All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY)

 - Class of 1930

Page 1 of 56

 

All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1930 Edition, All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1930 Edition, All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1930 Edition, All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1930 Edition, All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1930 Edition, All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1930 Edition, All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1930 Edition, All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1930 Edition, All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1930 Edition, All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1930 Edition, All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1930 Edition, All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1930 Edition, All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 56 of the 1930 volume:

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Dedication We lovingly dedicate this issue of EXCELSIOR to our beloved principal, Sister M. Rose Gertrude, O. S. D., and the faculty, to whom we owe a debt of love and gratitude for their constant and generous endeavor to pattern us after the ideal Catholic business girl. To Father Mulz, Our Reverend Pastor The Class of June, 1930, expresses deep appreciation for his inspiring Religious instructions. They will ever lic no ns a source of unfailing strength on our parh to eternity. Allll Saints CCo.nm1mne1r'eiall Sellrooll The Exeelsior Board EDITOR-INCHIEF Dominga Durlacher ASSOCIATE EDITORS Marie Greulich Dorothy Waldeck Lucille Harrigan Gertrude Wapenhaus Mary Leonard Helen Whooley BUSINESS MANAGERS Margaret Daunlmauer Celestina Scutari Dominga Durlaclmer Matilde Stravitsch Rose Oiammalvo Frances Trusz exneya G. O. O1HEieers President ,i,? Vicefresiclentsili- Sec retaryg - Class Representatives Lucille Harrigan Catherine Breitscli Margaret Fleming Dominga Durlacher Anna Hoclnett Matilcle Stravitsch Margaret Lukacsy Class Treasurers ,glw Gertrude Wapenhails CXSQXZJ CLASS PATRON CLASS COLORS Sacred Heart of Jesus Gold and White CLASS MOTTO CLASS FLOWER Veritas Red Rose Page 5 A1111 Saints Commercial School 0 bliging U pright R eliable JF aithful A miable C ultured U nbiased A L oyal T ruth-loving Y outhfloving Margaret Fleming, '30 Page 6 . . . . ..... . . , . ,,. . . 'f"f", W "'," ' "' f " I All Saints kC3OlHill'1lllC3l'CliZlllSCilll00ll A Parting Word to the Seniors GJQQXEJ OU have come to the parting of the ways, and as your Alma Mater sends you forth today, she wistfully bestows a tender blessing on each of you. Hopefully she entrusts to you the task of interpreting in your lives the principles she labored to inculate in your hearts during your years of intimate association with her. Physically you are separated from your Alma Mater, but if you keep her memory fresh you will find her close to you ever ready to console, encourage, and inspire as heretofore. Her highest hope is to see her daughters shining examples of true Catholic womanhood. You will not fail her. Keep ever in mind the motto you have chosen, and let it brighten your sphere with its light. Your "Veritas" will be your talisman, and it must keep you steadfast and true to self, to humanity, and to God. Securely will it lead you through all the mazes of this earthly life to the One Wlxo alone is Beauty and Truth. Farewell! May we hear of you with increasing joy! Sister M. Rose Gertrude, O. S. D., Principal Page 7 All Saints Commercial School Uni' Rose 918918 On an altar of marble pure, White as a lily fair, Lay. a rose-symbol of love- The token our class had placed there. We had offered it in deepest gratitude For the graces showered by Him Who had offered Himself on Calvary To free the world from sin. The stem is our undying unity- We shall e'er he as one, Hoping, striving for eternity And our Refuge, Mary's Son. Some petals droop with sorrow, Our sorrow for sins, not few, Dew-drops glisten-the tears we shed For clear, departed classmates we knew. Blushing, velvety petals Eagerly upturned to the blue, Not as those drooping with sorrow But tinged with joys of friendships trueg Friendships grounded in faith and love, Made firm by our service and truth, Clinched by our constancy and our hope To be faithful even as "Ruth". Our rose is now in fullest bloom, Glorious in its robe of red, A brightly burning torch of love, Ever bright'ning the path ahead. Dominga Durlacher, '30 Marie Stadler, '30 Page 8 , ,....,,,,. , .,,, .....,.... .. AH Saints Qj0Il'H'R1l'1I'HC'IFCi2UlH Scllnlcuzfoll G R A ID U A T IE S Page 9 Gawfvvxfwf-vfrfamsvQQ9c0Qf0Q2Qm2ffQm9f52L2fi All Saiiirnmts C0n'nn11'm1c1vQii:a11l Scllilooll Harrigan, L. Pmsidcfnr "Our Lou"-lllc only girl cwr ll1llllll171UllSlj' clsctcll to rllu Frasi- clfncw. L ' Hodnett, A. Class Rcp1'uscnmti4'l: Om' "comullian's" luummzils mmm-ksmll furrlx pulls of lfuaglltur. Breitsch, C. Vice Pwsilicnz Sllc swings ll uickvll pencil us LlHSICl10gH. iitravitsch, M. Class Rcp1'uscnmti1'c Tlu' urt of goull Jalvmrlcing is an fir! mdcl.-11. Fleming, IM. Vice Prusillcnt If"l'cggy" isn'Lsmil- ing, sl1cis4'tl1iw1lcing". Yvvapenhaus, G. 7'TClLSH7'L'T llwr golclcn locks 171lllCClIUTl,li7'llll'STl1'lll. Durlacher, D. Secretary "Dom" is our liter- ary gClllllS. Mucli succcssl. Lukaxcsy, M. T1'CllS1LTL'T W Rain or Sl1l1'lL', W Ivlargmec is crcr bright 1 ' and pleasing. i Page 10 ' .iff0Qff0Qff0fLfdfi2GJQA0CX8C'ff0OQCMOQQOQOQSDQWQGQ GQGQGGQQQQQQGQQQVOQQVOQQOQQQMOQQVOOQQQ All Saints Conmlnmlcrcianll Schooll Auer, A. artist. Bassler, hi. But llzzncing? Bennett, L. long amy. Bowers, G. happy zlwugllls. Anmz, alert and sin- , ccrc, cxculs as an Broedel, H. "A thing of beauty is a joy forever." Dulvits mul credits! Brush, D. Her wit is keen, llcr loyalty strong. A good all-arouml pal, lwr llL14'Lfll, goes a Burkhardt, F. "Fla" is always at the top. "Currie" is ll sweet J little lady, made fur Cantwell, hi. "Hur fuiuc was cvcr soft mul low, A1lUXCCllC1llllli11giIl wmnanf' Page 11 349ofaMoiraeragpmoraqfraehcxacanmmmmmmwommmmvammmmmmmmmmm All Saints Commnncrcia1l1Scll1100ll Clark, H. py and carefree, W'l1y.' Fm lrislin. Daley, M. Marys courtesy has made us love her. Helen, usually hap- has resolved to be serious. Daunhauer, hi. "Our Margyu, meek and modest, has a most attractive per- sonality. Cunningham, C. HCj1lI1'Ilj'ySU feet bc- eome wet avlzen it rains. Dillon, I. Betty's serenity is charming. Cunningham, K. "Sure and I 'm proud DiMaio, A. Movie bound? A future crtic? Perhaps! Dunn, H. Why will carefree Harriet insist on study- ing Spanish? Page 12 wwf-wfwfv ww we we f2efi23QQf2fo52ffM AHIlSaiim1mts Commercial School Eiter, A. Oh, wlmr I1 mimic is .-Kumi! Fischlein, C. Our HDawid" is small, fmt slzc dues knou' her Spfmish! Ell, E. Hur uiicu is ever 1lL'IlTLl ulmw Ihc Jin. Gennusa, A. Gentle "To11y's" giggles me as infec- tious as suurlcr fever. Fahey, M. Alxwzys pleasant and lmppy-go-lzadcy, IVIll'l'i!Hl is lmfcd Ivy all. Giammalvo, R. Service is sweet- rims thinks Ruse. Farren, M. "I'egg3"s" talks mu received with enthu- siasm. Greiner, A. Beneath tim! sophis- ticated appearance, rlwrc lies :L swcct character. Page 13 A1ll1rSza1inrts Conn1m1cerciaIlScho0Il Gressert, D. Roller skating? Pshaw, the cat's out of the Img! Leonard, M. "A modest violet grew". Greulich, M. "ls there anything 1 can Jo?" is so char- acteristic of Marie. Lux, H. 4'Luclcy" is heading straight for the Metro- politan Opera." Horsting, D. 'ADU unto others as you would have others do unto you." McCarthy, A- X And so sweet Alice let "it" grow. ' Jackman, K. Katherine hides her talents behind a veil of modesty. McCarthy, E. 4 Mischie1'ous Eileen i is a regular Mary Mix-up. Page 14 Zf5Ef0f3'fQf9fU QwsawilO6vifI2Q?0 fif5Qf5fvEfvQQQwsWsfQwmwmwiqqwmwwvowvewwc AH Sminnmts CCj0IIHl!lTlCJI'CiZ1lHSCIlll0Oll McCullough, R. Rall! Rllll! Rah! Sis Imam lmlx! All Saints! .-Xl1Suims! Mntzkewitz, A. "Thu curly bird cat- cfws tlw U'UT11l.H McKenna, F. Hl'y'Y'll7l,SH lmlvbjv is Xll'iIlll1li7l,Q mul us ll 1'us141t-Ajfcuklcs, y comu! Mihelich, E. Emilia posscsscs that mlmirrzlvlu rrf1it-- loyafty. 1N1CLeod, Ni. NIilLl1'ucl's musical Ullllfkld iS7'U1lHj'll77l1lS' mg Mohr, M. Hou' rlmr girl cfm .uixufvf Marz, F. Immccnr und calm, I'lmcncu1n:1'uT Icarus tl thing umlrmu. Murn, M. A chccrful heart mul W 11 well truimml lumd will carry MC1lliLT thru :my land. Page 15 A1111 Saints Commercial School Ohler, E, Eva is full of pep and l gog tl1at's wliy we all love llcr so. Spaulding, R. Ruth sings to keep away the blues. In the classroom? No! Oswald, P. A'Paul's" dimple is sweet. So is she. Springer, M. To lxladelinc, lifeis one sweet dream. O'Toole, A. Anna is ever willing to oblige-yes even to talk. Stadler, M. "All good things come in small packa- ges. Scutari, C. Celustina, neat and pleasant, certainly can "collect", Stalzer, P. Silence produces tlw l best thoughts. l Page 16 , ,, , , , ...... .,,.. .......... . -'f39ffQVff?,?ff99'ff09ff0WUWQ9ffQE3fffL?f92f99fG99:fQ91fQ?fQ,?1fQffl9ff0EfG?91!0?1f09"L39'Q5'ffQWf3W9ff9?ff0'-'ff09'fQ9'ff9Sff9.i.'3:Q A1lIlSa1im1rts Commercial Scllnooll Stotcnbur, M. Slw lms spruad sun- ' shim: in our midst. Trusz, F. Hur 17lUH'l,OTf' Tc- scmblcs ll "book suffoculccl". Stubing, M. Our u'i:a7'cl in cl vs- fnuml! Waldcck, D. "Dot", our petite JIUICUT, is Juinrincss pcrsrmijicd. Travis, E. Wlly u'm1'l llmt lmir stay in placv? Whooley, H. Cjvnrlu us a lumlv is she. Troina, S. Hur "Music llllfll charms to soothe :llc savage beast," Yhculon, G. ' So charming, swear, and friendly! Page 17 All Saints Conn11nn1tercia1llSelh1ooll Zinsley, K. UXVllO17I do you sup- posel met lust night?" Zopf, L. "Silence is golden." .,...,o.. . Gray, C. "Now in the eternal gardens." O'Neill, H. "A pleading forget- me-not." The Direaunm Girl of A. S. C. Possesses: The The The The The The The The The The The The The The hair of Mildred McLeod eyes of Margaret Lukacsy skin of Anna Auer dimple of Pauline Oswald smile of Dorothy Waldeck teeth of Eileen McCarthy voice of Helen Lux wit of Anna Hodnett pep of Dominga Durlaeher modesty of Helen Whooley knowledge of Florence Burkhardt disposition of Marian Stuhing personality of Margaret Fleming popularity of Lucille Harrigan Helen Broeclel, '30 Page I8 All Saints Commercial School .History of the Class of 1930 06026 NE evening we were lazily listening to the radio when suddenly we were startled by the sound of a familiar voice and the utterance of a familiar name. We listened carefully and heard, "This is Station A. S. C., Matilde Stravitsch announcing. Please stand by. As a special feature on the air, today Dominga Durlacher, editor-ingchief of the June 1930 Excelsior, will recount the History of the june 1930 graduating class of All Saints Commercial School. We know that many of the listeners will be eager to register at this well-known school after they have heard the annals of the outstanding Senior Class in the school's history. Address all communications to - All Saints Commercial School 23 Thornton Street Brooklyn, N. Y. 'Flushing Avenue! Watch the doorsl' warned the conductor when a group of giggling, excited girls left the train. Those were some of the freshmen of 1928, destined to be "the" senior class in the history of All Saints Commercial School. The first days of the freshman term were spent in becoming acquainted with the ever-helpful teachers, sociable girls, rules and regulations of the school. After this, we began our work in earnest. On the arrival of midterm exami- nations, we overtaxed our intellects to impart to our teachers our goodly supply of knowledge. This acquired knowledge was used by the teachers at the ex- piration of the term to mete out to us very distasteful tests. Notwithstanding, we came through with flying colors, which naturally was to be expected. Thus, our term as freshmen came to a close but our freshness and simplicity remained. SOPHOMORES! Upon reaching the second term, our timidity dropped from us like a cloak, and from shrinking violet buds we blossomed into self- confident flowers. With foresight of what we would be when we had fully blossomed, the teachers watched amid sighs of ecstasy, our blooming. We entertained the faculty and student body by two splendid assemblies. judging from the deafening, thundering applause we received, we decided that our effort to make our assemblies the most entertaining of all those presented during the term were rewarded. Meanwhile, our surprising store of knowledge Page 19 All Saints Commercial School was rapidly increasing thanks to the teachers to whom we gave our knowledge in the freshman class. JUNIORS! This term brought the joyful news that Father Mulz had been appointed pastor of our church. As administrator of the parish, Father Mulz and the students had become well acquainted, so we rejoiced indeed. We immediately prepared for him a welcoming reception, at which we spent a happy time. After the reception we returned home in a downpour of rain to spend the day as we pleased. Duning this term we presented two very interesting assemblies, "Over the Hills", and "The Hour Glass". Both produced the desired result. At the former tears flowed copiously, and at the latter serious thoughts had a very sobering effect upon our audience. SENIQRS! Ah! At least we had reached our goal. We were the most important people in the school fso we thoughtl. lt was rather gratifying to see the timid freshmen bow to us when they met us in the corridors, and step aside for us on the staircase. But alas, our happiness was marred by one sad event-the death of our beloved goldfish. This heavy loss was quite unexpected and stole from us our usual joviality. Even in his last moments on earth, our dear little "Goldie" was not deprived of water, for the salt tears fell fast and free. After the burial we resumed our studies in a very subdued mood. We learned that by doing excellent work during the term, we would be entitled to exemption at midterm. This was no hard task for such brilliant students as we thought ourselves to beg however, we worked with a vim. The joyful time of exemption for some and midterm examinations for others passed quickly, and the Easter holidays brought our last school vacation. On May 13 we had our senior play, which will not soon be forgotten. The seniors, making a very pretty picture, sang "Bigger and Better", revised by Dominga Durlacher. Then followed a lively and intensely interesting play entitled "Our Aunt from California". The climax of the afternoon was "The Death of Blessed Imelda", dramatically presented. Finally, the seniors sang "The Stein Song", also revised to fit the occasion by Dominga. Thus ended the history of the Senior Class of june 1930. Amidst tears and heartaches we said goodbye to our beloved Alma Mater, nevertheless, we have the consolation of having formed friendships that will endure throughout the yearsg we shall always look back upon the days spent in All Saints as both profitable and enjoyable. Fare-thee-well, Alma Mater! Fare-thee-well!" With tear-dimmed eyes we realized that the announcer had signed off. Dorothy Waldeck, '30 Lucille Harrigan, '30 Page 20 All Saints Commercial School A School Dany At 8:40 sharp the bell always rings. Then promptly we get out our Steno thingsg And through this period we do blunder, Until the bell outside does thunder. Then our period of Spanish begins- And do we make a merry din, Reciting verbs and how they form Reflexive and imperfect, the period long. As 10:40 o'clock draws near, We leave our classroom, oh so dear. We type with might and main, , Promotion sure in June to gain. The forty minutes pass like nightg Then to our classroom trip we light. Our Bookkeeping teacher there we meet, Who checks our ledgers clean and neat. Our program is disturbed by lunch: As we return we have a hunch That 'rithmetic will be our fate- For this, of course, we can't be late. Our English meeting then we hold, And variously our features mold, When to the class the speaker relates How Rebecca almost met her fate. Thus through the day we gaily go, Trying to learn and wanting to knowg But from without comes the sound of the bell, And thus we end a joyous spell. Margaret Metzner, '32 Page 21 All Saints Commercial School Wlllellinggg Traits GRADUATE Anna Auer Mabel Bassler Lillian Bennett Gertrude Bowers Catherine Breitsch Helen Broedel ' Doris Brush Florence 'Burkhardt Margaret Cantwell Helen Clark Catherine Cunningham Kathleen Cunningham Mary Daley Margaret Daunhauer Isabelle Dillon Anna DiMaio Harriet Dunn Dominga Durlacher Anna Eiter Elizabeth Ell Marian Fahey Margaret Farren Catherine Fischlein Margaret Fleming Antonia Gennusa Rose Giammalvo Anna Greiner Dorothy Gressert ' Marie Greulich Lucille Harrigan Anna Hodnett Dorothy Horsting Katherine Jackman 0606 N OTED FOR artistic ability loquacity laughing regularity collecting assignments baby stare wit ambition diligence vivacity gait freckles silence gentility thinking scintillating eyes rolling eyes personality imitating aggressiveness willingness good "talks" teasing baby voice stenography service rosy cheeks babyishness neatness humility chumminess cheerfulness timidity Page 22 MAN NER animated pleasing cheerful joyful generous optimistic mirthful kind humble gladsome laughing upright friendly ' sensible mild industrious gal' roguish benign inimitable congenial obliging good-natured winning grave joyous agreeable artless quiet ingenuous humorous sunny sober All Saints Comnnereiaill School GRADUATE NOTED FOR MANNER Mary Leonard studying reserved Alice McCarthy dreaming sweet Eileen McCarthy daintiness lively Regina McCullough school-girl-complexion jolly Frances McKenna giggling happy-go-lucky Mildred McLeod marcel waves timid Florence Marz "collecting" cordial Antonine Matzkewitz efficiency sedate Enlllia lVlihCliCl'1 "Betty" dependable Margaret Mohr vivid descriptions merry Mollie Murn smiling reticent Eva Ohler composing humorous Pauline Oswald dimpled chin blithe Anna O'Toole asking questions demure Celestina Scutari blushing meek Ruth Spaulding cheerfulness candid Madeline Springer resting considerate Marie Stadler singing eager Pauline Stalzer "Francie" exact Madeline Stotenbur perseverance pleasant Matilde Stravitsch oratory light-hearted Marion Stubing Spanish sympathetic Evelyn Travis indifference quaint Seraphina Troina melodies jovial Frances Trusz "Paulich reliable Dorothy Waldeck dancing delightful Gertrude Waperiluaus G. O. dues gracious Helen Whooley pensiveness gentle Gertrude Yheulon simplicity charming Katherine Zinsley ambition courteous Loretta Zopf modesty willing Margaret Lukacsy, '30 Helen Lux, '30 Margaret Lukacsy assiduity sincere Helen Lux singing persuasive Page 23 All Saints Commercial School Katherine Zinsley Ruth Spaulding Evelyn Travis Seraphina Troina Loretta Zopf Anna O'Toole ' Katherine Jackman Mabel Bassler Mary Daley Alice McCarthy Mollie Murn Anna Greiner Catherine Breitsch Antonine Matzkewitz Frances Trusz Pauline Stalzer Helen Clark Margaret Lukacsy Celestina Scutari Helen Broedel Doris Brush Helen Lux Regina McCullough Eileen McCarthy Anna Eiter Mary Leonard ' Matilde Stravitsch Catherine Fischlein Florence Burkhardt Margaret Mohr Dorothy Horsting Marian Fahey Lillian Bennett U KC U U CC CK If CI U U U CK CK H IC KC 66Telling'9 Songs 0250225 l've Never Seen a Smile Like Yours Looking at the World thru Rose colored Glasses Blondy" My Troubles Are Over satisfied" Ah, Sweet Mystery of Life Charming" "She's So Unusual She Drives Me Wild M-a-r-y" Beautiful" Sweet and Low" Beautiful Eyes" She Knows Her Onions Melancholy" ?"Two Pals" "Comrades" Gorgeous" Oh Doris" "My Lucky Star" Cf Collegiate" "Smiling Irish Eyes" Ich Liebe Dich" Oh! What a Pal Was Mary Red Hair and Freckles Little Pali' Sunshine" Margie" Like a Breath of Springtime Sunny Side Up" Page 24 Have a Little Faith in Me Allll Saints Commercial School Anna DiMaio Margaret Cantwell Margaret Farren Marie Stadler Marion Stubing Catherine Cunningham Kathleen Cunningham Anna Hodnett Mildred McLeod Margaret Daunhauer Marie Greulich Gertrude Yheulon Madeline Stotenbur Elizabeth Ell Emilia Mihelich Harriet Dunn Dorothy Waldeck Isabelle Dillon Dominga Durlacher Dorothy Gressert Eva Ghler Gertrude Bowers Rose Giammalvo Gertrude Wapenhaus Florence Marz Madeline Springer Pauline Oswald Frances McKenna Lucille Harrigan Helen Whooley Antonia Gennusa Anna Auer Margaret Fleming CK U Where'd You Get Those Eyes?" Honey" Ain't She Sweet?" If I Were You l'd Fall in Love with Me" So Sympathetic!" Good Little, Bad Little You" My Wild Irish Rose" Lucky Little Devil" Sweeter Than Sweet" We Never See Maggie Alone" Sweet Marie" Yankee Rose" Sweet Child" Trying" Mickey" Pretty Little You" There's Everything Nice about You They Come No Better Than Betty" H "She's a Good Girl to Have Around" "Baby Face" ! Painting the Clouds with Sunshine' Hard to Get Gertie" Rosy Cheeks" Dream Girl" What Do l Care?" Paddlin' Madeline Home" "She Had a Little Dimple on Her Chin" "Stepping Along" True Blue Lou" Lovable and Sweet" "Ah, So Pure!" The Pal That I Love" Let a Smile Be Your Umbrella" Margaret Fleming, '30 Dominga Durlacher, '30 Page 25 All Saints Commercial School Dunstamfs Last Ride 625045 I HE evening dusk was falling, the wind was howling, and a long-gatheriing storm broke as Dunstan Cass mounted on Wildfire rode savagely. His thoughts were dark even as the surrounding atmosphere and the sneer on his lips acclaimed his malicious character and his far from innocent plans. His schemes boded good for no one, but exceptional ill for Silas Marner and Godfrey. He rode the horse at a terrific pace, his spurs dug deep into the steaming flanks of the poor beast, until through sheer exhaustion Wildfire fell on his knees with a scream of pain. Covered with mud, and sending forth blasphemous oaths, Dunstan shot the animal, not with any thought of relieving the suffering creature, but to furnish an outlet for his horrible mood. After giving the quivering form of Wildfire a savage kick he walked on, muttering oaths under his breath. At a turn in the road a light from the cabin of Silas Marner met his eye. Ah, now had come his chance! Why should the old miser have such a hoard when the son of the squire of Raveloe was in such need of coin? Slowly and cautiously he approached, dodging behind trees at the slightest sound. Finally he reached the only window of the humble cabin and looked within. His wicked eyes searched all corners but no sight of the miser did he find. "Ah!" he thought "At last fate is kind to men. Noiselessly he entered the poor little hut. No, he did not hesitate, he went steadily on with his malicious task. Stealthily he looked under the mattress, under the bed, even up the chimney flue. Nothing was in evidence. As he turned from the fire, he gave a low cry of joy. He had stepped into a hole in the floor. Eagerly he pulled away the ragged bit of carpet which had been carefully placed over the hole. With a whistle of delight he drew forth the bag which contained the life-savings of poor Silas. Hastily slipping it into his coat he left the cabin. Lost in thick mist, he stumbled through the slimy mud. Suddenly before him he saw the figure of a man. Was it Silas? The coward's heart leaped with fear, and he clutched the gun tighter. No! the man before him was staggering. It was never Silas, who would not even allow himself suflicient food. As he advanced, he saw that it was Jem Rodney, inebriated as usual. A new idea entered his head. Why could he not use lem as a tool for his plans? He roughly jerked the latter's arm and said, "How would you like to make some money?" "Why hello, Dunsey", lem replied with a leer. "What'clya say?" Dunstan roughly shook the intoxicated man and hissed, "Listen, l'm sick and tired of seeing my brother Godfrey get everything his own way. I'm going to put an end to it. Here's where you come in. l want you to help me do away with him. Don't get excited! No one will know who did it. Page 26 All Saints Conimfereial School As soon as the job is done l'll give you half a bag of gold. It will be more than enough to take you out of the town and live comfortably for the rest of your life." At this point of the conversation, lem arose and said with the utmost dignity possible under the circumstances, "I may gambleg I do drink, but l'm no murderer. So long, Dunstan Cass. Do your dirty work alone." Dunstan rose with a yell, "You needn't think that you are going to back out now. Not with all that information." UNO? Who's going to stop me?" "I am", growled Dunstan. The two started to fightg neither winning, neither losing. They did not realize that they were so near the edge of the stone pit until Dunstan's foot slipped. I-le yelled and begged lem to keep him up, and lem, who was good at heart, tried to save Dunstan, but it was too late. The lately intoxicated man-now fully restored to his senses-heard a scream of agony, the sound of a human being go crashing down the bank, and a sickening splash. With a scream I awoke. I found myself slipping out of the bed, struggling with the bed sheet that had become wound around my neck. I thanked God that it was only a dream, and felt quite content to allow Dunstan to solve his own fate in the stone pit without my presence. Lucille Harrigan, '30 T7 7 5Spanlsl11? I like my typing, that is true, And my stenography I love to dog My bookkeeping I study with real zest, But it's English I think I like the best. There's one thing I just can't understand- Why do we study Spanish in this fair land? Elizabeth Delac, '32 Page 27 All Saints Commercial School A Retreat at the Cenaele QJGJQJQ CK D H 7 ' v - - - as f I ATS fine, girls. Im sure you will enjoy it, exclaimed one o our teachers when Peggy, Lucille and I told her of our intention of making a retreat at the Cenacle at Lake Ronkonkoma. We wrote for information, and received from the Sister in charge the very pleasing reply that on April ll a retreat for High School Girls would be held. Needless to say we counted the days, for we were eager to taste of the peace of the cloister. Then, too, our retreat would immediately precede Holy Week-we were indeed fortunate. At last the day of days arrived. Our principal very kindly gave us permission to leave early on Friday in order to prepare for our time of spiritual enjoyment, and in high spirits we boarded the Long Island train which carried us safe to Ronkonkoma with but one amusing incident-much to the enter- tainment of other girls on the train. In our haste to arrive at the Cenacle we attempted to alight at Central Islip UD, the station before our destination. We finally reached Ronkonkoma after an eight mile ride in a bus which, in the opinion of the passengers, must have been related to "Leaping Lena". Upon our arrival we were cordially received by the Sisters of the Cenacle, and the retreatants were apportioned into small groups, over which were placed Mothers who gave us instructions as to the manner of making the retreat. We three with several companions were given rooms in the main building, while the remainder of the party of girls were placed in the guest house and bungalow. Reverend. Father Obering, S. J. opened the retreat at 8:00 o'clock that evening with a short talk on the purpose of the retreat. After that encouraging conference we retired for a well-earned rest. On Saturday morning, with only the birds as witnesses, we enjoyed a brisk walk around the beautiful grounds. We attended Mass, had our breakfast in "silence", and then spent the rest of the day in prayer, meditation, and conferences. The most impressive of these was on "Death". ln this sermon Father Obering vividly portrayed death as it really is, and how it should be faced by everyone. There was no doubt in the minds of the retreatants that these intimate talks would remain fixed in their minds and hearts for a long time. lf asked, however, many would confess that the hardest part of the retreat was the silence which had to be observed during meals. The schedule for Sunday was much the same as that for Saturday, with the exception of a very pretty and impressive procession held in honor of Our Lady of the Cenacle. ln the afternoon, as a beautiful conclusion to our retreat, Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament, followed by the Papal Blessing, was given. Yes, it was enjoyed-every moment of it. We shall never forget our first retreat, and we look forward to other such times when we may turn aside, and with Christ, our Master, rest awhile. Helen Whooley, '30 Page 28 ' All Saints fC30l1l111fil1lG1l"Cl21l Selrool A Clever Appeal 6243043 Extract from secretary's report of April 3, 1930: "The homework was checked, all students were prepared. The teacher gave the new day's assignment-to write a letter to a teacher of any subject claiming that the work in that subject for the term should justify exemption from midterm examination." Extract from secretary's report of April 5, 1930: "After this, the work at the board was discussed. Then Sister called upon Dominga Durlacher to read her letter of claim. That letter delighted the girls." Here it is: "Dear Sister, l want your special permission to do a favor for you. You know, only too well, the troubles of examination week and the toil of rating papers. I am offering not to take the English test, and you will have one paper less to rate. But, this is no way in which to address a teacher of English, is it? Well, l shall have to start over again. Seriously, I think I am justiiied in asking exemption from English. Have I not always done my homework? Am l not an attentive child during the lessons? Do I not use A effort in preparing various reports and talks? The answer must be "yes", My spelling and quiz papers show an average of eighty percent CI hopel. l have laid the facts before you. My fate is in your hands. All that I ask is that your justice be tempered with mercy. Exemption from English means a free morning in the Spring. Ah, the Spring! That season of the year when all the forces of Nature unite to gratify man's senses and renew his faith in the Almighty. Golden sunbeams play hide-and-seek with the purple shadows on the hills. The newfgreen meadows are gay with dancing yellow dandelions, that nod their heads to the blue-birds and robins back from their Southern sojourn. There is a song in the very atmosphere-and my heart sings too. And while l'm tripping o'er the greensward, I shall murmur a liilting song of cheer into the ear of the South Wind, and she will carry it straight to you. May 1, Sister, look forward to this joy? Respectfully yours, Dominga Durlacher, P. S. The family physician says that l'm an easy victim for Old Spring Fever. April 3, 1930" Was Dominga exempted? She was! Page 29 Allll Saints Conamereial Selhiooil Memories C9696 OME memories are sad and beautiful, some memories are happy and beautiful. To us, the Seniors, the saddest, happiest, and most beautiful memory is that of our beloved Monsignor George Kaupert. Father, for a short time our Spiritual Director, was a true and kind friend to all, and we learned to love and honor him. His teaching was simple and earnest, his manner sweet and humble, his smile a godsend in time of trouble. But everything in this world must come to an end, even a beautiful life. Our Divine Master called, and His faithful servant joyfully answered. His passing was indeed a sad blow, nevertheless, we are grateful for the joy of having known our dear Monsignor, for he will ever be to us a beautiful memory. Matilde Strcwitsch, '30 loin,- The Service Squad 0460145 I HIS term we welcomed to our already very efficient system "The Service ' Squad". The suggestion to have such a body of workers was made by our immediate predecessors, but we have had the honor of being the first to wear the A. S. C. band on our arms. What a thrill the members experienced on the day of their initiation! The willing workers of the Squad may be seen in the corridors, in the yard, in the cafeteria-in fact wherever their assistance is needed. Keen was their enthusiasm, however, when they lent their services to the entertainment prepared for the semi-annual Alumnae meeting on the evening of May 5. The Squad worked eagerly that night, and with the loyal cooperation of the members of the association, success crowned their efforts. The members of the Service Squad have shown a splendid self-sacrilicing spirit, the members of the student body have given wholehearted cooperation. Thus there has existed during the term a spirit of unity. ls that not the best way to make our beloved Alma Mater "Bigger and Better Than Ever"? Gertrude Wapenhaus, '30 Page 30 . ,.., WDW.. .- , -.,,-, - AA. ' All Saints iComnrnereiailSc1lioo1l Alumnae News 0606 The faculty, alumnae, and student-body of All Saints send a sincere message of sympathy to the following who' have met with bereavement during the past year: Mrs. H. P. McDonald CMotherJ Sister M. jean Rosaire, 0. S. D. CFatherD Susan Kearney CMotherD They extend good wishes for future happiness IO and Mrs. N. Shroeder fFlorence Schmittl Mr. Mr. and Mrs. E. Nopper Uane jarvisj Mr. and Mrs. J. McMahon fFrances Kraus, Mr. and Mrs. W. Dittmar CAnna Rankerl Mr. and Mrs. E. Weisenfeld fAnna Brudermannl Mr. and Mrs. I. Poole fMary Fleming, They send a welcome to Mary Madeline, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. P. McDonald fwinifred Woodl joseph, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Basel fSophie Mauserl Elizabeth Estelle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. Connors Uulia Dempseyl They offer congratulations to to to Sister M. jean Rosaire, O. S. D. four former president of the Alumnael, Sister M. ,loan Dominici, O. S. D., Sister Miriam Francis, O. S. D., and Sister M. Frances Therese, O. S. D., who on May 1, at their first Profession plighted their troth to their Heavenly Bridegroomg Sister M. Lawrence Imelda CEileen Fitzgeraldl, who received the holy habit of St. Dominic on April 305 and Anna Bergmann Uune, '29J, who entered the novitiate at Amity' ville on February 2, and awaits the happiness of becoming a bride of Christ. Page 3 l All Saints Commercial School Assembly Notes 624506 During the past term the Dramatic Society has' been active. Among our successes we may consider "Eppie's Choice", a sketch adapted from Silas Mamet, well potrayed by the girls, "Writing a Tragedy", an unusual little comedy very dramatically presented by Dominga Durlacher and Helen Guzikas, "Mary Magdalen, the Penitent Sinner", not an easy play but well acted. The climax of the term, however, was that performance given by the seniors. The program opened with the chorus "Bigger and Better Than Ever" by the entire class. Then followed the amusing play, "Our Aunt from California". In this the following girls displayed real talent. Felicia Needy Helen Lux Rosalie Needy Marion Stubing Sally Needy Dominga Durlacher Mrs. Merry Muntoburn ,- Gertrude Wapenhaus A dressmaker - Helen Broedel Mrs. J. Needy Matilde Stravitsch "The Death of Blessed Imelda" was a Gtting conclusion to the afternoon. lmelda Helen Whooley Aunt Lucretia Lucille Harrigan Cousin Rosa Marie Greulich evidenced their dramatic powers, for at the death of Imelda hearts were touched, and the audience showed their appreciation in a most emotional manner. The seniors then made a pretty picture as they sang "The Stein Song a la All Saints". The students worked hard to make their final appearance a success. Did they succeed? Ask our timid freshmen. Last term our artist, Anna Auer, prophesied that some day the members of our dramatic society would become the "juvenile Wonders of the Stage". The girls, through hard work, have accomplished much this term. We look to even greater results next year. - Dofrotlry Waldeck, '30 Page 32 A1111 Saints Commercial School T he Autobiography of at Cheek 643045 Y life as a check has been one of adventure as well as one of service. For a long time I was the first of many brand new yellow checks in Mr. Anthony Gilmore's black and white check book. My how stuffy it was in that place, with not a streak of light but only fifty companions! But joy! I was the first selected for a journey. One bright sunny day, on Mrs. Gilmore's birthday, my master, ever courteous about such things, secured the book in which I was concealed, to my great enjoyment opened it, and started to fill out the spaces on what is known in banking terms as my face. I-low happy I was! Mr. Gilmore filled in my number, the city, the date, the bank in which I was born, to whom I was to be given, for what I was worth, and finally his signature. I was given to Mrs. Gilmore who immediately indorsed me, placed me safely in her new purse and carried me downtown, where I was presented in exchange for a dress. I was still the happy crisp check which had a few hours before been lying peacefully between the covers of the check book. But my adventures had started-I was to enjoy the whirlwind of commercial activities. At the close of the business day I found myself on the cashier's desk, where I had been placed with many unknown companions. One day I was released from my captivity, indorsed by Mr. Elwood, the Manager, and given to a painter for services rendered. I was creased in a cruel manner and carried by my new owner to the First National Bank where twenty-five dollars were given in my stead. There was no difficulty in obtaining cash in exchange for me, but the complicated machine built for my circulation was to me a new experience. From the teller's cage I was sent to a sorting table where busy clerks checked off the figures written on my face. By this time I was badly mutilated but could not escape being put into a machine which printed across my face my new residence, "First National Bank". I was next put into a dark bin with many associates, all of whom claimed the same birthplace as myself -"The Corn Exchange Bank". The following morning my companions and I were arranged in a neat bundle, placed in a large black bag and carried by the Bank messenger to the Clearing House on Cedar Street. When I again saw the light of day I found myself in a spacious room with hundreds of other checks. A bell was sounded and before I realized it I was being once again returned to my native bank. Before noon the same dayl found myself in the bank from which I had originally started. I wondered if I would ever be returned to Mr. Gilmore, and if so, would he discard me as being worthless. But I was to be handled and rehandled before returning to him. At the Corn 'Exchange Bank I was proved, examined and listed for Mr. Gilmore's statement. I then found Page 33 All Saints Commereialil Seihlooil myself in the hands of the bookkeeper who posted me. Idid not think there was a sound space on my face but nevertheless, I was again placed in a machine and the word "cancelled" written right across me. Finally I realized that my journey had come to a close, for I was enclosed in an envelope and addressed to my rightful owner who insert-ed me in a large package of checks. Immediately, I recognized my companions of the check book. My! how happy we were to see each other! We were soon busily talking about our experiences. Yes, here I remain the same yellow check but quite different from when I started. I am marked and creased, but I am very happy, for I have not only enjoyed myself but at the same time I have aided others. I Adelaide Volk, '31 . Ol The AlleAIH6TlCHU 96676 I HE essentials-personal and educational-to success in the business world, what are they? We may well compare the business world to a football stadium. The world sits in the stands-watching. The players take their places. One end is in view-the gleaming goal postsvSuccess. The game is on! Let's go! You are only the ball. Courtesy carries you past the Krst ten-yard line. Tact, Poise, and Neatness manage a trickplay which lands you on the forty- yard line. You are half-way across the Held. But-what do you see before you? You are confronted with usituationsn. To all appearances you will have to rely on your own- resources. Responsibility lurks in the next fifty yards., Initiative, Practicality, Coniidence, and Perseverance are the perfect Four Horsemen. Loyalty is an excellent tackle. Temptations of more or less importance are swept away by the force of his play: Knowledge and Intelligence are super-guards. They prevent errors from slipping through with the ball and discover new means of kicking a goal, stealing yards, and outwitting rivals. Everything moves in perfect harmony. I-low can you lose? You don't! The thrill of soaring over the goal-posts is an inspiration not only to attain greater glories for yourself, but also to encourage enthusiastic but less experienced participants in the Game to employ the All-American Eleven for ultimate, victory. g Dominga Durlacher, '30 Page 34 All Saints Commereiiall School A Busy Lunch Hour QXSEXD Dear Polly, I am taking a few minutes at lunch time to tell you about Pat's merry adventure. All the facts are before me and I am giving them to you in logical order. So, here goes. One day our vivacious friend suggested an exploration of the belfry tower of the church. With Pat at our lead four of us sneaked up the choir stairs. We went all the way to the top of the staircase. With trembling knees and excited giggles we stood before The Door. Excitement reigned within and without as Pat grasped the doorknob. The Door flung open. Half a moment later we were standing within The Door making scathing comments on the "ordinary-ness" of the tower room. A scuffling noise drew our attention to the farthermost and darkest corner of the room. A figure crouched low against the wall. Our high nervous screams echoed and re-echoed as we made a dash for the stairs. We fell in a heap at the bottom of the staircase, gasping for air and wailing, "It was a ghost", "No, it was Satan himself", "Oh, no, it looked like a hunch-backed maniac to me." "Maybe it was Lon Chaney", sobed Peg hysterically. "Where is Pat?" "Red" answered the question herself by tumbling down the stairs and landing on us, a scared and yet exultant look on her face. In her hand she held a beautiful, pearly-colored stone. "I found it at the foot of the ladder leading to the steeple, not two feet away from where we were standing", she replied to our questions. Bess, a sceptic and critic, looked at the stone and decided its worth. A "A five and dime special", she stated. Pat sighed and put the stone in her pocket. As we stumbled into the church proper our glances met that of a tall, lanky, swarthy-skinned chap. I can hardly say that he glanced at us. I-Ie actually stared. While we rushed through the alley Peg caroled, "Hey, that dark black-clothed man looked like a clothespin to me." "Mightn't we saye-a shadow?". Bess wanted to know. Next morning Pat saw the Shadow again. She told us about it before the bookkeeping period. "I could swear that I have seen that man more than once since yesterday. I had the feeling I was being followed. But on the train this morning he stood right across the way from me and stared in the most terrifying manner." Page 35 All Saints Connrinnieireiiaiil School Bess, with the advantage of ten months and six days, advised loftily, "Don't grow hot and excited, child. He was probably looking right through you-thinking of something that happened in Monterey a long time agoff That p. m. Pat was called from school by a "phone" call saying her mother had been stricken with an unexpected heart attack. When Pat reached the gate a cab-driver ushered her to a taxi standing at the curb and informed her he had been sent to bring her home. The girl friend hopped in and the taxi departed in the traditional cloud of dust. After a few minutes riding Pat realized that something was up. She was falling into the arms of Morpheus or wherever chloroform sends you. When she regained consciousness fthis sounds like drama a la Nick Carterl she was in a kitchenette, somewhere in Brooklyn for maybe it was New Yorkl. Anyway, it was a kitchenette, bare of furnishings and very high above the street. Our heroine had but one thought-escape. Suddenly, the Shadow stood in the doorway! Did he snarl "And now my proud beauty!" and stalk menacingly toward her? He did not. He lounged against the doorpost and apologized for the treatment she had suffered at his hands. "You see, Iittle girl", he purred, "you have something that belongs to meg something that I went to a great deal of trouble to get." "And what is that?" asked Pat, all curiosity. "Oh, that pearl you pickfed up in the church tower" said the villain nonchalantly. "I suppose I'll have to tell you the whole story. Myfere profession is not exactly smiled upon by Law and Order. Don't misunderstand me. I always give them a sporting chance. I have never failed to tell them of any objective I had in view or any object I felt the desire to possess." "You mean," faltered Pat, "you are a crook?" "Oh, not the way you mean it. I am a cosmopolitan, so to speak. Race andnation mean nothing to me," boasted the Shadow. "In this case, I had gone all the way to India, to the Inner Temple of the ancient and mysterious cult on the Ganges. For four days I disguised myself as a priest of the Temple. My aim was to get their largest pearl but I got only one of the smaller stones, because I gave them a sporting chance. Still, it will help me pay the messenger boy. Before I ask you fortthat stone I'Il tell you what part you played in the the affair. The cult sent some of their agents after me. I came to the States. Most of my hide-outs were known to these men and also to the New York police. I happened on the church as a good hide-out. I used the tower room. There is a secret door at the back of the room which leads directly to the church proper. That is how I got downstairs before you girls. I was interested in what you w-ould do with the pearl, so I followed you home and kept a vigil outside your door. In the morning I followed you to school. You know the rest. I won't bother you for the stone now but I will be back in ten minutes for it. So long." p Page 36 All Saints K30!U1l'l111lilC1FCilEilllSCllil00ll The villain departed. Our Nell, pardon, our Pat cast frantic glances to left and right. She couldn't go out the window and the use of vocal chords would bring only the Shadow. What should she do? Her eyes rested on a small door built in the wall. The dumbwaiter! Patty rushed over and opened the door. Well, what good did it do anyway? The dumbwaiter would only carry fifty pounds. Thought our heroine, "If I slide down the rope, my hands will burn and blister. Hold everything! Here's a ladder running along the side of the shaft." Pat lifted herself over the sill with as little noise and as much speed as was possible. On her way down she passed several doors. As she neared the bottom someone above began to send the dumbwaiter cellar- ward. Pat made a wild and sprawling jump of the last four feet. She dashed around the cellar wondering what to do. The principal idea was to get out. Suppose the Shadow should see her after she did get out? A pair of overalls and a paintfstained cap hung on a nail. Five minutes later Pat carelessly walked out disguised as an ashman-in a costume that did not fit her and a cap that was far too large! Soon "Red" stopped and collected herself. She was near Fulton Street and the Extension. Her net capital was thirty-three cents-and a pearl. She got rid of the overalls-a telephone booth. Would she call up the police? She called up her mother. "I won't be home till late", she said. Again looking like her sweet little self, she left the booth, walked a few blocks along Fulton Street, and suddenly darted into a prosperous-looking jewelry store.Tl , Well, now, how can I finish this tale? This is an assignment in English, due next Monday. I thought l would write out the plot and ask you to help me. l've racked my brain until it is blank. Please help me? just sit down like a dear and jot down a hair-raising ending for my narrative and l'll remember you in my will. How arejyou getting along, Polly? Did your brother johnny recover from the measles? Have you seen Edna since she had her hair cut? I personally think she looks a wreck with the "windblown". Would you like to take a season locker somewhere with Pat, Peg and me this summer? Lovingly, Dominga All Saints Commercial Lunch Hour-12:15 p. m. Page 37 A1111 Saints CCo,imm.eireiia11 Sclliiool Reaching the Goal No matter what happens you know there are few Who stick to their work and see it all throughg But life is short and the things that we do Should always be helpful, should always be true. Know that sometime you'll reach the top: Keep this in mind and never stop, Sometime you know there'll be a great day, Then to much work never say "nay". You'll never be lonesome, you'll never feel blueg You'il have more friends who will stick to youg You'll receive all the credit you think is your due, So stick to your goalg I'l1 stick to mine too. Josephine Matykumas, '31 i.....o1,T 1lini Memoriam 06926 EPTEMBER, 1928, was a very eventful month for us who entered our beloved All Saints. Excited and happy we were initiated into the preparation for service in the business world. But November 30 of that year brought us solemn news. jovial Catherine Gray had suddenly left us for a brighter home beyond the skies. In the midst of our joy, the sobering thought, that we too shall one day pass from this earth to meet our Creator, has helped us immeasurably to acquire a true perspective of life's values. ' Mildred McLeod, '30 Page 38 WMS 5102555296 QQQCQIE5 We W 5?55?JW A1l1lSa1ints CComtnereiia1llSelli1ooll Unit' School Paper 31N january, 1928, the graduating class was inspired to publish a school paper. How hard they worked to attain their goal! The result was a mimeographed booklet. The following term, their ceaseless untiring efforts were resumed by their successors. The result was the same. The publication of these two books meant much hard work, sore fingers from sketching and typing. ln january, 1929, the graduates realized their ambition-a printed school book. Their fervent and zealous efforts were rewarded. This was the present seniors' first term in the revered walls of their Alma Mater. We, too, felt a tinge of pride in our seniors' success, for after all we were fellow-students. For three successive terms now we have rooted for A. S. C., and each term has witnessed the editing and publishing of the printed book. After a perusal of this, our book, the reader will see that the seed which was planted by the january 28's has burst into bloom. We, the seniors, saw the sacrifices made by all those who helped make possible the printing of those issuesq now we deeply and sincerely thank you, dear Sister Principal, dear Faculty, dear Alumnae, dear Fellew-Students for your efforts in making our book a success. Helen Broedcl, '30 ,,o lin Memoriam QJQGX5 E are all looking towards the future with great expec- tation, but let us look back for a moment to the solemn day on which we learned of the unexpected death of our beloved classmate, Helen O'Neil, on April 30, 1929. We have felt the loss of her companionship, for she was a happy little person. Ripe for God's garden, the Angel of Death transplanted her soul to the eternal gardens. Her memory shall ever be to us a sweet and pleading forget- 1110-DOY. Matilda Smwitsch, '30 Page 30 All Saints Connmereial School Last Will and Testament of the Class of June, l93ll CDGJQXZJ E, the Seniors and Graduating Class of june, 1930, of All Saints Commercial School, situated in the City of Brooklyn, possessing the key of perfection and knowledge to all of our studies, do publish and declare the following as our last Will and Testament. I. We extend our deepest respect and sincere gratitude to our friend and pastor, Rev. john M. Mulz, to whose ardent weekly religious instructions we are indebted for our fuller understanding and deeper love for the Truths of our Holy Religion. II. We extend our sincere appreciation and love to our beloved principal, Sister M. Rose Gertrude, to whom we are under great obligation for the numerous benefits she has bestowed upon us. III. We extend our admiration and gratitude to our teachers through whose great skill and influence we have succeeded in preparing ourselves for the business world. IV. We extend our sincere thanks to the members of the A. S. C. Orchestra, whose melodies have given us many a delightful afternoon, during assembly. V, V. We extend our best wishes to the newly organized dramatic society. May their aim always be to give an excellent performance and may they reach their aim. VI. We offer to those who wish to read good literature, this issue of EXCELSIORM. VII. We offer to our successors, the Seniors, a. The daily task of ringing the bell promptly, b. The golden pennant for punctuality, c. Our brilliant knowledge of Commercial Law, d. Our service bands, e. Our offices at the G. O. meetings, f. Our places as students in the hearts of the faculty and student body, , g. Our power to make freshmen feel at home. PERSONAL ITEMS VIII. Senorita Fischlein and Senorita Stubing offer their excellent knowledge of Spanish to all those who are interested in the aforesaid language. They fear there will be some surplus knowledge. In that case the freshmen are the heirs. Page 40 All Saints Commeirciiall School IX. Catherine Breitsch and Mary Leonard bequeath to the Sophomores, their accuracy and speed in shorthand. X. Margaret Lukacsy and Elizabeth Ell leave their bookkeeping ledgers to the juniors, with the hope that they will use them to the best of their ability. , Xl. Dominga Durlacher leaves her unusual literary talent to all the students of All Saints Commercial School to be used for the future success of the UEXCELSIORH Xll. Matilde Stravitsch leaves her knowledge of elocution to whoever may succeed her as star orator at the assemblies. XIII. Helen Lux leaves her melodious voice to all future entertainers, especially to Dorothy Daly and Theresa Vitulli, who, we are well aware, do not need it. XIV. Eva Ghler and Dominga Durlacher bequeath their dramatic talent to the members of the dramatic society to be distributed equally. XV. Peggy Fleming leaves her charming personality, winning smile, and sunny disposition to all the pupils. We know they will greatly appreciate them. XVI. The present librarians bequeath their important positions to Peggy O'Sullivan, Adelaide Volk, Marcella Walsh, and Kathryn Hanrahan. XVII. Rose Giammalvo, Gertrude Wapenhaus, Florence Burkhardt, and Lucille Harrigan leave their places at the supply cabinet to Roberta Thompson, Mary Perry, Florence Conlon, and Gertrude Worth. The present workers expect, in gratitude, promptness in serving their schoolmates. XVIII. Gertrude Wapenhaus, Rose Giammalvo, Frances McKenna, and Pauline Oswald leave their positions in the cafeteria, together with the required courtesy fwhich, by the way, was always shownl, to those who possess the necessary qualihcations. XIX. Dominga Durlacher and Lucille Harrigan leave the candy and cracker counter to those who have promised to abstain from sweets with the hope that it will not prove too great a temptation. XX. We extend to our best love of all, our Alma Mater, our loyal promise to cherish, protect and honor her always. IN WITNESS WHEREGF, We, the june Graduating day of june, in the hereunto attached our name and affixed our seal this Zlst Class of 1930, have Year of Our Lord, One Thousand Nine Hundred and Thirty. Graduates, '30 Eva Ohler, '30 Lucille Harrigan, '30 Page 41 All Saints CCo.imim1eircia1ll School Class Prophecy, June, 1930 QXSCW5 A' O-HUM. Another day. Pray, wash, dress, breakfast, school. Same old grind. School? Today's Saturday! With a bound you are at the window and you see s - u - n - s - h - i - n - e. You must get out-you are out -out of the house and out of the city. You are running along the shore through the apple orchard, out on the beach whose silver fingers reach out to touch the sparkling waters of the Sound that reflects the blue of the sky in a deeper shade. You throw yourself down and gaze at the fleecy clouds gamboling like sheep across the heavenly field of blue and forming prophetic pictures. The breeze brings the hum and bustle of the city to your ears and you see the entensive plant of the Zipper Ice Skate Company. Dorothy Gressert, discoverer of the great Zipper lce Skate, is collecting a check from the treasurer, Doris Brush, while the president, Dorothy Waldeck, looks on. ln the next room a meeting of the Board of Directors is taking place and Mabel Bassler and Mary Daley are efficiently proving to the Chairman, Margaret Mohr, what expert efficiency experts they are. Anna Cwreiner hovers in the background, pencil in hand, waiting for words of wisdom to spread among the employees through "The Zipper." The head bookkeeper, Matilde Stravitsch, is discussing an account with the credit manager, Anna Eiter. Marion Stubing is bidding farewell to the sales manager, Dorothy Horsting. Marion is the Company's representative in Spain-though why they need ice skates in Spain, the clouds do not tell you. You next hear the pounding and mild uproar of the St. Louis "Star" going to Press. Antonine Matzkewitz, secretary to the City Editor, is rushing to the desk of Gertrude Wapenhaus, who runs the Woman's Page, frantically waving a copy of Rose Giammalvo's poetic contribution featured in the "Star" ln the same city you see Catherine Breitsch acting as court stenographer while Margaret Lukacsy pleads the case of her client at the bar. You are brought back to New York, and the sea drums words, words, words in your ears. Who is that tall, stately nun walking along a lane at Lake Ronkonkoma-with a shorter nun, a novice? None other than Mother Whooley and Madame Fleming, now Religious of the Cenacle? Now back to the city! To think that Margaret Farren is a lecturer of Current Events at all leading clubs! Helen Lux is doing her best to make a client, Anna Auer, Chrysler-conscious. Anna is private secretary to the President of one of the most successful business corporations in New York. A louder roar drowns out the voices and you are at the Long Island field of the Eastern Airway Express Company. Katherine Jackman is in the pilot seat of the tri-motor passenger plane bound for Philadelphia and St. Louis. Kathleen and Catherine Cunningham, fresh from the glories of an' extended appearance at the Palace, Page 42 All Saints Coimimniceireiiaill School are waiting for their manager, Mildred McLeod, who has the bookings of a mid-Western tour. You reach Philadelphia. Pangs of hunger prompt you to go to a tea-room of which Anna O'Toole is proprietor. A snappy orchestra, directed by Mollie Murn, offers the most popular gems from current musical hits. Many of these pieces are the work of Eileen McCarthy, who writes words and music for Irving Berlin, Inc. The orchestra is made up of Seraphina Troina, pianist, Gertrude Bowers, banjoist, and Isabelle Dillon, saxaphonist. You pay your check and wander into the business section of the city. You see the offices of Florence Burkhardt and Marie Stadler, who inform the world that they handle stocks and bonds. Anna DiMaio, their cracker-jack saleslady, is inducing Eva Ohler, a new and brilliant success in the operatic world, to buy American Utility at 126. You return to New York by bus and alight in the vicinity of' Lexington Avenue. You stroll down Lexington Avenue for a few blocks, stopping here and there to glance at the window displays. You are attracted by the establishment of Catherine Fischlein, Florence Marz, and Madeline Springer, who are interior decorators, and take their models from early colonial times. Your stroll next takes you to the fashionable business residence of Marion Fahey and Lillian Bennett who specialize in ladies' apparel. You meet Regina McCullough who acts as supervisor of the sports department. Marie Greulich and Margaret Daunhauer are enthusiastic over the frocks that are being displayed by Katherine Zinsley and Pauline Oswald, mannequins. Marie and Margaret proudly boast of their platinum, diamond-studded wedding rings. You wander out and drift up the avenue. In front of the New York Telephone Company, where Helen Clark and Harriet Dunn are supervisors, you stumble over Margaret Cantwell, who is rushing about with a determined look in her eye. She grabs your arm and as you hurry along Broadway, she tells you that she is bound for the Atlas Advertising Agency. Her purpose is to confer with the manager, Helen Broedel, in regard to the account of the Cressert Company where Margaret holds the position as secretary. You meet Evelyn Travis, bookkeeper for the agency, at the entrance to the Paramount Building. Evelyn tells you that Celestina Scutari, champion typist of New York State, is visiting Frances Trusz and Pauline Stalzer, who are in the production department of the agency. Margaret bids you a fond farewell and you saunter to the Hotel Astor. You have occasion to go up to the roof garden where the studios of the National Broadcasting Company are located. Here Ruth Spaulding and Anna Hodnett, R. K. O. comedians, are discussing future program arrangements with Loretta Zopf, an announcer. In another part of the studio, Antonia Gennusa, successful short-story writer, is conferring with Alice McCarthy, who illustrates her stories, in regard to a new contract with Hearst's International Cosmopolitan. You are smitten with a desire to go to Brooklyn and jump into a snappy collegiate cab, a fleet of which is owned by Doris Brush and Frances McKenna. You cross the bridge and are driven to the doors of the American Sugar Rehning Company where Elizabeth Ell is exporting manager. Page 43 All Saints Commercial School With her is Emilia Mihelich, her able assistant. Mrs. Roy Duane fMadeline Stotenburl fresh from a meeting of Gertrude Yheulon's Homemalcers, is about to return home to her bright-eyed lisping twins. With a shock you realize that you have been dreaming. The waves, the breeze, the clouds have been playing on your imagination, forming in your mind and before your half-closed eyes, fantastic pictures of the future. ln the glory of the noon-day sun, you seem to see the figure of Lucille Harrigan in the virginal robe of the Dominican Order. With the sudden realization that you are hungry, you are up with a bound and on the home-run to a delicious dinner made of beefsteak and onions. Mary Leonard, '30 Dominga Durlacher, '30 ln their vision, Mary and Dominga seem not to have seen themselves. However, they too have ascended the ladder of success. Mary, with flying colors, have passed the examination for the much coveted position of chief reporter in the United States Supreme Court. Dominga has become famous as a short-story writer. Each day her originality is attracting more and more attention throughout the country, and the leading magazines are clamoring for her work. 1107. Veritas CXQSWD Be Youth while you are young, Be Age when you are oldg Be honest in your work, It means much more than gold. Be fair in all your play, Never sneak, nor lie, nor steal, Give God your heart and soulg Be truthful, be real. Dominga Durlaclier, '30 Page 44 Ai1ilSa1ints Coimiiimeireiiml Seliooll Farewell! QX6045 Farewell, ye jolly seniors! We hate to see you go, For you've been mighty kind to us, Thru all our weal and woe. We'd love to see you linger Much longer in our midst, But "Business" lures you onward So luck, good health, success! l.o'retta Geiger, '51 -FF sl! , Y, ff, ,fygi--T MF f if I Q ,I W X wi .... Let nothing trouhle thee, Let nothing vex thee, All things pass. God alone changes not. Patience obtains all things, He who possesses God wants for nothing: God sufliceth. "Stll7ll Teresa Page 45 All Saints Commercial School Uuir Patrons and Patronesses CWDGXS Rev. john M. Mulz Rev. Michael A. Heinlein A. J. SL J. J. McCollum, Inc. joseph Bermel, Inc. john F. Betsch Mrs. Thomas J. Charles Mr. H. L. Bossong The Misses Buttina Mrs. P. J. Charles Mrs. G. Connors Miss Helen Dempsey Mrs. George H. Flagge Mr. William Feil Mr. Anton Franz Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Anna Freudenberger Josephine Fries Helen Gallagher Margaret Gruninger Marcella Grupp Florence Conlon Mr. D. Litzler Mr. Jos. S. Basel, jr. Miss Mildred Beilstein Mr. Stephen V. Benkowitz Miss Helen Brown Mr. Brown ' Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Mrs. Miss Miss Mrs. Anna Conlon Veronica Coppinger Amelia Dassau Rose Donlon Mary Fitzgerald Elisabeth Forster Regina Harrigan Anna Hastreiter A. M. Henry Lillian Hoenighausen Mathilde Hohl Marie Klein G. Kuhn Mrs. Margaret F. Hickey Mr. N. H. Himmelreicher Mr. Charles Sander Hahn Printing Company Francis W. Herehenroder, D. Miss Antoinette Herrmann Miss Florence McGuire Miss Catherine Mohr Misses Alice SL Emily Owens Angeline Rauch Ruth Rockwood Anna Ryan Chr. Schilling Marie Stumpf Eleanor Tremel John Willmann Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Miss Mrs. Misses Pauline SL Helen Wolf Mrs. L. McLeod Mr. H. Raman Mrs. J. Kurz Miss Mary Maas Miss Anna Macik Mr. Philip Marchese Miss Helen Marintsch Mrs. Winifred McDonald Miss Mildren McGouey Miss Winifred McNamee Miss Catherine Mehl Mrs. Emma Milhaupt Miss Anna Palko Miss Susan Saltamachi Miss Rose Schappert Miss Teresa Schmitt Miss Josephine Stampfl Miss Beatrice Thein Miss Dorothy Wynne Page 46 D fullfof fffifd'lfdlw'MuQ40',i1dli10fl1OQ10CfQQQCDQMDOIOCAD?ffOC40iifdQfcJli1dfMd'l'!cJkif0'.ifcJ'1fdlifokifcj X , . 1 . w .XII SZIIJJTS Lw,nm11nc rcmml Sclunol Arulmgralphs PLIIQC All Saints Commercial Schodl Autographs Page 48 , - V- r V, G, Q. , , , I ,V 1 rw,-.V-4,-V V ., ifff,-V-:VV'V'i:g.'fV4':131i1w.V ,- V.'1Vfl 4, V-'-1'f- , X '-Mi' ' fx' .:V1VF .Mb 'V f BW 172' View? V s 6 '53 P3 new f -23: V 5-.P .J 1 nf., M, ,L 73. 43, .I VV . 1- 1 .v uf 1 ' .gr ' " 'V ,V A VV . X . L ,VJ .V wig. ,-fw ,Q .9iv52I.,.,'-f..-'- 'R at i ' fi. ' "LV -M-M' .V,- 'VVVVQQWW V ' V V . N 'Q .655 MLV V , Ve-V -www V A fn - V g' kj! 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Suggestions in the All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) collection:

All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

1947

All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Page 27

1930, pg 27

All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Page 52

1930, pg 52

All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Page 42

1930, pg 42

All Saints Commercial High School - Excelsior Yearbook (Brooklyn, NY) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Page 55

1930, pg 55

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1930, pg 26

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