Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE)

 - Class of 1921

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Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 82 of the 1921 volume:

Dedication Cfo the business men of Alliance, who, ihrouqh their interests in the Hiqh School have qiven us their financial support and thereby made the publication of this booh possible, we respect-fully dedicate this Annual.book b-The SchoolTHE HIGH SCHOOLThe Spud Pace 5 XArtinM 10 n piu-b 6WI e tR  The Spud Paue 6 MR. PATE. Superintendent «f City Schools A. B. University of Nebraska; experience of twenty-three years in various Nebraska schools; ten years as superintendent of Alliance schools. Will be with us again next year. MR. PRINCE, Principal, Mathematics, Athletics B. S. Hastings College; experience McCook one year, Alliance three years. Will return next vear. t jfaA' MISS KEITH. Language and debating A. B. University of Nebraska, Peru; experience at Gresham and Hildruth; three years at Alliance. Will not return next year. MR. CUNNINGHAM, Science B. Simpson College; experience, Principal at alker, Iowa, one year. Alliance two years, ill not return next year. J • m 'C 7 MRS. LA MON Music MISS STECKLEBIIRG, Domestic Science B. S. Manhattan, Kans. Agricultural College, M. A. University of Nebraska. Three years experience at Fairbury, Nebr., one in Alliance. Will return next year.Pace 7 The Spud MISS HK DIMM k, English A. B. University of Nebraska. One year experience at Seward, Nebr., one year at Alliance. Will return next year. MRS. EMERICK, Normal Training Peru. Two years experience in rural schools, one at Big Springs and five at Alliance. Will not return next year. MISS WHITE, History A B. and M. A. University of Nebraska. Member of Phi Beta Kappa. Won a Scholarship in the Junior Class at the University for the highest average among the girls in 1916; experience, two years at Allen, Nebr., one year at Marysville, Kans., one year at Alliance. Will not return next year. MISS BISHOP, Commercial State Teachers’ College at Cedar Falls, Iowa; Van Sants School of Business, Omaha, Nebr.; two years experience in Broken Bow, and one in Alliance. Will not return next year. MISS SNKTHEN, Mathematics B. S. University of Nebraska. Experience one year in rural schools, one in H mbolt, and one in Alliance. Will return next year. wv— v: IA-a 11 The Spud Page 8 MRS. IH'NVINH, Expression Peru Normal. Five years experience in Hipham, Mont., nine years coaching for Declamatory Contest, coached the Junior class play 1920, and the Senior and Junior Class plays 1921. Will return next year.The Spud Mr. Cunningham Our Sponsor. "Capable and efficient fond of work and p'ay.” Chorus. Glee Club, Tom Miller I.atin Club, Spud Staff. Senior Play, Debating. Tennis’ Club. Pres, of the Senior Class. “Your high school days were wisely spent. All hail to you—Our President!” Dorothy Reynolds Sec. of Class. Latin Club. Spud Staff, Senior Play. Chorus. Glee Club. “In manners perfect, and in action kind.” Wanda Adams Latin Club. “Youth calls for pleasure, pleasure for love.” ■ The Spud Pace 11 Fvnwllne Afliwon l,atln Club, Dec lamatory, Senior Play, Chorus. "Not only good but good (or something.” Alice Boon Latin Club. Normal Training. “Silence Is her one great art of conversation." Lester Heal Latin Club, Basketball. Football. Junior Play. Track. "Oh bed, oh bed, delicious bed, the heaven on earth to the weary head.” Helen Brown Latin Club. Senior Play, Chorus. "The only way to have a friend is to be one.”The Spud Page 12 Carl Ruechseustein Junior Play, Senior Play. “Life is not so short but that there is always time for courtesy.” Ruth Donovan Chorus, Normal Training. "A tender heart, a will inflexible.” Irma Ellis Spud Staff, Chorus, Latin Club. “Full of fun and mischief too; doing things she shouldn’t do.” Frances Grassman President Latin Club ’21. Junior Play, Spud Staff. “A dainty miss, demure and sweet.”The Spud Pace 13 Xari - Howe Spud Staff. Junior Play, Senior Play, Declamatory, Secretary Treasurer of the Junior Class, Tennis Club. With all her faults we love her still -the stiller the better.” Jennie Hilton Latin Club, Spud Staff, Normal Training. "She is just what she seems to be.” Sterling Harris Winner of District Oratorical Class, ’21, Junior Play, Senior Play. "In soul sincere, in action faithful, in honor clear.” Sybil Hutchinson Latin Club. Junior Play, Senior Play, Normal Training. "A virtuous and well disposed person.”The Sped Pace 14 Alice Harris “Whose little body lodges a mighty mind.” Hilda Haeffner Normal Training. “She does her work, gladly and well." Royal Irwin Spud Staff. Sec. of the Latin Club ’21, Basketball, Senior Play, Track. “I like the girls, I really think I do.” Clarence Kihhle Track “Mirth, admit me to your crew.”The Spud Pace 15 Kobert Lawrence Basketball. Football, Declamatory. Let me have audience (or a word or two.” (ileimii Lawrence Latin Club. Senior Play. "Thy modesty is a candle to thy merit.” Paul McCoy Latin Club. “A man not of words but of actions.” Leonard Pate Football, Basketball, Track. “The studious look on his countenance is assumed for the occasion.”The Spud Page ]6 Muble Hockey Chorus. “Eternal sunshine settles around her hair.” Wailter Robbins Junior Play. “He was a foe without hate—a friend without treachery.” Ruth Man ton Senior Play. Debating. Latin Club. “Quietly she does her work and knows not w hat it means to boast.” Elsie Simpson Junior Play, Senior Play, Latin Club. Spud Staff. Basketball, Glee Club, Chorus, Tennis Club. “The brightest eyes and the cheeriest smile. The happiest girl is the most worth while."The Spud Page 17 Jolm Schreiner Latin Club. "Each mine! has Its own method.” Lillie Simpson Senior Flay, Captain Basketball ’21, Normal Training. Latin Club. “Gentle of speech, bene-fleient of mind.” Bernice Siiaiiklin Declamatory. Latin Club. "Patience and gentleness is power.” Mary iVimlis Pres, of the Latin Club '20. Junior Play, Senior Play. Editor-in-Chief of the Spud ’21. Chorus, Glee Club, Tennis Club. Pres, of the Junior Class ’20. Latin Club. "The girl with the smAe makes friends all the while.”The Spud Page 18 William Williams Senior Play. Football. “There’s iy o truet measurer of man than what he does.” Yiolette Walker “Queen of May” Senior Play. Winner of the District Dramatic Contest. “She looks as clear as morning roses newly washed with dew.” Ivan Wong Junior Play, Senior Play, Business Manager of the Spud '21, Track. “Succeeds in everything he tries.” Elizabeth Wilson Junior Play, Senior Play, Spud Staff . Latin Club. “Optimism is life; pessimism—slow suicide.”The Spin Page 19 Heh'ii Young Junior Play, Senior play. Latin Club, Declamatory. "The longer you know her the better you like her.” Thelma Znbel Junior Play. Senior Play. Basketball Captain ’20. “I am sure care's an enemy to lite."The Sped Page 20 Seniors of 1921 ACT ONE. The first of September, in 1917, eighty-two badly frightened, knowledge seeking wanderers strayed up the hill to A. H. S. We entered with mouths open, fearing even the kindly looks of Mr. Pate and Mr. Crawford. We soon recovered our fright and after regaining our usual self composure elected our class officers. President .............................................John Shreiner Vice President .....................................William Cotant Secretary and Treasurer......................Fima Calder Spud Rep.....................................Marie Howe Sponsor .....................................Miss Canfield In all enterprises which we entered we were very successful hut we were certainly glad when our first year of A. H. S. was completed. ACT TWO. The next year we came back smaller in numbers but more determined to gain the rest of the knowledge of A. H. S. in one year, that we might rest the last two years. We elected the following class officers who successfully filled their offices: President ...................................Wanda Adams Vice President ..............................James Fowler Secretary and Treasurer......................William Cotant Spud Rep..................................Helen Anderson Sponsor .....................:............Mr. Messersmith At the close of this year we felt the hardest part of school life successfully over. ACT THREE. In 1919 only 48 of us entered A. H. S. but we were so filled with knowledge that we successfully occupied the Junior rows. We however, did not feel as we did at the close of our Sophomore career, that we knew everything. We were only beginning to realize how much de did not know. Our offfficers were: President ...................................Mary W ool is Vice President ..............................Helen Young Secretary and Treasurer.........................Marie Howe Spud Rep..................................W’illiam Cotant Sponsor ..................................Mr. Messersmith Our banquet was one of the most elaborate A. H. S. had ever given and we will alwavs remember it. ACT FOUR. The curtain now rises on 36 Seniors who are duly proud of their position in the honored two north rows in the A. II. S. assembly. After electing these officers:— President .......................................Tom Miller Vice President............................William Williams Secretary and Treasurer ..................Dorothy Reynolds Spud Rep..................................Elizabeth Wilson Sponsor ..................................Mr. Cunningham —we were ready to settle down to rest, but our rest has been interrupted. A picnic at Harris grove and a parly in the gymnasium for the Sidney boys first broke our rest. In all A. H. S. activities the class of ’21 has been well represented and these interrupted our rest. Our class plays both as Juniors and Seniors were very successful. Although we will soon leave the stage of Alliance school life we will never forget four of the happiest years of our lives. May those who follow enjoy it as we have. CURTAIN.The Sped Pace 21 wAt the End of the Rainbou? On May 2, tne Senior Class of ’21 gave their class play, “At the End of the Rainbow.” SCENE- A COLLEGE TOWN Time—Present Day. Cast of Characters. Robert Preston, A Lawyer............................. Douglas Brown, A Football Player..................... Dick Preston, The Groom.............................. Stanley Palmer, Hawkins the Butler................... Ted Whitney, Captain of ’Varsity Team................ Jack Austin, Preston’s Secretary..................... Marion Dayton, Preston’s Ward........................ Nellie Preston, the Bride............................ Louise Ross, Known as Miss Grayson .................. Phyllis Lane, A Football Enthusiast ................. Kathleen Knox, Chairman of the Rushing Committee The Imp, A Freshman.................................. Emile Elliot, With a Conscience...................... Jane, A Maid with a Taste for Literature............. Mrs. Brown, Step-mother of Douglas Brown............. Polly Price Elsa Earnest Marjorie Arnold Marie Swift Molly Bruce ’of the Theta Phi ......Sterling Harris ...Carl Buechsenslein .......... Tom Miller ...........Ivan Wong ..........Royal Irwin ....William Williams .......Elsie Simpson ....Dorothy Reynolds .........Helen Brown ..........Mary Woolis ..........Marie Howe ........Ruth Stanton .....Sybil Hutchinson ... Evangeline Acheson .......Thelma Zobel , Helen Young Elizabeth Wilson J Glenna Lawrence Lillie Simpson „ Violette Walker Act 1.—“Den in the Theta Phi House—Early in the College Year. Act 2.—Library in the Preston Home—Marion’s Mask Ball Two Wreeks Later. Act 3.— Interior of Athletic Club House—Afternoon and Evening of the Day of the Game. Synopsis for Program. Act 1—Phyllis and the Imp at their studies. Emily and Polly have trouble finding things. Ted's plea to Phyllis to help the college. The Promise. Roberts story of his clients troubles. “At the End of the Rainbow.” The bride and groom. Jane sees some things. Nell comes to the rescue of Theta Phi. Molly becomes a maid. Dick employs a butler. A domestic rumpus. Jane alarms the butler. “Hawkins” makes love. Louise plays with Jack. Phyllis wins Douglas. The luncheon. The agreement. “Douglas Brown will Play.” Act 2.—The supper. Dick defends the butler. Maid and butler discuss affairs. Molly is taken in. Robert and Marion exchange confidences. The old story, “Hearts and Masks.” The substitution of papers. The plot to steal the papers. Louise deceives Robert. The combination of the safe. Douglas visits Phyllis clandestinely. The lesson. The candidate. Louis secures a packet. The imp makes a startling discovery. Marion’s sacrifice. “I sought the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.” Act 3.—The football game. Louise betrays Phyllis. Douglas in despair. “I have lost him forever!” Ted is hurt. A player’s lament. The victory and jubilation. Robert's suspicions are aroused. Molly is jealous but Palmer’s candy works a marvelous cure. Louise is exposed. The Imp is indignant. “My w'ings haven’t sprouted yet.” Phyllis and Douglas. “We’ll hold onto that old homestead.” Robert and Marion find “the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.”The Spud Pace 22 Commencement Program Senior Class PI ay... Junior-Senior Banquet Senior Class Picnic ... Baccalaureate Sunday Recognition Dav...... Cl ass Night ........ Commencement ........ May 2 May 9 Mav IB May 22 Mav 21 May 21 May 27 BACCALA UREATE PROGRAM March ........... Scripture Reading Music ........... Prayer .......... Music ........... Sermon .......... Music ........... Benediction ..... Phyllis Thompson ......Rev. Smith ......Mrs. Beal .....Rev. Kearns Mr. Bass Rev. Minort ........M rs. Rhein Rev. Epler RECOGNITION DAY PROGRAM March .................. Tribute to the Seniors.. Response ............... Music .................. Recognition Day Address Music ................... ..Gladys McCool Edward Morrow ......Tom Miller ......Verna Dow ...Mr. Pate Phyllis Thompson CLASS NIGHT PROGRAM Welcome Address Class Poem ...... Music ........... Class Prophecy ... Class History ... Whistling Solo .... Class Will ...... Class Statistican Class Song....... Farewell Address. ......Tom Miller .........Irma Ellis Elsie Simpton ...Violette Walker ..William Williams Dorothy Reynolds Carl Buechsenstein ...Elizabeth Wilson .......Marie Howe Ruth Stanton COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM March ..............................................Maude Spacht ]VfUsiC .............................................Leon Alter Invocation ..........................................Dean Dixon Music ................................................. -Mr. Bass Address ..........Hon. C. F. Reavis, Congressman First District of Nebraska. jVfusic ..................................... ...Janet Grassman Presentation of Diplomas ................................Mr. Pate Music ...............................................Mrs- Rhein Benediction ........................................ Rev. KearnsPage 23 The Spud Humorous Class Historuj BAD HABIT NAME CHARACTERISTIC Evangeline Acheson .........truest girl.................rushing boys Wanda Adams.................most beautiful girl.........staying up nights Lester Beal ................best looking boy ..........imitating animals Helen Brown ................best dressed ..............dolling up Alice Boon ..............-..quietest girl ..............too fond of eating t'arl BeuchsenBtein ........most modest boy ..........blushing Ruth Donovan ...............most sens’ble girl .......matrimonally inclined Irme Ellis .................wittiest girl ..............using slang Frances Grassman ...........cutest girl ................growing Alice Harris ...............wisest ...................attracting attention Sterling Harris ............most mannerly boy ........taxi for the ladies Jennie Hilton ..............sweetest girl ..............too quiet Marie Howe .................most popular .............asking questions Hilda Haeffner .............most sedate ..............too smart Sybil Hutchinson ...........most prim ................too fond of talking Royal Irwin ................most popular with girls ..trying to be cute Clarence Kibble ............jolliest boy .... ..........flirting Glenna I awrence ...........most reliable girl .......being too bold Robert Lawrence ............most accomodating boy .....too ambitious Paul McCoy .................wittiest boy ...............sleeping Tom Miller .................most sensible boy ..........rushing girls Leonard Pate ...............most studious manner saying “bugs” Dorothy Reynolds ...........best booster girl ..........working Walter Robbins .............most reliable boy ........too accomodating John Schreiner Bernice Shanklfn Ruth Stanton Lillie Simpson Elsie Simpson William Williams Mary Woolis school I Ivan Wrong Elizabeth Wilson jolliest girl ’ Vlolette Wra!ker too proud of himself ...vamping powdering Helen Young ................most unassuming .............singing Thelma Zobel ...............best girl athlete ...........giggling Mr. Cunningham .............most influential ............too businesslikeThe Spud Page 24 BUT WHEH HE C.ET5 ALone —. ___________________The Spud Junior Notes Pace 26 The Freshman class of 1919 entered the A. H. S. with the same feeling as most of the Freshman. We were enrolled with 60 members hut our numbers made up for the lack of courage. Vie had a class meeting in the assembly (a room willed to the Freshies) and elected Miss Beal sponsor and the following officers: President, W ard Joder; Vice President, Lee Strong; Secretary and Treasur- er, Helen Siedell: Spud Reporter. Edward Morrow. Since the Seniors were our guardian angels we did not make many mistakes. After becoming sufficiently acquainted it was decided we have a masquerade box social in the high school gymnasium. The upper-classmen tried to break it up but since they could not we had a very enjoyable time. After nearly a year’s hard work was over the Freshmen then decided to have a weinee roast out six miles from town. We toasted our supper, fingers, and faces, then played games until a late hour. Finally our Freshman year ended and we passed on as dignified Sophomores. We entered the Sophomore year with some new members and some old ones missing. This year our class officers were as follows: President Elsie Gillis; Vice President, Vera Smith; Secretary and Treasurer, Mariellen Beagle; Athletic Reporter, Cecil Beal; Spud Reporter, Oral Edwards. We held a party in the “Gym" which was counted as one of the good times of the A. H. S. We spent a very happy year on the south side of the assembly. Our last Sophomore party was held in company with the Freshmen where numbers made us have a very good time This year we took up the responsibilities as Juniors with the smallest class in High school only 25. Being small in numbers we had to work all the harder to keep even with the other classes. Wre chose the play “Patty Makes Things Hum” and gave it April 15 at the Imperial theater. W e succeeded in getting enough money from our play to give the Seniors a banquet and will do our best to make as good a success of it as the play but we will let the Seniors judge us as they are our 66 _• 9 superiors. Mr. Prince, impressively—“The money must go through Mr. Pate’s office first.” Excited student—“I’ll carry it through.” Mrs. Frank C. P.—“I saved the money to buy this dress, darling.” Mr. F. C. P.—“How did you do it, precious?” Mrs. F. C. P.—“Why I bought it with the money you gave me to pay the grocery bill and charged the grocery bill.” Chas. C.—“Would you like to hear me sing ‘All Through the Lovely Night’?” Katy H.—“No thanks. All callers leave at midnight.” « ft • “W hat makes history so hard. Miss White?” “Why, you see, first there was the stone age, then the bronze, then the iron and now' there’s the hard-boiled.” Mrs. Dotson—“Clement, don’t you know I told you not to play with your soldiers on Sunday?” Doc—“Yes, mamma. But today they’re the Salvation Army.”ThkSpvd J unioT Sen.ior Banquet Pace 27 The Junior-Senior banquet was held in the Fern room of the Alliance hotel, on the evening of May 9th. The room was made to represent a Japanese tea garden, carrying out the colors of pink and green. The tables were profusely decorated with pink roses, the Senior’s flower. Promptly at 8 o’clock the programme began which was as follows: Toastmaster ..... Greetings to 1921 Reply ........... Current Opinion The Spectator ... Success ......... World’s W ork The Outlook ..... Edward Morrow Mariellen Beagle ......Tom Miller .....Leota Becker Mr. Pate ....Mary Wool is Mr. Cunningham ...Sterling Harris During the programme the banquet was served which consisted of Fruit Cocktail Fried Spring Chicken Mashed Potatoes Celery Hearts Tiny Peas in Cases Hot Rolls Head Lettuce with Thousand Island Dressing Fruit Sundae Maccroons Coffee Mints Tell me not in mournful numbers Life is but an empty dream, When you wake from peaceful slumbers And curse the pickles and ice cream. Little bits of satin Half an ounce or less, W ith a pair of slippers Makes an evening dress.The Spud Pace 28 V f fJ ii fH r?p »h-» i The Sm Pace 29The Spud Page 30The Spld Pace 31 Class of 1923 Chapter One. W hen we started in high school we were as all other Freshmen, polite, scared, and green. When the dear Seniors patted us on the head we rejoiced for weeks. When the all wise Juniors bestowed upon us a smile or the Sophies gave us advice as to the exact location of the classrooms we felt that we were indeed a part of the big high school family. But gradually we discovered that the Seniors were not so awesome. When the Juniors addressed us with sarcasm, we learned to give back their sarcasm, doubled. The Sophomores, we regarded as beings beneath our recognition. We were all very excited about our first party, held at Purington’s grove. Despite the unsuccessful efforts of the upper classmen to leave us stranded in the grove with the eats among the absentees we had a very enoyable time. About Christmas we presented in front of a grinning assembly a program enjoyed by all. Christmas presents were fittingly distributed among the spectators and a large powder puff was donated to Mr. Prince. Near the end of the year we gave another program in which the kitchen Syniphony rendered a few beautiful musical numbers. Our second party was held in the gymnasium and was also a decided success. We now realized with gravity, that the time was approaching when we would no longer be Freshmen. W hen we must throw off our childish ways and deport ourselves in the manner of all dignified Sohphomores. Chapter Two. The time has come when we must add the second chapter to our class chronicle. How long it seems since we were mere Freshmen. With solemn manner we first sought our places in the assembly, no longer as Freshies hut as upperclassmen. Our first classmeeting, Miss White was elected sponsor and the following officers chosen: Frances Schott ......................................President Flora Spencer ................................. Vice President Josephine Wilson......................Secretary and Treasurer Rowland Threlkeld .........................Spud Representative Seth Joder ............................Athletic Representative Only one party was held this year in the gymnasium. Mr. Prince took all the prizes simply because he could argue the winners out of them. Not all of our class has stayed with us. Several, we regret to say, so loved the life of a Freshman that they remained, and are now members of the class of '24. Said Prof. Chase to a waitress bold. “See here young woman, my cocoa’s cold" She scornfully answered, “I can’t help that. If the darned things chilly, put on your hat. ' One hundred years ago When wilderness was king With powder in his gun, the man Went out to hunt a deer. But nowf the thing is changed And on another plan, With powder on her face, the dear Goes out to hunt a man. Fred—“I’m going to kiss you when I leave.’’ Verna (angrily)—“How dare you! Leave this house at once!”The Spud Pace 32FRESHMAN CLASS The Spud Page 33The Spud Freshmen Holes Page 34 With the spring comes the close of another school year, a year filled with work and pleasure, with lessons learned and friendships made stronger. This is how we, the Freshmen feel about the year just passed. Our first in the A. H. S. and we are eagerly looking forward to the next three years of high school life as upper classmen to he equally if not more enjoyable. Why do we have to go to school? f rom the little boy in the thrid grade who would rather stay home and fly his kite to the young man in high school who thinks he would he better working with his hands and earning money, ail make the same complaint: “I don’t see what good school will do me. I’ll never have any use for Latin or Geometerv, or Algebra after graduating.” But they are wrong. It has been proved that our minds need the training derived from studying these given tasks and our brains need the development. We might compare school life to the foundation of a building. The beginning, and everything depends upon the beginning. Our lessons are the bricks, each good lesson a good brick and each bad lesson a bad brick. Every one knows what happens if a foundation gets too many bad bricks. It caves in, and no matter how strongly built the top of the building is, it falls with the caving in of the foundation. So it is with our lives. Of course as is customary to all Freshmen, when we made our first appearance at the door of the school of higher learning, we were a trifle frightened but curious to find out for ourselves how truly different this life was going to be from that of the grade schools. All things were not as great as our dreams had pictured them for it is never so. The first few days it seemed as if everything we did was wrong so Mr. Prince kept us in one night after school and told us when, where, how', why. which, etc., our classes would be. After that we got along famously. We held a class meeting shortly after school opened and elected as our class officers: Charles Cross, President; Lucille Butler, Vice President; William Bick- nell, Secretary and Treasurer; Ralph Garvin. Atheletic Representative; Katherine Flarris, Spud Editor; and Miss Bishop, Sponsor. The first high school party we attended was the High School Mixer. Hallowe’en we had a party of our own in the gym entertaining the Sidney and local football boys. The Freshmen girls gave a short program in front of the assembly April 7th and the boys are now planning one at the time of this write-up. What is the matter, Miriam? Can’t you speak louder? Be more enthusiastic. Open your mouth and throw yourself into it! We editors may dig and toil. Till our finger tips are sore. But some poor fool is sure to say “I’ve heard that joke before.” Mark A.—“What is life anyway? Ruth A.—“Just one darned thing after another.” M. A.—“Well then, what is love?” R. A.—“Two darned things after each other.”The Spud Page 35 Editorials WHAT ARE YOU? Have you ever stopped to consider the many types or classes of students there ii in your high school? Did you ever classify the students who seemed to he tin most popular? Did you ever consider how you might be classified? There ,ire five main classes of students—the would be sports, the “I won’t works” the dumb-bells, the grinds, and the all round students. Of these the most objectable are the would-be sports. The class includes the boys who smoke- not because they enjoy it but because this is the proper way to lx- “hard.” The boys and girls who try to entertain the assembly but shake with fear when sent to the office belong in this class. There is also the girl who boasts of her dates, says she is tired of getting boxes of candy and is always talking of the dances and parties she attends and is presumably the leading attraction. The loafers need not take much time. They are simply the students who are too lazy to work although they could do passing work if they applied themselves. They are fit subjects for the poison ivy club and are a trial not only to the faculty but the other students. We wonder they come to school if they refuse to work. The dumb-bells are those who are not only stupid but lazy. “Nuf Sed.” Another class is the “grinds.” This does not mean that people who study-blit the people who study only and refuse to take part in any student activity. They are usually at their best when equipped with 14 books and a high brow air. They are offensively self-satisfied and fail to realize that there is anything to a high school but classes. Football, basketball, track, tennis, programs, and plays do not interest but simply bore them. Because of their supercilious air they are usual Iv the least popular people in school. The last type and we are glad to say that this includes the majority of the students is known as the all-round student. This person does good school work, doesn’t try to bluff his wav through, goes out for athletics if he or she has any abilitv' and is willing to take part in all school activities. These people are not deadly enemies of the faculty and get as many E. S. H. honors as anyone else. They are popular with the students and with the faculty and are a credit to the high school. Now that you have read this—think! if the process is not painful. See in what class you belong. While of course we realize that it is practically impossible for you to be out of the last class—but then you know how: women are. —Anonvmous. STOLEN M0RALIZ1NGS There are twenty overloafers to one overworker. A pessimist knows the world is full of liars; an optimist only suspects it. One who can “do about anything” usually can do about nothing well. A successful man thinks through a problem; a failure only thinks at it. It is better to take a chance and go broke than never to take a chance and go broke. Love, of course, makes the world go ’round, but what is more important is for it to make the world go square. Don’t advertise your faults nor your virtues. Your enemies will attend to the former and your friends to the latter. The difference between being and doing Is the difference between an oyster. And a whirlwind: The oyster is—and that’s all; The whirlwind does—and that is a-plenty. Don’t lie about your neighbors—they might lie about you. And don’t tell the truth about them—they might tell the truth about you.The Spud Alumni Rotes Page 36 The members of the Alumni wish to welcome the graduating class into the organization and to congratulate each one upon your success. With the addition of the 37 new members the membership totals 398. We trust that the new members may be benefitted by their association with the Alumni organization and that we may strive harmoniously to promote the interest of our organization. Three members of the Alumni association, Milton Keegan. '13, Marian Mote, ’16, and Lester Britton, ’16 have been elected to the Phi Beta Kappa society, an honorary society of the Nebraska University. Grace Johnson, ’14 who has been confined to her bed for the past two years is able to walk and be out again. W'e sincerely hope that Grace will soon be herself again. Claude McDonald. ’08 is able to go to his work again after suffering several weeks from a broken hip. Matilda Frankie, 17, who is attending Nebraska University has been elected to the Ealtyrie society. Marie Kibble, 19 spent a week at home before going on the chautauqua circuit this summer. Cora Lewis, 97 who has been seriously ill at St. Joseph’s hospital is reported much improved. We all envy Helen Hewitt. '15 her trip to Australia. Helen under contract with Annette Kellerman will put on special dances in Miss Kellerman’s performances there. Mrs. Robert Johnson formerly Nell Tash, ’15 expects to leave soon to live on her homestead near Moorcroft, Wyo. Mrs. C. M. Read formerly Hazel Bennett, ’13 now resides at Altamont, Kans. Leone Mallery, ’13 has enjoyed the past year in Honolulu so much that she is planning on spending at least one more year there. Leila Wewhirter, ’20 has accepted a position at the Alliance creamery. M rs. Milton Keegan formerly Ethel James, ’10 now resides at Denver, Colo. Ralph Johnson, ’15 is married and living in Fruitdale, Idaho. Alice Graham. '16 has completed her nurses training at the University Hospital. John Carey, ’19 is attending the University of Nebraska after spending several months in California. Russell Mann, ’20 is attending school in Golden. Colo. Helen Woods, ’20 has been teaching school this vear. Lessie Reeves, 20 has been employed as stenographer in Attorney Basye’s office. Miss Steckleberg—“In six years the human body becomes entirely changed and not an old cell remains.” Mable S.—“Then in six years you won t be Miss Steckleberg?” Miss S.—“I sincerely hope not.”book AthleticsThe Spud Pace 39 FRANK PRINCE. Coach. Played at Hastings 4 years, U. S. A. Team one year. LEE STRONG. Captain Captain Elect. Full Back. Age 17, Weight 158. Played 2 Years. LESTER BEAL Center. Age 20. Weight 165. Played 2 Years.The Spud Pace 40 IVAN ACHESON Left Tackle. Age 19. Weight 150. Played 2 Years. FRANK DAILY Left Half Rack, Age 17, Weight 146. Played 2 Years. JAMES FOWLER Quarter Back, Age 17. Weight 145. Played 2 Years. SETH JODER Sub. Half Back-End. Age 17. Weight 146. Played 2 Years.The Spud Page 41 ItOBT. LAWRENCE Right End, Age 20, Weight 151 . Played 2 Years. FRED PURDY Right Guard, Age 17. Weight 150. P ayed 2 Years. LESTER CROSS Left End, Age 17, Weight 142. Played 2 Years. LEONARD PATE Right Tackle, Age 17, Weight 145. Played 1 Year.LESTER HERMAN Left Guard, Age 17, Weight 155. Played 1 Year. LESLIE MISKIMEN Sub. Guard, Age 17, Weight 148. Played 1 Year. Page 42 RALPH GARVIN Right Half Back, Age 17, Weight 145. Played 1 Year. WM. WILLIAMS Sub. Guard. Age 17, Weight 155.The Spud The Football Team Page Vi Vi lien the c all for football candidates was first sounded, only a few responded. It was sounded louder and louder and more men were attracted. The first game was with the “North Platte Huskies.” When the season ended there were two small but good teams, both fighting to the finish. The second team is worthy of mention because it took many hard knocks from its superiors. Mr. Prince was successful at organizing two of the snappiest teams in the west. There were eight games played during the season. They were North Platte, Scottsbluff. Bayard, Hot Springs, S. I)., Sidney, Crawford, and Scottsbluff. Words by Some of the Players. Lee Strong—“Some Game Believe Me.” Wm. Williams—“I wish I had a couple more years of it.’ Ivan Acheson—"The game sure is 0. k." Lester Herman—“Its a great life if you don't weaken." Fred Purdy—“The greatest game ever played.' Lester Cross—“The best game ever put out.” The Whole Gang—“Let's go Gang." Five men will leave this year but more will take their place. Ke wish for the brilliant success in future years.The Spi n Page 14The Spud Page 45 Basket Ball Team Letter Cross—Forward. Captain. Sophomore—A good leader and a steady plaver. Frank Daily—Forward, Sophomore— Tall, active, an excellent basket shooter. Leonard Pate—Center, Senior—A good sportsman, seldon out jumped. James Fowler, Guard, Captain. Junior—A reliable man, a real guard, swell leader. Seth Joder. Guard. Sophomore—An excellent guard, and basket shooter. Royal Irwin, Sub Forward, Senior—Small, a hard worker, eager to play, full of pep. Fred Purdy, Sub Guard, Sophomore—Heavy, active, reliable. He always did his best. Robert Bicknell, Sub Forward, Junior—A good basket shooter, will be a regular next year. Raymond Brown, Sug Center, Senior—Tall, alert. He took his share of punishment. Frank Prince, Coach—A hard fighter. He stood by the team through thick and thin. The best ever. The Alliance tossers played more games than any other team in the state. The total number of games played was thirty-two. Twenty-four of them being victories. Twenty-two were played away from home. Only one man was on last year's team, the remainder playing their first year of basket ball. Nevertheless there were only eight defeats or 25 per cent of the total number of games. The Alliance team was the winner of a silver loving cup at Chadron tournament. Two of Alliance men being chosen as all star men. Only one regular will be lost next year and a real snappy team will remain. Review of Alliance Basket ball season. Alliance .61 Merna ........................20 .15 Ansley .......................28 20 Litchfield ...................33 .17 Revanna ......................36 31 Oshkosh ......................23 .35 Gothenburg ...................22 12 North Platte .................17 36 Chappell .....................20 60 Sidney .......................32 25 Antioch ......................16 21 Kimball 60 53 Mitchell .....................14 16 Bayard .......................18 19 Scott sbluff ............... 20 .34 Gering .......................22 20 Crawford .....................14 17 Hyannis ......................16 59 Oshkosh ......................23 23 Bavard .......................29 70 Mitchell .....................12 48 Manville, Wyo............... 15 19 Antioch ......................12 45 Chappell .....................16 21 •Kimbar...................... 46 19 Hyannis ......................28 33 Scottsbluff .................. 8 .31 Sidney .......................35 5 Stanton ..................... 11 74 Long Pine ....................12 46 Gordon ....................... 9 13 Hot Springs, S. D 12 26 Chadron ......................11 ‘Kimball forfeited on account of an ineligible man.The Sped Pace 46 The Spud Page 47 Qirls Basket Ball soon as the Xmas vacation was over, girl’s basketball practice started in earnest ami the first events of the high school were the class games. The first night the Seniors were victorious over the Juniors. The next game between the Freshmen and Sophomore class and the Freshmen resulted in a victory for the Sophs. Ihe final play between the two classes was ended. The Seniors being H. S. Champs. Next was to pick out the two teams and the first league game was played with Bayard on Jan. 1 1. Alliance girls went over the top with a score of 28 to 10. The second game, with Crawford ended with a score of 31-22 in our favor. The Gering-Alliance game at Gering was more of a scrap than a game, the score being 31-22 in favor of Alliance. The next game was with Scottsbluff and was a scrap from beginning to end. The teams tied several times during the course of the evening. The final score 31-25 resulted in a defeat for Scottsbluff. The following game with Gering was played here. When the whistle blew at the end of a hard fought battle the score was 23-12 in favor of Alliance. Our next game, w ith Scottsbluff was the only one lost by Alliance during the season. It was a hard fought game but fate was against us. The score was 27-17. The last game was played with Bayard at Bayard. Alliance come out on top with a score of 28-22. The girls showed good team work and careful forethought in all the games, having lost only one. The effect of their work resulted in the Western Championship for Alliance. We had a Girl’s Second Basket ball team this year and although it played only with Antioch, it showed good material for future use. Alliance won both games. We hope the second team will aid in helping to make as good a first team as possible next year so that Alliance may gain another championship. The “A" Girls are as follows: Elsie Simpson Ethyl Trabert Franees Schott Thelma Zobel Lillie Simpson Clara Garrett ...Forward ...Forward .....Guard .....Guard Side Center .....Center Lillie Simpson was the Captain of the team and Frances Schott was elected captain for 1922. Alliance 38 Bavard 10 99 31 Crawford 22 31 Gering 22 99 31 Scottsbluff 25 99 23 Gering 12 99 17 Scottsbluff 27 99 28 Bavard 22 Total 199 Total 140The Spi n Page W Track The track outlook is very promising. Coach Prince has developed some good men out of hut fair material. The Inter class meet was won by the Sohphomore by two points over the Seniors. Summary First Second Third Time and Distance 100 Yd Dash Dailv Garvin Strong 10 3-5 seconds 880 Yd Run....Lawrence Beal Wong 2:25 Shot Put L. Beal Purdy Pate 36 ft. 2 In. Broad Jump . Garvin Pate L. Beal 20 ft. High Jump ..Garvin Pate Daily 5 ft. 3 in. Pole Vault Daily Garvin Pate 10 ft. 1 in. 220 Yd Hurdles Dailv L. Beal Pate 32 seconds. 220 Yd Dash Daily Strong Garvin 25 1-5 seconds. Javelin Throw . Fowler Morris Wong 110 ft. Mile Run Lawrence Killian Kibble 5.31 3-5 sec. J20-yd h. hurdle L. Beal Garvin Cross 20 4-5 sec. 440 Dash ..Strong C. Beal. Wong 60 2-3 sec.The Sped Pace 49 Chapel Holes Sept. I 1. Program by the Excellent Scholarship Society. Sept. 24. Talk by Rev. Mearl C. Smith. Sept. 27. Lec ture on “Ambition” by Dr. S. I). Dorey. Sept. 29. Readings by Mrs. Inice McCorkle Dunning. Oct. 6. Evangelist Davidson spoke to the High School. Oct. 7. Booster meeting for the Spud. Oct. 11. Educational Victrola music by Miss Anna Booth. Oct. 14. Exams. Oct. 15. Yell meeting for Hot Springs game. Oct. 22. Rally for Bayard game. Oct. 25. “What Education has Meant to Me,” by Dr. Minor Morris. Nov. 2. Piano solos by Miss Alta V. Young. Nov. 4. A James Whitcomb Riley program given by members of the Expression class. Nov. 8. “Success” by Dr. Theodore Hanson. Nov. 11. Yell meeting for the Crawford game. Nov. 12. The Expression class gave a “Eugene Fields” program. Nov. 22. Girls Glee Club entertained the High School. Dec. 1. Mrs. Wr. A. LaMon gave several readings. Jan. 14. Yell meeting for the Bayard and Sidney games. Jan. 24. New semester begins. Jan. 28. Junior Play cast chosen. Feb. 24. Talks by members of the Debating team. Feb. 16. “History of the Commercial Club by G. M. Carey. Feb. 18. Mrs. Minor Morris entertained us with several readings. Feb. 24. Senior Program “The Awkward Squad.” Feb. 25. Efficiency tests for the Freshmen. Mar. 9. Rev. Minort spoke to High School on ‘Education and Opportunity.’ Mar 11. Junior Program. Mar. 25. Sophomore program. Apr. 15. Junior class play at Imperial theater “Patty Makes Things Hum. Apr. 22. Senior class program “Whiskers.” Mav 2. Senior Class Play “At the End of the Rainbow" at Imperial theatre. —Marie Howe. Elyse H.—“Say do you know what makes the tower of Pisa lean?” Dorothy F.—“No. If I did I'd take some of it myself.” t t At last Leonard got religion and advertised it along the highways and by-ways. On a certain bridge he put: “What will become of YOU after death?” Under it soon appeared this sign: “Use 3-in-l—good for burns. British boy (playing poker I—“All’ll wager a bloomin’ pound on this.” Robert English-—“Don’t know what you’re talking about but I’ll raise you a couple of tons.”book lll- Actiuities The Sped Page 52 DEBATING TEAMThe Spud Debating Page 53 The question for debate this year is “Resolved: That the Literacy Test for Restricting Immigration should he Repealed.” Alliance took the negative at the beginning of the year, and has won two debates while upholding that side of the question. At the state contest at Lincoln the team won first debate while upholding the affirmative side. The next debate, in which they also took the affirmative, they lost to the state champions. Those who made the team were Tom Miller, Edward Morrow and Ruth Stanton. Rowland Threlkeld was chosen alternate. Both Edward Morrow and Ruth Stanton were on last year’s team. Besides the four named above there were Harold Clark, Charles Cross, Margaret Schill, Mary Woolis and Chester Yount in the preliminary contest. Miss Keith, who has coached the Alliance teams for three years, deserves the greater part of the credit for the successful year, and a great loss will be felt when she does not take the reins next year. At the beginning of the year eight teams had signified their intention of entering the district contests. But a number changed their minds so Alliance debated only twice, winning each time, therefore becoming district champions. The debates were with Chadron and Sidney. From the tenth to the twelfth of May the team was in Lincoln at the state contest. At the drawing they found they were to compete with Fairbury first, and had the affirmative. Alliance won by a two to one decision. The next debate was with Cathedral High of Lincoln, Alliance again drew the affirmative. Cathedral High won by a two to one decision. The next day they became state champions by winning from Wayne, this time unanimously. This makes the fifth consecutive year that an Alliance team has won the district championship. The state is divided into eleven districts. Alliance being in the Northwestern district . In the eleven years the championship has gone to other teams but twice. —R. T. Miss White—“Stop bluffing and answer Yes or No. Who was Charles 8th?” Janice—“Is my skirt too short?” Bright listener—“No. Man wants but little here below, nor wants that little long.” Mr. Cunningham—“How does it happen you didn't name the baby ‘Warren Harding’ as was your intention?” Mr. Prince—“We named it Doris.” Frank and Lester Beal were discussing Raymond Brown. Lester—“I’m thin and you’re thin but he’s thinner than both of us put together.” • • • Sterling—“What kind of stone do you suppose I'll have when I die?"’ Marie—“Brimstone.” Mariellen—“I thought you took Latin last year.” I,ee—“I did but the faculty encored me.”The Spin Declamatory Pace 54 The preliminary declamatory contest, for the purpose of selecting three from each class to compete in the final local contest, was held March 7th at the High School auditorium, sixteen taking part. Since only two had originally entered the oratorical contest, these were not heard, but selections were made from the other two classes. The selection included Lois Boyer, Mildred Pate and Violette Walker of the dramatic class, and Eula Bar-ranger, Frances Fletcher and Margaret Schill of the humorous class. I hose who entered the dramatic class were Evangeline Acheson, Mary Becker, Lois Boyer, Elyse Harris. Edna Hiles, Mildred Pate, Ruth Stanton. Violette Walker and Helen Young. In the humorous class the entrants were Eula Barranger, Eva Beal, Lorea Edson, Frances Fletcher, Miriam Harris, Margaret Schill and Vera Scott. The contestants of the oratorical class, who appeared at the Imperial theater only, were Sterling Harris and Robert Lawrence. The final local contest was held at the Imperial theater a few weeks later. The three selected from the dramatic class and the humorous class, and the two of the oratorical class contested for first places and representation in the district contest. Of these Violette Walker, Francis Fletcher and Sterling Harris were chosen. Their selections were “Mistress Penelope.” “Coming Out of Miss Cummings,” and “Liberty or Death,” respectively. The ■convention of this district of the State Teachers' Association was held here the first of April, and the district declamatory contest was held then. There were nearly a dozen towns entered, and Alliance won first in two classes—the dramatic and the oratorical. Both winners represented Alliance at the State contests the second week in May. The best speakers in the state gathered at Cozad for the dramatic contest and at Stanton for the oratorical. Our representatives made a very fine showing, hut lost in both cases. Our disappointment, however, was modified by the district championships which they won. Both are Seniors and will not be back next September, but with several thriving classes in expression there should be the best of representation in all three classes at next year’s contests. Interest was the greatest of any year during the past season and many more will undoubtedly compete next year and carry off even greater honors for Alliance. We are very proud of the showing made by all contestants and wish to tend our heartiest thanks to those who made it possible. —Rowland Threlkeld.The Spud Latin Club Tlotes Pace 56 A meeting of ail Latin students was called during the chapel period October 29, and under the supervision of Miss Keith, a Latin Club was organized. About fifty-six responded, making the enrollment larger than in recent years. The following officers were elected for the year: Frances Grassman....................................President Edward Morrow.................................Vice-President Royal I rwin..........................Secretary and Treasurer Jennie Hilton............................................Spud Representative Three entertainment committees were appointed and three meetings were planned for this year, two of which have been given. The first meeting of the Latin Club was held Friday, November 5th, at the home of Irma and Ethelyn Ellis. The usual Latin games and music afforded a very enjoyable time to those present. Dainty refreshments were served at a late hour. The second meeting was held at the home of our president, Frances Grassman. There was a large attendance, including several Alumni members and the faculty. The greater part of the evening was spent in playing the Latin card games of Verbs and Anagrams. A short program was given and some new games were introduced which caused a great deal of amusement, after which refreshments were served. A very pleasant and sociable evening was reported. Since the organization in '08 the Latin Club has been an exceptionally enthusiastic body, and we hope it will continue to be larger and better each year. Rome Rursiuq and Phujsioloqu] One of the new studies adopted this semester was Home Nursing and Physiology as the Home Economics Smith-Hughes course is being taught for the first time this year. The course is based on Franklin’s idea that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. With this idea in mind we have taken up a study of preventative measures as are most ignored. First among these came the attempt to attain the right weight for the individual pupil as based on her height and age. Each person was measured and weighed and then we decided what we were going to do. Those that were over weight were to take exercise and have the right kind of diet. Since weight is a direct indication of the state of health, we are aiming to attain the correct weight. Here are some of the results of three weeks’ effort: 1 132 lbs. 24 lbs. 2 131 lbs. 23 lbs. 3 121 lbs. 13 lbs. 4 Ini lbs. 14 lbs. 5 10iy2 lbs. 21 , lbs. 6 95 lbs. 32 lbs. over weight, lost 21 g lbs over weight, lost 3 lbs. over weight, lost 2 lbs. lbs lbs lbs. We are very fortunate in having Miss Steekleberg with us again next year. She has been a very good instructor and we are sure she will be next vear. —F. S.The Sped Ttlanual Training Page 57 The Manual Training classes, nine and ten recite the first two periods in the morning. The reason for the two classes meeting at the same time is due to the small number enrolled in each class. f or the first two weeks of school the class met at the high school, where they learned how to make working drawings. Each class had a different set of drawings to make. Two class periods out of each six weeks’ period the class would have book work at the high school, where they would study the different tools used in the shop. They studied the different kinds of wood and different joints used in furniture making. W hen reporting at the shop the boys would make the different joints they had studied. Some of the things made by the Manual Training class are smoking stands, pedestals, handkerchief boxes, book racks, fruit and nut bowls, piano benches, candle stands, tool and medicine chests, card and library tables. Manual training is an interesting subject to take and more boys in school should enroll and help make it a worth while subject. It will help to build up a boy physically, mentally and also teach him to be accurate. It helps a great many boys to choose their life work. Commercial Department Up to the present term, the Commercial Course has covered a period of two years, but now in order to graduate, the work must be taken up in the Freshman year. Our commercial course is one of the most complete in Western Nebraska. It thoroughly prepares its graduates for positions and for this reason so many subjects are required in order to give the student a broader knowledge for the work. The required subjects are: Shorthand, Typewriting, Commercial Arithmetic, English, Bookkeeping. Penmanship and Spelling. The advanced class of Shorthand is also taking a course of “Office Practice,” which is beneficial to those who expect to work this summer. Miss Bishop, Instructor of this Department has a larger class enrolled than any previous year. Thirtv-two Freshmen took up Commercial work in September. Those who have received diplomas from this course under Miss Wilson are: 1915 Lora Nason, Dorothy Pederson. 1916 W alter Anderson. Carl kaester, Otto Snyder, Ralph W’atteyne. 1917 La Veta Boyden. 1918 Helen Lore, Annie Reeves, Bessie Younkin. 1919 Marie Reeves, and Pearl Trabert under Miss Bargey. Those who receive diplomas this year are: Alice Harris, Mabel Garrett. Clara Garrett. Ethel Trabert. Marjorie Harmer and Thelma Zobel. —T. M. Z.The Sped Paue 58 .11, ! Jllliance Hiqh School Annua The Spud 1 T Published at the close of each year b the students of the Alliance High School. (The Staff Editor in Chief ............................................ Mary Woolis Associate Editor ............................................. Tom Miller Second Associate Editor .......... Mariellen Beagle Business Manager.................................................Ivan Wong Advertising Manager ...................................... Edward Morrow Assistant Advertising Manager. Rowland Threlkeld Subscription Manager.................................................Elsie Simpson Assistant Subscription Manager............................. Inez Hagen Girls’ Athletic Reporter ................................Dorothy Reynolds Boys’ Athletic Reporter ......................................Royal Irwin Humorists .................................. Irma Ellis, Josephine Wilson Chapel Reporter ..............................................Marie Howe News Reporter ........................................ ..Frances Grassman Typists ......Ethel Trabert, Novella Coursey, Belva Tipple, Oral Edwards Senior Reporter .........................................Elizabeth Wilson Junior Reporter .......................................... Edward Morrow Sophomore Reporter Rowland Threlkeld Freshman Reporter ........................................ Kathryn HarrisTHE SPUD STAFF The Spud Page 59 ■The Sped Page 60The Spud Jokes Page 61 little boy taking bis music lesson was asked by bis teacher “Vi bat are pauses? The response was “Thing that grow on pussy cats.” She—“I wish God had made me a boy.” He—“He did. I’m it.” • Teacher—“What are the five senses?” Pupil—"A nickel.” « « « An ardent Catholic went in a restaurant andtordered fish, for it was Friday. but was forced to take something else. When the dish was set before him, he said: “Well the Lord knows I wanted fish anyway.” Customer—“What have you?” Waiter—“Pig’s feet, calf’s liver, and lamb's brains." Customer, verv sympathetically—“Poor man. Vi ere you born that way? • A—“When is a joke not a joke?” B.—“The biggest end of the time. ' Business Manager--“Now, the question is, how are we going to pay for this Annual?” „ Brilliant Member of Staff—“Build air castles and use the rent to pay with. • “Wilt thou have this man to be thy wedded husband?” “If you please,” was the polite reply. “Say, Helen, do you know the Lord’s prayer?” “You tell ’em. It’s that little ditty beginning ‘Now I lay me down to sleep— • Teacher—“Describe the geographical features of the country. Prank__“Oh, it’s got a lotta mountains and volcanoes an’ earthquakes. • Mrs. Looney—“But isn’t he just a little fast dear?" Theresa—“Yes, but I don’t think he’ll get away.” Miss Bishop—“Last night 1 dreamed 1 was married.” Miss Snethen—“Were you happy?” Miss Bishop—“Yes, until I woke up.” Mr. Pate—“Are you the oldest in your family?” Raymond B.—“No, both papa and mamma are older than I." J Miss White—“Who was Zwingle?” Francis S.—“He was a—er—ah -what do you call a man-nun? Lester—“It’s about time vou were ready. Kept me here waiting like a fool." Frances G.—“I’m sorry I kept you waiting, but I'm not responsible for the way you look.” Mr. Chase—“Charles, where does the process of respiration begin?" C. C.—“On page 85."Our Thanks To those who made the publication of The Spud possible, to those who contributed their time and talent, the faculty, the student body, and the advertisers, the Staff wish to express their sincere appreciation.The Spud Pace 63 MOT WCATMtl RECREATION flELC PLAY- ICE CREAM The coolest of Hot Weather Games Requires no exertion. Our parlors free for use of parties, consisting of one, two or more! Everything furnished. Charges nominal. Alliance Candy Store Phone 27. S. P. Jackson. 210 Box Butte Ave. Morgan Qroceri} Co. Hiqh Quality Louj Prices The Store that Started the “Bump of old H. C. L. EuerqtKinq for the TableThe Spud Page 64 A J IjBgJiJ Ljj ? ' ij Mf 14] “Sellers” wm 1 © J| Kitchen Cdbinets Are the Best S| SELLERS MASTERCRAFT Sold bg un ti . --------------------- —--j Qraduation HHH Perpetuate it One pleasant way is with an exceptionally good photograph. If we make it, it will carry down through the years, the spirit of a most eventful day. Portraiture which imparts one’s personality is the kind we perfect in our studio. We are guided by artistic impulses, and our work shows it even to mountings of subtle charm. A photograph which is really you is priceless. Why not call today? Uan Qrauen Studio Jllliance, Nebraska .________________________________________Tiie Spud Page 65 GIFTS THAT LAST For birthdays OR GRADUATION OR WEDDINGS OR MOTHER’S DAY OR CHRISTMAS In giving a present it is your most earnest desire to give something which will be more than appreciated. You want it to last forever in your friend’s possession, to always carry with it that token of friendship and goodwill. What could be more practical, more lasting, and yet contain those necessary gift qualities, than a gift of jewelry—a gift that lasts. Thiele's The Store With a Guarantee Without Red Tape i +The Spud Page 66 - •-------------—------------------------—---- Pianos and Player Pianos Victor Victrolas—Records WIKER MUSIC HOUSE Sheet Music and Instrumental Music. ReleCreme Ice Cream A Delicious Cooling Qoodness Jllliance Creamery Company Not only does the delicious flavor of Ice Cream have a universal appeal to old and young, but it possesses remarkable cooling properties. For Health’s sake, serve ICE CREAM often and abundantly, especially to the children. Order from any local dealer or direct from us. Dierks For Prompt Service Everything for the Builder and all First-class, too. If you plan building now or in the future, get our figures. Dierks Lumber Company ------------—...... ------------------------+Pace 67 The Spud Fourth Street Market CASH AND CARRY SELF SERVE Euerqthinq in Qroceries H. HIRST, Proprietor ALLIANCE, NEBR The Home of Better Ualues -FOR -- Thriftq Shoppers Baer Alter Shoe Co. Alliance National Bank Building Hi-Speed Finishing Shop Expert Kodak Finishing - - One Daq Seruice Tinting EnlargingThe Spud Page 68 . ■—.—----— — ------ Bride’s Appreciate Silueru dre Let us suggest to you any number of beautiful presents that would delight a bride. Our silverware comes in the latest shapes and the designs are perfection in workmanship. DIAMONDS, WATCHES AND JEWELRY Holsten’s Rhein Hardware Co. Hardware Implements Electric Ranqes, UJashers and Light Qlobes See Our Pressure Cookers Opera House Blk. Phone 98 COAL and LUMBER Buildinq material of dll kinds Telephone 73 Wm. M. Bevington, Manager.The Spud Pace 69 Everything for the Table GROCERIES, FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES AND CHOICE FRESH MEATS AT Duncan Son Use the phone for your convenience. CThc Spud is a Product of the Commerial Printinq Department of Jltliance Times The largest and best equipped Printing Office in Nebraska west of Grand Island The Newspaper at $2.50 a gear is equally goodThe Spud Pace 70 Ford Garage MITCHELL GANTZ COURSEY MILLER Attorneys-at-Law Phone 19 Alliance, Nebraska As Good As The Best, And Better Than The Rest You should be as careful with your clothing as you are with your health. Put your wardrobe in responsible hands the same as you would when you look for medical attention. Don’t let anyone experiment with your clothes at your expense. We have more help and equipment than all other cleaners combined. Keep"U-Ileat Scientific Cleaners PHONE 133 207 BOX BUTTE Mallory Grocery Co. Groceries and Fresh Meats GOODS OF KNOWN QUALITY SERVICE UNEXCELLEDPace 71 The Spud PALACE MARKET Fresh Meats and Groceries Full line FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES at all times Yours for Quality—Service—Price PHONE 131 WE DELIVER THE BAKERY IS YOUR BEST FRIEND IN HOT WEATHER As you go home at noon or in the evening stop at the bakery long enough to take some dainty for the table. Your wife or your mother will appreciate your kindness, especially during the hot weather when she has to stand over a hot stove to cook bread and pastry. Baking is Our Business We Do Not Mind the Heat. The Alliance Bakenj. Rumer ITlotor Co. Cadillac—Case—Chevrolet CARS Goodyear TiresThe Spud_______________________Page 72 , FIELD1NQ, Cleaners Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing. WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER Phone 682 315 Box Butte M. Nolan Co. Dealers in Fuel and Feed KIRBY, MAITLAND AND ROCK SPRINGS COAL Phone 41 LUNCHEON SERVICE REFRESHING DRINKS AND REAL ICE CREAM all these served as you like them at BRENN ATI’S Tell Your Frinds to Meet You There. "Uariety is the Spice of Life” —runs an old adage. This store contains Everything from Mouse traps to Hand-Painted China and Cut Glass The Dole Ddriety Store.The Spud Pace 73 Alliance’s best store, and you will save considerable money in the long run if you buy at the Bogue Store. Write to us for merchandise. COATS, SUITS, DRESSES, SKIRTS, BLOUSES, PETTICOATS AND FURS. The latest styles in all garments and the very best materials. SHOES For the Ladies, Misses and Children. The right shoes are as necessary to you as your food. A comfortable foot means happiness and rest. We give you a perfect fit. Piece Goods, Underwear, Draperies, Cretonnes, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Embroidery, Ribbons, Corsets, Brassieres, Boudior Caps, Night Gowns, Patterns, Toilet Goods and Notions. MILLINERY For Ladies, Misses and Children. You will not find a more up-to-date Millinery Shop in Western Nebraska than at The Bogue Store. Bed Spreads. Blankets. Comforts, Feathered Pillows, Table Linens, Dresser Scarfs, Huck Towels, Turkish Towels and Wash Cloths. The Horace Bogue Store ALLIANCE, NEBRASKAThe Spud Pace 74 There’s aDeal OfKnowledge m BOOKS —and far from the least of these, as every successful person knows, is the bank book. Acquire the bank book habit early in life and you will succeed. Run over in your mind the number of successful men and women you know and you will find that every one of them was ready with a bank account, no matter how small, to grasp opportunity when it came to them. Think it over and rtart your account at this bank teday. Pay by check—its the easiest and safest way. ! THE FIRST STATE BARK Of Alliance +■You Decide What Satisfies YOU t —IF— HART SCHAFFNER MARX CLOTHES don’t meet your demands— money back. $35 $40 $45 and $50 The Famous Clothing House The home of Hart Schaffner Marx clothes Stetson Hats Arrow Shirts Edwin Clapp Shoes Munsing Wear Perrins Gloves Holeproof Hosiery Walk-Over Shoes Fine Neckwear Always First to Show the New Goods of Finest Quality. TTlai] be June Bride T omorrou) It’s not uncommon—but no matter, for every worth-while occasion we have all the dainty material and exclusive accessories that she will need and want. Just now we are showing a very neat and attractive line of summer wearing apparel—the kind you will like to wear and at a price you can afford to pay. Everything for Men,Women and Children to wear, at a saving. IP. R. Harper Department Store The Big Store.


Suggestions in the Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) collection:

Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

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Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

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Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

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Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

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Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.