Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE)

 - Class of 1917

Page 1 of 64

 

Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1917 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1917 Edition, Alliance High School - Bulldog Yearbook (Alliance, NE) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 64 of the 1917 volume:

DO IT WELL Is the motto of our Repair and Manufacturing Department. We do not try to rush it through, but we DO get it out as quickly as good work will permit. Our workman is an all-around expert and the most difficult jobs you can bring will be executed without any trouble. We Guarantee All Our Work If you have any special designs you wish carried out, we will be pleased to give you an estimate free of charge, and, if necessary, a design. Look over your jewelry and see what needs fixing, and let us make it look like new for you. THIELE Jeweler and Druggist A Message To Men! If You Like NEAT, NILTY, NOBBY CLOTHES Come To Us. E. G. LAING Modern Clothes for Men,FOREST Lumber Comp’ny LUMBER AND COAL OF ALL KINDS PAINTS, OILS, GLASS AND BUILDERS' SUPPLIES Our Prices the Lowest Our Service the Best iGeo. A. Heilman, Mgr. Phone 73 Photographs When You Consider QUALITY STYLE AND WORKMANSHIP ALLIANCE ART STUDIO is the Photograph Center of Western Nebraska Go to the Alliance Art Studio for your Photos. You will be pleased. Phone Red 165 ROWAM WRIGHT Coal, Wood, Feed and Flour Elevator in Connection Telephone 71SUMMER FURNITURE Enjoy the cooling breezes of summer on the porch. Enjoy it better with selections from our new line of PORCH FURNITURE GLEN MILLER THE HOUSEFURNISHER SI ELLS HOES THAT’S ALL! J. S. Rhein W. E. Rousey RHEIN-ROUSEY CO. Hardware Implements Queensware Harness Paints Vehicles Alliance................NebraskaWealth Begins With Thrift The best way to be thrifty is to start an account in our Savings Department. Are you a member of our Christmas Club? Start this Year and have a fund for next Christmas Let us explain the plan to you. ALL DEPOSITS GUARANTEED FIRST STATE BANK We pay 5 per cent on time deposits. PHOTOGRAPHS are one of the necessities of Graduation Time. A graduation photograph should be something especially attractive, that will in after years bring back the memories of that first GRADUATION It has been our privilege and pleasure to make many graduation photographs in past years. We understand and appreciate the feeling of our youthful sitters as few others do. See our samples. VAN GRAVEN STUDIO. Alliance, Nebr. Phone 901 YES—Our PRICES are LOW.TO OUR FRIEND Miss Bertha Wilson tiiiNiiitKiin Sponsor of the Senior Class, whose personal interest and untiring efforts to help every student, have made us all love her, and whose steadfast loyalty to the Alliance High School has been our inspiration to strive for high ideals, not selfishly, but that we may be positive instruments in the maintenance of the high standards for our Alma Mater.THE SPUD STAFF.Hhe Spui Published bi-monthly, during the school year, by the students of the Alliance High School SVASCRIPTION, 50 CENTS. SINGLE COPIES, 15 CENTS ! Entered at the Post Office at Alliance, Nebraska, for transmission through the mails as Second Class Matter STAFF 1916-1917 Mable Grassman........ Ethel Clary........... Otto Snyder........... Homer Barnes.......... Matilda Frankie....... Walter Anderson....... Lucille Faucett....... Ray Butler............ Arthur Dillon......... Mrs. Claude McDonald Miss Bertha Wilson.... Ray Edwards........... Mrs. James W'alker... .................Editor-in-Chief ...............Associate Editor ..............Business Manager ....Assistant Business Manager ..........Subscription Manager Assistant Subscription Manager ...................Organizations ................Athletics Editor ....................Staff Artist ...................Alumni Editor ..................Faculty Notes ...............Exchange Editor ...............Normal Training FACULTY MEMBERS Mr. W. R. Pate,........ Mr. T. R. Crawford.... Mr. A. P. Stockdale.... Mr. R. E. Holch........ Miss Mary Wilson....... Miss Georgia Canfield Mr. R. Truman.......... Miss Bertha Wilson.... ....Superintendent City Schools ....Principal, History, Physics ....English, Normal Training Mathematics, Manual Training ................Latin, German .........Domestic Art Cooking ...................Agriculture ....................Commercial t Dolly Hagaman Beulah Reddish. Marie Kibble... Ruth Hawes...... CLASS EDITORS ..........................Senior Editor ..........................Junior Editor .......................Sophomore Editor ........................Freshman Editor 7............... TIip pittl ..inn....... THE FACULTY SUPT. W. R. PATE University of Nebraska. Supt. Pate has been with the Alliance schools for seven years, coming here from Sidney and during that time he has placed the Alliance schools in the front rank among the schools of the state. He is particularly able as an administrative officer and as an instructor. BERTHA WILSON Commercial, Senior Class Sponsor. Cotner Uni. A. B. Lincoln Business College. Miss Wilson has been a member of the Alliance High School for a number of years, coming here from the Blair High School, where she was very successful as a teacher. Miss Wilson has been very efficient in her work and has built up the commercial department until it is second to none in the state, its graduates all holding important positions. She will remain with us for another year. GEORGIA CANFIELD Dom. Art and Math. Kansas State Agricultural College. B. Sc. Miss Canfield, our domestic science instructor, is another instructor of long service in the A. H. S. She has proven her ability a countless number of times, both in the classroom and in the assistance rendered in preparing banquets, exhibits, etc. We are surely glad we are not to lose Miss Canfield. A. P. STOCKDALE Eng. History. Nor. Tr. Soph Class Sponsor and Debating. Peru Normal., Uni. of Nebr. A. B. Post Grad. Uni. of Nebr. Mr. Stockdale, our efficient English instructor, has been a member of the A. H. S. faculty for two years. His classroom work is of the very highest order and it would well behove some of our larger schools to notice the work in this department of our school. This year under his efficient coaching the Alliance High School won the district debating championship. In activities in church work and in local affairs, he is just as alert as in his school work. He will stay with us for another year.................................. (Thr imd'HuoiiwnMiiiiiiiiucjHiBUMniani'i...................... THE FACULTY T. H. CRAWFORD Prin. H. S. Physics, History, Athletics and Oratory. Hastings College. B. Sc. Post Grad. Work Uni. of Nebr. T. R. Crawford has been principal of the H. S. for the past two years, and his worth is attent to by his retention for another year at a large increase in salarv. Not only is he very good as an instructor and disciplinarian, but he has many numerous talents. He coached the Senior play and made it one of the best put on by a graduating class. Also it was he who coached the winner of the Oratorical class in the district contest. He is a good community worker and ready at all times to lend a helping hand. R. E. HOLCH Matte. Man. Arts. Uni. of Illinois. B. Sc. (Engineering Dept.) ; Post Grad Work Uni. of Illinois. Mr. Holch. our new manual training instructor, is the find of the season. His work is unusually fine and he displays a knowledge of his subject and an enthusiasm for it that is remarkable. He has previously taught in the Louisfanna State University and was re-elected but did not accept. He is just as capable in the various other lines of work with which he is connected. He is also to remain with us. REX TRUMAN Agriculture, Science. Director of Choral Club. Junior Class Sponsor. Peru Normal. Uni. of Nebr. B. Sc. Mr. Truman came into our midst the middle of last year from the Agricultural College of the State University. He took up the Agricultural work at the beginning of the year, and has carried it on in a very efficient manner. Mr. Truman is a musician of considerable ability and possesses a fine tenor voice. He has done much to build up this phase of student activities. MARY WILSON Latin and German. Freshman Class Sponsor. Uni. of Nebr. A. B. Post Grad. Work in Germany. Miss Mary Wilson, our Latin and German teacher, is a lady of broad culture and experience in teaching. Her work in this department is very good and during her brief experience with us, she has »qn the respect and admiration of all. We are glad to note that she also will be with us another year. 9OIHillllHIIDIIIIIIIIIIIinillHIIIIIIIC)lllllllllll|[}IIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIII(JJi|P D ................................................lOIIMIIHIIIClimillMIIOIIIIHIMlir ORAL HARVEY. Class President—(3-4). Winner of Local Oratorical Contest (3). Winer in Local and District Contest (4). Alternate on Debating Team (3). Member of Debating Team and Representative in State Debate (4). I atin Club (2-3). English Club (3-4). Class Play (3-4). Classical Course. DAVID PURINGTON. Vice-President of Class (4). Basket Ball Team (4). Stock Judging Team (3-4). English Club (3-4). Class Play (4). Agriculture Course. MABLE GRASSMAN President of Latin Club (4). Editor-in-Chief of Spud (4). Latin Club (2-3-4). Treasurer of Class (1-3-4) Secretary of Class (2-3-4). Winner of Local Humorous Contest (1). Declamatory Contest (2). English Club (3-4). Class Play (3). Classical Course. EDITH VANDEWARK. Athletic Representative (2-4). Basket Ball Latin Club (2-3). English Club (3-4). Class Deutschen Leute (3). Classical Course. (1-2-3-4). Play (4). DOLLY HAGAMAN. Class Editor (4). Basket Ball (2). English Club (3-4). Deutschen Leute (3). Class Play (4). Normal Training C ourse. OTTO SNYDER. Business Manager of Spud (4). Football (3-4). Class Play (3). English Club (3-4). Deutschen Leute (3). Agricultural Course. 10• 3iiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiMiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiuniiiiiiniiiic]iiiiiiHiiHaiiuiiiiiii lir iiiiiniHiiiciiiiniiiiiiitJiiiiiiiiiiiimiiitiiiiiiic3iitiiiiiiiiiC3iiiiiiiitiiir» SENIORS MATILDA FRANKLE. Subscription Manager of Spud (4). Athletic Representative (1). Choral Club. English Club (3-4). Deuts-chen Leute (3). Class Play (4). German Course. NINA WHALEY. Iiasket Ball (2-3). English Club (3-4). Deutschen Leute (3). Normal Training Course. GRACE CARLSON. English Club (3-4). Latin Club (3). Normal Training Course. JOHN WRIGHT. Latin Club (2-3-4). English Club (3-4). Class Play (4). Classical Course. 1 0 THELMA FITZPATRICK. Basket Ball (4). Deutschen Leute (3). English Club (3-4). Vice-President of Class (1). Class Play (3). German Course. ROSE CARLSON. Class Play (3-4). Declamatory (2). English Club (3-4). Latin Club (2). Domestic Science Course. 11• }iMiiHiuiinnHiitiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiiiniumimiic]iiiniiiiiiintmiiiini hr Ap h it iMiiimintnmimiiiiiiiiiiiinumni...........immniHiitiimoiiiiimiiK SENIORS WILL PULLMAN. English Club (4). Classical Course. TERESA MORROW. President of English Club (4). Member of English Club (3-4). ( lass Play (4). Latin Club (3-4). Vice-President of Class (3). Classical Course. ELEANOR HARRIS. Declamatory (2). English Club (3-4). Class Play (4). Normal Training Course. NEVA HOWE. Class Play (3-4). Declamatory (1). English Club (3-4). Deutschen Leute (3). Treasurer of Class (2). Normal Training Course. DONNA LA HODA. Declamatory (3-4). Debating (3-4). Alternate on Team (3). English Club (3-4). Choral Club. Deutschen Leute (3). German Course. DEWEY DONOVAN. Football Team (3-4). English Club (3-4). Class Play (3-4). Agriculture Course. 12................................. taljr ........... English Club Training Course. Football Club (3-4). President of HUGH DAVENPORT. Team (3-4). Captain of Team (4). English Class Play (3-4). Deutschen Leute (3). Class (1). Agriculture Course. FLORENCE ATZ. Class Play (4). Deutschen Leute (3). English Club (3-4). German Course. iiiMimiiiiiiiiimiiitimiiiiiiiiMiitiiimiiiimiiiiiiiii MRS. JAMES WALKER Normal Training. Peru Normal. Mrs Walker, a former A. H. S. instructor, took up the Normal Training work about the middle of the second semester. She is a lady who is extremely popular w th the students and we are glad that she has worked with us again even though it was only for a few months. 13•: ]iiiiiiiiiiiiC)iniimiHic]niniiiiiM(iniiMiiiiiinmiMMnii()HHiiiMM (X 111’ iiiiniiniiitJiiiiiniiiiiciniHiiiiiiiniiiniiiHiifiiiiiiHiHiitjmiiiiiiiiiK rilllllMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMiaillHIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIItlllMIIIMIIIIIIII EDITORIAL The last week in May has come. A queer feeling1 of sadness comes over us at the thought of the approaching separation from A. H. S. Not a feeling of regret that we have traveled this long path, but a feel-ig of interest and companionship. It is not only the feeling of the Seniors, but at the close of every school year, students realize their surroundings and opportunities. As we looked at our books day after day they seemed nothing but objects to us; but in times of affliction, trouble, or sorrow, how pleasant would be the memories of the time spent over those books or what a pleasure it would be to turn to these consolers with confidence and trust. For surely, there can be no one who would not have the most pleasant memories in regard to their education and opportunities therefrom. For beyond doubt, one of the principle values of a school education consists in the number of friends and acquaintances it is possible to make. And of what a value are our school fiiends. So we realize these things as the school year draws nigh. But still another benefit that education brings to an individual who is a possessor of the same is the ability to sustain and enjoy life, which oftentimes becomes intolerable to an uneducated person. How hard it would be to build up our ideals were it not for our education. Especially in the present state of affairs, our effoits are united and our one hope is for our country. Let us show what qualities we possess and let our hopes proceed to the building up of our ideals. But again, a3 t.me passes, we can not refrain from expressing our appreciation to the teachers for their inte est and patience shown and for their having guided us safely over the rugged paths. How clearly such instances are brought to light as the year closes. OUR SOLDIER BOYS. (Mr. Pate) Leon Edwards Chester Beck Robert Ralls George Fenning Ralph Joder Otto Snyder Philip Grove William Pullman Rex Truman When Company G was being organized and the call for volunteers went forth, the high school responded as probably no other organization did. We are p:oud of these boys—proud that in the time of their country’s need, they have recognized their duty, and although it means hardship,—may even mean death,—they have not hesitated, but ha e offered themselves freely. As long as this school exists, it will be pointed out with great justifiable pride that eight of its boys and one of its instructors offered themselves at the first call of their country. 15 «3iiiiiiiiiiiiC3iiiiiiiiiiiiC3iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiniiimiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiii CLlir |IU iiiiimiminimimminiimiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii(]iimiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiMc 16..................................................... nmu....... hr 5 puib.............miMinniiiMiiMtjmiMiiiiiiHiiMiiiiiMiniiiiiiiiiiiiniimi...... j CLASS DAY PROGRAM I ... 111| || IM11111 Ml 11M M MII111IMI11MIIIIIM111IIII III II Ml MI III 11MIIM Ml I • III 1111 ■ IIIIIIIMIIIIM Ml IIIMI..111MI f IMIM Ml (M MM 11MMMIMMI111 III Ml I III M M11111 The Class Day program was held in the High School Auditorium on Tuesday evening, May 22. Only the friends to whom Seniors had issued tickets attended this function. The following program was given: Quartette—Teresa Morrow, Mable Grassman. Senior Girls—Thelma Fitzpatrick, Donna LaHoda. Salutatory ...............................Dora Coker Class History ...........................Grace Carlson Class Poem ..............................Dewey Donovan Class Will...............................Donna La Hoda Class Phophecy .................................Thelma Fitzpatrick Piano Solo .............................Eleanor Harris Senior Dictionary .......................Nina Whaley Valedictory ..............................Oral Harvey Presetation of Gift ......................Otto Snyder Farewell ..............................Mable Grassman Song ............................................Class BACCALAUREATE. Instrumental Solo ........................Mrs. Ponath Vocal Solo ...............................Mr. Guthrie Invocation................................Rev. Layton Trombone Quartette— Messrs. Thomas, Havlik, Lamon and Cunningham. Scripture Reading ........................Rev. Cams Male Quartette ......................“Rose of Sharron” Vance, Hamilton,, Laing, Truman. Baccalaureate Sermon .....................Rev. Young Vocal Solo—“Salvation to Our God”.........Mrs. Rhein Benediction .............................. ev- Shaw COMMENCEMENT. Mixed Quartette .............................Selected Messrs. Havlik, Mendenhall; Misses Kniest, Williams Invocation .............................Rev. Black Piano Solo—Selected .............................Edna Bowman Commencement Address ...........Dean C harles Fordyce University of Nebraska Vocal Duet ..................................Selected Miss Acheson, Mrs. Thomas Presentation of Diplomas Vocal Solo—Selected.......................Miss Eunice Burnett Benediction ............................Rev. Shaw 17• ]iiiiiiiiiiiiaiMiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiiimiiiimiiiuiuii HI|p r “THE COMMUTERS.” On the evening of May 10th, the Comedy Play, “The Commuters,” was given at the Imperial Theatre, with the following Cast: Larry Brice .............................Oral Harvey Hetty Brice ......................................Neva Howe Carrie .......................................Florence Atz Mrs. Graham ........................Dorothy Hagaman Mr. Rolliston.......................David Purington Mr. Colton .........................Dewey Donovan Mr. Applebee ............................John Wright Sammy Fletcher .....................Hugh Davenport Mrs. Julia Stickney Crane ..............Rose Carlson Mrs. Colton...........................Teresa Morrow Mrs. Shipman .......................Edith Vandwark Mrs. Applebee...........................Eleanor Harris Mrs. Rolliston .....................Matilda Frankie Barnes ..................................John Wright Synopsis. ACT I. Story of the matrimonial experiences of Larry and Hetty Brice. ACT II. Sammy Fletcher, bachelor, boon companion of Larry, is invited to spend a few days in the country in order that he may also participate in the joys of the commuter. ACT III. A temporary disagreement between husband and wife follows. Sammy Fletcher tries to play the part of the gentle peacemaker, and in so doing, imperils everyone connected with the household in trouble. ACT IV. A mother-in-law, a telegram, Sammy. Needless to say, the play was well received, especially since the characters were portrayed with unusual ability—for 1917 has always stood on a pedestal of her own. JUNIOR-SENIOR RECEPTION. The Juniors tendered the graduates an excellently appointed reception in the High School Gymnasium, May 4. Previous to this year, it has been customary to give a Junior-Senior Banquet. But owing to the present conditions of our Country and the President’s call for economy in the use of foodstuffs and elaborate social functions, the Junior Class dispensed with the formal banquet and made the occasion into a reception. The Seniors responded to the spirit of the change and the event will ever be a memorial. 18«S ]IIIIIIIIIIIIC]IIIIIIIIIIIIC]IIHIIIIIIIIC1IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIII 4iiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii!iiiiiiic]iiiMiiiiiiiciiiiiiiiiiiiir After the girls of the Class of 1920 had served the graduates, faculty and hosts the most delectable refreshments, the following toasts here given, Lucille Fawcett, acting as toast Mistress: Welcome—Claxon...................................................Ralph Joder Response—Sparks ..................................................Oral Harvey To Seniors—Nuts .................................................Homer Barnes To Juniors—Burs ..............................................Florence Atz To Faculty—Cranks............................Thelma Fitzpatrick To Students—Gas .............................Miss Bertha Wilson Closing—Good Roads.........................................Mr. Pate The recollection of the old Gym, in its adornment of green and white and its illumination of good fellowship, will be a lasting one in the minds of both the hosts of 1918 and the guests of 1917, “RECOGNITION DAY” This year, as the year before, the Senior Recognition Day was observed on Monday, May 12. The committee for arranging the program consisted of Dorothy Hagaman, chairman; Matilda Frankie and Neva Howe. The following Chapel Program was given in their honor: Instrumental Solo ........................Alta Young Recognition Address ........................Mr. Pate Vocal Solo..............................Marian Grebe Farewell Address.........................Ralph Joder The Seniors wore their caps and gowns to all classes the remainder of the day, and their new dignity gave them a very distinguished air, quite awe-inspiring to the Under-class mates. SENIOR CLASS DAY. Each year the Senior Class of the High School is given a day for the class picnic. Each year the class goes out for a good time and this year the class has decided to go in cars, into the river country and bluffs near Scottsbluff. The class will start early in the morning of May 15, and go to Scottsbluff, where they will make their first stop and get dinner. From here the class will go out into the bluffs, where the best part of the afternoon will be spent in climbing the bluffs of our neighboring city. Pictures will be taken for the many Graduate Books, and, of course, lunch will be eaten before the departure for the river country which furnishes so many pretty places. The late afternoon will be spent in preparing the eats, and then will come the final drive to Alliance. The class is looking forward to this day as a day of good fun, a day never-to-be-forgotten. The class will be accompanied by their sponsor, Miss Wilson. 19JUNIOR CLASS. Top Row—Markham, E. Reddish, M. O’Mara, Rice, Truman (Sponsor), B. Reddish, Grove, Nason, Nation, Slaughter, Anderson. Second Row—Sicily, M. Harris, Sheldon, Graham, Reeves, Clary, Dobry, White, Johnson, Snyder. Third Row—Barnes. Mote, Rocky, Boyden, Nicolai, Fawcett, Cutts, J. O’Mara. Fourth Row—Thomas, O’Connor, Joder (President), Young, Watteyenne, Beck, Hamilton. «]iiiiiiiiimtniiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiitniiiiimiiiniiiiiiimioiimiuiiiiQn(t JIJT) Iiiitiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiii]iiiit3iiiiiiiiiinc» « ]IIIIIIIIIIIICllllllllMllinilllllllllllClllllllllllllC]llllllltllllC]lllllllllll She illlllllllllltJIIIIIIIHIIItJIIIIIIIIIIIICJIIIIIIIIIII![3lllllllllllitJIIIIIIIIIIII[»: llllllllinMIllllMMIIIilllllllMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIinillllllllllMllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinillllMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIItIMIIIHIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIimilllllllllllllllillllMMI JUNIOR NOTES (Beulah Reddish) President ..................................Ralph Joder Vice-President.......................................Leo Snyder Secretary-Treasurer.................................Noel Young Athletic Representative ...................Esther Nation Class Editor .....................................Beulah Reddish Class Sponsor........................................Mr. Truman I. As you read the following lines, close your eyes for a moment and think how grand it must be to be a member of the Junior Class. We, the Juniors, have had a very good representation in all High School organizations this year. In football, eight Juniors; boys’ basketball. five; girls’ basketball, two; declamatory contest, four; Ethel Clary, winning in honors and representing that division of the contest, at Sidney; Homer Barnes, winning place on team in debates; Demosthen-ean Club, thirty;—and when Uncle Sam stopped in Alliance and called for volunteers, six of our boys, and our Sponsor, Mr. Truman, were among the first to enlist. The Junior Class Play, given by members of said honorable class, was a great success. April 12, the Juniors gave a theatre party, after which they were very enjoyably entertained at the home of Esther Nation. Light refreshments were served and games played, until late in the evening, when the party disbanded each one seeking his bed of rest, to gain the much needed sleep in order to do themselves credit in the next day’s classes. III. Far and wide our way doth lie, A weary way and long; Yet we laugh at Algebra and German, And chase studies with a song. W’e’ve a book that keeps us safe, It teaches us civics And bids our spirits never chafe, At grim discouragement. IV. She measured out the German with a very solemn air, The Algebra and Geometry also, and she took the greatest care To count the problems correctly, and to add a little bit Of Latin, which, you know beginners oft omit; Then she stirred it all together, and pondered over it an hour But she never quite forgave herself for that gum she chewed before. 21 SOPHOMORE CLASS. Top Row—E. Barnes, Alters, Grassman, Bicknell, IMllon, Grove. Second Row—Reeves, Soth, Stevens, Collins, Sicily, Stockdale (Sponsor). Third Row—L. Mote, Pate, Lemons, Briggs, V. Soth, Richards, Preiss, Rolley, Ford. Rathburn. Larson, Jameson, Schill, Brown. Kibble, Dye. Mollring, Wesley. Fifth Row—Carey, Ryder, Graham, peich (President), Nelson, R. Butler, Williams, E. Curtis. C. Sicily, Spacht, O. Fourth Row—Jacks, Burkholder, F. Lots- ■t: n ]iiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiiMiimiiiiiiiiiiiiC3iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiMHiM (Jlir $yUl)1|l,||||||| |niiiiiiiiiiii(]iimimiiic]iiMiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiniiiinHiiiMiiiii(« IHItMIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIHIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIUIIIIItllHIIIIIIIIIIIIHHIMIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIHIHailllHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiTI (Marie Kibble) President ............. Vice-President......... Secretary ............. Treasurer ............. Athletic Representative Class Editor .......... Class Sponsor ......... ..Floyd Lotspeich ...Grace Spacht ..Frances Collins Corrine Mollring .....John Carey ...Marie Kibble ...Mr. Stockdale A Sophmore party was given in the Gym for the purpose of raising money for the class debts. This was put in the form of a birthday party, the boys bring twice their age in pennies and the girls donating the lunch and also their birthday collection. The evening was enjoyed by all who attended. “Ever read “Looking Backward?” “Yes, once in an exam and got expelled.” The last sophmore program consisted of: Piano Solo..........................Thelma Larson Songs ..................................Sophmores Violin Solo...........................Leon Alters And so it is. Here we are on the second step of the four-rung ladder. Here we are, the Sophmores, foolish Sophmores! But still Sophmores who beguiles the innocent freshman! Who smiles at his teacher with a knowing air? Who causes all the trouble? Who owns the school with a lordly manner? The Sophmore! Cast your eyes over the honor list. Linger a moment here and there, and you will discover that the biggest part of this list is composed of Sophmores. Turn your gaze to the list of noted athletes in the Book of Fame. There are many Sophmores; turn to the page of renowned orators and de-bators. What? Sophmores! Look at them all. Who stands straighter (who causes more trouble) than the Sophmore? And so it is indeed wherever you may go, wherever you may gaze, your eyes will behold him, the Sophmore. (Gee! but we’re glad we’re Sophmores). And so in anything and everything there are representatives of our class. Oh, Sophmores, hold your heads high! Cast down your eyes to none! Keep high and true your aim, and on, on, let awe be confined. The class is now composed of 42 members, and next year there will be at least 42 smiling faces of Juniors. Then as Seniors—who could beat the record. 23 FRESHMEN CLASS. Top Row—Baker, M. Reeves, Campbell, A. Harris, Wright. Second Row—Smith. Martin, Hawes, Rolley, Simson, Trabert, Wilson (Sponsor). Third Row—Bowers, Martin, R. Edwards (President), Woods. Carr, L. Butler. Brennan. E. Curtis. G. Joder. Fourth Row—Fuller, Schill, Zediker, Dunbar, Moxon, Laurence, Garrett, Dann, Lore, Gavin. Fifth Row—Lewis, Miller, H. Lotspeich, Schott, Lunn, Macey, Gilman, Donovan, Brennaman. c Vjiiiiiiiiiiii[]iiiiiiiiiiiiC3iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiitc]iiimtiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiic | FRESHMEN NOTE (Ruth Hawes) President...................................Ray Edwards Vice-President ..................................William Lunn Secretary and Treasurer ............................Glen Joder Athletic Representative ...................Milo Brenamen Spud Reporter ...............................Ruth Hawes Sponsor ..............................Miss Mary Wilson The Freshmen Class of 1917 has contributed much to the success of all activities. We have been represented in nearly all of the affairs of the high school and we feel proud of every member of our class. Our only hopes are for the building up of our class, both in number and in spirit, if it could be possible for spirit to increase. However, we are very confident that we will head the list in a very short time. A short program was given by several members of the class. This consisted of readings and piano solos, and proved a great success. However, several numbers were omitted, as others who were to take part, were absent. Mr. S. in English—“Was Ichabod Crane a wealthy man? H. G.—“No, he wasn’t.” Mr. S.—“Please quote your proof. H. G.—“He was a school teacher.” Freshman—“What turns silverware black?” Senior—“Why old age. of course.” Freshman—“Got a minute to spare?” Sophmore—“Sure, I have.” Freshman—“Tell me all you know.” TO A FRESHMAN. A Freshman there was, and he made a vow, Even as many do, That he wouldn’t work; He’d just shirk, shirk, shirk. His High School career through. In Algebra class, he lets questions pass, Too lazy to raise his hand. His course the reverse, quite short and terse, “I cannot understand.” 25......................................... CLffT ApudiiMiiiiiiuiniiimimiiuii.... The teacher in vain, will explain and explain, He knocks and there’s nobody home, Sound brains have been spent, And on foolishness bent, Naught’s there but an empty dome. Oh, the tears she wastes, And the fears she wastes, That fond mamma at home; Who sends him out in the morning light And at evening welcomes him home. A Freshman there was, and he made a vow, Even as most of them do, That he wouldn’t shirk, He’d just work, work, work, His High School career through. Oh, the tears she wastes, And the fears she wastes. That fond mamma at home. Her boy in the race Will be holding first place, The world needs just such a son. (To the Seniors). Never expect others to believe something you don’t believe yourself. Too many Freshmen talk an hour and work a minute. PRETTY SOFT. The woodpecker lit on the freshman’s head. And settled himself to drill. He bored away for a night and day, And finally wore out his bill. Now when his bill at last was gone, And all his work in vain. He went in search of a softer spot. Where he might drill again. This time he found a sophmore’s pate. And went to work with a will; At last he had a place so soft, He had no need for a bill. —Exchange. 26 ]iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiitiiHiiic]iiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiaNiiHiniiic]HiHiiiiii (JJjp JniiHHiiiioiiimiinHtjiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiniiiicjiiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiHiiiit rilllMIIMinMMIIIMIIIIHIMIIIIMIMIIMMIIIIIUlHMIllMIMIIIMHIMMMMIIMIItlllHIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMMtlMIIIIMIIMIIMimiMIIIIMMMIMIIIIMliniMIIIMIHIIHIIIIMMIMliniHIIIIUIIHIItMlllimimilllllL I SPUD NOTES—EXCHANGE COLUMN I (Ray Edwards, ’20) We wish to thank each and every one of our exchanges for the inspirations we have received and we hope you will not forget to exchange with us next year. List of Exchanges. “The Hastings Collegian,” Hastings, Nebraska. “The Wesleyan,” University Place, Nebraska. “The Daily Nebraskan,” University of Nebraska. “The Kansas Industrialist.” Kansas Agriculture College, Manhattan “The Tattler,” Blair, Nebr. “The Cotner Collegian,” Bethany Nebr. “Ogalala Light,” Pine Ridge, S. D. “The Doane Owl,” Crete, Nebr. “The Wayne Watchword,” Wayne, Nebr. “The Mirror,” Franklin, Nebr. “The Imp,” Boston, Mass. “The Red and White,” Lake View High School, Chicago. “The High School Life,” Clay Center, Kan. “The Madison Mirror,” Madison, Nebr. “The X-Ray.” Fairbury, Nebr. “The Buzzer,” Arligton, Nebr. “The Aggie Tattler,” School of Agriculture, Lincoln, Nebr. “The Pep Gazette,” Stanton. Nebr. “The Antelope,” Kearney, Nebr. “The Bison,” McCook, Nebr. “The Ma oon,” St. Edward, Nebr. “The Aggie Tattler,” School of Agriculture, Lincoln, Nebraska.— Well arranged departments; good, original jokes. “The Bison,” McCook, Nebraska.—Glad to welcome you to our list, good school paper. “The Hastings Collegian,” Hastings, Nebraska.—The pocrn,“ The Land of the Sunny Heart,” deserves special mention. “l’he Wesleyan,” University Place, Nebraska.—Your war special is especially into esting. “The Daily Nebraskan,” University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.—Too much credit cannot be given you. Complete in every department. "The Maroon,” St. Edward, Nebraska.—Another new paper. Original and inte esting. Some cartoons would look vel. in y ur paper. Why does a man’s hair turn gray five years sooner than a woman’s? Because a r..an wears his hair all the time. 27• ]llllllllllllt]|||||||||||IC]IIIIHIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIC]lllllllllll (titf $11111) IIIIIIIIIIIIIC]|||IMIIIIIIC)IIIIIIIIHIIUIIMIIIinil(]IIIMIIIIIII[]|||IIMIim[ Corrine Mollring, ’19 The school year 1916-1917, has been marked with such success and prosperity by the debating team that it has become recognized by the student body as one of the most flourishing activities of the school. At the local preliminary debate a team consisting of Oral Harvey, Homer Barnes, Corrine Mollring, and Donna LaHoda, alternate, was chosen. This team was given the affirmative side of the question, “Resolved, that the Monroe Doctrine Should Be Abandoned," in the District debate against Sidney and Bridgeport. The team worked exceptionally hard this year and succeeded in winning both district contests. This entitled us to one representative at the State debate. Oral Harvey won this honor by being selected as the one to represent the High School in the State debate. We are all proud of Oral and are sure his success will continue. HIGH SCHOOL ENTERTAINMENTS. In additon to the usual run of contests and activities, we have this year, held a number of other entertainments for various reasons, but with the prime object of causing the students to more thoroughly appreciate school life and school activities. Chief among these is probably the all H. S. party held on Hallow’een, to w’hich all students and teachers of the H. S. were invited. All kinds of games were played and a general good time had. The next event of importance was the Sweater night at the Imperial, which, through the kindness of Mr. DuBuque, furnished us w’ith nearly enough money to provide sweaters for the football boys. A county fair, consisting of various stunts and a Minstrel show, both of which were held under the auspices of the Stock-Judging class, proved good drawing cards for the H. S. and created a friendly feeling therein. It is to be hoped that next year more of these fellowship good times may be held. 28«Miiiiiiiiiiii[]iiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiii {Jhr pui) jiiiiiiiiiiiiaHiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiimii{)iniiiiiniinimiiHtHiaiiniiiiiinr This year Alliance witnessed one of the largest contests ever held here. About fourteen contestants entered, from which the following were chosen to .epresent Alliance in the District contest: Oratorical— Oral Harvey, “Touessant L’Overture;” Dramatic—Grace Spacht; Humorous—Ethel Ciary. The district contest was held in Sidney and again Oral succeeded in winning first honois. He will also represent Alliance in the State Oratorical contest to be held in Alliance. ALUMNI NOTES. Greeting to the Class of 1917. To you, our incoming members, we extend a hearty welcome from the Alumni Association. Chas. Spacht, ’15, has been elected to the position of Mathematic teacher in the schools at Plattsmouth. Margret Bell, ’15, was married to Mr. Bernard Phelan, at Denver, April 5th, and Mildred Campbell, ’16, to Mr. Jas. Burlington, March 12, at Alliance. The Annual Reunion of the Alumni of the Alliance High School was held at the High School Gymnasium, Saturday evening, May 19th. A new feature of the evening’s entertainment was the roll-call of classes, commencing with the Class of ’98, and continuing up to the newly enrolled Class of ’17. Instead of the usual toast list, an interesting program, consisting of musical numbers, readings and speeches by various members of the Association, was given. At the close of the evening, a dainty two-course luncheon was served by the girls of the Junior Class. About seventy-five members were present. Flower favors were presented ,and the new Alumni Directory was distributed. All present voted the affair a great success and hope for many more such reunions of the Alumni Association of A. H. S. 29•S ]iiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiHiiiiC3iiiiiiiiiii iiiiuiimiiiiiiiuini......me llllllllllUMMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiaillllMIIIMIIMillllllllllllllllllllllllMllllltlMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlllltll DOMESTIC SC1EMCE IlHHHIIIIIIIIMIIIiltllllllllllllHIilllllHHIII..................................................................... The work taken up in Domestic Science 10, is more Domestic Art than Science. The first semester work includes underwear and the use of commercial patterns. A few weeks at Chiistmas time are given over to the making of fancy work for Christmas gifts. The second semester the work includes simple drafting and designing, also making of shirt waist and dress. This year, for the first time the girls have made children’s clothes for people who would furnish the material. In additon to this, they have assisted in making material for the Red Cross society, such as the “housewife” for the soldiers and bed socks for the hospital box the local society is preparing. The latter part of he year they take up color work that applies to decoration of the home. The theory for this work consists of a study of textiles and sewing equipment in general. They also study hist ay of costume, designs, hygiene of clothing, economics of dress, clothing budgets, color and design as applied to decoration of clothing and of the home. DOMESTIC SCIENCE 9. The work covered by the girls in Cookery—Domestic Science 9— gives them a good general knowledge of foods and their preparation. The first of the year they can fruit for the ladies of the town, if the materials are fu nished. After that their laboratory work consists of the preparation of representative foods in all the different classes of foods. The work has been more enjoyable this year on account of the new range and electric plates that have been installed. The latter part of the laboratory work consists of the preparation and serving of meals. The usual allowance for eight people has been two dollars for eight people, but on account of higher prices this year the allowance has been raised to two dollars and eighty cents. The last thing is invalid cookery and in this work only a few of the liquid, semi-liquid and light diets for special cases are given. In theory the first semester, the study is given to foods, as to classification, source, preparation for market, ad digestion. The second semester deals with sanitation, care of small children, nursing in cases of emergency, bandaging and care of wounds, household budgets and simple work on balanced meals. HER BATTING AVERAGE. Magistrate—“The evidence shows that you threw a kettle at your husband.” Bridget—“It shows more than that, yer honor; it shows that I hit ’im.” 31❖ COMMERCIAL CLASS. Top Row Sicily. LaHoda, M. O’Mara, Dunn. Second Row—Wilson (Instructor). N. How—Shaw, White. A Reeves. Boyden, Brown, Grassman, Garrett, J. O’Mara. fourth Dillon. Miller, Burkholder. O’Mara, Richards, Preiss. Atz. Lore. Third Row—Carey, Nelson, Purington, J. Wright, G t2 O' ❖ OMiiMiiiMinmiiiiiHii(iiiiiHiiiinniiimtwiiniiHiuiMiiniiiiHiiiii(jJu' Apub JiiHiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiiiuiimniiiiic}iiiiMiniiiC}iiiiiiiiminiiiiimiiiic COMMERCIAL COURSE. The year of 1916-17 is the fourth year for the Commercial Department in the High School. The Department has been very popular and very successful. This department is not as large as it was two years ago, as students in the ninth and tenth grades have kept more closely to the regular course and have taken the commercial subjects as electives. The work offered in the commercial course is very difficult and the Freshmen should take up the legular course in the high school for at least two years. They are then able to carry satisfactorily, the work offered in this course. The students who have completed this course in the High School have been able to fill the best positions in the city and some have accepted good positions in other places. This year we have sent girls into the offices of the city during the school year to help out for a couple of weeks. This has given the students excellent practice and has assisted the business men of the city. Several of the students will be ready to take positions the last of May. Mr. Pate of the City Schools, will be glad to assist in placing any of these students. THE CLASS OF NINETEEN SEVENTEEN. With what awe and respect did we, as Freshmen, gaze upon the Lordly Seniors, and long to be like them. They shouted their praises to the skies, and we, with bated breath, listened in wondering admiration, and believed. Suddenly realizing that we, too, might some day become as illustrious as they, we immediately put forth an effort to attain greatness. As Sophmores, with new Seniors as instigators, we pushed forward with a spirit of loyalty bound to bring us to the front. As Juniors, altho’ somewhat reduced in number, we came back with an abundance of “pep” that caused haughty Seniors to “Watch their step.” And now—at length we have reached our goal. We, as Seniors, may sing our praises to the world, and say, “We, the class of Nineteen seventeen, are the best class that ever has graduated or even will graduate. But we refrain, for the world is deaf to our song. We only believe, yet we believe with all our hearts. We are justly proud of our Athletic endeavors. What valiant football heroes were Hugh, Otto, Dewey and Will. And our girls in Basket ball, who can boast of better than Edith, Thelma and Martha? In Declamatory, did not Oral win in District, and now he goes to State, where we feel sure he will win honors for the class of ’17. With no less ardor, Oral and Donna debated until their opponents did shirk with fear and also our worthy President Oral goes to Lincoln to debate. And to our Country’s Call, have not two of our Seniors responded to that call, Otto and Will? 33•:«3iiiiiiiitiiic]iiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiir]iiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiii 2I1|P Aputl JiiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiniiiioiiiiiiiiiiiinMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiK Proud, too are we of our honor students, are there not more than in any previous year? And now our High School Life, draws to a close. Thus leave you Alma Mater, Leave your halls and rooms so dear, Leave the font of all our learning, Leave the A. H. S. on the hill. NORMAL TRAINING DEPARTMENT In direct keeping with the great and wholesame change now taking place in rural life, the country people are demanding better teachers and better schools. They are seeking teachers who lead in ability and scholarship, as well as in those qualities essential to good citizenship, hence it is only natural that they should select young people who have taken training for this particular work. The Normal Training dapartment in Nebraska High Schools is supported by the state because its citizens recognize the success of the well-equipped teachers who have graduated from this particular branch. The course includes two years’ work in Pedagogy and reviews of the common branches, with six weeks’ observation and practice teaching in the grades. This actual experience will be of great value to the trainers, as they come in contact with the best methods and devices of well trained teachers. In this department are sixteen active young women, who have pledged themselves to teach at least one year. Six of them, upon graduation this spring, will receive second grade county certificates, and after one year of successful teaching, will be granted first grade county certificates of the class merited by grades earned in the teachers’ examinations. (The following was found in the April “Gregg Writer,” and asked to be published in the “Spud.”) This was a wedding announcement and an auction announcement mixed, and the exquisite “blend” follows: “John Smith, the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Smith, and Miss Lucy Anderson were disposed of at public auction at my farm one mile east, in the presence of 70 guests, including two mules and twelve head of cattle. “Rev. Jackson tied the nuptial knot for the parties, averaging 1,250 lbs. on hoof. The beautiful home of the bride was decorated with one sulky rake, one food grinder and two sets of harness, nearly new, and just before the ceremony was pronounced the Mendal and Sons wedding marcn was rendered by one milch cow, five years old, one Jersey cow and one sheep, who, carrying a bunch of bride’s roses in her hand, was very beautiful. She wore one light spring wagon, two crates of apples, three racks of hay, one grindstone of mousseline de soie and trimmings with about one hundred bushels of spuds. The couple left on an extended trip. Terms, spot cash.” 35 LITERARY CLUB. (Left to Right). First Row (Top)—Hagaman. Thomas, Howe, O’Connor, Davenport, Beck. L. Snyder, Barnes, Scicily, Stockdale (Instructor). Second Row—Nason, Whaley, Dobry, Harris, Frankie, Coker, Atz, Reddish, E. Harris. Third Row-Mote, Nation. B. Reddish, Clary, Markham. LaHoda. Rice, Carlson, Fitzpatrick. Fourth Row—R. Carlson, Graham, A. Reeves, Cutts, Nicoli Fawcett Rocky. Larson. Sheldon. White, Grassman, Wright. Fifth Row—Morrow (President), Hamilton, Pullman. Purington. O Snyder P Grove, Joder, Dillon, Shaw. ❖• ]iiiiiiiiiiiicjiiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiitaiiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiii JiiiHiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiaiitiiiiiiiiinHiiiiiimiuiiiiiiiiiiiir I ©1GANIZAT! (Lucille Faucett, ’18) LATIN CLUB. President ........................................Mable Grassman Vice-President ...................................Mabel Young Secretary-Treasurer................................Noel Young Colors...................................Gold and White Since the organization in ’08, the Latin Club has been an exceptionally enthusiastic body. Three meetings were held this year and all proved a success. The last entertainment was held at the home of Mabel Young, several members of the Caesar class as hosts and hostesses. An interesting Latin program was given after which the usual game was played and a dainty luncheon served. CHORAL CLUB. Director ..............................Mr. Truman This organization has grown to rather astonishing proportion. Not only has the number increased, but the wo k has improved wonderfully. One-fifth credit a semester was allowed. The members have appareed several times in chapel and at the Community Concerts. LITERARY CLUB. President..............................Terresa Morrow Vice-President .........................Edith Reddish Secretary ...............................Philip Grove Secretary................................Homer Barnes The Literary Club has been a very successful organization this year. We say successful, but perhaps we cannot say as interesting as it might have been for the number of attendance has not been the best. Though only three meetings were held, a great deal has been accomplished and the “Cricket on the Hearth,” was fou :d to be very interesting. The last meeting was held at the home of Martha Shaw. One of the chief features of the evening was Dean Shaw’s ta.k on “English Life and Customs.” Mr. Stockdalc, in English class—“Why did they wish to destroy the English feet, (meaning fleet)?” John—“So they couldn’t get a foothold on America.” “Another new hat! You should really save your money with the price of everything going up.” “Put why? The longer I save it the less I tan buy with it.”—Ex. .37JlllltlllllllCllllllllMIIIC]llllllllll|ir]!l,llllllll!r]"ll"IHIIinil|milllliC» On Saturday, April 21, the Manual Art department, together with the Emerson school, gave its annual exhibit. The furnitures shown were divided into three classes, tables and chairs, table lamps, and other pieces. Visitors were asked to ballot on the best piece in each class and the department awarded cash prizes to the students taking a place. The pieces made in the depaitment during the year represented a commercial value of about $125. The assembled production furnished an exhibit which gave inspiration to those who had a hand in the manufacture, and high hopes to those looking forward to taking part another year. Even some of the high school girls threatened to join the colors and build things for their future homes. An interesting thing in the exhibit was the quantity and quality of mechanical drawing. The students are required to make a detailed drawing of their work before beginning to build it. An innovation in connection with the drawing work was tried with success during the year. High school boys drafted up a series of exercises for the grade boys. The blue prints of these are furnished to the grade students and they are required to study out the dimensions from the blue prints. It was found that grade boys working from detailed drawings were more accurate in their work. Also the boys learned to read a blue print, a thing that every man should know. From three to four on the afternoon of April 20, the Manual Art shop was thrown open while in operation and the public invited in to hear the noise. The high school students in this department were all busy, each one demonstrating some interesting thing in connection with shop practice. Among the points brought out were the use of bird houses in manual training, practical drafting in high school, surfacing wood in cabinet work, mixing and use of stains and other finishing materials, the difference between quarter sawed and plain oak, and other items of interest made possible by the ample equipment found in our schools. Visitors were well pleased at the demonstration, although the real exhibit of the department took place on the next day, together with the patrons day display given by the Emerson school. 39• • Top Row Larson. Pullman, LATIN CLUB. —Morrow. Spacht. M. O’Marra. Clary. C. Sicily, O. Sicily, Second Row—Fawcett, Pate. Briggs. Jameson, Dye, Mollring, Third Row—A. Schill, Young. J. O’Mara, Wilson (Instructor), White, Wesley, Kibble. Fourth Row—Nicoli, Grassman, Sicily, J. Wright, Grassman (President). PI •  (i ill' $ u Jiiiiiiiiiiiidiitiiiiiiiii(]iiiiiiiiiiiic}iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiidiiiiiiiiinic IIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIMIIIMMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHMIlllllllllllllllllllllllMlltllllllltllllllHIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIHIIIHIIIIIIIIIIi CALENDAR 1916-1917 ! (Ethel Clary) Sept. 4. School enrollment. Sept. 7. Mr. Clements spoke to High School. Sept. 8. Class meetings for election of officers. Sept. 14. Miss Leone Mallery read to the students. Sept. 15. A. 0. Thomas, state Superintendent, spoke to High School. Sept. 21. Rev. Young talked to students. Sept. 22. Freshmen class party. Sept. 22. Oral Harvey was elected yell leader. Sept. 27. Spud Staff chosen by Faculty. Oct. 3. Chadron Normal Football game at Chadron. Chadron, 12; Alliance, 12. Oct. 6. Latin Club at home of Mable Grassman. Oct. 11. Junior class program. Oct. 12. Rev. Cams spoke to students. Oct. 13. Election of Literary Club officers. Oct. 20. Hot Springs football game at Alliance. Hot Springs, 0: Alliance, 7. Oct. 23. Mr. Leslie M. Shaw talked to students. Oct. 25. Sophmore class program. Oct. 27. Hot Springs football game at Hot Springs. Hot Springs, 6: Alliance, 0. Nov. 2. President Elliott of Chadron Normal gave a talk to students. Nov. 3. Chadron Normal football game at Alliance. Chadron, 6; Alliance, 43. Nov. 3. High School Masquerade party. Nov. 10. Sidney football game at Sidney. Sidney, 0; Alliance, 74. Nov. 15. Senior class program. Nov. 17. Dr. Long spoke to students. Nov. 17. North Platte football game at Noith Platte. North Platte, 85; Alliance, 0. Nov. 29. School vacation for Thanksgiving began. Nov. 30. Scottsbluff football game at Scottsbluff. Dec. 7. Rev. Martin spoke to students. Dec. 8. Mr. Crawford entertained the football boys at a theatre party and oyster stew. Dec. 13. Freshman class program. Dec. 22. Close of school for Christmas holidays. Jan. 10. Rev. Knowles delived a talk to students. Jan. 12. Junior Class play, “As Tou Like It.’ Jan. 16. Mr. Vern Copsey gave a talk on the navy. Feb. 8. Boys’ basket ball game at Kimball. Fe ). 9. Boys’ basket ball game at Sidney. 41............................................. |iu mmanHt»iuiainK}iiiii...a..................iihc« 42 oiiiiiiiHiiiniiiiiiHiiiicjiiiiimiiiiniiiHNiiiiiuiimiiimtniiiiiiiiiii 2llC jHiMiHiinniiiimiimniiiiMimiicjiimiiiniiniiniiiHiioiiMiiiiiiit« Feb. 10. Feb. 12. Feb. 13. Feb. 16. Feb. 17. Latin Club meeting at home of Ethel Clary. Girls’ basket ball game with Kimball. Boys’ basket ball game at Minatare. Girls’ basket ball game at Sidney. Boys’ basket ball game with Kimball. Feb. 26. Preliminary Debates. Feb. 27 Rev. Mulford spoke to students and gave two interesting Feb. 27. Mar. 8. Mar. 14. Mar. 15. Mar. 21. Mar. 23. readings. Literary Club met at home of Teresa Morrow. Dean Shaw spoke on “Organization of Cadets.” Mrs. Rowan gave several fine readings. Local Declamatory Contest. Literary Club met at home of Margaret Harris. Miss Alta Young played an instrumental solo in chapel. Mar. 23. Minstrel Show. Mar. 28-29. District Declamatory Contest at Sidney. Apr. 3. Apr. 10. Sophmore Class program. Party by a number of the Junior girls for boys who joined the army. Apr. 11. Apr. 18. Apr. 18. Apr. 20. Apr. 25. Apr. 26. May 4. May 9. May 10. Freshmen program. Senior program. Literary Club met at home of Martha Show. Latin Club met at home of Mable Young. Junior program. Piano solo by Edna Bowman in Chapel. Reception for the Seniors by the Junior class. Literary club met at Beulah Reddish’s home. Senior Class play, “The Commuters.” STOCK JUDGING TEAM. The Stock Judging Class was represented at the state tournament by Dave Purington, Philip Grove and Chester Beck. The team stopped at Seward on the way to Lincoln and worked a day and a half with Prof. Taft of the Aurora High School. They received some good practice which showed up in the contest afterward. In cattle judging, Dave won the red ribbon (second place) and Phil the white (third). The team, as a whole, took the pink ribbon (fourth). The class wish to express appreciation to their many friends who contributed so liberally with work or money toward sending the team. —Reported by Mr. Truman. I stole a kiss the other night, My conscience hurts alack! I believe I’ll go again tonight, And put the blame thing back. —Maroon. 43 —Maroon.«S»jiiiiiiiiiiiiC3iiiiiiiiiiiiC3iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiit Q niiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiicjiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiic3ii!iiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiuiiic «• ]iiiiiiiMi iciimiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiir3iiiiiiiiiiiit3niiiiiiiiimiiniiiiiii (£lir iiiiiiiiiimrsiiiiiiiiiiiicsiiimiiiiiicsmiiiiiiiiiuiiiMiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiic : I 11MII III II11IIIM1111 MU III! IIIIIIMIIMI ll I 1IIMIMIIMIII • IMMI III «MIM 1111IIM III 11III MM III Ml I Mil I If 11 III 11III Ml IIIMIII11 III l« •. ATHLETIC MOTES (Ray Butler) To Coach Crawford should be given most of the credit for the excellent showing made by the athletic teams for this season. While he was not paid for coaching the teams, he put in a lot of time and effort in the work. He can be classed as one of the best football coaches in the state. The Football Record for 1913. Sept. 29. Scottsbluff at Alliance. Score 45 to 0. The team shows mid-season trim. The line was absolutely impregnable. Fenning stars. Oct. 3. Chadron State Normal at Chadron. Score 12 to 12. The absence of Fenning cripples the team. Ralls stars. Oct. 10. Hot Springs at Alliance. Score 7 to 0. The two teams were evenly matched. Alliance played a straight line plunging game. Hot Springs did a good deal of punting and forward passing. Lotspeich stars. Oct. 17. Hot Springs at Hot Springs. Score 0 to 6. Captain Davenport and Edwards out of the game, an ample excuse for the defeat. Yanders stars. Nov. 3. Chadron State Normal at Alliance. Score 43 to 6. No chance for the Normalites. Davenport makes the record run of season. In the last quarter he intercepts a pass and ran one hundred yards to a touchdown. Nov. 10. Sidney at Sidney. Score 74 to 0. And they tell us their blood boils when they play Alliance. Snyder stars. Nov. 17. North Platte Champions at North Platte. Score 85 to 0. An acute case of stage fright. Lotspeich and Thomas star. Nov. 24. Sidney forfeits to Alliance. Their blood boils again. It seems funny that when the blood boils it leaves the feet cold. Nov. 29. Scottsbluff at Scottsbluff. Score 40 to 6. Oh! those beet pickers. Burns stars. Summary. Of the nine games scheduled we won five, lost two, and tied one, besides receiving one forfeit. One game was lost to an out of the state team and the other to a team that won the state championship in 1915. In the league games we scored two hundred fourteen points against opponents’ twenty-four. Not so bad for a bunch that took up football for the first time last year. We certainly should take our hats off to 45» iuniiiliiiiHiniiiiiniiniiinniniiniiiiiiim»n»amminiimiMm iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiicjiiiiiiiiiiiicjiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiC' those scrubs. With Carey as captain, they did make the first go some themselves in the practice games. I he scrubs took a team to Morrill averaging about one hundred fifteen pounds, and held the High School team at that place down to a score of .‘19 to 0. That’s playing football, especially when we were outweighed thirty-five pounds. Gilman at center made their old line look like a field hospital in Europe. Dillon, Wright, and Graham helped Schuy in this bloody massacre. They deserved to win. Watch some of these fellows next season and see what they will do. Say, do you know who is going to lead the team next year? Why, old Stub Fenning, of course. “Watch us ramble,” is our motto for the coming season. The football team certainly appreciates Mr. H. A. DuBuque’s kindness in turning over the proceeds of one night’s show at his theatre with which to buy sweaters. We deserve the state championship with such backing as that. We also wish to thank Coach Crawford for the dandy feed we received from him at the close of the season. The Players. Davenport (Captain)—full-back. (2 years). Senior. One of our very best line smashers. Particularly good on defense. Fenning (Captain elect). Right-half. (2 years). Junior. Our old stand by—always good for a gain. Lopspeich—Left-half. (2 years). Sophmore. The fastest man on good one end runs. Dickinson—Quarter-back. (2 years). Junior. Small, but gritty; a fine man to run the team. Burns—Left end. (2 years). Junior. Excellent on receiving forward passes. Donovan—Left tackle. (2 years) Senior. Fine on the tackle around. Thomas—Left guard. (2 years). Junior. No man went thorugh him. Fine on defense. Yanders—Center. (1 year). Junior. The find of the season; a demon on defense. Bennett—Right guard. (1 year). Junior. A stonewall on the defense. Snyder—Right tackle. (2 years). Senior. A bear on the defense— a fine running mate for Donovan. Edwards—Right end. (2 years). Junior. Another excellent receiver of forward passes. Butler—End and back. (1 year). Sophmore. Another find; always used his head and hits them low; will be a regular in the back-field next year. Ralls—Guard. (1 year). Sophmore. A strong heady player. 47 ]iiiiiiiiiiii{}iHiiuiiiiK}iiiimiininmimMmc»imiinnanmiiiiii(Shr Afjuft jiuiuiniiiniiMiiuiiiuimiiitHHinimiiHiiiirjiliimiuHniiiiiimiiit BASKETBALL RECORD FOR 1913-1917. Kimball at Kimball. Score 23 to 1. The fastest and cleanest game of the season. Ralls and Purington star. Sidney at Sidney. Score 8 to 18. Our boys are not used to playing on waxed floors. Lotspeich stars. Minatare at Minatare. Score 16 to 16. Later forfeited to Alliance. Grove stars. Kimball at Alliance. Score--------. Kimball was outclassed from start to finish. Lotspeich stars. Sidney at Alliance. Score 25 to 10. And once more Sidney’s blood boils. Purington and Fenning star. Minatare at Alliance. Score-------. A new star is brought to light in the shape of Mr. Hugh O’Connor. Some basketball player. Of the six games played we won four, lost one and tied one. We can truthfully say that we won the Championship through the practice we received playing against the Alumni team, which was made up of old college players. The Players. Lotspeich (Captain)—Right forward. Sophmohe. An excellent floor man. Ralls—Right forward. Sophmore. A particularly good basket shooter. Grove—Center. Junior. Never outpointed; also a good floor man. Fenning—Left guard. Junior. But very few baskets were made off Stub. Purington—Right guard. Senior. The find of the season. O’Connor—Left forward. Junior. A good basket shooter. Butler—Forward. Sophmore. An injured knee kept him out of the game. Edwards—Guard. Junior. Always reliable. It wras decided to have a track team this spring, but owing to the fact that most of our best men in this line of work enlisted soon after war was declared, we fail to have one. Next year we will almost certainly have a team for it is being taken up by all the other schools in the league and we can’t be left out. Penants w’ith the pictures of the teams were presented to the High School by the boys who were on the teams this year. These penants are to be placed in the assembly room. GIRLS’ BASKETBALL 1913-1917. (Miss Canfield) The 1916-17 season of girls’ basketball has not been clouded by a defeat. The girls played girls’ rules, twm courts, and have done excellent w’ork. Edith Vandewark was chosen captain and Beulah Reddish, business manager. The members of the team w'ere: Edith Vandewark 49•: ]Hiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiii!iiiiii[]iiiiiiiiiiii(]iiiiiiiiiiii[)iiiiiiiiiii(Iiir ......................................................................... 50« ]iiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiMiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiitiiiniiiiiiHiiiiniiiiiiMiii ulltr iiiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiMiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiir]iiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiiiic and Martha Shaw, forwards; Frances Collins, center; Beulah Reddish and Lena Preiss, guards. Thelma Fitzpatrick played first sub-forward and at the last part of the season Leila Cutts made such a good showing that she was likewise chosen as a sub. For some reason there have been but four games in the schedule this year. The opening game was with Kimball, February 12, at Alliance. The team work was excellent or the score would not have been made as it was, 23-4. In this game Edith Vandewark scored every point. The following week the girls were away and played the 16th at Sidney, winning by a score of 12-9; and at Kimball the 17th, winning by a score of 20-16. The same splendid team work was exhibited but the scores were made more jointly by the two forwards. The last game was with Sidney, February 23, the same night as the boys’ Sidney game. The score was 37-0 at the close, with every score made by the captain again. On the whole the team has made a splendid record. Each girl had done her part perfectly and should receive due credit for it. All of the girls have felt that the 1917 rules, two courts, make the best game of any rules they have played and are in favor of adhering to that plan. The Spud has been made an all-high school paper, so far as possible, by the staff and students who have been selected to put out the Spud this year. Perhaps the results have not been so satisfactory as the original conception promised; suuch is often the case, but the management has done its best under circumstances and hopes that the interest in a school paper will increase in years to come. Bobby—Make a noise like a frog, uncle. Uncle—Why? Bobby—Cause when I ask daddy for anything he says, wait till your uncle croaks. Teaches—I am beautiful, what tense is that? Pupil—Past. —Graceless. He—“What did the doctor say was the matter with your foot?” His Wife—“I think he said it was main toe poisoning.”—Selected. If a body sees a body Thinking in a friz. If a body helps a body, Is it the teacher’s biz? What is a parrot? An Irish bird with a Jew nose. 51• iiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiimiMiiiiiiiiic]iMiiiiMiiic3iiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiii hr uhiiiiiiiiiimniiiiiiiiiiiin............................Min.......iiiinioi......iiiiiuiiiiiiiiihic Used For a By-Product. An Irishman was newly employed at a lumber office. The proprietors of the company were young men, and decided to have some fun with the new Irish hand. Patrick was duly left in charge of the office with instructions to take all orders which might come in during their absence. Going to a nearby drug store, they proceeded to call up the lumber company’s office, and the following conversation ensued: “Hello! Is this the East Side Lumber company?” “Yes, sir. And what would ye be havin’?” “Take an order, will you?” “Sure, that’s what I’m here for.” “Please send me up a thousand knotholes.” “What’s that?” “One thousand knotholes.’’ “Well’ now, an’ ain’t that a bloomin’ shame! I’m sorry, but we are just out.” “How’s that?” “Just sold them to the new brewery.” “To the new brewery? What do they want with them?” “They use them for bungholes in barrels.” The worst is yet to come—think of those Exams! Sweet little Freshman she dearly loved slang. Though her father and mother would chide her, To-wit one day when the dinner bell rang, WTith her father and mother beside her While nodding her head, her mother said: “That’s fierce for a kid of your size.” “That’s a peach of a way to correct her,” pa said. Said ma, “I was putting her wise.” “Say, I bought this suit from you a week ago and it’s looking rusty already.” “Well, I guaranteed it to wear like iron.” She—“A penny for your thoughts.” He—“The very thing, I was just wondering how I could take you home on nine cents.” What is the hardest thing to catch? An eagle on a twenty-dollar gold piece. When is a chicken drunk? When it is stewed. •“The Freshie.” 52 CONTENTS IIIMIMMiaillMMIMIIMMIIII Alumni ........................................................29 Athletics .....................................................45 Baccalaureate .................................................17 Basketball Champions ..........................................46 Calendar .................................................. 41 Class Day Program .............................................17 Class of Nineteen Seventeen ...................................33 Commencement ..................................................17 Commercial Class ..............................................32 Commercial Course ........................................... 33 Debating ................................................... 28 Declamatory ................................................. 29 Domestic Science ............................................ 31 Domestic Science Class ........................................30 Editorials .................................................. 15 Exchange .................................................. 27 Faculty .....................................................8-13 Football Champions ............................................44 Freshmen Class ................................................21 Freshmen Notes ................................................25 Girls’ Basketball Team ........................................48 Junior Class ..................................................24 Junior Notes ..................................................20 Kodaks ...............................................14-16-42-50 I atin Club—Group .............................................40 Literary Club Group ...........................................36 Manual Art ....................................................39 Manual Training Class .........................................38 Normal Training ...............................................35 Normal Training Class .........................................34 Organizations .—............................................36-37 Our Soldier Boys ..............................................15 “Recognition Day” ............................................ 19 Senior Class ..................................................10 Senior Class Day ..............................................19 Senior Notes ..................................................18 Sophmore Class ................................................22 Sophmore Notes ................................................23 Spud Staff .....-.............................................. 6 Stock Judging Team ...............................-............43 "The Commuter” ................................................18 53United Press Service gfo Alltmtrr tTintra DELIVERED AT YOUR DOOR FOR LESS THAN 2c. A COPY. The greatest news gathering facilities that money can buy. Unexcelled Printing FacilitiesHIGH GRADE GROCERIES GLASS AND QUEENSWARE Phone 56 L. H. HIGHLAND LOTS OF FOLKS Don’t know what reason is, let alone listen to it; but anyone can find the real reason for the popularity of our Photoplays after witnessing their superb projection. They’re simply immense and we cordially invite you and your friends, now or later, to come and “make yourselves at home.” IMPERIAL THE POPULAR THEATRE OF ALLIANCE G. W. DUNCAN SON J. F. YANDERS Headquarters for TAILORS HATTERS ADVO GROCERIES First Natl. Bank Bldg. Alliance, Nebr. Phone 32 Alliance . . . Nebr. Strictly Up-to-Date“EVERYTHING IN MUSIC” Pianos, Player Pianos, Victor Victrolas WIKER’S MUSIC HOUSE Successors to National Music Supply Co. OPPOSITE POSTOFFICE Alliance...........................Nebraska MALLERY GROCERY CO. Quality Grocers — for GROCERIES AND FRESH MEATS All Seasonable Delicacies Quality considered, our prices are always lowest. Most Up-to-Date Meat Market Our Own Delivery Mallery Grocery Co. Phone 128 THE SUGAR BOWL Do your business with We have the only line of HOME MADE CANDIES in town—Come in and see us. 315 Box Butte Avenue Alliance National Bank Working Capital $100,000.00T. S. FIELDING French Dry and Steam Cleaning Done the Way You Like. PARTY AND OPERA DRESSES A SPECIALTY 315 Box Butte Avenue Phone 682 Fibre Furniture Is comfortable, durable and more lasting than the old-time reed furniture. Suitable for living room and porch. George D. Darling TELEPHONE No. 7 ALLIANCE ELECTRIC CO. Full Line of Electric (iood General Electric Contracting Work Done by Practical Men. Auto Batteries Repaired and Charged C. A. DOW, Prop. Only Up-to-date Equipment in the Country Expert in ChargeEDWARD TATRO FLORIST WHOLESALE AND RETAIL — POTTED PLANTS — CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS Alliance-------Nebraska Telephone 113...Residence 188 DIERKS LUMBER AND COAL CO. OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT We handle all kinds of BUILDING MATERIAL AND COAL TELEPHONE YOUR WANTS TO NUMBER 32 MITCHELL GANTZ DR. W. J. MAHAFFY Attorneys-at-Law DENTIST Fletcher Building Phone 870 Alliance . . Nebraska Alliance Bank Building JOHN R. SNYDER “The World Moves, So Does Snyder” TRANSFER STORAGE Phone 15 Anything in the Tonsorial line —at— Spons Barber Shop 201 Box Butte Hot and Cold Baths ShinesJ. M. KENNEDY DENTIST First Natl. Bank Bldg. , PHONES , Office 23 Res. Blk. 496 BOYD METZ Attorneys-at-Law Rumer Block Alliance, Nebr. Lotspeich Variety Store Mrs. I. B. Lotspeich, Prop. Burton Reddish Attorneys-at-Law WE SELL EVERYTHING First Natl. Bank Bldg. 313 Box Butte Avenue Alliance, Nebr. Phone Black 564 THE ALLIANCE TIMES Western Nebraska’s Leading Newspaper TWICE EACH WEEK FOR ONLY $2.00 A YEAR Gives You All the News Firit SKILLED WORKMEN MODERN EQUIPMENT Make TIMES Printing the BestHOLSTEN’S “£Tbe IRcrall Store’' Don’t forget us when you are ready for the Spring Clean-up. We carry the only complete line of Wall Paper and Paints in Alliance. HOLSTEN’S “THE REXALL STORE” Quality Works Cheapness Shirks The future years of service is the reason you and I make a quality purchase. You measure the worth and value of any article by the service it renders you in use—not by the price tag. Don’t you? That’s why every article in this store is selected with service giving properties the first requirement. Then they are priced right. BEST OF THE BEST.The Famous Clothing House Sells Nationally Advertised Goods Hart Schaffner Marx Clothes Manhattan and Star Shirts Arrow Shirts Arrow Collars Holeproof Hosiery—Onyx Munsing Union Suits Cooper Union Suits Vassar Union Suits Stetson Hats Mallory Hats Yale College Style Caps Walkover Shoes Douglas Shoes Perrin’s Gloves Hutchins Potter Gloves Wilson Bros. Imported English Underwear and Gloves Remember, if you want goods with a pedigree YOU WILL FIND THEM HERE And the prices are no higher than the ones without the Pedigree THE FAMOUS A STORE FOR MEN A Store of Today and TomorrowDear Sir:—After a journey, have you ever stepped off the train and been surrounded by a band of yelling hotel-runners, all making sword-like thrusts at you with stubby forefingers? How much more satisfactory to get right into the ’bus of a hotel of established reputation, where you know you’ll be well taken care of! Our Styleplus $17 Suits for Spring are the handiwork of a house with 50 years’ reputation in tailoring fine clothes. May we show the New-Season Style-Models, with not one jot of obligation on your part to buy a thing? Very truly yours, W. R. Harpers Department Store.


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