Allegany High School - Alleganac Yearbook (Cumberland, MD)

 - Class of 1943

Page 1 of 112

 

Allegany High School - Alleganac Yearbook (Cumberland, MD) online yearbook collection, 1943 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 112 of the 1943 volume:

4 1 x J 3 E I .u 24 QQ E E 1 5 E S L Q 3 E ! E 5 E a '1 i 5 E 1 U 2 E I: 5 5 J -i 1 1 1 -i 5 fi 4 1 i 1 E E 4 1 1 f Q 2 I E 5 i i A . 4 F f -1 ii 5 1 Q J 1 J 13 . A E 4 THE TWENTY-SECOND EDITICN EDITED BY Ross LEE WILLIAMS FRANCES Rum: Co-Editors-in-Chief ELAINE H1nsH BETTY MACEARLANE E Co-Business Managers RITA MILLENSON VERONICA KOMPANEK Advertising Manager Adviser THE l943 ALLEGEWI I gs an is 2 E 5 2 5 2 f 2 Z3 sx 3 5 g 5 2, 5: 2 wi i if 3 . i 'z fQ'iii'?i" , ' ' ' 5 i -' -W K ' H' f K k w 1 V ll..- We if 1 5' THE ALLEGEWI 1 9 4 3 ALLEGANY HIGH SCHOHL CU RLAN MARYLAND X X Xxsif W Vk XJ! m g? We E D I C A T I 0 A' To those whose lives are the personification of unselfish devotion. . . . To those whose courage and conviction make them a bulwarlc against imperial aggression. . .' . To those whose fearless daring sends them boldly into unknown peril .... To those who calmly lay aside their own desires and ambitions, to give themselves whole-heartedly to the perpetuation of a universal ideal .... To the scores of Alleganians who are now de- fending and serving their country with the same loyal spirit with which they once served their school .... To our men and women in the service. . . . We, the Class of 1943, humbly dedicate this, the 1943 Allegewi, our chronicle of an historical year. 'ix QM Z ' 1 U. if X - 1lif,N A . 'fm N .,l,x..' 7 , ,gf ff X 542, Q X, fx QIAQL ,gf X U" if Xsl il" '25 xg, FQ -fs M7 17 gy? . 3 my ,VC yi , W W M The 1943 Allegewi, with the realization that life at Allegany High School is but a tiny portion of a complex national and international life, from which it cannot be completely isolated . . . that this year, dominated by the powers of militarism and instilled with the burning fires of patriotism, should hold a significant place in the reservoirs of memory. Thus, in portraying the high spots of 1942- 1943, both academic and extra-curricular, it is our hope that when years have passed, this book will bring back memories of Allegany and world events that were taking place at that time. 1 . ., 1 -MI-N 3, A, Jigw , . L.,,...f,-...., 4 ,.,- . fc 1 - X, ,fyff ' 1 x 1 xv V rl ,, -, ,,,.,f- X 1 ,,. M. ,,,,-,.,A..,- , , I 1 1 x. X' AY L X. 3 ff f 'N ,fx-ni NN X YA 5 N1 1 VQ1131-N mpg. rvq 1? 1 :L A f rg- . ,-, 'n ,' 1 1 Q ,' ,65 1-,J gui' -.1-jf' S. 13" N, 3 1 ' 11' viyix r 'H XX .31 .- f 'N-it X Qifx UQ -1 ' Q ,f-:iff M x' X l- . 151.2 1 -1 " ' ' yj,ff'f I ' . 1 1 04, 1 1 , 1 - Qaf'fTT'7JjX1 1 V, A ff My 1 ,X - 3, , f 1'-. 1-1 174 ' ff' ' 11 - 1: K' ' 1 X1 4 ,. ' ' 1 g I ,,5,g-- .1 , 1.-1--"if"'1-'iff ,yrjigj ' 1: if-1 'gi"n"1' 1' ' ,3,L-1.,,."'J" x 'X"Afgf.llX if 1 . ' E71 1 ,. 11 X F' I4 1 ' LM l 14:1 .. 1 ,A N 1,1 Eiikl 1 1, ,---4-6710, 11 X V-45191412 12 'Q -',V .1 ' 1 rg - ,,, .1 .,.,L , ,-I , , , , J' 1Qf5:?"i! ,WMSTF fi E A 1 if Q-Q.: f1,,u,'i-51,3 5 1 1 1 KW ' . J 1.1.1gE-fififf 5. j 'A ff LXR MQ.. A' K' 1 ' 1 ,--'A"" ff I 1 I 1 ef ? if 1 .1 1 ' 1 X wt E 1 , 3 ff 1 1 1 .Q K ij' -A V I A ' E f 1' 'X I V' y J -, 1 sy-- .. K , I f" W.. X- W -' 11.41-f:'--2 . 'z - ' '1j,'w215-B - 4 'v 4 1 191' we 1 -fr, - 'Tx 12 V' ' . , V . ". i' ,f. 1 'ii 1 x J I 1 1 ...H -.Mu.,....s-:nissan AD INISTI2 TIDN AND IZACULT And we get our share of mental drill . . . We meet them in the inner sanctum . . . "Will you please tell Iohnnie to come straight home after school?" . . . "Make me five transcripts of record" . . . From one extreme to the other run the multitude of daily tasks confronting Mrs. Leyhe, school secretary . . . "Unexcused . . . one detention" . . . if office walls could speak, those would be the Words one would hear as Mr. Ball and Mrs. Higgins, as- sistant principals, perform in their capacity of dealers in detensions . . . While behind the bars of his tell- er's Window, Mr. Curry, keeper of the coffers, keeps our sums in cir- culation. They put us through Dorothy Campbell Blackburn . . . founder of Allegany house our manual paces and charming example for her "girls" . . . Albert Loper . . . one of those drawing personalities . . . Helen Klinestiver . . . enthusiastic supervisor of pots and pans . . . Iohn "Doc" Wol- ord good natured peddler of industrial arts . . . Marie Rich- mond overseer of needle pushers . . . George Gibson . . . Woodworks Wonder lad . Helen McFerran . . . she smiles, even when she makes the girls eat oatmeal. They Pwr us on FACULTY 1943. the defensive . . . In command of mathematical Gilbert Glime . . . just an ol' suave smoothie . . . Eliza- maneuvers. . . beth Meyers . . . can she play basketball? Wow! ! . . . Foy Curry . . . Witty guardian of Alco's Worldly possessions . . . Mary Ann Wheat . . . she gave us up for Allan . . . Rose Schrnutz . . . now you listen to me . . . Mrs. Simpson Knot picturedl . . . room 206 after school. They were allied with Pearl Eader . . . Alco's William L. Shirer . . . Mary the English . .. Sowerby . . . efficiency personified . . . Anna B. Higgins . . . oh, for the day when they ration detentions . . . Orpha Bonita Pritchard . . . shades of Shakespeare . . . Ieannette Holzshu . . . just give me a man like the "Virginian" . . . Veronica Kompanek . . . pleasant relief from faculty standards . . . Virginia Dixon . . . "and she Walked with dignity and grace" . . . Margaret W. Long . . . and she still has time for Iohn and the baby . . . Mary Isabel Griffith . . . Hark! Hark! the lark! C95 1943 FACULTY df4vttff0nfZ0yS for e uca zona Jeeps . . . They interpreted current Herman Ball . . . he sure was "on the ball" . . . Mary communiques . . . Rice . . . "now when I was in Mexico" . . . Mary Murray . . . just another name tor Alcohi Mirror . . . Olive Simpson . . . "united We stand, divided We fall", . . We fell . . . Dora Richard . . . the first musketeer . . . Nell Hawkins . . . the second musketeer . . . Mar- garet Baker . . . World history, World problems, World peace, Whewl I l . . . Anna Nicht Knot pictured! . . . sentry, on guard! I ! Promoters of physical Alfred Fritz . . . hammer banger for "Arsenic and Old fitness . . . Lace" . . . lane Grindel . . . good goods comes in little packages . . . Kate G. Curry . . . guardian of the witty guardian of Alco's World possessions . . ,Eugene Hopkins . . . good ol' Iakie, he's always the same . . . Lucille Houck . . . Allegany, .Red Cross and George . . . Walter Bowers . . . the strong silent type. 1105 Always equipped with FACULTY 1943 a quiz barrage . . . Dealers in camouflage, Stella Moyer . . . keeper ot the archives . . . Mrs. interpretation, furlough Rogers . . . little one. what now? . . . Mrs. Bruce . . . posi- fun and fanfare . . . tive poster promoter . . . Mrs. Roe . . . "now We had a system" . . . Mrs. Perry . . . Sherlock Holmes ofthe library . . . Dorothy Willison . . . "Oh-h-h-h say, can you see?" Anna Webster lnot picturedl . . . "All Gaul is divided into three parts." Chemical Warfare division Ruth Finzel . . . "Crissie's" little sister, heart and brain and quartermaster Woman . . . Mrs. Caldara . . . "I belong to Ioe" . . . Ianet corps . . . Anderson . . . firm believer in visual education . . . Ellen McKenzie . . . the third rnusketeer . . . Clair Livesay . . . specializes in corsages when not in the retail selling case . , . Harold C. Wickard . . . "Talk to me about myself" . . . Irene Lapp . . . stamp and bond queen . . . Mrs. McGoury . . . now, children, come With me iAndy Sullivan devoteel . . . Hilda Willison . . . protege of Gregg, the shorthand man . . . Theresa Nicht Knot picturedl . . . money raiser deluxe. llll A xxx , X xg 4 R? ff K X N7 if it TI G .,liii,.f Our ranks . . . our classes . . . Seniors with their good-humored superiority and guarded pres- tige .... Juniors with their eager ambition and jolly antics .... Sophomores with their newly found sophistication and ardent anticipation .... Fresh- men with their restless activity and vibrant chal- lenges .... Eighth graders with mischievous intent and Seventh graders with wide-eyed bewilderment. Attention .7 l Officers . . . battalions . . . pass in review. 4 W. - 4 . , 3' THE CLASSEI 1943 SEN IORS They led us over the top . . . Rossnr FULLER ................ President Lmwoon ROBINETTE .... Vice-president NANCY TAYLoR ..............., Secretary IOHN GQRMAN .....,.......... Treasurer Miss THERESA Ntcr-rr ........ Adviser And here they are int t upon some command . . Miss Nicht, "Linny". Nancyh Bob and "Gummy". II--7 4- But when We're called to muster A On life's great battlefield . . . To leave our Alma Mater With sorrow ill concealed . . . Count us not lost to Allegany, For in our places new . . . Our hearts will ever honor The glorious white and blue Four years . . . memorable years . ,. . scarred by failures . . . adorned by successes . . . spent sparingly by some . . . lavishly by others. Four years . . . gone, except to be relived in reminiscence . . . to find resurrec- tion in the highlights stored in the corner cupboard of memory. Freshmen . . . l939 . . . we found Societas Iuvenum Dramaticorum . . . junior dramatic club . . . Hume Annan wins the scholastic honor meclgtl. We Were proud. Sophomores . . . 1940 . . . we crash the athletic gate . . . Lois Piper, lean Moore, and Shirley Diedrich feature in girls' varsity basketball . . . Iohn Gorman makes his debut on the gridiron with the varsity eleven . . . and Frances Rudd takes laurels in scholastic competition. We were ambitious. Iuniors . . . 1941 . . . our ambitions begin to see realization . . . our leadership begins to be felt. Three of our girls are cheered with the varsity basketball champions . . . and three of our boys take corresponding honors with the male hoop quintet. Senior prestige is threatened as Wilton Sykes tl4l The ALLEGEWI 1943 becomes drum major . . . Lewis Everline takes declamation honors . . . and Henry Strock captures the scholastic honor medal. We were eager. Seniors . . . l942 . . . we ride at the controls . . . trying to keep an even keel in the rush of time and events. Hume Annan becomes Mirror editor . . . Rose Lee Williams and Frances Rudd assume command of the Allegewi . . . seven men are elected all-city football stars . . . a year of champions. Along with skating parties . . . the V-Hop . . . football and basketball . . . junior- senior prom . . . senior prom . . . "Arsenic and Old Lace" . . . we became war-conscious. Civil air patrol . . . physical fitness . . . pre-flight aeronau- tics . . . adoption of a Victory Corps program . . . all gear school life to a war-time pace. Graduation . . . 1943 . . . another chapter . . . new characters and new scenes . . . new thoughts and new deeds await our challenges. How shall they be met? We cannot know . . . we do not know. . . . Here we were when we first came here . . . But oh look at us now . . . 1 msn 1943 SENIORS We thought wefd never make it, but here we are . . . JOSEPH ANDREWS "Andy" . . . blonde, taciturn Adonis . . . easily succumbs to the arms of Morpheus when he's in an academic atmosphere . . . Betty's favorite. HUME ANNAN "Dopey" . . . conscientious, hard- working, sincere editor . . . cau- tious caretaker of Hi-Y funds . . . cheerful pal . . . always ready to be a plug for someonefs prank . . . "scoop snooper." FLOYD BARTLETT A "Chester" . . . willing worker . . . tall, blonde . . . constant com- panion of "Dopey" . . . bowling addict . . . ideal bachelor. ' DONALD BASILIO "MeatbaII" . . . dark, fun-loving . . . never serious . . . always "pulling" jokes . . . on football and basketball squads . . . has his serious moments. IOSEPH BEAL I "Sleepy" . . . spasmodically awake . . . baritone jet-maker . . . miniature Thomas Edison who ex- pects to spark many a plug. DONALD BECK I "Dandy Don" . . . "Ace' . . . tall, dark, husky athlete . . . came to Alco in his senior year . . . keeps everyone guessing on his heart throbs-usually in hot water. LOUISE BECKMAN "Becky" . . . brunette . . . wil- lowy Winterette . . . can laugh at the driest jokes . , . loves Saturday nights with the Navy. IOYCE BESTWICK "Bessie" . . . tall, English blonde . . . makes music the love of her life . . . looks forward to higher training . . . ambitious student . . . loves to cook and keep house. ALBION BIGGS "AI" . . . tall, serious, and sin- cere . . . friendly hello greets all his friends . . . can be seen work- ing hard at Murphy's on Saturday . . . track fan. EDWARD BOCH "Baldy" . . . mechanical minded . . . a big tease . . . studious . . . wears a perpetual grin and tre- quently gives in to hearty laughter. BETTY BOWMAN "Honey" . . . always a smile . . . has a lovely shoulder to cry on . . . versatile male interests . . . finds hers in Murphy's on Saturdays . . . Ford's or Central at other times. AUDREY BREESE "Punkie" . . . Hospital Room's Florence Nightengale . . . are you kiddin'? . . . frequently seen at Circle lnn . . . l-A classification. PAUL BROCKEY "Brock" . . . swell personality . . . very amiable . . . pleasing smile . . . perfect example of con- geniality. DAVID BROWNE "Dave" . . . tall, with that clean cut look . . . quiet smile conceals a merry wit . . . conscientiously in- spired . . . makes a lot ot noise on his baritone horn. PAUL BUCHANAN "Buck" . . . terse and tuneful majors in friends, minors in activi- ties . . . flashy dresser . . . peren- nial sleeper. I I. Andrews H. Annan' 1 F. Bartlett DT Basilio , I. Beal D. Beck L. Beckman I. Bestwick A. Biggs E. Boch B. Bowman A. Breese P. Brockey D. Browne P.. Buchanan C167 BETTY BURKETT "Bet" . . . fashion firsts in hair do's . . . good sport . . . genu- ine warmth of feeling for everyone . . . speedy speaker. GLORIA BURKETT "Burkie" . . . short but sweet . . . quiet and amiable . . . loves to read and type . . . walks like a movie star . . . definitely an in- dividualist. MARGARET BURRELL "Peggy" . . . linguistic aptitude . . . quietly charming . . . never a victim of procrastination . . . de- pendable is the word for her . . . teachers' idol. MARION BURRELL Miss Moyer's apprentice . . . Peggy's big brother . . . works hard after school hours . . . does his bit in defense work. HELEN CHAPMAN "Chip" . . . blonde and cheer- ful . . . one of those quiet efficient people . . . usually seen paired with Alice . . . just recently be- gan to notice men . . . has a pas- sion tor doll clothes . . . never on time. EARL CLITES "Shorty" . . . comes to school early just to watch the crowd go by . . . not a care in the world . . . cheery antidote for Gremlins. BETTY CONRAD Sophistication keynote of her pleasing personality . . . won't be seen without her earrings . . . takes to skating and dancing . . . and . . . Ioe. IAMES COOK "lim" . . . blonde top . . . has his quiet moments . . . warms Ford's corner . . . happiest at hunt- ing season. CLARA CROWE Quiet, demure, blonde . . . nice to know . . . always reliable . . . neat dresser . . . never says a word out of place . . . keen eye for brunettes. ROBERT CUNNINGHAM "Bob" . . . Seems to like mu- sic . lopes lazily from class to class . . . tall, willowy structure . . . slaps at bass viol. ROBERT DALTON "Bob" . . . another oi Allegany's senior new comers . . . has a singular flair on the trumpet . . . also a craze for bright plaid shirts . . . makes many feminine hearts flutter . . . one of the Ford addicts. B. Burkett G. Burkett M. Bun-ell M, Bun-ell E. Clites B. Conrad I. Cook C. Crowe R- Dalwn A. Davis D. Davis I17l l I H. Chapman R. Cunningham T. DeHart CHARLES DAUM iNo picturel "Charlie" . . . a carefree fellow with plenty of friends . . . brilliant mind . . . in- dependent nature . . . a diiterent sense of humor . . . gum chew- ing tire marshal. ANGELA DAVIS Quiet, reserved . . . model student . . . con- stant pal of brother, Johnny . . . takes care ot the "kids," DOROTHY DAVIS "Dot" . . . quiet conscientious commer- cial student . . . serv- ing secretarial appren- ticeship in vice-princi- pal's office. THOMAS DE HART "Ted" . . . or "Tom- my Ted" . . . some- times even "Sticky" . . . pals around with Iohnny . . . "Dick's" big brother . . . what's in a name? 1943 SEN IORS Draft bait, altar meat, or perhaps to become college "bread" . . . PAUL DEVORE "Billy Buck" . . . likes to hunt . . . constantly laughing . . . first on the school bus daily . . . going as well as coming. SHIRLEY DIEDRICH "Didy" . . . she aims to please . . . always exhibits friendly en- thusiasm . . . petite blonde . . . can boast athletic prowess . . . one of Alco's "five o'c1ock shad- ows" . . . definitely interested in Albright. CLARK DIXON Or "Dixon Clark" . . . teachers usually reverse the name . . . loves both swimmin' and women . . . an ambitious soda jerker . . . craves plaid shirts . . . the brighter the better. , WILLIAM DOWLAN "Bill" . . . boasts ownership one car . . . no tires . . . and a fiddle . . . favorite class is orchestra period . . . lets his fiddle speak for him. DROLIS DRIVER HD. I." . . . pet hate is his name . . . hence the intials . . . dark wavy hair . . . quiet appearance belies his fun loving character . . . always ready for a laugh . . . movie usher . . . currently featured with a blue-eyed blonde. PAUL EATON "Eat" . . . proud possessor of red car . . . runs races with the tardy bell . . . self-styled candi- date for a bachelor's club. WILLIAM EASTON "Bill" . . . boon to the Alcohi CLARENCEHDOOLITTLE. 1 ' Mirror staff . . . high school's gad Dooey . . . conscientious must- about - 4 . always on the loose cian who lives with his trumpet . . . for gossip - - - crazy about the really hits out with "Stardust" . . . oposite sox- always at Fords . . . usually sur- rounded by femmes . . . regular FLOYD EMERICK class wit. "Em" . . . extremely quiet . . . always eating candy . . . ardent sport fan . . . everybody's friend. HELEN ERLING "Early" . . . quiet unassuming student . . . loves to dance . . . one of those Catherman summer school students . . . always jotting down shorthand . . . has quite a memory. DONNA ANN EROR "Donnie" . . . black curly locks . . . usually in hot water . . . ath- letic, active . . . crazy about "red" . . . "Oh! I don't know." LEWIS EVERLINE l "Lew" . . . candid camera en- thusiast . . . blonde . . . declama- tion winner in junior year . . . wants to be a minister . . . lover of fun . . . travels to Mt. Savage frequently. THERESA LEE EYLER "Tres" . . . also "Windy" . . . one of those gay, full of fun people . . . ready supply of gossip . . . always ready to try something new . . . inclinations go toward drum majoring. EDWARD FERGUSON "Ed" . . . rolls a mean skate . . . has a steady date . . . fun loving . . . fun maker. MARGARET FLECKENSTEIN Popular 'lGus" . . . contagious giggler . . . astronomy and history club prexy . . . inherits sister Mary Louise's scholastic record. P. DeVore S. Diedrich C. Dixon C. Doolittle W. Dowlan D. Driver P. Eaton W. Easton F. Emerick H. Erling D. Eror L. Everline T. Eyler E. Ferguson M. Fleckenstein ll8l CHARLES FLINN BRANDON FULLER "Charlie" . . . another Don Iuan of the skating rink . . . particu- larly partial to Hi-Y parties . . . amiable feller who always takes his time. ADA FORD Keeps abreast of current events "King" . . . Wrigley's best cus- tomer . . . mathematical whiz . . . ' outspoken . . . optimistic . . . never on time . . . dotes on arguments . . . smooth looker . . . athletically inclined. . . . accordianist . . . ardent fol- lower of 4-H trails . . . has won lots of prizes . . . handy with a needle. ROBERT FULLER "Bob" . . . popular prexy for three years . . . likeable person- ality . . . dry humor . . . sports scribbler , . . always in a rush . . . IACK FOSSET "Spigot" . . . tall "Thin Man" . . . never lets studies interfere with his high school education . . . popular theatre usher . . . has definitely prefers blondes . . . mo- del leader. IOHN GORMAN "Bubbles" on the brain. HELEN FRANTZ "Gummy" . . . gridiron power- h use . . a most virile species ol o . the masculine gender . . . hard to Tall, sophisticated redhead . . . pet hobby is art . . . loves to de- sign clothes . . . and does . . . sings and plays piano . . . makes redheaded duet with Iane. IOSEPHINE FRAZIER "Fraz" . . . always has a smile for you . . . ready to pick you out something special in cafeteria. BETSY FREEMAN "Happy" . . . Hollywood smile . . . possesses those obedient locks . . . has a flare for neat, stylish clothes . . . one of those adorable "nuts" . . . a little old New York lingers in her talk. rile . . . generally informed . . . one of those athletic "brains." CARL HAMMERSMITH "Buss" . . . 6' 2" hunk of a man . . . gridiron linesman . . . in tact always a linesman . . . personi- fication of amoeboid action . . . always waiting for "Rue," LEONARD HAPPE "Boris" . . . successful declaimer . . . sports a flashy Pontiac . . . talented violinist . . . a punctual worker . . . always in a good hu- mor . . . Alco's Boris Karloff. C- Flinn A. Ford I. Fossett H. Frantz B- Freeman B. Fuller R. Fuller I. Gorman L- HSPPE W. Harden C. Hartman D. Harlsock U fl9l I. Frazier C. Hammersmith M. Hartsock WILLIAM HARDEN "Bill" . . . backstage boss . . . perlorms equally well in front ol the lights . . . Miss Lapp's right hand man . . . ready to step in and lend a hand . . . Alco's Adoli Hitler. CHARLOTTE HARTMAN "Roxy" . . . petite . . .flirtatious . . . tern- permental . . . iastidi- ous dresser . . . saucy . . . a dose of viva- city . . . likes the op- posite sex trom Fort Hill. DORIS HARTSOCK "Hawaiian" . . . could be because ot those beautiful dark tresses . . . sophisticated and sedate . . . loves to dance and skate . . . crazy about the Navy. MARY HARTSOCK Accomplished commer- cial student . . . the gal at the war stamp booth . . . certainly deserves Army-Navy I "E" award. CATHERINE HAST "Katie" . . . gay, darling blonde . . . knows how to pick good clothes . . . and wears them . . . holds sincere friendship . . . kind to all who know her . . . hardly ever seen without Rusty. ELAINE HIRSH "Hirshie" . . . spontaneous gig- gles accompanied by frequent blushes . . . fashionable . . . con- scientious in her work . . . and in her play. STEPHEN HORNICK "Steve" . . . tall . . . soda jerker . . . fiendish ice cream fan . . . always building model airplanes . . . quiet manner . . . pleasant to brown hair . . . teacher's favorite know- MARY ELIZABETH ICE "Lizzie" . . . short blonde . . . . . . commercial student . . . Ray's big sister . . . pairs with Mary Winebrenner in a Mutt and left duo. BERTHA IENKINS Tall, intelligent, unruffled . . . si- lent type . . . warm-hearted . . . believes in getting things done on time. DOROTHY IENKINS "Dot" . . . busy, bonny, blithe . . . "Sweet as a Song" . . . lov- able, jolly . . . not a care in a car load . . . stout with dimples . . . takes dictation from Barney. IOHN IENKINS "Iivin' Iohn" . . , steady guest of the "Y" Victory Room-also ct frequent guest in Alco's inner Sanctum. LUCY HELKER Dependable . . . hard worker . . . silent . . . does much, talks little, . . . secretary to Miss Richmond. EVA HENRY "Evie" . . . unsophisticated, lov- able . . . dependable as the 8:46 . . . aspiring typist . . . soft voice . . . easy going . . . Queen ot the Dairy . . . pals with Sylvia . . . beautiful hair. EDNA HERATH "Ed" . . . pleasing . . . studious . . . an enthusiastic swimmer . . . quiet and unruffled disposition . . . usually found with the twins. MILDRED HINEBAUGH "Milly"-free and easy attitude toward all things . . . pleasant conversationalist . . . keeps her hair to a "T" . . . lets Van oc- cupy most of her time. L. Helker E. Henry E. Herath M. Hinebaugh S. Hornick M. E. Ice B. Ienkins D. Iznkins G. Iones L. Iones D. Kagy D. Kammauf C203 C. l-last E. Hirsh I. Ienkins GLORIA IONES "Glo" . . . nice, neat, naive . . . "Words are few but thoughts are many" . . . keeps the neatest black tresses. LOUISE IONES "Minnie" . . . tall, blonde and willing . . . dependable and warm hearted . . . says lit- ' tle but misses little. DOROTHY KAGY "Dot" . . . timid, sweet . . . new to Al- legany . . . midwest- ern drawl . . . an all- round co-ed just wait- ing to be discovered. DORIS KAMMAUF "Dori-tie" . . . gor- geous shining brunette . . . spends time jitter- bugging with Iack . . . usually seen with Gin- nie or Milly . . . but has the tiniest feet. 1943 SENIORS Praise the Lord, for we upheld tradition . . CHARLOTTE IANE KEEFAUVER Most dependable . . . accommo- dating, domestic type . . . always a good follower and fast friend. CHARLES KELLOUGH "Chick" . . . tricky on the "T" tactics . . . allergic to dancing . . . which doesn't bother Evelyn . . . holds down street corners . . . pipe add-ict . . . now an Alco con- tribution to the Air Corp. ROBERT KLINGLER "Bob" . . . perpetual joker . . . easy going . . . chewing gum spe- cialist . . . smooth dancer . . . pleasant conversationalist . . . shows up in long distance sports . . . constantly coupled with Mary Margaret. DOUGLAS KOLB "Doug" . . . tall, thin "English" type . . . an accent to thrill you . . . Basils "little" brother . . . at- traction of several Alcoeds . . . re- cipient of one of Miss Eader's rare A's. ROBERT KOLB "Bob" . . . blimey . . . lady's man . . . has passed his signet ring to someone else's finger . . . quite the "ole" French whiz . . . just ask Bob. LORRAINE KORN "Korny" . . . winks habitually . . . and with good results . . . note third finger, left hand . . . her agreeable disposition also defies spinsterhood. BETTY KREGER "Bets" . . . genial, silent type . . . always seen with big sister's car . . . that is, before the era of A cards. HELEN KREILING "Twine" . . . dark, quiet unas- suming student . . . orchestra member of long standing . . . does- n't lean toward dating . . . balm to many a friend's trouble. RALPH LAING "Whitey" . . . "Tiny Tim" . . . dotes on cowboy names . . . chip- per chap who claims the privilege of being a bona fide blonde. DOROTHY LANDIS "Dottie" . . . flirtatious, attrac- tive brunette . . . fun loving "keed" with an eye for mischief and a mouthful of gum . . . jokes off really pleasing vocal chords. BEATRICE LAPP "Beatty" . . . homeroom house- keeper . . . craves dancing . . . "sweet" girl . . . silent partner . . proud commercialite. DOROTHEA LAUTERBACH "Dot" . . . sincere, sociable and fun, itself . . . loves to play basket- ball . . . intra-mural champ . . . self-styled. VIRGINIA LEASURE "Ginnie" . . . once was the smallest girl in the school . . . still hasn't grown much . . . crazy about skating . . . quite a big heart in that tiny body . . . brirniul of fun. DONALD LEE "Lefty" . . . handsome blonde . . . likes small dark girlfsl and "Hershey" kisses . . . heads var- city hoopsters . . . flashes those eyes in the friendliest way. ELIZABETH LEWIS "Betty" to you . . . easy to get along with . . . sincerely sympa- thetic . . . hard worker . . . you'll find her at the market after school hours. C. Keefauvcr C. Kellough R. Klingler D. Kolb R. Kolb L' Korn B- KFBEIBI H. Kreiling R. Laing D. Landis B. Lapp D. Lauterbach V. Leasure D. Lee E. Lewis f2ll 5 HELEN LEWIS "Shorty" . . . rightfully gains title form 59" stature . . . favorite past- time is eating . . . cheery, pleasant personality which gives in to prac- tical jokes. CARLSON LEWIS "Carl" . . . dark . . . coal black hair . . . teller of tall tales . . . al- ways talking about his "girls" . . . crazy about farming. IACK LINABURG 'lLinnie" . . . tall . . . blonde . . . tune twitterer . . . great capacity for friendship . . . makes a perfect partner for Doris. EDWARD LINDSEY "Eddie" . . . usually quiet and reserved . . . often seen plunging into cafeteria . . . frequents the basketball floor at the "'Y." ROBERT LLOYD "Bob" . . . Miss Simpson's prob- lem child . . . well dressed . . . humorous in his own particular way . . . friendly enthusisam . . . occasionally lapses into serious thought . . . has secret love ot dramatics. BRUCE LONG "Boots" . . . lazy . . . habitual home room period sleeper . . . tall . . . dark parcel of good humor . . . possesses a long slow, drawl. SARA IANE LONG "Sara" . . . quiet smile . . . good natured, neat and determined . . . a prize winning 4-H'er . . . domestically competent . . . lovely blonde feather bob. PHILIP LUCAS "Phil" . . . name means "lover of horses" . . . his favorite hobby is drawing them . . . honest to goodness blonde, speedy on the track and football field . . . par- ticularly adept at wise cracking. BETTY MACFARLANE "Lovie" . . . one of those typical redheads . . . a couple of freckles with a temper to match . . . al- ways thinks she is in hot water but comes out O. K. , , , pledges to work with plenty of zeal, and gets results. FRANCIS MARTIN "Zeke" . . . quiet agreeable and sincere . . . just a tinkering elec- trician . . . destined for a career of live wires. EDWARD MARTZ "Eddie" . . . a great fisherman? . . . quite ready to tell about "the one who got away" . . . seldom serious . . . habitual punster. C. Lewis I. Linaburg E. Lindsey R. Lloyd S. I. Long P. Lucas B. Macfarlane F. Martin M. I. Mason W. Mauck R. McCarty V. McCrea f22l H. Lewis B. Long E. Martz MARY IANE MASON "Still water runs deep" . . . likes to swim . . . chewing gum is her special ha- bit . . . claims it helps her to think. WANDA MAUCK "Wand" . . . tall, willowing senior . . . just arrived this year . . . sporty dancer . . . you'll find her in Ford's with Shirley or Carolyn. RUTH McCARTY "Gertie" . . . ami- cable . . . distinctive giggle . . . loads of fun . . . says lots and means lots . . . jester of commercial classes. VIRGINIA MCCREA "Ginny" . . . you can see that "redtop" for a mile . . . knows just how to fix it . . . and does . . . quiet disposition . . . boon to teacher's worries. 1943 SEN IORS And we really believe that Mthis is worth fighting fora' . . IOHN MCFARLAND Dark, good looking, "Mick" . . . you can count on him . . . model Hi-Y member . . . one oi Alco's best . . . has a serious side . . . more often on the gay side. IRMA MCINTOSH "Shorty" . . . jovial disposition . . . our efficient cafeteria cashier . . . look at her third linger, left hand . . . studious worker-a swell lriend. DONALD McINTYRE "Mac" . . . whizz on basketball court . . . suffers from study hall trouble . . . one of first to leave Alco's ranks to join those of Uncle Sam. RITA MILLENSON "Milly" . . . outstanding musical ability . . . busy, bonny, blithe . . . a mighty mite . . . handles num- erous tasks with equal skill . . . looks too young to be driving her own car. HELEN MILLER 'lBrownie" . . . blonde hair and big brown eyes . . . shy at iirst but warms up quickly . . . "neat- ness itself" . . . favorite saying . . . "Ain't that awful?" IUNE MILLER Iust "Iunie" . . . "lovely to look at . . . delightful to know" . . . and especially outstanding in declam- ation . . . likes to collect tie clasps . . . joined Alco's ranks from Fort Hill last year . . . senior's con- tribution to Victory Queen's court. MARY ELIZABETH MILLER "Betty" . . . greatest task is keep- ing her French and Spanish straight . . . plays bells in band . . . "F1ooch" . . . inlectuous grin contradicts her serious countenance. RANDAL MILLER "Randy" or "Sammy" . . . hon- est to goodness blonde . . . rather have "Freeman" take him for a ride than catch the 12:00 o'clock bus . . . radiator drummer. MARTHA MOFFETT No nickname . . . unless you'd consider "Mutfett" . . . dislikes ar- tificial people . . . crazy about cute gadgets . . . and sister Bar- bara . . . and Navy Blues-true, kind and sincere friend. ANNABELLE MONTGOMERY "Ann" . . . red hair . . . no tem- per to match . . . willing helper . . . specialty is her ready laugh . . . never seen without Catherine. DORIS MOORE Some call her "Funky" . . . al- ways going somewhere . . . or coming from somewhere . . . with a story to tell to go with it . . . pet dislike is French class . . . ia- vorite subject is "Bill." DOROTHY MOORE "Dottie" . . . friendly commer- cial student who takes to the skat- ing rinks for daily exercise . . . a "Popeyeian" disciple as she "aims to please." IEAN MOORE Sometimes gets "Puppet" . . . the studious half of the Moore twins . . . pet hobbies, poetry and athletics . . . played grand basketball when they had basket- ball . . . sturdy vertibra in the Hi-Y spine. IO ANNA MOORE "Iodie" . . . very dark hair and complexion . . . mainstay oi alto sections . . . large repertoire of jokes . . . which she's always ready to tell . . , can cheer you up in a minute. MARY MORRISSEY "Mor" . . . likes "Y" Victory Room . . . cuts a neat rug . . . majoring in the subject of Fort Hill boys on which she lectures frequently. E I. Mclderland E. Mclntosh D. Mclntyre R. Millenson H. Miller I. Miller M. Miller R. Miller M. Moffett A. Montgomery , D' Moore D- MODIS I. Moore I. Moore M. Morrissey .rg I23l 1943 SEN I ORS Through academic battles unscathed- sometimes not even touched . . . lOHltl NIES H ly inclined . . . one of those balms lohnny . ik. quietd. . lives to teachers' ruffled spirits. to eat... ies woo wor an model airplanes . . . "you get me!" VIRQQIA EARRISH h i 1 is lohn's Pet expression. grin muy tipicalssflgegdlg igfellf- LOUISE OGLEVIE gsi She displqiqg - - - Ccrqnpobellds "Lou" , , , petite pm-Cel of fem- Campbell Kid . . . amiable con- inine charm . . . mixed blonde type Ve1'SC!'li01'1UliST- topper . . . takes commercial but LA VERNE PAT-I-ON sornetirnles thinks commercial is --Puff' l I l keen sense of humor lakmg her' . . . self possessed . . . frank pleas- FRANCES QRNDQRF ing manner . . .-always agreeable "0mfe" , I I never too busy to . . . sports a diamond . . . likes help . . . pleasant smile for every- to Skate Ground- one . . . takes dictation from Mr. ALMA LEE PHILLIPS Webster . . . "That was clever!" - I U l has dated Dale for Years back. Has constant French worries . . . MILNOR OSWALD "Ossie" . . . popular, stocky ath- lete . . . Boy's Hi-y prexy . . . also swimming captain . . . handles favorite subjects are Leroy and brother Garland . . . used to sport her own car before rationing . . . says she's going to make athletics her career. both jobs efficiently . . . just as stubborn a line holder on the "T" LOIS PIPER team as swift a swimming ace . . . .150 1' tau bmfgene ' ' 'jcomf cr true AICC Campus leader- art1 ica eauty at s . . . oesnt need them . . . graceful and ac- DONALD PARKER complished swimmer and diver . . . "Don" . . . quiet type . . . but behind the scenes Worker on year- likes athletics . . . rather artistical- book and paper. EARL POORBAUGH "Pesky" . . . super duper football fan . . . "woman hater" . . . must have his joke in Commercial Law Class . . . frequent victim of "Is my face red?" BETTY PORTER Imperturbable . . . soft voice . . . one of those rare possessors of re- serve that make for a quaint charm. FRANCES POWELL "Pal" . . . bashful, roller skating enthusiast . . . lends a hand when needed . . . sincere pleasing per- sonality. LEAR POWELL Spohia's twin brother . . . com- era fiend . . . deceiving studious look . . . always on official busi- ness . . . need chewing gum? . . . ask Lear. IOHN RAFTER "Mott" . . . billiard shark . . . well-dressed . . . "Little Chun-L" ...ties a mean bow tie . .. usually pals with Ted and the gang. THOMAS RAHRIG 'iTom" . . . quiet, pensive good natured . . . chaplain of Boy's Hi-Y . . . hard to rile . . . free and easy attitude toward all things. l w l I. Nies L. Oglevie F. Orndorff M. Oswald D. Parker V. Parrish L. Patton A. Phillips L. Piper E. Poorbaugh U B. Porter F. Powell L. Powell I. Rafter T. Rahrig 6249 MARTHA RALEY "lakey" . . . blonde . . . big sister . . . always smiling . . . stu- dious . . casual personality . . . neat dresser. WILLIAM RAUPACH "Bill" . . . tall, good looking blonde . . . athletic . . . but ar- tistic . . . likes his "women" . . . Allegewi artist . . . secret heart throb of Alcoeds. WILLIAM REED "Bill" . . . also gets "Pete" . . . gay, mischievous blonde . . . al- ways ready to tell a cute joke . . . pretends to be quiet and mouse- like . . . smoldering volcano of mischief . . . pals the halls with Charlie. MARY DOWNEY REINHART "Downey" . . . a medium size brunette with a full sized personal- ity . . . usually underestimates her own abilities . . . gets big kick out ol everybody's thrills. IOHN REYNOLDS Never gets anything but "junior" . . . quite a baseball fan . . . you will usually catch him waiting or slipping notes to Angela. ELLA LOUISE RICHARDS "Ella" . . . Alco's gilt to the teachers . . . sincere, earnest sci- ence and music enthusiast . . . an accomplished seamstress and cook . . . occupies reserved spot on the honor roll. IOAN RILLING Iust Ioan . . . the excitable half of the twins . . . quite a charming "old maid" . . . the saying "Slam a door and the one that jumps the highest is Ioan" fits to a T . . . sports enthusiast. IUNE RILLING "lunie" . . . more sedate halt of the twins . . . except at basketball games . . . collects movie stars . . . is becoming quite a house- keeper. CATHERINE ROBINETTE "Kate" . . . llirtatious . . . swim- ming club fan . . . gigglesome . . . blonde hair, blue eyes combination . . . vivacious sport's enthusiast . . . never seen without Annabelle. LINWOOD ROBIN ETTE 'lLinnie" . . . athletic . . . pleas- ant personality . . . gets out of class legally ? ? ? . . . artistic beauty . . . dates "mythical" Ioy May Rogers . . . always in the "center" of things. RUTH ANN ROBINETTE "Annie" . . . one of those quiet unassuming students . . . works hard in the office . . . plays secre- tary lor Miss Willison. M. Raley W. Raupach W. Reed M. D. Reinhart E. L. Richards I. Rilling I. Rilling C. Robinette R. A. Robinette C. Robinson H. Rotruck G. Royce l25l I. Reynolds L. Robinette F. Rudd CAROL ROBINSON "Proxy" . . . blonde bombshell . . . favorite subject and pastime is Bob . . . crazy to try her hand at new lash- ions . . . likes to dab- ble in new dishes and tunes. HERMAN ROTRUCK "Chubby" . . . jov- ial . . . keen sense of humor . . . always alert for the bell . . . never gets a day's work done . . . a lirm believer in the tomor- rows. GLADYS ROYCE Dark complexion . . . black eyes . . . likable quiet personality . . . laughs a lot . . . inter- esting conversational- ist. FRANCES RUDD "Pee Wee" . . . one of our all-rounders . . . electrifying personality . . . typical coed . . . enthusiastic leader of our cheers . . . every- one's mainstay in time of trouble . . . infect- ous grin . . . always seen hither and thither with Dicky. 1943 SEN I ORS '6We did it before and we can do it again" . . . I ELIZABETH LEE SCHLUNT "Betty" . . . crazy about trips to Washington . . . cutest little hands . . . beautiful clothes . . . magazine and movie friend . . . an accomplished accompanist . . . al- ways ready to step in and help. WILLIAM SCOTT "Bill" . . . better known as "Scot- ty" , . . self confident . . . rare sense of humor . . . promising dramatic ability . . . has an individual touch . . . cra-a-zy about bright shirts and socks. VELMA SCREEN "Ve1" . . . blonde, sweet, and sincere . . . loyal member in mus- ical groups . . . loves to play cu- pid for all her friends . . . quaint and Winsome manner. PHYLIS SEDER Cute, short, pretty "Phyd" . . . lovely complexion . . . sports a bracelet with "Marvin" on it . . . has a hankering toward nursing . . . loves smooth dancing. OLIVE IUNE SEE "Iunie" . . . crazy about pas- tels . . . drawling talker . . . a grave charm attitude of detach- ed aloofness . . . another member of the "third finger, left hand" group. ALEX SHANER Iust Alex . . . six feet and sev- eral inches over . . . cartoon king . . . willing to help in homework trouble . . . one of Mr. Wickard's right hand men . . . chief of pro- jectionists. HAROLD SHANER "Mike" . . . Alco's Mickey Roon- ey . . . dashes hither and yon in his run-a-bout . . . has a yen for Centralites . . . usually pals with Mickey. EILEEN SHAPIRO "Rusty" . . . chic little redhead . . . seldom seen without "Katie" aclds life to every party . . . apt to be independent . . . allergic to tall, dark men. EDWARD SHERK "Eddie" . . . quiet and sincere student . . . camouflaged by a stu- dious countenance . . . bright crop of red hair stands out like a light . . . often flashes C.A.P.C. uniform. GEORGEANNA SHINHOLT "Georgie" . . . likes sports and dancing . . . eats soup through straws . . . hates to be rushed . . . indulges in the intricacies of tum- bling calisthenics. SYLVIA SHIRCLIFF "Shirttail" . . . brunette, brusque, beguiling . . . a sense of humor marked by a distinctive giggle . . . . . . low bangs and definitely not a highbrow . . . full of 1et's go. EDWARD SHULTZ "Dutch" . . . supreme indiffer- ence to the opposite sex . . . de- ceivingly studious looking . . . restive . . . reticent . . . "Why sure!" IACK SMITH "lock" . . . tall, dark, and hand- some . . . another of those foot- ball "he-men" . . . renowned wom- an hater . . . likes a "Wolf", how- ever . . . leader of study hall es- capist movements. MAXINE SMITH "Max" . . . personality plus . . . a swingeroo who can do justice to any jtterbug jive . . . possesses one of those rare delightful smiles. WILLIAM SMITH "Smithy" . . . everybody's pal . . . always seen with Van . . . quiet . . . boyish exuberance . . . confident slow-bashful grin. ' E. Schlunt W. Scott V. Screen P. Seder O. See A. Shaner H. Shanzr E. Shapiro E. Shark G. Shinholt S. Shircliff E. Shultz I. Smith M. Smith W. Smith f26l DON SYYDER The lad with the magic toe . . . city scoring champ . . . keeps his mind on his "stitcher" . . . pairs with Lindy for a "dizzy duet." MELVIN SNYDER "Met" . . . serious, sincere, straightforward . . . "on their own merits modest people are silent" . . . masculinity fused with gentle- manliness . . . pleasing personality. WILMA SNYDER Patient . . . conscientious com- mercial student . . . naive . . . tries anything once, provided its worthwhile. MARSHALL SOWERS "Sonny" . . . mainstay of the music department . . . deep bass voice . . . up to the minute dress- er . . . smooth dancer . . . crazy about his fiddle. VIRGINIA STOUFFER "Smoke" . . . "Lovely Picture in a Golden Frame" . . . captivating smile . . . postman's steady cus- tomer . . . steadies with Frank . . . mostly seen with Peg. HENRY STROCK "Moe" . . . one of the office standbys . . . proud possessor of the scholarship medal . . . has got a high future ahead in the busi- ness world. BLAIR STUMP Here comes Blair, smooth dancer and skater . . . conscientious, things are always lively when he's around . . . Mrs. Roe's protege . . . Allegany girls don't seem to sway him. GENEVIEVE MARIE SUDER "Gentry" . . . unobtrusive . . . Hollywood worshipper . . . got a one and only and keeps it one and only . . . naturalness itself. ALICE SUTTON "Sat" . . . sometimes gets "Al" . . . pleasant, demure brunette with blue, sparkling eyes . . . lovely naturally wavy hair . . . flower arranger. HARRY SWARTZWELDER "Swartz" . . . tall, smiling face . . . gets serious sometimes . . . he has a heart as big as he is . . . possesses a quiver provoking voice. WILTON SYCKES "Willie" . . . has music notes written all over him . . . long list of awards for his violin skill . . . drum major . . . left for college in February . . . remembers the trip to Baltimore. D. Snyder M. Snyder W. Snyder M. Sowers H. Strock B. Stump G. Suder A. Sutton W. Syckes M. Taylor M. Taylor N. Taylor C273 V. Stouffer H. Swartzwelder R. Taylor MARIORIE TAYLOR "Margie" . . . lots of fun . . , beautiful long page bob . . . smile strictly on the beam . . . fastidious dresser. MARTHA TAYLOR Medium size bru- nette . . . quiet and subdued . . . capable of much friendship and fun . . , loves to skate . . . prefers shadows to limelight. NANCY TAYLOR "Nanny-goat" . . . gracious and graceful . . . numbered high among our charming secretaries . . . beauti- ful hair . . . her heart belong to the Army. ROY TAYLOR A man's man . . . genuine . . . serious with a quick smile . . . plunging now and then in the social cir- cle . . . can't be trifled with . . . hefty football candidate . . . very in- dependent. VAN TETER "Turkey" . . . fine man on our undefeated squad . . . runs like made when the fire bell rings, and when Millie's in sight . . . clear cut . . . good case study for Dale Carnegie. ETHEL TI-IAYER Nice, neat . . . a model study hall student . . . takes life serious- ly . . . wants to be an accountant. ALLAN THOMPSON Amateur photographer . . . pleas- ant disposition . . . man of few words . . . independent . . . one of our first inductees. FREDA THOMPSON Small but mighty, just suits . . . full of talent . . . especially with a voice just built for swing or sway . . . quite an artist . . . doesn't have to be coaxed for dis- plays . . . favorite subject is "Iohnny." BETTY TWIGG "Bet" . . . short, sweet, and so- ciable . . . even-tempered . . . sings with earnestness . . . com- petent . . . neat brown hair. ROBERT WATKINS "Lefty" . . . navy blue and pin stripes give him that "tailored" look . . . Commercial Law sleep victim . . . another eligible. GENEVIEVE WEAVER "Gennie" . . . D. I.'s gal . . . blonde curly hair, most often with Milly or D. I .... loves skating . . . hospital room attendant . . . Wonderful to tell your troubles to. SHIRLEY WEAVER Curly hair, flashing . . . flirta- tious eyes . . . trim figure . . . has a flare for dancing and skating . . . pals with Carolyn, Wanda, and Georgie. EDITH WEBB Charming, willing worker . . loves her job in cafeteria . . . couldn't be that assistant of hers, could it? . . . toots a "horn" for A. H. S. band . . . looks after the kids. ROBERT WILKINSON "Wilkie" . . . tall, dark and hand- some . . . an attractive reserve . . . forms glamorous background for a striking redhead . . . teach- er's dream pupil . . . another of our early grads . . . daily race with tardy bell. IANE WILLIAMS They just call her "Ianie" . . . another of those quiet people with sweet dispositions . . . pals around with Helen always . . . belongs to all the choral groups . . . never too busy to lend a hand. E. Thayer A. Thompson F. Thompson B. Twiqg G, Weaver S. Weaver E. Webb R. Wilkinson I. Williams R. Williams R. L. Williams G. Willison f28l V. Tater R. Watkins I. Williams IOSEPHINE WILLIAMS "Iodie" . . . attrac- tive blonde with an in- dividual personality . . . one which chains the stronger sex as well as her weaker . . . loves all kinds of music. ROBERT WILLIAMS "Bob" . . . every school has one . . . shitty, tlashy quarter- back . . . the adjective "wilty" was created for him . . . French class comic . . . well- liked by all. ROSE LEE WILLIAMS "Boots" . . . a cute redhead with a special flare for originality . . . crazy about music and dancing . . , usually paired with Carol or Iodie . . . mostly Wil- kie . . . never too busy to try something new. GRACE WILLISON "Gracie" . . . curly blonde hair . . . usual- ly bedecked with rib- bons . . . the quiet and studious type . . . pals with the commercials. 1943 SENIORS And "these were the things we loved" . . . MARGARET WILSON IOHN WOOLARD Never called anything but "Peg" "lack" . . , one sees him, one . . . rather quiet but sweet . . . knows him, one likes him . . . easy constantly paired with "Stout" . . . ClCi1'1Cer - - - 12101169 - - - dates silky black hair . . . rare smile. "Windy" . . . tries hard to please. ARTHUR WINDEMUTH CAROLYN YANTORNO "Ike" . . . slight, silent, steady One of the vice principa1's right . . . likes his share in lun . . . hand "men" . . . seethes with se- hale lellow well met . . . promising cretarial ambition . . . neat bit of appearance . . . ready smie. dark vivacity . . . crazy about Coach Ball. MARY LEE WINEBRENNER "Hank" . . . lanky court star LODA MAE ZIMMERLA made her mark with Alco hoop- "Leda" . . . "Are you kidden!" sters . . . swell girl to know . . . . . . chewing gum . . . basic char- friendly . . . knows everyone. acter traits . . . heads war stamp , committee . . . among our most patriotic juveniles. MARY IEAN WISE "Ieanie" . . . dusty blonde, inter- ested in cameras and pictures . . . IOHN SLOAN matrimonially .inclined . . . note "Red" . . . flaming red hair . . . third linger, left hand . . . budding Allegdny's Superman . . . slow efficient secretary . . . keen sense and easy going . . . just made it of h11m0r- over the line with six majors. M. Wilson A. Windemuth M. L. Winehrenner M. I. Wise I. Woolard C. Yantorno L. M. Zimmerla Iol-in Sloan 1297 CLASS OF 1944 Seconds-in-Command . . RONALD KELLOUGH ,..........,..,..,.,.,,. ,.........,. P resident RICHARD ANDrRsoN ..... ...... V ice-President MARY Youm: ......... ....,,,, S ecretary THOMAS CARROS ,................. ,..,. T teasurer Mas. MARGARET W. LONG ....., .,,,.,,,,Y .,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, A d viser OC's now . . . but soon we'll lead the battalions . . . At ease . . . Tom, Mrs. Long, Mary Dickie and Rami, I A . Cecil, E. De Bouck, A. ' Clark, R. Dickens, W. Clise, L. Dicks, D. Ackerman, M. Bagent, W. Biggs, M. L. Cochran, I. Dodge, N. Africa, R. Bagley, M. Bowman, E. Conner, B. Doolittle, D. Allen, M. Baker, L. Bowman, R. Cowden, T. Douthett, D. Anderson, R, Barb, E, Brown, M. A. Darrow, W. Dreyer, R. Andrew, E. Bartlett, R. L. Bucy, B. M. Daum, M. A. Driver, W. Armstrong, H. Baumer, R. Bucy, R. Davis, I. Eisenberger, W. Armstrong, I. Beckman, B. Burton, I. Davis, W. Emerick, E. Armstrong, L. Beegle, E. Caldwell, C. Dawson, C. Emerson, G. Arthur, F. Beier, E. Carros, T. Dawson, Clem Evans, F. 1 4303 Ewing, M. Exley, C. Ferrone, R. Fisher, C. Fleegle, A. Fletcher, D. Fradiska, C. Fuller, D. Garey, M. Giatras, I. Giatras, L. Glass, B. Goodman, S. Gormer, R. Grabenstein, K. T Green, G. Herrell, O. Ice, R. LeChlif61', N- MUTIZ- B- Grove, L. Hershberger, I. Iankey, V. Lee, B. I. Matthews, S. Grove, Vernon Hess, I. Iewell, G. Lewis, E. L. Mawh1nneY- R- Grove, Vivian Hill, F. Iohnson, F. Lilya, R. McCol1Y- C- Grubb, W. Hilleary, B. I. Iones, L. R. Lohr, W. MCC0fm1Ck- C- Hadley, H. Hillock, B. L. Kellough, R. Long, L. McDowell, B- Hafer, M. Hines, I. Kemp, L. Lowery, H. MCD1-lffie, H- Hager, T. Heinze, D. Kesecker, M. K. Loyer, D. MClI1tYrf:', C- Hammond, B. Hixenbaugh, A. Kline, M. Lucas, M. MCKGIIZIS, M- Haney, B. House, C. Korn, R. , LUCUSI R- MGSSIHCIII, L- Hardman, E. Howsare, W. Kurtz, F. Macfarlane, I. Miller, B. Hart, A. Huff, E. Lancaster, S. Malamphy, M. Miller, L. Harvey, D. I. Hull, W. Lease, M. V. Martin, E. Miller, M- Helker, K. Humbertson, S. Leatherman, M. Martin, M. Mont. G. Herboldsheimer, N. Hutcheson, M. Leatherman, R. Martin, T. Morehead, W. Morgan, A. Mothersole, G. Myers, M. Naughton, I. Nelson, W. Noel, V. L. Oglebay, D. Oglebay, M. Oglebay, V. O'Neal, I. Oswald, V. Ours, B. I. Parrish, D. Paul, A. Poland, M. Price, I. Pritt, D. Reid, M. Reynard, E. Rice, R. Richards, T. Riehl, M. Ritter, I. Robertson, E. Robertson, V. L. Roy, F. Rush, A. Schaeffer, C. Schoenadel, I. Schry, I. See, R. Sell, R. Shatter, O. V. Spangler, R. Shaner, M. Steele, N. Shank, E. Steigerwald, M. Shank, G. Stein, G. Sherman, C. Sterne, O. Shircliit, M. F. Stewart, H. Shober, D. Stitcher, F. Shober, R. Stitcher, L. Simmons, I. Stonebraker, B. I. Simpson, N. Stotler, S. L. Sloan, I. Stoutier, V. Smith, C. Street, V. Smith, M. Strurtz, E. Smith, M. Swauger, E. Smith, R. Thayer, B. Sowers, L. Theis, W. t31l Thom, M. Thompson, V' Torbet, I. Towers, B. Trenton, I. Troxell, R. Twigg, H. Valentine, D. Vogel, B. L. Wadsworth, Walters, D. Walters, I. Walters, H. Ware, G. Weiss, K. Welsh, I. I I VVilliams, F. Williams, M. Williams, S. Wilson, A. Vfilson, VV. Winebrenner, I Wolfe, C. Wolfe, M. Yarnell, I. Yeager, R. Yoder, V. Young, B. Young, M. Addis, P. Bittner, A. Airesman, C. Bittner, B. Albright, L. Boyd, M. I. Allen, C. Briner, M. Atkins, B. Brode, S. Baily, M. Brotemarkle, I. Barnard, D. Bucki, U. Barnes, H. Burkett, P. Beals, O. Burton, M. L. Beals, W. Capaldi, W. Beeman, F. Chandlee, E. Bender, A. Chaney, L. Bender, M. Clauson, I. Berkley, S. Cloyton, E. Bishop, G. Clayton, M. Cochenour, C. Conner, B. Cook, I. Cook, D. Copp, K. Cox, I. Coyle, B. Cramer, B. L. Cramer, M. Cunningham, H. Daum, E. Davis, E. Dion, B. Dettinbaugh, M. De Hart, R. DeHaven, E. Diamond, I. Dick, A. Doman, S. Dorsey, M. Drew, C. Dumire, P. Durst, R. Durst, R. L. Earle, W. Ebert, D. Ebert, I. Emerick, I. Error, P. Everline, I. Ferrone, L. Finn, P. Firey, W. Fleek, H. Flinn, E. Ford, R. Foster, L. Fradiska, I. Freeman, I. Freno, R. Fresh, D. Frost, I. Gardner, V. L. Garlitz, L. Gaumer, I. CLASS OF 1945 Generals, Aides . . RICHARD DE HART I. R. WINELAND ........ HELEN WELSH ....,. CAROLE ALLEN .......... Miss RUTH FINZEL President . .... Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Adviser Often threats to the commands of our C329 superior officers Goetz, P. Goldsworthy, P. Greaver, B. Griffith, B. Grove, David Grove, D. Grove, E. Hager, B. Hager, C. Hansel, R. Hardman, A. Harper, W. Harris, M. Harsh, B. Hast, I. Hawkins, M. Heinrich, M. A. Heinrich, W. Henry, D. Hershberger, Hill, C. Holmes, B. Hosier, R. Huff, S. Hughes, W. Humphreys, Hunter, L. Iames, I. Iamison, W. Ienkins, F. Ienkins, W. Iohnson, D. Iohnson, R. Kane, E. Keith, G. Kendall, E. R. H. Kerns, H. Kerr, W. Ketterman, H Kitzmiller, B. Knott, M. Kolb, D. Kompanek, T. L. Lafferty, F. Lamm, I. Lancaster, D. Langer, Mary Langer, M. Larry, B. Lashley, E. Lashorn, I. Lauder, N. Lease, K. Lease, M. La Masters, C. Lewis, B. Liller, C. Lincoln, B. Loar, I. Logsdon, H. Long, R. Margolis, G. Martin, B. Martin, C. Martin, L. Martin, G. Martin, R. Matthews, D. Mauk, M. McBride, R. McCloskey, W. McFarland, P. McHenry, I. Mclntyre, R. McKinney, W. McKenzie, I. McVicker, E. Millar, I. Moody, G. Moody, O. Moore, M. Morris, N. Mower, L. R. Neff, W. Nesbitt, L. Nickle, I. Nies, M. L. Nine, M. Norris, V. O'Braden, M. Orndorfi, C. Orris, A. Paupe, D. Pearce, G. Payne, I. Perdew, A. Peterson, P. Pogell, B. Poland, R. Price, I. Pueschel, E. Purinton, B. Radcliffe, M. Raley, A. Raley, E. Rank, M. Rank, P. Rathbone, I. Reckley, L. Reger, I. Reynolds, N. Rice, R. Reffey, W. Ritter, R. Roberson, P. Robinette, B. L Robinette, P. Robinson, I. Rogers, Y. Rohrback, G. Romaine, L. Rose, H. Rowe, R. Ruppenthal, M. Scarlett, C. Schaeffer, I. Schindler, R. Shaffer, B. Shaffer, D. Shaner, T. Shirley, I. Shober, I. Shrout, W. Simmons, S. Skelly, D. Sloan, T. Smith, E. Smith, H. Smith, W. Snow, I. Snyder, B. Snyder, I. Stanley, W. Steele, W. f33l Stine, L. Stitely, I. Stroup, R. Strauser, K. Stump, A. Taylor, B Taylor Thompson Troutman, R. Twigg, I. Twigg, L. Valentine, . Vogel, M. C. Walsh, A. L. Swain, B. , D1 , W. C Warnick, C. Webb, P. Welsh, H. Whetzel, M. White, G. White, R. White, W. Williams, I. Williams, P. Wills, M. Wills, W. Wilt, L. Windemuth, L. Wineland, I. Wolfe, B. Wood, W. Yoder, I. Yost, I. Youngblood, R Zais, M. E. 1- Albright, R. Alday, I. Aman, M. Anderson, T. Auvil, V. Apsey, D. Auman, E. Bachman, I. Baker, C. Baker, M. Baker, R. Barbe, M. Bartlett, H. Bartlett, W. Beal, I. Beck, P. Beckwick , D. Bughly, I. Beier, M. Belt, B. Beneman, I. B. Bishop, S. Bittner, I. Blank, B. Blunk, B. Boch, C. Boor, I. Borgman, Bradford, Brant, C. CLASS OF 1946 First Sergeants WILLIAM KAGY WILBERT ROBERTSON PAUL KEIFER PAUL Mousr BARBARA COLEMAN IUNE ALDAY MARGARET LANCASTER MRS. MCKENZIE, Adviser Rigid regulators of the ranks . . Mrs. McKenzie l tells Billy. B b ra In e ar 3. ln. Margaret and the two Pauls how to collec t class dues. Brant, E. Brant, G. Bridges, R. Brotemarkle, R. Brotemarkle, B. Bryner, W. Calderwood, M. Calderwood, R. Campbell, R. Canfield, A. Carder, T. Cessna, B. Cassen, I. Chaney, M. E. Coffey, E. Coit, F. Dixon, I. Coleman, B. Dixon, R. Collins, W. Doolittle, E. A. Combs, R. Doty, R. Conner, L. Duckworth, V. Cook, A. Durrant, P. Crabtree, B. Eady, W. Crawford, W. L. Elder, D. Cromwell, B. I. Emerick, C. Crosby, R. Emerson, D. Cunningham, V. Engle, D. Curry, I. Evans, E. M. Davis, H. C. Keiler, P. Davis, M. L. Files, G. Dawson, M. Finn, I. Dendrinos, P. Fisher, L. Dennison, W. Fleckenstein, P De Vore, C. Floyd, R. Dickerhoof, H. Ford, S. Dickerhoof, V. Freno, A. C341 Gaither, I. Getzendammer, C. Gilpin, H. Glass, C. Goetz, G. Gorsuch, C. Grabenstein, R. M. Greaver, R. Gratehouse, V. Gump, L. Hardman, W. Harper, B. I. Hart, H. Hartsock, B. Heavner, I. I. Heavner, I. Helmstetter, L. Hensel, Iune lIohnson, R. Law, E. Hensel, Iack 'Iudy, V. LCIZCITHS. L- Hersch, G. Kagy, B. Lazarus, L. Hershberger, S. Kamens, S. l-SCIde1'. I- Hess, S. Kauffman, G. Lee, R. Himmler, P. Kellar, W. Lewis, A. Himmelwright, F. Kelly, E. Lewis, G- Hoenicka, R. Keyser, R. I-eWiS. H- Hopwood, H. Kerr, D. Lewis. P- Hoover, I. Kifer, S. Lighter, l- Humbertson, D. Kirk, R. Lindbufg. E- Hunter, W. Kisarnore, N. 1-0gSdOI1, E. Hutcheson, D. Kline, N. I-OgSdOI1. H- Hyde, I. Kline, M. I. I-0l'lOf, D- Iser, B. Knott, E. LOPST- L- Iackson, D. Lancaster, M. Mace, l- Iohnson, I. Largent, I. Mackey. E- Martin, L. McCullough, McGinn, A. Mclntyre, D. Mclntyre, T. Meek, M. A. Messman, K. Miller, S. Miller, V. Millholland, I Mitchell, S. Moore, M. I. Mortztelclt, B. Mosse1', I. Mouse, F. Mouse, P. Murray, G. Myers, H. Naughton, R. Nee, D. Nesbit, N. Newnam, E. Nichols, S. O'Baker, C. O'Baker, I. O'Baker, R. Oglebay, I. O'Rourke, I. Orndorif, S. Owens, G. Perrell, B. Peskin, P. Posselt, G. Poorbaugh, A. Pott, C. Powers, G. Powell, I. Price, R. Price, W. P. Radclitfe, I. Raupach, N. Ravenscrait, M. Rice, I. Richards, K. Richards, R. Riley, I. Rinker, R. I. Robertson, W. Rohrbaugh, I. Romaine, A. Runion, I. Russ, V. Russell, D. Lager, Z. Landers, D. Scarlett, R. Screen, D. Screen, R. Schade, K. Scott, I. Sears, R. See, F. Shatter, M. Shaffer, S. Shanholtz, M. Shroyer, B. Shroyer, I. Sinclair, H. Sloan, B. Small, S. Smith, B. Smith, B. Smith, B. Smith, I. 4357 Smith, R. Smith, E. Snyder, I. Sowers, E. Steele, C. Stevens, R. L. Steward, W. Strock, E. Sweitzer, E. Tabler, S. Tabor, R. Taylor, L. Tucker, D. Tuk, D. Twigg, A. Twigg, L. Utz, A. Valentine, M. Waingold, E. Walters, D. Walters, A. Walton, R. Warnick, E. Warren, N. Whitman, G. Whitman, M. Will, R. Wills, D. Wilt, A. Williams, A. Wilson, S. Wineland, L. Wolie, G. Yantorno, R. Yost, M. E. Young, I. Aaron, P. Adams, D. Albright, A. Allan, F. Amick, L, Anderson, B. Anderson, P Ansel, L. E. Bane, Z. Barnard, N. Barnes, M. Bartlett, B. Beal, E. Beckwith, E. Bennear, M. Billings, M. Bittinger, I. Blake, G. Blake, M. P. Blizzard, W. D. Bobo, C. Borgrnan, V. Boure, P. Boza, P. Brant, C. Brant, M. Brandt, W. Breese, G. Brennema, E. Brown, G. Browne, L. Bryan, T. Buchholtz, Buckle, R. Bug, R. Bug, W. Burkett, P. Came Y, I - Carson, W Chanz, I. Clark, T. Clower, R. Coats, M. Coffey, B. Combs, W. ,,--- l Conner, A. De Bouck, B. Folk, E, Conner, I. Dentinger, I. Ford, S, P. Conner, I. Diamond, E. I-'ullei-, D, Conner, T. Dibert, H. Fuller, S, Cosgrove, M. Dick, M. Fulk, I, Cubbage, K. Dickel, B. Gardner, I, Daniel, D. Dixon, C. German, Damrn, W. Eator, B. Giles, O, . Davis, C. Esposito, I. Glass, R, Davis, D. Everline, R. Goff, G. Davis, K. Fahey, G. Green, S. Davis, W. A. Feagles, W. G. Grimshaw, E. Davis, L. Fleegle, G. Grove, L. Davis, R. Fletcher, D. Grubb, S. A. Dawson, I. Flora, I. Hadly, I. CLASS OF 1947 Buck Privates . . PATTY BOWIE MARGARET MOODY IUNE GARDNER PATRICK AARON KENNETH CUBBAGL MARSHALL MoRR1sEY DONALD FULLER Miss HAWKINS, Adviser And We ask you . . . What's an army l36l without buck privates? . . . Hamilton, D. Hockadey, V. Keyes, S. Leonard, W. Maphis, E. Mitchell, B. Hare, B. Horn, I. Kienhofer, V. Lewis, M. Martin, A. Molenaire, M Hardin, M. Hughes, I. E. Keister, I. Lewis, W. Martin, M. Mandy, M. Harper, R. Humbertson, R. Kline, T. Llewellyn, A. Marty, V. Moon, H. Harris, P. A. Hunter, G. Klosterman, I. Liller, A. Matthews, I. Morrissey, M. Hartely, B. Iames, R. Klosterman, I. Liller, M. D. Matthews, D. Masser, D- Hartman, D. Iames, C. Knocke, L. Livengood, D. Mauck, K. Mower, W. H Hartsock, H. Iamison, T. Kompanek, L. Livengood, R. May, S. A. Mudge, I. Heishell, M. Iewell, R. Krimm, C. Loeber, W. McCormick, H. Murray, I. Himmler, D. Iohnson, S. Kuhrs, C. Lockhard, B. McKenzie, H. Murray, N. Hinebaugh, C. Iohnston, M. Landenberger, I. Logsdon, E. McNeill, B. Murray, B. A Hinze, F. Iones, L. Lashley, R. Long, I. Mellott, R. Myers, C. Hite, D. Iones, L. Larhorn, M. L. Lottig, B. Miller, E. Myers, E. G. Hite, L. Iones, M. Lee, S. Love, C. Miller, L. Myers, R. Hixonbaugh, R. Kesler, M. L. Le Master, D. Maies, B. Minnicks, R. Nave, R. Nicholson, I. Nicholson, I. Nine, I. Northcratt, D. Northcratt, N. Ogilvie, W. O'Neal, M. Owen, C. Paxton, I. Payne, C. Perrin, D. Peterson, H. Piquett, L. Poland, D. Price, I. Price, H. Rahn, R. Raupach, D. Rogers, I. Ravenscrott, M. F. Rogers, B. Redlick, C. Rosley, I. Reed, B. Russell, M. Reed, D. Sarver, R. Reynard, E. Schari, E. Richards, M. Schneider, D. Ritchie, E. Schramm, D. Ritter, S. Schramm, N. L. Robertson, Scott, M. I. Robertson, VV. Screen, E. Robertson, VV. Sell, K. Robinette, I. Sharer, B. Robinson, I. Shaw, G. Robinson, I. A. Sherk, M. Robison, M. Shipe, I". Robinson, R. Shuck, D. Simmons, B. Taylor, R. Welsh, D. Sisk, V. Tiley, M. E. We-nschlof, L Small, B. Tolwon, E. Whetzel, W'. Smith, B. Trenton, D. White, D. Smith, C. Tressler, K. Wickard, S. Smith, D. Tressler, O. Widdows, H. Smith, R. Troutman, H. Will, C. Snyder, I. Twigg, B. Wilkins, R. Snyder, L. Wagner, I. Wilkinson, S. Snow, L. Walizer, I. Wilson, L. Spies, M, VV'a1ke1', L. Wilson, M. Stewart, I. Wallrick, L. Winfield, M. Storey, G. Walton, N. Wright, I. Stoutfer, M. Wanden, M. Yoder, O. Stroup, M. I. Weaver, E. I. Yost, W. Stump, R. W'eires, I. Youngblood, Taylor, B, VV'elle1', I. Zegles, R. I 2 CLASS OF 1948 Yardbzrds . . . IERRY SWAN FORREST PATRICK EUGENE PORTER EDWARD DASHIELL CATHERINE MACMANNIS IosEPH KESECKER IUANITA LOOKABAUGH MRS. MCGOURY, Adviser For mischievous maneuvers "Snuify" has nothing on us . . . i Attention . A . .Lf'fmEfas.:5i" DQY' S- adie' log' Deetz, C. if Iuanita, Eugene Deelfzf D- and Catherine. D91-gulf, De Vore, C. Dick, I. Adams, V. Beeghly, I. Bridges, W. Claycomb, F. Dignan, B. Agnew, M. Bennet, I. Bright, B. Coiiey, T. Dorsey, I. Alderman, A. Benton, E. Browning, M. Cook, C. Doyle, S. Aman, I. Benton, B. Bruce, M. Copp, M. Drew, A. Andrews, I. Bete, E. Burk, T. Cost, V. Durst. E- Appel, S. Biggs, I. Burton, B. Conrad, M. Eaton, V. Ackworth, D. Blake, B. Bucklew, E. Collins, L. Easton, C. Baldwin, E. Blake, L. Campbell, H. Cowgill, P. Erling, A. Ballard, N. Bock, H. Campbell, I. Crabtree, D. Everline, M. Bane, E. Bolyard, M. Campbell, T. Cunningham, E. Eversiine, R. Barnard, F. Bobo, R. Cannon, C. Cunningham, M. Ewing, W. Barnett, I. Brant, G. Carter, E. Darrow, L. Farrell, B. Beal, N. Brenneman, H. Carros, D. Dashiell, E. Fishell, B. Beale, H. Bridges, C. Chappell, G. Davis, I. Fishell, D. Beard, N. Bridges, I. Chappell, S. Davis, M. Flesher, B. Foley, L. Foote, F. Foreman, E Foster, F. Frost, B. Fulk, I. Fuller, B. Gardner, H. George, R. Gibbons, R. Gilford, C. Gloss, E. Glime, M. Grahame, K Gray, F. Gray, B. Green, D. Grim, D. Grimes, R. Grindle, I. Gulick, B. C383 Gutheridge, E. Hager, V. Haines, D. Hardman, A. Hartley, F. Harden, K. Hartley, I. Hartman, B. Hans, V. Heinrich, R. Hendley, P. Hinkle, I. Hinzman, B. Hitchins, D. Hott, A. Huster, G. Huster, R. Hutcheson, T. Indolti, I. Iser, W. Iames, F. Iewell, C. Iewell, E. Iohnson, T. Iohnston, H. Iones, R. Kesecker, I. Keplinger, B. Keplinger, B. Keplinger, V. Kerns, E. Kifer, G. Kight, B. Kight, R. Kilrey, B. Knott, E. Kotschenreuthe Krans, S. Largent, D. Layne, R. Lease, I. Lease, I. Lease, P. Leasure, M. Leasure, O. Lebeck, H. Lester, S. Lewis, C. Lilycl, D. Longerbean, E. Lookabaugh, I. Lowdermilk, D. MacMannis, K. Macy, A. Mansfield, B. S. Mansfield, B. Mansfield, R. Margolis, D. Marquis, I. Mars, D. Martin, I. Martin, I. Matlick, R. Matthews, E. Mauck, P. Mawhinney, R. McCarty, B. McIntosh, F. McGregor, I. Myers, B. McKenzie, G. Nesbitt, E. McKenzie, V. Nies, D. McNeill, I. O'Baker, A. Millholland, L. O'Baker, M. Miller, G. O'Braden, R Miller, I. Ort, D. Miller, L. Owens, l- Miller, M. Painter, E. Mitchell, E. Patrick, F. Monahan, P. Payne, L. Montgomery, I. Petenbrink, M M01-gem, V. Ptitzenmayer C Morris, D. Phares, A. Morris, I. Phillipson, G Moyer, R. Piper: C- Mull, R. Platt, M. Poland, I. Porter, E. Pownall, I. Powers, R. Price, W. Radclitte, E. Rank, I. Rank, R. Reger, P. Reuschel, I. Renme, C. Reynold, A. Reynolds, I. Rice, I. Richmond, S. Rizer, D. Rodda, I. Rohrback, L. B. Ruehl, C. Ruehl, I. Ruhl, I. Rumer, D. Russ, L. Scarlett, C. Scarletta, W. Schade, M. Scheider, W. Shanholtz, B. Shank, I. Sharon, R. Shober, M. Shrout, D. Shupler, R. Simpson, I. Simpson, W. Sinclair, L. Skidmore, R. Slite, M. Smith, . Smith, . Smith Smith, Smith Smith, . Smith, Smith, . Smith, T. Smith, W. Sneather, R. Snyder, D. Somerville, D. Speicher, R. Sprow, I. Sterne, R. Qpvzgnmpoas Steward, M. Stewart, I. Stotler, M. Stottlemyer, A. Stowell, B. Sullivan, A. Sullivan, C. Sullivan, V. Swauger, E. Symons, E. Swan, I. Taylor, H. Thayer, H. Tower, S. Troxell, E. True, C. Twigg, I. Twigg, R. C397 Van Meter, Van Meter, Varner, G. Varner, I. B. M. Wagner, A. Wagner, S. Wakefield, Warren, I. Weaver, I. Webb, N. Welsh, R. Welsh, W. Whetzel, L. White, R. Whiteman, Whittaker, Wilkins, S. Wilkinson, C. R. I. I. I Will, L. Wilson, M. Wilt, B. Winfield, D. Winner, D. Winters, M. Wright, I. Yarnall, I. Yarnall, I. Young, M. Young, O. Zais, W. Zembower, xx X it ' 97 Y U W ii? '45 E TI 'lfilii' Our services of supply . . . organizations . . . group activities . . . those interests which take us from active duty but which are essential to com- pletion of the year's maneuvers . . . our non-combat divisions . . . training in initiative, personal develop- ment, leadership . . . production of officer candi- dates . . . generals' aides . . . public relations officers . . . quartermaster corps. . . Company . . . halt! I Right face . . . present . . . arms! !For your inspection, Sir. . . ,:. ,f . - - .l ,Y,, .,,, .x X- HL. -i ,-.w v .. -1 x A ,. 1 , - I V ' - .4 4 x f 5 f :N L V 1 It - ff f , -L - JL-11, 1- y. "1 W 33, ' ' , Q ,- . ,Y . ,K .., ,f M, 4,5 1 f ,.,-,A .. .-... .-.- .-,..., - ,-,,,..,,w.. W1 ...- ...,-,., . - , nf -N-1--M--..-, , ... ,,.,! ' K. -, ' ' E 1 . ' 1 '1 ff' ' . W P '3 -' ',',,'f 1 v ., E ...- rxk F I 1 I ,, . J K. ax H .- " FF ' '!'- n ,f ' 1 4 5 N' : , :.,f ,-..w : l N I , Hi: -5 Q' 1, i F. 3. -V fy d V3.6 X, ,. 1 X L - V X ? 55: f , w iv- X . ,W .I K V 1 S X , V j .NIP 5. Y, , Hx if , , - - . 5 . ,I Y , , -. 3 .1 f by : fs-W ' f Qlff ' E 2-V1 ' A 1 P:-f V 74.53 1 f 1 f1.- 7.3.4 5, S ' QA , Xfrp, Eggs ' if 13 " A - 5,3 , ,f ,- QQ, k ' ' ,' ' f V. '. 'z ' ' ' swf-Z V2 1? gi 'V 1 ' 'Tx' 2 Q 'Lg' 1 f "1 L 32, '- ye.: f H 1 , Wy, xy ' W-yn' L- 5 5 2 'ik ' :yi ' 1 .. 1' ' 4 . M , , - -, ., ' 1 1 K ,L .Jug V- MXN! -. -V ww 21 -g , My ,K 'fy 2, P H 1'-,, M--f 1 . , 1 n XJ X 1 ,. - ' .4 " . 4-. -- Ev . f Y"-ff' T Ji' , I -1 . ' ' . "'--- ?- rr '11-sf 411 J f ' '- 4' .. H III UIQGAN ZAT UN M Aon ITIEI Pausing in the midst ot rehearsal, "Arsenic and Old Lace" poses tor the Allegewi photographer . . . the current problem seems to be identification ot the "body" . . . 'GARSENIC AND OLD LACE" WITH I ROSE LEE WILLIAMS MILNOR OSWALD WILLIAM HARDEN CLASS IOAN BILLING DAVID BROWNE WILLIAM EASTON I IOHN WOOLARD ROBERT KOLB LEWIS EVERLINE ROBERT DALTON MARSHAL SOWERS LEAR POWELL BETTY MACFARLANE LEONARD HAPPE House lights dim . . . footlights go up . . . familiar blue curtains part . . . and two old maids "strut and fret" three acts upon the stage . . . three acts seasoned with chills and thrills . . . garnished by a touch of romance. March 12 and under the direction of Miss Orpha Bonita Pritchard, the senior dramatists brought to Alco's theatre the original Broadway production, "Arsenic and Old Lace" . . . with Rose Lee and Ioan portraying the lead roles of Abby and Martha Brewster, deft brewers of a sleep-bringing concoction, and Leonard Happe bringing to life the Boris Karloff character of Ionathan Brewster. Among the other dead and live bodies ap- pearing . . . Dr. "William Harden" Einstein . . . Iohn "Mortimer" Woolard and Betty "Elaine" Macfarlane who did a bit of neat romancing in between murders . . . "Teddy Roosevelt" Dalton, half-demented trumpeter, intent upon excavating the Panama Canal . . . Officer "Milnor" O'Hara, pseudo-playwrite .... Rehearsing one of the thriller-diller scenes from this scream stirrer are Rose Lee, Ioan, Bob, Bill, Leonard and Betty. Betty seems really to be caught in the throes of someone's acting. C427 SOCIETAS F I U VEN UM DRAMATICURUM KATHERINE RICHARDS ,..,.,,......,,,.,,. President BARBARA BRIGHT ................ Vice-president EDITH ANN DOOLITTLE ................ Secretary ROBERT DOTY ................................ Treasurer Society of youthful dramatists . . . eager pur- suits ot stage technique and characterization . . . serving apprenticeships in Alco's "little" theatre . . . gaining skill in the arts ot interpretations. stage management and production. Year's activities high-lighted by the presenta- tion of a modern comedy of adolescence . . . "Her First Party Dress" by Hilda Manning . . . Patty Anderson becomes beau-conscious Patsy Crocker and gets a party dress for her first date F! . . . Edith Ann Doolittle and Earl Knott, as Mr. I and Mrs. Crocker, debate upon the Ways of the younger generation . . . Eleanor "Cookie" Troxell, . . - - - 'h"h a little sister, showed that she refers male company only tor HRS? who bmld dw. MSM 'Q tth'Q,r P the lmle theatre amsts ha e ' athletic value While zoot-suited Robert Doty, derides his sister lgijfljgy' 'D5m2',Q9e5r'fWHagr9 Patty's anxiety . . . Thomas Burke appears as the gallant es- cort and Ruth Layne portrays the Weary maid. Donald Largent and Iolm Sprow. Coach Pritchard uses Elva Mae Nesbitt and Robert Doty for a drama demonstration. Giving it the critical eye are Harry Thayer, Nancy Walton, Patty Anderson, Anna Lee Mar- tin, Iohn Sprow, William Ewing, Tommy Iamison, ton the tloorlg first row, Sue Kamens, Katherine Richards, Catherine Rennie, Ruth Farrell, Ruth Layne, Iune Alday, Edith Ann Doolittle: second row, Donald Ort, Earl Knott, Mary Lou Bruce, Ann Reynolds, Catherine MacMannis, Barbara Bright, Gwen Smith, Shirley Chappell, Maxine Conrad, Tommy Burkeg back row, Iean Klosterman, Mary Iean Scott, Lorraine Kompcmek, Shirley Wilson, Eleanor Troxell, Eloise Knott, Dorothy Haines and Betty Hinzman. C43l nit n ALCOHI 1 MIRROR Assignments . . . copy editing and re- writes . . . pictures . . . ads and sub- scriptions . . . typing and proofing . . . take this to the typists . . . Where's that cut? . .. revvrne this acnve . .. super- duper snooper scoopers . . . just a vicious cycle . . . but a vital, vigorous, vicious cycle that records bi-Weekly the pulse beat of A11egany's life line. Here they are . . . the powers behind the press . . . Rita Millenson. associate editor: Hume Annan. editor: Elaine Hirsh. associate editor: Frances Rudd, managing mv'-"""' editor: Betty Macfarlane, reporter. Members of the main editorial staff: tSeatedl Puller, Rudd, Millenson, Annan, Hirsh, Woolard, Williams, tsecond roWl Miss Murray, Poland, Fleckenstein, Bestwick, Piper, Diedrich, Herath, Thompson, and Mrs. Wheatg tback rowl McDuttie, Mactarlane, Smith, Reid, Lewis. Iournalists and typists: Hirst rowl Strock, Bartlett, Lilya, Easton, Lancaster, Kolb, Troxellg tsecond rowl Hinebaugh, Eyler, Williams, Cowden, Taylor, Landis, Miller, Rinehart, Henry, Rilling, Seder, Torbet, Korn, Dix, Shoeber, Ienkins, Burkettg tlast rowl Hardman, Shry, Haney, Goodman, Dixon, Shaner, Exley, Williams, Shirclitfe, Moffet. t44l A bit of round tahle discussion by editorial staff members Rita Millenson, Ioyce Bestwick, Betty Mac- farlane, Ioan Rilling, Rose Lee Williams, Frances Rudd, Elaine Hirsh and Ella Louise Richards, Miss Kompanek, adviser, is ready to make some suggestion while lean Moore, Lois Piper and Shirley Diedrich have discovered something mighty interesting. Associate staff members Catherine lrlast, lune Miller, Betsy Freeman, Helen Chapman, Alice Sutton, Mar- garet Fleckenstein, Mary Downey Rinehart, tseatedl and Lewis Everline, Lear Powell, BettyrLewis, Helen Erling and Edna lrlerath lstandingl. Its no wonder they broke the advertising and subscription soliciting records. ALLEGEWI Rationing came mighty close . . . we almost had no 1943 Allegewi . . printers were scarce . . . photography doubtful . . . engraver hesitant . . . September passed . . . then October and still the fate of the Allegewi rested on priorities . . . November and we found a printer, signed engraving con- tracts, notified our photographer and began to make up for lost time . . Miss Kompanek sharpens her pencils . . . Choosing a theme to coincide with the significant events of 1942 and 1943, we made innovation the keynote of every phase of the yearbook production . . . new cover design . . . new feature sec- tions . . . new senior write-ups . . . novel art work . . . extra-special photography . . . trying to make every picture and every comment typical of some phase of current school activities and events. Ianuary brought the subscription cam- paign with record-breaking results . . . picture taking with some camera-break- ing results . . . and the editorial staff began copy preparation with back- breaking results. Deadline . . . March first . . . to the engraver . . . to the printer . . . composing and proofing . . . and in May . . . the twenty-second edition of the Allegewi rolls off the press. Typists . , . Henry Strock. Sylvia Shircliff. Anna Eror, Gloria Burkett. Eva Henry. Floyd Bartlett, William Harden. Douglas Kolb, Dorothy Landis, Nancy Taylor. At the controls . . . Business Manager Hirsh. Editors Williams and Rudd. Ad Manager Millenson and Business Manager Macfarlane. i4 59 i ii? And a mass of feminine pep and vivacity blended with candid sobriety meets the camera's eye . . . Row ONE-Nancy Taylor, Virginia Oglebay, Frances Rudd, Shirley Diedrich, Alma Lee Phillips, Betty Macfarlane, Dotty Landis, Mary Downey Rinehart, Iune Miller, Virginia Oswald, Margaret Fleckenstein, Helen Smith, Row Two-Nancy Dodge, Charlotte Exley, Theresa Eyler, Iean Moore, Iune Rilling, Georgeanna Pierce, Ioan Rilling, Lois Piper, Sally Williams, Margaret Reid, Dorothy Loyer, Patty Dumire, Catherine Hast, Mrs. Mary Griffith: Row THREE-Iune Hersh- berger, Margaret Poland, Genevieve Weaver, Regina Fradisl-ra, Carol Robinson, Betsy Freeman, Iosephine Williams, Margaret Reihl, Rose Lee Williams, Mary Catherine Vogel, Gloria Mont, Dorothy Doolittle, Helen McDuttie, Ioanna Moore, Martha Moffet. S7 Another big year gone by-a most active one en- joyed by twenty-two seniors, thirteen juniors and five HI'-Y sophomores under the guidance of Mrs. Mary Griffith, newly-elected adviser. Twenty-two pigtailed, short skirted initiatees pass the embarrassing ordeal at informal induction on the local Main Stem . . . and then become actives at the formal candle light ceremony, Regular rounds of meetings at the "Y" . . . group church attendance once a month . . . performance of many civil service activities . . . ushering at Community Forum . . . food distributions at Thanksgiving and Christmas. Social sidelights not to be neglected . . . thirty-two members attend the "Y" banquet . . . officers collaborate with Fort Hill members in a model induction ceremony . . . sponsorship of Scrap Can Iam as annual dance on March 26 . . . year's events brought to close with Mother-daughter banquet. Intent upon plans for the Scrap Can Iam are "Ginny", Oglebay chaplcring Alma Lee Phillips, treas- urerp Shirley Diedrich, president, "Lovie" Macfarlane, vice-president: and "Pee-Wee" Rudd, secretary. , C467 "Prexy" Oswald has his mind full of plans to tell Don Snyder, Linwood Robinette, Iohn Reynolds, William Raupach, Harold Shaner, Robert Clinger, Iohn McFarlane, and Iohn Sloan, row onep to Bob Fuller, Bill Smith, Iohn Gorman, Bob Lloyd, Wilton Syckes, Bob Williams, Clarence Doolittle, and Hume Annan, row two, to Ronald Baumer, Iack Stitely, Iames Twigg, Wilbur Hall, Wayne Driver, Thomas Rahrig, Ronald Kellough, Louis Baker, Albion Biggs, Ray Ice and Robert MacDowell, row three. Forms an integral part of our school and social life . . . one S of the most active organizations in the school . . . sponsored Loyalty Night and swimming meet . . . held V-Hop in February H I 'Y . . . served as ushers at football games, concerts, lectures and other community functions . . . compose and sponsor the sale of programs for Thanksgiving Day football game . . . Bi-weekly meetings at the Y . . . and church attendance once a month en masse . . . foster growth of character and self-reliance . . . Forty boys . . . three upper classes . . . boys marked by their courtesy. friendliness and Willingness to serve . . . membership based on scholarship, ideals and personality . . . training ground for leadership and initiative . . . One of those Allegany traditions by which each class is linked to those gone before . . . one those traditions to be maintained . . . honored . . . and revered. Out for a moment of relaxation from their trying executive tasks are Hume Annan, treasurer: Don Snyder, secretary: Bob Fuller, vice-presidenty and Milnor Oswald, president. 1473 ALPHA KAPPA OMEGA Here they are exploring the intricacies of photographic equipment . . . but we wonder how many can actually put in a roll of film. S1-:ATED-Velma Screen, Alma Lee Phillips, Helen Chapman, Alice Sutton and Bett Ml ' , y iler. STANDING-Betty Schlunt, Miss Nicht, Lear Powell, Lewis Everline, Richard Rowe, Pete Macfarlane, and Iean Yarnall. Formed t procedure . . . from first petition. Members learn An angle shot of an angle shot . . . Lear Powell and Lewis Ever- line caught trying for a difficult picture. o foster and promote an interest in ll h a p ases of photographic attempts at snap-shooting to entering prints in com- to do much of thei the most of available equipment. r own processing . . . to make Informal socials . . . several field trips . . . oom 113 becomes making Christmas cards . . . r studio for portrait photography . . . Mondays . . . discussions of fundamentals and intricacies of photography . . . picture composition . . . film developing . . . contact printing . . . en- larging and mounting . . . Second semester brought more advanced study . . . toning and tinting . . . color photography . . . studio, tabletop and trick photograph y . . . Officers for the year . . . Lewis Everline, presi- dent . . . Lear Powell, vice-president . . . Velma Screen, secretary . . . Betty Schlunt, treasurer . . . Miss Theresa Nicht, adviser. f48l "Saberse bacer lugar a lu cuendo" . . . Spanish motto . . . "open a way to Wisdom" . . . one of Alco's newest organizations . . . sixteen charter members . . . meet every other Wednesday in room ll5 . . . star-gazing on the athletic field every other Monday AST RON OM Y CLUB night tweather permittingl . . . hot chocolate later at Mrs. Wheat's home . . . had a get-together and our adviser told fortunes . . . but it is said that astrology and astronomy do not mix . . . Wednesday meetings bring reports on stars, planets, constellations . . . eyes glued to telescope for star studies at Monday night meetings . . . at last, star-gazing is justified. Amateur astronomers at- tempt somo daylight ob- servation in their searches for solution to puzzling constellar mysteries. Follow- ing the direction of Mrs. Wheat's pointer are Helen McDufiie, Virginia Oglebay, Drucilla Parish, Nancy Dodge, Duane Pritt, David Browne, Betty Miller, Char- lotte Exley, Eva Henry, Betty Schlunt, secretary, Floyd Bartlett, Ella Louise Richards, treasurer, Martha Shaner, lean Hess, Lewis Everline, Robert Troxell, Robert Kolb, and Margaret Fleckenstein, president. Meets every other Thursday night at the homes of members to discuss and debate world affairs . . . post- war plans discussed by Miss Eader . . . heard recordings of the "Cavalcade of America" presentation of "Abe Lin- coln" on February ll . . . sponsored an assembly with Digging into the periodi- cal archives tor news and views these extra-curricular historians present a most authoritative appearance. Pictured are Nancy Dodge, Drucilla Parish, secretaryg Betty Schlunt, treasurerg Margaret Fleckenstein, pres- ident, and Virginia Ogle- bay in row onep Rita Mil- lenson, Miss Rice, adviser, Elaine Hirsh, Ella Louise Richards, Hume Annan, Robert Kolb, Lewis Ever- line, Duane Pritt, Robert Troxell and 'l'ommy Rich- ards in row two. HISTORY CLUB teachers playing leading roles . . . remember the Wacky WAACS . . . Miss Kompanek, Miss Klinestiver, Mrs. Griffith, Mrs. Rogers and Mrs. Roe . . . Held debate on subject "Should there be military training in high school?" . . . Pan-Americanism subject of assembly in April . . .fifteen members . . . girls outnumber boys nine to six . . . annual picnic at Rita Millenson's for final meeting. C493 Medalists . . . Beverly Beckman with "England to America" . . . Leonard Happe . . . "Defeatism" . . . recognized excellence in interpretation, articulation, gesticulation and dramatization . . . sponsored by Tasker G. Lowndes . . . trained by Miss Pritchard and Mrs. Rogers . . . Gas shortage prohibited the county finals . . . but two contests were necessary to decide the local champions . . . also rans . . . Nancy Dodge, Iune Miller, Helen McDuffie, Mary Downey Rinehart, Floyd Bartlett, William Easton and Henry Strock . . . December ll, 1942 . . . another of a long list of contests which were begun at the end of World War I. Champion declairner Bev- erly Beckman demonstrates the art of dramatic expres- sion to coaches Rogers and Pritchard, and contestants Iune Miller, Helen McDuffie, Mary Downey Rinehart, Nancy Dodge, Floyd Bart- lett, William Easton, Henry Strock and Leonard Happe. Caught in front of in- stead of behind the film, these promoters of visual education seem to be at- tracted tor once by some- thing in real life rather than in reel life. Interested members with Mr. Wickard, adviser, are Bill Wolfe, Francis Schaffer, Sara Lan- L caster, Alex Shaner, Ruth Lilya and Blair Stump. Hot dog!!! Movies . . . Miss Ander- son's room . . . and at almost any period of the day we find one of Alco's pro- jectionists behind the reels giving expert assistance in the showing of class- room films provided by the new program of visual education. Trained by Mr. Wickard and adept at many skills in the handling of film and projectors . . . rewinding . . . splicing . . . preparation of films for shipment . . . this small group helps to keep the celluloid rolling effectively with science, social studies, music and health flashing themselves to the inner recesses of student minds. C503 M X W ,1 I-I M A,"-5, :V Vx 3, yijffl -. N pf , ' pf 1 1 1,3 , W W- ff L Y WW ., A 2 ,. ' fx , 5' ' - ff 1 u X.v..g-- ' ff, ,!,,-1 .N :X XJ -' I X - N W ' f 1 f v 'T' 2' 2 ,' fr. . 5 I, f,f',f'j?j.f , - 1 41 ,gf A rf' ff! . I 'I f.' U ., 9, , -1 1 , ,,,,., , ,,, ., I. DIQEAN ZATIDN UUR BAND Roll of drums . . . clash of cymbals . . . strike up the band!!! Parades . . . football games . . . rainy Weather . . . sunny weather . . . year-round spirit raisers . . . Striking victory drills at the famed Turkey Day game . . . vibrant "pepper-uppers" at pep meetings . . . concerts with a martial air . . . 'L recitals and assemblies . . . A year of innovations . . . new formations . . . With dczpper step cmd martial air, new songs . . . "Praise the Lord and Pass the Pigskin Over" . . . jive sessions with Bob Dalton and "Dooey" Doolittle leading the swingsters . . . Wilton Syckes completes his second year as drum major. Roll of drums . . . blast of trumpets . . . sound of the whistle . . . forward . . . march. Largest band in our history . . . sixty-seven marching musicians . . . augmented by high-stepping flag swinging and tricky twirlers . . . annual prize winners in local competitive parades. 1527 We had no idea that Doli Beck could sing . . . but here he is with Harry Swartzwelder Brandon Fuller, Robert Lucasl Ronald Baumer, SECOND ROW-Richard Rowe, Charles McCul- lough, David Browne, Marshal Sowers, Leonard Ferrone. ROW THREE-Iarnes Trenton, W11- liam Morehead, Leroy Mower, Dale Fuller, William Capaldi and William Thayer. l l MEN'S GLEE CLUB "Without a song a man ain't got a friend" . . . and without a men's glee club the music circle at Allegany wlvould be minus one of the most important arcs of its circumference . . . hearty qualterbacks . . . shy music lovers . . . barlaer shop tenors and bold basses . . . Vfvith one thing in common . . . they just like to sing. Rollicking rhythms . . . roblist reson- ance . . . first a solemn anthem . . . then a jovial ballad . . . a varied repertoire planned to give ample opportunities to these lusty lungs. l About to break ml harmonious medleys is the self-or- ganized quartet , . . Brandon. Harry. Wilton a 'd Marshal. C533 pit zvilzie -Egg.-. hui... .V .... V.. ...-.. .... .a...-...-, --. . T.-...,.. y eong . . . when priorities become a thing of the past, perhaps we can install a rubber-walled pit in order to accommodate the rapidly increasing orchestral per- sonnel. Pictured are H. Welsh, A. Williams, I. Williams, R. Richards. I. Hess, K. Richards E. Bradford, T. Carder, B. Pogell, W. Donlon, N. Dodge, N. Reynolds. C. Robinson. E. L Richards. C. McCullough, D. Willison, M. Sowers, L. Happe, W. Syckes, I. Williams, R. Lloyd H. Krieling, N. Nesbit, D. Paupe, B. Schaeffer, E. Holmes, M. Bender. R. Dalton, K. Wolfe E. Martin, C. Doolittle, E. Webb. V. Thompson, I. Stitely, D. Browne, W. Shrout, F. Arthur, H. Swartzweldcr, W. Stanley, R. Rowe, W. Wolfe, R. Campbell. P. Webb, and D. Doolittle. SENIOR ORCHE TRA Assemblies . . . concerts . . . plays . . . all augmented cmd embellished by the versatile senior orchestra. Conducted by Miss Willison or student di- rectors Marshall Sowers, Leonard Happe. and Clarence Doolittle. Annual assembly program in February . . . Ella Louise Richards was accompan- ist . . . lack Stitely and Ed Martin were soloists. In February also, Wilton Syckes, first violinist, soloist and concert master left Alco for Oberlin Conservatory. Organization of instrumental ensem- ble . . . guest artists at banquets and receptions . . . presented several broad- casts from local radio station . . . The Music Makers . . . instrumental ensemble . . . Miss Willison, lack Stitely. Ella Louise Richards, Donald Paupe, Marshal Sewers, Clarence Doolittle and Wilton Syckes. C54l Sometimes they squeak . . . sometimes they blast . . . but most of the time they're plenty good. Row one: Ronnie Sneathen, Teddy Kline, Katherine Richards, Mary Richards, Anne Reynolds, Dolores Hamilton, Suzanne Ford, Bernard Blake: Row two: Taylor Carcler, Ruth Richards, Eleanor Bradford, Allan Williams. Dorthene Poland, Doris Apsey: Row three: Robert Keyser, Margaret Moore, Miss Willison, june Alday, Richard Campbell, Gene Shaw, Tommy Hutcheson, Charles Piper. Katherine Schade. 1 Iuvenile musicians of Allegany . . . proving ground for many hours of prac- tice . . . and they lexhibit remarkable talent. . . After school rehearsal sessions find them under the clear, lucid direction of Miss Willison as they learn to cooperate, coordinate and enjoy music. Skills accomplished range from the basic principles of note reading to the intricacies oi playing a violin . . . U IOR ORCHESTRA A D BA D With the iaxrliliar roll of drums and the clarinet's trill . . . this group of vigorous youngsters blend their talent in a snappy tune . . . keeping step with the spirit of Allegany . . . They're only beginners . . . trying to master the novelties and difficulties of band music . . . but their futures look bright with crescendos as they pile into the band Wagon . . . l They certainly can do their share of the music making. Row one: Dorthene Poland, Suzanne Ford, Dolores Hamilton. Harry Taylor. VonCille Lohof, Nile Webb, Ronnie Sneathen, lim German, lane Nicholson: Row two: Donald Green, Tommy Burke, Iohn Twigg, Robert Moyer, Donald Largent. William Ewing, Ronald Iewell, Eddie Dashiell, Stuart Richmand: Row three: Tommy Hutcheson. Charles Piper, Ray Combs, Ioseph Iohnson, Eddie Reynard. Robert Baker, Iimmy Hoover. l i55l SENIOR CH ORAL CL ,B OFFICERS IOSEPHINE WILLIAMS ..AA.......,..., ......... P resident Io ANNA Moons .,,,,.. ,.., V ice-President Ross LEE WILLIAMS ..... .I...,. S ecretczry CAROL ROBINSON .... .... T recrsurer Joyce BESTWICK ...... .,vv. L ibraricm Four executive Canaries caught outside their cage . . . Rose Lee, Io Anna, Carol and Iosephine. Fifty-four "fem" songsters . . . cmd Miss Willison scores again . . . rehear- sals aiter business on Tuesday . . . joined National Federation ot Music . . . now have the privilege ot entering Federation contests as Well as the means with which to win them . . . Easter assembly with the Mixed Chorus . . . spring festival at Fort Hill . . . concert of Pan-American music in April in Allegany auditorium . . . South American numbers . . . oh, yi, yi . . . Betty Miller accompanies Warlolers . . . rehearsals of "New Mexican Love Song," "Chiapanecas" and "Rowing in the Sunlight" . . . Rita Millenson, concert accompanist . . . group ot Musettes represents the club in singing at churches, social functions, etc . . . features trio com- posed of Iosephine Williams, Io Anna Moore and Rose Lee Williams . . commencement music completes year's repertoire. Here they are . . . fifty-four of them. Row one: Mary Catherine Vogel, Margaret Reed, lackie Loar, Mary Williams, Teddy Cowden, Helen Smith: Row two: lane Williams, Iune Miller, Carol Robinson, Io Anna Moore, losephine Williams, Rose Lee Williams, Betty Miller, Betty Schlunt, Helen Kreiling, Betty Twiggg Row three: Rita Millenson, Mildred Hinebaugh, Eva Henry, Sylvia Shircliff, Ella Louise Richards, Velma Screen, Betsy Freeman, Helen Frantz, Theresa Eyler, Ioyce Bestwick, Carole Allan, Lois Stine, Iean Hess, Eleanor Andrews, Theoda Lee Kompanek, Dorothy Ebert. lane Ebert: Row four: Olin Schaeffer. Mary Frances Shircliff, Helen McDuffie, Frances Arthur. Vivian Grove. Norma Reynolds, Florence Williams, Velma Yoder. Iackie Price. Rosemary Ferrone, Betty Lou Hillock, Mary Louise Bender. Doris Lancaster, Barbara Kitzmiller. Doris Barnard, Sara Berkley. Margaret Wolfe. 1563 UNIOR CHORAL CL B OFFICERS KATHERINE RICHARDS ,,,,,,.,,,,AA ,,,,,,,,, P resident PRTTY BOWIE ............. .. Vice-Prdsideni Vivum IUDY ,,.. ,..,. S eclretary Sur: KAMENS ..,. ,,,,,, T reqgufer Special group . . . Row one: Barbee Sue Mansfield, Betty Kilroy, Nancy Walton: Row two: Iean Klosterman, Doris Davis, Everstine Mitchell, Margaret Russell, Kath- erine Richards, Patty Bowie, Iean Marquis: Row three: Ellen Newnam, Sue Kamens, Iune Alclay, Vivian Iudy, Lorraine Kompanek, Marjorie Valentine, Ioyce Beeghley. Almost eighty junior lassies' yoices . . . talented Ieanne Marquis accom- panies . . . Christmas program given at Corriganville P- T. A .... program in April with Girls' Folk Dancing Club under the direction of Miss Willison and Mrs. Curry . . . rehearsals eyery Wednesday afternoon . . . one of Miss Willison's pet groups . . . rehearsals of Spanish and Latin American songs . . . even mastered one in Spanish . . . Mrs. Ethel Bruce gave helpful hints for Latin American stage settingl. . . costumes of dirndle skirts and white peasant blouses . . . presentedl choral number on junior high Christmas assembly . . . participated in May day concert for lower grades . . . freshman vocalists automatically become members of senior choral club tor the tol- lowing year. l l And to think . . . they can all keep together . . . Row one: Barbee Sue Mansfield, Mary Ellen Platt, Everstine Mitchell, Betty Taylor, Elaine Simons, Nancy Walton, Catherine Rennie, Betty Kilroy, Elva Mae Nesbitt, Io Ann Robinson, Ieanine Hartley, Barbara Bright: Row two: Lois Ansel. Ellen Newnam, Marjorie Valentine. Ioyce Beeghley, Ruth Ann Richards, Sue Kamens, Katherine Richards, Vivian Iudy, IunelAlday, Patty Bowie. Maxine Shaffer, Margaret Moody: Row three: lean Bittinger, Marjorie Schade, Glenna Chappell, Dorlene Ashworth, Esta Mae Kerns, Betty Hinzman, Lorraine Kompanek, lune Whittacre, Betty Billin s, Marian Bennear, Shirley Iohnson Ada Romaine, Shirley Fuller Peggy O'Neal, Margaret Moore, Ioan Campbell, Shirley 9 - . Wagner, Ieanne Marquis: Row four: Margaret Russell, Clara Will, Mary Alice Sherk, Doris Davis, lean Andrews, Shirley Chappell, Virginia Russ. Beverly Smith. Alfa Ferris, Ruth Humbertson, loy Flora, Laura Brown, Doris Trenton, Katherine MacMannis, Anne Reynolds. i57l MIXED CHORUS Vibrant harmonious basses and tenors blending with clear melodious sopranos and altos . . . mixed voices seeking common gfOUHd.H1ChOIQllOH9S... Directed by Miss Willison . . . accom- pankxlby Rha and Chades.. .pedonned at Parents' Night . . . Christmas program at Centre Street Methodist Church . . . Ioyce, Iosephine, Rose Lee, Rose Mary, Helen, Mar- garet, Harry, Marshal and Leonard . . . soloists .. . Patriotic program in assembly . . . "Your Land and My Land" . . . "I'm Proud To Be An American" . . . spring concert . . . Easter assembly . . . county festival . . . senior sermon . . . and the music still goes round and round Mussettes , . . Rita Millenson at the piano, Carol Robinson, Io Anna Moore. Ella Louise Richards, Helen Frantz, Miss Willison, Rosemary Ferrone, Betty Lou Hillock, Ioyce Bestwick, Iosephinc Williams, and Rose Lee Williams, Octet . . . Ella Louise Richards at thc piano, Io Anna Moore, Rose Lee Williams, losephine Williams, Ioyce Bestwick, Wilton Syckes. Marshall Sowers, Harry Swartzweld- cr., and Leonard Ferrone. Pride of the music department . . . Row one: Betty Miller, josephine Miller, Mildred Hinebaugh. Betsy Freeman, Theresa Lee Eyler. Rose Lee Williams, Betty Lewis, lane Williams, Ella Louise Richards, Ioyce Bestwiclc, Rita Millenson: Row two: Harry Swartzwelder. lames Trenton, Richard Rowe, Brandon Fuller, Leonard Ferrone, Wilton Syckes, Leroy' Mower, Marshall Sewers' David Browne' Eugene Flynn, William Capaldi, Ioe Beal, Iack Woolard, Rudolph Freno, David Grove: Row three: Margaret Wolfe, Helen Welsh, Norma Reynolds, Theoda Lee Kompanek, Lois Stine, Helen Smith. Vivian Grove, Betty Lou Hillock, Rosemary Ferrone, Earlene Hardman, Helen Frantz and Carol Robinson. C589 Catch them before l They read notes and love it . . . ffirst row: Billy Meyers, William Ewing, Stewart Richmond, lack Biggs, Wolfgang Scheider, Bernard Blake: Second row: Gregory Miller, Iohn Sprow, Richard Mansfield, lack Martin, Tommy Burke. Calvin Davis. Robert Spiker, Harry Widdows, Donald Schramm: Third row: Raymond Sarber, Harry Thayer, Donald Largent, Eugene Porter, Robert Twigg, Ralph Lashley, Lewis Milholland, Teddy Kline. Demo Carros. Edward Dashiell, Donald Ort, Iames Ruehl: Fourth row: Richard Brotemarkle, Lynn Grove, Leo Piquette. Stanley Miller, Donald Fuller, Leroy Miller, Charles Krimm, Glenn Goff, Donald Sanders, Richard Himmelwri' ht. J . . . clear, bell-like altos . . . boyish, eager tenors . . . bold basses . . . l sopranos . . . soft, bashful heir voices begin to change UNIOR BOY GLEE CLUB put forty of them togdther and let them give out and that boy "sho do carry First semester found them working under the baton of Miss Willison they were featured in a program at Centre Street Methodist Church . . . on "Water Boy" . . . that watuh" . . . Second semester her an ample supply Thursday rehearsals . . Annual Iunior Ma Old Virginnyn and "C come . . . To give it all an Teddy Kline, presiden rought them to Mrs. Carol . . . and she brought with of both fun and Work . . . proved by Tuesday and 1. y Day Concert and they featured "Carry Me Back to i lribiribinn . . . and then that last rehearsal just had to executive touch, heading the young vocalists were - Demo Carros, vice-presidentg Ralph Lashley, secre- T, taryg and Donald Ort, accompanist. l casa I X 1, X Q fy xx f! Qs 3 jf! fv:9 4' f QW' N W ff? X, My X 17 X X7 EETI Our fields of active duty . . . where strength is tested . . . courage tried and sportsmanship chal- lenged . . . where we rise above defeat and build upon victory . . . bucking and plunging the line . . . matching mental and muscular stamina . . . getting our first tastes of physical competition .... All right, men . . . synchronize your watches . . . ready . . . let's go! ! ! f L ,1 r , ' ' r ' -. ,Q Q , 5 , X . w-mx , f , - 1 r YY, x -Zi E.: ,J , f . ,,, , l HI, , ,N , ,-QL, sk n, X, , -1 .X LETICI M. ' "1 VARSITY SQUAD . . . first row, Warner Bagent. manager, Richard Anderson, Don Snyder, Charles Kellough, Robert Williams, Carl Hammersmith. Wilbur Hull, Van Teter. Linwood Robinette. Milner Oswald, Iohn Gorman and Donald Beck. Second row, William Raupach, Brandon Fuller, Robert Fuller. Roy Taylor, lack Smith, Robert Wilkinson, Robert Lloyd, Herbert Armstrong. Iohn Sloan, William Darrow. Edward Chandlee. Phil Lucas, Curtis Cochenour. manager, and Coach Ball. Row three, Tommy Carros, Walter Davis, Robert Lucas, Iimmy Twigg. Merle Kline. William Street, Carl Mclntyre, Eldridge Del-Iaven, Marshal White. Harold Shaner and Ronald Kellough. FOOTBALL For the second consecutive year the Camper eleven marched through an undefeated, untied season . . . the third undefeated eleven produced by Coach Ball since his arrival at Allegany in 1936. THE RECORD Under expert tutelage, the hold-overs from the 1941 I season and the newcomers soon became a smooth- Our Opponents . . . . . Score Opponent Score working organizatlon and compiled an extraordinary 47 Ridgeley 0 record . . . five teams held to the zero line . . . and only 45 Keyser U 38 opponents' points as matched against Alco's 217 for 32 Alumni 0 the season. 45 Handley 5 The boy with the "educated" toe, Don Snyder, at full- 24 Charlestown U back, threatened to equal or surpass the city scoring 35 La Sane 12 record . . . but with a total of 113 missed the record 41 Martinsburg 0 by one marker. King of place kickers. Snyder also 33 Hagerstown 14 made his yardage count. 17 Fort Hill 6 The Camper's cause was also furthered by the trans- fer of end Don Beck from Huntington, W. Va., and by the prowess of holdovers Iohn "Gummy" Gorman. Charles "Chick" Kellough, Milnor Oswald and Linwood Robinette. C623 All City Stars . . . Tops on the HT" Allegany opened its l94Z season on September 25 with a 47-U victory over a badly outweighed and outplayed Ridgeley High outfit. The Campers went to work the first time they got possession of the oval and it took one play to cover the forty yards to the Ridgeley goal and pay dirt. Sparked by Don Snyder's sensational running and Bob William's tossing of perfect strikes to end Don Beck, the T-formation kept far ahead and the Allegany goal line failed to be crossed. Allegany romped to its sec- ond straight win, unleashing a smooth attack which struck alternately through the air and on the ground giving us a 45-U victory over Keyser high on October 2. This game gave a great display of offensive and defensive football for which the Ball men are so l Gorman, Tater. Oswald, Beck Snyder, Williams, Robinelte noted. Two scores came in the first quarter when Wil- liams flipped a pass to Bus Hammersmith who raced to a touchdown, and when Bob Williams furthered the Alco command with a wide end run, behind excellent interference, and went over standing up. From here out, with Snyder, Kellough and Smith scoring touchdowns, Allegany was never threatened. For a third time the unmark- ed slate was kept clean when the gridsters polished off an Alumni eleven by a 32-U count, paced by Iack Smith, Chick Kellough, Don Beck and Bus Hammersmith who all scored touchdowns. Probably the most outstanding thing of this game was in the final quarter when co-captain Linny Robinette in- tercepted a desperate pass and lugged the pigskin back 31 yards before being tackled. The main stem . . . formidable, eh what? Hammer mith, Hull, Teter, Robinette, Sloan, Gorman, Beck f63l How does he do it? . . . That question asked by countless fans might be ans- wered by this scene . . . Coach Ball in one of his in- active practices . . . one of those times in which he seemed always to be able to say just the right thing . . . how about it, boys? Bob Williams further proved his passing ability by making two touchdown passes. Scored upon for the first time, the Campers sought adequate revenge by trouncing Handley High of Winchester, Va., with a score of 46-6. This game also opened Allegany's defense of its 1941 C. V. A. L. crown with a bang. The Campers tallied in every period, crossing the Iudges' goal line once in the first frame and twice in each of the other quarters. But the Virginia boys con- nected on a pass in the waning moments of the final to knock the Alco lads from the unscored-on category. Paced by touchdowns by Chick Kellough. Don Beck, Bob Williams, Bill Raupach, Bob Lloyd and Roy Taylor, the extra points were kicked by Don Snyder and Iohn Gorman. A usually stubborn Charlestown eleven met a decided defeat when the Alco gridmen invaded their premises with a 21-O win. The Purple Panthers were broken by two touchdowns by Snyder and one by Chick Kellough. Making his toe go through its usual routine, Snyder accounted for the three extra points. The city campaign was opened November 6 with Don Snyder and Chick Kellough shredding the La Salle line in the late quarters and bringing Alle- gany from behind to roll over a light La Salle eleven with a 35-12 victory. There he comes . . . Chick Kellough caught in one of his yard gaining sprees during the Fort Hill game on Turkey day . . . and number 33 had some sprinting to do to catch up with the Allegany gridster. Chick accounted for much of A11egany's yardage in the season's final contest. Iarrecl by Francis Passarefli's 88 yard scoring jaunt early in the first period, the Blue and White reeledlagain as Iones stormed out of the "T" around right end to score another lightning touchdown a few minutes later. Allegany's scoring came in the second quarter on a 51 yard run by Snyder. From then on, with two more touchdowns by Snyder and two by Kellough, Allegany was never threatened. The rampaging Campers took over the lead in the C. V. A. L. by downing the Martinsburg High Bulldogs 41-0. Chick Kellough started the scoring derby Despite the rain and m early in the first quarter raced 16 yards to the Md over a play later. Fullback point. Meeting the strongest hard-earned 33-14 victory poned from an early date, when he sliced through a hole at tackle and then rtinsburg one yard line from where he smashed Snyder put his boots to the ball and made the extra opponent thus far, the Allegany gridders scored a over Hagerstown another C. V. A. L. crown. Post- this contest found the opponent's score the largest so far, and Snyder back on the even basis as he made four out of four extra: points. But there was no st ing drives. When the final touchdowns, Anderson and field goal by Snyder. opping Allegany's hard hitting defense and plung- reckoning was made, Beck had accounted for two Hammersmith each one, four extra points and a ud, almost 6,000 fans made their way up to the Fort g to see the clash of champions . . . both teams un- Hill stadium on Thanksgivift defeated and Fort Hill's record marred by only one tie. The story had its end. however, for the Campers had no trouble in making themselves both C. V. A. L. and city champions to the ltune of l7-6. Outplayed all along the line, Fort Hill gave in to Allegany's yard gaining and plunging spree as touchdowns were scored by Anderson and Williams. Snyder booted the extra points and added a field goal to our tally. l Undisputed champions . . . undefeated . . . untied . . . seven men on the mythical all-city team . . another T-formation clean sweep. l Jay-Vees PIGSKIN FODDER . . Damo d Th as Blank. Leroy Myer, y Bruce Anderson, Willi th e C a h Bo e B d R h cl L g P I D OH . all EIIIIISOH, m Shrout, Kenneth Davis, Orville Files, Iohn Lemon, Eugene Haste. Lamont Wineland, Marshall Mo Ronald Durst, Iohn Cox, Glen Stewart Iohn Nichols, Iohn Yoder, Iames Cook four, Gene Martin, Iohn Light am s Young. One of those close moments in the contest with a highly rated, chal- lenging Beall quintet . . . but it looks like "Gummy" gets the ball, BASKETBALL Almost but not quite seemed to be the fate of the varsity hoopsters as they just missed capturing both the city and WMI champion- ships. A season of surprises brought the Bow- ersmen nineteen wins and six defeats . . . opening with two victories over Parsons and the Alumni only to meet the first setback at the hands of Ferndale by a two point margin. Then came Keyser, Frostburg, Piedmont, Bar- ton and so on for eleven consecutive wins until the Campers had to match pass for pass and dribble for dribble against La Salle. The undefeated Explorers made the last toss good . . . and our second Waterloo was met by cr score of 32-30. High point men in the schedule by this time were Don Beck, Bill Spangler and Iirn McFarlane. Barton led the lads a merry chase but the Bowersmen came through giving the Creek- men a 46-42 setback, only to meet a revenge- ful Tiger team from Central which snatched away Alco's undisputed lead in the WMI league race to the tune of 20-26. History was in the making as the Tigers loomed up as dark horses for the WMI championship. THE SQUAD . . . row one, Iim Macfarlane, Don Beck, Donald Lee, Bob Spangler, Otis Sterne: row two. Coach Bowers, Robert Fuller, Phil Lucas. Edward Lindsay, Warner Bagent, Donald Basilio, Lou Bakerg row three, lohn Cox, William Heinrich, Herman Cunningham, Britton Schaeffer, Brandon Fuller, Arthur Windemuth, Ted De Hart, Ronald Kellough. C663 IIM MACFARLANE "LEFTY" LEE "BOOTlE" STERNE BOB SPANGLER DON BECK Forward Guard l Guard Center Forward THE RECORD December 17 35 Parsons February l 35 Piedmont DeCeml3e1' 29 43 Alumni February 5 SU Lcr Salle Ianuary 1 24 Ferndale ' February 9 46 Barton Ianuary 3 40 Keyser February ll 20 Central Ianuary 7 34 Frostburg February 16 66 Bruce Ianuary 12 39 Piedmont February 19 25 Beall Ianuary l5 35 Barton February 23 32 Fort Hill Ianuary 16 59 Davis February 26 28 Frostburg Ianuary 19 27 Central , March l 39 Ridgeley Ianuary 22 37 Bruce I March 5 39 La Salle Ianuary 23 33 Ridgeley March 6 23 Ferndale Ianuary 26 44 Beall March 9 29 Central Ianuary 29 38 Fort Hill The Gremlins were riding the rim for sure as chances for the city title faded when Fort Hill surprised local fans by taking the second meet with the Bowsermen by a one point margin. In handing the Camp- obello outfit its fourth loss in twen- ty engagements, the Sentinels made necessary a playoff between the Central Tigers and Allegany to de- termine Which club Would Wear the WMI league diadem. Results of the playoff . . . another "almost but not quite" and Central for the first time in WMI history took the crown along with a 29-32 win over Allegany. With both city and WMI titles out of hand, the Campers polished off the season by defeating the unde- feated La Salle Explorers in their last game of the season . . . a de- cisive defeat . . . 39-27. 1 i I W Coach gives the first and second stringzrs a bit on the ball . . . sitting, Warner Bagent, Lon Baker, kneeling Phil Lucas. Edward Lindsay, Bob Fuller. Otis Sterne Bob Spangler: standing, lim Macfarlane, Don Basilio, D Beck. Donald Lee and Iohn Gorman. i671 Softball champions . . . room ll6 . . . Bob Mace. Richard Harper. Iohn Horn, Richard Taylor. Billy Leonard. Ierry Paxton, lack Robinson and Iohn Price. BOYS' IN TRAM URALS Led by Captain Iohn Landenberger, eighth grade, room 116 copped the junior high intramural softball tournament. Landenberger's outfit Went through the tournament undefeated. Room 110 was easily taken in the preliminary rounds and room 213 swept clean in the semi-finals. After a hard fought battle, 116 came out on top of 118 in the finals. Besides handling the duties of captain, Iohn held down the pitching post and he and his catcher, Iack Price, made up a highly formidable battery. Bob Mace, at second, scooped up many a would-be hit While Dick Harper grabbed 'em out of the air at left field. The first sacker, Iohn Horn, turned in a capital performance with the assistance of Dick Taylor at shortstop. Romping through a hotly contested series, room 113 emerged victorious in the junior high intramural basketball tournament. The miniature Bowersmen boast an unddemed season, having taken over 1 rooni 109, 15-65 IOOH1 2l5,11-5groon1106,l7- lp room 211, 7-3, room 208, 6-0, and room 302, 9-3. The team was cap- tained by Iim Radcliffe, ably assisted by Man- ager Iay Beneman. Captain Iim, along with Glenn Brant and Her- man Myers, starred for the champs. Room 109 was runner-up after downing rooms 211 ' -- - - and 208 hi a second Winners of the 1un1or high basketball loop . . . lim Powell, Donald Screen, lack Lighter, Linden Gump, lay Beneman, Floyd Price, Ronald Screen, lack Bachman. t Herman Myers, Iames Radcliffe and Glen Bran . place C681 l Sometimes we think they re a menagerie . Z . G What with elephant walks . . . uck waddles . . . gir- affe stretches and so on . . . and then we think B that they are a new class in bodily contortions . . . but they just like to call hemselves tumblers . . . seem to enjoy twisting joi! ts and bouncing on their heads . . . climbing on top of each other and r their legs and arms do wierd things. They proved their Worth their assembly presentation and we acknowl- edge that it looked mighty as Betty Blank, circus barker, put her trained animals through their paces for the benefit of Pauline Durant who finally showed that she bit about tumbling too. In one of their many form- ations . . . Betty Blank. Shirley Lester, loann Robin- son, Mary lane Stroup, Le- nore Lazarus, Nola Barnard, Helen Troutman, Ina Hughes, Margaret Moody, Lois Shoh- er, Frances Shift, Betty Fis- chell, Rita Gibbons, Alma Hardman, Mildred Stotler, Pat Cowgill, Dolores Hamil- ton, lone Rice, lean Kloster- man. and Pauline Durant. Students of the art and in- tricacies of folk dancing . . . First row: lone Rice, Ada Ro- maine, Patty Bowie, Shirley Wilson, Sue Kamens, Mary Davis: Second row: Rosemary Everstine, Wanda Loebe, Su:- anna Ford, Shirley Wickard. lean Andrews, Betty lean Kight, Ruth Layne, Mrs. Cur- ry, Adviser: Third row: Laura Browne, Dolores Somerville. Margaret Cosgrove, Dolores Deetz, Ioan Snyder. Mary Boyce. Dolores Hamilton. "Swing your ma.. . your pa . . . swing your gal . . . familiar words the Allegany trip- pers of the light fantastic as learn the many B folk dances of this and fc countries . . . meet- ing every week, the members are chosen for abilities shown in try-outs . . . some claim to be the possessors of all left feet as they cavort around in the Highlandllrling . . . the Virginia Reel . . . Pop Goes the Weasel . . . Ace of Diamonds . . . C693 ,M...............-su Freshman kickball champions . . . Room 109 . . . Dorothy Hutcheson, Virginia Cunningham, Margaret Cal- clerwood, Barbara Coleman, lean Gaither, Charlotte McCullough. Sharlcen Orndolf, Dorothy Russell and Sylvia Mitchell. l GIRLS' IN TRAM U RALS New regulations, rationing, and curtailing of the girls' sport lield meant nothing to Allegany athletic enthusiasts, as they substituted intramural competition for county-wide contests. The results . . . After chalking up six straight victories, Sylvia Mitchell's kickball team of room 109 slashed through to make a clean sweep ot the kickball tournament sponsored under the direction of Lucille Houck. Throughout the series this team kept far in the lead and gave their would-be opponents no chance of sharing top honors. Winning honorable mention for their Victorious sweeping ot the volley- ball round robin tournament for senior high was sophomore room 107. Thelma Shaner, captain of the team, led them to a well-earned championship. Anna Eror's senior team placed second, with Marion Rank's sophomore followers gathered up third killing. Ninth grade girls of room 113, headed by Iane Auman, copped the fresh- man volleyball honors by downing the six opposing teams ot rooms 215, 206, 208, 211, 302 and 109, with their hardest struggle coming when they tangled with 215 and 208. Their laurels now rest unchallenged. -..---Y Senior volleyball champs . . . Lois Stine, Paula Freshman volleyball victors . . . Shirley Wilson. Williams, Winifred McCloskey, Ieannette Freeman, Doris Apsey, Sue Kamens, lane Auman, Iune Alday, Georgeanna Pierce, Thelma Shaner and Margaret Dorothy Elder, Vivian Indy, Alice Borgman. Margaret Ruppenthal. Baker, Barbara Blunk and Marjorie Valentine. l7Ul Scoring wide margin victories, the Dribblets, of rooms 109 and 113, made a clean sweep of the freshman girls' basketball tournament. ln easily tak- en contests, the Tomcats and Wilson Devils were conquered to the tune of 4U-Z and the Bullet Girls met the same fate by giving in with a score of 26-2 in favor of the Drib- blets. Their lead position was threatened only by the Morons who managed to roll up 26 points as op- posed to 37 tallied by the victors. 3 .,.. ,J-..-...- undefeated frosh hoopsters . . . Sharleen Orndorff, Peggy Baker. lane Auman. Dorothy Hutcheson. Vivian Iudy. lean Gaither. and Sylvia Mitchell. i' i' i' BOYS' SWIMMING TEAM All set for some Waiting for the go ahead signal from Coach Hopkins keen Competition . D 0 . . . ready to make for speed and form by way of prepar- ation for intra-city swim meets . . . Allegany's aqua stars . . . Milnor Oswald, Iames Hines, Harry Swartzwelder, Clark Dixon and Wil- liam Bartlett are pictured here as "Coach" checks on their starting form. 1711 Senior high water daubers . . . Top row: lean Moore. Lois Piper, Alma Lee Phillips. Sally Williams: Middle row: Helen Chapman, Alice Sutton, Edna Herath, Betty Purinton: Bottom row: Wilma Steele, Anna Norris, Shirley Brode. Louise Purinton, Lenore Lazarus and Elaine Hirsh. SWIMMI G CL B ALMA L53 PHILLIPS ..... ............ P resident Lois PIPER ,,,,,,,,,,,.,..,, ,,,,,, V ice-President IEAN Moons .......... ........ S ecretery SALLY WILLIAMS ...... ...... T redsurer Allegany mermaids . . . all sizes, ages cmd grades . . . large number necessitated dividing group into two clubs . . . weekly swim meets on Wednesday and Thursday nights at the Y. M. C. A. . . . Elaine Hirsh and Doris Moore, student instructors . . . Eighty-five aquabelles . . . swimmers classified according to ability . . . Beginners-float, arm move- ment, kick . . . swimmers-back- stroke, backfloat, crawl, side stroke, breast stroke, diving from side of pool . . . intermediates . . . improving swimming technique and diving from board . . . advanced . . . racing dives. fancy diving, distance swimming, underwater swimming . . . life-saving . . . breaking holds, water carries, surface dives, running front dives . . . And what have we??? Primary school for Billy Rose's aquacade. Iunior high splashers . . . Top row: Lois Lazarus, Shirley Chappell, Gale Phillipson. Betty Belt. Eleanor Troxell, lean Marquis. Ruth Burton: Greta Hersh. Patty Bowie: Third row: Paula Fleclcenstein, Katherine Schade, Margaret Lancaster. Betty Harper, Sharleen Orndorff, Evelyn Ritchey, Loiis Wenschoff. Maxine Stouffer, Shirley Wickard, Marion Warden, Lois Ansel. Virginia Cunningham. Ruth lane Rinker, Wanda Loebe, Suzanne Ford: Second row: Eleanor Durst, Lois Shober. Vivian Iudy. Charlotte McCullough. Barbara Coleman, lean Gaither, Doris Apsey. Shirley Wilson, Betty Blank: First row: Eleanor Waingold. Iune Gardner, Betty Kilroy. Doris Trenton. Ioan Matthews. Marjorie Schade. Peggy O'Neal. loan Snyder and Glenna Chappell. f72l S lvia Mitchell, A la g s Sh ley Wlso All set for a snow hike . . . y le lc Ellen Newnam, Doris Apsey, Paula F c nstein. Lois L a t elt Sh e B 9 Margaret Caldzrwoocl. lean Gaither, Peg y Baker. Do thy Kath C cl V HIKING CLUB Tramp, tramp, tramp, the girls are marching right into a newly or ganized hiking club . . . were executives long enough to elect lane Auman Virginia Mille: and Miss Houck. president: Paula Fleckenste Doris Apsey. treasurer . . . Twenty-six members set off full of jaunts . . . with Mi went off hiking with the Red a group of Alcoeds overlo Narrows from Lovers' Leap . tle smoke and ashes don't h cooked-out supper . . . still month of football games, fi pulling the hill to the stad with supper in Constitution lowing the game . . . Nove mbe more football games and mor in Constitution Park for thos ed. appetites . . . A scavenger hunt to let pent-up energy . . . skating the Armory rink . . . bowli and dancing at the Y Victory a year of fun, play and act healthful recreation . . . their world at war . . . a firmly group embedded in Allegan curricular activities. October, month of golden leav ok I1 in, vice-pres1dent Sylvia Mitchell secretary on a year Lucille S Houck treading after . . . guntil she l ross . . . es, finds ing the . . a lit- arm their October. nds them ium Park fol- lf... suppers famish- off some party at g parties Ftoom . . . lvity . . . art in a rganized Y. P 0 s extra- ix , NX 1 xiii 21 X52 cfm, 3 'jf 2 , N, M if , p J X7 E E T 1 57,8 il! Our victory program . . . the part we've tried to play in behind-the-lines scenes . . . where we get our preliminary training in those more important activities lying aheacl . . . where we learned the value of a ten-cent war stamp . . . where we took out the creaks in our joints . . . and first tried to master left-faces and right turns .... Hey foot . . . straw foot . . . company halt . . . mark time . . . mark! I .V 'x CTDIQY IDIQDGIQAM 1943 V...... A E R 0 N A U T I C S Stamps and Bonds Act II . . . scene one . . . cub pilots explore the fundamental principles ot cub planes . . . air- minded lads trying to get air-conditioned . . . "Lieu- tenant" Wolford heads the division . . . Scene two . . . Allegany buys a bomber . . . stamp and bond drive brings room ll3 out as chiet challenger . . . seventh grade tops class campaign . . . Iay Beneman and Iimmy Radcliffe . . . typical bond salesmen. l76l Physical Fitness Toughening up . . . build- ing brawn . . . kindergarten course for obstacle runs and twenty-tour hour marches . . . junior yardbirds directed in the ups and downs of body-building exercises by Coach Hopkins and Coach Bowers . . . Act I on the Vic- tory Program. Mr. Wolford il- lustrates a point airplane me- chanics. Rationing Registrars Act III . . . scene set in cafeteria . . . enter sugar, followed by gasoline, coffee and canned goods . . . the three "R's" of education switch from readin', 'ritin', and 'rithmetic to registration, rationing and recording . . . faculty members volunteer their services. V...+1943 Sergeant Sim- mons holds extem- poraneous drill for Minute Men. M I N U T E M E N Faculty Forces Act IV . . . scene one . . . hours spent in drill by Minute Men . . . reserve service corps . . . small unit in municipal organization . . . ' Scene two . . . one by one . . . draft coill . . . VVAACs . . . WAVES . . . defense work . . . and Lucille Houck to the Red Cross . . . answering the calls of Uncle Sam. C771 1943 V...... Drafted Typewriters Act VI . . . Our type- Writers receive their physicals . . . rated I-A and twenty per cent are fully inducted into the armed services . . . Bill Harden, Henry Strock and Marshell Sowers help them to report for active duty. Air Drills Drills Act VII . . . Commendation given by air raid inspectors on precision and speed with which Allegany students respond to the sig- nals . . . Curtain call . . . we bid reluctant farewells to "Chick," Don, Allan and Paul . . . our first seniors to be called by selective service. C787 Victory Corsages Act V . . . V-Hop staged by boys' Hi-Y and the girls sport war stamp corsages . . . featured in retail selling case display and made by the students . . . business training takes the patriotic turn . . . Miss Livesay directs the action . . . compiles victory scrapbook. VII FEATUIQEJ AND ADVEIQTISEMENU ON FURLOUGH V-HOP . . . Margaret Reihl is crowned Victory Queen . . . Milnor Os- Wald does the honors While attendants Shirley Nichols, Iune Miller, Shirley Wilkinson and Barbara Bright look on. AT EASE . .. Escaping from the commo- tion of the "mess hall" for a bit of relaxation. Dates and dances . Acts and antics . Keep us allergic . To too much pedantics . . TYPICALS . . . Night and day . . . day and night . . . Bob Fuller and Carol Robinson . . . one of our regular "steadies" . . . if only this old door could talk. BYGONE DAYS . . . Lone survivors of Alpha Del- to Kappa . . . Velma Screen, Frances Rudd and Elaine Hirsh. DOWN AT THE RANCH . . . Meet me at Ford's . . . gossip galore flavored with a bit of coke . . . Bruce, Phyllis, Tommy, I-Xlbian, Harold, Sylvia, and Lear in a gab ses- sion . . . Ray and Eva reflecting on the sub- ject. ASPIRIN . . . Prize customer Doris Moore receives prompt at- tention from hospital room attendants Weaver, Moore and Erling. ESCAPIST MOVEMENT . . . It must have been a good one . . . witness Catherine and Eileen . . . now don't wander too far from the building, girls. ' AT ALLEGANY HOUSE . . . Wonder how they'll like it when they have to manage a house ol their own . . . but here, inmates Margaret Reihl and Anna Orris seem to be enjoying some ol those menial tasks in- volved in the art ot keeping house. BLACKOUT . . . Technicians Bob Lloyd and Bill Harden at the light controls back stage of "Arsenic and Old Lace." OH BOY! DISMISSAL . . . And Vincent Thompson, Fran- ces Orndott, Wilma Snyder and Louise Iones lose no time. 1817 TROPHY MEN Coach Clark Shaughnessy, University of Mary- land mentor, presents gridiron awards to Milnor Oswald . . . sportsmanship winner for second consecutive year . . . and Don Snyder . . . chosen as most valuable player. YOUR PEP . . . "Your pep! You've got it . . . now keep it" . . . and by George, We can't lose it . . . what with Margaret, Louis, Pee Wee, Tommy, and Mary Cath- erine giving us the old hep, hep!!! HE's OVER . . . Up from the bench comes the squad . . . unanimous ap- proval alter Fort Hill saw us make another six pointer in the Turkey Day game. C821 POPPERGANDER . . . TEAcHER's PETS . . . Another Alcohi Mirror day . . . and the news "Spare the rod and spoil the child" and Miss is eagerly digested by Caroline, Barbara, Shirley, Kompanek threatens with a vicious yardstick as Shirley Lou, Zetta, lean, Mary Margaret, Lois, "Mackie" Wilson and Curtis Cochenour atone for Zede and Regina. some minor mischief. t HAINIT SHE CUTE?" . . . Says "Zoot Suit" Doty as he teases kid sister Patty Anderson in Sid's production of "Her First Party Dress." I'r's IN! . . . "PREM" , , , And Allegany rooters give out with lusty yells A rare sight . . . this group showing such of approval at the La Salle hoop contest on the keen interest . . . Milnor could make teachers 1101119 floor. envious ot his attention getting technique. C837 AND How THEY HATE 'ro GOIN... If they had their Way, Walter Neil and his entourage would choose this "narrow escape" regularly . . . looks like Lucas is up to sumpin'. BLOCKED . . . Looks like We caught a foul, but "Lefty" Lee, hoop captain, seems to have the situation well in hand . . . one of the many big moments against La Salle. BEHIND THE HOT PLATE . . . Mrs. Robert E. King, dietician and cafeteria manager, supervises two oi her "hot disher-uppers" . . . or- chids to Mrs. King for her splendid work . . . and her good "vitt1es." HSCHAEFH . . . MASCOTS . . . ' Keeper of the keys . . . one .. .. ., Good luck charms for the on our undercover men. Turkey Day game l . I Calvin Davis and Patty Anderson l84l ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We, the statt ot the 1943 Allegewi, take this means of expressing our gratitude and appreciation to those interested persons Without Whose aid, counsel, and cooperative encouragement, this book could not have been produced . . . To Mr. Robert Goldtine and Mr. Henry R. Brett, photographers . . . To Mr. Charles F. Sprankle, representative of Robert Rawsthorne and Company, engravers . . . To Mr. Leslie M. Weigel, of Weigel 6: Barber, Inc., printers . . . and To our patrons and advertisers. THANK YOU Wtscnaus Sl : ' Q mm ,W M W Ewa. 5SAssom5 85 THREE WISE GIRLS S E L E C T QUEEN CITY DAIRY MILK For Their Choice O40 WESTERN MARYLAND S LEADING DAIRY 86 f71fa1fvey's jewelry 'l'1 'UEZWGU' il' Distributors of ALLEGANY HIGH SCHOOL CLASS RINGS CARL MCINTYRE BE SURE WS FOR BETTER MEATS and AND GROCERIES fxaoax- Cumberland Street Cumberland Maryland ITS BETTER C879 THE SECOND NATIONAL BANK OF CUMBERLAND Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporati L E T , W CRYSTAL BARBER L COSTUMERS o MILLINERS KEEP YOU LOOKING YOUR BEST ' FURRIERS WITH THREE EXPERIENCED BARBERS OK? M k Y P 21 B 1 S Compliments - of - Western Maryland Cclleqe WESTMINSTER, MD. i881 CLAYTON'S STOP AT G R 0 V E ' S A PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY For Your Milk Shakes and Sundaes Henderson Ave.-At Valley St. Corner of PHONE 42 Centre and Valley Streets TO THE CLASS OF '43: May you face the future with that high courage that is your heritage from forward- looking pioneer ancestors. KUNG!! ROSE BAUM'S A CUMBERLAND INSTITUTION FOR NEARLY A CENTURY BENEMAN'S LA DQR BEAUTY SHOPPE WESTERN MARYLAND'S COMPLETE BEAUTY LEADING FURNITURE CULTURE SERVICE STORE Phone 863 143 Bedford St. f89l COMPLIMENTS OF The First National Bank of Cumberland "THE OLDEST BANK IN WESTERN MARYLAND" Member Federal Reserve System and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation We urge you to purchase United States War Savings Bonds and Stamps runs OF QUALITY Let E E A GREEN'S FUR IELVILIAIRIERQI Keep You Looking Your Best In Really Clean Clothes PHONE 19 156 N. Centre 536 N. Centre 74 Pershing F urriers and Designers 37 Baltimore Street GOOD Compliments of ARE AN AID TO William's Foundry success IN LIFE and THE MANHATTAN Machine Works 67 Baltimore Street 117 Valley Street When Serving, Be Sure It's SPEELMAN'S ICE CREAM Fancy Creations for All Occasions QUALITY AND SERVICE SINCE 1878 148 Bedford Street Telephone 1690 CUMBERLAND, MD. l90l Raimi William '43 SW.- FOR A SPIRITED SMILE AND HEALTHY TEETH Drink Farmers' Dairy Milk Curtis Cox, Manager C913 THINGS OF PRIME IMPORTANCE TO REMEMBER WHEN BUILDING A HOUSE 'An up-to-date bathroom 'A Well arranged kitchen 'An efficient heating plant O'X'O Our Materials Are the Best Estimates Cheerfully Furnished TRI-STATE MINE AND MILL SUPPLY CO. 310 COMMERCE STREET CUMBERLAND 3284 -1 Phones - 3285 QUALITY FURNITURE BEST WISHES IT PAYS TO BUY AND SAVE AT THE to the Wolf Furniture Co. CLASS OF 1943 M0 of:-0 38 N. Mechanic Street WTBO CUMBERLAND, MD. C923 Compliments of CONGRATULATIONS TO THE The CLASS OF 1943 George F. Hazelwood Company The South GENERAL CONTRACTORS Cumberland Planing Mill Co. ow Cumberland, Md. Office and Yard-'Howard St Cumberland, Md Evelyn Barton Brown "CLOTHES OF DISTINCTIONH A 11 N. Liberty Street Phone 336 Now Featuring Special Cash-and-Carry Prices LIBERTY CLEANERS -STORES- -PLANT-f 5 NORTH LIBERTY CORNER WILLIAMS AND WINEOW 301 NORTH CENTRE Next to ASP Super Mark t SCHWARZENBACH Sz SON 128 Baltimore Street Cumberland Maryland Cumberland's Traditional Quality Store SINCE 1869 C933 C 1' - - , amp Imam Snyder's Dalry Dlp Piedmont Grocery CO' Opposite Allegany Hospital R. G. DUVALL, Manager HOMEMADE ICE CREAM Piedmont W Va IT'S GOOD IT'S DIFFERENT Oakland, Md. SANDWICHES-MILK SHAKES C O M P L I M E N T S COMPLIMENTS OF CUT RATE SHOE STORE Baltimore Street Simpson COMPLIMENTS OF Candy Company Distributors of A FRIEND DAGGETTMS cHocoLATEs 1947 COMPLIMENTS OF Millenson Furniture Company 317 Virginia Avenue Corrlplinflents of Congratulations HABEEBSS Ward N. Hauger FLOWER SHOP fm' 11 S, Centre Street Phone 4378 26 North Mechanic Street LIBERTY TRUST BLDG. Phone 2765 Cumberland, Md. SENIORS! It is your spirit that counts on the road to success-keep up that spirit of being well-dressed. It is our desire to serve you for better success in life KAPLON'S YOUNG MEN'S SHOP 115 Baltimore Street COMPLIMENTS OF C. D. KENNY DIVISION Sprague Warner-Kenny Corporation Hill's Toy Store CUMBERLAND5 OLDEST TAILOR Headquarters for SPORTING GOODS H I R S H PARTY FAVORS The Tailor 45 N. Centre Street 36 Baltimore Street GEORGE'S CONFECTIONERY Home-made Candy and Ice Cream FRESH MADE DAILY Corner of Bedford and Decatur Streets C953 COMPLIMENTS OF George's Creek Coal Company We Write Every Form of Protection Clothes of Distinction Thomas F. Conlon from Conlon Insu an e The Cumberland r C Cloak and Suit Agency Company 400 Liberty Trust Bldg. Baltimore Street Phones 807-472 Cumberland Maryland LOUIS STEIN, Inc. FUNERAL HOME AIR CONDITIONING 117 Frederick Street Phone 27 CUMBERLAND, MARYLAND Cum1iZiiTf2'f,lfi1i5lfflllniritore WalSh 31 MCCagh Make Your Shoe Dollars Do Their PHARMACY DUW BY Always Going fo The Prescription Center W E B B , S can 3646 We Deliver For Your Shoes Corner Centre Street Out of the High-Rent District Af Bedford Street COMPLIMENTS OF Lillianls Dress Shop C967 GOLDSMITH SPORTS EQUIPMENT Smart Equipment for Smart Play S M I T H ' S TENDER FEET SHOES 123 Baltimore Street Cumberland Maryland THE WILSON 7 HARDWARE D. R. Kitzmiller MEMORIALS Frederick and George Streets 30 N. Mechanic Street Phone 379 GRADUATION GIFTS TIMES-NEWS S P E A R , S CUMBERLAND, MD. JEWELRY STORE DINGLE M Cleaners Sz Dyers Phone 1287 T 752-754 Greene Street Cumberland, Md. 62 Baltimore Street W e invite you to use the service of the modern bank LIBERTY TRUST COMPANY MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 'lLet me live in cr house . . . COMPLIMENTS furnished by t The Acme Hgmg Furnlture CO- Funeral and Ambulance g'Furniture That Pleasesn' Psermce hone 1454 73 N. Centre Street Cumberland, Md. 309-311 Decatur Street Cumberland, Md. Hood College Henry I. Stcxhn, A. M., D. D., LL. D. President Accredited College for Women B. A., B. S. in Home Economics, and B. S. in Nursing. Special War Emergency Courses. Approved courses in Education, including practice teaching. Also a Depart- ment of Music. A strong and well qualified faculty. For catalogue address REGISTRAR HOOD COLLEGE, FREDERICK, MD. ONE LOCATION ONLY B 0 P P ' S Flower Shop 75 Baltimore Street Cumberland Maryland COMPLIMENTS OF M SHOE. .STORE 135 Baltimore St. Cumberland, Md. Look Your Best and Keep Happy In Clothes from B U R T 0 N ' S 129 Baltimore Street Cumberland, Maryland FRANTZ HOME Real Estate Insurance BAKERY Specializing in Rye Bread M. D. REINHART Liberty Trust Building PHONE 1896 and Pastries 510 N. Centre Street GREETING CARDS SCHOOL SUPPLIES POST CARD SHOP 1 25 N, CENTRE STREET Insurance . . Bonding .... THE J. H. HOLZSHU COMPANY REAL ESTATE 21 S. CENTRE STREET PHONE 458 C991 FOR THE FUTURE- B U Y COMPLIMENTS OF WAR BGNDS N 0 W GEO. W. MARTIN 4 ll to buy and . 'f E1 t ' 1 ,Zi Apgfigffes GROCERIES ' Z after 3 the War O90 The Potomac Edison Company 417-421 Maryland Avenue 121 N. Centre Street 1- , V Phone 158 , DISTRIB UTORS ,rw , WALLPAPERS Congratulations to Compljmenls of Class of '43 W If d F I Rand's Self Serve 0 01' lllle ra Cut Rate Corner Centre and Baltimore Sts Cumberland, Md, Cumberland, Md. MANY ALLEGANY STUDENTS ARE ALSO MEMBERS "THE BIG FCEIENDLY Ye QMeet your friends at the Y. M. C. AJ l1U0l BEST WISHES FROM THE SABRE STAFF FORT HILL HIGH SCHOOL SCHADE SL TWIGG Radiator Service - Specialized Lubrication C3 ge and llnion Streets 638 C3 ene Street PHONE 500 PHONE 2456-M Compliments of HENRY R. BRETT +'!+ PHOTOGRAPI-IER 11015 11027 Photography By ROBERT GOLDFINE, '26 GCDLDFINE STUDIOS 11035 WEIGEL Sz BARBER, Inc "The Home of REAL PRINTING" PRINTING - RULING BINDING TELEPHONE 29-681 329 MAIN STREET IOHNSTOWN, PA. 1,--1-' we 1 THIS BOOK WAS PRODUCED IN OUR PLANT C1047 E 4 I . .v, 1 . .., W-1 5731 I 35,2 -52 U34 ff F J f . 45,35 Y if . F gf. 4 + iff L I ff r g 1 P 1 .2 f. I W1- I 1. '11, Y .H I, '14, . .nw 4 ,au 1 -.,, , PS-rvrb ri Nan: k'..f'f N ANL AH.h'w 'r"f"? 1 1 !'r'TF"' N ' ' 'I Q-""h-:-nnw Q' ......,,.,,,,sw,,4gL, fi


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Allegany High School - Alleganac Yearbook (Cumberland, MD) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

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