Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE)

 - Class of 1920

Page 1 of 88

 

Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1920 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1920 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1920 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1920 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1920 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1920 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1920 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1920 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1920 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1920 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1920 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1920 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 88 of the 1920 volume:

1 neir iyh School building trill he erected nest four. The present buUdiny trill become a Junior High School. TO THE OLD HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING WHICH HAS BEEN THE SCENE OF THE JOYS AND SORROWS OF HIGH SCHOOL LIFE DURING TUB past DECADE, WHERE HE HATE REJOINED IN Ol'R VAC ATIONS AND WHERE WE HAVE FOUND SYMPATHY IN OUR DEFEATS. WITHIN WHOSE WALLS SO MANY HAVE RECEIVED AN INSPIRATION TO LIVE THE LARGER AND MORE BEAUTIFUL LIFE. TO THIS BUILDING AS TO AN OLD AND VERY DEAR FRIEND WE DEDICATE THIS BOOK......................... I Activities .....................................•" The Spud Page 4 Stanley Wright, William Coutant, Edward Morrow, Iti-th Stanton. Miss Keith. Debatinq The question for high school debate this year is: “Resolved: That Congress Should Prohibit Strikes on Railroads Doing Interstate Business.” The members of the A. H. S. debating team are Ruth Stanton, William Coutant and Edward Morrow, with Stanley Wright as alternate. We are very fortunate in having Miss Kieth as coach. It is rather soon to tell anything the team has done. Our only debate so far has been with Sidney, in which we won. The next debate will be with Scottsbluff to decide the district championship. Should we win this our next opponents will be the champions of some other district. There are ten debating districts in Nebraska. By a series of interstate district debates all but two teams will be eliminated. These two teams will debate at Lincoln on High School Fete Day for the state championship. Alliance has won the district championship for three consecutive years and we will do our best to make it four.The Spud Page 5 IIMIIIIIIIMIIMIIMMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMHIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIII Ma l laliic Zcdlkcr Robert Lawrence Asenath Scliill Declamatory Mrs. Dunning undertook the coaching of the students who went into the Declamatory contest this year. The preliminary contest was given February 2, at the High School and the following were selected to appear at the Imperial a few days later: Robert Lawrence and Edward Morrow in the Oratorical; Evangeline Acheson, Ruth Stanton and Madelaine Zediker in the Dramatic; Elsie Harris, Ruth Scott and Asenath Schill in the Humorous. After this contest Mrs. LaMon took over the instruction work and got Madelaine and Asenath ready for the district contest, which was held at Sidney. Robert received outside help. We were well represented in all three classes at the district contest and secured a “first” in Dramatic. A Boy’s Essay on Breath. Breath is made of air. We breathe with our lungs, our lights, our liver and kidneys. If it wasn’t for our breath we would die when we are asleep. Boys that stay in a room all day should not breathe. They should wait until they get out of doors. Boys in a room make bad, unwholesome air. They make carbonicide. Carbonicide is poisoner than mad dogs. A heap of soldiers was in a black hole in India, and a carbonicide got in that there hole and nearly killed every one afore morning. Girls kill the breath with corsets that squeeze the diagram. Girls can’t holler or run like boys because their diagram is squeezed too much. If I was a girl, I had rather be a boy, so I can holler, run, and row, and have a great big diagram. If the old quotation “what you don’t know won’t hurt you” is true, then the Sophomores are safe from all harm. Miss W.—“Columbus discovered America 1492 A. D. What does A. D. mean?” Bright Student.—“After dark.”TRlfl ........................................................... 9 pnds amThe Spud Pa re 7 t........................................................................... iiiiimiitiiHiiiimiiiiiimitiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiKiiiiiiiimiiMiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiHiiimiiiitiiiitiiiiiiim M It. FRANK PRINCE. Coach He played 4 years at Hastings. 1 year on the S9th Div. l S. A. team. HOWARD LOTSPEICI1. Captain Left Half Rack. Age 19. Weight 158 Played 2 Years. GEORGE PURDY. Captain Elect Full Rack. Age IS. Weight 132 Played 1 Year. 020048000100020102010101010002484853530000010202000202090248234800The Spud Page 8 lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIItllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMMIIMHIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIHIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIMMMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHII JOHN DONOVAN UIght Tackle, Age is. Weight 1S9 Played 1 Year.The Spud Page 9 ..............mi............................................. LEE STRONG Guard and Full Back, Age Id, Weight 135 Flayed 1 Year.The Spud iiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiruiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiutmiuiiiiiii Page 10 miiiiiiiiiii’iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiitiMiiiiMiiniiiiHiMiMimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii LEX .!ni EH Wight Half Rack, Age 17. Weight 17.0 Played 1 Year. FRANK DAILY I-eft Enel. Ago 10. Weight 140 Played 1 Year. IVAN ACIIHSON Left Tackle, Age 10. Weight 152 Played 1 Year.MHO A I polvi'i OS I ! l o v 4pJBnj)-qns ag?iaa a nia iiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiHiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiniiHMiiiiiMiMiiimiiiimiMiiii IT inMMIMIIIIIimillllMIMIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIimilMMIIIimilMmilllllllllllllllM'IIIIM pnds am—............................................ Zl pndS aqj.The Spud Page 13 lllllllllllllllllllllHIMIIIMHIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMlinillMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIMIIMMIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlMIIIMIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIMimiMmillMlllllllinillMIM Reuieu) of Reuieujs FOOTBALL S4 HFIH LF 1010. Oct. 3 Alliance 0 Bayard . 27 Oct. 10 Alliance 43 Scott sbluff 0 Oct. 17 Alliance 7 Bayard 0 Oct. 24 Alliance . 47 Sidney 0 Oct. 31 Alliance 0 Hot Springs 27 Nov. 7 Alliance 0 North Platte . . 31 Nov. 14 Alliance 42 Morrill . . 0 Nov. 21 Alliance 35 Sidney 3 Dec. 5 Alliance 0 Scott sbluff 6 Total No. Points Alliance 174 Opponents 94 REVIEW OF SEASON The football season of 1919 proved to be very successful in spite of the fact that the outlook at the opening of the school term was all but bright and encouraging. When the first call for practice was answered, Coach Prince found a very difficult task confronting him. The candidates were exceptionally light and only three had had previous experience. The majority of players were not acquainted with the rudiments of the pigskin game, the squad was too light for the old line-plunging style of play and it would take time to prepare the eleven for open field work. The Coach sized up the situation and then set about to develop a winning team. At the close of the season the Alliance squad stood second in the league standing and Prince had accomplished more than anyone had even dreamed of. He had organized a squad of unpromising, but eager football candidates into one of the best and “smoothest working” elevens in western Nebraska. Of the seven games played with Western Nebraska teams Alliance won five victories and suffered two defeats. The Hot Springs “terrors,” champions of South Dakota, won from our lightweights by a score of 27 to 0, and the North Platte veterans annexed another game to the tune of 31 to 0. These defeats can not be counted against the record of the Alliance eleven because in both instances the locals were playing teams of a much higher class. There were no outstanding stars on the Alliance squad. The eleven men worked in almost perfect harmony and every player was in the game from start to finish. Captain Lotspeich developed into a sure goal kicker and Frank Daily was a reliable punter. The forward pass was used to great advantage, the open field play accounted for much of the success of the team and several men could plunge the line when short gains w'ere needed. Six men will be absent from the line-up when the 1920 eleven is picked. They are Lotspeich, Brennan, Edwards, Joder, Donovan and Cusick. These “has-beens” unite in wishing the 1920 team a successful season. Ward—“I love you, will you marry me?” Ruth—Ward, didn’t I just refuse you last week?” Ward—Oh, was that YOU?” The way the Juniors knew when the war was ended was when the girl on the cover of “Snappy Stories” was being kissed by a civilian instead of a soldier.The1 Spud luimiitfirmi ' ttr : :: Page 15 Basketball BASKETBALL SUHKIHLK 1920. Jan. 10 Alliance 28 Morrill Jun. 16 Alliance 36 Scottsbl ufl Jan. 23 Alliance 33 Kimball ... Jan. 30 Alliance 15 Sidney Jan. 30 Alliance 25 Kimball ... Frb. 6 Alliance 54 Crawford . Feb. 20 Alliance 35 Bayard Feb. 23 Alliance 25 Scottsbluff Feb. 27 Alliance 25 Sidney . . Mar. 9 Alliance 39 Bayard .... Mar. 11 Alliance - 37 (’hadron Total Alliance 352 Opponents 27 . 18 29 . 52 48 27 15 . 17 42 32 21 323 IMflVIlU L 11 KITK-ITS. GLEN JODER—Forward and Captain. Brilliant, fast and shifty. Senior. An excellent floor man and a dandy leader. RAY EDWARDS—Forward. Accurate, swift and steady. Senior. Very accurate when it comes to shooting baskets. He never misses. LESTER BEAL—Center. , t , . Tall, alert and active. Junior. He was seldom out-jumped and never outplayed. CLINTON BRENNAN—Guard. Reliable, strong and heady. Senior. A fine guard and a hard worker. JOE CUS1CK—Guard. . . . Clever, speedy and dependable. Senior. He could play the floor, guard his man and shoot baskets equally well. LESTER CROSS—Sub. Forward and Captain-Elect. Freshman. A steady player, a fine basket shooter and good sportsman. He will make a dandy leader. ROBERT LAWRENCE!—Sub. Center. Junior. Always reliable, eager to play and willing to take his share of punishment. SETH JODER—Sub. Guard. J J Freshman. Seth always did his best, was a faithful trainer and a hard worker. GEORGE PURDY—Sub. Guard. Sophomore. He never missed practice, was full of pep and fought for the team. Will be a regular next year. FRANK PRINCE—Coach. , „ . . , o Patient, kind and loyal. The best coach in Nebraska and a good friend to the boys. He stood by us thru victory and defeat. The Alliance basket ball squad finished third in the league standing this season with eight games won and three lost. Sidney won two contests from the Alliance five and Kimball annexed the other game. These two teams had practically the same line-ups as last year when they defeated Alliance in three games out of four. The local quintet had one regular and one substitute from last year s team. The other men were playing their first year of basket ball. Inc record made bv Alliance is far from poor when one is familiar with the facts. In onlv two contests were the five first string men in condition t„ plav. Joder was kept out of the first three contests with an injured foot. Beal took down with the influenza and missed two contests, rewards sprained an ankle, making it necessary to watch thiee games from the sidelines and Cusick was sick during the Bayard game at Alliance. Nevertheless,- eight victories were marked up for the locals while only three games were taken from them. There were no stars on the Alliance five. Each player was valuable in his own position and every man contributed his share tov arc the victories. Coach Prince deserves all the credit for the good showing made by Alliance. He was always on hand at practice, he instilled fight and “pep” into the team.imimimimimi...................................... mi...............................mm.... 91 pndg aqxThe Spud Page 17 IIHIIIIIIIIIIIIMIftlllllllllMlllllltllllllllllltflt Qirls’ wJlthletics In the early part of the year the inter-class Basket Ball Tournament was held. Each class had a team in the contest and behind each a loyal band of supporters. The first evening the Juniors defeated the Seniors. The second game between the lower classes ended in a victory for the Freshmen. The final scrap put the Junior girls the Champions. As soon as the class games were over the girls started in real practice for the League games, the first one being played January 9. As this was the first year of a girls’ league in Western Nebraska there were more games scheduled than usual. Out of the ten games we won eight. The two we lost were undoubtedly caused by an absent member from the team. We closed the season tying Scottsbluff for the Championship. None of the girls who played on the team this year graduate in the spring, so we are looking forward to another successful season. The “A” Girls No. of Minutes Played Frances Schott ...............240 minutes... Thelma Zobel .................238 minutes... Lillie Simpson ...............225 minutes... Elsie Simpson ................210 minutes... Garnet Lunsford ..............210 minutes... Clara Garrett ................180 minutes... Place on Team .....................Guard ...........Guard (Captain) Side-Center (Captain-Elect) ................... Forward .................. Forward ....................Center Alliance ......... Alliance ......... Alliance ......... Alliance ......... Alliance ......... Alliance ........ Alliance ......... Alliance ......... Alliance ......... Alliance ......... Total Points SCII ElU’LE . 10 Scottsbluff ......................... 14 28 Morrill ............................„...... 5 . 32 Crawford . 13 . 14 Crawford ..........................._... 23 . 32 Bayard ..............................v. 9 10 Scottsbluff .......................... 7 . 33 Bavard ..................„............... 8 2 Morrill .............................. 0 2 Sidney................................ 0 31 Chadron .............................. 3 194 Total Points . 82 By Thelma M. Zobel. Roman Dieties. Jupiter—King of Gods and men—Mr. Prince. Juno—Queen of Heaven—Miss Elliott. Venus—Goddess of beauty—Helen Brown. Mars—God of War—Frank Daily. Diana—Huntress—Elizabeth Wilson. Apollo—God of beauty—Wray Rominger. Minerva—Goddess of wisdom—La Rhea Lunn. Bacchus—God of enjoyment—Bob Bicknell. 1920 amendment—God of argument—Harold Gaven. Axioms. A permit in the pocket is worth ten in the office. Many are called—but few get up. All you 7 :45s. A word to the wise is resented. Remember that when you talk to the Seniors. People who love in glass houses should pull down the blinds. Ignorance is bliss. The average freshman. There isnt often any excuse for an excuse. Never confide your secrets to a woman even tho you call her dove—she may turn out to be a carrier pigeon.The Spud iiiiiiiiiimttiiiiiiiiititiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiittimiiimiiiiini’i Page IS Tennis, Basket Ball, Uolleq Ball, Etc. oily Ball is a very interesting game; it causes a person to become quickei in action and eyesight. In this game it is perserverance and quickness that counts. A person has to almost know where the ball is going in order to get to the proper place to send it flying back to the other side. There are many rules and difficulties about this game but. played in the proper spirit, it is beneficial to health and sport. _E. H. At the close of the Basket Ball season gymnasium practice began, bwings, bars, etc., were put up and made ready for use. This was work w hich w as interesting and beneficial to all those who can or have time o take it. After a hard day’s work in the school room it is a good recreation for anyone. It develops the body physically as well as furnishes a good exercise. am- High Tennis Club is a recent organization in the . lliance High School athletics. I he club consists of thirty-three members which elected the following officers: Lester Beal, president; Marjorie Stephens, vice-president; and Madelaine Zediker, secretarv-treasurer. 1 wo courts have been prepared and have been in use for some time iintu the recent snow storm which has not permitted any playing. Tennis is a very popular game and we hope that it will be continued fiom j eai to year in the Alliance High School.—Lester Beal. WANT ADS. A recepticle large enough to carry my books home.—Wray Rominger. A new giggle. My old one is worn out.—Madelaine Zediker. Some other color besides green.—The Freshies. A new nickname.—“Red” Purdy. A sale where I may exercise my true ability.—Horace Fuller. Auctioneer. CtiiIs to sew buttons on the second floor; two feet or more in height. —Clement Dotson. A pair of overalls so that I may be in style.—Mr. Prince. A deportment grade this year.—Dorothy Fricke. Some one to donate John Schriner a pair of overalls to wear to school. “But Glen,” said Marjorie coquettishly, “will vou love me when I grow old and ugly?” “My dear Marjorie,” answered Glen gallantly, “you may grow' older but you will never grow' uglier.” And she wondered w'hat he had said. L. B.—“Say, Harold, can you tell me how' to teach a girl to swim?” H. G.—“Put your arm gently around her waist and with your right arm gently hold her.” L. B.—“Oh, come off; it’s my sister.” H. G.—“Push her in the water.” D. R.—My mother doesn’t allow me to use slang. I. E.—Mine doesn’t either. I’d get it in the neck if she heard use slang, you bet. meIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIMIIMMIMIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIMIItIHMIllllMIIIIMIIIMIIMIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIItlllllMIMIIMIIIIIIII IIIIIMMIIIIIItIMMIIIIIMIIIIIIMIMIIIIIMItMllllltMMIIIIIIMMIMIIIIMIIIIIMIIIMIIMIMIIIIIIMII'1 • 61 PndS 94XiiititiiiimiiiiiiiMiiutiimiiiiiiluiM.iiiiiiiiiiiliHiHMiliiiiiiiiiiMHiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiHiMiiiiiMifilnhniiiiii OS 93«d iiiiiiiiiiiiiMMtiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiii.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiinimiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii pnds amThe Spud High School Calendar Page 21 iiiimiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiMm Monday, Oct. 13—Mr. Prince explained a game of Foot Ball to the assembly, and he hopes to have a good turn-out for practice. Tuesday, Oct. 14—Meeting of the Chapel Committee. ednesday, Oct. 15— ictrola music, which was greatly enjoyed by all. Thursday, Oct. 16—This 15 minutes was certainly enjoyed by the pupils for study. Friday, Oct. 17.—Foot Ball boys left for Bayard. Monday, Oct. 20 to Friday, Oct 24—The Chapel periods of this week were devoted to singing; Victrola music and last, but not least, the “Junior Program.” We are anxiously waiting for the next program, Juniors! Oct. 27 to Oct. 31—Senior class meeting; Foot Ball boys leave for Hot Springs, S. D., and we were also entertained by a Y. M. C. A. man, Mr. Arnold, who was in active work in Russia. Nov. 3 to Nov. 7—Reports of Hot Springs game, and entertained by Mr. C. E. Knapp. He gave us a very splendid talk on “Achievement,” the call to advance; also Latin Club meeting. Nov. 10 to Nov. 14—Sophomore Program, come again Sophys. Mr. Prince reads the rules so students will know what to do in case of fire. Nov. 17 to Nov. 21—Boot Ball boys play at Sidney and Exams. Nuff sed. Nov. 24 to Nov. 28—Thanksgiving week. Dec. 1 to Dec. 5—-Entertained by Rev. Gould from the Baptist church; Victrola music and a meeting of all non-resident students. Jan. 1, 1920 to May 21, 1920—Sure busy days for Seniors and Juniors, and in fact everyone, for Declamatory contest, Debate, Junior Play, Senior Play, Junior-Senior Banquet, Class Day, Commencement week. Final Examinations and last of all the Seniors receive their diplomas.—Alberta Lunsford. Dew Drop Inn. (Hotel Rules Tor Guests) This hotel is located on a delightful bluff and is run on the same order. Breakfast at 5, dinner at 6, supper at 7. Guests wishing to get up without being called can have self-raising flour biscuits for supper. Guests wishing to do a little driving will find a hammer on the stand. If the room gets too warm, open the windows and see the fire escape. If you are fond of athletics and like good jumping, lift the mattress and watch it spring. If the lamp goes out, take a feather out of the pillow; that is light enough for any room. Don’t worry about paying your board bill; the house is supported by its foundation.PersonalitiestlilllillllllltUIIIIIHIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIMIIIIHIIIIIIII S3 IIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIMM pndg amThe Spud IIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIII|||||||IMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIII||||||IH||||:i|||||IIIMMl,lllllllll||||l|M||||||,||||||||||||||||||,in,|,|| Pajre 24 IHIHIMIIHIHIIIHIIHHIIIHIIIMMMIIIMHIIItlMllfllliiiiiti MARY WILSON History anti Normal Training A. B. ('hadron; taught at Long Pine and Gordon; one year at Alliance; sponsor of Freshmen Class; will study music at the American Conservatory of Music, Chicago. PRINCIPAL P. A. PRINCE Mathematics and Athletics B. S. Hastings College; experience McCook one vear. Alliance two years; will return next year. ALICE ELLIOTT English A. B. Wesleyan University; experience Aurora three years, Alliance two years; will not return next year. SUPERINTENDENT W. R. PATE A. B. University of Nebraska; experience of twenty-two eais in various Nebraska schools; ten years superintendent of Alliance schools; will be with us again next year. RENA KIETH Language and Debater A. B. University of Nebraska, Peru; experience at Gresham and Hildreth; two years at Alliance; sponsor of Senior Class; will remain next year.The Spud Page 25 lllMMMIIMIIIIIMIIIIIMHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIHHMIllllMIIMIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIHIMinilllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMmilllimiMIIIIIIII ROSAMOND BAKGKV Commercial Pott sd am State Normal. New York; Lincoln, Nebraska Business College; experience Ashbury Park, N. Y„ Pat-chcgue. Long Island, Lincoln, Nebraska; two years at Alliance. Nebraska; will not remain next year. MIL MESSERSMITH Manual Training Pitsbury State Normal Pring.. Weir, Kansas High School two years; Alliance two years; sponsor of the Junior Class will not remain next year. MARGARET BEAL Home Kcoiiomlcs B. S. University of Nebraska; experience, Schuyler two years; Alliance two years; sponsor of the Sophomore Class; will not return next year. MIL CUNNINGHAM science. A. B. Simpson College experience, Principal at Walker, Iowa, one year; Alliance one year; will return next year. HELEN WHITNEY A. B. Simpson College; rive years' experience; will not remain next year. VIII t lit till I mmillllHMIlllIMKIMIIIMtllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIlIKlllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifif. t |||IS||||;)S)| tIMIIIIIII I lilt III 93 pnds aqxThe Spud Page 27 ........„.................................................IIWI—nil.........mom......................... hiiiiiiiiiiii................ MISS RKNA KEITH Our Sponsor “Her disposition is as sunny as her hair.” GLENJODER Class President '20; Basket Ball ’18, ’19. Captain '20; Foot Ball '19; Spud Staff, Junior Play, Senior Play. "Jick likes a little lass named Marjorie.” MILDRED ABEGG Secretary Class '20; Senior Play; Spud Staff; Latin Club. “Of all the friends there are, she has the most.”The Spud ............ """""................. I...mi..mm........... Page 28 IIIIIIIIIIIIMMIItlllllMimimilllMlllIHliHiiitiiiiii katherine baker Spud Staff; Junior Play; Senior Play Latin Club. “The only way to have a friend is to be one.” ROSE BALER Commercial Course; Junior Play. “Not only good, but good for something.” CLINTON BRENNAN Football '18, ’19; Basket Ball ’18, ’20. “A steady, worth-while athlete.” grace carr Declamatory; Junior Play; Latin Club; Normal Training. “Virtue is her own reward."The Spud Page 29 ................................................... JOE CUSICK Newcastle, Wyoming, '17. '18; A. H. S. ’19. ’20; Football '19; Basket Ball '19, ’20. "He craves the fair sex.” JOHN HONOVAN Football '18, ’19. "Flash thinks a lot, hut says little.” RAY UPWARDS. President Class ’17, '19; Football '17, '19; Basket Ball ’20; Senior Play; Junior Play; Spud Staff; Debating ’19. “School is for study, not for play." HORACE FI LLER Junior Play; Senior Play; Latin Club; Tennis Club. “The women, he knows not.”The Spud Page 30 HAROLD GAVIN Football '18; Junior Play; Latin Club. “For points in bluffing, see me.” 1UTII HAWES Spud Staff; Class President T8; Junior Play; Senior Play; Latin Club. “A truly worth while girl.” LA KHEA LI NN Spud Staff T9; Latin Club; Glee Club; Chorus. “A good, hard working girl.” ALBERTA LUNSFORD Latin Club; Glee Club; Chorus; Junior Play. “Capable and efficient, fond of work and play.” The Spud Page 31 ••HI"............................. —................................................... iiimiinmiNmiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiii:iiimnMi......... SCOTT LEE Klsie High School ’17. ’18; A. H. S. ’19, '20; Latin Club '19. "I wish I were a Junior.” Hl’SSELL MANN Spud Staff; Latin Club; Senior Play. "Not as innocent as he looks.” LEILA MEVniIRTER Kavenna High School ’17; Broken Bow High School ’18. ’19; A. H. S. ’20; Normal Training. “Gentle ot speech and manner.” LE8SIE REEVES Commercial Course; Junior Play. “Business is my motto."The Spud 11111111111111111111111 IIIIIIIH Page 32 WRAY ROMINGER Aurora High School '17. '18; A. H. S. ’19, '20; Spud Staff; Senior Class Play. “Life to him is a merry chase; now and always he’ll win the race." ASENATH SCHILL Declamatory; Junior Play; Senior Play; Editor Spud ’20; Normal Training; Latin Club. “I say just what I think and nothing more or less.” EVA SIMPSON Latin Club; Junior Play; Basket Ball; Normal Training. “A virtuous and well disposed person." MARJORIE STEPHENS Tennis Club; Junior Play. “Men to her are like the weather; she likes a change.” The Spud Page 33 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIMIIHMIMMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIII LEAH WEAVER Glee Club; Chorus; Junior Play; Normal Training. "It’s the quiet people who do the work.” HELEN WOODS Latin Club; Junior Play; Normal Training. "The tiniest girl, the wisest mind ” MA DELAINE EDI kEK Tennis Club; Junior Play; Senior Play; Chorus; Declamatory. “A senior mind, with a laugh pure Bold.”The Spud Page 34 'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiit hi mu mini mtmmwi iiiiiiiiiiiiimtiiiiiiiii tmtirnttwiiiiiHHitwiitiHimimm Senior Class Notes SENIOR CLASS HISTORY Glen Joder...............................................President Russell Mann........................................Vice President Mildred Abegg.............................Secretary and Treasurer Wray Rominger..................................Spud Representative Ray Edwards...............................Atheletic Representative We, the class of ’20, entered the A. H. S. in ’16. There were 40 green Freshmen who placed their names on the class roll. We had a shaky feeling as we sought our places in the assembly room. We struggled bravely through this year, and 1 think we all gave a sigh of relief when our Freshmen year closed. We entered the following year with a determination to make good. Flora Mae Smith and Thelma Thompson entered our class this year. Then came the year when we were dignified Juniors. We worked hard this year. Several new members entered our class, including Genevieve and Geraldine Dotson, Scott Lee, Mildred Abegg, Wray Rominger and Alberta Lunsford, who all put forth their best efforts to make our class one of the best on record. The Junior-Senior Banquet and Junior Play took much time and diligent work, both proved to be a great success. The year ’19 and ’20—We are now entering on the last and most important of all, our Senior year. This is the year that marks an epoch in our lives. This is the time w hen we will be out of school life and must be prepared to meet life’s problems. LaRhea Lunn, Russel Mann, and Leila Mew-hirter entered our class this year, making a total of 25. The Senior Play was given this year and it wras a decided success. We regret very much at leaving the old A. H. S. and hope the ones who fill our places will make the most of every opportunity, and make themselves worthy of the name “Seniors.” The Seniors take this opportunity to bid farewell to the High School and Faculty. We are sorry to leave you, and only wdsh, that we could here remain. But higher things are calling and we must ever press onward. Farewell—O High School—Farewrell. EXCHANGE We wish to thank all schools for exchanging papers with us. The total number of exchanges this year wrere 110 papers, which is more than ever before. We certainly enjoyed reading the papers and hope to see them on our reading table next year. We have appreciated the co-operation of other schools with us but wish more schools would exchange next year. —By Elsie Simpson.The Spud Page 35 MiHiiiiMimiiMiiiimmiiiHiiitimiiiimiiiimiMiiiiiM Commencement Program April 23..................................Senior Class Play May 6................................. Junior-Senior Banquet May 11.....................................Senior Class Picnic May 16...........................................Baccalaureate Sunday May 18.....................................Recognition Day May 18...................................................Class Night May 21........................................... Commencement BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM Music.....................................................Male Quartette Scripture Reading.................................Rev. Dixon Music ............................................... Selected Prayer ...........................................Rev. Smith Music ....................................................Miss Simmons Sermon ........................................ Rev. Epler Music ...................................................Janet Grassman Benediction ......................................Rev. Gould RECOGNITION DAY PROGRAM March ..........................................Gladys McCool Tribute to Seniors........................................Mary Woolis Response .........................................Glen Joder Music ...................Elsie Simpson and Josephine Bradley Recognition Day Address............................Mr. Pate Music .................................................Dorothy Reynolds CLASS NIGHT PROGRAM Welcome Address...........................................Glen Joder Class Poem................................Madelaine Zediker Class Song................................................Leah Weaver Class Prophecy.........................................Asenath Schill Class History.............................................Ruth Hawes Class Will.............................................Russell Mann Duet .......................LaRhea Lunn and Marjorie Stephens Class Statistician............................ Eva Simpson Violin Solo...................................Helen Woods Farewell Address..............................Ray Edwards COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM March......................................... Grace Spacht Music.........................Miss Williams and Mrs. Duncan Invocation ......................................Rev. Smith Music ........................................... Mr. Mann Address ...................................Charles A. Payne Music ............................................. Selected Presentation of Diplomas...............Superintendent Pate Music .....................................Robbins Orchestra Benediction .................................... Rev. KearnsThe Spud Pacre 36 .................... mi...... anil...in... miiimiuiiim....... Class Plaq On the evening of April 23rd, the Senior Class presented to the public the play “Safety First.” The cast of characters are as follows: Jack Montgomery—A young husband Horace Fuller Jerry Arnold—An unsuccessful fixer..............Ray Edwards Mr. McNutt—A defective detective.........................Glen Joder Elmer Flannel—Awfully shrinking Russel Mann Abou Ben Mocha—A Turk from Turkey..............Wray Rominger Mabel Montgomery—Jack’s wife................Madelaine Zediker Virginia Bridger—Her young sister.............Asenath Schill Mrs. Barrington Bridger—Their mamma Ruth Hawes Zuleika—A tender Turkish maiden Kahterine Baker Mary Ann O’Flinnerty—An Irish cook........... Mildred Abegg STORY. This new and sparkling farce has a story of sustained interest, abounding in mirth-provoking situations. Its leading role is that of an innocent and inoffensive young husband. Jack Montgomery, who is plunged into the abyss of the law after trying to rescue a Turkish maiden from the hands of the police. Jack and his chum Jerry visit Zuleika to aid the interests of Jack’s cousin, Elmer Flannel, a shrinking young man. Jack, Jerry and Zuleika are arrested and sentenced to thirtv days in jail. In order to keep the disgrace from Jack’s wife. Mabel, and Jerry’s fiancee, Virginia, they tell them that they are going to a convention of Shriners by boat. The scheme works and Mabel and Virginia bid them a tearful good-bye. In the second act the ladies have received word from the steamboat company that Jack and Jerry are not to be found on board and have probably been washed overboard and drowned. They are heart-broken and don mourning for the loved ones they never expect to see again. Jack and Jerry, in jail, know nothing of this, and when their thirty days expire they return to the ladies full of joy and explanations of their wonderful trip to Florida. It takes some tall explaining to show why they were not drowned, and when Mrs. Bridger, the mother of the girls learns that Zuleika has been missing for thirty days, she naturally thinks that she accompanied the boys to Florida. Mabel decides to return to her mother’s roof and never see Jack again. The third act straightens out the tangle after a series of laughable events culminating in an elopement down a ladder in which Jack, who thinks he is eloping with Mabel, his wife, finds that the lady he is running away with is the Irish cook, Mary Ann O’Finnerty. The play moves briskly along with culminating effect, incident succeeds incident, and the act endings are quick and snappy, with plenty of movement for everybody. The characters are equally balanced, as everyone in the play has a great opportunity to impress the audience and add to the laughable situations. This play will prove a success even in the hands of the youngest or most inexperienced actors, and will please any kind of an audience, however finiky.Class History I H = i I cn i C I Q- NAME BAD HABIT Favorite Expression CHARACTERISTICS WOULD BE WILL BE Kattie Baker Writing letters Goodness gracious! Attracting attention Milliner Shoemaker Rose Bauers Dates Shoot the Buffalo! Enjoying evening air Cautious adviser Heart smasher Clinton Brennan ('hewing gum Want my “A” sweater? Getting fussed A dandy Soloists Grace Carr Changing her mind Say— Blushing Dignified School ma’am Hay Edwards Being vamped I’ll say it is! Making promises President Nurse maid John Donovan Complaining Oh, Lord! Weight Thin Fat Russell Mann Girls Gosh! Length Spanish dancer Farmer Mildred Abegg Talking fast Ya! Giggling Actress Goodness knows Asenath Schill Bluffing Such high grades! Studying Peru graduate Flunker Joe Cusick Late to everything Oh Kid! Hair Tough Principal of A. H. S. Madelaine Zediker Gossiping Coo Coo! Hope chest Orator Old maid Bessie Reeves Talking By Heckv! Giggling Stenographer Millionairess Glen Joder Hoping Quit your kidding. Missing trains Cautious adviser Prof, of reform school Lelio Mewhirter Eating candy You’re crazy! Red (?) hair A dandy Farmer’s wife Harold Gavin Sleeping Gee w’iz! Grin Graceful Married Scott Lee Changing his mind I et's see. Bluffing Good Bad Alberta Lunsford Talking Oh Jimmy! Daintiness School teacher Married Ruth Hawes Powder Oh Lordy! Grouch Popular Matron reform school Wray Rominger Dancing Looks Cute Comedian Eva Simpson Breaking hearts! Oh Dear! Cheerfulness Married School teacher Helen Woods Laughing Oh such blue eyes! Happiness School ma’am Actress La Rhea Woods Studying Women’s rights. Hail A suffraget Popular Marjorie Stephens Whispering Good night! Ring Housewife Old maid Horace Fuller Being quiet I’ll say so! Soberness Industrious Cute Leah Weaver Bragging Oh Henry! Hopefulness Happy wife Grass widow Miss Keith Flirting Good night nurse! Eyes Engaged Reserved 1 CO =• y Y r" i$ . HIM 11111 • 1111111 • IM11111111111 111M t III 11111111111111111111IIIM111111111 f 11 • 1111111M11111111111 • 11111II 88 pndg aqxPage 39 The Spud iMHiiiimmimimiimiHitiiiiiHiii miimiiiiiiiiimiiMnimMiiiimiMiiiiiiiihMiiiiiiiiiiiit.......................................................................................... 02010001010001020201000200000002235323530253535353235323532300534848230248234802The Spud Page 40 .."""""......""""............................................................. Junior "Notes ............President ........Vice President Secretary and Treasurer Athletic Representative ...Class Editor Class Sponsor As we come to the close of our Junior year, we can look back and say : “We have done our part in the various school activities.” School actnities put the “PEP ’ into school life, and a good student participates in at least one of these activities. 1 herefore it is with a feeling’ of pride that we review our accomplishments. Let us skim over some of the more important of these activities. On the football team we were represented by Lester Beal, James Fowler and Robert Lawrence. Although the boys met with reverse in the basket ball preliminaries, the girls succeeded in taking the championship. On the basket ball teams we were represented by Lester Beal Robert Lawrence, Thelma Zobel, Lillie Simpson and Elsie Simpson. In’ declamatory work by Robert Lawrence, and in debating by William Coutant. Our class play, “Professor Pepp,” was, up until that time, the biggest financial success ever enjoyed by a class. We received many compliments from the local papers, and altogether it was a decided success. The cast of characters was: Mary Woolis.... Helen Young.... Marie Howe..... Itester Beal... William Coutant Mr. Messersmith Professor Pepp...... C. B. Buttonbuster... Howard Buttonbuster. Sim Batty........... Peddler Benson...... Noisy Fleming Pink Hatcher........ Buster Brown........ Betty Gardner........ Aunt Minerva......... Olga Stopski......... Kitty Clover........ Vivian Drew.......... Irene Van Hilt...... Caroline Kay......... Walter Robbins William Coutant Carl Buechsenstein ...Sterling Harris ........Ivan Wong .....Leonard Pate .......Lester Beal ... Robert Lawrence ......Mary Woolis .....Elsie Simpson Sybil Hutchinson ......Marie Howe Helen Young ... Elizabeth Wilson Frances Grassman We wish to extend our thanks to Mrs. Dunning and Mr. Messersmith for their patience and untiring efforts in bringing the plav to its completion. Next year we come back to the old A. H. S. as the dignified Seniors, and we wdl look back with pride on our Junior year.—William Coutant. be Ch V JZ H JCXIOR CLASS. First Kow: Alice Harris, William Coutant. Dorothy Reynolds. Marv Wollis, Warda Adams. Carl iPiochsensteln. Frances CJrassmnn, Mabel Hockey. Hlndvs Smith. laniard Pate. Evangeline Acheson. llilla llafner, Ivan Wong. Second How : C.lenna Lawrence, Maltei Marie Howe, John Schriner, Noama Caddis. Paul McCay. Ruth iHmo an. Clarence Kibble. Sibil Hutchinson, W illiam Williams, I»acy. Mr. Mess rsmith (Sponsor). Third Row: Kllsalieth Wilson, H ith Scott. Helen Young, Elsie Simpson. Zobel, Lillie Simpson, Rernice Shanklin, Erma Ellis, Helen Young. Sterling Harris. Robert I-awrence, Robbins, Kenneth ThelmaThe Spud Page 42 89234800534853482348482348232353534800000200010001020000235323534823532323480001535353532348232323532323534853532348232348232353235353234848232353532348The Spud Page 43 ................................................................................... iiiMiiiiiMiMiMiiHiiiiiiiMimiiiiMiiimiiMiiimiiiiiiiiiimMmiMiiMMMMmMMHi thH iii nmsiHJ i n» HIJtoij 1 Ailcrfr WEU C,tl TW1 ' loT Ki AN QEIHt'VQ «5I H5The Spud Paj?e 44 MIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIItllllllllMIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIHIMMIIIMIIIMIIIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMMIIMItlllllllll oc eu£ 2 0 2 o g £ x . fco - r • S -•— r —« . =± £ z n os M £ C 4 •a I'f! S, . fjsi: . ;c § 8 g 5 5 T X-2 8 35 — _ t. C c x- £ JS-sg X £ “sts 1 -• .? £ S — " ■ E 1 si=«: a. y. -» , T = «- .il — g 4- W — i •• s _ P fc . M u - s X s -X u«- - VThe Spud Page 45 llllliniinMIlMIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIItnillinilllllllinillllMIMIMMMIIIIIIIMMIMIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMMMIHHIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIHIIIimilMIIIIMMIIIIIIHtllimilllllllllllllllM Sophomore Class Rotes A class meeting was held on Friday, April 20 for the purpose of electing a president and vice-president. Garnet Lunsford was elected president and M. J. O’Conner, vice-president. Thursday, April 22 the boys all decided to economize and wear overalls to school. They sure looked cute, didn’t they, girls? The girls looked cute in aprons too, but perhaps Mr. Prince didn’t think so on Thursday morning. If he did though, why were they sent home to change them? However it was decided at noon that the girls could wear aprons and gingham dresses. Of course there are always a few slackers though. The oldest of two country boys left the old farm for the bright lights. After working a while at his job in the city, he wrote his brother out on the farm telling him of the joys of city life. A part of the letter reads as follows: Thursday we autoed out to the Country Club where we golfed until dark, then we motored to the beach and Fridayed there. The brother on the farm answered. Yesterday we buggied to town and baseballed all afternoon, then we went to Ned’s and pokered until dark. Today we muled out to the corn field and gee-hawed until sundown, then suppered and after that we piped a while. Later we staircased up to our rooms and bedsteaded until the clock fived. SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY The class of ’22 entered the A. H. S. one bright morning in September. As we looked around, our knees quaked and our teeth chattered—but we went bravely on. After receiving fatherly advice from Mr. Pate our courage was again restored. After struggling through the Freshman year we entred the Golden Gates of our Sophomore year —only to find out how little we knew. But now we are nearly through the Sophomore year and we feel at home under Mr. Prince’s kindly glances. At the beginning of this year we were glad to accept three new teachers and sorry to lose our former ones. We have several new students with us, including Ethelvn Ellis, Elsie Gillis, Garnet Lunsford, Evelyn Bryce, Nellie Daugherty, Loren Winship and Lloyd Evans. Those who have left us are Hazel Seely, Florence Huckett, Helen Seidell, Elsie Boness, Elsie Gillis, Vera Smith and Cecil Beal. A class meeting was held early in September for the purpose of electing class officers. They were selected as follows: President ............... Vice President .......... Secretary and Treasurer Athletic Representative Class Editor............. Class Sponsor ........... Elsie Gillis ......Vera Smith Mariellen Beagle .......Cecil Beal ...Oral Edwards ........Miss BaallillllHIUlltllllU The Spud Page 4( 'iiiiiiniiUMiiHiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiHHiiMiifiiiiiiipmiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiitiitititti It seems the Sophomores have a hard time keeping officers. First the president, Elsie Gillis, left us, then the vice-president, Vera Smith, and also our athletic representative, Cecil Beal. I wonder whv thev are so hard to keep? The first Sophomore program was given on Friday, November 14, and the last on Friday, April 9. Both programs were very good What we especially appreciated was the fact that they took up so much time. A class party was held in the Gymnasium Friday. January 23. There were a large number present. Games were plaved and refreshments were served at a late hour. All spent an enjoyable evening in spite of the fact that the lights would not stay on. How about it? Was it the fault of the lights alone? JUNIOR SENIOR BANQUET The guests entered the gymnasium about 8 o’clock and found it re-created. The color scheme was tastefully carried out in red and white; red crepe paper was used for the walls and white for the domeshaped ceiling. The table was profusely decorated with flowers, carnations, the Senior’s flower, being used. 1 he attention of those present was first focused on the program, which was thoroughly enjoyed by everyone. After that the toasts—these were especially good: Sincerity .... Understanding Courage ...... Co-operation Endeavor ..... System ....... Service ...... Carl Buechsenstein, Toastmaster. .........-...........................Glen Joder -....................................Mary Wollis .........-...........................Miss Kieth ..............................Frances Grassman ..................................Ray Edwards ......................................Mr. Pate ................................Madelaine Zediker Then, at last the event of the evening, the banquet proper. The food was deliciously prepared and served. The menu was: Grapefruit Cocktail Opera Sticks Potatoes in Half Shell Radishes Chicken Pie Creamed Asparagus Tips Rolls and Butter Perfection Salad Nut Bread Sandwiches Cherry Ice Gold Cake Coffee Mints A very enjoyable time was had and much credit is due the Juniors for their work.Jokes The Spud Page 47 mum...immiiiii.............. Miss Wilson—“Your report should be written so that the most ignorant might understand it.” Joe C.—“What part don’t you understand?” Irma E.—“I haven’t slept for days.” Frances—“What’s the matter, sick?” Irma—“No, I sleep at night.” Ivan—“What is the reason that men never kiss each other, while women waste a world of kisses on other feminine faces?” Naomi—“Because men have something better to kiss than women.” “Willie, your master’s report of your work is very bad. Do you know that when Woodrow Wilson was your age he was head of the school?” “Yes, father; and when he was your age he was President of the United States.” A miracle is anything that somebody does that can’t be done. What Has Put Them in the Limelight. Elsie Simpson—Senior English. Wray Rominger—Sarcasm. Elizabeth Wilson—Vamping. Robert Lawrence—Walking. Katie Baker—Loving. Harold Gavin—Kidding. Russel Mann—Bluffing. Marjorie and Glen—Devotion. Joe Cusick—Flirting. Dorothy Fricke—Laughing. Thressa Looney—Blushing. Frank Dailey—Shying. Lester Beal—Athletics. Lucille Butler—Curls. “What ya doin’ Shorty?” “Thinkin’ over my past and I got lots to think about.” K. B.—“I wonder why Russell’s feet are always said to be so cold?” M. A.—“Because thev’re so far from his heart, probably.” The Sheriff—“WThat do you mean by walking across the court house lawn? Can’t you read the signs?” Bob G.—,‘But the signs say ‘Fine for Trespassing. Miss Keith to Leonard Pate—“Can’t you speak louder? Be more enthusiastic! Open your mouth and throw yourself in it. Freshie finding a paper with “Ruby Coon” written on it—“Why I thought all coons were black.”The Spud Page 48 .............................................................................. iiiiih.....1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111...,minium..................hi iiimmmmiiimi Freshmen Notes On September eighth, seventy-five hunstmen assembled at the school house on the hill to search through four years, for that wily fox called Knowledge. Superintendent Pate, who instructed the hunt, informed us that the path we must travel to gain on the fox was rocky and full ot hard knocks, but that when we finally had covered the path that the tox was a very nice thing to have. So we started on the hunt. At first we were to travel very fast, fearing the ridicule of those who had started before us, and those who were nearing the end of the path. But gradually our courage overcame our fear, and with great determination we started on the long hunt. Faithfully by our side, trudged Mr. Prince, occasionally lifting us over the hardest bumps and spunng the laggers unmercifully on toward the goal. Every few miles along the road we would come upon beings who called themselves faculty and whose sole purpose for being there was to encourage the huntsmen and to replenish our store of pep, ginger and other articles needed for the hunt. Equally distant from the goals were posts. We were told, finally, that we were nearing the first of the four posts, and eventually were that much nearer the fox. Oh how wTe hurried, scarcely noticing our tired feet and aching joints, for we were told that if we did not get that close to the fox by a certain time we must go back and stait at the beginning of next year. The time gradually drew' nearer for us to arri e at the post and our hearts sank as we saw’ the distance to be covered before that time. Mr. Prince, urging and pushing us onwardThe Spud Page 49 IIIIIIIIMIIIMnillllllllMMnMIMinMIlllllllMllininillllMIMIMIIIIMIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIMHIIIIMMIIIIIMIIMIIIIMinilllMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMMIMIIIIIIIHIMIIIMIHIMIIIMIHIHIIHIIimillllHIIIIIIIIimiinimiMMIIIII toward the goal. Beads of perspiration dripped from our faces. We ripped off our coats so as to make a greater effort, never stopping for rest and nourishment, we pushed onward. Could we make it? Mr. Prince said “yes,” but our weary feet told us “no.” We quickened our pace, as the time drew nearer, one last struggle, one last push and it was over. We sank down beside the post exhausted but just in time. Our glad hearts rejoiced for three months of well deserved rest and as our sleepy lids closed we felt with a sigh of relief, that one-fourth of the distance was reached, that we were much nearer to the fox—Knowledge. One of the most important events, so far in our High School career was our class party, the first, last and only party in our class this year. At 7 o’clock, one evening in the early fall we assembled at the High School, confident of a good time. There were trucks waiting for us to transport us to a nearby grove of trees. After we arrived there games were played until the refreshments were served. After lunch more games were played. At a later hour some of the members of other classes joined us but soon after we returned to town. We lingered a while on the High School lawn and then departed for our homes. A good time was reported by all and we look forward with pleasure to more functions next year. On the night before Bayard played Alliance, the Bayard team was on the train headed for our city. One of their team stuttered horribly so when he approached the coach, to tell him something that appeared to be important, the coach (who was busy playing checkers) refused to listen. Finally after two hours of refusing the coach turned and said in desperation: “Boy, when you want to say something you should sing it.” Undaunted, the boy burst out singing “Should auld acquaintance be forgot and never brought to mind?” The guard fell out the window and is twenty miles behind. We cannot see why elephants are killed when there is so much ivory in the Sophomore class. Mr. Prince asked a boy a question which he could not answer. His neighbors tried to prompt him in audible whispers. Mr. Prince snapped : “You ought to be able to answer it, you’re getting enough help back there.” The boy grinning, replied: “I could, only there’s a difference of opinion back there.” Some Answers Found in Exam Papers Rabbi is plural for rabbit. A fort is a place where soldiers stay; a fortress is a place where soldiers’ wives stay; and fortitude is a place where they both stay. A gulf is a dent in a continent. An island is a whole lot of water with a little sand in the middl° of it. An infantry is a place where they keep infants. A glossary is a place where they polish things. Chemistry quiz—What is hard water and how softened? Answer—Ice and by melting. Carl B. (to barber)—“I want a hair cut.” Barber—“Might as well cut ’em all. Nobody’ll notice that one.”09 pnds aHX 23232348234853010002020102000200480290234848480002010223010253232348482348485353232323235348482348484848484848232353535301532353235353010153482389234823IIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIHIIHinHIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIMinilllllMIIIMMIIIMIIIHIMIIIHMIlllllHIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIinilMIHMIllllHMIlHMMIIIIIIinHIIIIIMIIIIIIIIHIIIIMIMIIMIIIIIMIIHIMIIHMIHIIII ig PndSIlilllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIlIhllllllMMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII' IIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIilMMIIIIIIMMIIIIIIHIIIIIIIMMIII ZQ pndg aqxThe Spud Page 53 iiiMnMiiiHiiiHiiiMMMiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiHMiiMimiiiiHMiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimMmiiiimmiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiMiiMiiiiiiiiiiuiiNiimiiiiiiiiiMi Alumni Rotes With the graduation of the Class of 1920 from A. H. S. twenty-five new members will be added to our membership which at present totals three hundred and thirty-two. Miss Nellie O’Donnel. ’09, after serving about fifteen months with the American Red Cross in France, returned to her home in this city January 1st. After a several months’ visit with parents and friends she departed May 1st for New York City, where she has accepted a position with the Red Cross. Mrs. A. C. McDonald (Alice Acheson) ’07, expects to leave soon for Chicago, where Mr. McDonald has been transferred and where they will make their future home. Mrs. D. J. Kinney (Katie O’Donnell ’ll) and little son, have been visiting in Alliance for the past several weeks. Their home is at Poca-tella, Idaho. Miss Edna Bowman, ’16, and Mr. Paul Clinton MacDonald of Minneapolis, were united in marriage March 22nd in this city. They are making their home at 414 High Street, Burlington, Iowa. The marriage of Miss Ruth Rice, ’12, and Eugene V. Black occurred in this city on May 12th. They will make their home at 920 Box Butte avenue. Alliance. Mr. and Mrs. William A. Lunn (Marian Grebe, ’16) will leave in the near future for California to make their home. They have not yet decided in what part they will locate. The Alumni entertainment for this year welcoming the graduates of 1920 into the association will be given at the Hotel Alliance on May 17th. A banquet will be served and an interesting program has been prepared. It is hoped that every Alumni member of the Alliance High School who is in Alliance on that date will be present. Verb Vagaries. “I fly to thee, love,” and with rapture he flew. “I cry to thee, love,” and with passion he crew. “Oh, try me, dear love,” (a few others had trew). “Let me tell thee, sweet love, all there is to be told, “How thou dwell’st in this heart” (where some other had dwolled) “Oh, my heart sweels with love,, (as before it had swolled). “Oh, shake not thy head, love,”—his pleading voice shook; “Oh. wake not thy heart, has thy heart never wook?” But her mein made him quake, so he stood still and quook. “Thy presence I fly,” he cried and he flew, But fell on the step, and lay still as he lew; With closed eves he said, “I shall die,” and he dew.The Spud Page 54 .. ..............1 ...................Hum ilium ...................——............. II 1 JK. I liance H.icjK ScKool Annua The Spud. I Published at the close of each year by the students of the Alliance High School. The Staff Editor-in-Chief............................................................Asenath Schill First Associate Editor................................................. Katherine Baker Second Associate Editor........................................................... Miner Business Manager.................................................................. Joder Assistant Business Manager....................................................Ivan Wong Subscription Manager................................................................Elsie Simpson Assistant Subscription Manager.......................................................Oral Edwards Organization Editor Royal Irwin Girls’ Athletic Editor..........................................................Thelma Zoble Boys’ Athletic Editor Ray Edwards Spud Artists.......................................Russell Mann and William Coutant Humorists........................................... Mary Woolis and Mildred Abegg TyP,sts Lessie Reeves. Mabel Garett, Belva Tipple. Oral Edwards Faculty Editor....................................................................Miss whitney Senior Representative..................................................Wray Romjnger Junior Representative......................................_.........William Coutant Sophomore Representative..........................................................Oral Edwards Freshman Representative....................................................... Wilson Alumni Representative..............................................Mrs. E. B. O’KeefeEditorial The Spud Page 56 HHMIlllltinillllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIII A REMINISCENCE. The book is finished—done—completed, and we are glad. The countless nights of anxiety and worry and work, the pleasures forsaken, the classes missed, have shrunk into insignificance now that we have really found relief in completion. Now that the 1920 Spud is a reality, we wonder how it was accomplished. There was a time—long ago—when the production of a year book seemed but child’s play. We could do it with ease. Later, when work began, we lay awake nights wondering with what gems of thought we could fill these 86 pages. One of the greatest helps was the way the student body took a hold and helped us to push it through. We thank the Staff, who did not hesitate to sacrifice their personal comfort for the welfare of the Spud, and those who in any way made this Spud possible.—The Editor. ♦ In this, our last issue of the Spud for this school year, the “Staff” desires to bring to memory many events which have occurred during the entire term. To do this co-operation of the Faculty and student body was asked—and received. So, the Spud Staff wishes to extend to them and also to the townspeople who made this Spud’s publication possible, their heartiest appreciation. And, too, the Staff of 1921 has our best wishes for a successful year. This year has been full of events both pleasant and unpleasant. But as we look back upon it we seem to remember most of the happy, carefree days, and not the sadder ones. Especially to thou who are to graduate this year will memories be cherished. This book will be their last memento of the dear old davs in A. H. S. A Few Daily Prayers Football Captain— Bless my team, the scorekeeper and Bless the timekeeper, and referee, May we all work together. Janitor— Lead the students not in with dirty feet, And deliver me from gum and candy wrappers For my back aches and my broom is wearing out. Student—(After exams) Amen! . Two pretty girls met in the street and kissed each other rapturously. Two young men watched the meeting. “There’s another one of those things that I hate,” said one. “What is that?” “Women doing men’s work.” A Sophomore saw a patch of green. He thought it was the Freshman class; But when he got a little closer He found it w'as a looking glass.The Spud Page 57 IIIMIHIIIIHIItMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIHIIIIIIIIIHIIIHIMIIIHIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIMIMIMIMIIIIIIHIIHIIIIMIIIHIlIJMIIHIIIIIIIHIHHIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIHtllllllMMIIIMIMIIIMMIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIllllllllHIIIIIIIMU LUestern Tlebraska Track and Field TTleet The first Western Nebraska Track and Field meet was held at Scottsbluff Saturday afternoon, May 8, 1920, and plans are under headway to make it an annual affair. The meet was successful in every way. Scottsbluff won the meet with 39 points; Bayard second with 36; Alliance third with 34. The winner was undecided until after the last event, the half-mile relay, which Alliance won easily, finishing with a 15-yard lead. Lee Strong, Lester Beal, Robert Lawrence and Frank Dailey composed the team. Alliance had six men competing; Bayard eight; Scottsbluff 14; Sidney five; Crawford 3. Bayard had a one-man team, Simmons taking six firsts, winning individual honors. Pease, Scottsbluff, second with two firsts and two seconds. Lawrence, Alliance, third with two firsts. Alliance brought eleven medals with them; three gold, four silver, four bronze. The following Alliance men winning points: Robert Lawrence first place in half-mile and mile. Frank Dailey second place in 100-yd. dash and 220-yd. dash and third place in pole vault. Lee Strong first place in 440-yd. dash, third place in 220-yd. dash. Lester Beal (capt.) third places in shot put, discus, high hurdles and second place in high jumps. Some good records were made although handicapped by the cold weather. THE EVENTS 120-yd. hurdles—Bayard first; Scottsbluff second; Alliance third. Time 20 :4. 100-yd. dash—Bayard, Alliance, Scottsbluff. Time 10:4. Shot Put—Bayard, Sidney, Alliance. Distance 35 ft, 6 in. Pole Vault—Bayard first and second; Alliance third. Height 9 ft. 880-yd. run—Alliance, Scottsbluff, Bayard. Time 2:16. 440-yd. dash—Alliance, Scottsbluff, Bayard. Time 54.4 seconds. Mile run—Alliance, Scottsbluff, Bayard; 5.24 min. High Jumps—Bayard, Alliance, Sidney. 5 ft, 2 in. Discus Throw—Scottsbluff first and second; Alliance. 86 ft, 5 in. 220-yd. dash—Scottsbluff, Alliance second and third. Time 25.4 seconds. 220-yd. hurdles—Scottsbluff first and third; Bayard second. Time 30.4 seconds. Broad Jumps—Bayard, Scottsbluff second and third. Distance 19 ft, 4V£ in. •4-mile Relay won by Alliance. With most of the men back and more coming out for track, watch Alliance step in 1921.The Spud Page 58 IMIlllllllMIIIIIIIIIMMIIIMIMIIMIIMMlinillllMIMIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIMIUlllHIIIIIMIIMIMMIMIMMIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIiniMIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Latin Club Notes The Latin Club was organized in the early part of last September with a membership of thirty, which consisted entirely of girls. The first meeting was held at LaRhea Lunn’s home. Only a few took part here and were able to consume the large abundance of ice cream prepared for a larger attendance. The second meeting held at Evangeline Acheson’s home was attended by a few more members and a great number of alumni members. The last at the home of Frances Grassman was the best of the season because of the program and larger attendance of boys and the Faculty. Prizes were given for Latin names of pictures and Mr. Messer-smith won the “Booby Prize.” We hope that next year the Latin Club will be larger and better than this year.—Royal Irwin. An overall club was organized in A. H. S. on April 21, 1920. All of the boys wore their overalls on Thursday with the exception of a fewr. We hope this will help to lower the cost of spring suits. COMMERCIAL. The Commercial department has been growing steadily even since it wras installed, and the time is now approaching w'hen an assistant will be needed in the work. Although the classes are wrell filled with students taking parts of the course, this year’s advanced Shorthand class is very small. This is owing to the fact that the beginning class last year consisted largely of seniors, w’ho did not return this year. Last fall the class numbered four but two dropped out to take positions and one was lured by the chime of w'edding bells, leaving only one to finish. The ideal time to begin the study of Shorthand is in the junior year. This leaves the two years necessary to complete the course and the student is then mature enough to grasp the w'ork readily. Review’ of Reviews—The week before exams. Smart Set—Sophomore and Freshie. Success—Anything above 80. Century—Last week before vacation. Life—Post graduate. Judge—Faculty. Ray E.—“Why are you limping?” Russell M.—“I stepped on the spur of the moment.”LATIN CLUB. Back How: Trances Graitsman. Evangeline Acheson. Ruth Stanton. Garnett Lunsford. Maricllen Beagle, Alice Boon, Evolyu Boon. Katherine linker. Second How: Bernice Shanklln. Alberta Lunsford, Irma Ellis, Josephine Bradley, Lois Boyer, Jennie llilton, Sybil Hutchinson. Mary Woolis. First How : Wanda Adams, Mildred Ab.‘gg, Helen Young, Vera Smith, Evelyn Brice, Ethelyn Ellis, La Rhea Luun, Miss Keith. The Spud Page 59 HiHHMMiHiiHiiimiiiniiHiiiiiMimmiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiitiiiiiHimHimtm:;—............................................................................ 00020202005323230048480000234848484853232348485323532323010100010002020053480202020223The Spud Page 60 ..........................iiiiiimiiiimiriimm'iMiiiinmmiiiiiiiinmiiiiiHimi’itimmiiiiiiiiiiimHtmimiiiiiimimmiMiiiimimmiHMiimimiiiimmiiiittiiH APPLIED ARTS AND HOUSE FURNISHING. Among the various new studies adopted this semester was applied art and house furnishing. The principles of art were first studied and applied to each individual in regard to dress, home furnishings and all art in general. We have learned to analyze our clothes and other personal accessories to make them more attractive. All of the girls taking this have gained a broader view' in this line of work, and I am sure that the girl of today will find it well w-orth her time to take up any form of Home Economics. General excursions have been made to the various stores w’hich have proven interesting as well as educational.—N. G. The Ninth grade girls began their food work with a study of food preservation. They canned vegetables, fruits, preserved jams, jellies, pickles, relishes, etc., and have reported good products used this winter in the homes. As the holidays approached they prepared for them by making fruit cakes, plum puddings, candies and bon-bons of all kinds that only the expert need try to rival. The second semester they began a vocational Smith-Hughes class and as the girls desired it, clothing was studied in place of foods, and with this course applied art and house furnishing was taken. In clothing the girls made rapid progress and all of them will have finished the wash dress before school is out. The tenth Domestic Art girls have made rapid progress and shown great ability in dressmaking, house planning and interior decoration. Most of the girls have worked with wash materials, silks and woolen goods. Besides being able to make their own clothes they have a better knowledge of choice of clothing. Each girl has planned and furnished a modern house for an average family. Excursions to the stores and houses in construction have been made by the girls. These were of interest and educational value as the girls in the future will be able to help solve the housing problem. MANUAL TRAINING 9. The Ninth Manual Training class comes the first two periods each day every Monday for about two-thirds of the year, then we finish it and meet at the shops each day. The first semester we were supposed to make a project with square-ing up a board (lover board), mail project (handkerchief box), and a chamfering (tie hanger) and a dado joint (ironing board), mortise and tendon joint (piano bench, and any other project. Some of the projects made by us are: pool tables, sleds, taboret, piano bench, kiddie car, work table, tie rack, library table, handkerchief box and many others. MANUAL TRAINING 10. Manual Training 10 comes the seventh and eighth periods each day. At the beginning of the year we had book work each alternate Monday, but finally got through with it, and wre are all very disappointed. The required work for the first semester was: One piece of cabinet work, a box—this is usually called a good piece of work, one drawing which has at least two joints and one piece each of face plate and spindle turning. We have made the following: ironing board and stand, nut bowl, tie box, candle stick holders, fruit plate, pin tray, smoking stand and many others.—F. S.The Spud Page 61 IMMIMIMIIIIIIIIIinillllllllllllllllllHIIIMIIMIIIIinillllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIMiinUlillMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIMMIIIIMIIMIIHIIIIIMIIMIIMIMIIIIIMIIMIIIMMIIIMIIMMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIHIinHIIIIIMIIIIIM SALTED OOV VNThe Spud Page 62 iimiiiiiiiMiniMiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiuiiiiiiii THE TRIALS OF A FRESHMAN IN THE SOPHOMORE ROW. Do you know what it is to be in an alien country? If you do, you know what a trial it is to have estrange, hostile eyes looking at you, causing a shiver to play up and down your spine. When you hear your back door neighbor say in a whisper to her friend “What kind of games are they going to play at the party,” and the answer comes, “Oh, tin tin—sh that girl that sits in front of you is a Freshman,” and your neighbor says “Oh, so that’s the trouble, well I tho’t she was rather green for a Sophomore.” And then you w.ilt. Then your front door neighbor says to your side neighbor: “Say, do you think so-and-so will make a good”-----, and your side neighbor interrupts to say, “Say, shut up! this girl here is a Freshman.” And you feel out of things. And if you should be out of ink and none of your neighbors are home and you should just borrow it without leave. Then when your neighbor returns, and you return the ink with a carefully thought up apology and thanks, to have her turn to her neighbor and say, “Well, now isn’t that nerve; Oh, well by that you could tell she was a Freshman.” Then you feel like an Eskimo in Africa. Then suppose you ask your neighbor to help you with an awful hard Algebra problem or a Latin translation to hear them say: “Oh, I learned that last year but I can’t help you now.” And then last, but not least suppose you want a magazine and ask one of your neighbors for one and she would say: “Oh, you’re a Freshman and must not waste time.” Then suppose you get moved to the Freshman rows—“Oh, ain’t it a Grand and Glorious Feeling.”—E. H. Our Ideal Senior Girl Must Have: Helen Wood’s demureness. Madelaine Zediker’s popularity. Leila Mewhirter’s hair. Wanda Adams’ grace. Elsie Simpson’s pep. Katie Baker’s wardrobe. Irma Ellis’ wit. La Rhea Lunn’s grades. Frances Grassman’s feet. Mariellen Beagle’s complexion. F-ierce lessons. L-ate hours. U-nexpected company. N-ot prepared. K-icked out. The more we work the harder we look. Our teachers work very hard, Therefore our teachers are hard lookers. Shakespeare Revised. Comedy of Errors—Freshies. Much Ado about nothing—Sophies. As you like it—Juniors. All’s well that ends well—Seniors.Jokes The Spud Page 63 IMIlllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIimilllllllllllllll Singers and Their Songs. John Donovan—The bigger they are, the harder they fall. Bob English—The blacker the berry, the sweeter the juice. Naomi Gaddis—Don’t cry, Ivan, don’t cry. Ward Joder—Slow and easy. Tressa Looney—You ain’t heard nothing yet. Ruth Donovan—They are all out of step but Jim. Mable Rockey—I want my old baby back again. Wm. Williams—Chew, chew, chew. Seth Joder—If I only had the nerve. Wray Rominger—All wise chickens follow me. Miss Wilson—I want what I want when I want it. Elsie Simpson—I don’t want to get well. Bob Gavin—Everything’s a joke. Lester Beal—Wee, Wee, Marie. Walter Robbins—They go wild, simply wild over me. John Schriner—When you come back. Irma Ellis—Kiss me again. Helen Young—I’m going to follow the boys. Marie Howe—Charlie. Mr. Prince—Oh, what a pal was Fern. Helen Woods—All the quakers are shoulder shakers. Dorothy Reynolds—Wee, gee Wee, gee. Robert Bicknell—Sing me to sleep. Sterling Harris—Oh what a pal was Mary. Scott Lee—Can you tame wild women? Mr. Messersmith—I love my wife, but oh, you kid. Frank Dailey—There are too many girls in the world. Millard Donovan—I just can’t make my eyes behave. Irma Ellis and Scott Lee—Some day we’ll be happy. What Some Books Remind Us Of. How to Reduce..........................Dorothy Hampton The man of the Hour.................................Loren Winship A Girl in 10,000....................................Alice Boon Alice in Wonderland...............................Bernice Wilson The Fortune Hunter...........................Janice Adams Freckles.....................................Mabel Rockey The Little Minister...............................Clement Dotson Little Women..Frances Grassman, Mabel Sisley, Louise Boness Little Lord Fauntleroy..............................Royal Irwin A Certain Rich Man....................................Ray Edwards The Man in the Brown Derby.............Robert Lawrence The Life of George Washington.........................Tom Miller Their Yesterdays...............Harold Gavin, Katie Baker Sentimental Tommy.....................................Bob Gavin Wind Jammers.........................................Byrd WheelerMiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimi.'iiiiiiimniiiimmi't The Spud Page 64 IIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIimilllllKIINIIIIIimilll Jokes Mr. Cunningham—“Have you read ‘Freckles’?” Miss Keith—“No, brown ones.” Beatrice L.—“What makes your hair so red?” Red P.—“It isn’t red. I was out in the rain once, got wet, and it rusted.” Miss Wilson—“A fool can ask so many questions that a wise man can’t answer.” Horace F.—“That’s why so many of us flunked in exam.” Horace F.—“Please take these hints for auctioneering: “Rules for public speaking—Stand up—Speak up—Shut up.” Blanche P.—“Mother says you’re two-faced.” Frank S.—“You didn’t believe her. did you?” Blanche—“Well, I didn’t think you’d wear this one if you had another.” Ruth D.—“Can Lee use his eye yet?’ Tressa L—“I don’t know, he hasn’t tried.” Mr. Prince—“Do you want to speak to someone?” William Cotant—“No sir, I want to speak to you.” Spring Styles Men’s pants are being worn longer this year—about one year longer. Much calf skin is being seen on the streets—skirts being shorter and hosiery of thin silk. Shoes are all high—at least 12 simoleous. Men’s hats are being worn as high as usual—about 5 feet, 8 inches from the ground. Whiskers are expected to return to fashion if the cost of shaving goes any higher. Mr. Prince (coach)—“Have you ever been to the country?” Ivan A.—“No sir, why do you ask?” Coach—“I was just thinking how thrilling it would be for you to sit on the fence and watch the snails go by.” Leah Weaver (when she was practicing teaching, was telling her small pupils the story of the coming of the Pilgrims and the rock on which they landed.) “Now,” she said, “we are not quite sure as to the exact location of the rock.” “Oh, teacher, it said in the paper that Mr. Jones shipped twelve Plymouth Rocks to Omaha yesterday.”The Spud Page 65 llllltlllllHIIIIIHIIHIIIIIHIIIHIIIIIItllHIIMIIHIIMIIIIHIIHIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMMIII Jokes Dedicated To A Freshie. A student there was, Who was told a lot; The more he listened The less he got. “1 want a pair of shoes for this little girl,” said the mother. “Yes ma’am,” said the shoe clerk, “French kid?” “Well, I should say not,” was the irate answer, “she’s my own child born right here in America.” ¥ “Which is the most delicate of the senses?” asked the teacher. “The touch,” said young Jones. “How’s that,” asked the teacher, and young Jones explained: “Well, when you sit on a pin, you can’t see it, you can’t hear it, you can’t taste it. but it’s there.” “Winnie, dear, what was the parson’s text this morning?” “Oh, papa,” said Winnie, with a shocked look, “it was ‘Abdomen, Abdomen, my son Abdomen.’ ” Mr. Messersmith’s Wife Takes a Vacation. The place seems so bum without wifey, There’s nothing to eat on the table; I’m living alone; the bed’s like a stone. And the kitchen looks just like a stable. ♦ In the gentle month of May, Mr. Prince thinks of tennis each day; He feels that working does not pay, He’d like to quit and get away; “Spring Fever?” That’s the right essay, When tired in the month of May. The fourth grade teacher had a great deal of trouble with Fred’s attendance. He was absent so often that she got suspicious and wrote a note to his parents as follows: “I am afraid that Fred is playing truant and I would like your cooperation in securing a better attendance record for him.” Back that P. M. came this answer: Dere Teecher—If Fred is playing truant he didn’t lern it a hoam. We air church peeple and hain’t got a card in our house.” Debating team at Mason City—Edward M.—“Where is the town?”Jokes Tne Spud Page 66 lllllllllltllHIIIIIIIHHIHIIIIIHIIIHiniHlimilHIIIIIItlllMlllimMIIIIIIIH Bashful or Otherwise? Daily—“If you are asked repeatedly, I should think you might accept the young lady’s company now and then.” G. W.—“Do not despair. Marked attention from twelve young men during one semester is not so bad, you know. Observation After the Freshman and Sophomore Party. In spring, boy’s fancy turns to hand-holding. Examples: Raymond—Evelyn; Lester—Janice; Millard—Josephine; Robert —Dorothy; George—Belva. Did Mr. Prince fall down so much that he might call attention to his gracefulness? Wanted—A position as a manipulator of a mop. Experience: scrubbed walks while we were Freshmen in High School. The Seniors have had their picnic. They saw Bridgeport. What became of the large(?) Freshman banner. The school went right on even though the Seniors weren’t there to set an example. Lester B. has already distributed some of his medals. But Frank Dailey has all of his. No chance, girls. Debating team on the Pullman—Edward M.—“W illiam, get out of the hammock, I spoke for it first. Raymond Brown—“W hat is ice made of, water?" Mr. C.—“Water has the greatest thermal capacity of any sub-stance Sterling H.—“No sir, a baked potato will stay warmer longer than water.” Miss K.—“Give principal parts of possum. Ivan W.—“Head, legs and tail.” “Matter, Miss Whitney, aren’t you feeling well?” “No, I ate German noodle soup and French fried potatoes for dinner and they refuse to arbitrate.”The Spud Page 67 UIIIIIINIII.. Jokes Betty’s grandmother had died in a distant town, and about the same time her little dog was poisoned and died. Betty said to her mother one morning: “Mamma, isn’t it strange I cried more for my little dog when it died, than I did when grandmother died?” “No, that is not strange,” replied her mother, “you were with your little dog every day, and your grandmother living away, you hardly knew her.” Betty replied: “Yes, and I didn’t raise grandmother from a pup.” “Nothing that is false does anyone any good,” thundered the orator. “I’ve got false teeth,” said a voice in the back, “and they do me a mighty lot of good.” Technical Meaning of Student Terms. Senior—A person looking for a job. Roasts—Compliments handed out by the Spud Staff. Junior—One who needs a father’s care for another year; also one who trys to act as dignified as a Senior. Cartoon—A sketch of ourselves as others see us. Debate—A three weeks’ grind. Noise—First song in Chapel. Annual—A species of lemon which is handed out to all. Tennis—A spring fever in which amateurs are especially valuable. Exam—An instrument for discovering mental vacuums. Rebuttal—The billy goat of debates. Sophomore—A harmless biped relying on the hope of future achievements. Flunk—The intellectual dark brown taste of the morning after. Pony—Can’t define this—none of the editors ever saw one. Freshman—A highly combustible compound of self-confidence, noise and unsquelchableness. Prof—“Define and give the etymology of equinox.” John S.—“Equi—from Latin means horse, nox from Latin means night. Therefore, equinox means ‘nightmare’.” To the Honorable School Board at— I understand that you want to hire a teacher of grammar and history, either lady or gentleman. As I have been both for a year or so, I hereby make application for the place. Mrs. Nobody—Ex. Senior Knowledge. Wray R. (In Chem. Lab.)—“Somebody’s gas is getting away.” Russell M.—“Shut your mouth.”Our Thanks (To those who made the publication of the Spud possible, to those who contributed their lime and talent, the faculty, the student body, and the advertisers, the Staff wish to express their sincere appreciation.The Spud t Page 69 imimiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiMiHimiiiii “SELLERS” Kitchen Cabinets Are the best. Sold by ALLIANCE, NEBRASKA. Graduation— Perpetuate it. One pleasant way is with an exceptionally good photograph. If we make it, it will carry down through the years, the spirit of a most eventful day. Portraiture which imparts one’s personality is the kind we perfect in our studio. We are guided by artistic impulses, and our work shows it even to mountings of subtle charm. A photograph which is really you is priceless. Why not call today? VAN GRAVEN STUDIO. Alliance, Nebraska.The Spud •Inin +■ iiiniiiii'iiiiiitiiiiiMiiiniitifiiitiitiiiMiiiiiMiiiiitiii'iiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiimiiiiiiiMM'MilimMiniiiminiiiiMiiiMiiiiMiiiiiiimiMi Page 70 i-ii + ONE MINl'TK STOKE TALK “Thait good appearance inspires self-respect ami Unit self-respect is just about the tirst step to real ‘Americanization’ needs no particular brilliance to discover. Why, if it wasn’t for good clothes and the wonderful industry that it represents, where would this country be todayP said a student of social conditions, a visitor at our store. TRY HARPER’S FOR SERVICE W. R. Harper Department Store. BIG STORE ALLIANCE, NEB. Morgan Grocery Co. High Quality Low Prices The store that started the ‘ bump ’ of old H. C. L. Everything For The Table. I The Spud Page 71 ................. mmummmiuimmimmmm...................mi.mmmmmm...mm"""....... ----------------------------- Music Lovers Choose The BRUNSWICK Music Lovers choose the Brunswick Phonograph to play their favorite records, for it plays all records at their best. The Brunswick Method of Reproduction makes this possible. It consists of two outstanding, exclusive features—the Brunswick Ultona and the Brunswick Tone Amplifier. T II I E L E ’ SThe Spud Page 72 lllllllllllllllllllllllMllllltlllMMIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIinilllMIIIIIIIIIMMMIIIIIIIMIIMillltllilllMIIIMIIHIIIIIIIIIMHIlinillllMMIMMMliniMMIIMIMnMMMMIMnilllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMnillllllinil t------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ t GEORGE W. DUNCAN SON. Groceries and Fresh Meats YOU HAVE THE ASSURANCE OF SATISFACTORY SERVICE WHETHER YOU CALL PERSONALLY OR TELEPHONE TO THE STORE. Some Dai] You will want a home of your own; that is the natural desire of every man and woman. When that time comes you will not find better materials, safer advice or larger stocks than at Dierk’s Lumber Co. Everything for the Builder. GOLDEN RULE STORE STRICTLY CASH Everything for Men, Women and Children to Wear. ■+The Spud Page 73 Fourth Street Market CASH AND CARRY SELF SERVICE Kverything in Groceries H. HIRST, Proprietor ALLIANCE, NEBR. The Alliance Hotel And Annex J. M Miller. Prop. Private Telephone Exchange Steam Heat and Hot and Cold Running Water in Every Room. Special Banquet Service in Buffet Room on Request Something New in Kodak Prints SKIM A TONE School Snap Shots--.One Day Service. HIGH SPEED FINISHING SHOP. Over Holsten’s.The Spud iiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMMiiittiiiHiiiiiiimimimiHiii Page 74 MMIIimillllllMMIIIIIIIMIMlimillllllllllllll Ford Garage COURSEY MILLER Phone 19 MITCHELL GANTZ Attorneys-at-Law Alliance, Nebraska House Cleaning Time iMiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiiimmiiiiinnimiiiiiimiir Save time and trouble by coming to our store for your needs. You can find in our stock just about everything you need—be it a small or large item. George D. Darling. MALLERY GROCERY CO. GROCERIES AND FRESH MEATS GOODS OF KNOWN QUALITY. SERVICE UNEXCELLEDThe Spud Page 75 MiiiiiimMmiiiHMiHHiiMiiimtmiiiM1 We would if we could But we can’t offer you anything better than OUR CHOICE CONFECTIONS Delicious Ice Creams Cool and Healthful Summer Drinks. YOU WANT THE BEST! WE SUPPLY IT. ALLIANCE CANDY STORE. Phone 27 MELICK STEPHENSON Successors to O’Bannon Bros. Dealers in FLOUR, FEED AND FUEL Full Weights. Prompt Service. Courteous Treatment Rhein Hardware Co. Hardware—Implements Electric Ranges, Washers and Light Globes See Our Pressure Cookers. Opera House Blk. Phone 98The Spud Page 76 mmmiiiiiiimmmniiiiiiiiiiiMimiiiMMmiiiiiii make Ijour Old Clothes Do 1 Haue them cleaned, pressed and repaired. Phone 682 Fielding Son. Dole Variety . Somelhinq for Everybody. Dishes and Qlassware. SNYDER TRANSFER AND FIRE-PROOF STORAGE WAREHOUSE “The World Moves and So Does Snyder.” We give claim checks for your baggage. Are equipped with moving pads and Piano truck, also can furnish you with boxes to pack your books and dishes in Phone 15. Bock F urnishing Store EVERYTHING FOR WOMEN. 120 WEST THIRD STREET ALLIANCE, NEBRASKAThe Spud Page 77 A Breath of Spring For Your Dressing Table Violet Dulce Toilet Water, Cold Cream, Vanishing Cream and Soap HOLS TEN'S LOWRY HENRY DEALERS IN Dodge Brothers MOTOR CAR ALLIANCE, NEBRASKA COAL AND LUMBER BUILDING MATERIAL of all kinds Telephone 73 Wm. M. Bevington, Manager. COMPANY iK paThe Spud S LlS IPhen The Time Comes Remember Bui] Ijour House Furnishings from Qlen Miller. 311 Box Butte Aue. The Spud is a product of the Commercial Printing Department Of The Alliance Times The largest and best equipped Printing Office in Nebraska luest of Grand Island. The Newspaper at $2.50 a year is equally good.The Spud Page 79 Coats Suits DressesnlDaists Itlillinenj Ttlunsinq Underujear Qordon Hosiery THE Horace Boque Store Beacon Blankets and Bath Robes Demjuale Linens Educator-Billiken Dorothy Dodd Shoes For Children Shoes For IPomenThe Spud Page 80 mMIIIIMIIMIHIIHIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMimill A Safe and Sound Banking Institution If it were possible to use any greater precaution to make this bank a sound financial institution, we certainly would have done so. Organized as it is under the stringent laws of the State of Nebraska, every transaction must meet the approval of the constituted authorities who regularly inspect its books.. All deposits are protected under the Depositors Guaranty Fund of the State of Nebraska. In addition to this our officers and directors are men of sound business judgment and of the highest integrity. Consult us on your financial investments and do your banking through this good bank. Start an Account Now and Watch It Grow 5% Paid on Time Deposits CThe First State Bank. Of L llliance.A Special Opportunity For Young Men On April 29 we bought from Schwartz Jaffee, Broadway and 19th, New York City 50 Young Men s All Wool Suits At a little below the regular price and we are going to give you the benefit. They consist of single and double breasted models in browns, blues and greens and the new Liberty Stripes. In fact they are regular $50 values. These goods are hand tailored and this offering is unusual at this time of the year. Schwartz Jaffee are the largest manufacturers of Young Men’s Clothes in New York City. The Famous Clothing House. THE MEN’S STORE. +• ■ t At the close of School and throughout all seasons of the year the Fashion Shop is prepared to serve the girls and women of this vicinity with the most complete stock of Coats, Suits, Skirts, Frocks and Blouses and all of the other articles of ladies rc dy-to-wear garments. For the hot weather we have a nice line of attractive wash dresses and waists that will appeal to particular dressers. Tilling 1‘rint AIIIn m e. Nel r.


Suggestions in the Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) collection:

Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1916 Edition, Page 1

1916

Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

1917

Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

1918

Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

1921

Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

1924

Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

1925

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.