazine articles concerning what is being done to improve attendance in other schools. The solution of attendance and tardiness requires the co- operation of all students and teachers. This attendance group has endeavored to arouse the interest of the students in school improvement. BOYS' HOME ROOM REPRESENTATIVES Under the leadership of Mr. Pohle, the Boys' Home Room Representa- tives met on an average of once a month to discuss some of the important problems which affected home room groups. This organization was com- prised of one official representative from each of the boys' home rooms. The members were selected by their home room teachers because of their executive ability, scholarship record, and dependability. Two members were chosen by the group to represent the organization in the Senate. Along with other activities, they conducted, throughout the year, various campaigns which affected the interest and Welfare of the school in general. BOYS' SQUAD LEADERS Who helps to keep things running smoothly during gym classes? You're right-the boys' squad leaders, who are the answer to a gym teacher's prayer. These able-bodied fellows are mainly responsible for the orderly and efficient manner in which the boys' gym is run. The instructors, who by this plan are "overseers," meet with the boys each Friday and plan the next week's schedule. Due to the large classes which are typical of Altoona High School, the instructor finds it difficult to direct class activities, however, with the able guidance of Mr. Morse, the squad leaders can easily manage the smaller number. CHEMISTRY CLUB HSeeing is believing" is an old saying, and Mr. Harbaugh's "budding young chemists" use this motto as a guide in many of their club experi- ments-for one of the first projects of this successful club was the analysis of various metals. Among the other interesting activities of the club were the following: A planned field trip to the laboratories of State Collegeg speakers from various outside organizationsg individual demonstrations and experiments, and last but not least, the publication of an annual bulletin, by the club members, for a summary of the year's work and for future reference. Page Ninety-four Front Row - Boyles, Tromm, Fisher. Second Row - Augusture, Mig- nogna, Smith, S t a ple t 0 ri, Martz, Folk, Cipriano, lckes. Third ROW - Reed, McNogna, Dancler, Milt o n, Harrity, Stackhause, McCarl, Hetler, Emeriok, W. Stouffer. Fourth Row--Loynes, 1-lesser, A. Delozier, Earon, Mauro, Mc- Manamy, Ainscough, Reimer, Shiffler, C. Houck. Front Row - Cohn, Fritsche, Nedimyer, Ianuzzi, Loyacona, Levine, Whitesel, Smith, Mier- ley, Evans, Sonefelt, Brady, Stevenson. Second RoWfMetzger, Gillaspie, McCann, Schreiber, 1-iarrity, Misciagna, Moffa, S t a. t e s, Love. Baird, Makdad, Emer- ick, Mr. Pohle. Third Row-L. Earon, Harnish, D. McDowell, Warner, D. De- lozier, Stahl, Kattouf, Fergu- son, J. McDowelI, Ainscough, Festenstein, Joyce, Boyles, Stewart. Front Row-Imler, Parrish, J. Pensyl, Cole, Harris, Fiester, Albright, Klcbetanz. Second Row - Ventresca, G. Kauffman, Creamer, Meintel, McClain, Columbo, Boslet, Lettieri, Rouzer, Hower, J. Meintel, Ginnick, Fagan, Mr. Morse. Third Row-C. Miller, Leedy, Stouffer, Aller, McCormick, Stumberg, F. Davis, Goclow- ski, Stein, Jamison, Shaner, Sponsler. Fourth Row - Titleman, Ed- wards, W. Pensyl, Filer, Rus- sell, Fenell, B. Kocoloski, Maschke, Snyder. Fifth Row-Boggs, R. Creamer, Nole. Front Row - Beeler, Taylor, Scott, Neuman, Mr. Harhaugh. Second Row-Tobler, Cramer, Mattern, Gorsuch, Pennock, Brophy, Rosskopf, Madden, Wallace, Stoke, Sewall. Third Row - Mock, Rusmith, Fisher, Kilgore, 1-latch, Kane, Isenberg, Bittner. Fourth Row-Walter, Weierick, Cohn, Hogue, Stahl, W. Smith. FORTY LEAGUE CLUBS SPCNSORED IN '40 Front Row-Kane, Tate, Tay- lor, Frederick, Levine, Davis Nagle, Meyer, Calderwood Burke, Fleck, Boslet, Baker: Ellstrom. Second Row-Cohn, Goldberger, LeVan, Cover, Stiffler, Lantz Soyster, Heinbaugh, Isenbergj Masterson, Gildea, Mr. Pohle. Third Row-Simpson, Harken- rider, Shock, Warner, Wright Miller, H a r r i t y, Fellows Bailey, Hammer. Front Row-Snyder, Simmers Corle, Gettman, Morgan, L DeLeo, Laratonda, Michaels Ventre, Daubenspeck, Bigelow Stoke, Cramer, Eichelherger. Second Row A Wolf, Pennock Deffley, Heaps, Richards, R0bi inson, Hopkins, Lower, John- son, Brumbaugh, Mills, Lebo. Third ROW 1 SCl'1l6hI', Cfabtfee, Fillman, T h o m a s, Mentzer Kimmel, Neaffer, Shaw, Hal- ler, Ammerman. Fourth Row-Bechtel, Ranck, Stout, Steward, Martin, .I DeLeo, Nickol, Lockard, Hob- SDH. Front Row - Rhodes, Crist Baker. Second Row-Yohn, McFadden Heller, Spearing, Fauth, With- erow, L. Wood, Conrad, Math ias, Burket, Rettburg, Veach Miller, Kaylor. Third Row 4 Warsing, Moore, Marx, Glass, Boyer, Fidorro, Quay, Reed, A Ill m e r rn a n, Glenn, Burkhart, M. Williams L. Williams. Fourth Row4Miss Eberle, Way, Piper, Wilson, Cross, Lasher, Meehan, Blanchard, D, Wood, Gray. Front Row - Hettler, Quirin Hopkins, Kough, Mr. Hoffman Second Rowe-Bigelow, George Wills, DeAngelis, C. Miller Lower, Durnm, Adams, Fin- ney, Pierson. Third RowAMoffit, Ainsworth Brunner, R y a n, McAllister Warsing, Carson, Lickel. Fourth Row - Leonard, Meese Furry, Harkenrider, Bryant Laughlin, Clinger, Dembert. 1 1 1 1 1 1 CORRIDOR PATRCL ul-Tall pass?w That is the magic paper which permits students to traverse the corridors of the Altoona High School during any one of the seven periods of the day. These passes are checked by the members of either the Girls' or Boys' Corridor Patrol who are stationed in the halls. The Patrol members, who can be identified by their maroon and white arm bands bearing the insignia C. A. P., are under the sponsorship of Mr. Pohle. They are responsible for order and quiet in the halls during class periods. The boys hold positions at street doors to check lunch passes and also at auditorium and cafeteria doors during the fifth period. During every period two patrol members are stationed at the reception desk at the main entrance to offer information to visitors and to give any assistance needed. To become a member of one of the patrols, a student must measure up to certain definite requirements. Eligibility for membership depends upon the scholastic standing, reliability, honesty, cooperation, and regular attend- ance of the applicant. The personnel of the patrol includes members from each of the three classes. From each group a member is chosen to represent his or her branch of the organization in the senate. ENTERTAINMENT CLUB Entertainment! Everyone enjoys being entertained! Therefore the Enter- tainment Club, sponsored by Miss Emma Eberle, was organized. It is com- posed of one representative from each of the girls' home rooms. To plan better entertainment and menus for parties and to consider personal improvement are a few of the purposes of this club. Questions of the uup-to-date Missw are answered by discussions among the members on such subjects as uMind Your Manners for Modems," styles of hair dress, proper make-up, and fashions. Because the activities of this group have practical value, membership in the Entertainment Club is considered la privilege. , FLASK AND BEAKER CLUB Future chemists, maybe, but just now members of the Flask and Beaker Club, sponsored by Mr. W. H. Hoffman. Membership in this organization is an honor. The club boasts a constitution and a club paper known as MThe Filter Paper? This publication is written, compiled, printed, and distributed by club members. The club meets every Friday to make tests and conduct experiments. It is a long-standing rule for this group that new members are admitted by a two-thirds vote of the other club members. For those seeking office in this group, petitions must be presented and voted on by the other members. Page Ninety-seven BOYS FEDERATION FOUNDED IN '31 FOOTBALL CLUB The Football Club, made up of members of the football squad, made use of its time by making a general study of football. During the season the members discussed each game and the coaches pointed out mistakes and planned new strategy for the next Saturday's encounter. With the club as a supplement to the regular practices, those boys planning to go to college and to play football received a broader knowledge of the fundamentals which they will need. Another advantage was the fact that it gave the coaching staff a chance to work with most of next year's squad and plan for the coming year. FORUM CLUB For all girls interested in acquiring ease in public speaking, the Forum Club provides the ideal means, The discussion, which ranged from books, plays, and travel to the rules of good etiquette, were entertaining as well as helpful. At some of the meetings the sponsor, Miss Ruby Krouse, entertained by telling stories. The highlight of this yearis activities was a style show presented at a Girls League assembly program, January 23. Street, school, and sports wear, as well as evening costumes, were modeled by the club members. A party late in April brought the work of the club to a close for the year. FUTURE TEACHERS OF AMERICA So you want to be a teacher? The girls who joined Miss Dunn's Future Teachers of America Club at least thought they did, and the club provided an opportunity for them to learn more about the profession. The qualifications and personality traits which are necessary to become a successful teacher were discussed in order that each member could decide whether or not she was fitted for the vocation. Another phase of study centered around the colleges and universities which best prepare one for special fields of teaching. This year Miss Dunnas club was affiliated with the national organization of Future Teachers of America. GIRLS' ATTENDANCE DIRECTORS Each home room in A. H. S. has an attendance director whose duty it is to check on the absentees each day and make out a report at the end of every month. These representatives met with Miss Bancroft at various times during the year to discuss the causes of irregular attendance in the high school and offer suggestions as to how conditions might be improved. It has been estimated that about ten per cent of the student body is responsible for ninety per cent of the absence... The subject of tardiness and ways of improvement were also topics of discussion at the meetings. Page Ninety-eight Front Row-Cadle, Hanley, G Kauffman. Second Row-Mr. Bashore, Hop- per, Pringle, B, Kaufman Boyles, Pfeffer, Karl, Ven: tresca, Danella, Fenell, Catal- do, Kinzer, C 0 n d r i n, Mr Wear. Third Row-Thompson, L. Mil ler, Jamison. Barley. MclJow ell, Frontz, J. Russell, Sopata Andros, Contafkos, B u L 1 e r Savine, Mr. Black. Fourth Row - Bell, Cuzzolina Turchetta, Alvis, Fowler, W Stouffer, Love, D. Stouffer Cassidy, Deeter, Zehowitz. Fifth Row-Gasiorowski, Ram sey, Fouss, Rhodes, Tromm Creamer, G i a r t h, Hetrick Balestino, Riggle. Front Row - George, Humm Grimshaw, Brophy. Second RowiBeck, McGarvey J. Beeler, Karstetter, Kiner Berman. Third Row-Wilson, Leonard Fillman, Harris, Snipes, sner aw, Parsons, Fleck. Fourth Row-Kearns, Peterson Hoover, Taylor, Brown. Front Row-Ammerman, Fore- man, Burns, Croft. Second Row-Stellabotte, Shade Thompson, Morgan. Third Row-Estep, Shellenbarg- er, Miss Dunn, Benney, Mal- Olley. Front Row-King, Fagley, Alex ander, Snyder, U m b o w e r Weamer, D e g a. n d. Rubino R a. g e r, Motlica, Pulicichio Kauffman. Second Row - Fickes, Geist Lower, Ajay, Carn, Webb G u n d e 1, Ostrander, Glenn Brown, Granville, Long. Third Row-D. Rhodes, E. Gil more, C r a m e r, Brungard Kraft, Gettemy, Kinsel, Ment. zer, Brurnbaugh, lioefaro. Fourth Row-Z. Tremrnel, Ed- wards, Douglass, l-lumm, Mil- ler, Jackson, Ryan, L. Riley McCracken, Byrne, Olkoski. 1 1.3 CLUBS INFLUENCE CHOICE OF VOCATION First Row - Davis, Benson, French, P. McGarvey, Ham- maker, Morgan, Masucci, Bee- ler, M. McGarvey, Tharp, Fonner, Brown, Wingert. Second Row - Gibbons, Volk, Boal, Rose, Seward, Brallier, Shaw, Intereante, Whippo, Fi- gard, Hollister, McC o m b i e, Vaughn. Third Row - Robison, Harte, Schandelmeier, Brumb a u g h, Bowen, Tobler, Donahue, Hol- lingsworth, Schmelzlen, Reed. Fourth Row - Kern. Teeters, Kuhn, Mills, Leiden, Ake, Lickel, Kemberling, Luckner, Boyles. Front Row-Criswell, Patronik, Palm, Ritchey. Second Row -- Estep, Gesser, Speacht, F r e n c h, Donahue, Kuhn, Rudasill, Murray, Zieg- lar, Schmid, Porte, Phillips, Koch. Third Row-Trivelas, Simmers, Bookman, Crist, Matry, Patt, Hopkins, Imler, Cooper, Pas- cale, Williams, Hess, Watson, Straw. Fourth RowAFo!'ema.n, Luckner, Pacifico, Orr, Croft, Haber- stroh, Hesser, Sigrist, Humm, Gibson, Cassidy, Adams. Front Row - Haigh, Confer, Long, Conrad, Weyandt, Gill, Maggiore, G. Hamilton, L. Hamilton, Bookhamer, Glass, Allison, Shope. Second Row - Pielmeier, Dona' hue, Leonard, Conlon, Wilson, Hawk, Kim m el, Novosel, Greaser, Funk, Mathias. Third Row-Dumm, Brubaker, Sharer, Geist, Rupert, Pletch- er, Kimberlin, Burchinal. Front Row-Koush, Alexander, Haberstroh, M. Abraham. Second Row-Metzger, Grove, Faust, Kwolek, Conrad, Kurit- zky, Criswell, Gomersall, Miss Taylor. Third Row-Brought, Brenne- man, Fry, Brumbaugh, Hum- bert, B u r k e t, Berkstresser, Hughes, Hollister. Fourth Row-Gugliotta, 'Haupt, Parkes, Coldwell, Cunningham, Deffley, Acher, H. Abraham. GIRLS' HOME ROOM REPRESENTATIVES When an important affair of the school is being staged, what organization cooperates and gets behind it to aid in its support-Mr. Pohlens 4'Girls' Home Room Representativesn of course. This outstanding new group meets on an average of once a month to discuss not only the home room problems but also vital issues of the whole school. Each home room teacher chose one girl as a representative for her group. Only girls with good scholarship records, dependability, high rating in citizen- ship, and a promising character were selected. This new organization should be congratulated for the successful projects it has completed. GIRLS LEAGUE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Who plans Sophomore Day, the L'lVlother-and-Daughter" banquet and the biennial trip to Washington? Who decides what students are worthy of receiving scholarship awards? The members of the Girls League Executive Committee, a group including the officers of the general organization and the presidents of the clubs sponsored by the League, work in cooperation with Miss Lentz and carry out these school functions. This efficient association, which makes it possible to keep close contact between the clubs and the general organization, has the power to determine the policies which shall control the work of the group. GIRLS' SQUAD LEADER CLUB Class, attention! This marks the opening of a meeting of the Girls' Squad Leader Club, held every Friday during activity period. Within the school year, each member has the opportunity to take charge of the girls in this club in order to secure practice. The members observe a demonstration of the exercises to be taught in the gym classes during the following week. With this training, they are qualified to act as student gym teachers, participating everyday in directing daily squads in their ua, b, c's." This participation, which is fun for them and entirely voluntary, develops leadership, physique, cooperation, sportsmanship, and skill. GO TO COLLEGE CLUB Next fall will find many of our graduates about to enter the field of higher learning in various colleges and universities. The Go to College Club was organized to help prospective college students select an institution suited for their needs, and to acquaint them with the general routine of college life. Under the leadership of Miss Taylor, the girls investigated entrance requirements, courses, and tuition fees of colleges which were of interest to them. They also discussed social activities of a typical college campus and made a study of the correct type of dress for college. Page One Hundred One DEVELOP PRACTICAL SKILLS... GO TO COLLEGE CLUB Interest in the Go to College Club so increased that it became necessary to divide the club into two sections for the 1939-40 term. This alert group of future collegians, under the direction of Miss Krick, made a study of cata- logues from various colleges and received additional information from graduates of higher institutions of learning who spoke to them during regular club meetings. One of the main activities of the club is an annual visit to colleges located near the city. Juniata College, Pennsylvania State College, and the Altoona Undergraduate Center were among the institutions visited during the second semester. HANDICRAFT CLUB Now what could girls be wanting to do with such materials as wood, cork, and leather? The members of Miss lda Woomer,s Handicraft Club soon proved that they knew just what to do with these objects for, during the year, they did some splendid creative work and completed interesting projects. Among the articles they made were leather belts and bracelets, wooden belts, and favors for parties. The workmanship in their tooled bookmarks and tooled pocketbooks was of exceptional quality and their plaques carved from wood were interesting. Such worthy projects as these give profitable use of leisure time. HORSESHOE CLUB The Horseshoe Club was organized for the express purpose of acquaint- ing persons interested in publication work with the various processes and procedures involved in the production of a yearbook. The club period is used for discussions of problems which arise in the publication of the H orseshoe. Since the members are particularly interested in the literary phase of the book, style of writing and page make-up receive careful attention. However, it is in this group that cover designs, art pages, and styles of type are presented and discussed. Guest speakers and field trips added interest to the program. HI-Y CLUB The Hi-Y Club, under the sponsorship of Mr. Pohle, is in close relation- ship with the Young Men's Christian Association. During the year the boys of the club find great enjoyment in helping at conferences held at the Y. M. C. A. The members also have formed a basket- ball team which helps to develop them physically as well as mentally. The outstanding social functions of the club are the alumni dance and the annual banquet for the parents of the members. Other dances are sponsored during the year, and every other Wednesday the boys attend a dinner meeting where a friendly get-together spirit prevails. Page One Hundred Two Front RowwSnyder, Pryor, Wil- liams, Shaw. Second Row-Zumsteg, Mackey, McNichol, Himebaugh, Mar- cus, Launchi, Robertazzi, Petta. Third Row-Stall, McGirk, Mar- inucci, White, Seward, Stoke, Schauer. Fourth Row-Rosskopf, Rockey, Robinson, Rupert, Wolf. Front Row-Lower, Louder, Im- ler. Second Row-Replogle, M. Sny- der, Shultz, S. Myers, H Myers, Appler, Woomer. Third Row-McGarvey, Fee Coppersmith, Maddocks. Fourth Row-M. Snyder, Lytle Stiffler. Front Row-Brallier, Haines Patt, Scott. Second Row-Slagle, Leonard, Palm, Snyder, Ferris, Straw- mire, Boliski, Yoder, Halter, Keith, Gundel, Sewall Gil- more, Gettman, Miss Givin. Third Row-R. Bentley, Adams, Cherry, Foster, J. Bentley 1 C 1 C h f' Granvi le, ar , o en, .srea ser, McAllister, Little, Starch- vill, Gilbert, Loeaara, Me- Guire. Fourth Row-Ake, Davis, John- ston, Gleichert, Smiley, Houck Noble, Brennecke, Ritchey Patton. Front Row - Simpson, Slep Kane, McDowell. Second Row-Leedy, Kilgore Scott, Rotz, Kinzer, Peters Mr. Pohle. Third Row-Johnson, Cuzzolina Heinbaugh, Earon, Ferguson Stahl, Stevenson, Leonard. Fourth Row+Fellows, Rouda- bush, Felty, Snyder. PROVIDE SPARE TIME INTEREST . . . Front Row-Ianuzzi, D. Petta, Fusco, Moffa. Second Row-Venturato, Wills, P a g l i a r a, Macedonia, H. Petta, Launchi, Laratonda Rizzo. Third Row-Pagnotta, Mangia- carne, Veleno, Gallo, Gentile, Rainelli, Consiglio, Shortino, Bidoli, Maiorino, Furgione, Pietropaulo, Hawn. Fourth Row-Lettieri, Palma , Arsena, Pucciarella, Caporus- cio, Marascia, Columbo, Iuli- ano, Dematteis, Covini, Bar- caro, Rosera, Malone, De An- tonio. Front Row-Burket, Bair, Metz- ger, Young, Pielmeier, Pacif- ico. Second Row - Bowers, Barnes Grove, Brubaker. Hancuffi Davis, Bigelow, Shuss, Weav- er, Mofta, Quintili, Richards, Sell, Miss McGuire. Third Row-Beasom, Boring Adams, Ketrow, Calandra Smeltzer, Maloy, Monahan Webb, E. Kaufman. Fourth Row-Dibert, B. Kauff- B D H ll' Parisi, Wertz, Showers, Launi: man. arr, ry, o ings worth, Shollar, Strobaugh Front Row-Rudasill, Stewart H a c k, R e is h, Scheeler Speacht. Second Row-Garrity, Aiello Howe, H. Miller, C. Miller W e s t b r o o k, Neugebauer Shaner, Warner, Treni. Third Row-Moore, Lynch, Low- ther, Crumbaker. Fourth Row - Cox, E. Miller Oellig, Olewine, Yorannone. Front Row-McNulty, Wilson. Second Row-Taylor, McGeary Ebersole, Reed, Lioy, Parks Mr. Cross. Third Row-Sharrar, Gleichert, Straw, Keller, Shields . v 1 v 1 1 1 , v i ITALIAN CLUB The Italian Club, under the direction of Mr. Crimminger, brought to- gether students with common interests and provided a splendid opportunity for them to learn more about the talents of other individuals. Particular inter- est was shown in present day conditions in Italy, and the club conducted a study of the art, music, and literature of that country. Social activity was furnished by means of the piano and radio-victrola which were available for use. A novel activity was introduced at Christmas time, and at least one club member was made happy,-that person being the lucky winner of a large turkey. KNITTING CLUBS Among the charming array of brightly colored knitted parka hoods, scarfs, mittens, and pocketbooks sported by A. H. S. girls, are to be found representative pieces of Work done by the Learn to Knit Clubs sponsored by Miss McGuire and Mrs. Young. However, before anything was knitted, the girls made a study of materials suitable for various articles, they mastered the technique of holding needles correctly in making stitches-simple or intricate. When the elementary steps had been mastered, the yarn-artists tried patterns requiring different stitches. They were then ready to knit, first articles of simple design and later more complicated ones. KNITTING CLUBS MA stitch in time saves ninei'-or so it seems with the busy workers in Misses Bell's and Downes, Knitting Clubs. Knitting has been and continues to be one of the favorite pastimes of the girls of our high school. The members of these clubs made various articles of clothing. If anyone needed help with a difficult turn in a sweater or a skirt, the sponsors and the girls all had the same motto-HHelp Thy Neighborf, The elforts of the group met with great success and many beautiful and useful articles were completed by the end of an interesting club year. KGDAK CLUB ' Whether the world would be better off without them or not, some of the boys of Mr. Cross, Kodak Club developed into regular candid camera fiends. These students snapped pictures, had them developed, and then in club meetings they compared and discussed them. Some of the pictures were taken while on club field trips. The boys studied various kinds of cameras and kodaks, different types of lenses, and methods of blullaing by trick photography. They also gained data concerning their hobby from speakers who talked during regular club meetings. Their outstanding activity was a photography contest held in the spring. Page One Hundred Five BREAK DAILY RCUTINE LEARN TO DRIVE CLUB HAre women careless drivers?', The girls of Miss Lauver,s Learn to Drive Club all say, "Now As this club is interested in learning driving rules, the mechanism of the auto and the reactions of the driving public, it will surely have no careless drivers. Discussions on traffic rules and reactions, with contributions given by each club member, proved to be very successful and held unusual interest for the girls. The club carried out a varied and detailed program for the year-may its members prove that women can be just as good drivers as men. However, this is Leap Year and the girls do have all the privileges. LEARN TO DRIVE CLUBS Ooga, oogal Boys can no longer refer with contempt to uthese women driversf because the girls are really becoming quite expert. The prospective drivers of the Learn to Drive Clubs of Misses McCartney and Nelda Miller are studying the mechanism of a car so that the ufemales of the speciesw will not be entirely helpless when engine trouble bears down upon them on a lonely lane where there is no hero able to rescue a nLady in Distressfl Members are learning rules of the road and answers to questions asked when taking a driving test. So here is to safer and saner driving! LIBRARY CLUB The Library Club aims to bring the students into working relationship with the library, so that each girl may develop the ability to locate needed materials. Girls considering library work as a career can get an idea of library requirements and organization, and the duties of employees, they can also become acquainted with numerous book tools. The club members enjoyed a get-acquainted party and a Christmas party. For one of the League meetings, the girls sponsored the assembly program, at which time several girls gave a review of a l'Career Book," and the film. NFound in a Bookf was shown. NATL. STUDENT GRAPHIC ARTS CLUB The local unit of the National Graphic Arts Club is sponsored by Mr. Romig, of the Print Shop. This club carries on a systematic exchange of ideas with other schools, but the program places emphasis on the cultural aspects of printing and the practical appreciation of the Graphic Arts for personal and social betterment. The written constitution of the national organization gives as aims the promotion of printing as a hobby in the manual arts, and the development ol' a general spirit of good comradeship between the students and the in- structor as they gain a useful knowledge of the Graphic Arts. Page One Hundred Six Front Row-Adams, J. Bickel Brown, A. Bickel. Second Row-Brurnbaugh, Ber tino, Gates, J. Bickel, Corle Brubaker, Chappell, Moffitt Crain. Third Row--Antes, Perchey Glunt, Francesco, Eisenberg, Campbell, Miss Lauver. Fourth Row-Foor, Gruber Decker. Front Row - Speacht, Sco't Shull, Noll, Kauffman, Miller. Second Row-Proietta, Spinaz- zola, Winnaugle, Williams Schultz, Rizzo, K. Wagner McMonigal, Hughes, Keexh Miss Nelda Miller. Third Row-E. Wagner. Haber Panos, W h i p p 0 , Tompkins, Silknetter, Mccloskey, Hoey Hart, Moerschbacher. Fourth Row-Swan, Heinbaugh Overcash, Snively, Nixon, Nie denthal, B. Ringler, B. Ring ler, McCready, Lindberg. Fifth Row-Prough, Rorabaugh Weamer, Snyder, Peffer, Roe- fare, Lykens, King. Front Row-Forsht, Hopkins, C0l'1I'8.d. Second Row-Kensinger, Caso, Hench, Saylor, De-lCoco, Ajay. Third Row-Line, Blatt, Miller, Kemberling, Endress, Stout, Hoffman, Owens, Houseman, Wertz, Dullinger. Fourth Row-Schlehr, Shaefet, Detwiler, Burgoyne. Front Row-Giboney, Kaylor Reimer, Price, Hyssong, Ei: chelberger, Mr. Rornig. Second Row-Wohlbruck, Schrei- ber, Hess, Howser, Over, Betz McClellan. Third Row -A Lioy. Geissinger Knipple, Grassmyer. , sf ENCOURAGE LEADERSHIP . . . Front Row-Moore, Catherman, Bragonier, Balsley. Second Row--Myers, Long, Bol- ger, Sigrist, Sutter, Woltinger, Nagle. Third Row-Harris, Steel, Quirn, Miller, Gentile, Gottshall, Kil- gore, Springer. Front Row - Roloertazzi, Ross- man, Pascale, Neher. Second Row-Ruff, Pavoni, Pe- tro, Ross, Reed, Reeder, Miss Krouse. Third Row-Pielmeier, Richards, Morgan, Rockel, 15. Madden, Meek, B. Quirin, ltiggleman. Fourth Row- Z. Madden, Mar- shall, Norris, P. Ryan, Nico- demus, Matlock, Petrocelli. Fifth Row- D. Ryan, Robison, Morris. Front Row - Watson, Widley, Willis. Second R 0 W - Seese, Sewall, Shellenberger, Whitehead. T h i r d Row - Szeyller, Stultz, Stere, Sybert, Wood, Shiplett. Fourth Row-Wallin, Sharer, Shoenfelt, Vaughn. Front Row - Anderson, Confer, Cooper, Keen, Keck. Second Row-Beck, Burkholder, Baker. Brown, Bland, Long, E. McCurdy, Johnston, Mc- Cartney, Laratonda. Third Row-Citro, Burley, Bol- linger, Boyles, Bressler, Little, R. McCurdy, Koontz, Lower, McCracken, Jarkiewicz. Fourth Row-Corrada, Caporus- cio, Criste, Bergsted, Berry, Lingenfelter, Holstein, Lewis, Laune, Lytle, Kindness. Fifth Rrow-R. Brady, Helsel, McCarI, McCool. NATURE OBSERVATION Nature, Godis handiwork, is more visibly shown to us in the springtime than any other season of the year, but the members of Miss Faustis and Mr. Yoderis Nature Observation Club iind a delight in studying nature the year round. During the year the boys go on several very interesting trips and have the privilege of seeing slides on different phases of nature. They have estab- lished four feeding stations for the birds at Lakemont. They also clipped articles from magazines to make notebooks for the Nature Observation Case. The members of the club plan the programs according to their interests. NEEDLEWORK CLUB Will needlework ever go out of style? No indeed, it is always in vogue and brings enjoyment to each generation of girls. ln Miss Krouse's group, members chose their own designs and materials and with them, worked wonders. Attractive table cloths, pillow cases, and many other articles were completed. Among those attempting fancy stitches and difficult knots, there was evidence of determination to master this art. Along with the usual amount of gossip about this and that fWhat is a sewing circle without gossipipl, the girls acquired worthwhile skills. Who knows but what these accomplishments will be invaluable to home-makers. NEEDLEWORK CLUB HA stitch in time saves ninei' is sometimes quoted by the girls of Miss Miller's Needlework Club. Needlework is tedious and the harmonizing of colors requires real skill, but the finished products are very attractive. This club gives the girls an opportunity to crochet, embroider, and weave. Both plain and fancy designs help contribute to well-finished articles which are very useful in home decoration and in personal adornment. The members made pocketbooks, tablecloths, aprons, pillows, and other articles. The purpose of the club is to develop good taste in choosing materials for needlework and to provide a profitable leisure time activity. NEEDLEWORK CLUBS Swing those hammers with a right good will, girls! Indeed yes, hammers, for the members of Miss Lowther's Needlework Club pounded pewter dishes from metal. Besides this and their regular needlework projcts, these students did some intricate weaving during the year. The girls of Miss Cristis club, who are also interested in beautiful hand- made articles, crocheted fancy bed spreads and table cloths, and made quilts. They also did some fine embroidery work on luncheon cloths, bureau scarfs, and other useful articles. ln the spring these two clubs united with the other Needleworkers for the annual exhibition of their handiwork. Page One Hundred Nine DISCLOSE HIDDEN TALENTS . . . NEEDLEWORK CLUB Bedspreads, towels, doilies, embroidery and crochet work-these are only a few of the articles turned out by Miss Gouldas Needlework Club. First of all, the girls learned how to do the various stitches, and then the real work began. The result was the production of many beautiful and useful articles which will help to bring harmony of color and design to many a home. Each girl brought in whatever type of fancy work she was most inter- ested in doing, and toward the end of the year the best articles were selected and displayed in the trophy cases on the first floor. x. NEWSWRITING CLUB Extra! Learn all about news! The Newswriting Club, under the direction of Mr. Faris and Miss Heiss, was open to staff members of the Mountain Echo and to all students interested in this type of work. Different phases of newswriting, and up-to-date trends in newspaper Work, including the make-up of a dummy, were presented and discussed. Interest in journalism and unoses for newsi' are characteristics of this enthusiastic group. Club programs included quizzes on news, newswriters, and newswriting. In the spring the club sent a delegate to the Columbia Press Convention held in New York. PHYSICS CLUB The Physics Club, sponsored by Mr. Stong, devoted much time to field trips which gave the members a chance to see, in practical operation, the theories which they had studied in their physics classes. These trips gave the group an insight into a few local industries and helped individuals in choosing future vocations. Besides this, many interesting experiments were carried out during club periods by students who thus secured a much better understanding of the physics. All in all, a very interesting and educational program was carried out by the club, and its members profited greatly by their participation. RIFLE CLUB During the last few years, hunting has become more and more popular among our high school students, however, along with this rise in popularity has come an increase in hunting accidents. In an effort to help curb this unfortunate situation, the RiHe Club members have been instructed in the correct use of firearms. Besides this, the club furnishes for each of the boys an incentive to improve his skill in rnarksmanship. The new Armory was secured for this purpose and many competitive meets were held. Such activity gives the boys an excellent opportunity to display a spirit of co- operation and sportsmanship. Page One Hundred Ten Front Row-Dubbs, Donahue Dullinger. Second Row-Haigh, Hack, De Biase, Gensamer. Third R o w - Horton, Gordon M. Gin, Faretta. Fourth Row-D. Gioiosa, Harp- ster, Flick, S. Gill, DeAntonis Dunkle. Front Row-Goldberg, Shaw Musser, Festenstein. Second Row-Moses, D. Burli- holder, Hull, Snyder, Benson Ferris, H a 1 1 e r, Holtzinger Dembert, Schwartzbart, B. Le vine, Bathurst. T h i r d Row - C. Burkholder Gettmen, Hahn, Berman, Bro- phy, Pannone, Sender, Crozier Detwiler, F o s t e r, Sawtelle Gilbert, Marcus. Fourth Row4East, A. Levine, Canan, S m i t h, Gleichert, Sacks, Schulman, Wolf, Gold- berger, Share, Stine. First Row-Misciagna, Simpson, Taylor, Savine, Mr. Stong. Second Row-Loyacona, Worrell, Wingert, Koush, Finney, Pier- son, Bentley, Ventre, Haver- stick, Betz, Slagle. Third Row-Hettler, DeBernar- dis, S w a r t z, Brumbaugh, Schwartz, Myers, Kleffman, Daniels. S n y d e r, Rodgers, Shoemaker. Front Row-Sweeney, Fagan. Second Row-Waple, Leedy. B. Long, Heacox, Smith, Morris, Ianuzzi. T h i r d Row - Sipes, Vaughn, Stumberg, Brent, Goodman, Moorhead, Eger, Rudy. Fourth R o w S Possum, Spitz, Duganne, Bowser, Chevalier, R. Long, Westley, Mangus. I I 053' PROMOTE COOPERATIVE SPIRIT . . . Front Row-Prosser, Roth, Mr. Grove, J arkiewicz. Second Row-R. Johnson, Pope Leonard, Caporuscio, Semple G. Young Davis Kattouf A Miner, Ki Millers Way, Danl drea., Otiesh. Third R 0 W - Minster, Conay Kerns, Delozier, Ferris, Earl nest, Figard, Courtney, D Frederick, W. Frederick. Fourth R 0 W - Kinsel, Carter Calasante, H. Young, Chathl ams, Estep, Luke, Sinisi, Means. F i f t h Row - Olewine, Grove Wojtowicz, Meals, Mater, Hi JOTIUSOD, Smith, C!'0ll, Hegll, McCork1e, Nelson. Front Row-Boyles, Cadle, Neu- man. Second Row - Earon, McCann, Calderwood, Flenner, Hanley, S h r a f t, Isenberg, McNulty, Joyce. T h i r d Row - Sessler, Raup, Price, Barger, Ramsey, Roth, Ritchey, Butler, Simpson. F r o n t Row - McKee, Young Hoffman, Nicodemus, Little: Paul, Morgan, Kehoe, Galardi E. Emery, R. Emery, Deboi GFCBHE, Knox. Second Row-George, Alexander, Hemphill, Reighard, Daniels, Li Ad L nn, ams, ong, Grove, Johnson, Haverstlck, Tharp, Miss Orr, Smithoover. Third Row--Musser, Ajay, Wor- rell, Amheiser, Hanawalt, Lar- nick, Ianieri, Benson, Clark, Housner, Lowe, Glover. Fourth Row-Matulnes, Cramer Gibbons, Gentile, Rigas, eral zier, Snavely, Hartsock. Fifth Row-Nassif, DeShong Butterbaugh, Lockard. Front Row-I. Caum, Hampton, B. Gesser, Price, Kuhn. Second Row-DeHaa.s, Gualano, K. Gesser, Glenn, Hoffman, Gottshall, Rigg, M. Sessler M. Sessler, Baricello, Shadel Miller. Third Row-Carolas, Fasnacht Gisrth, Sloey, P. Hanley, F-is! sel, Thompson, Labriola, Mc- Donnell, Kauttman, Metsgar. Fourth Row-Deyarmin, Hiner Hoover, Holdernan, Harpster Mangus, Grimooris, Lafferty Watson. F i f f. h ROW - Eichenlaub, M Caum, Grove, Banks, Jacobs Kimmel, McCamant, Shannon: 1 1 v I 1 v SAFETY CLUB The members of the A. H. S. Safety Club, under the sponsorship of Mr. Grove, observe the three fundamental rules of safety, Stop! Look! Listen! After these youthful patrolmen had received valuable instruction in traffic direction, they put their knowledge to practical use by guarding the safety of the students. The club program stresses the importance of care on the part of the pedestrian as well as the driver, and points out the necessity of strict adherence to safety rules. Throughout the year speakers talked on traffic control and traffic problems which confronted the school. This procedure should decrease the number of accidents. SKIPPERS' CLUB Do you boys ever think when you "sit in" on a Boys Federation as- sembly that the credit for having these programs belongs to the Skippers, Club? And did you ever stop to realize that the efficient system of boys' clubs in this school is mostly due to the efforts of the Skippers and their sponsor, Mr. Gress? Maybe you're wondering just what this club is that can accomplish so much. Well, it is made up of the Federation officers, executive committee, and all the presidents of the boys' clubs. You can readily see this club has the "inside trackn to all Federation activities. SOCIAL DANCING CLUB '6Your presence is requested at a dance to be held"-how many times will the lucky girls of Miss 0rr's Social Dancing Club receive such invitations? Along with dancing instruction, the girls are taught poise, grace, and proper ballroom etiquette. Such training gives a feeling of ease in any social group. During the year the club was visited by local authorities on dancing, who gave interesting and instructive talks on dancing and general ballroom conduct. The girls danced to the latest recordings by popular orchestras. The stag line's forming to the left, boys, so choose your partners now. SOCIAL SERVICE CLUBS The Social Service Club seeks to create in its members an interest in welfare Work which may encourage them to become leaders in this field in the future. A desired achievement is the development of an attitude of friendliness and cooperation toward those in unfortunate circumstances. Miss Puckey and Miss Fleck directed divisions of the Social Service group this year. Their groups held several joint meetings, at which time they were addressed by prominent welfare workers. An important part of the work of this organization is the annual dis- tribution of gifts at the Williamsburg Orphans' Home. Page One Hundred Thirteen AID PHYSICAL GROWTH . .. SOCIAL SERVICE CLUB 77 '6And that's that for today! Good Deed Polly appears in A.H.S. in the form of Social Service Clubs. Miss Florence Rollin's club of this group completed an interesting, as well as useful, school year. First of all, the girls got together and planned for the annual tea to be given by all the Social Service Clubs, at which successful function they were privileged to be hostesses. During the year, they took field trips to various service agencies of this city, including the Negro Center, City Hall, and the Salvation Army Home. Thus, they obtained first-hand information concerning local conditions. SOCIAL SERVICE CLUB A study of the social service agencies in the city was the principal interest of Miss Frederick's Social Service Club this season. The club made a thorough investigation of the complex net of activities in the local agencies, and studied the aims, activities, duties, and needs of the various social service organizations. To supplement their studies, the club also visited several Welfare agencies and observed them in action. Throughout the year the club heard talks given by local social service workers concerning the everpresent duties and needs of the social service workers and their agencies. SOCIAL SERVICE CLUB lt is the purpose of the Social Service Club sponsored by Miss Unverzagt to acquaint girls with types of social service work and to promote social welfare. To fulfill the first aim, this club has visited the City Hall and heard such speakers as Mrs. Bell, the representative of the Colored Com- munity Center. The members planned such activities as parties and the hanging of Christmas wreaths. They also sent Christmas gifts to the Orphans, Home at Williamsburg, where their kindness brought much happiness. UA friend in need is a friend indeedn is their slogan, and a very fine one it is. STAMP CLUB One of the clubs which is especially able to help its members in developing a valuable and useful hobby is the Stamp Club sponsored by Mr. Barr. The boys of this club get together to study the stamps they collect and to determine their value. They also note any interesting, curious, or ir- regular markings on them. Any kind of stamp may be placed in one of the various collections of the club members and exchanges are frequent. At various times during the year this enthusiastic group sponsored exhibitions of their stamps in some of the school trophy cases. Page One Hundred Fourteen Front R o w - Moyer, Cassidy, Crozier, Fusco. Second Row-Beers, Rubino, Ja- cobs, Lukens, Ventre, Mar- tella, Moses, Miss Rollins. Third Row-Rhodes, Ritchey, Niickola, Leasure, Porta, Ma- thieu, Huber, Leoni, Vaughn. Fourth Row-McGreg0I', Schwartz, Robison, Fletcher, Bsorman, Liddle. Fifth Row - Hobson, Nickola, Ward. Front Row-B. Brown, DeCarlo, Straw, Cramer, Riley, Ehradt, Showalter. Second Row-Matry, Koch, M. Brown, Keirn, DeSteiTle, An- nal, Cardinal, Disabato. T hir d Row - Duifield, Mock, Gleichert, Boyles, P e n s y l, Shortino, T a y l o r, Hort0H. Kraft, Schultz, Karle, Miss Frederick. Fourth Row - Orrler, Allfandiv Furgione, Alberts, Stiffler, Treasure, Casciotte, L e e s, Manning, Mentzer. Fifth R o W - L'-VHS, PRIOUSKY, Lickel, Kromberg, Johnson. F r o n t Row - Harkey, Hess, Campbell. Second Row-Dumrn, CSCMIIUS. McClain, Alker, Filer, I. Kant- ner, B. Hite, R. Kantner, Det- wiler, Lindie. Third Row-M. Kuhn. Lowe", Woodrlng, McGra.in, Ha.hn, J. Heller, I. Lykens, Hanks, Gor- s u c h, Robinson, Malagese, Moore, Miss Unverzagt. Fourth Row - Negley. ,KniSe1y- Mackey, Clawson, White, Chil- cate, McCready, Gonter, Ka-- bello, Heberle. Fifth RowiHelsel, Keirl, MC' Cool, Miller, R. Fickes. Front Row-Lewis, Burke, Flen- ner, Mr. Barr, McKamey, Corbin. S e c o n d R o w - Wasyliszyn, Kough, Karle, Caldwell, My- ers, Russell. ... 4. 1 ll .A ,ww FOSTER PUBLIC WELFARE INTEREST . . . Front Row-Smiley, Ritchey Bidwell, Noble, Mr. Lantz. Second R o W - Biddle, Pensyl George, Hinman, Hughes, Har: ris, Farber, Adams, Warsing Weaver. Third Row - Henry, M. Eichel- Keim, cohen, cumore, Beck: berger, K i m m e l, Leopold Hepner, Sheraw, Ashburn. Fourth R 0 W - Banks, Matry Patt, Miller, Scott. Fifth R 0 W -- J. Eichelberger Fagley, Titelman, Benfatta Stiffler, Kane, Lurie, McCorl mick, Harder, Royer, Cum- mings. Front Row-Maillard, C. Fasick Shaner, Swope. Second Row-Mr. Adams, Scott C. Gearhart, Meckley, Stew: art, Smithmyer, E. Miller McGough, Weatherly, Bryson Wagner, Sorge, Schmerbeck J. Gearhart, Marrhosm, Pe: ters, Mr. Bartholomew. T h 1 I' d ROW - Felty, Weight Beck, Martin, smith, Wie: singer, Moore, V. Miller, Wig- iield, Nelson, Matlock, James Gillaspie, Chilcote, Mentch Meintel. Fourth Row-Troutman, Long Keller, Ammerman, K o c h Harman, Hoffman, McCreary: Robison, F i n n, Kisielnicki Harpster, Rupp, Cipriano. Fifth Row-Delozier, Durkin, Wible, Ross, Va.nTries, Ward, Lotz, Yon, McClain, Baker Snyder, Pannebaker, Crozier Harker, 0. Fasicx, Davisl Leonard. F r 0 n t Row -- Stein, Teeters Thompson, Hinman, J. Ritchey Second R 0 W - M. Brown, B Brown, Hoffman, C r u m m Wingert, Muccilelli, Haines Aiken, Speacht, Pierson, Hau: ser, Haverstick, M a t t e r n Adams. Third Row-Calabrese, Gibbons W Ch rr Rei hard eaver, e y, g I Closson, White, Harris, Sew- ard, Hepner, Carn, Ketrow Figard, Sawtelle, Miss Lauver Fourth Row-Houck, Calandra Yoder, P r y o r, D. Ritchey Thomas, Patt, Matry, Moffitt Haberstroh, Hesser, McGuire Taylor, Parrish. F i f t h ROW - Smith, Fisher, Moore, G. Ireland, A. Ireland McCann, Ostrander, Marshak Boggs, Lattier, Smith, Henry Johns, Heinbaugh. Front R 0 w - Sigrist, Wagner Carn. Second Row-Servanti, Pizzino Richards, Grabill, 1-'acitico Degahd, Hatch, Finney. Third R 0 W - Whittield, Corle Loudenslager, Snyder, Jacobs Lingenfelter, Valentino, Keith Foster, McKnight. Fourth Row-Berkheimer, Hays Orner, Zeigler, Morgan, Kib: ler, Koll, Rutoia. Fifth R 0 W - Lindemer, Gray Leiden. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 STATESMANSHIP CLUB The study of contemporary problems in social and economic fields was this year,s aim of the Statesmanship Club, sponsored by Mr. Lantz. The club attempted to cultivate proper attitudes and to develop in future citizens the habits of critical thinking and cooperation. The group drafted and ratified a constitution by which the club will be governed in the future. The members of this organization learned and practiced parliamentary law and procedure, and acquired some appreciation of the value of cooperation with each other. The Statesmanship Club is the only Boys Federation club which in- cludes both girls and boys. TRACK CLUB The A.H.S. Track Club is organized expressly for those boys interested in track and field. Motion pictures of last year's track and field events were shown to emphasize form and technique. Of special interest this season, were the talks by the sponsor on cross country. Among the dis- tinguished guest speakers who addressed the group were C. D. Werner of State College and Carl Olson of Pitt. The club was instrumental in bringing to A.H.S. the world-famous runner, Glenn Cunningham, who spoke on his track experiences. In the spring the club sponsored a roller skating party which was a great success. TRAFFIC PATROL '6Other stairs pleasef' is the pet cry of the traffic patrol of Altoona High School. This group of approximately seventy selected students of the high school is sponsored by Miss Lauver. The T.A.P. may be recognized by their maroon arm-bands bearing the white insignia T.A.P. and '11-O. The duty of this organization is to maintain order and promote courtesy in the corridors between the class periods. Although the T.A.P. is not a social organization it has sponsored different social functions in the school. This past year it sponsored the Hallowe'en Social and made a great success of it. In the spring it usually sponsors a big party and dance for the enjoyment of its members. TRAVEL CLUB A desire to see the sights of our wonderful world brings together the girls of Miss Stevens, Travel Club. Even though the members are building air castles, they have found a joyous way to spend some of their leisure time. Speakers who have traveled a great deal tell of their interesting experiences and thus help the girls to realize some of the pleasures of journeying afar. Students who have traveled also relate their experiences. ln dreams they have sailed the seven seas, seen the Wonders of the World, and realized the future has something fine in store for them. Page One Hundred Seventeen BUILD PERSONALITY . . . TRAVEL CLUB Many students of the Altoona High School have the desire to travel in foreign countries, but not many have had the pleasure of journeying abroad. The partial accomplishment of dreams was brought to the girls of Miss Dunbar's Travel Club by a well-'planned program of entertainment and study. During the year they studied people, customs, and interesting places of foreign countries. Enthusiastic speakers told of their travels and not a few displayed articles they had purchased in other countries, thus making their talks of more significance and interest. Much enjoyment was derived from all travels--actually taking place or imaginary. TYPING AND SECRETARIAL CLUBS Are you a one-finger typist? The girls of Mrs. Lingenfelter's and Miss Irma Lewis' Typing Clubs aren,t, because each of them must have at least a semester of typing to her credit. During their meeting periods the members may do personal typing instead of having any planned program. This system provides a wonderful opportunity to use a typewriter. To become an outstanding secretary or business woman is the aim of the members of Miss Duncan's Secretarial Club. The girls conducted a study of office manners and proper dress, they also investigated a number of fields open to the average business woman. VIVO CLUB A chummy, neighborly atmosphere, lots of good, clean entertainment, and a first-rate basketball team make this club a fine group. Its meetings were plain old get-togethers with an occasional guest speaker. The only goal set for these meetings was a friendly good time. Having friends is one of the best things in life and the Vivo Club has been responsible for the beginning of many lasting friendships. The fellows took a real interest in their basket- ball team and it turned out to be a big success as far as real sport and fellow- ship were concerned. i VOCATIONAL SAFETY CLUB If in accident prevention, as well as in other phases of industrial activity, we are to be in keeping with this progressive age, it is clear that we should spend some time upon the elimination of the causes of accidents. In the various high school shops much has been accomplished and many hazards have been eliminated, due to the interest and watchfulness of the safety rep- resentatives. The boys in this group are also members of the National Safety Council. Mr. Heist, of the Pennsylvania Edison Company, gave a very fine talk on Industrial Safety, illustrated with interesting moving pictures. Page One Hundred Eighteen Front Row-Hess, Burket, Ca- zen, Wesley, Martino, Hesser, Mattern, Gettemy, B e n n e r, McCartney, Ostrander, Werth, Catalano. Second Row-J. Miller, Brown, Martin. Hart. Gin, Mu-obelu, Corbin, A. Miller, Tromm, An- derson, Miss Dun bar. Third R o W - Helsel, Griffith, Prosperi, Rouzer, Chathams Keagy, McCracken, Buchanan Goshorn. Fourth R. 0 w - Parsons, Hare, Gority, Podgurski. Front R o w - Edwards, Croft, Brown, .Mastos, Schandelmei- er, Albright, Bookman, Maru- schak, Trivelas, Jones, Porta. Second Row-Diamond, Hugh, Roy, Horton, Masucci, Willis, S h 1 r k, Lebo, Wertzberger, Luther, Evangelista, Detiore, Laratonda, Dente. Third Row-Conner, Rubino, Di. Nicola, P a n n 0 n e, Wolfe, Grace, Boyer, Fonner, Davis, Gates, Schmelzlen. Fourth Row-Hauser, Kraus, W00d, Kimmel, Reader, Han- sen, Piotrowski, Eichelberger, L. DeLeo, Cerullo, Fink. Fifth Row-McCormick, Fagley, Caswell, Covert, Sherman, Fi- gard, Biel, Bienlck, Cunning- ham, Speece, Furgione, J. DeLeo. F r o n t Row - Weidel, Frank, Creamer, Fleck. Second Row-Klobetanz, Siem- mer, Abdallah, Davis, Misi- tano, Kitt, Fochetta, Mos- chella, Mainello, Mr. Graf. Third RoW4ZakrzewsKl, Snyder, Shamas, Breslin, Kasun, Mein- tel, Shannon, Calderwood. Fourth Row-Grassi, Deleo, De- stadio, Weamer, Campbell, N icomede. Fifth Row - Perove, Molllca, Simms, Fasick, Gonter, Red- line, Wealkland, J. Bayle, Ceglar, D. Bayle. Front R o w -- Ktslelnicki, Mr. Ross, Hess. Second Row- Smith, Bracken, Malsotzki, McGregor, Ritchey, Housholder. Third Row-DeFiore, Koestner, Reisinger, B r 0 W n, Means, Marshall. Fourth Row-McMa,namy, Muro, Leonard, Akers, Grassmyer. 1 1 . , DEVELOP PERSONALITY . . . Front Row-Baird, Estep, P Brown. Second R o w - J. Burkholder, Corso, Clapper, D. Burkhold er, Edmonds, Chippertield. Third Row-Benn, M. Eichelber ger, Cardinal, J. Eichelberger, Chambers, M. Brown, Breon, Brandt, Clarke, Alwine, Am- heiser, J. Brown, F. Brown. Fourth Row-Bene, Eisel, Clos son, Banks, Aurandt, Bath urst, Bradley. Front RowiWeamer, E. Snyder G. Yon. Second R o w - Sutton, Wight- man, Taylor, Wagner, Shaal, Shaffer, Vance, Varlotta.. Third Row-Szuhaj, H. Yon Selwitz, Summers, Schmeier Samuels, Stewart, Simpson Shute, M. Snyder, Warsing Spearing, Trout. Fourth Row-Weakland, Wertz Thomas, Williams, W e s l e y Schuh, Snoberger. Front Row-Hoff man, Grassmy- er, Haupt, French, Hall. Second Row-Flory, Laing, Hile- man, Galardi, Lovell, Umbow- er, Gallace, Hamilton. Third Row-Huber, Gearhart, L. Hill, Fluke, Fasick, Larnick, Foor, Getz, Titus, Gettys, Miss MCC8.UlBy. Fourth Row-Gindes, Gurisallus, Kucharek, Gallo, F o n n e r, Green, Force, Fagley. Fifth ROW-Lilly, Heist, A. Hill, Long. Front Row - McCombre, Hawk Murray, Phillips, .P r e s s e l Rose. Second Row-Miss Lewis, Far- ber, Long, Wingert, Mace- donia., Boyle, Musser, Grove, Palmer, Koch, Robison, Robb, Miller, Polidori, Posiowaych, Peters. T h i r d Row - Barr, Sanders Clemens, Feathers, Mussel: man, Smith, Williams, Neafs fer, Russell, Morgan, Wertz, Rouzer, Poorman, Pellegrini. Fourth R 0 W - Decker, Scott, Shoemaker, Bergstein, Young Zinn, Smales, Otto, Penning: ton, Orner, Nevitt. Fifth Row-Patterson, Carrig Consiglio, Streight, G l a s s Pollard, Riner, Piedilato. 1 1 WORLD FRIENDSHIP CLUB The girls who were members of Miss Buck,s World Friendship Club strove to understand the meaning of peaceful fellowship. To appreciate a true world-mindedness, it was necessary that they recognize one another's problems, hence reports were made by club members. The group discussions disclosed geographical differences, customs, and historical backgrounds. Speakers who have traveled in foreign countries, frequently visited with the club. At other times post cards and various displays were utilized in programs. The correspondence from foreign students proved to be both educational pnd interesting, and, if continued, should provide an absorbing hobby for the uture. WORLD FRIENDSHIP CLUB It is the purpose of Miss Harner's World Friendship Club to stimulate student interest in the people of foreign lands, to undersiand them and to cultivate an intelligent attitude toward the maintenance of friendship and peaceful relations between countries and individuals in these countries. Members of the club corresponded with c'Pen Palsi' in foreign lands and also heard speakers who talked about political and social conditions which exist in other countries. The purpose of this club is to acquaint the girls with the customs and traditions of foreign countries and thus bring about a feeling of good will towards people of other lands. WORLD FRIENDSHIP CLUB The World Friendship Club under the sponsorship of Miss McCauley fosters an understanding of life and ideals of other countries among its members. The club stands for a sympathetic interest in other countries, with the hope of ultimate peace and a feeling of good will among nations of the world. Several interesting talks were given to the group by visitors, some of them residents of foreign countries. The girls corresponded throughout the year with citizens of several foreign nations, especially those of South America. Another interesting phase of club activity was the study of peace symbols throughout the world. WORLD FRIENDSHIP CLUBS The girls in Miss Croveis and Miss Elsie Lewis, World Friendship Clubs are trying to promote friendship among the peoples of the various nations of the world. ln fulfilling this purpose, members were fortunate to hear a number of enlightening talks by qualified speakers, among whom was Mr. John McAfee, who gave interesting facts concerning far-away lands. 'Ten Pals" from abroad, who have aroused the interest of American youth, might become helpful as peace makers of tomorrow. Members of the clubs studied customs of different countries and presented short sketches depicting typical homes in various nations. Page One Hundred Twenty-one I I in ,au ALTOONA'S Dale Harten Chester Ehredt BAND AND ORCHESTRA Mr. Krivsky The orchestra and band represent individual and group achieve- ment. Each member of these respective organizations must measure up to certain standards as individual musicians. Then these per- sonalities and temperaments are forged into a musical unit. As this is no small accomplishment on the part of members or conductor, the school may be justly proud of her symphony orchestra and military and concert bands. Each has a record to be proud of. Our orchestra has traveled to various towns in central Pennsylvania, giving concerts which have been enthusiastically received. They present concerts each year for public attention, featuring soloists HS well as selections by the whole group. Each fall, those who see and hear the band in its trim military regalia, during the football season, are impressed with the enthusi- asm aroused by music. What would these games be without the added zest and color of this organization, with its brilliant marches and its stirring '4Alma Mater" at the half ? The band, too, presents a concert each season. It also won state and interstate recognition for marching precision and musical distinction. As you no doubt realize, this is not accomplished without a great deal of work and effort, patience and cooperation, not of a few, but of all the members. This cooperation engenders a feeling of fellowship and mutual attainment. Those seriously interested in music are given an opportunity to play with others in the state who are similarly interested. Each year the outstanding members meet, forming a large symphony orchestra which presents some of the most difficult music in the symphonic repertoire. The members of the band likewise compete for the privilege of playing in a state-wide concert band. These musical activities are conducted for the betterment and advancement of Pennsylvania's public school music. Fortunate indeed are those students who participate. Music is an important factor of our school life and these two organizations play a major part in that life by fostering a feeling of fellowship and loyalty among our students. Page One Hundred Twenty-two BAND: Bb Clarinets-R. Macln-tyre, E. Flickinger, R. Balthaser, W. Camberg, H. Crider, J. DeAntonis, L. East, D. Delozier, T. Ellstrom, G. Fagan, F. Fee, C. Flickinger, R. Foust, E. Houston, P. lacovella, R. Kjellman, F. Lamb, G, Lloyd, H. Lowery, A. Lukens, J. Meckley, C. Nedimyer, A. Misciagna, J. Rice, R. Sel- ders, D, Slep, H. Shiplett. Eb Clarinets-P. Gallace, C. Piper. Bass ClarineteA. Dubbs. Flutes and Piccolos- G. Makdad, G. Harman, J. Potter, J. Tate. OboevD. Korns. Bassoon-D. Gibboney. Librarian-J. Haigh. Bb Cornets and TrumpetsfW. King, R. Ainscough, M. Amheiser, L. Bidoli, R. Dematteis, J. Felty, R. Flen- ner, R. Fluke, D. Houseman, W, Kimmel, J. Martin, J. Pittman, B. Rhodes, W. Smith, G. Smouse, R. Strong, W. Sunday, R. Weakland. French Horns-G. Houseman, F. Bastian, R. Hoover, W. Kilgore, D. Miller, D. Petta, E. Petterson, P. Rice, R. Schilling, J. Sims. BlaritonesiD. Detwiler, J. Caraher, K. John, F. Weamer. Eb Alto Saxophones-R. Fetter, C. Hall, W. Nearhoof, F, Rosgia, J, Sgro, R. Hurley. Bells-R. Dumm. Tympani-R. Weamer- Tr0mb0I1eS-N. Meredith, G. Bistiine, R. Boiger, R. Dumm, R. Edminston, D. Good, D. Houpt, M. Knouse, R, Laughlin, J. Meintel, R. Mierley, A, Nole, L, O'Connor, J. Parsons, R. Rupert, T. Scott, W. Spahn, R. Zimmerer. Bb Tenor Saxophones-H. Saylor, Eb Baritone Saxopihones-G. Pinizzotto. BBb Basses-J. Yost, K. Harnish. R. Smith. Eb Basses-D. Wambaugh, R. Gable, E. Long, E. Rollison. Snare Drums-L. Appleman, J. Barley, E- Jones, W. Martin, R. zimmers. Bass DrumAL. Roudabusn. Cymbals! D. Isenberg, E. Raible. ORCHESTRA: Violin A-D. Brennecke, J. DeLeo, D. Detwiler, G. Deshong, R. Garman, M. Gettemy, B. Panagos, N. Thompson, W. Shields, M. Wingert. Violin B-A. Burns, M. Cunningham, B. Gearhart, R. Gib- boney, E. Hershey, J. Ivory, K. Marcus, B. Mehaffie, M. Mignogna, M. Musser, C. Notopoulos, M. O'Connor, J. Pruyn, J. Spahn, M. Yorgy, B. Price. Viola-J. Findlay, J. Malone, J. McCachran, H. Schwartzbart. Cello- E. Gayman, E. McCurdy, R. Thompson. Bass Clarinet-A. Dubbs. Bassoon-D. Gibboney. Bass-E. Coldwell, H. Mehaffie, C. Miller, R. Rodgers, R. Topper. Oboe-D. Korns. Flute-G. Harman, G, Makdad, J. Potter. Clarinet A-T. Ellstrom, R. Kjellman, R. Maclntyre, C. Nedimyer. Clarinet B-F. Fee, E. Flickinger, G. Fore- man, E. Houston, J. Meckley, G. Pinizzotto. Alto Sax. A-C. Flickinger, R. Harris. Alto Sax. BPJ. Clark, T. Ferrara, G. Lloyd- Tenor Sax.-H Sayler- Librarian-H. Kimmel. Baritone sax.-F. Lamb. Trump-et A-R. Ainscough, J. Caraher. Trumpet B-R. Force, B. Rhodes. French Horn A-G. Houseman, G. Schade. French Horn BST. Clemens, J. Sims, P. Rice. Trombone-G. Bistline, D. Houpt, N. Meredith, L. O'C0nnor. Piano-M, Clouse, R. Croft, F. Prestipino. Guitar-J. Wolf. Drums-R. Weamer. Tympani-J. Barley. MMS H...-1... f' ,NTLM 7 ,QE Q fi'AQ Q , 1 ., "' Sf N gkhqguayg3MHU3 3 sf Q X' Q5 H' if M . M LQSVJ ' , "" 'L df-Q Q : X . ,S W , Q 2, EH g I Qw'E1,l A-.im - iw . X x dd N A XX M Xx v , 3 ' 'E 1 5 1 e 2 5 Q 2 3 Y 2 2 x 3 x Q Q I Miss Alma Eberle Front Row - Peters, Clouse B o y er , Cramer, Shaffer: K e l r n, Witherow, Collins Shoal, Mackey, B a k e ri Mathias, Gundel, Laing, Porte Biddle, Clark. Second Row-Baird, Wagner, Hughes, Green, Crain, Nader Vecere, Waee, Fleig, Watts Campbell, L. Williams, Hanl ley, Berkstresser, Werth. Third Row4Anderson, Bechtel Bathurst, Barr, Gesser, Glen Thompson, Nearhoof, Beam Heaps, Schraeder, Emory Nole, Miler. Fourth Row-Way, Piper, Sch- merbeck, DeNardo, Probst Brown, Snavely, Silknetter: Lingle, M. Williams, Hahn. Fifth Row-Ditcher, Holt, S H i l l, Goodfellow, Decker Bickel, E. Hill, Samuels, Mc- G r e g o 1' , Hauser, Robinson Niedenthal, Bowers. Bill King Front Row-Clouse, Nedimyer Maclntyre, Meintel, Saylor. Second RowiRogers, Sunday, Ainscough, Arnneiser, Mere- dith, Nole. Third Row - Fetter, Barley, King. Mr. Krivsky Front Row - Scott, Mierley, Houpt, Meredith, Meintel, O'- Connor, Edmiston. Second RowfParsons, Dumm, Good, Zl1'I1I1'i6!'EI', Spahh. Third Row - Rupert, Bulger, BiStliIl8, Knouse . GIRLS' CHORUS Melodies sweet and music gay Refrains to chase your blues away. Feeling blue? If you are, just casually saunter by Room 317 when the second period Girls' Chorus, under the direction of Miss Alma Eberle, is in the daily rehearsal, going full tilt, and listen as your "Blue Skiesn roll away. ' This organization is made up of thirty-eight girls, bound together by one delinite purpose-to sing for the pleasure and entertainment of others, as well as for their own enjoyment. Out of this group the girls chose the following to represent them as officers: President, Constance Keirng Vice President, Penny Collins, Secretary, Patty Witherowg Pianists, Mar- garet Ann Hughes and Miriam Johnson. By singing both sacred and secular numbers, they have added much to many school programs, social functions, and church services. DANCE BAND One of the most popular organizations in our school is the dance orchestra, which has proved to be practically a necessity in our school life. What would our socials be without this snappy band to furnish sweet melody and contagious rhythm to which we might swing and sway? And our Friday afternoon dances depend directly on this group. Besides providing music for dances, the orchestra often entertains in assembly meetings with the latest popular hit tunes. The members haven't confined their talents to high school alone, but have played successful engagements in various surrounding towns. This band of young musicians is representative of youth itself. lt has within it that spirit of restlessness and motion that is youth. The music is light and frivolous. It is born in a moment to pass as quickly- like a summer breeze, as 'cvisions of the futurej' materialize, there come deeper thoughts and serenity. Since the dance orchestra is organized and directed by students, it is, in a sense, independent of our music department and faculty. TROMBONE CHOIR Men about town-and swinging into top place in their number of appearances on top notch musical programs, the Trombone Choir has certainly reached new heights. There,s no limit to what the boys under Mr. Krivsky's direction can play. Whether itas a martial clarion call, a fanfare, the solemn chords of a religious composition, the haunting refrain of an American folktune, or the swing of this mad but merry season, the Trombone Choir is always ready to suit the music to your mood. Practically the 'ababya' of the musical organizations of AHS, it,s very much the precocious child-and we've yet to see any other school choir that can surpass its achievements. The boys won new laurels in the Annual Show by their smart versa- tility from the swing to the sublime. Radio, too, called for their services this year, and we're going to have to do something drastic about the already rapidly-building-up schedule for the coming year! Page One Hundred Twenty-five 4... .. L.. - se. A CAPPELLA CHOIR: T. Ainsworth, E. Ajay, L. Ajay, W. Anderson, J. Archer, E. Banks, J. Beeler, V Bigelow, G. Bistline, A. Blackburn, P. Bland, M. Boltz, A, Bowman, D, Bray, J, Brought, M. Brophy, L Brown, V. Brumbaugh, H. Burley, E. Caldwell, L. Canan, M, can-1, M, Clemens, B, Casner, M, Clousey J Cole, A. Cramer, J. Cross, J. Cunningham, L. Denardo, L. Detwiler, A. Ditcher, J. Donaldson, R. Drenning M. Dumrn, L. Earon, D. Eichelberger, J. Faris, H. Fissel, R. Force, B. Foust, V. French, R. Fry, D. Gaines J. Galloway, M. Gilbert, J. Gilmartin, E. Gilmore, N. Gordon, M. Grassmyer, S. Gray, B, Greaser, S. Griml shaw, L, Hahn, V. Hammaker, L. Hampton, E. Hanawalt, B. Haupt, M. Haupt, R, Harrity, G. Heller, F Hilman, J. Hinman, A. Hirst, M. Hobson, J. Houseman, M. Houseman, G. Houser, E. Houston, R, Hughes, A Ireland, G, Ireland, R. James, K. John, C. Kahle, P. Kauffman, R. Kelley, P. Kleffel, V. Keith, P. Lafferty, M Leonard, C. LeVan, E. Little, B. Long, E. Lower, T. Luciana, L. Lucas, K. Luckner, E. McAllister, N. Mc- Cartney, E. McClain, P, McGarvey, G. McGraw, J. McNamara, H. Mackey, W. Maier, Y. Maiorino, G. Mak- dad, A. Maloy, K. Marcus, J, Martz, K. Mater, L. Meckley, J. Meyer, G. Miller, M. Miller, A. Moyer, M Moffit, N. Musser, L. Nickol, T. Orange, J. Osner, A. Ostrander, M. Owens, S. Palm, E, Pennock, J. Peters E. Pierson, E. Piper, E. Pryor, R. Quiggle, J. Rigg, E. Rigg, D. Robison, M. Schauer, Y. Schulman, S. Scott R. Selders, D. Shaffer, W. Shinn, E. Shultz, S. Snoberger, J. Snyder, L. Snyder, M. Snyder, V. Sorge, L Stevens, J. Stewart, M. Stine, J. Stoke, J. Straw, B. Strawmire, J. Stoudnour, D. Stultz, V. Summers, P Swartz, A. Szcyller, P. Thomas, J. Treese, H. Troutwein, W. Wagner, C. Walters, J. Weaver, H. Wenner, P Wertz, M. White, M. Wightman, J. Wilbur, V. Williams, L. Wilson, J. Wolf, A. Wolfe, L. Wood, J. Wood, R Wynekoop, M. Yost. GIRLS' A CAPPELLA CHOIR: C. Albright. P. A16Xander, M. Amheiser, L. Ashburn, H. Aveni, E. Barr, M, Bookman, A. Boorman, H. Brice, D. Brown, V. Burkhart, E. Caldwell, M. Carn, H. Carner, B. Casner, L Clawson, J. Crain, D. Cramer. A. Crist, B-. Cullison, A. DeAntonis, P. Downing, A. Figart, S. Geist, J. Glass, R. HaFTiS, F. HaFpSt6F, M. Haften, M. Heller, E. Himebaugh, H, HQWQ, F, Imler, B, ,I3,C0bS, E, Keen, L Kensinger, E. Kindness, P. Kiser, G. Knox, M, Laratonda, J, Lees, H, Logkard, A, Louder, J. Lower, A Lowey. J- McDonough, M. MCGarvey, E- MCMH111, H. Mentzer, C. Miller, M. Miller, T. Nardella, F. Parsons J. Phillips, R. Reighard, B. Santilena, E. Saylor, M. Saylor, B. Shaw, B. Shiplett, R. Snyder, M. St Pierre, B. Sucklin-g, V. Swan, G. Sweet, E. Trivelas, R. Wagner, B. Wallace, I, Watson, L. White, A. Wolfe, M. Worrell, V. Detwiler. Page One Hundred Twenty-six 1 , T A CAPPELLA CHOIR sl-:ARP OR FLAT . . . NEVER ustart the day right," is the motto of those one hundred and fifty girls and boys who report promptly to Room 315 the first period every morning. A rustle of music, a shifting of the chairs, a tap, tap, tap of the baton, a lifted arm, the sound of young voices all raised in song, and the Mixed A Cappella Choir, under the direc- tion of our beloved '4Pop,' Lindaman, is in session. The A Cappella Choir, one of the finest and best known musical organizations in Altoona and surrounding communities, has built up a reputation for itself that is very difficult to surpass. Always willing to lend their talents, the group has added much to assembly programs and community affairs. The choir appeared with the famous sculptress, Baroness Silvercruys, when she lectured in the Roosevelt auditorium. The vocalists also sang several selec- tions in the Christmas Pageant and held the annual Christmas Vesper Service at the Broad Avenue Presbyterian church. Stepping out of character this year, the choir put everything it had into making the football spirit predominant throughout the school during the fall season. The members of the group took a very active and colorful part in the Annual Show and, as a fitting close to a successful year, they sang at the Sunday Service for Graduates held in the Jaffa Mosque. Our hats are off to you, 'fPop," and to your A Cappella Choir! GIRLS' A CAPPELLA CHOIR Room 315 seems to be a very popular and by far the most musical spot in Altoona Senior High School. Peering in there dur- ing the second period, we see a room crowded with a bevy of pretty girls. Upon inquiring from their director, Mr. Wood, who has been dubbed "Woodie,', we learn that the Girls' A Cappella Choir is about to go into its regular morning rehearsal. This organization, due to its variety of selections and its own inimitable way of rendering them, has become well known and popular in Altoona and neighboring districts. During the school term the Girls' A Cappella Choir took part in many school and community affairs. It appeared in the Thanks- giving program and the Christmas Pageant. For National Educa- tion Week it rendered selections over the local broadcasting station and also appeared at many churches and various clubs. To ring down the curtain on their brilliant season, they reached a new high in their performance in the Annual Show. Page One Hundred Twenty-seven Mr. Lindaman Mr. Wood CURTAIN CALLS ON ALTO0NA'S DRAMATICS The New Poor The Miracles of the Clock The Boy in the Meadow The Laundry Mark Hy Hoe Miss Magee A brilliant season, according to dramatic standards, was enjoyed by AHS students, both those who participated in and those who viewed the performances. First among the hits of the year was The New Poor, the annual play of the English department, directed by Miss Magee. The story opened with the wealthy Wellbys at a complete loss when their servants stage a 'cwalkoutl' and the daughters cannot manage the large home. Their business-like brother is disgusted when he Hnds how helpless his sisters are, and introduces some sup- posed Russian nobility, who act as servants. The action moved swiftly to the climax, when the Russians are unmasked as imposters. All's well that ends well, however, and the path of love runs smooth when the friend of the family is unmasked as the villian and the c'Russians" prove to be actors out of work. Christmas was duly observed with a musical pageant, The Miracles of the Clock, presented under the direction of Miss Magee. The pageant took place before a clock tower, where, it was believed, the miracle of Christas birth was re-enacted every year. Against a beautiful, medieval setting, showing the rich coloring of illuminated windows, the Christmas pageant unfolded "The Miracle" of the Nativity in beautiful tableaus, stories, and carols. The Girls League, too, came in for its share of laurels with the presentation of a Christmas play, The Boy in the Meadow, with Miss Grace Breidenstein directing. This one-act play, centered about the story of an orphan, living with a German peasant family, who sees a vision on Christmas eve. Because of her unselfish love, the orphan is well rewarded on Christmas day. The Laundry Mark, a one-act comedy, was the feature of the paid-assembly program presented by the Girls League Dramatics Club under the direction of Miss Batrus. The story was about Winfrid Donovan, a one-hundred-per- cent American boy. At one time he has a flair for the neighborhood band, at another an enthusiasm to enter radio slogan writing contests. When he entered and won a laundry slogan, the use of the money given as his prize brought grave family problems. Seeing New York with the Hoe Family was the theme of this yearls annual show, Hy Hoe, the script of which was written by the senior students in several of the English classes. Mr. Lindaman was the director. Winning a contest entitling them to a free trip to New York, the Hoe family plans a tour of points of interest in New York. The scenes depicted the Hoe family at home planning for their sight- seeing tour, at a philharmonic orchestra concert, a night club, Madison Square Garden, and an opera. Page One Hundred Twenty-eight 'hy-.X 9 Qfifwv ? X Sa M ff ? ?' Q 4, DRAMATICS CLUBS Front Row-Lafferty, Matry, Harris. Second Row-T. Dodson, 1-'ana gos, W. Wood, DeAngelis Daubenspeck, Finnley, Bro- phy, Heaps, Summers, La- Morte, Kelly, DeNardo, Ed- wards, Michaels, Walters Weaver, Hinman. Third Row-Blackburn, 1-Iouser Flegler, Dougherty, Cramer Paff, Clark, Biddle, 1,. Dod- son, Algoe, Muir, Bradinsiiy Goodfellow, Teeters, Gaines. Fourth Row-Batrus, Burtnette, Patronik, Ellis, Beam, Horner Mallory, L. Wood, Downing Nale, Wise, Orange, Earle. Fifth Row - Gilmartin, Boltz Getz, Warsing, Manspeaker Burns, Thomson, Emory, But- ler, Gable, McGregor, Holtz- inger. Front Row - Sirnmers, Wertz, Langer, J. Wolf. Second Row-Barrett, Sparks, Cramer, Davis, Stiffler, Yorgy, P. Dembert, J. Miller, Porter, Brown, Behe, Conrad, Wolfe, Whitsel, Szedlacsek, Zakrzew- Ski. Third Row-Mosser, Penmon Holt, Brisbin, Kneidinger, M Dembert, Victor, Detwiler, Segrniller, Fritsche, Thomas- hesky, Cain, Jacobson, Sickles Patterson. Fourth Row - Pheasant, An- spach, Fisher, McNamara Stewart, Phillips, Kiser, Barrf Musser, Johnson, Weidmann B. Woodcock. Fifth RowMMcDowell, Brande Paisley, Boal, Ebersole, Seidel Filer, Nagl, Hollen, Swan, Ai Woodcock, Raber. 1 v 1 Y The lights are dimmed, the curtains part, and the stage is set for another presentation of Miss Batrus' Dramatics Club. To give every girl an opportunity to appear on the stage is one of the aims of the organization. This club is divided into eleven small groups and each group is held responsible for one program during the year. At a special paid assembly in February, the Dramatics Club pre- sented a play for the Girls League scholarship fund. Farther up stageg farther down stageg louder, please! Such directions are heard in meetings of the Dramatics Club sponsored by NESS Brc?dlenstein. The girls of this club delve into interesting p ases o ramatics, and stress correct methods of s eakin both on and off stage. Reports were given on outstanding mldvies End plays. Short plays which tested the dramatic ability of the members were presented at various meetings. The feature presentation of this group was The Boy in the Meadow. 1 . .-.. c4Last call! Curtain going upli' The house lights are dimmed and the members of Mr. Dejaiffejs stage crew get the material ready to go on for the next scene. The boys work on all the stage productions, including several outstanding programs. The club activities include addresses and demonstrations by persons experienced in this phase of dramatic production. These boys are to be congratulated for their fine accomplish- ments. Their tasks are not easy-they have quite a bit of night work, too, and '4Who likes night work?'7 From a small group, which had its beginning before the Boys' Federation was organized, this club has grown into an indispensable part of our school program. These boys capably handle the usher- ing of football games, special assemblies, P. T. A. meetings, com- mencements, and various outside activities. Very few people realize the amount of work an usher must do or how well he does it. But seldom is the time that any praise for him is heard. He, like a great many other things in life, is taken for granted. STAGECRAFT CLUB USHERS' CLUB Front RowfFields, Mr. Dejaiffe, Calderwood. Second Row-Patterson, Shinn, Foster, Stouffer, Lockard, Young, Tate, DeStefano, Man- gus. Third RovvgReed, Sykes, Quan, Crider, Stoll, W. DeJaiffe, Werner, Boggs, Black, Haines, Bartley. Fourth Row--Maier, Tate, Bry- ant, G r 0 v e, Rickabaugh, Shock, McGregor, McDowell, Simpson, Stohl, Thrayer. Front Row e Mitchell, Leber- hnger, Schmoke, Jackson, Seese, Henderson, Lynn, Mor- gan, McCachren, B. Foster, R. Miller, Ostander, Mr Plummer, Boslet, Whitesel Breslin, Brubaker, D. Miller R. Greiner, Leipold, Paul Baker. Second Row - Drenning, L Schroth, Allmond, Brady Musser, R. Greiner, Fiester Dunn, Shover, Sigrist, Wil- liams, Davis, Campbell, Misko English, Frank, Prough, Wat- son, Staino, Runyen. Third Row-Hoopes, W. Foster M. Deffley, B. Simpson Geist, Neff, D. Smith, Mock Peo, Grove, Moore, B. Sehroth Graffius, Cardone, Donley Wiberg, Shimer. Fourth Rowil Deffley, Boyle McCarl, De Peepe, Russo Flanagan, Henry, W. Smith Moran, Woomer, Shiffler Bearr, King, Chaplin, Weyant Mayer, Rock. Fifth Row4Carrolus, Carroll Burkhart. Houck, Edwards Wakefield, Wolfe, Sponsler Weamer, Levine, Laws, Wen ner, Parish, Byrne, W. Simp son, Small, Plunket, Conrad GLIMPSES OF HY HOE REHEARSAL Over the Barrels- "Hy Hoe," Off We Go Boy Meets Horn On Skates Team Work With a Swing Directed by Howard nPop,' Lindaman, the Annual Show has become a fitting example of the cooperation and ingeniousness of the student body, for the task of preparation and production is the concern of the entire school. When the curtain rises, a master spectacle is presented, but, in reality, the curtain goes up on a perfect coordination of school facilities. Here is scenery, beautiful and realistic, whose intricate design is the work of the art depart- ment. Now, a glamorous costume sweeps into view, the pride of the sewing classes. Then, as the lights are changed or an uncanny effect occurs, the stage crew lends a hand. A rousing song, a thrilling dance, a side-splitting comedy-all are the results of an extensive talent campaign. To the directors, to the actors, to the choirs, the technicians, the authors, and all who annually boost this show to its dazzling heights, go the orchids for a wonderful performance. Truly a production of the students, by the students, and for the whole town, the Annual Show takes its place among the traditions of the Altoona High School. Page One Hundred Thirty-two HLETICS gf 1 , f f 1 , 1 M T' '4 1 f L 1 ,lf ' ' .- .Ji f 1 ,M J ' 1 -x. 'Zi x ,L + , 5134 I J KL f q , fb 1 7 Y Q4 J 122 ' ,L 1 fu 3 x 'E rl 1 .N 5? . . f':5! A'?jL ffffffiefi' N X ' If 1 v ull is an P -' . U. vm AQ 'ii-in ff' 'Wh 6797- 'N -. 2. "Q, . V. Ni, xi- 1 f f - x -H. ir 'A' ir " NN xQ Q xx X I X xXx wr :if- we 55411 s s xi ...,. N x X fi .Q-.N Jw..- Q 2,315 A, Bmw' W 'Mfg 'SW 'W y ' , S. W..- 'Q wi.. I 0431. ALTOONA'S ATHLETICS 'k Q.. 235 ,Q .5 . x I 1 Q x. s. N...- N... E Q 1' aw 14 S1323 Z h w kwa if X, 3 ,Qgmgwv A :i'i2"'Xlfe: my 2 MY' " '3:fS531:'f- ffwng , fifseigy ,mx--3 , L Hiram iwiiffgz BUILDERS GF TEAMS . . MOLDERS OF MEN A decade of efhcient service has marked the participation of the Athletic Council in the sports program of the Altoona High School. Organized in 1930 to regulate all athletic activities, the board is com- prised of seven members, including the principal of the school, the superintendent of schools, the president of the Board of Education, the secretary of the School Board, the faculty sports director, a faculty representative, and a representative from the student body. In chartering this group, the Board of Education provided for wise and impartial administration of all sports through a central organ- ization. Regular semi-monthly meetings, in addition to special confer- ences when the occasion demands, enable the council to carry out its important work. Not only do such responsibilities as schedule arrangement and other inter-scholastic problems fall into these able hands but also the task of purchasing equipment, the issuance of awards, and the regulation and enforcement of athletic rules. Not alone for the star athlete has the sports program been prepared. Rather, through the elforts of the Athletic Council, a well rounded system of intramural as well as inter-scholastic events Mr. Bashore has been established in order that all might reap the benefits of physical development. Competitive intramural sports are designed to develop in the average student the valuable qualities of sports- manship and cooperation. During the past ten years, the services of the Athletic Council have become of invaluable assistance in all phases of the sports pro- gram-on the field, in the school, and with the spectators. Now an indispensable feature of the athletic department, the council swings into its second decade of administration with an earnest desire to make better sports of and for the students of Altoona High School. Standing-Mr. Thompson, Earon. Sitting-Mr. Wolfe, Dr. Gilbert, Mr. Maddocks, Mr. Williams. Page One Hundred Thirty-nine ALTOONA'S IRGN MEN RAMBLE FI'DI1t Row, Thompson, Cadle, Stewart, Tromm, Sopato, Stouffer, Fuoss, G. Kauffman, Rhod Br n es, ow , Ramsey, Butler, Boyles, Riggle, Russell, Claybaugh. Second Row, Georgiana, Miller, Contakos, Berry, Speacht, Creamer, B. Kaufman, Karl, Bayer, Wright, Yeager, Twardon, Hamilton, Russo, Balestino, Third Row, Posiowaych, Ventresca, Turchetta, Long, Frontz, Kelly, Hopper, Cassidy, Popetti, Nardell, Yeager, Mentzer, Andros, Jamison, Fennell. Fourth Row, Pfeffer, Hanley, Sopato, Shaner, Mr. Bartholomew, Gardner, Love, Mr. Wear, Mr. Morse, Mr. Bashore, Maseia, Cataldo. ln answer to the call for football candidates on August 21, a hundred and fifty boys, none veterans, turned out at Mansion Park field. From these hopefuls, after a month of intensive training, an eliiciently reorganized coaching staff selected fifty lads to comprise the four varsity teams. With a new head coach and backfield mentor at the helm, the Mountain Lions sailed into the 1939 grid season with a record of but twin losses for two previous years. Starting in proper style, the Maroon Club vanquished Huntingdon, with Greensburg, Johnstown, Lewistown, and Erie Strong Vincent falling into the Lionis den to be devoured in victory. The Maroon gridders emerged in glorious victory from a Johnnie fray, were handed a surprise defeat by Norwin, a newcomer, and then closed the season by halting Lewis- town on the brink of an undefeated campaign. Now, 4'let,s look at the record." BEARCATS CLAWED While spectators stood perspiring in their shirtsleeves, the Mountain Lions donned black jerseys and routed Huntingdon High, every member of Altoona,s four squads leaving the substitute bench. After the Maroons had advanced the ball to their own 4.41-yard stripe, Karl took a forward from Turchetta and laid the pigskin down for a 9-yard gain and a first down. A barrage of passes filled the air during the remainder of the quarter but neither team scored. The second period found Altoona four yards from the goal but through a series of fumbles the ball was forfeited. Then Captain Fouss grabbed a Bearcat pass which was turned into pay dirt as Cadle crossed the zero mark for the first tourchdown of the year. The Maroons took the resulting kickoff over the goal again in six plays but failed to convert. Late in the third quarter, passes and laterals brought two more scores plus conversions to the Mountain Tide and as the final whistle blew the two teams exchanged touchdowns, the game ending 341-6. Page One Hundred Forty MAROONS MASTERED Receiving the first setback of the season and the first ever in a Westinghouse game, the' Lion's roar was silenced by a 12-7 defeat at the hands of a strong Pittsburgh team. Nine plays after a Maroon fumble, a Westinghouse lineman was hugging a pass on the scoring side of the goal line. At the close of the half, Quarterback Kaufman took the hall at midfield after an exchange of punts and, evading an army of tacklers, crossed the touchdown line to place the Lions on top. Taking advantage of a poor boot from behind the goal and an 8-yard penalty against Altoona, Westinghouse grabbed the ball and went to work, scoring on a lateral but losing the extra digit. With the tide again turned, the locals began to flip passes and laterals but the final quarter closed scoreless as the scoreboard announced a 12 to 7 defeat. 1 "13" UNLUCKY FOR GREENSBURG For the fourth consecutive year, Altoona downed Greensburg by a score of 13. This year, however, was the first for the opponents to score. ln the first half neither goal was crossed, although the Lions were put in the hole no less than two times by quick kicks over the safetyis head. Altoona placed her bid for a score early in the third period as Stewart slipped around right end and dashed 23 yards for a touch- down. After gaining a first down on power plays, the Browns tossed a 22-yard pass which rang the bell on the scoreboard. ,lust as the G-burg squad was preparing to march to victory, Speacht of the Maroons jumped on a fumble at the 15-yard tape and again the Lions roared over the goal. The final score, 13-6. HATS OFF TO LATROBE While a chilly wind whistled through the goal posts, the Maroon Tide entered a battle of upsets and adversities with Latrobe for the seasonis first nawayn game. With both sides losing heavy yardage, and passes and laterals going haywire, Kauffman booted a perfect placement to score three points for Altoona. Marching to the goal position on drives, Latrobe shot a bullet pass over the line for a touchdown tally in the third quarter. After Page One Hundred Forty-one Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr Bartholomew, Trainer Morse, Assistant Coach Wolfe, Faculty Manager Bashore, Head Coach Wear, Backfield Coach McDermitt, Assistant Mr. Coach fAbsentJ SPREADING ALTOONA'S FAME a freak punt into a Latrobe Hhuddlef' the L-men pushed the ball around right end for the second and final score. The count at the whistle, 12-3. A JAYHAWK JAUNT Bowing with respect to a powerful Jay team, the Altoonans left the opponent's field after a hard-fought game of football. The action for most of the first half was in Jeannette land but the Jayhawks beat the Maroons to the payoff with a 4-3-yard play ending in a lateral for a touchdown. The Mountain Lions knotted the contest in the third period after recovering a Jay fumble. Cadle tore around left end to set the ball down in the end zone and Kaufman inserted the additional numeral. With the encouragement of a blocked Maroon punt in the final frame, Jeannette reeled off another score in four plays but failed the conversion. Result-Jeannette 13, Altoona 7. DEADLOCK! Old Man Winter was on the scene as Erie Academy brought traditional weather for a skirmish and a tie amid the snowflakes. The very first play was an eye opener, for a Gold halfback, almost smothered by Maroons, broke through his right side, brushed away tacklers, and made for touchdown land 63 yards ahead. The following two periods were scoreless but not inactive, the Lions rolling up ten first downs to the visitors' five. The break came for Altoona in the final stanza when Erie stretched a forced punt a mere nine yards and Turchetta bounded over the goal after suc- cessive power drives. After a rush for the extra point, the final whistle sounded on a 7-7 deadlock. MAROONS FLOOD JOHNSTOWN With claws sharpened and an appetite for victory, the Mountain Lions yanked the Johnnie Trojans from their pedestal of success in the annual battle, this year at Point Stadium, Johnstown. The first half was one grand exhibition of brains and brawn. Longacre of the Jawns surprised the local eleven by recovering his own fumble and sprinting 29 yards to start a drive deep into the Maroon sector. Halting two such campaigns, the Lions marched toward the other goal but were stopped by the whistle at the half. Early in the third period, a Maroon pass was chucked into Cadle's arms, and after unfolding a 19-yard gain he was downed seven yards from the goal. Turchetta then hit the line for three yards and Cadle for two more, but a penalty was levied for backs in motion and five yards were lost. A shift to the left gave Cadle the ball and he scampered untouched through perfect blocking to register against the Jawns. When Kaufman booted the ball between the uprights, the final count was obtained and the Johnnies found themselves on the short end of a 7-0 score. LIONS BOW TO NEWCOMER Facing a giant squad from Norwin High for the first time, the home gridders scored in the initial quarter and then watched the visitors dominate the contest with a 14-6 tally. A triple reverse with Twarden skirting left end placed the oval on the 4-yard spot from which Kaufman slipped it over for the score, the kick being blocked by Lear, Norwin guard. A passing combination of Cole and Hawk gave the visitors their first count as Page One Hundred Forty-two Top to Bottom Cadle, Halfbaek Sopato, End Berry, Guard Ventresca, Guard Kaufman, Quarterback Brown, Guard Speacht, Tackle Fouss, Center Stewart, Halfback Turchetta, Fullback Twardon, End in . fav' Bottom Row-Cassidy, Thompson, Boyles Second Row-Cataldo, Kelly, Karl Third Row-Mascia., Ramsey, Yeager. Top Row-Kauffman, Hopper, Hanley, Claybaugh, Sopato THE VICTORICJUS ELEVEN the big left halfback juggled a pass into the scoring district, minus the extra number. Neither goal was darkened in the third stanza, but as the game drew to a close, a safety gave Norwin two points and Hawk again snagged a long toss to complete the unexpected defeat. Score, 14-6. ANOTHER ERIE TEAM FALLS What started as a clear-cut Maroon victory ended as the most closely played game of the season as the Lion men eked out a 141-13 count over Erie Strong Vincent. The scoreboard was empty at the half but, early in the third quarter Hopper of Altoona tore around end in a reverse and unrolled 16 yards with a touchdown at the end. In the opening minutes of the final period, Cadle toted the pigskin around left end for a run of 16 yards and scoring honors. Both placements were completed. Not to be outdone, the Red men from Erie launched an aerial attack that netted them two touchdowns plus conversions in the closing six minutes of play. Final recording, 14--13. TURKEY DAY TUMBLE The Mountain Warriors saw red in the annual Thanksgiving Day match as a scarlet-clad Braddock squad hung up a victory in the fourth quarter with but live minutes to play. The Reds were plenty tough when it came to defense, but offered little in the way of ball toting. Altoona carried a majority of first downs, nine to the visitors, three. The upset came at the close of the contest when a brilliant 83-yard dash by Blasik, Brad- dock halfback, put the score keeper to work. He scooted around end and proceeded untouched to the goal, scoring but failing the extra point. Result-Braddock 6, Altoona 0. LEWISTOWN HUMBLED IN WIND UP Drawing the curtain on a season marked by the districtis heaviest teams, the Maroon and White gridders emerged victorious from a fray with an undefeated Lewistown eleven. A safety and a touchdown in the number two quarter insured Mountain Lion success, for the ball rarely left Silktown territory. A pass to Sopato in the third period was converted into a score by Cadle in two plays. Altoona was content to cage the Panthers in their own country for the remainder of the game. For a finishe- Altoona 15, Lewistown 0. Laurels to you, lads of the gridiron, and congratulations, coaches, for putting over a brand new style of play. 'k A Big Picture A Big Team A Big Season FACTS AND FIGURES ON THE JAY Undefeated, the Junior Varsity gridders emerged from the 1939 season with but two deadlocks to mar an otherwise perfect two-year record. A shift in the varsity coaching staff placed Hugh Black in the head position with Paul Adams as his assistant. Together they successfully piloted a fifty-two man squad through a schedule of tive games, reaping victories for the local lads. The initial contest on October 6 brought the Mehaffey High varsity to the home field for a closely fought game ending in a tie. Although leading in first downs, the Maroons were held deep in their own country until the second division when the visitors grabbed a fumble on the home thirty-live and sailed into touchdown land with a 30-yard pass. After a late Mehaffey threat, the period closed with the ball on the local 8-yard stripe. Rallying in the third frame, Hughey Blackas pigskin toters pushed the ball across the touchdown line in twelve plays to balance the score and provide the final count of 6-6. An open date on October 13 set the stage for an inter-squad game with Coaches Black and Adams backing the first and second teams respectively. An interception and a series of power drives upset the Navy as Army hung up a 12-6 victory over the reserves. On the following Friday the Maroon Juniors took a 27-0 win from Howard High, scoring in all four periods and completing three boots for the extra points. The red and white guests threatened once when an Altoona pass was intercepted and the visitors advanced the pigskin to the 1-yard line where they lost the ball on downs. The first count for the home eleven resulted from a recovered fumble at the goal. Another interception led to the third period score while two more heaves and a 26-yard sprint accounted for the final tally. Playing in a sea of mud, the Jay Vees again featured four- period scoring as they humbled Bigler Township on October 27. VEE'S VICTORIOUS SEASON Line plunges scored an early touchdown and a 30-yard toss netted in the second division. Altoona reeled off 23 yards to place the ball in scoring position again, and in the fourth quarter a 30-yard punt return set the pigskin on the 20-yard marker. Line plays easily ran the score to 26-0. Snowshoe High visited the Mansion Park practice field on No- vember 3, and fell as the third victim before the Junior Mountain Tide. Long runs were the feature of the day as the Jay Vees rolled up fifteen first downs to the opponent's six. ln the initial quarter, Altoona struck pay dirt after a 35-yard run. Scoring lagged follow- ing the conversion until long end runs in the third period brought two scores plus the extra digits. Snowshoe registered in the last quarter when an Altoona fumble paved the way for a touchdown from the 13-yard spot. In seven attempts, the ball was over for a six-point tally. Final score-Altoona 21, Snowshoe 6. November 9 saw the Junior Varsity squad close the season as it opened, with a draw. Altoona scored in the first quarter and then saw the blue and gold of Carrolltown High off to a length-of-the- field run and a second period touchdown. End runs brought both the score and the additional point to the local team, after a short punt was taken far into enemy territory. The top performance of the day was turned in by a Cambrian fullback who faked a kick from his own 10-yard line and tore around left end for 90 yards and the tying touchdown. Scoring chances were lost by both clubs in the second half as passing attacks were balked. When the referee,s whistle closed the seasonis final game, the score remained a dead- lock, 7-7. Credit where credit is due, and we do mean due! To coaches and team for turning in a grand season and upholding a line record. Front Row-Huber, Picano, Arsen-ieu, McDowell, Kisielnicki, Koelle, Stayer, Green, McCall Second Row-Mr. Adams, Bryson, R, Hoffman, Alvis, Trostle, Disabato, R, Georgiana,'Nedimyer, Savin-e, Mr. Black Third Row-Johns, Brown, Ianicelli, Jones, Patton, T. Tur- chetta, A. Hoffman, Fowler Fourth Row-Mcllnay, Kenney, Giarth, A. Turchetta, Stouf- fer, Zehowitz, Gasiorowski Fifth Row-E. Stitt, A. Georgialna, Nardell, Mengle, Goclow- ski, Lockard Sixth Row-Kinzer, Irvin, Perove, Giosa, Durkin, McGraw Seventh Row-J. Stitt, Peters, Young, Condrin, Manager Mr. Black, Head Coach Mr. Adams, Assistant Mr. Hoffman MEET THE CAGERS 'A' A sixteen game schedule, seventy-two candidates and two vet- eran varsity men provided Coach Ray Hoffman, newly-elected cage mentor, with both the opportunity and the material to mold an inex- perienced but fast squad of Maroon passers. DOUBLE FEATURE True to tradition, the Altoona High cagers launched the new season with a double bill, taking wins from Williamsburg and Mar- tinsburg by wide margins. The local steppers passed the half-way mark in the Williams- burg game, with the score at 27-5. When the final whistle sounded, the visitors found themselves on the sad end of a 444-10 defeat. For the second Maroon triumph, a fresh combination, sparked by Ceglar and Karl, nosed out a Martinsburg team by 21 points. The score by quarters: 9-41, 18-6, 32-ll, and for a finish, 37-16. -ALUMNI ANNEXES A first half lead of 24-ll gave victory to a strong alumni club in the annual skirmish between the varsity cagers and Dr. Tippery,s veterans. Although the third period went 10-4 to the Maroons and the closing stanza stood at a 9-9 deadlock, the experienced grads enjoyed the advantage of an early spurt and claimed a 39-30 win. A PHILIPSBURG FALL Three complete teams saw action against the visitors from Philipsburg and defeated the Mountain Leaguers, 4-7-22. Altoona allowed three points to Philipsburg at the start and then ran wild as the guests' defense faded. The Phils were held to An anxious moment. Another one for the record. PRIDE OF ALTOONA HIGH SCHOOL four baskets with their remaining tallies resulting from foul shots. All four periods were taken by the Maroons with 19 field ringers and 9 fouls. LIONS TAME BLUEJAYS lnvading Franklin Boro for the yearis first away game, the Hoffmanites vanquished a so-far victorious Bluejay five by an eleven- point edge. The local basketeers led 7-2 in the first quarter, 13-9 in the second and cinched the match 21-11 at the end of the third period. Final count, 27-16. MAROONS HALT LEWISTOWN By checking a winning streak for the second time, Coach Hoff- manls quintet handed Lewistown, Mountain League champs, a 28-18 defeat on the home Hoor. The Panthers led the first period 4--2 but were topped 15-6 by the local chargers at the half. lt was Altoona all the way as numer- ous reserves put the Silks in the rear on second half scoring. MOUNTAIN LIONS ROUT LITTLE LIONS A second long distance trip netted victory for the Maroon five as the Mountain Lions of Altoona humbled the Little Lions of State College. Held close by the Staters' effective zone defense, Altoona ekil out a 10-9 lead in the first canto and were held down to a 15-14- count as the half closed. The Altoonans swung into scoring style with a 15-point rally in the third frame. The score was again altered, 7-5 in favor of the Maroons to whom a 37-20 victory was due. JOHNSTOWN JOLTS MAROONS A record crowd saw an upset game as the pale blue of Johns- town came over the mountain to hand Altoona its first ,lawn defeat in four years. Featuring a classy zone defense, the ,lohnnies grabbed an early lead, took the first quarter 10-1, led 13-11 at the half, and then cinched the decision 13-5 in the third stanza. Result-Johnstown 32, Altoona 20. ALTOONA DROPS TO KISKI Chalking up a record low count, Kiski Prep invaded the Moun- tain Lions, den to play a freak low scoring game and take a three- point win from the Maroon chargers. The period tallies were 7-3, 4.-2, and 7-0, the Maroons claiming the advantage. The Prepsters Front Row-Mr. Adams, Yava sile, Herr, Bayle, Neuman Ferguson, Mr. Hoffman. Second Row-Yeager, Hanley Weakland, Stoltz, Karl. Third Row - Withers, Ceglar Cassidy, Morgan, Williams, Manager. N ardell THE BASKETEERS Top Row- Stoltz Herr Yavasile Ferguson Neuman Bayle Bottom Row Karl Weakland Hanley Nardell Yeager were held scoreless in the final as Ceglar dropped in a lone basket to run the count to 14-11. STATE STUMPED AGAIN Q? Back in winning form, the 1VIountain Cagers played host to the Little Lions of State College and downed the guests with a score of 33-16. With three complete outfits in action against the Staters, the locals supplied the period scoring of 6-1, 13-111-, and 18-10. MAROONS BOW TO CHERRY AND WHITE Limited to a pair of field goals in the first half, Altoonais cage men dropped a hard fought ganie to Wfillianisport 011 the Cherry and White floor. Paced by Ken Karl, Coach HfJITH13H7S charges received seven of their second half points at the free toss line. The Billtowners led at all four stages, the quarters ending 10-6, 18-15, and 29-19. The count at the whistle, 37-26. A SECOND LEWISTOWN LOSS By traveling to Lewistown for a rematch. the Lion Cagers treated the Silktowners to their first hoine defeat of the season. The Panthers led the first period 5-2, then played out as Altoona took over the second and third quarters 10-8 and 20-14. For a second Silk defeat, Altoona 27, Lewistown 23. RALLY WINS FROM FRANKLIN Staging a second half rally that proved fatal to Franklin Boro's ll-9 lead, the Maroon passers silenced the Mountain League visitors in a second encounter. THRILLS AND CHEERS Altoona took the third period 9-5 to lead 18-16, then won the final stanza 8-2 to capture a 26-18 victory. BILLTOWN COPS ANOTHER lV1ufl4ed foul throws gave Williamsport the edge in a fast and close home return game as the Cherry quintet squeezed out a victory from the local cagers. The Billtowners led the first and second periods, and as Altoona made a nine point bid in the final stanza, the visitors Hstolei' two Maroon passes and ran unmolested to the basket. Final score- Williamsport 24-, Altoona 22. LIONS CLAW PHILIPSBURG Visiting the Philipsburg floor, the Maroon hasketeers made a second clean sweep of the Phils by means of a 36-17 decision. Captain Neuman sparked the scoring with five baskets as his squad started with an 8-5 lead, held a 13-12 advantage at the half, and easily claimed the final stanza. JOHNNIES TAKE OVER ln closing the cage season, Coach Hofifman's steppers missed chances in the district eliminations as a one point shortage at the foul line cost the Altoonans an 18-17 defeat on the Johnstown court. The Jawns carried the opener 7-6 but the half found their guests out in front, 12-10. The third quarter ended 15-15 and Johns- town took the final period 3-2 to win the match by the margin of a foul goal. A rousing cheer! To the cagers and their coaches for a snappy season and great promises of wllhings to Comef' Bayle tries a. long one. Altoona takes the tip off. Jump ball! Karl steals from a Johnny. Is it or isn't it? Ceglar scores for the Maroons. THE JAY VEE COURTSTERS A WORTHY RECORD Team Opp. f. V ,s Date A Hi-Y .............. ....... 2 6 23 Dec. 16 Weaklands .............. .... 9 17 Jan. 6 Comets tex. per.J .............. 241 22 Jan. 16 First Methodist ...... ....... 2 0 412 Jan. 26 Eagles ............... ....... 2 2 38 Feb. 2 AZA Seniors ....... ....... 2 3 25 Feb. 3 Y Juniors ......... ....... 2 0 19 Feb 16 Intramurals ....................... 13 17 Feb. 23 Mr. Adams Front Row-Mr. Adams, Tongue, Stouffer, Plank, Felty, Querry, Weight. Second Row -- Tomassetti, Fel- lows, Akers, Gundel, Carrol, Nedimyer. Third Row 3 James, Parrish Schmerbeck, Weatherly. Topping their opponents in scoring, the Junior Varsity Cagers, piloted by Coach Paul Adams, dragged down live victories from an eight-game schedule. With a majority of sophomore players, the Cub basketeers met a close defeat at the bands of a strong Hi-Y squad, walloped a Weakland team, and then bowed to the Comets for a one bucket margin in a 'csudden deathv period. Three straight victories for the Maroon Juniors followed, with a loss to another "YF team preceding the final rough and tumble triumph over the Intramural All-Stars. When the season closed, Paul Adams' passers had tucked away a total of 203 points as compared to a 157-point tally for the entire list of foes. Tops in scoring were Querry and Plank, with Jack Tongue turning in the greatest number of quarters played. TRACK AND FIELD A raft of eager candidates, the majority of them veterans, turned out on March 7 at Coach Dick Bartholomewis summons for the 1939 track and field squad. Altoona was fortunate in having a large number of last yearis stellar athletes back on the job for the new season, the lauded mile relay team of Madden, Shaner, Gilliland, and Mclntyre remaining intact. The season started off in traditional style on March 29, as two records toppled at the hands of Altoona trackmen in the first handi- cap meet of the year. Byron Crozier chalked up a new 70-yard high hurdle mark of 9.5 seconds, falling .2 of a second under the existing record. Hurling the new size discus, Leonard Frescoln set a new mark with a toss of 111-8' On April 1, the Maroon cindermen moved indoors to shatter four records, equal two others, and at the same time win the annual indoor track and field championship at the Pitt Track House for the second straight year. By amassing 59 points, a seventeen-man squad effectively defended the title won last year. The only event in which Altoona lagged was the shot-put. New marks were set by Ed Webster at the high jump, Harry Clarke at the 50-yard low hurdles, and the 200-yard shuttle relay team knocked a full second from the existing record. Taking all places but one, Altoona trackmen found an Erie Strong Vincent team an easy mark for the first competitive outdoor meet of the year. A 78 to 39 margin in points was picked up by the mountain men as Altoona landed tallies in twelve events, missing only in the half-mile run. ln this event Erie triumphed as two state champions, Hunter and Martin, finished in a dead heat. Two more record smashing performances were given at Man- sion Park during the running of the second handicap meet on April 8. Harry Clarke broke the former record of 9.5 seconds for the 70-yard high hurdles by winning that event in 9.4 seconds, while Byron Crozier entered the record breaking field with a leap of 5' 11" at the high jump. The following week Mansion Park was the scene of another record shattering day as the Maroon tracksters led the field in the Page One Hundred Fifty-three Mile Relay Team Front Row- Shatner O'Shell Second Row- McIntyre Madden Gilliland Mr. Bartholomew Mr. Bartholomew Mr. Adams Mr. Bartholomew Mr. Mastracola Front Row-4 R. McGough V. Miller E. Miller Smithmeyer Swope Second Row- Carls Auker Weatherly Smith running of the Central Pennsylvania Relay Meet. The famous relay quartet turned in a record performance of the mile exchange as they flashed across the cinders in 3 minutes, 28.2 seconds. Four out of six first places fell to the Maroons, feet. April 21 saw Altoona's varsity lads score a 79 to 38 victory over the Alumni in the annual dual meet at Mansion Park. Dead- locks were the feature of the day. Ramsey, alumnus, and Dan Gal- braith of the varsity, each hurled the javelin l76'. A triple tie was recorded at the high jump where Crozier and Webster of the varsity were matched by Nate Benjamin, alumnus, at 5'9". The third tie found Dick Degenhart, alumnus, and Fasick of the varsity, shoulder to shoulder at the finish of the 220-yard sprint. Varsity perform- ances won first places in all remaining events. Reaching the goal of all relay teams at the forty-fifth annual running of the Penn Relays at Philadelphia on April 28, Altoona High School received a mammoth plaque symbolizing the high school title of America. The remarkable running time of 3 minutes, 25.2 seconds gave the Maroon foursome a 2.2 second edge over Cedar Rapids High of Iowa with whom the old mark of 3 minutes, 27.4 seconds stood. The Altoonans stepped off the pace smoothly, Gilliland putting the locals in the lead and Captain Bill Madden leading the pack by fifty yards at the finish as he reeled oli' the 440 in fifty seconds flat. While the relay team was busy covering itself with glory at Philadelphia, the remaining trackmen were winning a W.P.l.A.L. meet at Connellsville. With over five hundred athletes participating and seventeen scoring places, Altoona took the meet with five firsts, two seconds, and a tie for another second place. Specializing in long distance meets, Altoona trackmen traveled away from the home field for the third consecutive week on May 5. This time the scene was Johnstown and the opponents, Pitt Junior College. Coach Bartholomewis cindermen easily annexed the meet, winning eleven firsts out of a possible twelve and breaking four existing records. Three existing Altoona High track records went by the boards on May 12 at the hands of Dick Bartholomewis varsity squad as Johnstown was defeated in a dual meet, the Maroons scoring 92 Page One Hundred Fifty-four points to the visitors' 25. The outstanding feat of the day was Cro- zieris record leap of 6' M," at the high jump. Harry Clarke set a further record by streaking down the 120-yard hurdle alley in 15.2 seconds and another school record was established by Mike Shaner as he ran the 200-yard low hurdles in 23.2 seconds. After a week of comparative relaxation, the Cinder squad vic- toriously entered the fifteenth annual running of the district six championship meet. Altoona won the meet for the tenth consecutive year and scored 9915 points in the fifteen events, placing first in eleven. Harry Clarke hung a new record over the high hurdles, and Byron Crozier hit an all time high when he cleared the high jump bar at 6' 2". To the track lads, on May 27 at State College, went the honor of capturing four first places and the state titles, this being the highest total ever recorded in a state P.l.A.A. championship event. Bill Madden, Mike Shaner, and Dan Galbraith won respectively the 440, the 200-yard low hurdles, and the javelin toss. The mile relay team won the crown with ease and rang up a new mark of 3 minutes, 25 seconds. Running in a special invitation meet on June 4, Altoonais relay foursome shattered its own state record and barely missed the high school worldis record of 3 minutes, 21.4 seconds by creating the almost unbelievable time of 3 minutes, 22.2 seconds. Crozier of Altoona and Black and Irvin of H-burg placed first respectivley in the high jump, the pole vault, and the broad jump. The match race at the University of Pennsylvania on June 12 will long be memorable to A.H.S. track fans not only as the close of a successful season but also as the greatest relay contest in the history of the school. Altoona's American championship quartet, after two years of undefeated running, dropped a fast race to West Philadelphia Catholic High School. The worldis record was endan- gered as West Catholic covered the mile track in 3 minutes, 21.9 seconds. Time was lost by the Maroon squad during the first two exchanges and though Captain Madden strained to his utmost, he was unable to recover the twenty feet by which he was trailing in the last quarter. A toast! To the coaches-for a fine preparation, to the team- for a victorious seasong to the future-may it be as successful. Page One Hundred Fifty-five E Front RowgCrozier, McIntyre Gilliland, O'Shell, M. snanerf Galbreath, Maddeln, Bathurst Miller, Smithmeyer, Sorge Frescoln. Second Row - Schrrlerbeck W r i g h t, Barthe, Swope Di l W ' K s Rams V9 Y, 10 , BY, Speacht, Kenney, Ward, Al- bright, Webster, Cadle. Third Row-Kisielnicki, Peters Gasiorowski, F. Shaner, Fas- ick, Van Tries, Meckley Bingham, Riggle, Knipple, Gil lespie, Meintel, Bryson, Ogden Wallace. Fourth Row - W. Pheasant Love, Herr, Johnson, McGraw Ammerman, Graffius, Kaylor Guido, WEYHHI, Smith, Finn Dietze. Fifth Row - Carr, McConahy J. Pheasant, Yon, Langer Quirln, Rupp, Fyock, Wig fi ld E ' e , mswller, Plunket Templon, Keller. Sixth Row-eMr. Adams, Shinn Earnest, Mr. Mastracola Bingham, Carls, Mr. Bar- tholomew. , 1 A.H.S. TRACK AND FIELD RECGRDS Holder Event 100-Yard Dash 220-Yard Dash 440-Yard Dash 880-Yard Dash Mile James Ward James Ward William Madden Dick Degenhart Eddie Ammerman 120-High Hurdles f4.2"J Donn Kinzle 120-High Hurdles C3901 Harry Clarke 220-Low Hurdles 200-Low Hurdles Donn Kinzle Mike Shaner Pole Vault Ullysses Wharton High Jump Byron Crozier Broad Jump James Ward Shot Put Steve Lach Discus I4 lb. 6 oz.j Steve Lach Discus f3 lb. 9 oz.J Leonard Frescoln Hammer Throw Steve Lach Javelin Dan Galbraith l'Ted Gilliland Mile Relay Don 0'Shell Mike Shaner Bill Madden Year 1935 1935 1939 1938 1937 1936 1939 1936 1939 1934 1939 1934 1938 1938 1939 1937 1938 1939 AWARDS FOR TRACK VARSITY MA" Bill Barthe, Ray Bathurst, Harry Clarke, Byron Crozier, Robert Dively, Thomas Forbes, Leonard Frescoln, Dan Galbraith, Anthony Georgiana, Ted Gilliland, Eugene Karl, Thom- as Kenney, Bill Madden, John McIntyre, James Moyer, Don O'Shell, Cyril Ramsey, Mike Shaner, Arthur Sorge, Charles Smith- meyer, Bob Swope, Bill Ward, Ed. Webster, Emerson Wicks, and Leo Ernest, Manager. Meet Record District Six 9.8 sec. District Six 21.8 sec. State Meet 50.1 sec. District Six 2 100.9 min. Brown University Pitt. Freshmen 15.2 sec. District Six 15.2 sec. District Six 23.8 sec. State Meet 22.41 sec. Alumni 11' SMLN District Six 6' 2" State College High 21' 'YMH Alumni 53' 12" State Meet 138' ISM" W.P.I.A.L. Relays 14-8' 1050 Alumni 152' 15" District Six 185' 11" Special Invitation 3:22.2 min. AND FIELD JUNIOR VARSITY HAH John Albright, Norman Cadle, Carl Fasick, Joseph Kisielnicki, Robert Maillard, Edwin Miller, Alex Posoiwaych, Robert Rupp, Mauro Russo, Norman Schmer- beck, Francis Shaner, Melvin Tem- plon, Richard Thompson, Bill McConahy, Mgr., Horace Smith, Mgr., Jack Pheasant, Mgr. 4529.8 min. Bob Dively pre- paring for a mighty heave. Georgiana going over the top. Breezing h o rn e with M i k e Shaner. ATHLETIC AWARD WINNERS FOOTBALL BLANKET Donald Fouss VARSITY EIGHT-INCH HA" William Balestino, Richard Berry, Blair Boyles, Ernest Brown, Glen Butler, Norman Cadle, Armando Cataldo, Raymond Claybaugh, Enrico Fennell, Donald Fouss, Donald Hanley, Jack Hopper, Brooks Kaufman, George Kauff- man, Kenneth Karl, Donald Kelly, Chester Pfef- fer, Alex Posoiwaych, Cyril Ramsey, Dallas Rhodes, Roy Riggle, Mauro Russo, Jack Russell, John Sopato, Gene Speacht, Jack Stewart, Wil- liam Stouffer, Richard Thompson, Harold Tromm, Vincent Turchetta, Walter Twardon, Art Ventresca, Raymond Yeager, and Arnold Love, Manager. VARSITY SIX-INCH "A" Christ Andros, Richard Bayer, Herbert Cas- sidy, Louis Contakos, Richard Creamer, Lam- bert Deeter, Wilbur Jamison, Ray Long, Americo Mascia, Charles Mentzer, Lester Miller, Louis Pippete, Joseph Sopato, and Frank Yeager. JUNIOR VARSITY SIX-INCH HAI, Russell Alvis, Wilbur Bryson, Stanley Gasio- rowski, Andrew Georgiana, Mario Giosa, Joseph Goelowski, Allan Hoffman, Wilbur Irvin, Thom- as Kenney, Joseph Kisielnicki, Dale Lockard, William Mengle, John McCall, Robert McDowell, Edward McGraw, William Mcllnay, Mike Nar- dell, Gerald Nedimeyer, Alex Perove, Mike Picano, George Savine, Melvin Stayer, Donald Stouffer, William Wolfe, Paul Zehowitz, and Paul Condrin, Manager. BASKETBALL VARSITY EIGHT-INCH "A" James Bayle, George Ceglar, Ted Ferguson, Donald Hanley, Rogers Herr, Kenneth Karl, Milton Neuman, Richard Weakland, Joseph Ya- vasile, and John Williams, Manager. VARSITY SIX-INCH HA" Herbert Cassidy, Harry Morgan, Mike Nar- dell, Patrick Stoltz, Fred Withers, and Raymond Yeager. JUNIOR VARSITY SIX-INCH HA" Robert Fellows, Jack Felty, Donald Kelly, Richard Plank, Donald Querry, Donald Stouf- fer, and Jack Tongue. Page One Hundred Fifty-seven If GIRLS, IN THE GYM . . . ON THE FIELD Physical fitness in the girls of today means better women of tomorrow. This point is not overlooked in the Altoona High School. Under the direction of Miss Eyre, the head of the girls' physical education department, Miss Bloomfield, and Miss McGinnis, the girls are given vigorous work-outs and taught how to play many dilferent games. The games are of value because they require cooperation among the girls and they foster a spirit of good sportsmanship. Winning or losing, they play for the fun derived. HOCKEY AND SOCKER After school has been organized for the fall term, there is a call for candidates for hockey and soccer. The girls report to Man- sion Park after school where they are supplied with the necessary equipment and taught how to play the games. For the first few days, there is nothing but an excited, disorganized group of girls running up and down the field swinging their clubs and striking their fellow players' shins and knees-as well as the balls. After they have learned to play the games, teams are chosen for an intramural pro- gram, as no games are scheduled with other High Schools. At the end of the season an honorary team is chosen. BASKETBALL Another game well liked, and one to which there is no limit to the number who can participate, is basketball. Girls7 basketball differs a great deal from the game of basketball played by the boys. There are six girls to a team and each player,s maneuvers are limited to a certain area of the fioor. However, the scoring is the same. Just as in hockey and soccer, teams are chosen to play against each other and an honorary team is selected at the end of the year. VOLLEYBALL Intramural sports opened another exciting season of volleyball. The girls were instructed in the gym classes as to how the game was to be played. Later, home room teams were chosen. After school the gym echoed with shouts of encouragement and glee as enthusi- asm rose in the games. Game after game was played, but finally a victor emerged. This year it was Home Room 104. The girls received the praise of the home room and the admiration of other girls interested in sports. Miss Eyre 'A' Drilling for Form Upside Down Lassies Time Out to Pose I ..., y , 1 " xr" Develop Sportsmanship From Games MUSHBALL SQUAD LEADERS CLASS ROUTINE If you had walked through the hall some evening after the close of the school day and happened to hear shouts coming from the girls' gym such as, 'tHit it hardlw or "Throw it here, quick!" you would know that mushball competition was under way. Teams were chosen, games scheduled, and then the girls were all set for some real hard playing. With the bat in their hands, they were ready to play their best ball for the home room. The girls played elimination games every evening until one home room was left-the winner. These girls were congratulated and to the losers it was said, "Better luck next timell' "Where,s my other sock?" is a familiar cry heard amid the noise of the locker room as the girls don their gym outfits and pre- pare for their weekly period of gym. Suddenly, a call is heard- '40n floorli' and shoestrings are hurriedly tied, and suits buttoned as the girls rush on the floor. The classes are divided into several squads. Each girl falls into her particular place and a shrill whistle begins roll call. Each squad has a leader, who takes gym every day and has special duties. She acts as teacher to the girls of her squad, checks the girls on showers, and keeps the locker rooms free from excessive noise. Each Friday, she meets with Miss Eyre, who shows her the plan of work for the coming week. Squad leaders are usually sturdy athletes and models for every other girl in the gym class. ln the first part of the class period, each squad is assigned to work on a special piece of apparatus-walk the balance beams, climb the ropes tor at least tryl, and exercise on the rings and stall bars. Then the girls are divided into teams and the remainder of the period is spent in playing games. These include kickball, mushball, cageball, and volleyball. Finally the fun is over and it is time to run for the locker room. In a few minutes the squad leader's voice is heard calling, uShowers?'7 and those obedient people who have taken them report their names. The signal rings and clothes Hy, as the slow dressers gather their belongings together and hurry to the next class. Page One Hundred Sixty i - ,Sn W - Front Row-Olewine, Davis, Harrity. Second Row-Bray, Turnbaugh, Gillaspie, Schraff. Three cheers for the Cheerleaders-those boys who made the students get behind the team and lead it to victory. Both at upepv meetings and on the playing field they put Hue spirit into the root- ers. In all kinds of weather the squad was on its toes in the business of arousing enthusiasm. A large group of candidates was turned into a squad of Well trained cheerleaders under the direction of Mr. Wood. Practices were held regularly after school, at which time the cheerleaders worked for better cooperation and synchronism in the squad. As an experiment, a cheering section was reserved for special rooters, in order to bring out greater volume and cheering at football games. In Altoonais away games, members of the squad traveled with the team and did their duty by pepping up the team with cheers and yells. During the 'cgreatn Johnstown game, the opponents pre- sented our cheerleaders with a large basket of chrysanthemums according to the usual custom. The cheerleaders who received awards during the year were: Varsity leaders receiving six-inch chenille letters-Russell Davis, Robert Schraff, William Olewinc, David Bray, Ralph Harrity. Junior Varsity leaders receiving numerals-Donald Sonefelt, Mahlon Yingling, Elvin Gillaspie, Harold Gundel, William Loechner, Russell Smiley, Henry Cohen, Paul Kleifel, Arthur Turnbaugh, Wilbur Pensyl. Page One Hundred Sixty-one CHEERLEADERS ' uRGE TEAMS TO VICTORY L TIME MARCHES ON .... AUTUMN September 7, and the pageant of time sends life's players scurrying again to their places behind the scenes. As the curtain is drawn there is revealed the portal of Altoona High School, and amid a surging throng of eager disciples of learning are to be found certain individuals who are expected to play a vital role in current history indeed, very important personages-the students of AHS. We are new, But so are they- About six strange teachers We Sophs can say. Something like this was the rhyme that newcomers to Senior High School were repeating fwith tongues in their cheeksj during those first days in the corridors of their new school home. But, in spite of the bewildered wanderings about of those timid souls who furtively start at every shout of "Soph,7' the routine moved smoothly and Altoona High proceeded in the great arena of scholastic life to gather laurels of achievement in every field. Even before "curtain timei' in the great theater of school life- precisely, two days before the gala opening of the 1939-194-0 term -the dutiful members of the corridor patrol met to learn the ways of a traffic officer. Their job, you will recall, is to curb uspeedingi' in AHS halls .... September 12 saw the boys of the Federation meet in solemn conclave-their first of the year. On the following day, the girls filled the ether with soap-box oratory and prepared to select new officials .... The i'Spirit of the Past" gave way to her successor on the twentieth when the Girls League inaugurated new executives in the annual installation services of that school-wide organization. Altoona's men of letters had their first opportunity to Hstrut their stufim during National Air Progress Week, September 15 to 22. Essayists throughout the school responded to the query 'iWhy Would You Like to Fly?" We hope the sponsors donit think the winner needed a different or higher outlook on life-but could you wonder at our enthusiasm? The prize was a flight over the city .... With dots and dashes and lots of flashes the first issue of the Mountain Echo found its way into the hands of AHS students on September 22. This year became a year of innovations. The first was an exclusive cheering section, made up of notables among noise makers, selected to cheer the Lions to victory--and they did. Roaring de- fiance and breathing out threatenings to all who would oppose, the Mountain Lions on September 23 dispatched their first foe, Hunt- ingdon, in easy style. Wanted! A Linguist. Such a one was almost needed on the twenty-sixth when George Nelidoff, a Russian baritone, sang 'fLargo,' in Latin to an English-speaking audience .... HTime and tide wait for no rnanf, nor did the Activities Ticket Sale which closed with the crack of the ufinal gun". that sent September spinning into eternity. Page One Hundred Sixty-two Around the Light-well See What We Won! The Umpire Pulls a Boner Treed! It's Leap Year A11 Day Suckers School Dismissed! Off to Class There's Gossip in the Air A. H. S. Basketball Stars This Is How It's Done Follow the Leader Cartoonist Corky Generals Three The Parting of the Ways Camera Visits the Classroom Let's Jive Kg., il! 16- . 5 5.154175- :Q ' Q 5 M is 'E QM w f ,fvfvw R21 if .3 Vs ' GLEANED FROM THE RECGRD .... 'a": -'Q .2-5' ' IT , U I Q, 'gl-hi els, fffgia L 'ff 1,1 .4 .alle 43. .af ffl' 11 Q " L, Again AHS broke precedent and instituted a new system of marking report cards. What was wrong with the old ones? Simply "Gone with the Windf' . . . Time out for Institute! And as Altoona teachers set out for the annual Teacher's Institute they did so in defiance of fate and superstition, and at risk of life and limb-for of all days, it was Friday the thirteenth. Mr. Leselli delighted those who flocked to the auditorium on October 23 with his gay little troupe of marionettes in the roles of Alice and her friends in Won- derland ..,. For a little while, hobgoblins, brooms, and witches reigned, when on the twenty-seventh Hallowe'en invaded the cor- ridors and staged a masquerade .... Look out all you camera-shy playboys! The Horseshoe staff is looking for good subjects for candid shots. If you don't use precaution you may see your antics portrayed on yearbook pages. The proverbial Davy Jones received a visitor on November 4, for that date marked the day when Altoona sent out a squad of eleven destroyers to sink that marauder of the gridironf-Johnstown. To beat the Johnnies was their aim, And carry with them football fameg The Lions grabbed at every chanceg Result: the Senior Victory Dance! For all those who were not sufficiently aware of the benefits of education, a sort of advertising campaign was staged to sell uEduca- tion for the American Way of Lifew during Education Week, Novem- ber 5 to 11 .... Lest they forget, the Girls League assembled for an Armistice Day program on the seventh, to honor American patriots. . . . November 8, the Ritz Trumpeteers featured a variety program of old familiar classics. Can you imagine playing two instruments at the same time? lt can be done and was done by each member of that famed quartet .... Altoona High Schoolls band presented its annual concert November 17. One of the many features of the program was a narrated novelty selection, a'Uncle Tom's Cabinf' . . . And then came vacation, turkey, and Thanksgiving. The Thirtieth, tradition said: This year it came a week ahead. But same as usual was this one,- A day of turkey, rest, and fun, The air chill with November frost, A football game,-alas, 'twas lost. UA Man Without a Countryi' was relived in AHS on the twenty- seventh, when Salon Riszk, a Syrian-born American, caused four thousand young citizens of Altoona to thank their lucky stars that they were born in the "land of the freef, His address on "The Americanization of an Americana, stirred anew the love for native land .... November 28 Dr. John Sloan of Duke University demon- strated the powers of 'cliquid airv at a paid assembly. After seeing eggs sizzle on ice and frankfurters become hammers, Altoona students wondered if they could ever believe their eyes again. Page One Hundred Sixty-four LEST WE FORGET .... WINTER December-and itis grease-paint time again. This time our Thespians apply their make-up for the English Department play, uThe New Poor" fwith a Russian accentl, presented December 8 in the Roosevelt Auditorium. December 15 really deserved to be a red letter day with three fcount 'emi big activities on its schedule. It was the day of the first performance of the Christmas pageant, HThe Miracles of the Clockf' always a high spot of the year. On that day, too, the basket- ball fans got their first big thrill of the year when the Maroon Cagers opened their season by toppling both Williamsburg and Mar- tainsburg on a double bill. As if that weren't sufficient for one day, the Christmas Carnival Dance was also held that evening in the cafeteria with everyone in true holiday spirit ready to '6Swing and Sway the Bill King Way.'7 And then the events of the last few days! The Girls League play, "The Boy in the Meadow," was presented on the nineteenth. . . . December 20 everyone forgot about diets and indulged at the home room parties .... December 21-the long awaited day when, after listening to carols sung by the A Cappella Choir, the signal released 4,000 happy and excited students for two weeks of sheer joy! The warmth and cheer of the Yuletide season suddenly ended with the call to class on January 3. Though it was a little late for New Year's resolutions, it was the same day that Seniors were solemnly exhorted to apply themselves and uPrepare for the judg- znenti'-that coming day, Commencement .... AHS welcomed to her courts on the ninth, none other than the famous Glenn Cunningham, holder of the worldis mile record, as guest of honor and speaker in special assemblies .... AHS students travel! This the Mountain Echo photography competition revealed when the udges made known their decisions on the eleventh. 'fSee America firstn was the slogan of many winners, but others managed to find spots for photos in far away Europe and Asia .... With many a fear and much trem- bling, students of Altoona High School embarked upon stormy seas on January 12-the first day of those inevitable tests. Many a rumor gained impetus during this trying time, but probably the most comforting ran like this: Actual evidence I have none, But my auntis cousin's sisteris son Heard a gentleman on his street Tell a school boy not to cheat, For he had a brother, who had a friend, Who knew when these tests were going to end. Now all you classmates, who, dissatisfied with your lot, have wished the teacher-student relation might be reversed, consider AHS instructors slaving over Wrong examination answers while you enjoyed the twenty-third in bed. Page One Hundred Sixty-tive -- --Y- 2- 5 f I ,W-x.2h-' x ,X tb g rae r r ' U Tl, DAY BY DAY EXPERIENCES As each day must find its final rest in the past, so the first half of the school term was destined to pass into the ken of history, and on January 25 the stage was set for the new semester .... lnductions and initiations were in vogue as the Academy of Science and the Quill and Scroll welcomed their new members .... Do you remem- ber the 'cevil eyev in Poe's 'Tell Tale Heartn? Well, it must have been a similar situation on January 26, for Johnstown looked Al- toona in the eye and proceeded to avenge their recent disgrace of the gridiron .... The girls of AHS certainly lost no time in getting started on their Leap Year activities. The week beginning January 29 being designated as '4Leap Week" gave them an excellent opportunity to take the initiative in carrying the boy friend's books, walking him to class, and treating him to the weekly movie. However, these were mere preliminaries to the big event-the Leap Dance on February 2, sponsored by the Senior Class. As proof that when the girl pays she does it in a big way, we report that this dance was one of the most successful AHS socials held in many a year. ln contrition over their unusual behavior, the fair sex hereby offers this apology: 'cPlease pardon the maidens for being so sporty And taking advantage of M194-Of' In AHS they had a dance, Which gave the bashful boys a chance." Music lovers throughout the school were elated at the privilege of hearing one of the foremost male choruses in the world, when the Don Cossack chorus visited Altoona on February 9 .... February 14-, and the ranks of students were considerably thinned by the bat- tle against the elements. This was particularly hard on our hero, who, after shoveling himself out of the heaviest snow of the winter, had to beat a path to the door of the lady of his choice to present his gift and Valentine sentiments. This year the AHS Orchestra featured numbers by student soloists in its annual concert held February 15. Among the numbers were the famous Strauss Waltz, mfales of the Vienna Woodsf sung by Virginia Keith and HZegeuner- weisan," a collection of Gypsy airs played by Alice Hirst on the marimba .... February being known as the month of birthdays, it was very fitting that Dr. C. C. Ellis, president of Juniata College, should speak on the subject of MLincoln" at the senior class meeting on February 21 .... AHS students are always grateful for the holidays on Wash- ingtonis birthday, but this year when they got the very welcome, although unexpected, extra twenty-four hours on Friday the twenty- third, their pleasure knew no bounds .... Then to add just the right finishing touch to this month of gay frivolity, the Girls League dramatic group presented on February 27 the rollicking comedy, "The Laundry Mark." Page One Hundred Sixty-six Kitten Capers Readin' or Writin"? How Big? Classroom Snickers IOOWJ? A Yoimg Man's Fancy? Squads Left! Well-Fed Faces "To the A. H. S." "The Goblins'1l Git You" April Fool! The Bill King Way Up Again-Down Again ,fa -as it W i ' ' ,NJ LV, A N.. ....... I M, - is Y Q ! .WR ff XL, T511 4 f g E 5 xg, X 3 W ix 'E M. AHS HIGHLIGHTS .... Name and Address, Pl ease Just Before the Bell A. H. S. Solons Debate Studying? The Russian Accent When They Hear the Din- ner Bell Pay as You Leave Off to Work We Go Second Floor Next Future Chefs of America 'Tenshunl The sun is bright,-the air is clear, The darting swallows soar and sing, And from the stately elms I hear The bluebird prophesying Spring. -Longfellow True to tradition, unpredictable March made its entrance, escorted by sunshine, snow Hurries, and cold weather. To add to the chill of AHS, the lawns, with grim determination to affix the final seal of doom to all hope of championship honors for Altoona, met the Lions on March 1. It was the last game of the season and the Lions battled hard to stave off defeat, but they came out on the short end of an 18-17 score .... Some omniscient school prophets might have stolen a peek into the mysterious realms of the future, when AHS began sending her versatiles out into the Held of competi- tion. uAlmost professionalw was the comment of the critics on uThe Nine Lives of Emily," which was Altoona's contribution to the dramatic tournament at Shippensburg on the secondg and AHS students upheld the press decision with enthusiasm. March 6 marked the initiation of a uhumanitarian campaign,'- a school-wide drive for the Community Chest. The public address system carried a home room program to encourage students to make an investment in human welfare and help fill the 4'Community's Hope Chest." . . . On March 7 AHS watched her future Thespians perform, when Keith Junior High School presented prevues of its Varieties .... The next day, sophomores played host under streamers of maroon and white to a throng of dancers at the Sophomore Hop. Credit where credit is due-it was a grand party .... The Girls League discovered on March 12 what happens to their presidents after high school days are over. In an assembly of junior and senior girls, seven past presidents of the League addressed their educational posterity. Paging Noah Webster! The third annual Mountain Echo spell- ing contest was broadcast on March 141. They tried to 4'Stump the experts," but the senior team emerged victorious. After March 14, AHS journalists began to strut with pride. And why not? For the second consecutive year the Columbia Scholastic Press Convention rated the Mountain Echo 'giirst classf, . . . There was music in the air while eight Altoona High School musicians perform on March 141, 15, and 16, at the All-District band festival in Lock Haven .... Inhabitants of 4'The Forest Primevali' invaded AHS from March 18 to 23 and made camp in the light well. It was Wild Life week .... March 20 and the Sophomore Musical Quiz Box was opened. Hereis a sample. '6Finish the title of this song, Lin the Middle of ai-1, 7, Well tell you-adreamf, Shame! Didn't you know that 'CSO Many Memoriesv was the theme song of the Dance Band? . . . Only after a prolonged argument with 4tOld Man Weatheri' did he finally con- sent to permit Altoona to begin on March 4, another successful sea- son of record-breaking events. Page One Hundred Sixty-nine t "BIG MOMENTS" April 5 and itis Senior Ball time! This year it comes as a Revelation dance with the Class of 1940 revealing its class colors, flower, and motto. It was one of the gayest affairs of the year, yet there was a note of sadness and regret that the experiences, of which this gathering was a symbol, were quickly drawing to a close . . . For men only, the exciting one-act play, uSubmerged," was presented April 12 and 13 at Franklin and Marshal college by an all male cast. More fun for the boys! 6'Hy Hoeli' Come to the fair. Grads, Seniors, e'en Sophomores are there. Two tickets! Remember, she'll not say you no, To see, of all things, this yearis annual show. Are high school students concerned about their future? Yes, deli- nitely! If the success of College Night, held April 25 is any indication. The Juniors had a lot of super-socials to come up to and they arose to the occasion on the night of April 26. The result was a dance equal to the best of them . . . May 10 the writers from the three AHS publications got together for the publications Picnic at Ritchey's Farm, for the dual purpose of food and fun . . . The next evening the Girls' League held its annual Mother and Daughter Banquet. The girls were lucky to have as speaker the secretary of our commonwealth, Miss Sara M. R. O,Hara. May 15-Senior Day, when "40,s Favorites" bade a fond farewell to classes, teachers, and friends-wait a minute! They,re back again. This time for the Senior exams held May 16, 17, and 20. The Sophomores and Juniors took their punishment on May 27, 23, 29. The worst being over, everyone concentrated his efforts on the final dash to the finish. The rare days of June have arrived, and to none so rare as to Seniors whose great expectations are soon to be sealed with the stamp of fulfilhnent. While professing bursts of pleasure and visions of rap- ture at the close of school days, AHS students confide to themselves secret misgivings upon their farewell to the familiar scenes of their Alma Mater . . . More Seniors than ever in the history of Altoona High School sat in the Sunday Service in the Jaffa Mosque on June 2. It was as a final solemn chord that made each Senior aware of the beauties and responsibilities in life that lay along the road before him . . . In a sudden change of mood, the Senior Class, on the third, observed its final festal day-the Senior Banquet . . . June 4--the grand finale to the pageant of school life drama and AHS students make their last appearance in effervescent jubilation. With farewells on every side, Seniors prepared for their banishment from AHS, but not to banish memories of three happy years of full experience and enjoyment . . . Cap and gown, symbols of completion, were donned on the fifth to enact the last scene of high school life, the commencement play, On Our Way. Page One Hundred Seventy Winding, twining, around the mountain's crest Ties of Wood, ribbons of steelg In this feat of manis creation Find beauty, rugged and noble. In this Horseshoe, namesake of this curve of iron, Find laughing, loving memories Preserved and guarded by its printed words. Page One Hundred Seventy-one We shall always sing thy praises, Hail to A. H. SJ" Page One Hundred Seventy-two ALMA MATER Blow, oh gentle mountain breezes, From the golden west, Breathe thy peaceful evening tidings To the A. H. S. Whisper to us words of pleasure, As the dim twilight Softly gathers round our colors, Dear Maroon and White. Now the shades of night grow darkerg Birds have gone to restg But our colors shine the brighter Of the A. H. S. Sinking sun behind the hilltops Sighs a soft ugood nightn To the colors Waving o'er us, Dear Maroon and White. Night has slowly crept around us, Stars are shining bright, Waving, oh so calm and peaceful, Dear Maroon and White. We shall always sing thy praises, Work for thy success, Hail to noble ALMA MATER! Hail to A. H. S.! Page One Hundred Seventy-three AUTOGRAPHS AUTOGRAPHS


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Altoona High School - Horseshoe Yearbook (Altoona, PA) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

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