Allen M Sumner (DD 692) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1962

Page 1 of 74

 

Allen M Sumner (DD 692) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 74 of the 1962 volume:

4 -4 I 5 SUITZERLAND 1 n AUQTMA 9 l FRANCE ATLANTIC OCEAN ' I 6 .36 A snazm as 3+ lfpfllq 7 I Roo Lo A I ffm. . ,I . . l qi. I zlxstzfl I I f 0 f ,r,,,r' 1: ,If ii , -ya I llxlo Q I I' YI l IXN CIVIIIVI lfl If 591' ,' 1 I I V IL.: it Yxxp A f 1 I TN-XX f I Nxxsg I .I SPAIN Q III, if : S lu!! 'I 3 rmuoncf. I 5 'l 'rvnalismfwf 5 F I A vllx 4-0 ff I If ,Agn 0 W """' ""f' "' E 4!', . I m AZ,1-is-?'i':-1.18-P.-57:25--,--I f , -f "' 'x 7547777702 t I 'Xvlxx ,-"'if 1 ' X5 . , -evif ' 9' . 54-"5" - ffsf-gg' I E,yee3rr""g ' rumsm .47 ' 59510 ' Jin AICIRIB I . o Mediterranean Cruise 1962 ff' 9 March Departed Mayport, Flordia .9 20 March Inchop QP 2-15 April Thessaloniki, Greece 17-19 April Kavalla, Greece 28 April-1 May Malta 8-13 May La Spezia, Italy 24-31 Civitivecchia, Italy y 7-10 June Golfe Juan, France 19-19 .Iune Toulon, France 19-25 June Cannes, France 2-8 July Naples, Italy 12-15 July Naples, Italy 21-26.IuIy La Spezia, 'Italy 3-8 Aug. Messina, Sicily 17-30 Aug. Naples, Italy 1-3 Sept. San Remo, Italy 10-17 Sept. Golfe Juan, France 20 Sept. Outchop 2 Oct. Mayport, -Flordia G. HSLEAII ussn 1 1 1 'r Q HUNGARY 1 RUFMNNWA xXx i U I A x, 1. 5 vucosuvm Z, BLA ex szA '.11 3. 7 . 'G J ' gf Aonumc - " ' In L ' ,b 9" 'nib Qmwm .WA ,Q ,w h is 550 41+ .T . Y NQW-ES Q h Q, ' 'b filo Q XR 4 1. t iw- ' J x ' fg XM: if , X 'f fn JA50fMv . -ru ' ' A J, Rf 1, . Xolx Q N Q ' x au, ,qs- 9 9 0 N gi-as QA Y IONIAN .SEA 9 Ax fry 'Jw ' 1, ' 'f o. 4 ' R X1 W 4 v 41 ' -0 M X3 L? Q - X, : .f -. f-wvff f- ,. XX ix - X .4 QI! 2 .N 7 A ,A :V I 4 E b J X ' ? QMAI-TA X X X ' 1' ri: 6 ,N X N' x S- N " x 's s S -N, 4 W-fgff I-584101091 I E v 5.708001 I' . "mm It sauna H scvnr 1 Amon 80 N AM E :EA ADDRESS l , I 1 A , I , I V . 'vf L , 0 , 1 i 1 F, l S 'Y r 5 s 1 X - "S-1... . if C i i x I P F r P E 1 I -Q.. ,.,, -X if msg. X235 fsws ff-wr 'Nw sm.-. .. . FWZ: .1 'M 60,4 3 N53 4 X f5'fS6'::.x.,.. wssfS--- :Aff 'fa new aim Sggyf-dm mwmxcfggp mg: gm -visa tw M4 vw, JMX areibwfxg fglef sw? :Ag W.: f-M, V. S-'cw giiok -!.,:Q:?g,9 QHAFLES i EDWARD 2 8 JANUARY QQBQQQUJBUELRYTEQESQZ 1 ff ,M lnwwma lf! 4L ff, ' f 0 H, xxx xy xi 'f4f f HISTURY Named for a Marine Corps Captain of the First World War, USS ALLEN M. SUMNER was the first of a class of destroyers, larger and more heavily armed than her predecessors, being 376 feet in length and weighing 3200 tons fully loaded. Built in Kearny, New Jersey, in the fall of 1943 and commissioned January 26, 1944 SUMNER reported to the Commander-in-Chief, Pacific, Fleet at Pearl Harbor in September 1944 for combat. She became part of the fgamousr third slrll f llfeettand ,..l..' ope.rat.e,d ,,,.. with. ,,,. t he :,. ,,,, f i,.rs,t.,a.ir.eriaft carriers in Philippine waters . The waht Of 2-3 1 l2r 1.9 yn, F44 ,, . QS ,.n.... Q ,,n,,,,.,,i f iaahtine Shun- In company wlth sister ships USS MOALE2 assigned the task of inter- cepting a Japanese convfpy enroute tolapd rievenforpcernlents ,zpqz at Ormoc 1111 Iheyte. Shortly after enter- ing enemy waters enemyf planes 'iili' steadily for? the next four hours. One near bomb miss perforated the starboafiid and Ili' 3 iii'i a fire which niarked her more clearly to the enemy. At midnight "t"'l ct" Or'm'o'tc':B'iaY 'ii't tandyi' 'it" i nts 1'- being empty, the convoy was already there and ifiifrloading. sank ships Cone a Japanese destroyerl and de- Stroyed Six Planes- 11iil'1'lfl1E.... lf' 1':ti1i I ... illl The action was folilowedff. ,,,,vb i'i' n ,,V,,,.V ssignftrient A": iiipport on ltllindoro and Luzon. During the pre-invasion bombargiment fa Japanese lil iliiiil pilot fourfd SUMNER a good target, clipping the after stackgi tearing iiirr o ,ff E., fzafter torpedo after group of machine guns and exploding bombs in 'i'11A1.: .an after compartment. 'Q21 imembers of the crew were killed and many more Wcifunded. She "l:'1i1 ontiniie ., ,lp in the action after the? landing and then returned to the Admiralty Islands. for temporary, repfaifrs Viyzilyqiql folldyved by month dverhaul in San Francisco. During the following years she maintained a participation in the atom bomb tests at Bikini and extensive fleet operations. ,,..,, . vzpgql "li1l VAIZ , In April 1953 SUMNQER steamed out of .....q: .corny-mence voyage that saw her stopping at Korea t aid the U.N. forceps yvpv in fight, ,lp .againsft fi' The next operation of note was a large scafe in the British ,Royal Navy. In July 1956, .yI.T. to the Vliii Mediteififianean ":'itl'1 on a four mpnth tour of duty and pro- vided support for Nationals 2.s,, .Pat the outbreak of the Suez crisis. After returning to theUZS. chosen as ..:, oneyof two ships to represent the Navy at the second inauguration of i11': 3Eisenhower, 1'f:r.,..,,V,VA Following her visit to Washington SUMNER entered the shipyard folffya fourr.2i1j.f.nio'ii'ith ..,...,. 'l-,..,q: "ii 2 Zpqp During 1958 SUMNER spent five the Mediterraneanp "i1 returning to the United States in July she became part of until which operated in the North Atlantic. SUMNER again departed for in February, 19529, for seven months entering the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a upon her return, i'l' ito the U.S. In the Summer of 196lt0,SUMNER the ba.m1ite.effipi ii' ency "E" in competition with other ships of Destroyer Squadron SIXT'E1FQNiil1'i5while participating, in entensive Atlantic Fleet exer- cises. In September, 1960 SUMNER was again enroute to the Mediterranean. Upon return from the Mediterranean SUMNER underwent an extensive seven month overhaul under the Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization program CFRAMD which was completed in Dec., 1961. I On March 9, 1962, following, two months refresher training at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the SUMNER departed for her fifth Mediterranean deployment. This veteran destroyer proudly wears nine campaign ribbons on her bridge with Battle Stars on her Pacific Theater and Korean Service Ribbons. The SUMNER boasts of being in continuous service longer than any other destroyer in the United States Fleet. COMMANDING OFFICER CDR. WILLIAM J. FLYNN, USN Son of Dr. and Mrs. Charles T. F hool in born in New Haven, Connecticut on February 4, 1923. He attended elf-gmeilgz-EY Eiuowing Hamden and graduated from the Morgan School, Clinton, Connecticut in - one year at Yale University, Commander Flynn entered the U.S. .Naval Academyii-1192116 apolis, Maryland from which he graduated wi th a Bachelor of Science. degree mh Atlantic served his first duty on the USS WINSLOW CDD- 3595 on convoy Patrol 1D the Nort t nee until the end of WW II then resumed normal destroyer operations including accept ad to evaluation of the MK 56 gun fire control system as Gunnery Officer. In 1947 he repOI' G . . . ' F'rst the USS CORAL SEA CCVA-433 as a member of the commissioning crew serving as 1 Division Off' ' ' ' lynn of Branford, Connecticut, Commander Flynn was 1 1 I 7' . s xcer and Aide to the Executive Officer through 1950. Commander Flynn Wa , , . . ' the then toured as an instructor of Engineering Drawing and Descriptive Geometry ln Department of Marine E ' ' ngineering, U.S. Naval Academy from 1950- 1952. Following tthii was a tour in command of LSM-397 in the Amphibious Force, U.S. Atlantic F199 ' 1954 Commander Flynn r t eported as Senior Damage Control Inspector and Instructor F166 Training Grou Ch p, esapeake Bay. On detachment in May, 1956 he was assigned as Efecutwe OffiCe1' USS ROBERT K. HU I . NTINGTON CDD-7813 serving in that capacity HHU1-my, 1958 at which time he reported to the Engineering Department, U.S. Naval Academy as ag instructor in Applied Thermodynamics. Detached in June 1961, Commander Flynn repOl't9 Shortly thereafter as Commanding Officer of the SUMNER while she was in the Shlpyardv in Charleston, S.C. undergoing her Fram II conversion. Commander Flynn is m ' arried to the former Charlotte M. Glynn of Portsmouth, Virginia- They have two children Peter B ' , . and Harriett A. Flynn. 5 5 EXECUTIVE OFFICER LT CHARLES F NASON USN A graduate of W1ll1ams College L1eutenant Nason recerved h1s oomm1ss1on through Offloer Candldates School Newport RI 1D May 1953 Followlng two years aboard mlne sweepers ln var1ous engmeermg blllets and fmally as Exeoutwe Offloer he reported to the USS WISCONSIN CBB 64D where he served on the staff of Commander Battleshlp D1v1s1on TWO The USS DALY CDD 5195 and the USS MACON CCA 132D were hls next asslgnments Upon oompletmg a tour of shore duty as an lnstruotor at the U S Naval School Communl oat1ons 1n Newport R I LT NASON was ordered to the USS BIGELOW CDD 9425 as ope ratlons Offloer 1n wh1oh oapao1ty he served unt1lreport1ng on board the SUMNER as Exeou t1ve Offloer rn February 1962 LT NASON now resldes 1n Jaoksonvllle Flor1da wlth h1S Wlfe and four ohlldren DEPARTMENT HEADS GUNNERY LT. G.E. PILLOW OPERATIONS LT. D.L. WILBURN ENGINEERING LTJG. H. SIPPLE SUPPLY ENS. .l..I. DAVIS 1 W 1 l W ii JE Ui 1 4 'E 5 L1 . 1 1 1 L, .li xii ,H 2 is L 'Z Sv ag H5 E .QV il EEE 9 ri' 4 1 ll 31 if :I ia! U fl 25 G i4 fl. . L .3 -1 ,E lx if il A 15 Q1 Qi ri F Y fi 'a x 3 5, 1 Q? I I ie w 'J E. 155 n if-I., , mimi I4 1 YV, 315 ,. V , 1 1 wie 1 li Mif' :N ' EHS' , 11:1 ,N ' fi Ltig J. Eksfrom Ensign SY'in9 o mvusloN OFFICER ELECTRONICS MATERIAL OFFICER R- Pe'Ce1'SCI1, ETCM J. Anthony, RDI T. Brown, RDZ H. Hain, ETZ W. Kirk, RDZ W- Simon, RD2 T. Cozzens, ET3 H. Dunn, ET3 ,.......-.nu L- Esko, ET3 W. Ewing, ET3 D. Hodges' RD3 R. Margoni, ET3 R. McLean, R133 P Reed ET3 ' J. Sxlver, RD3 K. Smith, RD3 R. Stirpak, RD3 R. Strickland, RD3 K. Tratnik, RD3 J. Bielefeld, RD3 A. Cook, RDSN J. Dowd, RDSN J. Ferguson, RDSN A. Finley, RDSN R. Gibson, RDSN R. Harrison, ETRSN X W Kowalskl RDSN R Mmsch RDSA D Reg1ster RDSN Os N l 1 X 55 f S. , C a 3 ,,-..-,-A 'M f ,l-f fi' C--11,3 'amz Xi. 41 ..-.-. A , 1 "-N" ---' xggff "Golfer, GET A QECOMMENAA1-IgM, FROM COMBAT! " 6 Dilfisiv Nix LTig R. -Barrett C DIVISION OFFICER J. Brady, HMC J. Leonard, SMC R. Edwards, YNC B. Owen, RMI R. Dockery, RM2 B. Wilkins, SM2 P. Chase, RM3 df' J. Frazier, RM3 C. Keech, PC3 A. Mohr QM3 - 3 C. couins, RM3 O. Dixon, YN3 A. Dommago-, RM W. Shupe RM3 G. Stafford, RM3 D. Zehner, YN3 A. Bowman, RMSN F. Budner, RMSN J. Linhares, SN F. Miller, SN R. PSTCZ, SN J. Pritchett, RMSN C. Smith, SN Cv. Stiff, SN R- Valln, SMSA R. Whittler, SN S. Young, SN HQ' f f f Gif 4 'wr 2 V, ,. ,M fw 'mf Q. , f. , f, , 7 . -ff W W ', . , V V, , I ff. J ' I 5' D mi ,. ,,.,,f.,,-,,Mo-awww Ensign J. Davis 5 S DIVISION OFFICER E. comp, csc D. Prescott, SH1 F. Riggs, C51 L. Johnson, C52 A- Suppan. C53 W- Waters' SHE J. West, SDZ S. Allen, SD3 J. Collinsworth, CS3 I. Cunningham, SK3 ww E' HYIBT, SK3 F' Lubnow- C53 H- BU-h1'1'f1B-11, SN J. Carreon, TN E. Cash, SN J. Connell, SN T. Enoch, TN A. Enriquez, TN J Hall SN N Lanclos SN R Sm1th SN C Wood SN if R Webb SHSN C Yarbel N mfs? . , . , ' I I l f ,ff ' . - 1 . ', S f wilif , ' 2 f if ,V , gf?-yzf-nfywxjfj I f ff '2,.ff"O'-fZf2",24 M ff,,,'Qgff,f- I f ,Wg , Q pf ff ,' ' , ' ,Wf Qiy ' f-:Q f ff,ff3 , , .41 an z . IE. If Zim! Diffisim II: ,I Ii gm . f, If g , , my It il ' ' fl I E EI ,L IEA I 4, 2, I Q il I i'x 3 ii I I 1I1 If Ensign C. :Bigsby Ensign .I, GuIm IL ,, FIRST LIEUTENANT FIRST DIVISION OFFICER IW rw III zij Ii? Il Ip li 521 E! 5? 'iii S. Clark, BMI L, Margerum, BMI J. Stanfill, BMZ W. Arbogost, BM3 C. Crumpley, BM3 R. Nettleton, BM3 C. Barker, SN EI ELI I I ji :I if SQL! C- Beal, SN R- Bi-3-DCO, SN R. Bourassa, SN R. Caswell, SN I L W, . i 6 I I R. Cowart, SN R. Dahl, SN R. Dempsey, SN ,I I H. K Dolan, SN M. Donnelly, SA R, Ellington, SN B Fulb , h T13 L SN R. Grabowski, SN - , . L , K , .4 .' QZQZ ',- 1' .-,,f-11. - . ,Q ,.fxq...,.,.. ,w:.1- -QV ,' -- -fl ftgjffijjf. 1,1-' - J " " -, - - f f f f.-W4-w P, Hartwell., SN I. Hayman, SN R. Lafontaine, SN E. Leopard, SN T. Manney, SN E. Mulhallg SN G. Olsen, SN G Ostrom SN M Pounds SN R Ruffm SN R Smnmons SN J Srnltn SN C St Armour SN K Steck SN J' Wade SN J Whltaker SN J' Zohlmsky SN T Duncan BM3 L Ramlrez SA W Stevenson SA f X ff! fff u I ' I ' I Q 1 . . , . 3 . , . , . . , W W ' 1 . , . , - 1 - I ' I ' 1 , , ff ,,f. , ff , , , I , X L f ' if f , f 1 'fm ,,ff:f'f I I f, f' , f f fm!-f f,,,,',!,, ,f ,X V ,f ,V , f f -WAQWM , , ,,, , ,,, ,VV, H, , ,, f ' f ' X' ' 4 f41v,'Wi'f ' 'T' f f , , , fffffff f ,W ,,,, H fy, 3 , , , f I I, ,,,,,, ,Wf, ff, 'way' rf Q f JH! 566014 Div! X014 X N 5 14-flxgxg EMIK IA I , I5 ED- ' vga 2 ' . I II9L'Q,g IZSMF' E I 0 L C .. . oTiF00'?:I T.--.-..,-i-'-.An i V' any Sf ,, 'L ,jf NK" Dueecrff-Q .. mf-'ax' g off' H' 'IE HANK' A jALjflfx.-4" W. Mooney, GMGC U Ensign L. ,Lipscomb SECOND DIVISION OFFICER C- Andrew, GMI R. Hull, FT1 J. Hunsaker, GM1 G- Torma, FT3 R. David, FTSN B H- Acosta, GMZ C. Aubert, GMZ S. Jones, GMZ B. Russ, GMZ J- Bagley, FT3 J. Cerina, YN3 R. Lane, FTG3 J. Langdfmf G m m M 3 Gleave, SN . S. Macnalr, SN R, McKinney, SN F, Neeley, SN G. Pullen, SN . , Q. ,V . , A, ., ,-..,.V.,,,,-.3-,,f,.V.,, Tai.--iw .. .. ' Q, , .V .- 'k Q LM: ,Y ,V ,A , Ulm! Divis ,014 D Stalvey socc LTlg R Hamilton THIRD DIVISION OFFICER .T Place TMI F Klng SOGZ G.Klein, SOG2 T. McGrath, SOG2 S. Johnston, SOG3 W..Tuzwiakowski,TM3 M. Miller, SOG3 J. Poston, SOG3 E. Allen, SOGSN L' Conley, TMSN G. Dodd, SOGSN W. Grable, SOGSN D. Hayden, TMSN B. Lehmann, TMSN L. Muhlbeier, SOGSN G. Palmer, TMSN ff M 31, Q 'N 'Tue -was, You 6 2 ...Q IDIOT, IN 'THE 'linigfq K-A T I L.-v ,S '--f 0 53,53 I Lug W Iglbson Ensign R. Cuulkins Ass 1 MPA M DIVISION OFFICER C Ayers MM1 J Foley, BTI N. Jackson, BTI W. Montgomery MM1 J Murray, MM1 M Engle MMZ W F1sher MM2 eww MM-4 B Moore, MM2 1, Redman MM2 J- Reynolds BTZ J shulfs, BT2 R s1mpkmS,BTz J smlrh BTZ ,4,. ..A., ...I I. , oofo H I- . I ,, ' A?" ff f, ,f,,.- hh, Q, X 5. .NU , . P .jf .f 4 ' , , I ' ' 1' , ,ZW f' 'f if wa, . .5 I ff! if 1? Y f 'fifffff-tffVzf6 ,.114f' I, A-f Myne I o fa, 4 ff, 2 , - 267-Zh 'f f", of 'If' ' f 'fi"f"HbV- '-o" , "Z, ' qygfy 1 zjpgnf 1 1 721 7. if W, ,kr , Z 5 ' f f . 1 L f ' mi 10-f , f, 'agyqfm , , fi ' 4 ,ga C ', ' YIXCZV ff ,, , wL,,,,.,wf1,- . -'-Lu' V - f- ' ' ' ' f ' Y A ' ff, ffp'f 'f'E': VVf'.Vf.-' V' aff" fif"' , 2 .,-, .V . V. .V ,wwf -, 511'-zfzgnqyfg'i.,fV,fVf . ' -z ,V Vw-if: Viz! A A 'Q VV 15, 1 ,W ., V' V ' ii!?Zfff5Vf2-ifVi?V7'v2f??fi'VZi??-W' , .,,,, Z D- .5 , .V ,V V .-f,-. V ,Vwf.fV.f,-Vgf V , ,- ,V ,.f y ,V, 1 VV ,1, . ., - W- m"kk f' f-'ff2W64" 452.-na".-' ' Vzcfsx-V .-:g ff: z, 4, 4- -:fi 3. ' ' X, " ' C ' 'Lm' 'LL'LL , - . ,,,h,,, 1 A 5, f X-,'. "l- -, P. Crlsleff BT3 D- Demancf BT3 B- Gaffofdf BT3 D- Gelkmf MM3 , 1 E. Hudson, BT3 J. Jones, MM3 J- MCClell-an, BT3 C. Parker, BT3 L. Pearson, MM3 B. Perry, MM3 M. Shang, MM3 D. Thaler, MM3 L. Wallace, BT3 L, Williams, BT3 G.Wilsoncroft, MM3 E. Armentrout, MMFN M. Barker, MMFN A. Batts, BTFN V. Bohacik, FN J. Brimer, FN C. Cerkas, FN C. Fennell, FN J. Gaddy, FN H. Good, FN B. Hill, FN R. Jobson, FN W. Jacobs, FN V M ' "f f V V, V Z' . " VV., Z , V , f ,WV ,V -'fgzw f, ,WW 2 22 216:13 fig V KW ,V rf, 4. , ff V7 f ' " 9 ' - f' V WW? f fVV6'2'1,Vf V y. V VJQVJ-:,',3.q 'fa 6.'+g'u':.-VS ' f ff 4 V W4 Vg ' ' " ?4g.M'V fff , 11, V ' V-ZZ: 'gjzc , Q V ,f rf , QV V ,I 1,2311 V. ' Z, WWW 7 gfV!'z,..:f" ww VV V g zi2L'." ' 7 " .7 - ' "c " V 'V V. V X V, ,f,V , ,,,,,, V,,V.,,, V , ,,,V ,,, ,V , V, +A'-V! , , -7'Z'ff"" 'yn ,142 'xg' ' VV' Z ', Q 'ffl V 4 f1f,ffVf,ifuvw'V', A V mV, f l,Vm,,,V f4,g jj 7, 'K nw ,VXV fy f ,, I , 'f V X , V f0g,,,'.Aff"f V2 gy? V, , W- Schultz, FA J. Schwartz, BTFN K. Sp H .Tones FN G. LaFontaine, MMFN G- La R. Staszak, FA D. Tabor, FA F. Taylo M D. Par er, lete, FN I 'K C. McDaniel, DCFA J. McHone, FN A. Morse, FA . Patterson, FA J. Ritchie, MMFN . Ro en ar er, 5. t W X fix NK ' Vt ' f'c"' . F X , - :F F N F X 4 5 .. -1' ' 1 , f " J T1 R ' . : ' I F If -'I F 1 A lv 'EQMISSWV - II 'F ' 'Q LV U- . X 721 va ww F -- fy , 5 was nwvfv ' F . .- Q x Pgewsslb' 'Q . s - 3 ' t 'm BL0'-U If Q - , R 10855 ' ., ' D - af pgmreo' X I. ,A xwgfmq-pry?-4 Q . F C za . Il I I P, 1 f .1 Divisim I Ensign T. McNichoIas Ensign R. Curtis R DIVISION OFFICER Ass't R DIVISION OFFICER DCA Ass't DCA G. Despins, EN1 E. Elyard, MRI R. Kerr, EMI F. Cappeletti, EMZ D. Carter, SF2 I-I. Edwards, EMZ D. Sinor, DCZ D. Smith, ICZ E. Allen, MM3 P. Delasco, IC3 K. Fincannon, IC3 .42 WML wif wg,'Y"1 'Ha- ,J .Q A ' I .li L, T' -.sau 1. . ' '.,.1:1..' .-4 xg-Qggpfffivf. NM- -.s.--5,-.-., ffizimibrf "s " "F 5113:-"'Z'1"1' R- Gall. EM3 H. Jmmson, SP3 K, Laing, EM? , V ffffff if wmwmm num -...vi R. McKee, EM3 J. Mead, SF3 B- Pennington' c. Goodwin, FN H. Hoff, ICFN J. Perez, SFPFN EM3 E. Sparks, 153 R. smcki, EN3 R. Bunt, FN D. Debolt FN T. Shell, ICFA R. Turner, EMFN B. Vaughn, EMFN x QX 'N' on Gs' 0 4 Axlg ffl "Novo Mufftek CONT fc,oL. -'Ax -. 7,1-ii THE DAMAGE 9Arar1e'sY" W iff y 4 2 .. 311. ,:,,?.-.q.,w-5.3 -V, A, -4 if--. ' ' J , -"' -""K x f. f ' ,. - ' 7 Q "-- ' - GW' ' f ' fix:1P1.fn,-'f:'grfr.sfm.:Q:Levy-' . 4 . at ' f "VA 74 f f I f ' f'-ff f ,.. 1 ' . ' ' - ' ff . " ---- b , WL . .f ' -' - "" 1 ff.-ff -"-" . GN ffl iff! -0 - ,J Kwfssfvi. . 2. x-.GR x 44 w g:-mxNp-:- - " M W N ' if V X ' bf'-.xxy ix Uv X ' f " X x X X f Q m X . Q is , Q' X B ri-P X , C ff - . , P. , , ...., . .,.,.. ,..,A, ,, . X., .ff WWW 12 f ff y f " , ,iifv-.xgjs5iL..AQb. ,fqfiym a, ,XXX N if vffeyy., cv vu mb-. m S0 Qu ' , '. ,vs 53,1 x XXX X x Sli W -3 5 ' " KT NN ' , .f . ,, . - , . ., X X X Y X fig - ' 'f X --f f , -f f . 1. ,. 1 SM .: -...M--1 ,ff-gr. 1, mm-H:Q-.5Q.,-X-.,,.-vi. my, g ' 2:fff1ffig.,5f?"f' R xr 555 Y I ,ff Q' X in " 5 'N - P, m m W r' ix XX X sl z,-, N v 4 ff - -..,, -f . ,. . my-f,-.:,v:."siL,f,-.. 'gf g? f... 'fe ,aw ,Af ' - -- K Sw -- fw sgi ' X XXNX A-1 ,, . , , .. . , A, , ,,,. . . . ME ,a ' 1 xy-A is: 559151551 05 Q X iii -15 W , Xin, X .,,,Z2, .. ,t N, 11 5511153 li.-vxf ifliix N X W X 7 f fs M M, ., vw. X. . . , . .AX xQm,.X.... t .Xxx THE UNITED STATES SIXTH FLEET POWER FOR PEACE The United States Sixth Fleet stands ready to support and protect the interests of the United States and her allies in the Mediterranean, through "Peace" and good will if possible, through "Power' ' if necessary. Normally consisting of approximately fifty ships, thirty thousand men, and over two hundred Navy aircraft, augmented at times by a special anti-submarine force, the fleet contains the equipment and material necessary to operate independently of shore bases in the event of hostilities. For carrying out its operational commitments the Sixth Fleet is divided into three task forces. The attack carrier striking force and the amphibious force, with approximately two thousand combat ready marines embarked, provide the strong arm while the service force maintains the fleets mobility and independence from shore bases providing fuel, ammunition, hardware and groceries at sea. The offensive and defensive -capabilities of the fleet are maintained at a peak of readiness and efficiency by continually practicing and improving tried and proven concepts as well as by testing and evaluating new ones. The Might of the Sixth Fleet stands ready for use with the newest in weapons and tactics if necessary, but peace through mutual understanding and mutual trust is its primary goal-its primary weapon the People-to-People program. 1962 MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE From exhaustive days of fleet operations to relaxed times in hospitable Mediterranean ports this cruise will long be remembered by those men aboard the Sumner. The at sea periods were ever filled with the many exercises necessary to maintain the fleet and the individual ships in a high state of readiness. Fleet anti-air exercises and anti-submarine exercises, NATO exercises, engineering drills, plane guarding, and underway refueling and replenishment were the rule broken by welcomed spells of independent steaming, holiday routine, and even a task force swim call. ,However it was the in port periods that were anxiously awaited, and for small wonder. Sumner sailors left their tracks throughout the ancient ruins in Greece, Italy, and Malta, over the Maritime Alps, on the beaches of the "Isle of Capri", throughout the French and Italian Rivieras, and at such attractions as Rome, Pisa, Florence, Cannes, and many others. The ship sponsored a party for orphans and school children in Greece, donated blood to the Greek Red Cross, opened the ship for visitors in many ports, and participated in various other good will activities. There were many events for the crew also such as a ships "Tea" party, athletics, crew rowing races, smokers on the flight deck, and even a French style show on the fantail. Sumner was on hand for the earthquakes in Naples, the flight of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton through Civitivecchia, and can truthfully say no other Sixth Fleet ship had closer contacts on the French Riviera than we did. Athletics also gained popular support as witnessed -' by- a fine record of 19-6 for basketball, 21-7 for softball, 4-2 for football and a decisive O-1 tug of war loss to the HMS Broadsword in Malta, In resume' the cruise was interesting and eventful but seven months is a long time and there is no place like home, so October 2 becam ' - of the day. e a magic date and channel fever the disease Thus with seven fruitful months behind her and ten long days ahead, Sumner departed the Mediterranean on September 22, Proudly entering Mayport October 23 Her duty done and a Well earned reunion and rest ahead, -skimme- P 5 v long days, and UNDERWAY It was a bleak day in Mayport, When, after a day's delay due to bad weather, the SUMNER pulled out for her seven month Mediterranean appointment in company with the BIGELOW, LAWE, ZELLARS and BRISTOL to rendezvous with a tanker, the USS ALLA- GASH. After being continuaI1y"Rocked" and "Rolled" by waves of up to thirty-five feet in height for eleven days, on March 20 We passed Gibraltar and entered the land of midnight refuelings, large fleet operations, short nights. It was a battered ship' and a tiredierew that relieved the USS SOLEY off Majorioa on March 22 but reoupera- tion was rapid and the crossing soon belonged to the past. REFUELING AT SEA FORWARD STATION BRIDGE MIDSHIPS STATION AFTER STATION 15 FORWARD INHAUL git-if STROMBOL, STRAIGHTS OF MESSINA Our first scheduled port was Thessaloniki, Greece for a two week tender period and liberty so the SUMNER set out for the Eastern Mediterranean, passing the active Volcano Stromboli and navigating the Straights of Messina, between Sicily and the Italian mainland on the way. Arriving in Thessaloniki on April 2, after twenty-four continuous days at sea, we moored in a nest of five destroyers alongside the tender USS TIDEWATER. Athletics, historical tours, and solid land were the prime attractions here. ASSISTANT NAVIGATORS THE ROOST I XR, The Ba skei' ba I I fedm. stuffs ns Wlnhlflg wqys 51. the local YMCA. Victim is th USS LAWE 58-30? K, X-. N '--1 ,r ,Q 7 X, X. K Monument to St. Paul- Verea Close- up of Guided Mossaic Steps from which x 5 We N Q St. Paul taught Waterfall near Eciessa Greece is a land of great natural beauty and ancient ruins , and startling contrasts. Unhurried in her way of life the old and the new exist side by side. Here modern busses compete on narrow roads with donkey carts while modern western clothing and ageless local dress mingle freely in the towns. Greece has a rich heritage of great civilizations and famous men. In Verea is a monument to St. Paul. Behind this monument are the actual steps from which he taught hundreds of years ago. ' .. ,,.,..,,x 'Y' Kiwi-f"w1g9.f-iivli' N s . ,115-:1-Y'X,--ik',,,, ,. ' 'f - spd.. t' . ,' , , - .X . K N. N " . A 1-1 XWNS . , .. vb 1 . of . 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H H.-- . . - - P it . . 9 R ' ' 5 t ' Q et i ne JQHS GT 8 G , QU 31 S0319 Ing . 50m I1 W Cene is in Ncarousa, site at Greek National Monuments to Heros of three wars. Q -I5 ?z?1?z?2?ii 323 div 311113233 sunmwww WW ii mliiiii mm Bw UW Monument to Greek Heroes of three wars KAVALLA, GREECE The next port, and our first designated liberty port, was the seldom visited town of Kavalla, Neapolies of the Bible. SUMNER visited Kavalla alone and it was here that our People-to-People Program saw its greatest successes. THEATER RUINS OF PHILIPI BELOW--RUINS OF PHILIPI The land of contrasts Below- SUMNER visits the Bishop of Drumd Kavolla nested among the mountains with ancient Aquaducl in Kuvvllu SUMNER inconspicuously moored to the break- water. SUMNER men visited the Bishop of Drama, one of the leading religious figures of Greece, gave blood to the Greek Red Cross, had parties for Orphans and school children, and held general visiting aboard the ship. Kavalla was a welcomed opportunity met with a very successful venture in People - to - People relations. OUR ORPHANS GROUP PLUS ONE 4mesk'G'V Western movies. - Who? eise? 'Sf Another Muriorie Maine BEFORE . A-wr ' , . ,.,n'V"" AFTER 5 E...Q .TV ggi . X, X 5 x X Q N P - sv-1 A-R pk - x X wk K X The "At Sea" period following Kavalla was a busy one. Besides small arms practice the ship exercised at general quarters and was in turn exercised by the Quarterly Physical Fitness Exams given under the sadistically alert eyes of our Chief Hospital Corpsman and our Chief Master-at Arms. All flailed but few failed this realistic evidence of "The New Frontiern. Y N Americas secret weapon 4-L, The British Island base of Malta was the next stop, and a very interesting one. Many past civilizations have contributed to Malta's growth and each has left its influences. Still in evidence are the influences of the Greeks, Turks, and Romans and in a negative sense of the Germans and their ninety day bombardment during World War Two. The most prominant features are the continuous walls and the predominant brown look of the cities, brought about by using sandstone as the main building material. The British ship HMS BROADS WORD was our host ship and did a lot to flavor the visit. From parties for the officers and chiefs to a tug-of - war and a consolation beer Qwe lostj, the hospitality of "The Bl od B' " o y ritts was well directed and enthusiastically received. It'll never get off the ground The Walled City One of First 3QDimensionuI Mesuics UIIVE L-IU 5 Ruins of an Ancient Temple Tug cf:-5 War wiih HMS Broodsword W6 . Back to seaand back to Work to the tune of a full scale replenishment, a monthly affair h . W ere . f od hardware repair parts, fuel, and ammunition. Replemshment day means long h Ours recewe o , , nd hard work but this capability keeps the fleet mobile and independent of shore bases A DOUBLE WHAMMY ., ,dsl ,Al LA SPEZIA ITALY La Spezia-inspeotlon and sports Even the garbage man got in the act as the Commanding Offloer of the USS WRANGELL CAE 125 was in vited to hold a full dress mspeotion of the SUM NER Results-an excellent A The Basketball team kept up 1tS winning ways with a 56-48 victory over the Wrangell while the softball team suffered-one of its few losses C1 42 The Stuff of Med life Even the garbage collector gets an the oct 1 S mx' Q The Basketball team kept up its winning Ways "" WLT K ,Q , , tiff T" -5 'rdtwi' 1- N,Qf?iu ' A STH V L' V' ,b1's5f2"A'.V-'2--255-.. KH 5' 2? . V- . . -V X .Nm.,1w--,::::w,"'t1 ' 2'--nfs'1.'4:'w vi.-na.-1, 'af-'.'vfv' ZVVZ' ,- '. -4-' .V A 3-V, ,ar-,,-V: :'.7:..f-ygf."4'-5 fa .gz-ls '-mfg 11' gs-:lf -Qrqjifwx.:--.-:1'-1 ,vex- f f- ZX f. 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I i I Y 4 I 1 All of this for one picture , 'V L CIVITIVECCHIA, ITALY Civitivecchia was the scene of a phenomenon rare in the annals of Naval History. In the midst of a cold spring came a message from COMSIXTHFLT saying that on May 24 the uniform shifts from blues to whites. Almost uncannily on the evening of May 23 the skies cleared, and May 24 found summer entering Civitivecchia and SUMNER in Whites. Sort of makes you Wonder who pulls what strings. In stateside preparations for Civitivecchia had been made. Over 100 cases of Busch Bavarian, Budweiser and Schlitz "Tea" had been brought on board. All was put to use in a series of "Tea" parties in which Supply Department won the softball championship and all won the party. tl2iijaf3-tix i' it I .?.,t7l., ,f jf i X f r fi f ,yr-"M-. f I Mwxwwrwwmgwpxe A , :n1""'q' 'W L " 1 if ixfsefffg, - i, I Civitivecchia is also thesea port to R I fifty 'miles away, so Rome was the faVOg1:leeaf91'l.ly ing spot. Here the many famous ruins were Vigfiltsig. e a examined, and perpetuated by thousands of graphs. P Unl hoto. ike many of the isolated ruins visited pr e. viously, modern Rome was built around andi porated her ancient ruins in her expansion Sona?- most were within easy walking distance of dowat n- I town, a fact well appreciated. l .GJ l Q 44 51: , rm-fr1::c+ JS! c v" , War rf, fi wr rg Fleet Anchorage, Bay, Sardina . Eight days and one fleet anchorage later, SUMNER arrived at the French Riviera port of Golfe Juan in ideal weather- clear skies and calm seas. Suddenly in the early morning of June 8, without warning, a gale struck with winds of over forty knots and SUMNER started dragging anchor. Despite all possible efforts the ship quickly went aground and just as quickly the storm abated-its damage done. Through the combined efforts of all hands, near-by American ships, and a French Net Tender we were soon freed and proceeded to the dry docks at Toulon, France for inspection of damages and repairs. Sporting a new sonar dome and two new screws, SUMNER emerged ten days later ready for operations and headed for Cannes. Seranade by band of USS , ntnttpy t SHANGRI-LAQCVA-38Jar A , l'aIlCl. wr , ,J i Ye I W K b 3 3: r' 1, .f . , - ,, ' e ' - ,Rf , N A fi 'U ,AM-K if, W ,gy I, gg, y , X-5V I , 9 W 1 . . 5,1 P. 'gf 5 1 r ' : 5 f "-qw. ,warn . f f VL- '7 4, '1 ' ,G ,W ff , 1 V ffftifiy- V, H H, -, , D q 4 ft' Q- hw, Y .F - gp , I YS W , , K 1 57,41 ,ng t., , 'Aw-me -- ,J .zz ' tr .5 , N t ,wwf -:N ,amrw+ 1 lo-'traf- 'ff ' ' -f' , ff . ,7 - f "Av: .gm-: - ya., . if I 5 ' 1 f 5 2 4 5' Y a As - ' r V 3- x ' ry .I 11 a -f H, r:. 1.3-4.-'.fV,1vfg'V2V,:':4Vf , Q qi : .4 1' gf ' i ' , X , ' ' xg 'Z j " '- ' .fm ja'-u.,,,J--gf: ' M - 1 11. , . V X dar' ur x . 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I-1,-.fp :g g f,g,,1-25, 7 ,.',,f.,,,:,,-Y.-3:-.,,,Liar Vvf',,.-gA,f.3,V . , M I view- -LU. eg V.. . .aif gf?-If -Q, . ' T .-1'F','4 A-Star?-71:ve-:1?.,"'a:-.,f'.-:F-. ' ' 'sa 'fn f I Y , , -ff ---: ' - .,.-' -ff ,- aria., W ---.4-,-3,14-,ev ,-1-.4,,::-:wa-15:14V-rw - V , fi, K W' ' 'r ' " ' ' 1' 1-V ' 'f' N ' in Q M ,, 1, ,Lf - N. r. f ' 1 f , '32 ig' , - Drydock in Tculon 'I ff, fff, f , , W, ,,, The screws replaced, The dry dock flooded l l l 1 P The Hedge- Hogs reloaded And ir's off to Cannes CANNES, FRANCE After Toulon it was back to the French Riviera, this time to Cannes. Cannes was the scene of a French Style Show presented on the fantail and featuring the latest in Paris styles, the best of Paris Models, and Americas most secret weapon-MISS SUMNERCOut1awed by Geneva Conventionj. N lx X 'xx 5 - ., t is S .NS For Evening For no one Nowhere Miss Sumner is going Critical So is everyone else Physical fitness exam time again and the normal at-sea routine such as refueling, highline, helo transfers, an d for dessert-the mall HELO. . .. f,'rs4sm , Q AT IT AGAIN THE EASY WAY THE HARD wAY LA SPEZIA ITALY 11ybyF h hmp th th th upflkfthq dpid x .- Wy W V X K W Do you SEE THEM YET? ALMOST VICTORIOUS While in La Spezia many visited the near by leaning tower of Pisa and the soft ball team continued its winning Ways. Qsww A fl' uw, 3- "' gi ..,: :xl nf' 'if f WX' tw? Vx .zgzgw Q4 ar K . M., - eg M fm Aw -af, H45 H , A 3, 13559 L, f , si Z 9, 5, V Q 'Q 52' x a. 1' 3 f Q ,Q N .Ki -. X , if Z , f .w , , ' ', ,, 5 'jr k , X f fc' ' V, , f. X '51, W , Q wmlvg ' - 'l ,, ,. ji", X ,N . ,. , -1, .z ' I w,ww,,,.1.r:vLw1'1 4. , :Af M. , 0 ' igf4'Yfffw.,j,:,St.f,jm!ff y gf. ,, f if f L W f M "'fg.',Y'j'?',Qi.'4' ' ' , 'vw 'ff' , ,.4a.qw:f-1112 f 4 'Q f'-?f,2"-lflw x rf f-N ,M 2 - A ,, FM., MESSINA, SICILY In Messina SUMNER held the first of at popular eries of "FH ht Deokl Smokers" which turned S ' S up Considerable amature boxing talent. fxfx N Xfyx- g,f,oX,, X,2f.VfX:- ' X XXWVV Qi, X, 1VX:,t,xXX, f ffmx, X,X,1,i, XXfXfxfx X Nffx-' Xfx XfXf Mx, V f -J Jfv Vvx XJXV fufXfwx,X,,f5' ,Xf-f fx, if-.Lx .. Vue , fo ,Xf X..,t, J , .1 1-f-U if fx-f C- Xx ,Xnfxf-XIX--X,4XY ,f--frvt, ,,fX,."gxHfifv,1Q,1 5 ,X,X,k,cX,X,X,X,.,-,X-, ,,fi..Xi X, .V X.Xfv- .. Q., ,-V-.fXfX. ,.XfJvX1"' nf ,H ,fx ,XJ ,- Xi. z' f X, f V -,X f.Y,.fX,4 JCX ,,,' M . V X ,3- .,, f f , , ff ,XX,t, , , ff , , f,Jf,,., ,i,X, ,of , X X, fn ,nf-,V X y, -y-, X. J - .- ,A vvxfxm Xr X gm! ,Xl-Vi XJXY,-, XA ., -VVX, 1 .1 x, X , ,f X, X, i, mf '-1' , X 1-Xkfv ,fXf -,1.f..'!ff, ',f,., 1 ',- .f 1 '- Xf--ff., ,-,--1-' ' wtf 1 X X, ,f iff Following Messina was a busy sea period terminated by two weeks tender availability in Naples during which the finishing touches were applied to the ship prior to going home. It was a busy time for all with with a lot of work to do. This sea period and the one following San Remo were to be our last two Sixth Fleet Operating periods this cruise. It saw us engaged in typical Fleet Operations plus the not-so-typical plane guarding for the Nuclear Carrier E TERPRI E. F' X fX, J -.1 X1 gf? 1 K XJ V M' VJ xy! -J - .1 . mhfx fo X nf .X,,,fX fX,X, , MM, V fqwf X -,XfX, A1117 X f Y- N, Xf frfX,f,1,Xf- ,, ,UU V f .J if 1,,,iXfX,-f .f 1 . gf, 1 'fJs,fxfxfX, Lfwfiflln ,XJ ,Ui . ,uf , ,-,,,-. 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K N.,Nw.-.'-rv.4r''.x:'w',"X'x:f':-:'-czvxkrkvkxfLdiiwbxNik" , . -1:'- YA N SK SW ' X4 vs . ,b N WMS X X a , , X ' 'AY'Q X f R X 1 'FWS' Sltlvilfxm A QXYNYWXX. wh.,-,aa 1 E v , N l I Plane Guarding for uss ENTERPRISE HOW Heh' ,, ,,.E...,..,Jmwfs' Holidu Y Rouii-ne A Ndwss as 'irfff """1' M ' '41 Mb? ,A m ' GOLFE JUAN, 'FRANCE Most thoughts were homeward bound in Golfe Juan, the last port of the cruise, nevertheless a tour of the Riviera and of the French Maritime Alps proved popular. On September 18 the long awaited event ar- rived as SUMNER departed Golfe Juan heading for turn over to the USS MOALE at Pollensia Bay- and Home. ! - IIIIllllllllmIImumnmanumm-sunnlnnlillllll mf Q' :ww ggggiggiisr ww SHIPPING OVER EXERCISES QKX. w::'?:lf - fflg QX wwx m.. V :f ' AX . ' ' 'gi X ' Q11 ' .Lmrlffff '- Q' .,-1 - 0 4 Y ,ff Q Q x xx.. .H EN .Q Q, , ::f"ig7Wf' Q, wx XX ,, Q zwzf? . 1 , xii ' ., if '1"."" V .NX 53" gg Sk? g Bw.-' v gi' 'Al' . H x A i Q x 2 f , ...,. ,M VM, Ax 'fb'-, Navi? 5, 1 of ' ,, Q ,E '51 ' P ' SH N 'w , , V., , 'K- , . ., ,, Q ybqw' 9 of B M , Y ' 3 Ki, f ff Mffff 541 1 W fwmy ,wwkff ,W f '94 gfr awivfyyf ff, X fi W' W1 ,A J 4 ,QM ,UW M 41 , i 6. 17:1 .f f' ' n f , f 4 Q ww if Q ,qw W' f , if o I ff: mf v ZW f mg A4 f . "fi y M 4 ' A V11 71' ,uf 5' e . . , ,I X 2 we 'Dua ,J K .. N55 A' T Y VV Ike" The Lust'Thne ' "For Bravery above and beyondthe cull of Duty"--Fire in magzine 33- me-....a-M .ISN HOME ' f .- 1 I 9 L 4 i I E I f 16 4 Q 4 2 r S F 5 WHY WE WERE THERE .... Why did we leave MaYP0ft for seven momlfj and travel a third of the waY afolfnd the WSH d to operate in a distant sea? WIIY did th? United States spend the money' use the Ships,-any Separate us from our families for this cruise. The U.s. SIXTH Fleer, locafed in We Med' iterranean Sea, is as sound an expendltufe Qf men, ships, and SUPP1ieS as can be made m this day of international tensions. The SIXTH Fleet has become a symbol of strength to our friends as well as a mighfY SYmb01 of our de' termination to preserve liberty and jl1stiC6- The fleet in the Mediterranean is our instrument of national policygwith peace, stability, and good will as its major purposes. The aim of the SIXTH Fleet is friendship, but it also stands ready to wage any kind of warfare, limited or general, conventional or atomic. The nations of the free world are largely an oceanic confederation. Commerce on the seas is the lifeblood of the free world, and sea power ensures that this lifeblood may flow unhindered. The United States SIXTH Fleet is a part of the insurance for the free world in the Mediterranean. That is why we were there as part of that fleet. The SIXTH Fleet normally consists of fifty to sixty ships and is a balanced, mobile and self-substaining force capable of more d , ' estruc- trve power than all the forces of World War II combined. During its stay, Destroyer Squadron SIXTEEN, one of the several destroyer squadrons COUSWHIIY maintained in the Mediterranean, played a significant and vitalrole i ' h n t e SIXTH Elilet- Desfmyef Squadron SIXTEEN ships car- rie out the many tasks of which destroyers are Capable, such as, anti-submarine warfare, shore bombardment, and serving as rescue ships for carrier flight operations. Fast, versatile, alert and ready, the ships of our squadron ranged from Gibraltar to Istanbul, beyond into the Red Sea Black Sea, Indian Ocean, and Persian Gulf, doing their jobs with the best of our capabilitie 7 S. DESII V 162 The good-will component of the SIXTH Fleet's mission should not be overlooked. The in-port periods are primarily for recreation, sightseeing, and relaxationgyet- all hands fully realized that they also had the important task of being working ambassadors of good will for the United States. Church parties, exchange of official calls, parties for the underpriviledged and orphans, and distribution of clothes to the needy were some of the ways in which our good will mission was accomplished. Our destroyer- men made many personal contacts, developed many good friends, and found that mutual re- spect through better understanding resulted. Every man ashore on liberty was an individual representative of the United States. Our purpose in the Mediterranean was to assist in promoting friendship and good will among free nations and to ensure lasting peace. As Destroyer Squadron SIXTEEN departed the Mediterranean, the following words were re- ceived from VAM McDonald, Commander SIXTH Fleet, "The performance and generalsmartness of Destroyer Squadron SIXTEEN was commend- able during this Med Deployment. Destroyer Squadron SIXTEEN ships have been a credit to SIXTH Fleet and to all Destroyermen. To all hands ---- Well done". As the recent Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Arleigh Burke, once quoted: "We are destroyermen, a big ship man would have trouble filling our shoes. We like to think that we would have no trouble filling his. We have learned the lesson of self-reliance of not being afraid of a little rough living on any tough assignment. We are real sailormen, the destroyermen of the fleet. When things are getting too hard for anyone else, they're getting just right for us. 7 '1-"f ,,..-..,,......-in-'nn Captain Rexford V. Wheeler, Jn, USN is from Marion, Arkansas and attended the U.S. Naval Academy, graduating in 1937. His first sea duty was in the ,fgl1f10CfY dfpaft' ment aboard the cruiser USS VINCENNES, followed immediately by similar dl1fY in the destroyer USS GRIDLEY. Except for two years in USS VINCENNES and a Year and a half as Executive Officer of the battleship USS IOWA, Captain Wheeler's sea dUIY has been primarily destroyer duty, having some 12 years experience in destroyer type ships in both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets, which included USS LONG and USS MORRIS ifl ' ' estroyer Division 262, and Destr0Yef Squad' the Pacific and USS ROBERT A. OWENS, D rons FOURTEEN and SIXTEEN in the Atlantic. He has served one tour of duty in Washington, D.C., in the Office of Naval Opera- tions and another in the Bureau of Naval Personnel in addition to duty in France aS Chief of the Naval Branch for Foreign Military Assistance on the joint Staff of the United States Commander in Chief for Europe. From Paris, Captain Wheeler returned t0 Norfolk, Va. to take command of the fleet oiler, USS ELOKOMIN CAO-553 on Oct. 28, 1959. Captain Wheeler assumed his duties -as Commander Destroyer Squadron SIXTEEN on Ian. 7 1961 at Naples lt l H ' , , a y. e was relieved of this command on july 7, 1962 at Naples, Italy and d - ' ' procee ed to assume his new duties as a member of the International Relations Branch of Harvard University. In addition to two Bronze Star Awards with Combat "V", Captain Wheeler holds American Defense Medalg American Theater Medal, AsiaticfPacific Campaign Medal with five engagement stars, World 'War ll V' - ' S ' rctory Medal, Navy Occupations Service Medalg Philippine Liberation Ribbon ' h f ' wit two stars and National Defense Service Medal. .Captain Wheeler is married to the former Eleanor Harlcey of New Orleans, 1.11. Captain and Mrs. Wheeler have one daughter, Eleanor. 'Y f l CAPTAIN REXFORD V. WHEELER, -Jr. 1 5 I K l I l - CHANGE of COMMAND COMMANDER DESTROYER SQUADRON SIXTEEN on board United States Ship BIGELOW CDD-9425 at Naples, Italy 7 July 1962 COMMANDER SIXTH FLEET Vice Admiral David L. McDonald COMMANDER CRUISER. DESTROYER FLOTILLA SIX Rear Admiral John W. Ailes, III COMMANDER DESTROYER SQUADRON SIXTEEN Captain Rexford V. Wheeler, Jr. Captain Frederick M. Radel, Relieving COMMANDING OFFICER, USS BIGELOWKDD-9425 Commander E. Bruce F lory BAND SE LECTIONS NATIONAL ANTHEMS INVOCATION BY CHAPLAIN REMARKS Captain Rexford V. Wheeler, jr., USN Captain Wheeler reads his orders PRESENTATION OF SQUADRON PENNANT Commander E. Bruce F lory, USN 'Commanding .Officer of USS BIGELOW.CDD-9425 presents Squadron Pennant to Captain Wheeler REMARKS Captain Frederick M. Radel, USN Captain Radel reads his orders and relieves Captain Wheeler BAND SELECTIONS a . 2 E X A I 7 I Relieve you, Sir. ' ,,4.............-.1 Captain Frederick Malcolm Radel was born in Juneau, Alaska on luly 27, 1915, .and graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1939- He 1H1UauY Served m the Confmunfca' tions department aboard the cruiser, USS NASHVILLE, followed by a tol1r21S Cflglfleeflhflg officer in the destroyer USS DALE. As an Ensign aboard USS DALE in Pearl Harbor On December 7, 1941, he took the USS DALE to sea as Commanding Officer until sub- quently relieved the following day. Since departing the cruiser USS NASHVILLE, Captain Radel has spent the re- mainder of his ten years sea duty in Pacific Fleet destroyers. Captain Radel gained his experience as an executive officer aboard the destroyers USS COGHLAN and USS SHIELDS. Following a brief tour of duty in the Bureau of Naval Personnel, he returned to sea to command the destroyers USS MURRAY and USS WALDRON. In November 1946, he reported for duty on the Staff of Commander Hawaiian Sea Frontier followed -by a tour of duty on the Staff of the Commandant of the Armed Forces Staff College in 1948. He returned to sea in March 1950 as Commanding Officer of the destroyer GURKE d d ' h an serve wit the SEVENTH Fleet during the Korean War He returned ashore in October 1952 and served in the Office of Naval Operations and Staff of Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet before assuming command of Destroyer DiViSiOI1 92 in July 1958. Captain Radel has recently completed a tour of duty in the Office of Naval Operations before reporting to assume command of Destroyer Squadron SIXTEEN. In addition h S'l ' . to t e 1 ver Star Medal Captain Radel holds the Bronze Star Award with Combat "V"g Navy Unit Commendation Medal, American Defense Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with seven n u u i e gagement stars, Philippine Liberation Ribbon with one star, Korean Service Medal and National Defense Service Medal. Captain Radel is married t h f Q o t e ormer Frances Price of Glen Ridge, New jersey. Captain and Mrs. Radel have two children, Frances C. and Kerry M. CAPTAIN F. M. RADEL fe, S i X . .A X0 'M ffffwv Wffmi ,QQ ,wwf ,ga,,,A7-.lfffff-w.14. ,ZS M, M y UMM M M ' fm WL M' 0 'fffff TM 59 244 'M PM' ALM M M M Wffffwwiw "'ll'W'Q Qfami, J9,0,., ffm' h f7f4Qflg-. MMM' U-J mlm .P "7 ,,..,....- Captain Audley Hill McCain USN was born in McCormiclc, So. Carolina and attended schools and Th C' d ' e ita el College in that state before entering the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md. from which he was graduated in 1942. Upon being commissioned an Ensign in l942,he served in the destroyers BRISTOL, AULT and BLACK in the Atlantic, Mediterranean, and Pacific during World War ll. Assignments during this period included all ship departments, duty on the staff De- stroyer Flotilla THREE and Executive Officer of the BLACK. During this period he Was promoted through Lieutenant. The period immediately following the war, while con- tinuing to serve as executive officer of BLACK QDD-6665, was spent in operations in Northern China and the Yellow Sea, and the occupation of that area. A three year post graduate course in guided missiles was completed from 1946 to 1949 followed by assignment as executive officer of the destroyer RUSH which operated in the Atlantic, Mediterranean and in the Pacific during the Korean War. After com- pletion of this assignment he spent two years in research and development of weapons systemsn in the Bureau of Ordnance in Washington This was followed by a two year ' assignment at Supreme Headquarters Allied Pow- ers Europe in France, where he served on the staff of the Supreme Commander. Returning to sea, he assumed command of the destro e Ch l y r ar es J. Badger followed in l957 by assignment to and placing in comm' ' ission as Commanding Officer, the new destroyer BIGELOW, built at Bath, Maine.During this tour in BIGELOW C ' ' fl h' aptain McCain served as ags ip of the newly formed Commander South Atlantic Force in that command's initial visits to the African continent in the A l ' ' t antic and Indian Oceans and up the Congo River. This tour at sea was followed by a three year as ' ' of th B signrnent in program management . e ureau of Ordnance and later the Bureau of Naval Weapons where he dealt rin- cipally with the new weapons s P I I ystems now under construction or being introduced in ships of the Navy. From this assignment he assumed h f D t e rank of Captain and command o estroyer ONE SlX TWO in December 1961, , . ,. -.. .ar .- -.,-,-.-..v.-, ww,-,Y.---, -..-:-f-eff---.f.v. . .H Y .. ,, , CAPTAIN A.H. MCCAIN Xglllx' 1" K sse' - X W fW 4, 'ZQZZ f if if W . , ii, QMS, ,ly 4- wi-' 'QW f if ,," iff Qifflcx, Cf, CDR E.B. .Flory uss BIGELOWKDD-9431 DESTROYER SQUADRON SIXTEEN SKIPPERS CDR WJ. Flynn USS SUMNER CDD-6921 CDR G.L. Dickey, Jr, CDR K.F. oaneffe uss LAwE coo-my uss MCCAFFERY fnaseoy CDR N.C. Bohun USS WARE IDD-8655 CDR J.E. Murphy, Jr. USS ZELLARS IDD-777D CDR! Cote CDR H E Wolters USS HARWDOD KDD 8615 USS FURREST ROYAL CDD 8725 111asno11 16 sr F - ix, ' 1 1 i 1 1 V, ,, , J I f 1,3 !M,,jC l 1 1 l l I Lt William L. Lipford LI- M- BFUCC' Hall Operations Officer Communications Officer H 1 l LCDR Richard J. Lynch Q Chief Staff Officer l 3 P K Lt Verle Henricksen ' LTjg R. R. Black Lt Jerry R, Ryan Chaplam Electronics Officer Medical Officer 1 1 K: 4 iwffif C 1 W Iwo i I 1 l Qt-l LTjg j. E. Doffin, jr. , Relieving Chaplain ' C 1 William W. Oberst, RMC Cliff W. Kuehl, SMC Joseph E, Cornn, YN1 Norman "N" Williams, SD1 Bernard J' Trejchelf RM2 Thomas A. 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Suggestions in the Allen M Sumner (DD 692) - Naval Cruise Book collection:

Allen M Sumner (DD 692) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 14

1962, pg 14

Allen M Sumner (DD 692) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 5

1962, pg 5

Allen M Sumner (DD 692) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 56

1962, pg 56

Allen M Sumner (DD 692) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 72

1962, pg 72

Allen M Sumner (DD 692) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 32

1962, pg 32

Allen M Sumner (DD 692) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 23

1962, pg 23

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