Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN)

 - Class of 1961

Page 1 of 198

 

Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1961 Edition, Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1961 Edition, Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1961 Edition, Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1961 Edition, Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1961 Edition, Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1961 Edition, Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1961 Edition, Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1961 Edition, Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1961 Edition, Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1961 Edition, Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1961 Edition, Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1961 Edition, Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 198 of the 1961 volume:

Ci U.,- f X Q- ,h ,M -Y Yi' . 5 Q32 J mam X 1. Ban- N Q, 2 V W, 8 aa K X XM, fa 'P r wxssph' 3 fa-X ef V Im .fxe fy M As? ,WEA 1: 2:14453 , .viagra 1' V H22DTETia?'m.'4?1Xv--' r' ?5if'??'4?i1i1H,Eimfir'-' , ,, Lv -Q Hy? 5' 1E',1:lEfIeiF5" " .. " 21.1, 'I f ' A1-E1 finale GhE?XEw2Ih2V?'-V F1 ,EEF 1' 'fav SSE' ff' f V V J J , , V. ,,,- - . , V. nm-,.e-' M- Huw-', --av., . "rn-V, N- 4:1-'4..,2, .,.y.-, -fa '- , :W . i- ww,-1 4- ' . hw. ,, --,fY,:.:1if4., ..'.i,e1f ' ew-' n-'Y if 1 'S 1.--ff, ,f A I. I A k , . ,, ,C J ,, A.,44,f . v- ,Wg f' am-fp,-1gil,,aw.,f, A. ,,w.,v.- -,.,.,.a:g,,: A ., wg ,...f..1.qf 1, .m x ,w t ,. , X , , 1, Af gg, 1 ,. - . ,, , L ma, ,-WA, ,-f .sw . ' - UK ww, ew- .. V4 . .,,, . x, .1 , A.. uw. . .Aw VH: A , . W ,Y . x I - L 2 MM, M, L- A ' 'XM 424 V. BJ youu Q60-Of 1 , ,Qfc94f9fffQ ' 'fri T . 5 ,M ,-:pf V, L - M .W , wa, L Q gig? 1? 31 ...,..l .- as Q J E5 i E 55,3 1 mpg Qkifif 3 2, rf 73 S3 sfgiip G ,552 52,3 E ffgffily 'sig Bgrggfkff A, 4f,M 22322592 g5Q2?1 A f5! -ha " 'f "' Af - - , :I Q- : . '. -, + ' ? - f, ., .- Q' 1 " ix MSX n ' Q ff 6 E ' - 'I K . 1961 TIGE 5,1 V , if :if P bl' h d by 'll 1S S R -4 a 35 emor lgh choo ' f el." ea, 1I'l.I'l.eSO 3. Wav We QM, iff, Je 'wfa 'QQ 'a its 5293, Q: wg, ,gf Q32 X 'M ,M A f 595 5 if KN iz' NJQWMWN "fb, 1 Nw. W7w.:.f,M 5? . ' Www v, Xie, 1: . A , - W -QM. M. ff' 0' ,., 2' ,V -I , "+?W.7q: -T D M 9 Magi? ,. + , ,. fsxffxkfgf 4. Of ' G' 5 'ln if . ,J ' 'Myzz - + 5 , -, f f-Er. N ggff ' 1 JO! Y Q x Z5 , -k f.,j ,. ,, "M.f:f.-.N W 'sgffagyxgiggfk i f . . ' lbw-.. ,, Xb, ff . W f:E23f2Z952fZ?2 UV ' ,. L . ' . ' f' Af - -mf: ., efwfs-mfixsfzgvggaviivfs,ff fx Miwf 1 ,- wzfQff5'gg3k-1 235.1 f ' VX , - ff f wxfggfsfgwig -W1p?wg2'f?52?f2f af, ' ., -1 fa 3ZQQi'Q3i?sf9if24iXg5wfiZS3Qga.fmwf . QW graimikf' , ,fw lff wg? 51 M s-vw my ffwwgiy-4.,v fi fax ff wg' if Swwgkggwwvzkwif gf fweiiffs wmmsi, - 'f M 5, M . . - - f ,,5,.44..m. .4..,..34z,,.,,.,MA,. J., Mg , . . W J , 4, ,I 5 xy, ..f Lf' X , ,J .Lf-' f ' V, J-f V by . A ,441 V iii iw Wliu, M mum CM lm WMM W2MMMfJJ 6+ 'A lfvx UUA vxfO"X Glo. N W If ! , - Q Lf' A ,- L V , L .J f , Q15 Lp 1' Cf! Xb' - r , V - I ,. I A 4 ' IU", f f' fn 7 'I 1 L 1' 'fy " 4' 2 if L 1, ,L ,V ww 1 JJ", LL' ' - X ' V V 1 ,L , I L1 f lu Nl K LV f f -, I , L I 3 - u , !, ,. ff' fi L, Q "" - ' F L 4 LM : ,Lf 1 1 ' 1 1 A . ' L -2, 4 V V Q P , , L 5 I K, '7 ' ' gb' A A7 vu I LV E Q 1 ,Z fb L' . 45 ff. C 'QP L Zigi-,fdf'!1lV . flffw QXQ I, :Q , , , 4' J f L' ' fi ij If j jf' Cf? I lr A L74 X N V r 'M IG! 1 , ff M, I uk A ,iii ,. f' f- 'L Lyon? i:,f5"i,Q-2 db V' dv , ,ff J, .auf Qui iii, ff V 1 1,08 X1 4fljvvlqf'L ITV lu, ,, . U 2,52 f WN, ,U ,yy wir V , . 4,2191 fi ,, 'Q 1' WV 'Z MW 4711111 ,zW'ffJl V' 0 fi " A , f A vu ff, f ff-111 f c NT M ABLE 0 je! af f ' 6 ,f fy C, 4 . . . 1,1 2 M 9' 1 Administration and Faculty . . . 6 Q ' Classes .... . 32 ' Organizations . . 80 Sports . . 122 Student Life . . 166 , Index . . 183 yn 731010 v 13 E,-J U Faculty Index . . . 189 yy Organization 'Index . 190 e-,QW 5 f 2 ' . V 1 , , 1 fx. U ' 4h X ' N.. fl' Q ,fd J V We - , 1 sw' IR, . W akn K ,gm lx, X 1222, M2251 I 'K x x -f ',g"'m N il, A, K vii. . 2. s VA .Y ., '. X gyru - X., 2 . s .Y 9 xx . s.,, 1. Q 1 ' , N 4 'E 11 'x 0 he ,X ' 8 ka x- Q ' .4 6 as Q ' L xx 4. 7 I 4, ff , , IW. ' 5 k.,,, 'F 1,84 'ev-VTQ d 4 J . f w Ab- W X AYN-1-MV 'K .Wu yas. XQN' QQ,Sh,.,1.- Q, NSW' DVI QSAY Q3 kbkmtxv I V40-'Ah Cbxrsfxfl -1-XAQXI IAQ-7 g,,.rk will X Tv-I'-' AVNNM Q Qdivwm rev-fe WLC-9. mow. WON ggi' SWSLIQI Noni? I gl ,XB-e X V-ASM -yew Q :,i,,,,,-G-me 1 O A 4' N if .Rx-L, L xi V' 0 f 'wr' The modern design on the walls of the first floor of the new addi- tion was accentuated by the light streaming in from the Clark Street windows. The well-ventilated halls were fluorescent lighted. The completion of the new addition in Ianuary reflected the progress of the school in 1961. The three- story building, designed by I-laarstick and Associates and constructed by Dawson, Inc., of Minneapolis, enabled much expansion and improvement of the sci- ence, mathematics and library departments. All physics, chemistry and biology classes were moved into specially-built science rooms. Each room, designed to accommodate 30 students, was equipped with seven lab tables, hot and cold water, gas and compressed air. An additional feature of the physics laboratory was an electric panel timer and rectifier with which the amount of electricity supplied to the indi- vidual lab tables could be controlled. Mathematics classes were also moved into new classrooms. Each room was lighted with fluorescent light and equipped with new desks and a floor sound outlet for movie projectors. The entire first floor of the addition was devoted to a new and more expansive library, designed to be the educational material center for the school. Besides an increase in shelf space and student working areas, spe- cial music and conference rooms were offered to facili- tate private study. A classical record collection was established and a stereophonic phonograph assembled. Construction of Addition Reflects Each laboratory table in the chemistry rooms was equipped with The check-out desk was the center of the new library. Surrounding modern scientific conveniences and storage cabinets. A laboratory it were shelves of reference materials and hchon and non-fiction tor long projects adioined each room and was similarly equipped. literature. The larger study area facilitated more study room. Page 4 .gang it Nl - 3 ,' .' 1 X N Lf' V f 'I L I Y 1 I X- , 1 ' Q - J . ff x I ,V W KL A a L N 5 Q Vixwvwww SX klk X Q Q C' JF E fi' l X Q lx l li I F' xt' l xiii in fi 3 Gb Ly ll? fx N i X J , V . fr ' 1. V . x, , X L f 'V 1' - 1 A x, L, , QL. x ,. t. . ' . ,v , 1 - 1 ' x F s ' 1 ' Q I j , 12 1, K 1 , e 1 , bf u, 131 ,t 1 'sf I I' .1 V , . v Z Q 1, ,P LA L I' . XX My lvl ' N l XX U X Af L L Ll Q K, L L Y- Y X! Vfyq v l L LL X L CL A' M X, X2 6 xii' X , .2 V 'J 1 V E? L if Q ,K Q fv jf I L5 T1 lt f w t gr Q3 'g 1 vt fb K g We V r N n, 1 , ' A. ,U 1 X u t- X' , , I ' X, K , I L 1 sf '13 , 1 51.5 A I N1 ' y . M X Y' rzi XL, 1 1 1 , C' ,AA I v -X lyk V ak dv HJ M 53 Ji f,flW1,i.f' lW',E" XV U, it me LLL LX QW ' fe cl 1139 5314, lv . x. 1 4 1 ' t. 1, 1 , , 1 1 1 f N. , , , , - 1 I f 'l L ,L , , , f 1 1 , cf f . V 1 . 1 L . v .V . q1y I, X' LLC Dc V V L Lx. GLM VN . 1 ,Lift I W1 L CU C2 N 04 Q' MN ka bk ww LJXX? LN Xt by xl Q JEL MDW 1 M LLL LL V1 75 L 1 ky L it LL L N t M, , ,I f L., f 1, , 1 1. , X, 1 , .U . 1 , v 1 w f, 1. ,f V 1 V 1 , L Y. I t , X I t ul r I V , I, , , v 1 JV' ' X' V ,N I . 1 ti' L Y Lo LX xl, -5 K, Cytcl Lblltu t L tilt L K Yu 0 xr mf X M CW l y EL K' PM 0 C L 7 XX JM CV kg J 1 x, J, 'X t , fb ' f clkkichb CW LLC Cy Eli' Q l, jfj i L w KLL 7 Ll K cbd! Ll, 1 C1 Progress The addition of the new building creat- ed an elongated eflect on the Clark Street side of the high school. Com- pleted in January, the extension imme- diately' alleviated crowded conditions prevailing in the old building. z ' 1 ,M Mwf,,..H ,A,,,,,.M-v-'MW' " N QT x'x, :lXQ Y vw? ' , W F2513 Q xgxx My ,ez It M-yr M9276 ww C Q Www, W K waz ew -,gi W vp-Y,, Y A l Wfafei-iffy? Wig? M ww i E f 1 X L f I Qffifyf VOA? ! pf f 'f X ll Fro t ay of August through the first day of N Iune, faculty and administration members worked to I , s I unprove the school's curriculum through instruction and I participation. The daily school routine was supple- M77 mented by weekly faculty meetings and special confer- - . . . 1' ff ences. Each 1nst.ructor's and adm1.n1strator's efforts re- E 1 flected the combined academic spirit of the school. 4 X ,Q if 077 3 QQ. 6 421 V ' tk. - Qi, 'tak K Q N rf, .uls.u. f - amllfifsfzzwf,-W lik - 'K I I ' "Q, 3 Z I - 6,2 f of I I E5 3- U w 2 - .. " fwisftwgff - W.: vQ'f, ?2f214f-fSifffgif5SY?ZWZf 3' ' -4ffd'Z 0 f I J J 71 A f Ca id X jf ,.,, X! CO fad, HM M 4 , X N A Dr. Rudolph Gcmdrud Mr. Lee Gorder Mr. Kenneth Hotchkiss Mr. Theodore Munson F' Yfm' W My Administration A good school requires many things-students who want to receive the most profitable education, teachers who are interested in the students and an administra- tion that desires to make the school the best possible. Mr. Lorne S. Ward served as superintendent of the Albert Lea schools. By proving to the students that he is interested in the welfare of them and the school, he did much to urge the students to do their best work. Senior High principal, Mr. I. R. Mclfllhinney, by his friendly manner and always present dignity, showed that fun and work can go together. Mr. Roland Ellert- son, assistant principal, gave the school pep. Administrative assistant Mr. Irvin I. Anderson was in charge of managing the lunch programs and school bus transportation as well as the care of school fi- nances. Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, Mr. Martin lordahl, was in charge of the maintenance staff. The main duty of the school board this year was to supervise the construction of the new building. lt also controlled the policies of school functions and employ- ed all members of the faculty and administration. Mr. William Pickavcmce Dr. Clayton Nelson " Page 8 Leads All Phases of School Life I. R. McE1hinney Senior High Principal Irvin I. Anderson Administrative Assistant Roland V. Ellerison Assistant Principal Martin Iordahl Superintendent of Buildings cmd Grounds Page 9 Staff Assists in Office Work Lorraine Bangert Ethel Folck Lorraine Horninq Iennelly Ingvaldson Marilyn Krueger Marilyn Mickelson Phyllis Roorda Karen Steqenqa Helping the Administration in its work throughout the school year was the office staff. Miss lennely lngvaldson was secretary to Superin- tendent Lorne S. Ward, and Principal I. R. McElhinney was assisted by Miss Lorraine Bangert. Miss Phyllis Roorda was secretary to the Administrative Assistant, Mr. lrvin l. Anderson. Helping Mr. Martin lordahl, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, in perform- ing his duties, Was Miss Marilyn Krueger. Serving as bookkeeper was Mrs. Ethel Folclc, with Mrs. Karen Sfegenga as assistant bookkeeper. Miss Lorraine l-lorning was Guidance Secretary and Miss Marilyn Mickelson was the senior high clerk-typist. Senior high girls assisted the office staff. Working for one hour each day they answered the office tele- phone and delivered messages. They also picked up attendance slips and distributed the daily bulletin. SENIOR HIGH OFFICE girl assistants were Audrey Stolze. Ianice ASSUMING their oftice assistance duties were Lois McCormack, Ger- Van Riper. Iudy Tuite and Marilyn Schumacher. trude Kuiper, Beverly Gulbrandson and Sandra Brcrbec. KEEPING TAB on library helpers lean Madson and Karen Unselh were Ruth Iordahl and Diane Wilkinson. Rosalie Dudley Senior High Library Leon King Librarian Ruth Nelson Senior High Library Library Offers Better Opportunities ALPHABETIZING AND ARRANGING books were just two of the library responsibilities undertaken by Pat Enderson, Ioy Hanson and Edna Kycek, senior high volunteer workers. Better lighting and more room for study and new books are two of the features found in the new library. The large size of the library permits l5U students to study there while the old library had room for only 45 people. Many new books are added each year as there is now room for twelve to fifteen thousand books as compared to nine thousand in the old library. Students wishing to listen to music assigned to them by their instructors listen to the records in the new music room in the library. Filmstrips and slides are also shown there. Students may use maps of the United States and Minnesota which are hung throughout the library. College catalogs from many colleges of the United States are also available to students. Past magazines are so arranged that students may obtain them themselves. A special check-out window is in the library so that magazines may be taken out. Readers' Guides are placed in a special table which is used only for students using the magazines. A new atlas stand is another feature. This stand provides a better opportunity for students to make use of the atlas. Page 11 Guidance Counselors Aid Students The guidance department, under the direction of Mr. Dales Shuldes, continued its program as a consolidated department to guide, counsel and aid the student in his academic and extra-curricular activities. Counse- lors ot the Central and Southwest junior l-ligh Schools were included with the Senior l-ligh School counselors, enabling co-ordination ot counseling activities. Helping students in choosing their educational cur- riculums constituted the major duties of Miss Gertrude Piers, sophomore counselor, and Mr. Stanley Mittle- stadt, junior guidance director. Another duty ot these counselors was to record standardized test scores. Mr. Egil Hovey and Mr. Shuldes, counselors of the senior class, assisted students in making preparations for college and other opportunities upon graduation from high school. lt was their responsibility to report the various scholarship test scores to the students. With the innovation of the seven-hour day, the re- quired credits tor graduation were raised to l3. Subjects required included three years ot English, three years oi social studies and one credit ot a science. ONE OF THE MANY duties of Mr Egi1Hovey senior counselor was MH. STANLEY MIDDLESTADT, iunior counselor. checked his file for to relate college entrance information to seniors the name of cr prospective counselee. With Present and Helping future seniors choose and plan their senior class schedules was one of the main responsibilities of the lunior Class counselor, Miss Gertrude Piers. Besides planning academic schedules, Miss Piers conducts conferences throughout the year with each of the students of the lunior Class. With these confer- ences, Miss Piers helped the students with their social, scholastic and vocational plans. One of the valuable opportunities of the senior year was College Day, an annual event. College Day provides an opportunity for students and parents to become acquainted with the colleges of interest to them. Much information was obtained at College Day concerning various phases of college such as tuition costs, housing facilities, working opportunities, scholar' ships, student loans, activities and the curriculum offered. Each student had the opportunity to meet with representatives from at least three colleges. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOT1-YS Professor Roger Page outlined Uni- versity programs to interested seniors Michael Morrison, Roxanne Wehrhan and Barbara Slife on College Day. Future Plans WHICH COLLEGE IS FOR ME? How much will it cost? Where do I obtain the answers? These questions could be answered for the prospective college students by numerous college bulletins available in the senior high guidance oHice. WORKING IN CLOSE ASSOCIATION with sophomores in planning their senior high curriculum was Miss Gertrude Piers, sophmore counselor of the Guidance Department. Nw Page 13 A i Ioyce Allen R. Wayne Cleveland Grace Dahle Edna Gercken L, , English 10, 12 Speech I, II English 12 Ioggnalism A ll A American Field Service English 12 Senior Adviser Algebra fy!! , National Thespians Ah La Ha Sg 7 .P--f---'J i English Teaches Basic: Skills, Speech Orville Gilmore English 12 Humanities I1 HUMANITIES II STUDENT, Mark Iohnson, compared Brugel's "Tempta- tion of St. Antony" to Grunwald's "Crucificion." both of which are Renaissance paintings of the northern school. Man's intelligence is revealed every time he opens his mouth to speak or picks up his pen to write. Senior high students endeavor to develop this ability through three years ot English study. Sophomores delved into a complex study ot word usage, sentence structure and commonly misspelled words. Experiencing Shakespeare tor the first time, they read and analyzed "julius Caesar." Coinciding with the study of United States history, juniors pinpointed their reading to American literature. The word individualism took on a new meaning after reading Thoreau. Preparing for college work, juniors experienced the long hours oi research and careful composition that is involved in writing a term paper. Clirnaxing two years of Engish study, seniors con- centrated primarily on literature. Three Shake- spearean plays and Marlowe's "Dr. Faustusu high- lighted their reading. The senior term paper was longer and required more work than the junior paper. HUMANITIES I STUDENTS, Paul Black. Martha Wayne and Larry Fredrickson, learned techniques of note taking, term paper writing and study habits, valuable college assets. , f ,,N,,4.N.Nf,N.. ...,, . , ' iv s . 'Y' Page 14 . M ., ,, 2 f x -:aa 4' 3 I ZXZLLUKW7-1 S -f1enl ww Helen Heath Wallace Kennedy Edythe Olson lames Swanson English 10 English II English 10 English II Hi-Teens Humanities I Hi-Teens Communications Skills Future Teachers of America Humanities Compare World Culture To endeavor to find man's purpose, "To Know Thyself' and to improve oneself culturally and intellect- ually are three purposes of the humanities, a course offered to capable juniors and seniors. Humanities l students delved into a study of American history, art, music and literature. "Our Town" by Thornton Wilder was presented in a series of four movies. tm Humanities ll students studied the history of the Western Civilization in which the aspects of music, art, literature and architecture were covered. Sophocles' "Oedipus Rex" and "Hamlet" were presented through educational films. Students attended the Minneapolis Art lnstitute, a Shakespearian play and an opera. Externporaneous speaking, panel discussions and various kinds of speech material were introduced to Hlldfed :rennihm Speech l pupils. ln Speech H, every aspect of the Enghshn theater was taught, including make-up, lighting, set design, tragedy, comedy and costuming. CAST MEMBERS from "Great Caesars Ghost" collapsed on the sofa AS MRS. HELEN HEATH dictated from behind the lecturn, two sopho- alter u hilarious but exhausting practice. more English students made up their daily lesson. Page 15 Ruth Bauer French Il Latin I. Il Spanish II French Club Spanish Club Hi-Teens Bernice Nervig Not Pictured: Luverne Ahrndt German I, ll. III Thomas Claseman Advanced development of communications and transportation enables people of today to travel by jet from New York to London in a few hours or to call Germany from Washington, DC., in a matter of min- utes. Because the world of today is figuratively small- er, it is essential to learn the language of other people to promote understanding and peace between nations. Albert Lea offers four languages to linguistic enthu- siasts: French, German, Latin and Spanish. French l classes, taught by Mrs. Barbara Verdoorn, concentrated their studies primarily on grammar and vocabulary. French ll students delved into an exten- sive study of tenses, phrases and the parts of speech. Memorized dialogue was an integral part of the course. German students covered their area of study through various activities, including singing the "Schnitzelbank" and writing a term paper in German. Singing Christmas carols, translating films and learning more about the Spanish culture were the goals of Spanish pupils in both first and second years. Latin l classes learned vocabulary, verb conjuga- tion and translation methods in preparation for a study of lulius Caesar and early Gallatian culture which will be extensively discussed during their second year. Semtanl Mrs. Bernice Nervig replaced Mr. lerome Narveson. pamsh I Barbara Verdoorn French I 0 0 0 Lmquists Learn of Cther- Nations French German SPUTHST1 I-Clin Carol Yost Robert Demo Barbara Sliie Daniel Bisqaard Page 16 Art Orchestra Band Chorus Steven Westrum Marline Minear Ioan Hanson William Rhiger Fine Ar-ts Promote Native Abilities Working together to bring culture to students were the music and art departments. To please audiences ot concerts, the art classes erected original settings as the choruses, orchestra and band provided music. A new chorus system was put into ettect by Mr. Robert Myers to give more interested students a chance to participate in choral work. B Chorus consisted of sophomore girls and boys, Girls' Chorus of junior girls and A Chorus ot junior and senior girls and boys. The outstanding participants ot A Chorus were selected tor the Chorale, a 50 voice group. The Chorale sang for church and civic organizations as well as participated in choral concerts. During the Christmas season it made more than 15 appearances. The band gave concerts, marched at football games and parades and played the school songs at pep assemblies and basketball games. Band members perfected their music by private lessons, home practice and sectional rehearsals when necessary. A The orchestra contributed to our culture by setting the mood before plays, at school concerts, at gradu- ation and at public concerts. They practiced daily. Senior high art classes consisted ot senior high stu- dents whose objective it was to acquaint themselves with as many medias as possible through Weekly in- dividual projects. Cil paints, lndia ink, charcoal tempera paint and crayon were a tew of the drawing supplies used to bring out the students' artistic talents. George Acheff L. I. Emmons Art 10, 11. 12 Band Art Club Pep Bond B Wrestling Winton Melby Robert Myers Orchestra Vocal Music Tiger's Roar Chorale Page History, Social Sciences Present Q , .., . lzll .....: iw i at it f W "2" sf -320 S 4 is W 9 i si .-:sgssreaeazar , ' -' 1 ,,,,,,,, t f -55,53 t Nicholas Cords William Christopherson U. S. History Social Studies 12 Humanities I, II B Football B Basketball World History presented a study of the various cultures of the world and of the Middle Ages, the Ren- aissance and the World War l and ll periods from the European aspect to sophomores. Through studying the civilizations of ancient man, we can better understand our own heritage and back- ground. Also, the period of invention was delved into in order to give students a better understanding of the English Industrial Revolution. Gaining a background on the French Revolution in world history paved the way to understanding our own American Revolution which was studied in United States history, a required subject for juniors. Renais- sance explorers, Pilgrims and Puritans, our founding fathers, great naval leaders and statesmen were studied during the first half of the year. The Civil War, slavery, emancipation, women sufferage, the world wars in relation to America and the days of Franklin D. Roosevelt completed the American history course. Humanities l students made a more complete history study using Allen Nevins and Henry Com- mager's "A History of America" as a frequent reference. Two weeks out of six were devoted to studying the development of American music including folk songs, jazz and Aaron Copland's "Billy the Kid Ballet." Paul Ehrhard Alice Gammel World Hisfofv W0f1dHiS'0fY AUDREY NELSON felt confident md: she had punished her disobedient A Wreslllnq child. Ianice Morreim. correctly. However, she learned better methods of B Football disciplinq children in her Social class. Lettermen's Club "I FOUND lT" exclaimed Sandra Hanson after she had searched through her whole locker to find one social book. lfllililfillilff 15920321 222324 . Ylilflftlllll Page 18 United States and World Situations Developing knowledge of government and sociology were the goals of the twelfth grade social classes. One semester was spent in the study of United States government. All aspects of federal, state, county and local governments were covered. Besides the regular classroom work, students were also required to do outside reading and research papers. ln the second semester, students delved into the sociological qualities and problems of man. The fields studied ranged from man's physical and mental struc- tures to common teenage problems of today. lnstructors of the classes were Mr, William Christo- pherson, Mr. Egil l-lovey and Mr. Rene Wambach. Another social studies course offered to seniors was the modern history class. Taught by Miss Elsie Sebert, this elective dealt with present world problems. Various areas of the world were studied, including Europe, Russia, Africa, the Middle East, lndia, Southeast Asia, China and South America. Daily news reports were required of each student. Iames Gustafson Egil Hovey U. S. History Counseling A Football Social Studies 12 B Basketball Knowledge of the work was acquired through special reports, research papers and the construction of maps and charts. The class participated in weekly World Affairs Examinations offered by the Minneapolis Star. STUDYING THE VIKINGS' course to North America was Dallas Breamer. sophomore world history student. Bruce lohnson U. S. History Track B Football Lettermen's Club Elsie Sebert M. E. Wambach World History Social Studies 12 Modern History World Geography 1 f Page 19 ni Studies of Life Reveal Complexity Robert Dreisbach Olive Iohnson Biology Biology Ushers' Club Warner Nettleton Melvin Salmela Physiology Biology Psychology Science Club Biology, the study of life, introduced students to the strange world of an ameoba, the metamorphasis of a grasshopper and the complex study of the human body, all of which clarified the course. Fall projects of biology students were a leaf collec- tion and collecting and classifying approximately 40 different insects. The arrival into the new addition enabled students to use advance facilities in dissecting frogs and worms, a "must" for all biology enthusiasts. Offered for the first time was a course in psychology and physiology. The first half of the year was devoted to studying the nervous system and various nerve cen- ters in the body. This prepared students and gave them a background for studying the mind, which was covered during the second semester. Psychology deals with probing into the depths of man's mind to discover the basic reason for human behavior. Emotions, reactions and personality display man's true nature. Because of environmental and cultural back- ground each person is individual in his mental make-up. Through extensive study in this field, one can better understand himself and others. Teaching this new subject was Mr. Warner Nettle- ton, replaced in biology by Mr. Robert Dreisbach. IAMES DALEIDEN and Mark Iohnson created hydrogen through water displace- ment in their laboratory experiment as part ot the chemistry course. WORKING DILIGENTLY and carefully to disect frogs. biology students studied the internal organs of one of the world's most common amphibians. Page 20 Mathematical reasoning challenges the mind and develops acuteness in thinking and solving problems. lt is necessary for college and aptitude test achievement because of today's scientific emphasis. Senior arithmetic offered a practical course in mathe- matics helpful in figuring income tax, budget balance and everyday quantitative thinking. Plane geometry was the elective of most sophomores while trigonometry and analytical geometry taxed the brains of senior engineering enthusiasts. The latter course was offered in two semesters and covered an advanced study of the plane geometrical angles, circles and triangles along with algebraic equations. To continue the study of ninth grade algebra, llobert :Eiersen S Murvlbln ilesne pplie ysics enior at ematics advanced algebra challenged capable students. General Physics Applied Chemisky Chemistry involved extensive formula and equation sclence Club General Chemistry Audio-Visual writing, which was necessary in understanding the basis of chemistry. The success of laboratory experi- ments Was determined by the students ability to write correct equations. Although classes did not move into the new addition until February, the new facilities were put to good use in the spring. Physics, scientifically defined, is the study of matter and energy and the physical changes which occur in matter. Aspects of heat, electricity, electronics, light, simple machines, inclined planes and sound were stud- ied. Coinciding with this, problems of coefficient linear expansion and gas volumes were worked out. Various laws of physics were also studied. Milton Norman Byron Spear Advanced Algebra Trigonometry Analytical Geometry Advanced Algebra Plane Geometry Science Emphasizes New Space Age COUNTING THE STRANDS of this pully system to determine mechanical advantage were Leo Yokiel and Thomas Van Beek. physics students. Irwin Volkman Maurice Thompson General Chemistry Plane Geometry Senior Adviser Business Classes Arthur Anthony Bookkeeping II Business Arithmetic Business Machines Journalism Business Adviser Gene Erickson Business Arithmetic Business Correspondence Personal Finance mv' Charles Fairchild Business Principles Typing Iournclism Business Adviser Iva Loy Shorthand I. II Office Practice Prepare Students Numerous business courses offered interested stu- dents Valuable training. These courses enable gradu- ates to obtain better jobs in the future. Seniors were taught in office practice how to operate Various business machines by practical application. Machines used in the course were adding machines, calculators, a duplicator, a comptometer, a dictaphone and the bookkeeping machine. A special office prac- tie book was used with the course to teach students about familiar office procedures. They were taught how to file and how to type contracts, wills, letters and telegrams. About nine weeks was spent working on the IBM and dictaphone machines. Methods of filling out cash receipts books, cash payment books and profit and loss statements were only a few business techniques taught in bookkeeping. This class was offered either as a one or two year course to juniors and seniors who were interested. Through typing, students were familiarized with the standard typewriter keyboard. Speed and accuracy were the main things stressed as methods of typing memorandums and letters were taught. Charts with the maximum words per minute typed by each student were kept in some typing classes. ONE OF THE MANY MACHINES used by students in business courses was run by Dorothy Reichl. Norman Bailey Retail Sales Diversified Page 22 For Various Secretarial Occupations Not only students planning to enter the field of business benefited from business courses but also those who were going to college. Diversified occupations employed students in part time employment. Various places they Worked were department stores, restaurants, drug stores, garages and business offices. These students attended school only in the morning and Worked during the afternoon at their respective places of employment. 'lhe first year of stenography taught students how to write and apply shorthand. Constant drilling of brief forms and recall words enabled students to build up speed and accuracy in dictation. Transcription ll, the second year of stenography, Eugene Lysne provided advanced learning for those interested in further training. Most of the year was spent on writing letters from shorthand notes and taking speed dictation tests. Awards were given after passing each test. Shorthand I Typing Business machines trained seniors how to operate the ten-key and full-keyboard adding machines, calcu- lators, the bookkeeping machine, the spirit duplicator, the comptometer, the Burrough accounting machine and other important office equipment. About eight Weeks was spent on the dictaphone and IBM. Marie Skieveland Typing Bookkeeping I FOUR STEPS IN WRITING A LETTER: dicution. composition, typing and examination of the Journalism Business Adviser iinished product. were shown by Ronda Iohnson. it XT Ruth Woods Typing Iunior Red Cross ' Puqe 23 Russell Esson Earl Iacobsen Electricity Industrial Drawing Aeronautics Photography Adviser To gain practical experience and basic technical knowledge, many students enrolled in some of the various industrial arts classes offered at Albert Lea. The industrial arts courses were divided into four general areas. One of these, aimed at developing technical skills, was instructed by Mr. Earl lacobsen, and included machine drawing, blue print reading and shop mathematics and architectural drawing. Metals, a one semester course in basic metal work- ing, served as a pre-requisite for Vocational Machine Shop I, and was open to all senior high students. luniors who progressed satisfactorily through the first course in vocational machine shop were allowed to take a second year of it as seniors. These courses in metalworking were instructed by Mr. Linus Siefert. Electricity and basic electronics, delving into the world of radio and television, were taught by Mr. Rus- sell Esson. Through the course in aeronautics, students learned the principles of flight and navigation. Mr. Sydney Schwartz headed the classes in wood- working. ln the basic course of machine woodworking, any senior high student was given an opportunity to learn safe and proper use of the tools used by an exper- ienced craftsman. Upperclassmen were permitted to learn the many aspects of cabinet-making, and exper- ienced seniors learned much about the trade through a practical course in carpentry. Linus Seifert Sydney Schwartz Metals Machine Woods Vocational Machine Shop Cabinet Making Sh P 'd V t' 1'I' "g AS THEIR MACHINE SHOP project, Steven O'Neal, Gary Rupp, Gary CAREFUL MEASURING and calculating had to be considered before Nelson and Dennis Stoa constructed a motor scooter on which to ride. David Larsen could finish his architectural drawing assignment. If - Page 24 in trical appliances, foods and other household items. The Home Economists Learn Domestioity Dealing with problems and situations of family living and upkeep of the home were a few of the things studied in home economics. Knowledge acquired in this course will prove valuable in the future as these young homemakers start to build their own homes. Planning wardrobes and future homes, studying home furnishings and developing sewing skills were the highlights of the first semester. Each student picked out a pattern and material of her choice and undertook the job of sewing an article of clothing for herself. The second semester was spent on baby and child care, family life and cooking. New foods were tried and old ones were revised. Special emphasis was on meats and salads. The girls studied digestion, the buy- Loneng Bqnovetz Phyllis Hostage: ing of food on a budget and the care and use of elec- Home Economics 11, 12 General Home Economics Home Visitation Home Visitation girls also studied synthetics, rugs, coloring of rooms and many other things that will prove valuable when they are confronted with the problems of interior decor- rations of their own homes. Senior girls had an opportunity to make either a coat, suit or dress using winter fabrics. Besides sewing they studied types, kinds and colors and the ways of choos- lnq CICCQQSSOUGS' They planned lhfslf Spnnq wardrobes' KAREN MATHEWS and Suzanne Helqeson diligently worked on their first dressmaking feats as part of their sewing course. CONCOCTING SOMETHING undoubtedly "de1iciuse." were Barbara Hegland and Karen Meixell as they undertook their cooking assignment for the day. CONSTRUCTING CHRISTMAS TREES of toothpicks and cork balls and spray painting them various pastels were the tasks of Mary Vig and Sandra Bergo. Page 25 Agriculture Studies Far-m Aspects Donald Paulson Agriculture 10, 11 Coordination and Home Visitation Future Farmers oi America Lowell Ross Agriculture 12 Farm Accounts Home Visitation Young Farmer Program LARRY LARSON, Gary Thompson, Charles Pererson and David Mor- reim admired a bronze bull. an FHA award. Page 26 LEARNING THE GROWING process of hybrid corn were Gary Thompson and David Morreim, "pupils" of Larry Larson. Helping to train the future owners and operators of America's largest single industry, farming, was the task of Mr. Donald Paulson and Mr. Lowell Ross, as they taught senior high boys correct farming practices. Aided by Mr. Paulson, the sophomores were taught the basic fundamentals of crop and livestock produc- tion. Many of them joined the Future Farmers of Amer- ica, composed of boys taking vocational agriculture. ln their junior year they devled more deeply into the areas of crop and livestock production and learned how to make a bigger profit by using the correct fertilizer. They also learned that by using soil conserva- tion they could keep valuable top soil from washing away, helping to alleviate a big farming problem. Skillfully supervised by Mr. Ross, the seniors dealt With more involved problems concerning the farm. lt was during this year that they dug more deeply into problems they had dealt With in their junior and soph- omore years. Another important part of the year, which Was the equivalent of a second year in any other course, was learning to keep accurate records. -...D DALLAS STOVERN exercised a referee's position on Richard Prantner as part of his sophomore gym course. Donald Buhr Physical Education A Basketball Baseball Ralph Summers Athletic Director Intramural Basketball Baseball Lois Wagner Physical Education GRA Physical Education Promotes Fitness Varied activities stressing physical titness were un- dertaken by senior high physical education classes under the direction ot Mr. Ralph Summers. Mr. Donald Buhr, in his second year as head basket- ball coach, also instructed the boys' classes, and Miss Lois Wagner headed girls' classes and led the GRA. The school year began with the boys playing sott- ball while the girls competed in soccer. When the weather prevented turther outdoor activity, boys and girls began a co-educational program ot square danc- ing aimed at developing social graces. As the winter program progressed, the boys went on to learn the skills ot basketball, wrestling, volleyball and gymnastics. Meanwhile, the girls were improving their talents in ping-pong, basketball and volleyball. As in past years, only sophomores were required to take physical education, and due to the new seven- hour day, classes were pared down, allowing much more individual attention to each student Participants also enjoyed the use ot the newly- enlarged wrestling room, which provided the much needed space to allow a larger number ot boys to engage in this highly competitive sport. BEFORE EACH VOLLEYBALL game. sophomore girls had to through warm-up exercises to better their accurateness. Page 27 Summer School, Nurses Aid Students ,,. . A Q ' lt "GOOD GHIEF! These books are like cannon balls," exclaimed sum- mer school student Donna Mayotte to Gary Roelofs. PROVIDING AN OPPORTUNITY to the student for spiritual learning, these doors represent something invaluable to every Christian. LV? S . W. MMM Page 28 "TIN-V N SWELTERING IN THE HEAT while attending summer school social studies, lean Madson and Dennis Tostenson paused to refresh. Throughout the summer months, many students had the opportunity to acquire extra credits in summer school. Courses were offered for a six Week period. One full credit towards graduation was given for the completion of English and social courses. These consisted of classes five days a Week, four hours a day, adding up to a concentrated study of 120 hours. Elementary and junior high classes were offered, but no academic credit was given. Typing classes were conducted by Miss Iva Loy and Mr. Gene Erickson. Five academic courses were taught in senior high. Teaching the classes were Mrs. Kenneth Allen, English IO: Miss Grace Dahle and Mr. Stanley Middlestadt, English 125 Mr. Bruce lohnson, World Historyg Mr. Iames Gustafson, United States History: and Mr. Wil- liam Standley, Social Studies l2. School nurses always hold an important position in the school system. They are present when the students need medical aid due to sickness during the school day. Heading the nursing staff in senior high was Miss Elea- nor Beethe. Miss Betty Skaff worked in co-ordination with the elementary schools. Acting as secretary in the main nurse's office was Mrs. Beryl Hillstrom. SCHOOL NURSE, Miss Eleanor Beethe. checked Catherine Iuve's KAREN PETERS curiously wa wwvwvs . T3.?.i't At' 5 7 3 y M jf' B' tched Miss Eleanor Beethe, nurse, test ll l d to render service. Ion Paske with the audiometer used in detecting hearing defects. temperature and was wi ingy rea y Churches Provide Religious Training Christian knowledge and how to put it to use is needed in the classroom and in all school activities. Because religion was not offered as a school subject, time was taken once a week for religious instruction. Each Wednesday morning the high school students attended religious classes ot their choice. None were compelled to go to these classesq those who did not wish to attend went to a regular study hall. The classes met for a 40 minute period. Some churches, too small tor an individual class, joined with other churches. Pastors from Albert Lea area churches taught the students. Buses were provided tor those whose churches were not within walking distance from school. Churches taught different subjects, but usually a book in the Bible or the everyday problems which Christians lace were discussed. ln some, hymns were sung and psalms were read. These weekly sessions gave students an opportunity to strengthen their faith and learn more about the Christian heritage. There was not much work assigned tor this class aside from Bible reading and other assignments con- nected with the discussions. Special report cards were issued at the same time as the regular report cards. RELIGIOUS RELEASE TIME class conducted by the Rev. Fred Iacoh- sen discussed the New Testament in relation to the end of the world. ' rfl 2 M 9 it ' ' 3 l Page 29 WAYNE WALK, Roy Erickson, Kenneth Myron and Edward Ellertson TAKING cr "five minute" rest before starting their night janitorial relaxed against the workbench before continuing their list of duties. work wer7'George Head. Ro f, chroeder and Elmer crylor. , f , Af it xt!!! aj X! If ,iffy J k K, anfroze-fe,f4..f1-.i.1fZt ,ff , , .f ftt' ,, 667714- 1 f , een ft l to " r r Cf , ,faffv-ff .ff t X u , 4 ' X f ff f X Q Custodians Take Charge of Schoolg CALL burq, ,, ED FOR PICTURES were Frank Whiteaker. O. E. Gucken- Donald Vee, Lowell Olson, Ioseph Roche and Sylvin Lewis. in '1 , 5 's r Cs. infix l i l? X Ks? 2 . ff- 'swf' f , ,..r . it W x , , A e Q U Q, V M158 W Xi Zz, rg :Wifi . of in f 2 5 ' Q W if . Q N A V ' tl ' A ,f-xl., :ew . ' ,qw 4 ,f 4 t ,. .M 4,3 ,rf ,l Y K Lass X K xx? wry Mina? if f X , . s f W 14 Y . 2741 , K r r xv y if is-it fe'-K its l 1 Q A r i I .,., f ,,,l N l " " A ll' . a it i ' he etimefzzxw. Page 30 The janitors continued to be an established part of the school system. Although their main responsibilities were to maintain the neatness of the school building, they were also confronted by many extra duties. Throughout the day, the regular duties of the janitors included sweeping hall floors, straightening desks, tables and chairs in classrooms at the end of the school day, washing blackboards, emptying Waste-paper bas- ets and cleaning all classrooms every day. During school vacations and on most Weekends, the staff made an extensive cleaning of the building. Floors and desks were Waxed and windows were Washed. Extra responsibilities of the men occurred throughout the year. Occasionally a broken or stuck locker re- quired fixing. Often students requested the keys of a janitor to retrieve a forgotten book in a locked class- room. ln the winter, snow had to be shoveled and the slippery sidewalks sanded to prevent accidents. Several times the heavy snow was removed from the roof of the school by the janitors. A constant duty was that of regulating the heat in all the classrooms of the building. Pleasant odors comina from the cafeteria during the morninq meant that the cafeteria staff was busily pre- paring the noon lunch for that day. These lunches were offered to all students who desired them for 25 cents. The meal included a main dish, salad or vegetable, bread and butter, milk and dessert. All meals were planned so as to have different selections each day as Well as a nutritious meal for each student. Student workers helped the cafeteria staff serve and clean the room and tables after lunch so that the next hour study hall could be accommodated. ln order to have enouah room, junior and senior hiah students ate at different hours. Teachers were assigned to the cafeteria during lunch periods to supervise students. UNLOADING CAFETERIA TRAYS from the sterilizer were Mrs. Lor- raine Slette and Mrs. Evelyn Ienson as they prepared for lunchtime. Cafeteria Staff Prepares Lunches MACAHRONI HOTDISH was being prepared in the huge cooker by BAKING COOKIES for the hundreds of cafeteria patriots. so aptly cafeteria workers Miss Dina Flim and Mrs. Gladys Olson. illustrated by Mrs. Irene Peterson, was a hiq iob. Page 31 f Www t R 1"f--.....,...,,.-- ' 0 4, M' ,g , '1""mxrq 1 I J uw' lv f' 15' MQ ,?:fn:'1Q'rw ""f""rN'f g53r7 Q5,g?fA f'v":1j,TZ?'l:x"-v N- 1521- 5,572 kqzggm au,-11,1 vfqneivi-In 3 Hg. nv- ig-L .fr w ' 7 x Y ' 1 v 1- u ,If ' wi 5 9 " 'fp' 'F -- f . 1' 1 .wx.f...N.,,.,,,31M......LifA.aLh....lM........m',h,....m.. M 1 .1..esa.1 fm mama Aug. .12 Y 4 A 1 CLASSES The hm-loving sophomore, the energetic iunior. the sophisticated senior . . . each one played an important part in the formation of school spirit. Each class. under the direction of the class officers. was responsible for various cl s-sponsored activities. The initiative and perseverance of each student was a reflection on the good quality of our senior high school. S ai fi A i 3 Mary Gilbertson Dee Ellertson Rebecca Boyer Mary Keil Mcxrgit Larson Uma ps Who's Who Reflects Cl: Out of the 350 seniors in the class of 1961, there were a few who reflected the spirit of the high school by devoting their time and efforts to curricular and extra-curricular activities. Ten of these outstanding students have been chosen by a faculty committee to be placed on the 1961 Who's Who list. Representative of drama, music, student organizations and scholarship, these seniors were selected on the basis of scholarship to the best of their ability, character and achievements. We proudly dedicate these two pages to the ten seniors who have reflected the initiative of the grad- uating class of 1961 at Albert Lea Senior High School. Richard Oliphun acter, Scholarship PLANNING THE SENIOR BREAKFAST was a responsibility of the Gari, Carol Yost, Ruth Iordczhl, Ronald Swanson, Ioan Hanson, Judith Senior Executive Council. FRONT ROW: Sharon Blizard, William Holway, Ralph Erlandson and Bobbie Ernest. Ienner, Sara Shoemaker and David Iordahl. BACK ROW: Freda Rotary, Lion Representatives Tell LION REPRESENTATIVES-FRONT ROW: Sandra Hanson, Cynthia ROW: Dee Ellertson, Barbara Slife, Margit Larson, Mary Keil and Bothoi, Sara Shoemaker and Gwendolyn Wahlstrom. SECOND ROW: Ianice Nelson. Mr. Lorne Ward, Dr. T. M. Hansen and Robert Bonnerup. THIRD Page 36 The first big project of the senior year, which was under the guidance of the class officers, was the Senior Breakfast held on December 22. Opening speeches were presented by Class President Bill lenner, Super- intendent of Schools L. S. Ward and Principal I. R. Mc- Elhinney. A nativity scene was portrayed and a reli- gious selection was read by Sally Shoemaker. On the more humorous side, there was a beatnik poem, a skit entitled "Christmas Then and Now" and a girls' quartet. The breakfast closed with group singing led by Rodney Seeger. Character, scholarship, leadership and service were the qualities possessed by the seniors selected to at- tend the weekly meeting of the Lions and Rotary clubs. They served as a link between the businessmen of Al- bert Lea and the high school. Each student was a rep- resentative for a particular month, reporting on the events and activities occuring in school. -,, -:-::,,- at we :-'tr' Barbara Heqland and Del Bosacker were chosen the American Auxiliary and Legion Representatives. Local Men About School Activities ROTARIAN REPRESENTATIVES-FRONT ROW: David Peterson, Iohn Iorqenson, Mr. Irwin Andersen, Mr. Niles Shoti, Mr. Robert Myers and David Iordahl. SECOND ROW: William Dcmielsen, Paul Wilke, Del Bosacker, Stephen Claybourn and Richard Oliphant. NOT PIC- TURED: Daniel Bisgaard. Page 37 IAY ACKLAND-A Chorus l5 FFA l, 2, 35 Iunior Clas- sical League I. RONALD ACKLAND-A Chorus l, 2, 35 Chorale l, 2, 35 Student Council I5 Iohn BroWn's Body 25 Wrestling 2. LARRY ALLEN-A Chorus lg Band l5 Student Council 35 Intramural Football 2, 35 Rifle Club 2. R. PAUL AMANN-Tiger's Roar 35 Football 15 Intra- mural Football 3. SHARON AMUNDSON. BERNETTE ANDERSON-Band l, 2, 3. KAREN ANDERSON-B Chorus l 5 I-Ii-Teens 15 Pep Club I5 FTA I5 Diversified Occupations 3. RAYMOND ANDERSON. RICHARD ANDERSON-Orchestra 2, 3: Band l, 2, 35 Swing Band 35 Basketball 25 Baseball l, 2, 35 Tennis I5 Lettermen's Club 35 Cross Country 35 Tiger's Roar 3. Graduating Class of 1961 Tries LANNY BACHTLE. IUDITI-I BARTELLAB Chorus li Orchestra l, 25 Red Cross 35 Ushers' Club I, 2, 35 GRA I, 25 Spanish Club 2, 3. WILLIAM BAUERS-FFA I, 2 3 , . LYNDA BELLeB Chorus I5 I-Ii-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 GRA l5 FTA 2, 35 French Club 2, 35 lunior Classical League l, 2, 35 Script and Gavel 3. LOWELL BERGA-Orchestra I5 Band 35 Swing Band l, 25 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 Diversified Occupations 35 SAN- DRA BERGO-AB Chorus l5 Band I5 I-Ii-Teens l, 25 Pep Club I5 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 GRA l5 French Club 3. Page 38 EDWARD BERTELSON+Iunior Classical League 2, 35 Football I5 Track l. DANIEL BISGAARDfA Chorus l5 German Club 2, 35 Iunior Classical League l, 2, 35 Basketball I5 Golt l, 2, 35 Intramural Basketball l, 2, 35 Rotarian Representative 3. IANET BLANCI-IARDe,Hi- Teens 25 Pep Club 25 GRA l, 2, 35 FHA 2, 3. PAUL BLECKEBERG. SHARON BLIZARDeA Chorus 2, 35 Orchestra I, 25 I-Ii-Teens I, 2, 35 Pep Club I, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Red Cross 25 French Club 2, 35 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Ouill and Scroll 2, 35 Class Treasurer 35 Senior Executive Council 3. BETTY BOI-ILMAN. . W "'- .,. 5 gf' 4 NANCY BOLINGER-WA Chorus 25 B Chorus I5 Hi-Teens 1, 2, Red cross 1, Tiger 3, Ah LQ HQ Sa 2, 3, TRL 3. tx it IEANENE BOOEN,fA Chorus 2, 35 Band I5 I-Ii-Teens 35 "'4 -..r,.ff' Pep Club 3: Red Cross l5 GRA 3. MARY BOS. To Achieve Challenging Horizons DEL BOSACKER-Band l: German Club 2, 35 Football l, 2, 35 Wrestling l, 2, 35 Track I, 2, 35 Intramural Basketball 15 Lettermen's Club 2, 35 Kiwanis Represen- tative 2, Rotarian Representative 3 CYNTHIA BOTI-IOF -A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus I5 Chorale 35 Student Coun- cil 25 Prom Committee Chairman 25 I-Ii-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Red Cross l, 25 French Club 25 Iunior Classical League I, 2, 35 Thespians I5 Tiger 35 Ah La I-Ia Sa 2, 35 Ouill and Scroll 2, 35 Cheerleader 2, 35 Lion Representative 35 TRL 3. BERNARD BOUVET- Student Council 35 Tiger's Roar 35 French Club 35 Track 35 Intramural Basketball 35 Lettermen's Club 35 Lion Representative 35 AFS Student 35 Entered from Lille, France, 3. ROBERT BOWMAN-FFA l, 2, 3. REBECCA BOYER- B Chorus 1, I-Ii-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 German Club 2, 35 Library I-Ielper 35 Red Cross 2. KAREN BOYERfB Chorus I5 Hi-Teens l, 25 Pep Club l5 Tiger's Roar 25 GRA l5 Diversified Occupa- tions 35 Distributive Club 3. k A Page 39 IUDY BOYUM-B Chorus l5 Orchestra 15 1-li-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 FTA 35 French Club 2, 35 Script and Gavel 35 Oueen ot Snows 3. lULlE BOYUM-B Chorus 15 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 Bowling League 25 French Club 2, 3. IACK BRIGGS-Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3. DARLENE BUTLER-Hi-Teens 35 FHA 35 lunior Classical League 3. LOWELL BYE-Spanish Club 2, 3. KAREN CALLAI-lANwIunior Classical League l. WESLEY CARD. ROSE CARROLLeHi-Teens l, 2, 35 Diversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 3. IULIE CASEY-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 l-li-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l. Active Executive I Page 40 Council Prepares NANCY CHAPMAN-Bowling League 25 GRA l, 2, 35 Spanish Club 15 Ottice Helper 25 Diversified Occupa- tions 35 Distributive Club 3. SANDRA CHRISTENSEN -B Chorus 15 Class Treasurer l5 Hi-Teens 15 Pep Club l5 Tiger's Roar 25 Red Cross 25 German Club 3. ROGER CHRISTIANSON-A Chorus l, 2, 35 Chorale l, 2, 35 Glee Club 35 Orchestra 2, 35 Band l, 2, 35 Swing Band l, 2, 35 Student Council l, 25 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 Red Cross 35 Script and Gavel 35 Wrestling l, 2, 35 Golf 25 Intramural Football l, 35 Letter1'nen's Club 1, 2, 35 Class President 2. BRUCE CHRZ. CARROLL CLAUSEN-FFA l, 2, 3. STEPHEN CLAYBOURNeA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 Student Council l, 2, 35 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Spanish Club 15 Football l, 2, 35 Basketball l, 2, 35 Lettermen's Club l, 2, 35 King ot Snows 35 Rotarian Representative 35 Senior Exectuive Council 3. IAMES COLLINSfFFA I, 2, 35 Entered trom Freeborn, Minnesota, I. LORRAINE CORNELIUS. ALICE COR- NICKfHi-Teens I, 2. TERRY COTTONf-Student Council I5 Baseball I, 25 In- tramural Basketball l. IAMES DALEIDEN-German Club 2, 35 lunior Classical League I, 2, 35 Basketball I5 Intramural Football 35 Intramural Basketball l, 35 Ki-- Wanis Representative 2. WILLIAM DANIELSENvStu- dent Council l, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 French Club 2, 35 Foot- ball I, 2, 35 Basketball I, 25 Track 2, 35 Intramural Bas- ketball 35 Lettermen's Club 2, 35 Kiwanis Representative 25 Rotarian Representative 3. GARY DAVIDSON-A Chorus I, 2, 35 Chorale 2, 35 Band I5 Tiger's Roar 35 Red Cross 2, 35 German Club 2, 35 Basketball l, 25 Golt l, 2, 35 Intramural Football I, 2, 35 Intramural Basketball 3. GERALD DE BOER-A Chorus I5 Intramural Football I. ROBERT DEMO- Prom Committee Chairman 25 Tiger's Roar 35 German Club 2, 35 Football I5 Wrestling I5 Intramural Basketball 35 Ritle Club 3. Plans for Annual Senior Breakfast ARLENE DILLING-4A Chorus 25 B Chorus I5 I-Ii-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 lunior Classical League l, 2, 35 Tiger 35 Ah La I-Ia Sa 2, ARTHUR DRAAYER-Intramural Football l, 2, 35 Intramural Bas- ketball I, 3. WILLIAM DRESSfDiversitied Occupa- tions 35 Distributive Club 3. KENT DUGSTADeA Chorus I, 25 Diversified Occupa- tions 35 Distributive Club 35 Football 25 Wrestling l, 25 Baseball I5 Intramural Football 35 Intramural Basketball 3. STEVEN DULITZfIntramural Football 2. RICH- ARD DURNlNflunior Classical League 2, 3. Page 41 l DENNIS EDWIN-Orchestra l, 25 Swing Band 25 Rifle Club 3. DONNA EDWlN+Hi-Teens 35 GRA 3. DEE ELLERTSONfA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Prom Com- mittee Chairman 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 GRA l5 French Club 2, 35 lunior Clas- sical League l, 2, 35 Script and Gavel l, 35 Great Caes- ar's Ghost 35 Lion Representative 3. RUTH ANN EMSTAD- Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 Hi- Teens l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 35 Red Cross l, 35 Bowling League l, 2, 35 GRA 35 Spanish Club 2, 35 Senior Execu- tive Council 3. LARRY ENDERSON. PATRICIA EN- DERSON-B Chorus lg Hi-Teens 2, 35 Library Helper 3. Tigers Contain Cherished Memoriesg The class of l96l won several honors during its senior year that will long be remembered. t Susan Wolgamot and lames Daleiden were named National Merit Scholarship finalists. Pamela Hirsch Mary Lindeman, lean Madson, Barbara Mortenson, Myran Nelson, Steven Palmer and Paul Wilke received letters of commendation from the National Merit Scho- larship Corporation. These students scored in the upper three per cent of all students in the nation. Winning another honor was Barbara Mortenson, who received the Betty Crocker Euture Homemaker of Tomorrow award. She scored the highest on a written test taken by Albert Lea seniors in home economics. Many oscars were awarded this year to deserving seniors. Susan Wolgamot and lames Daliden each received one for their high scores on the Merit Scholar- ship test. Richard Cliphant received one for his out- standing preparation and work in the Homecoming parade and also for his leadership in football. Del Bosacker also received an oscar for his display of abil- ity on the football team. Linda llle, lames Groos, David lordahl, Karen Mathews and lohn Iverson T received them for outstanding work in the Tiger's Roar. "WILL YOU SIGN MY TIGER?" This was stated many limes as seniors wrote and reminisced in the annuals oi friends. Seniors who were willinq to oblige were Gerald De Boer. Patricia Enderson, Iean Schlehr. Gary Skaar, Edna Kycek and Iames Lair. Page 42 ' IUDITH ENGBRITSON4Hi-Teens l, 2, 3, Pep Club l, 2, Bowling League l, 2, 3, GRA l, 2, 3, French Club 2, Thespians l, 3, Script and Gavel 3, Great Caesar's Ghost 3. RALPH ERLANDSON---A Chorus l, 2, 3: Chorale 2, 3, Band l, Iunior Classical League 2, 3, Foot- ball l, Intramural Football 2, 3, Senior Executive Coun- cil 3. BOBBI ERNEST--Student Council l, Tiger's Roar 3, Bowling League l, 2, 3, French Club l, Senior Execu- tive Council 3. TERRY FAHLEYfTrack 2, 3. CAROLYN FARRY-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus l, Prom Committee Chairman 2, Hi-Teens l, 2, 3, Pep Club l, 2, 3, French Club 2, 3, Iunior Classical League l, 2, 3, Script and Gavel 3, Great Caesar's Ghost 3, Homecoming Attendant 3. DAVID FlELDBERGfDiversitied Occupations 3, Dis- tributive Club 3. See Completion of High School Year IACK FLANN. EUGENE FLASKERUD-B Chorus I: Band l, FFA l, 2, 3 ALTON FLUGUM-A Chorus 3, Science Club 2, 3, FFA l, 2. KAREN FOLCK- -Hi-Teens 3, Tiger's Roar 3, Bowling League 3, Science Club 3, Spanish Club 2, 3, Entered from Anoka, Minnesota, 2. DE ANNA FOLEY4A Chorus 2, B Chorus l, FTA 3, French Club 2, 3, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 3. DARRELL FOLIE -Student Council l, FFA l, 2, 3. SHARON FREDRICKSON. STEVEN FREDRICKSONf Band l, 2, Swing Band 2, Tiger's Roar 2, French Club 2, 3, Football l, 2, Rifle Club 3. ADRIAN GAARD- FFA l, 2, 3. Page 43 FREDA GARIeI-Ii-Teens l, 2, 35 FHA 35 Senior Executive Council 3. MYREEN GAVLEfA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus I5 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 GRA l5 FTA 35 French Club 2, 35 Thespians 35 Script and Gavel 35 Great Caes- ar's Ghost 3. REGINA GEHRIG. PATRICIA GILBERT-B Chorus l5 I-Ii-Teens l, 25 Pep Club l, 25 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 Red Cross 15 Bowling League 2, 35 GRA I5 Diversified Occupations 35 Distrib- utive Club 2. MARY GILBERTSON-B Chorus I5 A Chorus 2, 35 Chorale 2, 35 Orchestra l, 25 Band l, 25 Stu- dent Council 25 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 GRA I5 lun- ior Classical League 2, 35 Kiwanis Representative 2. LARRIE GLENN-A Chorus l, 25 German Club 2, 35 In- tramural Football 2, 3. , Ambitious Juniors Work To Present LEIGH GROETZINGER-Diversified Occupations 35 Dis- tributive Club 35 Basketball l, 25 Baseball 25 Intramural Foootball 35 Intramural Basketball 2, 3. IIM GROOSf A Chorus l, 2, 35 Chorale 2, 35 Glee Club 35 Student Council l5 Tiger's Roar 35 German Club 2, 35 Basketball l5 Intramural Football 35 Intramural Basketball 2, 35 Sen- ior Executive Council 35 Ritle Club 2. THOMAS GUIN- EYfFootball l, 2, 35 Wrestling l, 2, 35 Tennis l, 25 Let- termen's Club 2, 3. BEVERLY GULBRANDSON-Ottice Helper 3. VIR- GINIA GULBRANDSON-A Chorus 25 B Chorus 15 Red Cross l, 2, 35 Library Helper 3. IOHN GUNDERSONf Wrestling l, 2, 35 Track 2. LOWELL GUNDERSONeA Chorus 2, 35 Chorale 2, 35 Student Council l, 35 FFA 35 Intramural Football l. SANDRA HAGEN4Diversitied Occupations 2. LOREA HALVORSON. Page 44 LARRY HAMSONAFFA 25 Ritle Club 3. CORRINE HANSONfBowling League 2, 35 GRA l, 2, 35 Iunior Classical League l, 2, 3. HELEN HANSONJFHA I. IOAN HANSONWB Chorus l, 25 Orchestra l, 25 Band I, 2, 35 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Senior Executive Council 3. IOY HANSONAGRA I, 35 French Club 2, 35 Iunior Classical League l, 2, 35 Library Helper 3. IUDY HANSONfB Chorus lg Hi-Teens 2, 35 Red Cross I, 35 GRA l, 2, 35 Iunior Classical League l. Excellent Prom for Upperclassmen SANDRA HANSONAA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus I5 Stu- dent Council 35 Student Council Secretary 35 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 GRA l5 Cheerf leader l, 2, 35 Homecoming Attendant 35 Lion Represen- tative 3. WILLIAM HARDINGfBand l, 25 Student Council I, 35 Red Cross 25 Spanish Club 2, 35 Intramural Football 2, 35 Intramural Basketball 2. RONALD HAR- PEL--Diversitied Occupations 35 Distributive Club 35 Basketball 2. LOIS HASSBERGfA Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus I5 Student Council I5 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Hi-Teens I, 2, 35 Pep Club I, 25 FTA 35 French Club 2, 35 Thespians 35 Script and Gavel 35 Great Caesar's Ghost 35 Homecoming Attendant 35 Kiwanis Representative 2. MORRIS HASKINSeA Chorus l, 2, 35 Chorale 35 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 Red Cross 35 Thespians 2, 35 Great Caesar's Ghost 35 Father Knows Best 25 Football l, 25 Wrestling l5 Track I5 Intramural Basketball 2, 3. LAWRENCE HAUGEN-A Chorus l, 2, 35 Chorale I, 2, 35 Glee Club 35 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 lunior Classical League 25 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Intramural Football 2. MARVIN HEEMSBERGEN. BARBARA HEGLANDe'A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Chorale 35 Band l, 25 Student Council 25 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 Red Cross 3: French Club 2, 35 Homecoming Oueen 35 Class Vice President l. WILLIAM HEILMAN -A Chorus l5 Sci- ence Club 2, 35 Ritle Club 3. Page 45 SUZANNE HELGESONAA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Hi- Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 Red Cross 35 French Club 25 Thespians 35 Script and Gavel 35 Great Caesar's Ghost 3. BEVERLY HERFINDAHL. BERNARD HERMANfScience Club 25 Chess Club l. PAMELA HlRSCHfB Chorus l5 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 Bowl- ling League 2, 35 GRA l, 2, 35 FTA 35 lunior Classical League l, 2, 35 Script and Gavel 35 Library Helper l. IANIS HOlUMfStudent Council 35 Hi-Teens l5 Pep Club l, 25 GRA l5 Diversified Occupations 35 Distribu- tive Club 3. RlCHARD HOLTfDiversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 3. lUDlTH HOLWAY- B Chorus l, 25 Hi-Teens l, 25 Pep Club l5 Tiger's Roar 35 Bowling League l, 2, 35 GRA l5 Senior Executive Council 3. GENE HORNlNGfFFA l, 2, 3. GARY HOVERSON-eBand l, 25 EFA l, 2, 3. Career Day Aids in College Plansg THOMAS HUESMANN. IOHN HURLA. IAY HUTCH- INS-Diversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 3. lANlCE HYLANDfB Chorus l5 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 lunior Classical League l, 2, 35. LlNDA ILLEAA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus lg Chorale 35 Majorette l, 2, 35 Student Council l, 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 GRA l, 25 French Club 2, 35 Script and Gavel 35 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Ouill and Scroll 2, 35 Homecoming Attendant 35 Class Secretary 2. IANET lNDRELlEfB Chorus l, 25 Ushers' Club l5 Diversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 3 Page 46 MARGARET INDRELIE-I-Ii-Teens I, 2, 3: Pep Club I5 GRA I5 Iunior Classical League I5 B Chorus I. IOI-IN IVERSON--Student Council 25 I-Ii-Teens 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Iunior Classical League 2, 35 Intramural Football I, 2, 35 Intramural Basketball I, 2, 35 Senior Executive Council 3, ARNOLD iAcoBsoN--Diversified Occu- pations 35 Distributive Club 3. BARRY IACOBSONfFFA I, 2, 3. WILLIAM IENNER -Student Council 2, 35 Track 35 Intramural Football 35 Intramural Basketball I, 2, 35 Class President 35 Senior Executive Council 3. IAMES IENSEN-Orchestra 35 Bancl I, 35 Tigers Roar 35 Iunior Classical League 2, 3. MARILYN IENSENfRecl Cross I5 Bowling League 2, 35 Science Club 35 GRA 25 French Club 25 Iunior Clas- sical League I, 2, 3. SANDRA IENSEN-Spanish Club I. STUART IENSENY-FFA I, 25 Tennis 2. Representatives Answer Questions ""'1' RONALD IENSON-FFA I, 2, 3. MARY IEPSON-Fl-IA 2, IUDITH ICI-INSON-Student Council 35 I-Ii-Teens I: RA 3. LARRY IOI-INSONeA Chorus I, 2, 35 Chorale 25 Track I. LOWELL IOHNSCN-FFA I, 2, 3. MARK IOHN- SON-Tigers Roar 35 Iunior Classical League I, 2, 35 Intramural Basketball 35 Rifle Club I. Page 47 MARLENE IOI-INSON. MARY IOHNSON-Band I, 2, 35 GRA I5 Script and Gavel 3. RANDA IOHNSON-B Chorus I5 Hi-Teens I, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Red Cross 2. DAVID IORDAHLSA Chorus I5 Glee Club 35 Orchestra I, 2, 35 Band I, 2, 35 Swing Band l, 2, 35 Student Coun- cil 35 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 French Club 2, 35 Tennis I5 Intramural Football I, 2, 35 Intramural Basketball I, 2, 35 Kiwanis Representative 25 Rotarian Representative 35 Class Vice President 35 Sen- ior Executive Council 35 Ritle Club 3. RUTH IORDAHL aB Chorus I5 Hi-Teens I, 2, 35 Pep Club I, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 GRA I, 2, 35 French Club 2, 35 Iunior Classical League I, 2, 35 Library Helper 2, 35 Kiwanis Represen- tative 25 Senior Executive Council 35 TRL 3. IAMES lORDANfRed Cross 35 Intramural Football I, 25 Intra- mural Basketball I, 2. IAMES IORGENSON-Spanish Club 25 Football I5 Basketball I5 Intramural Football 25 Intramural Basket- ball 2, 3. IOHN IORGENSON-A Chorus 35 Chorale 35 Band 2, 35 Red Cross 35 FFA 25 French Club 35 Track 2, 35 Rotarian Representative 35 Entered from Alden, Min- nesota, 2. ROBERT IOYNT-Science Club 25 lunior Classical League I, 2, 35 Basketball I, 2. Foreign Exchange Page 48 i 3 Q 5- 2 rir c lik. Ears? X Student Receives DENNIS KAPPASfTiger's Roar 35 German Club 2, 35 Football I, 2, 35 Basketball I, 25 Goli I, 2, 35 Intramural Basketball 35 Lettermen's Club 3. MARY KEILfA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus I5 Chorale 35 Student Council I5 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club I, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 Spanish Club l, 35 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Ouill and Scroll 2, 35 Lion Representative 35 Kiwanis Representa- tive 25 Class Vice President 2. LARRY KING-Tiger's Roar 2, 35 Football I5 Intramural Football 3. SHARON KLAVEN-Entered from Waseca, Minnesota, 3. ROBERT KLINE---Goli I, 2, 35 Intramural Basketball I, 2, 3. MICHAEL KNUTSENeStudent Council 35 French Club 35 Spanish Club 35 Football 35 Basketball 35 Lettermen's Club 3. WWA' s Glimpse of Ameri ROBERT KNUTSONAB Chorus lg Diversified Occupa- tions 35 Distributive Club 3, Football lg lntramural Foot- ball 21 lntramural Basketball 2. BARBARA KOFSTAD -B Chorus lg Hi-Teens l, 2, 3: Pep Club l, 2, 3: Tiger's Roar 3, GRA l, 2, 3g French Club 2, 3, lunior Classical League l, 2, 35 Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Ouill and Scroll 2, 3, Kiwanis Representative 2. CHARLOTTE KRlEGEReeA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus ly Hi-Teens l, 2, 37 French Club 2, 3g lunior Classical League lg Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 Bowling League l, 2, 3. IAMES KRUECfERfGerman Club 2, 37 Basketball 3: Rifle Club 3. TERRY KRUEGERfB Chorus lg Student Council l, 25 Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3, Wrestling lg Baseball l. GERTRUDE KUIPERA A Chorus 2, B Chorus lg Student Council lp Hi-Teens lp Office Helper 3. Bernard Bouvet, American Field Service exchange student, arrived in Albert Lea from Lille, France, to complete his senior year as an American teenfager at Albert Lea High School. During his stay in the United States, Bernard stayed with Ieff Brooke, a junior. Interested in sports, he at once became active in cross country, track and intramural basketball. Bern- ard's determination, sportsmanship and ability brought him high recognition and respect from Albert Leans. Socially, Bernard has been one of Albert Lea's boosters by exhibiting school spirit and enthusiasm in sports events and school dances. Soon after his arrival, Bernard managed to overcome his language difficulties. He appeared in various organizations telling of his life and experiences in France and in America. He Was a member of Student Council, French Club and a Lion Representative. Barb Slife represented the American teenager dur- ing her stay in Belgium last summer. She also was sent by the American Field Service Program. Barb visited a Belgian school and toured the country with her families. She was treated as a regular member of each family, thus being able to contrast European family life with life in the United States. BERNARD BOUVET AND BARBARA SLIFE, AFS students. qot together to reminisce about their experience in the foreign countries to which they were chosen to be representatives. can Family Life .,., ., 'B Page 49 SHARON KURTHfA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Chorale 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Spanish Club l. STEVEN KVEN- VOLD. EDNA KYCEK-B Chorus l5 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 25 Tiger's Roar 35 Red Cross l5 Bowling League 2, 35 GRA 35 Script and Gavel 3. FREDERICK KYCEK+German Club 2, 35 Spanish Club l, 25 lntramural Football 35 lntramural Basketball l, 2, 35 Checker Club l, 2, 3. GAlL LAGESONfA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Chorale 35 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 Red Cross l5 French Club 25 lunior Classical League l, 2, 35 Cheerleader l, 2, 3. LARRY LAHSfStudent Council 35 Red Cross 35 Football l, 2, 35 Wrestling 2, 35 Track 35 Lettermen's Club 2, 35 lntramural Wrestling 2, 3. Local Pastors Offer Basic Truths IAMES LAlRfBaseball l, 2, 35 lntramural Basketball 2, 3. DAVID LARSEN-Band 15 Tiger's Roar 35 Science Club l, 2, 35 German Club 2, 35 Script and Gavel 35 Great Caesar's Ghost 35 Football l, 2, 35 Track l, 2, 35 Lettermen's Club 2, 35 Audio Visual l5 Photography Club 2, 35 Tiger 2, 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3. IAMES LAR- SONfStudent Council l5 Football l, 2, 35 Track l5 lntra- mural Basketball l5 Lettermen's Club 3. MARGIT LARSON-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Chorale 35 Student Council l, 2, 35 Student Council Treasurer 35 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 French Club 2, 35 Cheer- leader l, 2, 35 Homecoming Attendant 35 Lion Repre- sentative 35 Kiwanis Representative 2. THEODORE LARSON-A Chorus l, 2, 35 Chorale 2, 35 lunior Clas- sical League 2, 35 Football 2, 35 Baseball l, 2, 35 lntra- mural Basketball l, 2, 35 Lettermen's Club l, 2, 3. CAROLE LEE-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Student Council l5 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 25 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 GRA l, 25 French Club 2, 35 Script and Gavel 35 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Class Treasurer 2. GARY LEE-German Club 25 Diversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 35 Football l, 25 Basketball l5 Golf l, 25 lntramural Football 35 lntramural Basketball 2, 3. IEANETTE LENZE. CARMEN LEWlSfB Chorus 15 Hi- Teens l5 Pep Club l, 25 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 Bowling League l, 2, 35 GRA l, 25 Ottice Helper l. Page 50 DENNIS LlEN. GRISELDA LIMON-Spanish Club l. IUDITH LlNDfB Chorus l5 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 GRA l, 25 Diversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 3. MARY LlNDEMANeA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Chorale 35 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 Bowling League 2, 35 GRA l, 25 French Club 2, 35 Spanish Club l. PAULETTE LOKEN-Student Council 35 Hi-Teens 25 Entered from New Richland, Minnesota, 2. NANCY LONG. Through Weekly Religious Classes kv MARILYN IEAN LUNNlNGfHi-Teens l, 2: Pep Club l, 25 GRA lj Tiger's Roar 25 Diversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 3. ALLAN MADSON-fA Chorus l5 Rifle Club 2, 3. IEAN MADSONeA Chorus 25 B Cho- rus l5 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Red Cross 25 GRA l, 25 Spanish Club 2, 35 Library Helper 3. DAVID MAlDEN--Spanish Club 25 lntrarnural Football l. BARBARA MARlNER- eHi-Teens l5 Bowling League 25 GRA l, 25 lunior Classical League l5 Office Helper 25 Diversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 3. KAREN MATHEWS -Band l, 25 Student Council 35 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 Red Cross 25 Bowling League l, 2, 35 French Club 2, 35 Thespians 2, 35 Script and Gavel 3. DONNA MAYOTTE-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Cho- rale 35 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Ushers' Club l, 25 FTA 35 Spanish Club 35 lunior Clasical League l, 2, 35 Script and Gavel 35 Ah La Ha Sa 25 Ouill and Scroll 25 Library Helper 3. KAREN MElXELL eA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus lj Band l, 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 25 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 Red Cross l, 35 Bowling League 2, 35 GRA l, 2: FTA 35 French Club 2. DONALD MILLER. Page 51 KAREN MlLLERffCateteria Helper 3. MARGARET MlLLEReHi-Teens l5 Bowling League 35 GRA 35 Span- ish Club 2, 3. PATRlClA lVlOENfBowling League l, 2, 35 GRA l, 25 French Club 2, 35 lunior Classical League l5 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3. lANlCE MORRElMeA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus lp Band l, 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 25 Tiger's Roar 35 Red Cross l5 Bowling League 35 GRA l, 2, 35 FHA 35 French Club 2, 3. MICHAEL MORRlSONY-A Chorus l5 Stu- dent Council l, 25 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Hi- Teens 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 Spanish Club l, 25 Thes- pians l, 2, 35 Script and Gavel 35 Dr. lekyll and Mr. Hyde l5 lohn Brown's Body 25 Deep Are the Roots l5 Father Knows Best 25 Great Caesar's Ghost 35 Drama Club l, 25 Football l5 Golt lj Track 25 lntramural Foot- ball 35 Kiwanis Representative 25 Ritle Club l, 2. BARBARA MCRTENSON-Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 25 French Club l, 25 Script and Gavel 35 Library Helper 3. Extra-Curricular Paqe 52 Activities Improve KENNETH MUILENBURG-lntramural Football l, 35 intramural Basketball 35 Football 2. IANET MYERS! A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Chorale 2, 35 Orchestra lg Band l5 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 25 Tiger's Roar 35 Red Cross 35 FTA l, 2, 35 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Script and Gavel 3. GARY NELSONflntramural Wrestling l. lON NELSON-A Chorus l, 25 Student Council l5 Red Cross l5 Spanish Club l5 Football l, 25 Wrestling l5 Track l, 2, 35 Baseball l5 Tennis 25 Intramural Football 35 intramural Basketball l, 2, 35 Lettermen's Club 35 Rifle Club l. AUDREY NELSONeA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Chorale 35 Orchestra l, 25 Band l, 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l5 Tiger's Roar 35 Red Cross l5 Bowling League l, 2, 35 GRA l, 2, 35 lunior Classical League 2, 3. DONALD l. NELSONAB Chorus l5 Student Council 35 Red Cross 25 Spanish Club l, 25 Track l, 2, 35 Letter- men's Club 35 Rifle Club 2, 35 Cross Country 3. DONALD O. NELSONYFFA l, 2, 3. DONNA NELSON -Hi-Teens l, 25 GRA l, 25 lunior Classical League 2, 3. IANE NELSON-A Chorus 25 B Chorus l5 Prom Com- mittee Chairman 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Red Cross l, 25 GRA l, 2, 35 Thespians 35 Script and Gavel 35 Great Caesars Ghost 35 Library Helper 3. lANlCE NELSONAA Chorus 25 B Chorus 15 Hi-Teens 1, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 French Club 2, 35 lunior Classical League l, 2, 35 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Ouill and Scroll 35 Lion Representative 3. LARRY NELSONfA Chorus l5 Orchestra 2, 35 Band l, 2, 35 Swing Band 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Science Club l, 2, 35 lun- ior Classical League 25 Rifle Club 3. MYRON NELSON. lf! MYRNA NELSONfOrchestra 15 Band l5 Hi-Teens 25 Pep Club 35 Red Cross 15 French Club l, 25 Kiwanis Representative 2. RICHARD NELSONH -A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l: FFA l, 2, 3. SHARON NELSONeeOttice Helper l. School Spirit, Abilities of Students THEODORE NELSONfA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus lj Cho- rale 2, 35 lunior Classical League 2, 3. THOMAS NEL- SON. CYNTHIA NlCHOLSeeA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 2, 35 Hi-Teens 15 Spanish Club l. ELSE NlELSENeA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 Chorale 2, 35 Hi-Teens l, 35 Science Club 15 GRA 15 Spanish Club 2, 35 Script and Gavel 3. LACK NHVION fA Chorus 15 Script and Gavel 35 Track l, 35 Checker Club l. IOAN NOLAND. RUSSELL Ol-lMfFFA 2, 35 Chess Club l. RICHARD OLlPHANTfStudent Council l, 2, 35 Student Council Vice President 35 Spanish Club lg Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Ouill and Scroll 2, 35 Football l, 2, 35 Basketball l, 2, 35 Baseball l, 2, 35 Letterrnen's Club l, 2, 3: Kiwanis Representative 25 Rotarian Representative 35 Class President l. IOHN OLSON-e-Football l, 2, 35 Basket- ball l, 2, 35 Track l, 25 Letterrnen's Club 3. 1 Page 53 IUDITH ANN OLSONfA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Student Council 35 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 GRA l5 French Club 2, 35 lunior Classical League l, 25 Cheerleader l, 2, 3. lUDlTl-I OLSON--A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Chorale 2, 35 Hi- Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Red Cross l5 lunior Classical League l, 2, 3. NORMAN OLSON vDiversitied Occupations 35 Football l. STEVEN O'NEALwRitle Club 3. lOAN OSMUNDSON -B Chorus l5 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l5 Iunior Clas- sical League l, 2. FRANK OSTBYAA Chorus l, 2, 35 Chorale l, 2, 35 Glee Club 35 Band l5 Tiger's Roar 35 lohn BroWn's Body l. DENNIS OVERLAND. DAVlD PALMER- Student Council 2, 35 Red Cross l5 German Club 2, 35 Football l, 2, 35 Basketball 25 Wrestling 35 Track l, 2, 35 Lettermen's Club l, 2, 3. STEVEN PALMER. Students Gain Valuable Knowledge PATRlClA PARRY-B Chorus l5 l-li-Teens l. ION PASKE-A Chorus l, 2, 35 Chorale 2, 35 lohn BroWn's Body l5 Football l5 Track l5 lntramural Basketball l. lULlE PAULSONfA Chorus 25 B Chorus l5 l-li-Teens 2, 35 Pep Club 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 FTA 35 Spanish 35 Script and Gavel 35 Tiger 35 Ah La l-la Sa 2, 35 Ouill and Scroll 2, 35 Kiwanis Representative 2. PEGGY PEASLEE-B Chorus l5 Hi-Teens l, 25 FTA 2, 35 Fl-IA 2, 35 Iunior Classical League 2, 3. ANITA PETER- SON. DARLENE PETERSONfStudent Council 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Bowling League 35 Spanish Club 2, 35 Entered from Menorninee, Michigan, 2. Page 54 With the strains of "Pomp and Circumstanceu the seniors of l96l marched down the aisle at Commence- ment lunie l. Mr. Harmon H. Bro, educator, author and editor, and lecturer at Northland College, Ashland, Wisconsin, was the speaker at this ceremony. As their diploma was handed to them a look of pride and accomplishments was radiated on the seniors' faces. This occasion, with its serious solemnity, was the high- light ot the year. lt closed the doors of high school and opened the doors to the world and its opportunities. The long awaited Awards Assembly was held May 26. The seniors, dressed in their caps and gowns, anx- iously awaited to discover who would be named to Who's Who. The deserving seniors received their Tigers with a feeling of humble pride and accomplishment. Scholarships were awarded by groups and organiza- tions to students who plan to further their education. An inspiration to all seniors was the beautiful Bac- calaureate Service held on May 28 in the auditorium. The B Chorus, under the direction oi Mr. Robert Myers, provided the music. A sermonette was given which inspired all seniors to reach new goals. MAKING PREPARATIONS FOR GRADUATION. Ruth, Ann Ernstad attempted to straighten Iohn Olson's cap before they walked down , the aisle to receive their diplomas. Y Through Participation in Classwork DAVID PETERSONfA Chorus l, 2, 35 Chorale l, 2, 35 Band l5 Student Council l5 Tiger's Roar 35 German Club 2, 35 Basketball 15 Intramural Football 35 Intra- mural Basketball 2, 3: Rotarian Representative 3. IAN- lCE PETERSON-A Chorus 2, 3: B Chorus 15 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 FTA 35 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3. KAREN PETERSON-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Bowling League 35 GRA l5 Script and Gavel 3. ROGER PETERSON-Golf l, 2, 35 Intramural Football 2: Intramural Basketball l, 2, 35 Lettermen's Club 1, 2, 3. SUSAN PETERSON-B Chorus l5 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 lunior Classical League 2, 35 Great Caesar's Ghost 35 TRL 3. THOMAS PETERSON-A Chorus 25 B Chorus l5 Diversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 3. Page 55 IOAN PONTO-B Chorus I, Hi-Teens I, 2, 3, Pep Club l, 2, Tiger's Roar 3, French Club I, 2, Script and Gavel 3: Ah La Ha Sa 2, Library Helper 2. ELAINE POST- HUMUS-A Chorus 2, 3, Chorale 3, B Chorus l, Student Council 3, Hi-Teens l, 2, 3, Pep Club I, 2, 3, Tiger's Roar 3, GRA I, 2, 3, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Ouill and Scroll 2, 3, TRL 3, Kiwanis Representative 2. LYLE POWNELL. RICHARD RADKE. ROGER REESE. DOROTHY REICHL-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus I, Chorale 2, 3, Hi- Teens l, 2, 3, Pep Club 3, Tiger's Roar 3, Red Cross 2. KAREN REINCKE-A Chorus 2, B Chorus I, Hi-Teens 2, 3, Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3. WILLIAM RHIGER-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus I, Cho- rale 2, 3, Tigers Roar 2, 3, Father oi the Bride 2, Great Caesar's Ghost 3, Father Knows Best 2, Football I, Kiwanis Representative 2. IANICE RICEeA Chorus 2, B Chorus I, Bowling League 2, 3, Ushers' Club I, 2, 3. Baccalaureate Inspires Graduates Page 56 GARY ROELOFS-A Chorus I, 2, 3, Chorale 2, 3, Glee Club 3, Student Council 3, Tigers Roar 3, Intramural Football 2, 3, Intramural Basketball 2, 3. FRANK RUERUP-Orchestra 3, Band I, 2, 3, Swing Band I, 'I'iger's Roar l, Red Cross I, German Club 2, 3, Football I, Intramural Football I, 2, 3, Intramural Basketball I, 2, 3. GARY RUPP. WILLIAM RUPP. DONNA RUSLEY-B Chorus I, Orchestra 2, 3, Band I, 2, 3, Hi-Teens 2, Tiger's Roar 2, 3, GRA 3, FTA 2, Library Helper 2. RICHARD RYE- Diversiiied Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3. Worthy Scholars STEPHEN SHEAfGerman Club 2, 35 Golf l, 2, 35 Intra- mural Football l, 2, 35 Intramural Basketball l, 2, 3. SARA SHOEMAKERWAB Chorus l5 Orchestra l, 2, 35 Band l, 2, 35 Student Council l, 35 Hi-Teens l, 25 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 GRA 2. French Club l, 25 Thespians 25 Lion Representative 35 Class Secretary 35 Senior Executive Council 3. GARY SKAAReBaseball l5 Intramural Basketball l, 2, 3. DONALD SKELTONeBaseball 2, 3. BARBARA SLIFE -A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Chorale 2, 35 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Red Cross l, 25 Spanish Club 35 Thespians l, 2, 35 Script and Gavel 35 Great Caesar's Ghost 35 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Ouill and Scroll 2, 35 Lion Representative 35 AFS Student 3. HOWARD SIVIEBY-FFA l, 2, 3. RONALD SANVIK-eeWrestling l. WILLIAM SATREH Football 2, 35 Basketball 3. IEAN SCHLEHRfHi-Teens l, 2, 35 Red Cross 35 GRA l, 25 French Club 2, 35 Tiger 3: Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3. DIANE SCHNEBLYveHi-Teens l, 25 Red Cross l5 GRA l, 25 French Club 2, 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2. MARILYN SCHU- MACHER---A Chorus 25 B Chorus l5 FHA 2, 35 Office Helper 2, 3. SHARON SCI-IULTE-B Chorus lp Hi-Teens l, 2. IOHN SCHWEN-fA Chorus l, 35 Chorale 35 Glee Club 35 Orchestra l, 2, 35 Band l, 2, 35 Swing Band l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 Spanish Club 25 Football l5 Track 25 Baseball l5 Intramural Basketball l, 2, 35 Lettermen's Club l, 2, 35 Iohn BroWn's Body 2. RODNEY SEEGER eA Chorus l, 2, 35 Chorale 2, 35 Glee Club 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Red Cross 25 German Club 2, 35 Spanish Club l5 Football l5 Track l, 2, 35 Intramural Basketball 35 Letter- men's Club 2, 35 Cross Country 2. GLENDA SELLE. Receive Awards Pan 57 DAVID SMITHfA Chorus I5 Diversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 2, 35 Intramural Football 35 Rifle Club 3. LARRY SORBYfDiversitiecl Occupations 3. ALICE SORENSENeOrchestra I5 Hi-Teens 25 German Club 2. RAYMOND SORENSEN-Student Council l5 Football l, 25 Wrestling l5 Tennis l5 Intramural Football I5 Intra- mural Basketball l. TERRY SORENSEN-Tiger's Roar l, 2, 35 Science Club 35 Rifle Club 3. ARTHUR SPELTZ -Orchestra 35 Bancl l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 Iunior Classical League 2, 3. Dignified Seniors Receive Diplomas ROBERT SPELTZf-Band l, 2, 35 Iunior Classical League 2, 3. CHARLES STADHEIMfA Chorus l, 2: FFA l, 2, 3. HAZEL STOAfHi-Teens l, 25 FTA 35 Spanish Club 2, 3 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3. AUDREY STOLZE-A Chorus 25 B Chorus I5 Hi-Teens I 2, 35 Pep Club 35 GRA l, 2, 35 FHA 35 Ottice Helper 3 Library Helper 3. ION STOUTeSpanish Club 25 Diver- sified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 35 Wrestling l, Golt 35 Intramural Football l, 2, 35 Intramural Basket- ball l, 2, 35 Rifle Club l, 2, 3. MARY STOWELL- Script and Gavel 3. WILLIAM STUDER. RAMONA STYVE-B Chorus I Hi-Teens 2, 35 GRA 25 French Club 2, 35 Spanish Club l, Library Helper 3. THOMAS SUTHERS-Diversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 35 Football l, 2, 35 Track l5 Lettermen's Club l, 2, 3. Page 58 RONALD SWANSONvTrack 25 lntramural Football 1, 2, 35 lntramural Basketball l, 2, 35 Senior Executive Council 3. STEPHEN TENNIS-A Chorus l, 2, 35 Cho- rale 35 Crlee Club 35 lunior Classical Leaque l5 lntra- mural Basketball 2, 3. ROGER TENNYSON-Divers? fied Occupations 35 Distributive Club 35 lntramural Foot- ball l5 Intramural Basketball l, 2. EUGENE THOMPSON. GARELD THOMPSON. THO- MAS THOMPSONelntramural Wrestling l. To Terminate Years of Learning IOE TREIO-fScience Club l, 2, 35 Rifle Club l, 2, 3. ANTHONY TONGAfWrestlinq l, 25 Track l5 Chess Club l, 25 Rifle Club 2, 3. THOMAS TONHElMfA Chorus l5 Father Knows Best 25 Football l, 2, 35 Basket- ball l, 2, 35 Golf l, 2, 35 Lettermen's Club 2, 3. IUDlTH TUFTE-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Orchestra l, 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 Office Helper 35 Script and Gavel 3. ALLEN TULL- BERGflunior Classical Leaaue 2, 35 Tiqer 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Basketball l5 Baseball 2, 35 Tennis l5 lntramural Football 2, 35 lntramural Basketball 2, 35 Lettermen's Club 3. DONNA UGLANDfDiversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 3. WARREN ULRICH-lntramural Basketball 3. KAREN UNSETHiA Chorus 25 B Chorus lg Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 GRA l, 25 Library Helper 3. THOMAS VAN BEEK-Tiger's Roar 35 lohn Brown's Body l5 Track 25 lntramural Football 3. Page 59 IANICE VAN RlPERfA Chorus 25 B Chorus l5 Office Helper 3. KENNETH VAN WILGEN-German Club 2, T 3. GARY VOLLMER-Red Cross 35 lntramural Football l, 25 Intramural Basketball 2. GWENDOLYN WAHLSTROM-A Chorus 2, 35 B Cho- rus lj Chorale 35 Hi-Teens 2, 35 Pep Club 35 Red Cross 25 French Club 2, 35 Lion Representative 3. GARY WAL- KEReA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Chorale 2, 35 Glee Club 35 Student Council l5 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Tiger's Roar 35 Basketball l5 Track lj Tennis l5 lntra- mural Basketball 3. ROBERT WALLACEfA Chorus l 5 Student Council 35 German Club 2, 35 lntramural Basket- ball l. Individual Plans for Future Vary LELAND WARNER. THOMAS WASlVlOENfFFA l, 2, 3. JERRY WAYNE. ROXANNE WEHRHANWA Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Chorale 35 Grchestra l5 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l5 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 French Club 35 Thespians l, 2, 35 Script and Gavel l, 2, 35 Great Caesar's Ghost 35 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Quill and Scroll 2, 3. SHARYN WENDELBOE. SANDRA WENTZELL-Hi-Teens l, 2: Pep Club l5 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 Bowling League 2, 35 FTA 35 German Club 2, 3. ELSIE WESTHUIS. STEVEN WESTRUM, GERVAISE WILHELM----A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus l5 Student Council l5 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 Red Cross l5 Bowling League lp German Club 2, 35 Cheerleader l, 2, 35 Home- coming Attendant 3: Class Secretary l. Paqe 80 PAUL WILKE-Student Council 35 Student Council Pres- ident 35 Spanish Club I5 Football I, 2, 35 Basketball l, 2, 35 Tennis l, 2, 35 Lettermen's Club l, 2, 35 Kiwanis Rep- resentative 25 Rotarian Representative 3. DIANE WILKINSCNAB Chorus l5 Hi-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l5 Tiger's Roar 35 Red Cross 25 Bowling League 2, 35 Library Helper 3. CRLO WILLMERT-Crchestra 25 Band I, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 25 Intramural Basketball I, 2, 3. LAWRENCE W'OLFF-Wrestling 2, 35 Baseball l, 2, 35 Intramural Wrestling I. GCRDCN WOLFF. SUSAN WGLGAMCTEB Chorus I5 I-Ii-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club I, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 FTA I5 Spanish Club 2, 35 Iunior Classical League l, 2, 35 'Ihespians 15 Tiger 35 Ah La I-Ia Sa 2, 35 Quill and Scroll 2, 35 Library Helper 2. From Jobs to College Applications CARCL YCST--A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus I5 I-Ii-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club I, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 French Club 2, 35 Script and Gavel 35 Senior Executive Council 3. BRIAN XAVIERffBancl l, 2, 35 Swing Band 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 2, 35 German Club 2, 35 Kiwanis Representative 25 Rifle Club 3. BARRY YOCOM--Band I5 Swing Band 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 German Club 2, 35 Ritle Club I, 2, 3. LEG YOKIELfTiger's Roar 35 Football l5 Wrestling I, 25 Intramural Basketball 35 Rifle Club 3. CAMILLE ZAVITZfB Chorus I5 Student Council 35 I-Ii-Teens l, 2, 35 Pep Club l, 2, 35 Tiger's Roar 35 'Ihespians 2, 35 Script and Gavel 35 Father Knows Best 2. NCT PICTURED: Donna I-Ielland. lohn lohnson. Iohn Morgan. Robert Nielson. Robert Olsen. Ruth Perkins. Patricia Wright. Page 61 fficers Rachel Ackland. Steven Adams Roger Ahl. Maridee Alm Carol Amundson. Shirley Amundson Barbara Anderson. Keith Anderson lames Bale. Bruce Baker Le ad Class of 1962 As the important date drew near, lights could be seen burning long into the night in Albert Lea l-ligh School, as junior prom committee members worked to complete preparations for the 1961 lunior-Senior Prom. The committees were headed by chairmen selected by the lunior Class officers. The theme "Candyland" was carried out through attractive decorations in the Central l-ligh School Gym and in the cafeteria, where the tradi- tional buffet dinner was served. Prom goers danced to the music of the Marv Tenhoff Band. Representing the junior class among local business- men were the l4 Kiwanis representatives. This is the fifth year of participation in the Kiwanis program. The delegates attended regular luncheon meetings and reported on past and future events at the high school. An important event to each student in his junior year is the day he receives his class ring - a symbol of his class which he will wear with pride for many years to come. The l962 emblem was a lO karat gold ring with raised shield and white gold initials of the owner. lt was selected from several samples. Required subjects for juniors were English and Amer- ican history. Many juniors took physics, chemistry or biology to meet the requirement of one science during the three high school years. leffrey Brooke and Mary Neibuhr brought a sense of achievement to the lunior Class by qualifying as semi-finalists for a trip to Europe during the summer sponsored by the American Field Service. :-l: ,VJ .,,v .-:lv F.: - V . "4 uull v.A. . y zz, , A. Susan Barrett. Dorothy Barry. lohn gg, .4 ' agp' gy 49' ' ""' to Q A Bates, Lorraine Bauman. Linda Bendix- zulau ' it-,.,k ft"" '-2' . i uuz, - --.,.. en, Io!-inn Benson .IZ """'- ' "Edie ..,., A - gi " i. trtn it or B vlvvv - ...yay i ' , ' V .. ,EL --uu el "":" ljllj lqzul I H. 322512 ,..--: 5 gr , E, Paul Black. Byron Boer, Daniel Bohland. 'M ,aw iwgfji 4 egg' ' ,'-1'E W :-,- " W Patricia Boone, Timothy Bothof, David my 3 '-1' f M... W , ,.. W' B0Yum W' M ' My y' ' W .::.. -::. "., Izl ' A, ,,,,,, :::- . 0. j ..... ......,..-.r r .A . A j ..,.., . ::f: Y., ...I L :... vv'vv-, ' 1-., .,., . "".. ,.,.,.,.,,.,"" ""' if .,..: ., "'i"' '.-. 3 ,,, 1 ' , "':"'-...,., .l ' H """' --1- 'vrt .-.. , A :::"-':--t' 'i""'ti " WX ':"1 I "'t"'t" , .Q ..1.1. ludifh Brddienf SGI1d1'G B1'CIbeCf Ruihfmll if '::"' ,,,, :'.. . gb ':':t" Q my ' V, K- .,,- "': 5 5 9 5 Brandt. IoAnn Broitzman. Ieftrey Brooke. ,.. ' kvtw .E :-.,, 4' .. x W ag., M. ,, jail A Randy Brown .. .., ,Q ff ....' ":" ""' - if 'iff ' zzz' ...Q fjiffig f- 5 fQ.lflff"' -- V ,.,,, . . """ 3 - K i-'ri 't': :':' ::: -- :,: ,,"1-:"""' . ,. f ---:: :'1x , ,E b ' 12:1 -'2' ' ' L f ' - ,:,,.,, M, ' ""f """'1 j" Q in Iqjql lauzuu Z Susan Brown, Raymond Bryan, Beverly - -iii. --.::---- 1 - 7 . A , ' E A ' :" ."':2 1 , 4 Butters Nina Calvin Valerie Carson. use .,.,.,. E ., , ' ' -'-'-"" -- ' -::- 5 , - ' fm -.:- 'W . . .. ' '- :-f' 1 1.5523 - 5 ' ' ,, QW K. S gg: ' ., K- will A W l :uzuu Gordon Caya "":1-. ans. .-- .... 'Wa .:f. " ":" to -.,,,. ' "" ' S ":: lull tizirlr I ""ti -- "::":': zzjl ' - K ' " Page 62 In Search for Successful Year Pauline Christensen. Bruce Christenson Keith Christenson. Milton Christensen Robert Christenson. William Cliliord Barbara Collins. 3 r. r,,,. , X' ,fx , 4 sg ,A A F as f 11:71. .s,4, 'S' ,R 'I , v.,,,. 3 9 :-:: , .aa l ' s ""' or 1 . . .,.,::., 1 "' ' f :,, r,:,rr- - A '-t--' if lsr. - .. , dp-if r r :av in if .. 1: ' -,,," -, Q Q " 'lg ::-, s, ,Q wg Q. swf N 3 1 AMA KN is 573.74 Mx L x i n ,r Gary Collins me 5 M ""-t'-- - . Q ::- A Charles Coonradt. Ks . , .ll -f ,N CLASS PRESIDENT Larry Fredrickson assisted 'rrsasursr Martha Thomas C"u"'e's an . Sherman in "balancing" her books, but as Vice President Alice Ng' W ' Thompson seemed undismayed, Secretary Linda Kirk wondered if the 1 1961 prom would ever be completely planned. Q " -- an 4 fr ,rrr " William Cutts. Fredrick Daqner. David ' 7 H - " 4 , ' rf- lulll DeHaan, Bette DeNeui. Lola Dinqemans. ,s :Q ' f ff mn' 8 a 3 . N 3 5 - Q' , 1" f"": if Iames Dittmar 'L' : ,,,, ,.... ' F wi . ' 3 ' ., V ,W QM ,,:- -.....,:.::.,.' '-,,: in 4 - I 4 3 1 ,-., , I ' ' 1 -3 rr ,. 5, A W -,as .r r 1 , ,rf f f - ':" ssfr i "' 1 M L L1 zrr -:-rr , " ,. ,V ,,,.,,., 2 xxx 4, I A ' W' Ianice Dixon, Iames Donovan. Sally ."" ' gg g :1": 3 V , D ,:r.,., ,,-. E Doyscher, loan Draayer. Edward Dusek, ,564 f rv QQ 5 ' 7 as Af George Eckun V l:":"" , :-:- .. 1, , . P D in , ttf -I -,,,::::::, Z lvvv is J I ..,,1,, V A i ' M r,s, .r.1 P , , 2 VW .,,r D H Q -1 p h V ...E V fwlgi, ' W 2 , .,r, -"' , 2 . 5 I Sharon Eisenbise, Loren Eilinqson. Y .3 ., V' I , HZ, David Elvebak, Diane Evans. William 27' W Q- ' ,,,. ,,A.' A f '... '31, l Evenson, Peter Fabry .31 3 V 3, ':":"i" f 'Z .ilu """:"" : " ls. E :::"' 2 'fff ...ls W l" '- fl' -:lv ki . ist V f v":"':"': E '- l . K -xr rrr,,, , ,,.s.,11r - . ' "" xx . "'l: ,,, r,:,.,, , 1 sr., ., .1,,r, 2 sz:a:s:e:s::s,, f J S X it Clair Flaten, Larry Fredrickson, Frank " Y Q .-r. 5 3 VV,V , ' Vvzzu, 3 , E Ffemeim' lam GQPPU' AM' Gmfe' 'ii' is ' 1 rrrr If l , """l i r " W' N901 Gendlef J .. 1 . ,,r-' , , 1 ' far V' gi' ., rs-2' "" if W , N ,mi if gy ,V 0 ..,.,. A Q , , v . v iiii i'i' E P- L Page 6 3 Delegates to Kiwanis Keep School OVERWHELMED BY WORK on his first term paper, Neal Gendler seemed io have fallen asleep. bui senior Bill Ienner, an experienced lerm paper writer. rushed to his rescue. Lois G ill, Curt Gniflke Shirley Golherq. Morland Goskeson Iudith Goldman, Diane Gooderum Icrnei Goodmanson Paul Grasdalen if gt .Q W, ::.::- :11'1 1 K Q , , 4 Ralph Greenwood, Amy Greqerson :,.. W .,1, I ,:.,.,.., ., Q g f' :,,.f ,. " 5 ' A S 5,53 " ' M Y :--- ll Ml - rw f fr .zzlz rrrre ao ee r zzzz V , ..,. E 1, of ' """ if luzunun - ."" ' ..1,..,. -----'f- t if -'--: 'I ""' ffzz 5 s ...... --:-- ::. ,: V . EE- A ' gg, . 2. my E? :lzl gg. ',-- fw' ' fl, ll . :,'f if, W? AIII .X ,,V, J ff IoAnn Gudmanson, Barbara Gurwell, Larry Haqqe, Nancy Hall. Steven Hal- vorson, Gene Hansen Karole Hansen, Bonita Hanson, Ronald Hansen. David Hanson, Nancy Hanson, Paul Hanson Vonice Hanson, Kay Hareid. Reginald Harms. Frederick Harris. Pamela Hatha- way, lack Heather Phyllis Hebel, Fred Heilman, Terry Heil- man, Donna Hendrickson, Frances Hen- drickson, Loree Hendrickson Page 64 In Minds of Local Businessmen . FN WR ,, :,.... 4 "".' Qi .,.,, C : 1 I ,.:...,.. , ..,.,. , MW -H il:-:Zi If at 5 5' Q .:.. N Aww 1,21 "" W 22... "A","": 'H .,,::v MM V . ,Q W : X . L .,,,, xx , nlsi , Iss, P ," 1"1::: A Q if SW r .. ,,,""'2QQ. ,,..1:'Q f ' , if , 'bbbb Q A k 1 I B A ..:-' ,:"' 59: f ,,.,- Q Ei V .4 "" """ zg. , .,,,: ' ' A AA .. , .. ,M so I I r gk ..: Sa' E ,,:, R 5 . , ig In ...::-: Q 112: I ., ..,:: 5 1':: 5 5 ' 'fN.. .,...,,.vv ,1': I - ' ':"' Q ""':" ff tall" -,:.-' I .:,., ,-- "'::1: ? f', .:,, Q ,I Y ':-::v: E 34 zzv .- H " X ' A Q Q 3352 by A b I W ,VV,q ,., Z I iw. I --:I' . ,, 5 ., "':T'Ti .--. I A ,at XE F ,Q R VA -E: .,.., Q 1 wi - ,:,. . V' ' J A fits' "" i N ve 3 :M IZ. AVN ,,,, I "" I I Q ::' K - 3 ,., . gi :':-. :lb zz' fl -I I in E-T' v -...:-.-. . .. .:..,, .-.. , 5, "'-1 , hw., ::-' -.Eg --- X ili: ...:,. 5 Wit' X . it :Q 15: ....,, Q .,, J., ,V , Y l "" . '- X- ,, E ,.,.:::E.E.'. max I T A . V ,- FIRST ROW: Karen Hershey, Diana I-Iiqgins, Bruce Hillstrom, Robert Holton. SECOND ROW: Norman Hoyne, Annette Hum- phrey, Raymond Hurst, Iohn Ingebritson. THIRD ROW: Sandra Iverson, Sharon Iverson. Gary Iacobsen, Raymond Iacobsen. THE IUNIOR KIWANIS REPRESENTATIVES kept Kiwanians informed of the many school activities this year. FRONT ROW: Peter Fabry. Wayne Mortensen, Gary Iacobsen, Steven Person, Charles Coonradt. left Brooke. SECOND ROW: Thomas Ogren. Mr. I. R. McElhinney. FIRST ROW: Shirley Iacobsen, Daniel Pahns, Ierome Iakobson, Michael Iansma. SECOND ROW: Alva Iensen, Bette Iensen, Bonita Iensen, Donald Iensen. THIRD ROW: Galen Iensen, Iay Iensen, Iohn Iensen, Marilyn Iensen. Mr. Howard Christenson, Mr. Valdemar Xavier. Mr. Martin Iordahl. Mr. Donald Paulson. THIRD ROW: Cheryl Lutner, Iudith Ness, Kristin Sether. Barbara Gurwell, Iudith Sackett, Mary Neihuhr, Iudith Moffit. Betty Tolo, Linda Kirk. Page 65 New Science Mary Lou lensen, Norma Iensen Wayne Iensen. Barbara Ienson Ruih Ann Iepson. Steven Iohannsen Cheryl Iohnson Darrel Johnson, Gary Iohnson Cherie Ann Iohnson, Rooms Add Facilities x RICHARD NELSON AND RICHARD KNAUER found speciiic gravity of an obiect of unknown densiiy-one of the many experiments per- formed by siudents in physics classes. . "i" fl, ,, 4 . 'vv-'--v-,A r , A 4 V all .,:,. 1 -N Q 0 i 'V ::-:- A y V5 , - ,uqazu , zzy ng: Iudith Iohnson, Ierry Iohnson. Iames f V g WN 0 x Q' 55525 , ,I M Iohnson. Keith Johnson, Thomas Iohn- 4 ' -v-:: z ""' ' 4 QE, i:-Igzgiifziigfu son, Bonnie Iohnston ivi- ff fi ' ---e- f -' ----e --:- .,.. V L I I ,Q ., , Mi rvrv ,yyxu A' ,V .::, ':1"- X H ,,,, ,Q x ..- ' A .,:,. 'V Qi.. A Thomas Iorqenson. Norlene Kaasa. fue zzu ' -it ww if . xg. , if' ' W A iv Ardith Kanzenbach. Palricia Kappas. M111 ' X D' z L '51, .,:, X' u ' N im- f W, nf, Robe!! Kennedy. Iudilh Kennelly Y , 'fr 1 R cw zzzz y 'I ',,y2 i -.,.,: W 2--"' N 'Q ' - ,, ,,,, ., 2 "" ' ,,.:,.,., . 1 V ..::.. :-- - , 2 N ' M' 'i" .-:: - . ' M P, ..,. .... HIAI: W , ,, P Q blll .i.. . I , M Richard Kang, Linda Kirk, Kathleen Kis- :-- :':':: Q JK ,j"'3-5 33 if :IH N . singer. Roger Kitlelson. Ianice Klukow, in Nw: . ,Ease ,,,., EE: V -V A A :::: x n . ,- 'Qui Richard Knauer T Z., 1535 , A "':'1 ""' , . .,:: Eg. A " -1-' l ,.,:. " T E '::" V. ., '-1': "" A , . fi L. "li-.-U ":': ,. E' l .... ...M , , V,,,,,.. Q W ::,. " "i: 1" v--- , . ....:,..,, ":: ' ' "" '--"" ' ' 6 :'i: 1 izil " --1,,, QE Roberta Knudtson. Michael Krause. Dale Q, QQZ. 3 A ,,3T- 1 --:--" ,..:f izi ' ...fi zzz 'L "IMP 24 Ladlie, Barbara Larson. Philip I.eBeau. M ' ,W mp' 2-: ::,.. -V X Carol I-ee 'N my "' E A ,I SUM EEEE5: me E. X . ili 'W' vqpmlr iiz ' M "" ' ' v ' . zz' ,qqq """' " :i:" ' 51 Q f A'i- Page 66 For Advancing Technical Knowledge UNABLE TO ATTEND the regular meeting, prom chairmen Carol Lee, Craiq O'Neal, Iudith Goldman and Timoihy Bothoi me! later Carol Leqried, Eleanor Leschefske Iohn Levens. Pamela Lindahl Marie Lorenzen. Mondra Ludwig Cheryl Lulner, Michael McCarty Lois McCornack. Dennis McGill I ' is ,V,, IQEHV: S x P ' QQ,?? ?iH,, lzz '1'1' qluli l"::2 K oe ' eoe W :A V , ,fl so j '..:... "TM H in S, ' .:,,i: EE. M A, :n, by i L ' '? as if sink :,, Q' C, N , - .:'- ':'f'sag.,5u M 'f '1-V.: - , -..-,,': 2 ' 1" ' Z., -V " Kaihleen Maas. Audrey Meyer. Carol i . :E ,-: 9 , 1 The ' """' ' ' H-, in , Meyer, Robert Michaelis, Diane Mills, +V 5' , K 'J an W' 3 I Marline Minear Y "':,,.,,,: A -2. ' 'C ' ..:. A-V I B L.. :., ,, C' '- ,1'.:.,.,,, :zz . fzlnu V M H ,.,,:: " V .-.:i: :..,,. , "yi :.-5 a ' , """': , A i f f-,'E 4, f ' 5 Gary Moden. Doris Moe, Iudiih Moffil, 5 -,:: .-,, """"':':i ' CQ I ' fm sw. New Wayne Moriensen, Elizabeth Mosher, .g -os. 7 , X . 'Q 'HQ "',, ai ex e-- I M - A M ,.,-r Q ' "" R o:m uilenberq ,,, .QV ,WA , " 1 ,,,. A V V i -f " 04. -2,,, .f ::::::l:::" H .ii...,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,.., iizvzl ::" mg :-: gf I ., V zv. . is Steven Munson, Ronald Murphy, Lucille . , . 4 , .,,, . ,.,. 5,5531 5' ' ,,,,,,, ,N Nellis, Bruce Nelson, Curtis Nelson, La- M' ww ' 4. l ' M... ,. M Donna Nelson "1', , W I T54 '::- 'T' '35 Q l"' i M' if, A 5 ff iii.. inline :-l' ---l::- Magi Il' Q - gin. ":' e,,,,, gg nes lm l"e ,Wei , Z' ,. X SV ! :..:-..,, -3 ,, "ff Richard Nelson. Iudith Ness. Mary Nie- 1" 21,3 ' ' H' vs, 'V I V1 x . .z --1-'- .Q ,., 4, buhr, ferry Noland, Michael O'Byrne, "',., gs . :"' -2--': H 3' ,gk ' ' Thomas Oqren 'w'.:"' ' , , w , ,f -2 ,..--":' . " ' "IL" ,A - , - ::- f In ,z 2"' '- 1, :-: L ,. nj ii' 'K WW' vas S r x Q23 W. as ., g. 'E' QV A HZ' Q 'W l ..i, A: A.-A 95"X gm 4 'E L Page 67 Juniors Work Toward riginality, CHOOSING A THEME for the prom called tor much discussion by the junior prom chairmen. The 1961 chairmen were Kathleen Kis- singer, Cheryl Lutner, Susan Olsen, Ianet Roorda, Bonita Hansen, FIRST ROW: Iames Oliver, Gerald Olsen, David H. Olson, David P. Olson. SECOND ROW: Ioan Olson. Lewis Olson, Susan Olsen. Craig O'Neal. THIRD ROW: Geneva O'Rourke. Bruce Palmer, David Peik. Duane Perrin. FOURTH ROW: Steven Per- son, Karen Peters, Ronald Petersen, Elizabeth Peterson. Q IEII.: " We .,.,, il' ' W rr.. - I ' A --',,,-:: : - A 5 1 , 5 XZ ,4 .,.., jlwdw ,R ,Q , K 4.2. rl H I V g at 4 fi I W 1 --,- -I ----r-- .,,,. 1. .. ' ':" "':' ' I .... " ' ' n f, as -::-, V 1 svs I , .Lili y ,f f .,.,. " is ,.,. , . ,,:,: l , ""':: 'ii' - 2' 3 r f R' A, -.-- , ww I H uuzz E iff' lf' A """ ,,,. ,,..,. M Q? , :!.i L. ei 1,7 W V 1 E -255222:-I: .,,, .... , " . " ,mm , ,,,, , ,,.,. .,,.,,, 1 , I g In-f .... " A I zzll ,-5. 25: M -:-::::-' M f Z- Q .,,,, ..,, , 1 Page 68 Iudith Ness, Barbara Iensen, Betty Tolo, Edward Dusek. Iohn Inge britson and Wayne Mortenson. Not pictured was Roger Thompson FIRST Curtis Roger Linda Philip ROW: Iudy Peterson, Karen Peterson, Sandra Peterson Pickavance. SECOND ROW: Paul Pierce, Perry Pierce Poole, Barbara Pratt. THIRD ROW: David Rasmussen Rasmussen, Gail Ravenhorst, Ioan Reese, FOURTH ROW! Reinaas, Kathleen Reincke, Pat Rietsema, Dennis Riley. Perfection in Planning First Prom :zzz , : - Michael Rollins, :. izzz e- Y Ianet Roorda We , :,:, , X. 1-if ""' L we a-a-asazaeail' X ,rfiig X .:, ,r in , Carol Roscoe. -. William Russell :,:, ,,...:1-- - - :':': 2::,j E11 "'i rj? ..... f 3 Q ' le, - 42 :-: ,f A N. ""'iVV 1 ' W Andrea Rutherford, -' "" -P H 1 is Iudith Sackett ' is ::. Q x ,,':2r: 1 ., 'l,.:,,,,,:: ,,:. 5 ,,,., --"' C ,,,, ,,,. I -:L ..,, - Qbghwv , My .,,: , .s ' ..-, K 1 5 ,1553 Qin Susan Satre, X Nick Schermer .. - - David Schewe. - Gene Schlede f Efi A if 5 i f V vV,,,, MM 9' :, 'K 5 Saga .:::,"' ima , Barbara Schmidt, Kathryn Schneider. Charles Schroeder. Pamela Schuhmach- er, Faye Seedorf, Barbara Seifert. Kristin Sether, Martha Sherman. Richard Sickels, Karen Siqurdson, Iane Sipple. Margaret Skelton. Charlotte Skogheim. Darryl Slinde, lames Smeby. Kraiq Smeby, Susan Smith. Ianet Sorenson. Morris Sorenson. Mary Sprankle, Ernest Springer. Steven Spurr, Karen Steffen, Thomas Steil. 'Q t E 2 3 AMBITIOUS FISHERMEN Thomas Counters and Timothy Bothof seem- ed unaware of lurking danqer as Mr. Warner Nettleton stealthily pre- pared to apprehend the mischievous poachers. ffm f 1 4' we P C' rw 5 52 w...3.:, ,, A 'Ke is an w . tu,-Mn 4 H551 -We ' 25- he are yy y I in M Nl -..,.,. "" 3' , We ,,:: ,Th 'bv ' WX XX fr A 1 :K ee, A Q. V rr '-2. 1 . , , 1 pm r , it If rf Y E 'ss Q, E 'H 2: Y Y .61 Z-sr H 1 CC if W -M g Qh i E Nw H- Q.. Q 4 s , , it ,irr A ,.:: 1 H ,.. V , -::: ., '-VV r"":' . :,., k it lfflivfw -:V:--V ',-V' uuzn P I y 5 'nf'nr" A in r.t,f -ra, M " A if E, 3' b ,. 1 i v .f-ff :E l ' N-f I :,. XL' E ,... L' :::::r.,:... """-A S ' -ww v::--: , . 3 ig QV- iti , .'-aw., , fi ' 315222235- We-as f -I rs- , --:: :V -:-: zzv I 1 gy... 'ci- .,,:::.,,, 'A 1 A . ,.,.,.,,.,. oz 5 ' , 'IV' " " ::.- ,.,.. ., .. ,V , ,:,:., V ,. -:-, U lllllv .,. .. Q lll, ..., byti : V EP :,,,.,:-Eb .gr is . S t t f ew... we tt t v n Puqe SS Middleclassmen Ioyce Steinke, Kathleen Stencel Dennis Stoa. Ralph Summers Constance Sweet, Lowell Syverson Katherine Taylor. Athalene Tesch Mathia Thisted, Alice Thompson Cbtain Their Rings ft' 1 .... ' 'gy zaz -.,A Y: Q i f rne e A is g ,Q , W ...:,:.:,,, .... V Q 2..: if ::V..,, :":" if :'. ff ::"i' " " ff "' V :'-: ,,,,. zzaz' ' I, Q :':--- 5 ,, X r .::-:::,,,-. QQQ, -I ,,l,,: kg: .'..'-::,, . ..,, R ,:,. "--:-- . . ,..,.. . Q: U5 iaa iileeeeell n eeee iieeeee ieeeeeen ,,,,, is ' "" ..2, ziz ::a,, zzal r ile lgggl ' is -... , 4 ..,::--::"" 22112:-: ":' A liliia,n ,l eee ai ii c illi elee 1 ":':: 5 :1- - -1:1- 'I2' ' , -::.: Q ,." 3 . J' I , x b . " ,'12: is 12,0 :::1 :::,- "':- ":':- -,:, -llll t to Q .- 4' ::,:.L E. "" vif imf 2'- , "l"',' .:.: 5 , , fl ' ...:' 2 :2: N - t 5, f' .:,..-:" llc..-'R x 1.5:-' ' :.Q ,1-i f zaz. . f ii- .- t THE 1962 CLASS RING-received and worn with pride by members of the class of 1926. Its long and colorful history makes the ring a tradition. and iuniors anxiously await the arrival of the class symbol each spring. The shield which appears in the inset was designed by Mr. Byron Crabbe in 1913. and has been used in varying iorms since that time. The ring is chosen from a selection of designs pre- sented to the class in the tall by its ofticers. uvvlu - Ei T .. " ' '-:2 -1225: ' 'IIIQ 5. 45 . t f '1" A "."' i ' ' ,i 25515: "'- in if. 'W ,:,::.. -:Ez z E ,QM , -" I, N ai ...,.--: A-v W' lf , ' ,.,.-- d L -1::::., Ri" 'gl W -. --:- 2 :,., w-M M 5 , ::,.. We .A .- ., H "" ..-- 1 W ,,, 3' .'..' i 'QW ---' I H G fl l Lg, ' va K ' :':: E A... Q 22' '35 ::i:" ' ' . ,,:v '::""' 1 ':',,.., Alan Q - W 5 ' "" ' rag- W el "2f?1ffi'f51i-if: ,,. K -... ',:: ::': I lncd W tk :sir .,,-l 1: ..,' t l:-:. i ,,. 1 ll ll .. v'---.-,, t .....,: Q . Q- X rg., www KN zyg L i r at R T , AE: 3 AQ, l ::,. 'K' uk :,: '30, Q W' .,:, 2 W3 4 ::l"":"' Z -1 Q s VV":'i't'- 'W ' ,,:,, :ff :,,1 'fb' rf' ' :., ',wMW' 'if ':"" 'Q ,',.V Q In lll Q5 IIA: 5 ,,. M: 'I A ,,gaasi:5a,., 1:25 :., -I ll: E is as k , :.,:, 1 , li glam M' V ' iiiiil ,.r. r.2::::::...,, V E . '::i" 1': M ::1-- :-- --:-V -::- e ::: ,. :,".--. gh! ,.:,: J, :-ll. ' . "y" ..l. Q -'ce "y' 2 1 ,. 21, 1 'f 4 ..iir n -r Sci i'y:2 n r We r:,. '::" '--., ' ,,., ".- 5 :.,e ' ' ?wlN ..,,. ,. - F -..:, :,:,, , 4: ft ,353 vlvlvlv- S W ":E.,:-:-:M 152:3- L Q l Af """ if -G rtzi' ,,,,," ' 2 - 2 f' 2 zzzd dnlllln G Iznznzzz ' Q' 4 ...:.. , .,.. , zz' ' :,1., ' 1 'ce' ' ,,,, ' lrr. , :::-"f'2'-- . ' . ""' lzzzzn Z "EE ""'::: 5 :-' 3 ,.. J ., ':. K ' :"' :,: ' , :-'- ....,,i , ..,.,.: 1 '--- . V,.- ' 1 ..,: - Ii' fy r " ' 3. ff: ---- wr I, V , .V r :II . .,,...: z z , 5' Q' . 45,- iwx 4 .:,.v J V, i, M Q , 7 ,, Y ...,,:,.:.,., .,,: gg, . ., ,,. ,,, -":E ' , ' ddv' A 1 All 9 Y ,,,Q N. llzlzlzl 'A lt ,rr Y '--l-A- fix , V 3. N "'- :.g.'- yi ri 5 B 4 , -:::: , g i I ' N Page 7U Clarence Thompson, Ianet Thompson. Patricia Thompson, Roger Thompson, Ronald Thompson, William Thompson Linda Todd, Betty Tolo, Ronald Tosten- son, Donna Trae, Mary Tuite, Sandra Twetten Wayne Ulrich, Mary Vandenheuvel, Gary VanderSyde, Mary Viq, Gordon Voldahl, Sharon Wacholz Larry Waltz, Renee Wambach, Dean Wangen, Gerald Wangen, Sharon Wangsness, William Warren As Symbols To Wear With Pride ' x , -f:Es,siz51I,,5gaa5si5:12-':,sg,,55':21jg.:2i ffsii' ,I 1 .... : ' REFLECTING THE EXCITEMENT that prevailed throughout the school durinq early sprinq, Annette Humphrey, Elizabeth Peterson and Karen Peters compared their 1962 class rings. EXERCISING GREAT CARE, Dennis McGill used the band saw to shape a piece of wood for his shop project, keeping in mind the many things he learned about the instrument. Bruce Waterman, " QS ' G June Wayne f 5 r . Z ,,:, I 'Nt' ' 'i'e- .qzzl z Q 3 , ,-t:- 1 Martha Wayne. 1 """ 3 A ' Ui fl QW MUTY WGYM ' .. fe 'I q:: 'Q :": :,.,., NQQSQ QHRSS. Charles Wed'-Je, ggi M V di 1 Rita Wedge ":' iw' ' " --15, q,.......,. 'I .j:::,. . . iy, t ':y'i A Carol Wendeloe, ' Q, t ' Dean Werner ' X ' zglf Y , .,,,, .. ' " .. ., , ,--- . ,qi x S V, ,Q Florence Willaby, "1 ',,:,:.. id if . Hx Cynthia Wilson Q ,.,,. Irene Zamora, Mary Zimney Ion Zoller NOT PICTURED: Dean Allen, Paulene Baas, Michael Beaver. Walter Bennett. Carol Ekstrom, Allan Freeman, Ian Groten, Ierry Heideman, Steve Hoelscher, Gary Hoffman, Larry Hoium, Thomas Hoy, Ann Dee Iensen, David lensen, Gayle Lindahl, Thomas McKey, Brian McMul- len, Patrick O'Leary, Don Paczkowski, Gerald Paulson, Harold Peter- son, Lloyd Schroeder, Donald Sherril, Neil Stenzel, Patricia Thompson. Paqe 71 I Class Party, Elections Introduce FIRST ROW: Abrego, Ahern, Allen, Amundson, B. Anderson. SECOND ROW: D. Anderson. G. Anderson, I. Anderson, Lory Anderson. Laurie Anderson, THIRD ROW: T. Andresen, Andrews, Arneson, Atchison, Aumentcdo. FOURTH ROW: Ausen, D. Bailey, I. Bailey, Bangert, Bartness. FIFTH ROW: Bcxuers. Beck, Behr, Benson, Berg. . W , "" . . '- :QIVI .., , V '-,, T , "fa .VQ ,Q . -tt, f A ,,., ' -V " ihnn lBB A e . , , 5 dl" R gt ' i t M' A .,..., ,S . , ,,,. A b ':': .,., H A cccnnc . y ,DDD , , -. A ,'-v W ss::1a5-VV ' I-' Qi! ' Q, A :s- Q 111.1 'i'V -If' , .-.. 1 ---., W -.,.,.. ":l1 .. T azz- "B: "in" . ' In :zzl .:,..-., 3 .... i . 5 i": i ' , ,.,Q: H rf ' rf 'ft:2 F i-n- '- , t :'f f ,L 1 Z ...,-. ,,,,,,, lqqlll :,...,, ":":: l, ' ' wi .,. nf' gtg ., ..,. i ,gn ::- 'Sift' W . nnnn nn o f t A h B ei nn F , J Page 72 The beginning of the l96l school year found the sophomores in an atmosphere of excitement. Class elections were the first big project. After a vigorous and profitable campaign, Keith Kuiters was elected president, Susan Hendrickson, vice president, Linda Petersen, secretary, and Nancy Wing, treasurer. With Homecoming came many new activities for the sophomores. Each of the homerooms worked diligently on its float, striving to capture the prize offered for the best float in the parade. Attending the coronation of the Homecoming Queen for the first time left deep impressions in the minds of the underclassmen. The traditional Sophomore Party found the sopho- mores decked in their very best attire. The Swing Band furnished the music for the gala event which was held in the Boys' Gym in April. The sophomores captured a large role in the annual production of the Tiger's Roar. Many new acts and the enthusiasm of the sophomores contributed largely to the success of the production, entitled "Showboat." Throughout the entire school year the Sophomore Class contributed much ot the success and educational development of the l96l school year. lt also received much in the field of education and in the valuable experiences of working together with fellow students. Miss Alice Gammel and Mr. Warner Nettleton assisted the class during the year as class advisers. '.V' , "'. ,. . - Z ":' .. 1 'f' '1 .- ""-" ' .. l , I, ' -- " 1',1 E zz' .. I ,, . i - I 1 WW SKI Wwxifuw Q95 w'W EQQ. EFL TNQ EMM is I' -::A , W f ' Q , ' ' V-:: X , f :zz 1-:--- f P f zir, 3 bqqqlllb :,,.:: qvbl ,,.., . ...,'.b . b .,b:b , V.V-, :bb I , '1 ' ,'-.I: 1 ,,Q. I .,-: f if - 1 ,. ,.:. i zi- ' I ' - A I -'ifjz' V f ' Y W ' fi 3 'Z "":' S. wx I , fs. f ,, ".' . , - Q., - , II, I .....A. :Q:::: :f"V'2' r 1Q--, . W ' ...,: -:-,,, -:-. ' 1 1 :izg I . ::,. In 1 SW .na navn, , ., 'I H. I .. Q 9 i 1 , ziez:-me , 1 5555 v 'if' 3 ::.. , . A ,.,.,.:- 5 '::' :,,.. 7' '-21, - ' 'I "l-'-'--'- ' ' , A ' W- 3' if 3 -1 :Q f 'fir "'f 2 'sfa 'Q " . ...... f 55 1 :.. ' 2 f I .. mv f im- f -..,, 5 Q .:,:: ".,,. , . ""',, :'Z ' ,.,: 4 if , ::., E : EEK V t ,.,,: ',A:, 1 ,gf V : , ::, , 3 tllz I , '::::Al ..:..., ., E X ,ig . j:: ,.,.,,, 1 :::3 .:," Iz.. . Egqggu, """ 3 H :,,:, 3 zz., , f- K 125 -:, 2 :5 :" , . V . :,. 4. W? "2 .:::a :ar :Q . I ' . .." Quuz ':"' i V::.. I ' ' vyy, ' rrrrv we fr in if I yy -L r ,,, ... t., N .,,,.-.,5:s . , 1a5:,.,.. .sat H' -...f nik D 2 'N , af" ' A 2521... . . :::, '-rw -. -. .. vii , -2":- we . . , I --': . " "::f f R - .,.:.:A, ' ,.,. . 5 ,.:,., --L21 4' 5 I Q 9 . .,,, . H EV .vltbb I ,K :::: ,::,, R .,,,. 5 nzzzvzn , fx " ' Q , ' 4' , .:.-,,,. 3 "" ' ' , 4 , Q- FIRST ROW: Bierke, Bleckeberg, Blocker, Bluhm. Boelke. SEC- OND ROW: Boettcher, Boyer, Braaten, Bradley. Brand. THIRD ROW: Brandt, Breamer, Broitzman, Broskoii, Brott. FIRST ROW: Brouwers, Brue. Budin, Buntrock, Burnett. SECOND ROW: Bushlack, Butenhoii, Butler, Bybee, Callahan. THIRD ROW: Canipe, Carlsen, L. Carlson, M. Carlson. S. Carlson. Students to Senior High Activities MAKING USE OF the facilities of the library were the sophomore class oiiicers: Susan Hendrickson, vice president: Keith Kuiters, president: Linda Petersen, secretary: and Nancy Wing, treasurer. FIRST ROW: Casey, Casper, Chapman, Chrisinger. Christensen SECOND ROW: Christiansen, Clark, Clausen, Cooper, Cornelius THIRD ROW: Daqner, Davies, Davison, DeBoer, Deckard FOURTH ROW: DeRaad, Dingenmans, Distad, Draayer, Drescher FIFTH ROW: Dudley, Dulitz, Duqstad, Eastvold, Ebsen. :,, , Z: . ' ":"':',,' V' .:., I QQQQ If -::v: ,... 1, will I x -.r,:.,..,," E E:E::E:- WI Q N' -,::::E: ::'5 il - f in "i. . .--', i ,W if E W TR ' F -...,. 5 A Y ,,.... ' H :Z ,,,, .,,, 4 2 gffi T .. y y 'VE zzv W A '::1" ' ::-. .A i , ,., -L wr ":: E :':':'::: 1:... -,if IE" ite- ---- - isis ' "::: fig Vvvvvyyyqqy y K- ,... , stx Q H . E lnz, Vg? y . ,..,.,.,,,., s -: , I vlzzv ' --"" I U .-..,,-.- s -15si'..:..,.. :nu uuluu ' ' ququi ' ' I ..,, ,,... I 1 ii' , "'- P' .Z Q". I :zvvv ,AQI X, 'H Y f I " A' I jg. me - Q lv 4 W 3 Ayrplll 3 ,Y J ,,, I 2 ,,,, S .,,,,, . .1 H A , 1:1 V 2, ilzg MA vvvv Y M -v l ,,.,,. S .,,, fg. , I 3 456 'zhl K ,sgzw H M A , .. , S .A - 2 Q I ' Page 73 Vlg bln? giz zz' Egg. We ,,..,,A."" f I ,r .,,1 1, 1.-.-. :,,:, E I gjfxni :-11 ,f" "'1 ,..kiil ,m.l.M - I E iil PAAA E bb.: ..V. , id N, ,, 5 ...,. figi . Q 1 H.. i f . ,.,:., - x Q :,I s .', ' r .t ,,:: M f gs 3, E . isle .,, z, -:,, v,,' ' S' A W- ,tiit t ':"Q I Q PS I -.:A X Qquiizz 'f W ::'- .-:g.,., ' 4 :.. I ' ::.,. , -'why ....:1:' ,,,:, ':':' : :l:.-.-., 4 A S I" I ""' I :"' i. :V I I ":'::::::':v ',',' 'I'f ':I- R H ,:,, -:E-E ii- ....- ,Y I 1 " ' 1 'P':1 I :,::, , f "1' gg :.1 2.:,: , , . ' "-- 5 1' 21-:Q A W :1,1 , awww .,.,,,, ,, . ...,.,.,., qllu , ..':' A'.:-: , , ' "" 2 :" T 1... D ., H ' w Z ,-'- ' "" ' I 2 .Aw -. NK Q n .fi -. ,.:: an Mg 3 , :.. JE , - W 3: 1 , -....,,, 2 jr , , W n -2-- X ,Bun x, -m W :gi ' " '2'., an in in .. 5 5 fa 'WT '.., Q ,. nn E., LQ.ww MV! ' -"1:" ::":' ::,:: Q ...:::: E Zzvv li zuz "" 2 .zzzz Q Q 'lliz m b ,,,v .::., .':...... i E ....- g "ii :,,"', , ' 'Y N Q A i f 9 "-- f :1i1?5'5: ,',,,,, I Afizi EE ' EE" l A :,:q" E I .252-i'1g ' :EHQA 5 'zzzv "V1::- I zzl, , "1"" - , if .-':5 1 ulqq' -"' 7' -- '-':: ":' .P ..,., Y .,.,. Q ::- 'f -.:: "v, :44 :':' " ZZZ ',..I z ' " I ' ' f 2AA, , . W ,-: zzzzzz- - W 1 -e .::, wi' he-f ""-:...:- ...:. , , 1 '---1 "--- 4- i ' ::.:.:., VV....:.:. , 'L W 5 ".. , ::.:... , i s so :f2 3 ,"1: ,,, A.:,:. Q :A-.. .- '---A 'N' ::-- -Q. "-:::-- , , ":" - gs , f --:- e ",,,.: '-" b .h" .V -:-:: 2 : f 2 -. 'jg "1-'-' , "If,s. :,' -'112 fs , 5 J: A .,..:.,,. . 3 ::. EEE.. Q In . 5 Q ...: tlri.. QQQQ . W ,,,. " I fl- ":: 7 :"" :" 1- I I . , FIRST ROW: Eckart, Eggum, Egland, Eksirum, Ellinqson. SEC' FIRST ROW: Fleminq, Francis, Frank. Freeman, Fredrickson. OND ROW: Emsiad, Enderson, English, Erickson, Erlandson. THIRD ROW: Evenson. Ferring, Fink, Fielbroten, Flanagan. SECOND ROW: Frizzell, Gari. Gavle, Gilberison, Gilpin. THIRD ROW: Glesne, Goldman, I. Goodmanson, K. Goodmanson, Gordon. Sophomores Strive for High Goals ' SOPHOMORE HOME ECONOMICS students, Margaret Enderson and Loretta Run, were shown carefully pinning their pailern. This was one of the lirst steps in clothing consiruciion. Paqe 74 FIRST ROW: Grasdalen, Green, Gunderson, Haqe, Halvorson. SECOND ROW: Hamson, C. Hansen, I. Hansen, R. Hansen, B. Hanson. THIRD ROW: D. Hanson, I. Hanson, Sonia Hanson, Susan Hanson, V. Hanson. FOURTH ROW: Harding, Hareid, Haskins, Haugen, Hauti. FIFTH ROW: Head, Hecl-res, Heems- berqen, Hellinq. Helmets. f wwf' ' f W A 3 ., , ,V - ,f ,... M , f M ,.,, ,A ! . S -Q, .4:,.,,E .4 ',.,,--, , 2 :'1::: ,,,,,-. ,, , ,.--- ' I " ::':' '3 1. . guru :'-" , I Eg' ' ' f fs: ,Q I .,., ,f . M- Q... .Q 'Y ' , lI-- , t ggi ..,.,., .. ., ...,- fl ,.,, W, 21 6 - I X :-: ,,,:. qui V .ggi in ,:-' I . .,,.,, if ':' , .,,V I.. ,, 1. Iin- H "l' iin' 1 .,,, , I I lssa nsns anninin -gg ..., I ",..,., . - A ,,,,: I , f ,in, -1.. ,v"l ,,,. I I ---"" " in ..A' ': ' ,Sg : :': I ..... -fifii' iii if -:::::" - FE is " 2 , if I -I -I :-: , 5 I .-tis zllll W? lllvil ... ,,,, I Q P, zzu ,., , 4'V. 'v" .., ' W- I I .. . ... I zz., :IIA , Q :., , , 3 I :':'2 ',,,,... fffg -1,, -"' : 1 ..-l " , -,,,. . ..,,- ., A. V , ,. . J ,V,,, ki ,X g...: 1 .A :Ei , .i d :--, V3.- A X ,:., ,H ,..,:.I anlbb X it Z ..:, :IE V. 1 y .... . .. V J: by A .::..zT:-- ,... J. ...I . S 5 E: ' 3. my V Img, W A- Q' .F -E, ,R V. J , Mis' W, ' we .f - .- --'- ' ' f W' I A-'- . A , ' A ' V ...... " .- 5 ' I .... ,, X x . K ----- tt , ., , I ..-. fe ' -:, ---- -----' ...,. ' ""' . -'---- 1 - , , , , SEEN I " If I' 1 I :Sai .... F ' 5 1 I' . ' I - 2. . .... ,, I K Kb .-.- f . -gk W - W 2542 'W - A 1 . SUN gr it Q.. ' A ' I 4' Q Q- P+- . rf ,. A I 'f .. f S ,. H . ., ' 1. " '-'- , ' ,.,,,. f I " M e AA-'-' S is - , I 3 f I 'f I . . . . R I t 1 -I 1 ..... 1. ,I I,- -WEEE if . -., :.. . ' ' 3:5 "" : I , E I if I2',',5.i:C'- "g f ' I ...,, . i Q. . . . ,, y . N, y 15. , , 1 ., .. . , .-5, V e -Q Y .,..., ,, 4 5 Ei k ,. , X ..... W U' vw ' ...W A-:VY ' 'A I 5 if ,.,,, Aff I Q Y .----- Q.. . -M W' 2? . Jw 1 ef H . I ' .... . . ..... .,.. f , ' ' H . . ' Q I! a ny 'wi Q K ig x x K S A D W - -..W inn ? Ei' i FIRST ROW: Henry, D, Hendrickson, L. Hendrickson, M. Hen- drickson, S. Hendrickson. SECOND ROW: Henderson, Herth, Higgins, Hillstrom, Holle. THIRD ROW: Houchin. Hubbard, Hunt, Hurst, Hutchins. FIRST ROW: Hylbcrk, Indrelie, Iverson, Iacobsen, V. Icxcobson. SECOND ROW: S. Iacobson, Iahns, D. Iensen, Icrmes Iensen, Iune Iensen, THIRD ROW: P. Iensen, R. Iensen, Doris Iepson, Dorothy Iepson, Iesse. To Meet The Challenge Before Them FIRST ROW: Ioachim, Ioel, D. Iohnson, H. Iohnson, I. Iohnson. SECOND ROW: I. Iohnson, M. Iohnson, Renee Iohnson, Riiu Iohn- son, Iones. THIRD ROW: Iorduhl, D. Iorgenson, R. Iorgenson, Iuers, Iuve. FOURTH ROW: Iuveland, Kauffman, I. Kennedy, M. Kennedy, King. FIFTH ROW: R. King, Klingbeil, Klinqius, Klukow, Knuuer. 1- -is ,152 , 1, 6. 1 Ez' V 1 W , I' -1 " G. . my I A ':s5?xM,,.:v. ' I - , ' I - fd .QI - , . f if' Q' W ' X0 V , J .,.,. wav V . , 5' if ' ':i52s:., I' i ' If ' fr, ,.,. 5 s,.,.f.,., E ':'51.1: ' 1 , 'iziiii J I fzffif. ' .... .. ., Q, I ...,. .212-'f "-' ,ir-ffe if . ,,,. ' .. M me I ,mf W I . J -5... 5 ,V .... , .. . , ' , 2 21 I 1:1'r 57 Iz' .,,. , .,,.. . ' 72W I I "" - I ----'-:: : f .2 'ri ii ' QIQQ I I , , , , I I bvl' .if ' ., . "" '---, , ,, A ., " IK , I, ' R K .,,, N. - i f 4 , ' , ' , If W 2 " I ..... - I ""I' I ' ' ' . - W "' ' . " 1 - ...fi 'Q ml., Q'-vw., h r .... : I I I IV - K " .,..,.. L Ex ..,:z . .AAA TYPING is one of ihe many business courses that are offered to sophomore students. Here an unideniiiied iypist displayed her newly acquired skill for the photographer. Page 75 SOPHOMORE TWINS, Diane and David Knudson found sharing a ' H I n,.,.,.,. . . ul is I fl' . , ,,.,.s. - 1,, - , - 5 zz. 'M . - -' Q I '-52. .." . WV "::::' , - 2 '4 I' 'Z "" ':":" E ' ""' - ..:,,', f CY , ' X' ':::: I , inf ":':E :::,.-"" N- "" I 3' L ff. :,: ..... iil' :., .i 'f Inini' ':"'1 I " ' ,ssi'i-'s,QsgwQjw.isE 2-ni qqqu ..:.. v'v' I :AZ uqiz -'-1' Ati ::'.::. :.,.,,' I ,.,,,,, " ii 2 is 5 ' .... 1 .,.,: .... 'V EP . ww- s N, 5 ?? 51515Eii'::"E. I.. 'B ii" 5 1 if ,.Q:E:.,' .. ' ..2.QE5' . 5? 4 ,. M , .,., - - ' fix IX. Q Iss 1 1 A . w - ""' I FIRST ROW: David Knudson. Diane Knudson, Knudtson, Kressin, Krause. SECOND ROW: Krominga, I. Kuiters, K. Kuiters, Kven- void, Kycek. THIRD ROW: Lacis, Larnpinq, B. Larson, C. Larson, LaRue. ' in if ,Q :"::: I go. I., o in in X , - I , .,..,,. iii Q- ,. . . ,, id, r 'Q "2-sa::a-If if 1, I If X . i W . ,.,.,. . .,,: b ,: ,, ,,,,, ..... I VV t Q K :II .1 . .,.. , an ... III- ..,., , ...,. " ..,,.., , A V , -- X. , I- Y villi- s ., I iiilili 12. fl 5 '. ,l il-. is . . .,. .... ..,. " .wax Q V ' .,..,. .,.,, . , ,, ' ii- " ' 5' R .,... '- 2.55-2l5'.f i, 1 l.,...Qss.. X- ? FIRST ROW: Laursen, Lair. Leif, Lembke, Lent. SECOND ROW: ROW: Lien, Linquist, Lunninq, Marqadani, Mariner. THIRD ROW: Massey, Matthes, May, Medd, Meister. Unclerolassmen Strive with Ambition FIRST ROW: Meltinq, Miller, Miovac, Modlin. Monson. SECOND ROW: David Morreim, Diane Morreim, Morrison, Mueller, Myers. THIRD ROW: Nagel, B. Nelson, Carole Nelson, Carolyn Nelson, James Nelson. FOURTH ROW: Ianet Nelson, Iean Nelson, Kathleen Nelson, Keith Nelson, Kenneth Nelson. FIFTH ROW: R. Nelson, T. Nelson, E. Nielsen, S. Nielsen, Nordahl. .' , an "1" , A ., , 29 is -' I ..,. -Q. M1 . was eu ' . H '2:'--' K f " f I 1 fi I . .e ,Q ":'- I ,. . . ' ,mfs ff. e'w+iswr its I, I , g ... 21 VZ. gl I' I -...- I f ,I .,.,.., ..,.,. , , 1 l I .1 ,.,. Q., Q, In ,f I .. 4 'fi' ff . - "'1- I .wifi ' p ' ,.,., --:-' I D eye nxsffnes pig? ei. ff, V I i Q 1 ..- .. Q.. , g--M: .... ..,. , . V V, I . . W4 If I 'A ,,,,,,, I A xi lik I i . ... .- , " I f I: :viii 53519 3:1 1asi:."f I Y ..,. , if . A A. . f - 1:'1A"' .Jw Page 76 locker wasn't quite possible. Books and coats for two people, especially for twins, just won't lit in one locker. V :'-:-v' x - tbit -1 xl :A ki, V -I 5 .... , by ',,,, 2 . ., . E , 'W W -Q si :: , we , Q--- 1. ' " - is ::" in -::: 5 xx si... -E zzl. 4 1: :,,:,:: 3 if F .3113 ,L I ,, -::- r P , M .- 1 .. ,1,, ' ...,, ::b: I Auzaub ,ZA 1 ,.-If ZP' QV 'Vv:V V: QIQHP y y IHIEH: E z Wx fs. t 3 . sssmssse :LI eihsgse . I -fgggcgi. 1 fffi .Q.: 1221 is ---,-: Iz' , ::-.'- '..-: Z: x ,L ..--:-.:'f-- . :-ll -,., A A -.-, t t- vi If - 'Q....- P I """ '... 2 . ' .ffl "-' I . ':1: , 1 ' :A::. m 5,5 Q . , li ., .E .,.,.: in ,. .Eggs 4 Q A gt! NA 1 A.. .gi gm ,-,,, , if .:,: by , A .... A I A y WV ,qv x EEE L:-E :-: 0 .5 y V Q ,ivbl av 5 - ,:,,,-- , I t -I .::,,:,:, f -... 1. , M gf , - " .A:.A,, .1 gg I I ':"' ' 1,.. ,, at 1 ? ,QQ ,. L .X --,,,, A ' 'fi:I:5E:.s::E., L : " ' ' , . J " . -ntlt .. --f--- , , I . .:..,,,, x .:,,.,,,,, 13 ...W 2 , 1 . 'I I :::::' ' ff aw A zzi "" A H H M... ' ' A " I M 49 f 55, ,Q 1 33 -. y ,I I ...: - x . 2 G -fr-gg.: ' Q ,E :::, M. Q, .:, E- Q . .gli -M M ws.. J ,.,' E: L 1 .... Al-,. , ,Q E Z 55 :QQ ., If .. at - fe 'Q W S " :gl L ' FIRST ROW: Oakland. Oetiin, Oltenbecker, O'Leary, Oldenkamp. SECOND ROW: Oldert. D. Olson, Iane Olson, Ioanne Olson, M. Olson. THIRD ROW: R. Olson, O'Neal, Osburn. Ostley, Petersen. FIRST ROW: Palmer, Parry, K. Paulson, M. Paulson, Payer. SECOND ROW: D. Peak, G. Peak, Perkins, C. Peterson, T. Peter- son. THIRD ROW: Phillips, Phirmey, Poole, Posthumus. Prantner. To Result in Successful School Year- GEOMETRY STUDENT Mary Ellen Paulson attempted to Iinish her assignment in preparation for class the next day. Geometry is offered for the first time during the sophomore year. FIRST ROW: Register, I. Reichl, R. Reichl, Reindl. Remmel. SECOND ROW: Renchin, Richardson, Rietveld, Riley, Roelofs. THIRD ROW: Romer, Roscoe, Rund, Saxon, Schlehr. FOURTH ROW: D. Schmidt, R. Schmidt, Schenck, Schue, Schultz. FIFTH ROW: Schwartz, Severson, Severtson, Sheveland, Sicmer. .1 ,,,, 5 gh f . "' "ff H 1-1 1 .,. .rf S tttt ,S if ll I "-- ,'," ::' Z A ,, ' g I .. az ..,., 5 .,,:,g 1 U I if f 1 Q' '::.. MM, , ..,., am M is ir- :: f l ' ,,,,,, ,,,., I ,. -'--1 MW ...Q 'T .,.,,,.,,,.,.., , . W rnlz I Eglzfj 2. r .,:...V V My .gf VHV- ,M V f ' ":" 5 ,:,.f f , V- ,.. "-:::: L. ..,-:.. ' "" 3if'5"i ivva V i A , V? -' , .2i:fjs' .1 + 1 : QR. y e ..., Q V , I :EEN V .. Q.. Q ,..,,,. A , , . A' "" ' A 1111, 2 11" , WW, .jeg yv fi ix I -A fv . - f , --1-', 1 ,,,, 'V Y V ' ,, ' ', AJ "'2- , Page 77 .. . wp ww 45-5 -92 :. . 7 "'-5... a" li5...'l"' in 3525. W Q. I ' . W ' I ' M " Q MX A N1 2 T I -A', , . N- . I ' V ,. . 5 V M xt . ' 'rm - ..,,.. mi :sw .Iii . .. xr 134: ...kt ,.: iw Q' .5.5,.,x:,1A,5i W FIRST ROW: F. Sipple, K. Sipple, T. Sipple, Skophammer, Slife. SECOND ROW: Smeby, Smith, Sonksen, E. Sorensen, I. Sorenson. THIRD ROW: Robert Sorenson, Roger Sorenson, Springer, Stadt heim, Steele. .55 ,V ' .-,. X " ' ":::": ::i. '3 3' ' .. J 'I ' ff an A ,ge I Qquq N ...v 5- W v '.5-55, we ' "' ., 555555. it' . Zv- x Q' ":,,. ' ' ' , , :" 7 ' , ii f , ,..,,. 5 5 ,,. . at QII: EV Q I . 1- H :vznz l . ' ""' ,5. ,. -,,. , -5. , . .,,,,, ,rr I in .. -R.: lf:- I 3 E552 I 3 :I 5: ', "1-'ll I A':-:: E M --":' 'V ':::" :5: 5:52. zll: E 5 4' 'S I ' f 1.5 QQQ: I IIQ E :,,, . 9 , ,,., : 5:5' ., .'.::: E .- ..,: i :EEE A ...,, .5 ..,,: 5 Q ::-- M .... 5555.3 ..., x .A , ..-, n V- A .55.. , me E555 ,,, ---- I ' f "" " 555-5 . --5- , 7' "" ...., .. .5Q- 5 . FY " -5,55 5: ,:'. '5'5'-- :5.': I 2 " Iza' 5 :" .ia FIRST ROW: Steele, Steil, Stensrude, Sliebler, Stoa. SECOND ROW: Stovern, Diane Stowell, Dorothy Stowell, Studer, Sullivan. THIRD ROW: Swanson, Tanqen, Tarvestad. Tasker, Thomas. Co-Curricular' Activities Encourage SOPHOMORES OFTEN Iound it necessary to receive assistance from upperclassmen. In this situation, Duane Hendrickson, sopho- more, persuaded David Palmer, senior, to come to his rescue. Page 78 FIRST ROW: D. Thompson, G. Thompson, I. Thompson, L. Thomp- son, M. Thompson. SECOND ROW: Sharyn Thompson, Steven Thompson, Timmerman, Tostenson, Tostrud. THIRD ROW: Trapp, Tuchtenhaqen, Tusen, Van Riper, Van Ryswyk. FOURTH ROW: B. Veldman, P. Veldman, S. Veldman, A. Venem, I. Venem. FIFTH ROW: Verdoorn, Volkman, Waldemar, E. Wangen, L Wangen. 5 'Y ,Q 55. g..,.' I Q Ii. 9' ...X X i Q? 1 Y Tie ss y 'ir' 1 , 4 ,z . in H I W'-J' ' gh -fe fa 3 t .-.., Wi ,. ' ar. . " Q' 4 gb E z s ' I 5:i . . ....:- . :.... 1 f5'5lI ..f villa '---' :'5: .,:...- live? ' l---:- -5 5553- W . l I all -:-' 5 it I i' -.-. 453 :':'- if 1 . , if , I " + 5 .'.' . ii: 55"":'i. i ii .- gg 5., gif 1 1 A . " , ..5.. .i Y QLII: ii '555' T :.' . ...W 1 A "" """" 55-5 ' 1 iii' . M 'P I -. . 'A'A J -55: Q ii, ff, .... fi-1 .... Q, . .1-'G' - K .A M :.,: .......,, -:.., Q I A 5. i Rl - I M 5-'-' 'rw - I . ' X :" . A.AA X. in . ,Ei :"' . , , vu -:,. -::: , 45. .blz m t f... 4 :,, 2"' W- ':':: . ' f I .. 3' A ' :" ' Q. I f I tti' y v I! .....,:: .. ...,,.. --..,, , . - Y 4 A T I r ,,,,... V r, A eh ,.,, . A is : , I Qqqg 1:" ,,:,v I 'A :': I , ,. . Q ,. '. :-'-' I ltbbbb N - 11 I.: K ,,-,- E -. -::-, .-.'---- .: , I 2' " .3 A. .:a.. A,'-:: . Z: ,M -I : I I : EEE... ,Q :E ::- 'KM' I I I' 3 -,-,.... ,:. ,,:, 5 -E5 L: QIQQ ,M "-V,V ,xx , ::." N ":. -- I ..,' I .::A. iag., ,.,: If I ,V Q uuuq- 5 "2': I' ff V WWW ZAA 'A:A :': ' f, Q v V,q,,,,. ' lg' R ,, ... ,.,.. Q uuulubb. A 1 i Q if X I A.-:-" .,.,,.: , X :,: e QQ ' -' , A ., Q 'Q ""' fi g ..:...::-- ' , , 1- .,,.. 2: IQ . ,:: - f I 'A .1,: 'A'q q"' 1 . " J K , f '.-, .,,, btl- -V I . A 'lx ":"'1:"' '2"" . -':.:,,, Q FIRST ROW: Wanqsness, Warner, E. Weckwerlh, R. Weckwerth, G. Wedge. SECOND ROW: B. Weigel, R. Weigel, Weik, Werner, Weslhuis. THIRD ROW: Westland, Weslrum, K. Wes- irum, While, Whiteaker. FIRST ROW: Wicks, Wilcox, P. Wilds, R. Wilds, Wilhelm. SECOND ROW: Wing, N. Wing, E. Winium, N. Winium, Will- kamper. THIRD ROW: Wogen, Wolf, Wyanl, Yost, L. Zamora. Adjustments to Senior High Life M. Zamora, Zimney, Barry, Narverud. , lm A 1 '-:.,..,' 1 Av 15 '- If , . I - W me W ff ., 5 'S' 'jg ., '5' "if Ji' s 'W f I. 32 ' . A ' .3 ' NOT PICTURED: Bartell, Christensen, Davis, Groten, Guerra, Haried, Harms, Hendrickson, Hernandez, Hoelscher. Hoiseth, Iohn son, Klessin, Krey, D. Larson, L. Larson, Maiden, Miranda, V. Nelson, W. Nelson, Nemee, Ohm, Paqel, Peik, Peterson, Prihoda Rave, Reed, Schench, Spain, Steinbeck, Warner. "FUN, ISN'T IT FELLAS?" exclaimed Frederick Spain to his sup- porters," but Daniel Verdoorn, Gary Hareid. Dallas Stovern, Blair Larson, Richard Pratner, Dean Poole, Ronald Bunlrock, Gary Steele and Dallas Breamer failed to share his enthusiasm. f,f.. ,. M. MM, ,,,,,MMW .,,, A, ,ummm H Page 79 g,,.7W2x News CRGANIZATICJNS Each organization had its specific duties. but many times extra work was required of oiiicers cmd members alike. With the addition of several new organizations and the revival of a few old ones, the extra-curricular program was expanded. Student pcnticipation helped to maintain the activeness of each group and again reflected the school spirit that existed thruout the year. ezwztsa ,W www' PICKING MOVIES and planning movies for the student body was one of the main tasks of the Assemblies Committee: Daniel Gilpin. Beverly Butters, David Palmer and Iohn Goodmanson. Council Builds PRESIDING over all Council and Cabinet meetings were the four executive officers: Sandra Hanson. secretary: Marqit Larson, treas- urer: Paul Wilke, president: and Richard Oliphant, vice president. COUNTING THE BALLOTS of all the elections held was the duty oi the Elections Committee: Iudith Iohnson, Iudith Goldman, Robert Wallace, Larry Allen and Kathryn Sipple. TAKING CHARGE of all the financial problems of the council were Laurie Anderson, Charles Peterson. David Wilcox, Keith Kuiters, Michael O'Byrne and Margit Larson, Finance Committee members. REFERRING TO Robert's Rules of Order for correct council procedure was the Parliamentarian Committee: Harold Mueller, Susan Hendrick- son Richard Oliphant. Ianice Brandt and William Ienner. HOSPITALITY COMMITTEE members, Donald I. Nelson. Barbara Gurwell, Darlene Peterson and Maridee Alm. showed Bernard Bouvet, foreign exchange student, the lockers in the new addition. "WHlCH DAY SHALL IT BE?" was the question oi Larry Lahs, Stephen Claybourn, Iudith Ann Olson. Steven Person and Ieitrey Brooke, Social Committee members, as they decided dance dates. Student Character, Plans Projects Working together to gain a better knowledge of government procedure, the Student Council attempted to solve the problem of the students. The first major project of the year was Homecoming. Using the slogan "Wallop Washburn," the energetic students worked diligently to make the Homecoming festivities fun and successful. Again this year the Council sponsored Sadie Haw- kins Day. A committee was chosen to set up rules for the day. A S2 prize was given to the girl who caught the most elusive bachelor, Paul Wilke. lnstead of having the traditional Charity Tree this year, a contest was held between the homerooms. Each room's donations were recorded on a chart. Under the direction of Mr. Robert L. Myers and Mr. R. Wayne Cleveland, the sixteenth annual Tiger's Roar was presented to the public Ianuary 28, 30 and 3l. The theme was "Showboat." DECIDING who would get an oscar each month was the problem facing the Oscar Committee, composed of Lowell Gunderson, David lordahl, Elaine Posthumus and Sara Shoemaker. TYPING THE LIST of weekly panel members was Karen Mathews as other Youth Forum Committee members, Steven Spurr, Bruce Waterman, Kathryn Taylor and William Harding, watched. PUBLICIZING ALL EVENTS and making posters was the iob of the Publicity Committee: Camille Zavitz, Gary Roelols, Dallas Breamer, lohn Sullivan and William Danielsen. A Chorus Strives for Perfectiong PRACTICING DILIGENTLY for the coming A Chorus concerts were Mary Lindemcm, Sharon Blizard and Carole Lee. FRONT ROW: DeNeui, K. M. Peterson, Nielsen, Helgeson, Wayne, Yost, Wehrhan. SECOND ROW: K. R. Peterson, M. Jensen, Olson, Hassberg, Gooderum, C. Bothof, Muilenberq, Mayotte. THIRD ROW: Rutherford, Lindeman, Tuite, Hanson. Blizard, Schneider, Tolo. Lee. FOURTH ROW: Gilbertson, Wahlstrom, Hendrickson, Gavle, Krieger, Performing for various events throughout the year, the A Chorus was continually striving for perfect har- mony and organization through daily practice. Under the direction of Robert L. Myers, the lO3 voice choir made its first appearance at the Homecoming Coronation ceremony with the singing of "La Czarinef' They also sang for the Thanksgiving Convocation. To set the mood for the Yuletide season, they pre- sented both light and serious numbers for the annual candlelight Christmas Concert. They received much applause at the Christmas for the Service Clubs. With the holiday season past, they began perfecting their numbers for the Spring Concert. At the Big Nine Music Festival, held in Winona, they blended their voices with the massed choruses of the other Big Nine schools and presented an individual concert. With the singing of "You'll Never Walk Alone" at Commencement Exercises, the chorus made its final appearance of the year, and the senior members made their last appearance as A Chorus members. Sweet, Sether, Doyscher, A. Nelson. FIFTH ROW: Iansma. G. Iensen, T. Bothoi. Haugen. Hillstrom, Gunderson, Iohnson, Schwen, Haskins. SIXTH ROW: Ackland, Gniflke, Seeger. Tennis, Ostby, Rhiger, Lar- son, T. Nelson, Walker. YQ o :,'Q'i ' f gr AA,. A. " 46' 4 .J N X 1' W- Q ff X mm M' ff I j'f"' Q ' A an " I,-4 nn, lx TV i k X M ' 2 ' "" "" , W , 1 , W V x ' I V up 0 ' I ' "-- is 'gi f f W! :- A 1- " 2? W f2+ - -V in ' ig ., .55 K :':' " H., .- S, f 1 as .ff f , -f'1 il A 3. ----:- , , gl it :-',1 E yu , 1, Q E A ,.A,, , , ..., A , . x 1 ,:... k 3 , 0 V Q A .,., ,.. :C rx 2 .,,, ,.,.. ' ' "" V '1-, 3 f - P I "H -' 'Q' ':"::'h f ' 5 15555 :::: , q -.: -' ,:,.:.,.:,:. ' -,.:. Q ' 5 - I 'Z' 1 A 3 I . by ',.. 1 Q M , A in , .63 . XM A 4 .. ..,,,: E EM 5 as is ,fl an or f , up -, if . .. H A S ' " ' W i ' 4. 1 E r N , Ab ., if awe, Q "Q ---::::: ."' X .,a:asa.1 ,:-:" t ":' :,:5., , V -:-,,, ::: 5 4 ny - it ab , . 5 .-v,,, Y ik in ' ' ' ' fs' ,, , .,-:: 5 5555 , V? -,:-. i J .. .,:::. 5525: .. . J H t' ' N21 V . ., ':"' Y ,.., :,1 :.,.,. . zz. uf' ' A' - fi Q ' Xi: W' 95 V M aw -M .Q - Q vi , -..: E -:E ::: ":: A t - ' Mtv' - ., A ., , M9 E , r qi , 3 vnbv V 5 gi ' : 'U' IQII ' '- -...:: xv i t VI' , Q lg ,-.,,,::,1.- x ,, -. - I .,1. .. A 'S ' nz: I 2 :gigs 5 Y I x K , 1. Q? z.,.. .3 is A x 2 I I -2 i ar ' I W 2 3 V , ,wh J I Q fl"' gf' 5 uv ww 1 21 : W 5 A 1 fa 3' ,iff-gy ,W as , , f , ' ' . z -1 "Q-: HM 5 A 5 p 1 af , , ' 2 3 f Q ' 4 9 Q11 1 , if 1-X FRONT ROW: Olson, Slife, Paulson, Casey, Venem, Tuchlenhagen, Gavle. SECOND ROW: Severtson, Flanagan, Knudtson, Barlness, Weslrum, Veldman, Hanson, Skophammer, Hendrickson. THIRD ROW: O'Nea1, Haskins, Iverson, Kvenvold, Kycek, Eqqum, Modlin, Canipe, Sieinbeck, Reichl. FOURTH ROW: Wangness, Yost, Blecke- berq, Davies, Andrews, Glesne, Fink. FIFTH ROW: Sleil, Monson, Haried, Whiteaker, Posthumus, Burneite, lohnson, Carlson. B Chorus Members Create Harmonyg FRONT ROW: Morlit, Mayotle, Hanson, Lageson. C. Bothof, Gilbert- son, Roordcr, Thompson, Olson, Lindeman, Kurth. SECOND ROW: Wehrhan, Keil, Slife, Heqland, A. Nelson, M. Larson, Posihumus, Benson, Nichols, Wahlsirom, Reichl, Ille, Nielsen. THIRD ROW: Haskins, T. Larson, Hillslrom, Haugen, T. Bothof, lensen, lansma, Peterson, Chrislianson, O'NeaI, Groos, Roelols, Schwen. FOURTH ROW: Walker, T. Nelson, Gunderson, Ostby, Seeger, Tennis, Ack- land, T. Iorqenson, Paske, Erlandson, Davidson, l. Iorqenson, Rhiger. Page 85 FRONT ROW: Veldman, Peak, Romer, I. Kuilers, Nelson, Reindahl, Carlson. SECOND ROW: Diane Knudson, Winq, Peterson, Evenson, Hanson, D. Olson, Broskoii, Anderson, Francis. THIRD ROW: Duq- siad, Gilberison, Iordahl, Morreim, Braiten, Miller, Wanqen, Smith, I. Olson, K. Carlson. FOURTH ROW: Henderson, Goodmanson, Chrisiianson, K. Kuilers, Green, David Knudson, Behr, Toslrud. FIFTH ROW: Bailey, Marqadant, Roelois, Boyer, Eckart, Gilpin, Iepson, Boelke. Chorale Shows Music Talent, Skills An addition to the regular chorus groups this year was the boys' Glee Club. Under the direction ot Mr. Robert Myers, chorus instructor, the club was initiated by boys from the A Chorus and later included inter- ested boys whose schedules did not allow them to include chorus in their curriculums. The Christmas season proved to be one oi the busi- est times ot the year for the Chorale. Formerly known as the Madrigal Singers, the group of 48 select voices performed nightly during the holiday season and made special performances at the Christmas and spring con- certs and the Big Nine Music Festival at Winona. Prac- tices, directed by Mr. Myers, were held each Tuesday evening. A tobogganing party and a steak fry picnic highlighted the group's social events tor the year, Composed entirely oi sophomores, the B Chorus served as the training group tor music aspirants. The chorus was mixed tor the tirst time in three years. Per- tormances were given at the Christmas and Spring Con- certs and at the seniors' Baccalaureate Service in May. FRONT ROW: Iensen, Bothoi, Christiansen, Tennis. SECOND ROW: Peterson, Haugen, Iordahl, Ostby. THIRD ROW: Schwen, Person. Roelois, FOURTH ROW: Groos, Rhiger, Walker. Page 87 Senior High Band Displays Talents FRONT ROW: Ackland, B. Hanson, Roscoe, Skophammer. SECOND ROW: Iordahl, Counters, A. Thompson, Ellingson, Leff, Bariness, Taylor THIRD ROW: C. Nelson, Schneider, Iuers, Bernette Ander- son, Phinney, David Knudson, Kennedy, Mueller. FOURH ROW: Dittmar, S. Hendrickson, Iorgenson, Henderson, M. Thompson, R. Nel- Performing at concerts, football and basketball games were just a few of the activities of the Albert Lea High School Band. Under the direction of Mr. Lawrence l. Emmons, the band could be heard each morning first hour during practice. Members of a selected pep band helped the cheerf leaders lead the students in the school songs at the pep assemblies. At the Homecoming game the entire band entertained spectators as it presented a special halfe time program. The band played the traditional " La Czarineu and formed a crown before the Queen and her court. Also featured were a rousing charleston number and a series of marching techniques. Band members not only performed during the school ,fear but also in the summer months. They presented concerts at Fountain Lake Park and played daily at the Freeborn County Fair during the four days. Highlighting the year was the annual spring con- cert held April l2, On May 5 band members jourf neyed to Winona for the Big Nine Music Festival. Assisting Mr. Emmons throughout the year were the band officers: David lordahl, student directory Donna Rusley, librariang and Sara Shoemaker, secretary. son, Yocom, Riley, R. Iensen, Bonnie Anderson. FIFTH ROW: A. Speltz, Syverson, I. Hanson, Erlandson, Mariensen, I. Goldman, S. Goldman, Petersen, Dudley, Iensen, Ille, Mr. Emmons, Bailey, R. Spellz, Whiieaker. ' ff Y For Parades, Concerts, Assemblies t , Q THE FLUTE TRIO consisting of Mary Niebuhr, Andrea Rutherford and Sara TAKING TIME OUT for cz iam session and some additional Shoemaker was often seen drilling on various musical selections. FRONT ROW: Smith, Niebuhr, Rutherford, Shoemaker. SECOND ROW: V. Hanson, Roscoe, Veldman, Wing, Moflii. THIRD ROW: Rusley, Hurst, Wilds. Sonksen, G. Wedge, D. Hendrickson, D. Knudt- son, Xavier. FOURTH ROW: Rimmel, Posthumus, Kuiters. FIFTH practice were Iohn Iorgenson, Robert Speltz, Richard Ander- son, Donna Rusley and Iames Iensen. ROW: Iohnson, T. Nelson, Paczkowski, R. Anderson, Christiansen Willmert, Eckart, G. Thompson, I. Iensen, Cooper, L. Nelson, Schwen SIXTH ROW: Ruerup, Slinde. Erickson, Humphrey, R. Thompson Tostrud, Kennelly, Weigel, S. Hanson, R. Wedge. FRONT ROW: Tostrud. Speltz, Iordahl. Counters, Mortensen. SEC- Xavier. NOT PICTURED: Christiansen. Syverson. OND ROW: Iohnson, Nelson. Schwen, Cooper, Yocom, Anderson, Swing Band Captivates Music Fans GOING BACK to the Roaring Tweniies were Roger Christianson, Merlin Tostrud, John Schwen and David Iordahl as they rehearsed their jazzy Dixieland number lor the Tiqer's Roar. Page 90 The Swing Band continued to provide a musical touch tor various school events in its sixteenth year of existence as a supplement to the senior high band. lncluded in its many performances were approximately eight school dances, the Tiger's Roar and a program ior the annual National Cooperatives, lnc., meeting. Under the direction oi Mr. Lawrence I. Emmons, senior high band instructor, the band members held weekly practices in the band room of the high school. most of their musical arrangements used during the year were those of Art Dedrick and Duke Ellington. David lordahl was the student director. Saxophonists included David and Arthur Speltz, seniors, and Thomas Counters, Lowell Syverson and Wayne Mortensen, juniors. lohn Schwen and Larry Nelson, seniors, and Peter Cooper, sophomore, played trombones. Trumpet players were Roger Christianson, Barry Yocurn and Richard Anderson, seniors. Senior Brian Xavier played the piano and sophomores lames lohnson and Merlin Tostrud played the string bass and drums. David, lohn, Merlin and Roger were also members oi the Dixieland Combo, an addition to the Swing Band this year. This group's main appearance was in the Tiger's Roar. David also acted as the leader oi this group, which specialized in various jazz arrangements. "C1i.REFUL BOY, watch out for ihe arm!" exclaimed Brian Xavier as Barry Yocom attempted to help while Larry Nelson waiched their antics in an ahitude oi utter helplessness. With New Styles A NEW FORMATION? Well, Thomas Couniers, Lowell Syverson, Wayne Morlenson and David Iordahl, members ol the Swing Band. claimed they were busily praciicing! f AQWKLQW l l Page 91 jf ---- 1 I 2:':2-1 - 2 'f .,.,V 'Qi' f J' FRONT ROW Mmear Westrum Severtson ONecl SECOND ROW Lutner, Grcxsdcxlen, Stensrud, GroH, Loken. Iordahl, Counters. FOURTH Anderson Huried Lmdcrhl Shoemaker Rutherford THIRD ROW ROW: Mr. Winton Melby, Wedge, Moftit, Tostrud. Senior Orchestra Attains High Goals Strains ot music could be heard coming trom the third tloor ot the junior high, where under the instrucf tion and leadership ot Mr. Winton Melby, the Senior High School Crchestra practiced during first hour. An occasional sectional practice was held. During these each section would pertect the Weak parts in its music selections. Challenging was also a tamilar sight, with each student trying to become a tirst chair player. Striving tor pertection, the members spent many hours practicing tor the numerous performances during the year. The major performances was the annual Christmas Concert which was given tor both the public and the school. ln the spring ot the year, the orchestra was kept busy with the annual Spring Concert as Well as graduation. The concert was given May l in the high school auditorium. There, among the tormal atmo- sphere, the audience heard the beautiful music played by the orchestra. The orchestra played tor Baccalau- reate and Commencement at Southwest. A tew members were given the honor ot being selected to play in the Big Nine Select Crchestra at the annual Big Nine Music Festival at Winona, Minnesota, May 5. At the testival the orchestra displayed its musicial abilities betore the Big Nine Schools and com- pared itselt with the other participating schools. Page 92 E FRONT ROW: Mortenson, Boer. Rovang, Wilson. SECOND ROW: Mueller, Rusley, Hurst. FOURTH ROW: Niebuhr, Slinde, Ienson, Hanson, Ackland, Skophammer, Roscoe, Groskreutz, Penny. THIRD Nelson, Tuite, Eckstrum, Iohnson.. ROW: Speltz, Hendrickson, Anderson, Christiansen, Kennedy, In uality, Harmony, Perfection STRIVING FOR PERFECTION before a performance was the violin "THATS THE WAY TO DO IT!" commented Cynthia Wilson as Mary trio, Marline Minear, Barbara Anderson and Kathleen Westrum. Tuite and Iames Iohnson tried playing the same bass. Page 93 French Club Initiates New Members FRONT ROW: Francis, P. Thompson, Brown, Vandenheuvel, East- Kanzenbach, Peters. Tanqen, Hendrickson, Roscoe. DeNeui. S. Han- vold. Daqner. SECOND ROW: B. Hanson, Indrelie, Steinke, Hill- son. FOURTH ROW: Bergo, Kennedy, Zimney. Nelson, Iohnson, strom, Krey, Olson, I. Thompson. THIRD ROW: Heather, Peterson, lorgenson, Black, Wehrhan. HREGARDEZ LE EIFEI. TOWER," commented Mademoiselle Ioan Draayer to Mademoiselle Peggy Dudley, who held a Petite duplicate of the famous tower in her hand. To learn more about France, its customs and its language, the French club listened to music, both old and new, read famous books and stories in their origi- nal form and viewed movies on Paris and other parts of the country. This proved to be a definite aid in help- ing students to become linguists. However, it was not all work for the French enthusi- asts. ln November the French l students planned a hay ride, and later both classes sponsored a dance. Profits made on dances were pooled by the two French l classes and the three French ll classes to buy pins and finance parties. At Chirstmas time the members read Christmas stories and learned many French carols. Adding a realistic touch to these informal sessions, Bernard Bouvet, AFS student from France, told of his family and social life in France and the United States. Throughout the year, Mrs. Barbara Verdoorn, French l instructor, and Miss Buth Bauer, French ll instructor, advised the students in planning their activities. Miss Bauer helped carry through the interest in the French Club by relating her personal experiences in Europe. Page 94 FRONT ROW: Morreim, Moen. King, Evenson, Ebsen, Olson, Hass- Palmer, Slile, Hanson, K. Gavle, Ianet Nelson, M. Gavle. FOURTH berg. SECOND ROW: Roorda, Boyum, Oslley, Neilson. Wahlsirom, ROW: Schnebly, Casey, Register, Danielsen, Woqen, Knutsen, Yost, Stadheim, Reilveld. Anderson. THIRD ROW: Ianice Nelson, Bluhm, Farry, Larson. FRONT ROW: Abrego, Schlehr, Knudson, Lee, Koistad, Lindeman. Verzloorn, Knudson, Ellertson. FOURTH ROW: Bell, Foley, Hen- SECOND ROW: Draayer, Dudley, Flanagan, Gendler, Krieger, Boyum, drickson. Iordahl, Hylbak, Bailey, Fredri:kson, Ille. Mathews. Hegland. Iacobson. THIRD ROW: Blizard, Kycek, Mofiit, Sether. Siyve, Olson, Page 95 FRONT ROW: Butters, P. Kappas, Kennedy, Lee, C. Hansen, Ludwig, Krueger, Kittelson, Knauer, Groos, Davidson, D. Kappas, Gavere, Ahl, Knudtson. SECOND ROW: Lutner, Boyer, Ackland, Iorgensen, Gur- Demo, Glenn. FOURTH ROW: Kycek, Bisqaard, Boyum, Boer, Iohn well, Doyscher, Gunderson, Gooderum, Hendrickson. THIRD ROW: lensen, Larson, G. Hansen, Coonradt, LeBeau, Black. German Club Members Earn Money, FRONT ROW: Tesch, Sprankle, Tolo, Ravenhorst, Wentzell, Schneid- Pickavance, Kennedy, Bole. FOURTH ROW: Peik, Sorenson, Dale- er, Wilhelm. SECOND ROW: Thompson, Mary Wayne, Martha iden, Wedge, Yocom, Syverson, Summers, Peterson, Cooper, Lacis, Wayne, Minear, Sherman, Taylor, Olsen, Waterman, Tostrud. THIRD Davies, Erlandson. ROW: Krause, Peterson, Rasmussen, Iensen, Moden, Van Ryswyk, Page 96 ln its second year ot existence at Albert Lea High School, the German Club, under its adviser Mr. Luverne Ahrndt, experienced a year filled With varied activities. A dance was sponsored by the club atter a football game. Members ot the club decorated the gym and took charge ot selling tickets and providing the music. Girl members became busy in the spring of the year preparing all sorts ot delicious, homemade cakes, pies and breadstufts. These goods were used tor the spring bake sale which was held at a local store. Through their energy and hard Work spent on the bake sale and the dance in the tall, members raised funds which were used for CARE packages and Radio Free Europe. The CARE packages were Wooden crates which consisted oi materials and articles needed and required by the needy people throughout the world. A spring picnic tor all members Was held at Edge- water Park. All members enjoyed the trollicking attair and the tempting dishes at this semi-potluck. Assisting Mr. Ahrndt in planning the activities tor the year were the otticers: Daniel Bisgaard, presidentg lames Daleiden, vice presidentg Cfervaise Wilhelm secretaryg and Martha Sherman, treasurer. "LISTEN to what I have to say," said Gervaise Wilhelm to Gary Davidson and Dennis Kappas as she prepared her German speech. Purchase and Send CARE Packages FIRST ROW: Massey, Paulson, Morreim, Sorensen, Springer, Peak, Xavier, Van Wilqen, Fabry, Perrin, D. Olson, Person, Fink, Ogren, Niebuhr. Sacketi. SECOND ROW: Thompson, McGill, Riley, P. Grasdalen. FOURTH ROW: Cutts, Breamer, Margadant, Munson, D. Hanson, Seeger, Pratt, Volkman, Inqebritson. THIRD ROW: Wallace, Palmer, B. Palmer, Wilson. Goodmanson, Roscoe. Petersen. Page 97 FRONT ROW: Indrelie, Schmidt, C. Hanson, Wilson, M. Iensen, Sipple, Bendixen, Wolqamot, Kirk, Lee, Mayotte, Bothof, Kofstad, Olson. SECOND ROW: Laqeson, Kennelly, Stencel, Goldman, Hareid, Ienson, Iudith Hanson, V Hanson, Dillinq I. Nelson Osmundson, Krie er . . , q , Brabec, Muilenberq, Hyland. THIRD ROW: Ellertson, Kaasa, Peter- son, Steffen, Moe, Hebel, Bell, Humphrey, Greqerson, Pierce, Bertel- son, Iverson, Callahan, Farry, Butler, Reincke. FOURTH ROW: Dono- van, D. Nelson, Goodmanson, loylene Hanson, Iordahl, Haugen, Zim- ney, K. Hanson, Hirsch, Ioynt. Bisqaard, Daleidan, I. Iensen, Iacobsen DeHaan. Club Members Attend Banquet, 'HOW'S THIS ONE?" said Mary Haskins to the other committeemen, David Boyer, Barbara Collins and Iohn Sullivan as they planned the decorations for the Latin banquet. IUDITH KENNELLY and Claudia Erickson were frantically trying to make their sheets look like togas before the Latin banquet. lunior Classical League is composed of Latin l and ll students and also those students who have taken two years of Latin in previous years. The two main programs of the lCL were the banquet and the State lCL Convention. At the traditional ban- quet held on April l5 in Bethany Hall at the Frst Luth- eran Church, members tried to recapture Roman cus- toms by dressing in togos as the ancient Romans did. The program consisted of a skit and a talk. On April 29 ICL members attended the State ICL Convention at Winona High School. The convention was in the form of a workshop. Those attending divid- ed into different groups. 'lhe groups were responsible for service, money-making projects, programs and a scrapbook. Iudith Kennelly, the State Secretary Scriptor, helped plan the program for this convention. A caroling party was held in December. After the members had sung at several places they returned to the high school cafeteria for refreshments. Miss Bernice Nervig, Latin teacher, was the adviser for the group. She Worked with the officers in planning the year's activities. Officers Were ludith Dugstad, presidentg Claudia Erickson, vice presidentp and Nancy Wing, secretary-treasurer. Page 98 1 FRONT ROW: Behr, Gilbertson, English, Haugen, Ferring. Barry, Knauer. Distad, Erickson. SECOND ROW: Hage, D. Iohnson. Knudt- son, Leif, Ekstrum, Dugstad, Kauffman, Iordahl. Gilbertson, Goldman. State Convention PLANNING THE YEAR'S ACTIVITIES were the Iunior Classical League officers: Nancy Wing, secretary-treasurer: Iudith Dugstad, president: and Claudia Erickson, vice president. FRONT ROW: Schenck, Narverud, I. Tuite, Tarvestad, Rutherford, Peaslee. White. SECOND ROW: M. Tuite, Severtson, Steele, Westrum, G. O'Leary, G. Wedge, Winq, Skophammer, Studer. THIRD ROW: B. Veldman, C. Nelson, Ohm, P. Veldman, Skelton, Romer. THIRD ROW: Rita Iohnson. Harding, Renee Iohnson, Frizzell, Iuve, Boyer, Laursen, Collins, Cotton, Andrews. R. Wedge, A. Nelson, Tasker, Peterson. FOURTH ROW: Pieper, R. Speltz, P. O'Leary, A. Speltz, Smeby. T. Nelson, Mueller, Witt- kamper, S. Veldman, Melting. Page 99 FIRST ROW: Bartell. Alm, Peterson, Hendrickson, Mayotte, Madson, Amundson. Klinqfus, Wilson. Reinaas. SECOND ROW: Folck, Hareid, Eggum. Hubbard, Wambach, Osburn, Iones, Tostenson, Warren, Dingemans, Wyant. THIRD ROW: Petersen, Miller, Butler, Stoa, Kuiters, Clausen. M. Paulson, Siife, Wolgamot, Emstad, Blocker. FOURTH ROW: Iefiery, O'Byrne. Bye, Iuers, Oliver, Fretheim, Mor- rison, I. Paulson, Harding, Keil, Bradley. Students Study Culture, btain Pins AT THE LAST MINUTE the two Mary Ellens lPau1son and Keill busily worked on the pinata for the Spanish Club party. Page 100 Spanish tood, games and a pinata were the main features oi the Spanish party held in February. Songs were sung and Spanish games were played. At Christmas time Spanish carols were sung in class. Skits, plays and readings were given by each class. Together with French Club, a sock-hop was sponsored alter one ot the wrestling matches. Gold pins in the shape ot a Mexican sornbrero with the club's inscription were bought by students. Slides, tilms and tilmstrips were used to obtain a greater knowledge of Spanish culture. Students brought souvenirs ot Mexico. Also aiding a great deal were the phonograph and tape recorder. Miss Ruth Bauer, Spanish Club instructor, subscribed to several magazines to get information from Spanish countries. First year students learned the common vocabulary and past and present verb coniugations, Main em- phasis during the second year was on speaking. Translations, dictations and short stories were used. Each class had its own otticers - lulie Paulson and Ruth Emstad, presidents: William l-larding and lean Madson, vice presidents, and Barbara Slite and Susan Wolgamot, secretary-treasurers. Entering new this year into High School extra-curri- cular activities was the Teenage Republican League. The TRL began in the tall. lts members began tak- ing an active part not only in the national presidential election, but also in the state and local elections. At Weekly meetings, the TRL discussed Ways in which the club could help campaigning, heard speakers from the local Republican party and helped with local rallies. The biggest event for many oi the TRL members came when they traveled to Rochester to hear Mr. Richard Nixon, the Republican candidate for President, speak at a rally. Many other state and local candidates were met at this and similar rallies. Such meetings helped the members become better acquainted with the candidates and with the important campaign issues. Each member made posters to advertise the club and to gain new members. Membership cards were obtained from the national society by the president. Meetings, held each Monday after school, were conducted by Steven Spurr, president, and Gail Raven- horst, secretary-treasurer. Republicans Join FIRST ROW: B. Larson, Bothof. Knudson. Ravenhorsi, Iordahl, Bolinger, B. Ienson. C. Hansen, Iucobson. SECOND ROW: B. Hun- son. Sprankle, B. Veldman, Engbritson, I. Nelson, Iordahl, Posthumus, CAMPAIGNING VIGOROUSLY for the Republican Party were TRL members Cynthia Bothoi, Nancy Bolinger, Linda Ille and Icme Nelson. New rganization S. Peterson, Wedge, Skophcxmmer, Edwin. THIRD ROW: Andrews, Hillstrom, Glesne, K. Hansen, Spurr, S. Veldman, Bailey, Wedge, Goodmcmson, Ille, Gregerson. Page 101 Drama Students Adopt New Name, SEARCHING FOR NEW PLAYS were otticers Carole Lee, exterior vice president: Lois Hassberq, treasurer: Cheryl Lutner, secretary: Myreen Gavle, president: and Suzanne Helgeson, interior vice president. FRONT ROW: Kappas, Hassberq, Ellertson, Gooderum, K. Gavle, Bendixen, Kirk, Knudson, Lutner. SECOND ROW: Haskins, Kycek, Boone, Klukow, DeNeui, Andrews, Duqstad, Gendler, Braaten. THIRD ROW: Gilbertson, Hanson, Evenson, Harding, Gurwell, Bell, Ille, Adopting Script and Gavel as the new name for the drama club, the dramatists worked diligently collecting properties, painting sets and delivering posters for their two major prodctions of the year. The first production was "Great Caesar's Ghost." This three-act play illustrated, in a humorous way, what happens to those who have been led astay by hypno- tism, the supernatural and the world beyond. The spring play, "The Madwoman ot Chaillotf' a poetic and comic fable set in the twilight zone of the not-quite-true, was presented in April. The two-act play told ot a group ot promoters who plotted to tear up Paris in order to unearth the oil which a prospector believed he had located in the neighborhood. Members of the club possessed an avid interest in dramatics. They journeyed by bus to the St. Paul auditorium to see the Broadway production ot "Five Finger Exercise," a musical comedy. Advancement into the National Thespian Society resulted after many hours oi work. Officers were Rox- anne Wehrhan, president: Carolyn Parry, vice pres- identy Barbara Slife, secretary, and Karen Mathews, treasurer. Mr. Wayne Cleveland acted as adviser. Furry, Engbritson, Lee. FOURTH ROW: M. Gavle, Christiansen, Knauer, Fredrickson, Counters, Wehrhan, Bailey, Larsen, Breamer, Iensen, Collins, Helqeson. Page 102 Attend Play, "Five Finger Exercise" FRONT ROW: Myers, Offenbecker, Petersen, Thompson, Romer, Peterson. Sprankle. Tuite, Mayotte. SECOND ROW: Stowell, Wedge, Skophammer, Register, K. Slite, Nimon, B. Sliie, Motfii, Ponto. THIRD ff ROW: Tolo. Skoqheim. Roscoe, Niebuhr. Zavitz. Venem, Mathews, Pratt, Mortenson. FOURTH ROW: Nelson, Yost, Veldman, T. Mor- rison, M. Morrison, Melting. Paulson, Schmidt, Olsen. THESPIANS WERE, FRONT ROW: Roxanne Wehrhan, Carolyn Farry. SECOND ROW: Barbara Slife, Karen Mathews. THIRD ROW: Morris Haskins, Camille Zavitz, Michael Morrison. HURRY UP! IT'S LEAVING! cried Gary Hoffman to Iudy Boyum and Barbara Collins as they left to board the bus to attend the play, "Five Finger Exercise" in St. Paul. Page 103 FIRST ROW: Gilbertson, Bothoi, Lindeman. Wilhelm, Blizard, Reincke, Tuite Iudith Olson Iudy Boyum Unseth Booen Indrelie M ers SECOND ROW: Morreim, Schlehr, Iulie Boyum, Hassberq. Edwin. Kofstad, Iudy Hanson, Iudith Ann Olson, Gari, Wahlstrom, Madson, Wilkinson. Folck, Mayotte, Hyland. THIRD ROW: Laqeson, Ellert- son, Ponto, Kycek, Mortensen. Krieger, Peterson, Emstad, Ianice Nelson, Mathews, Posthumus, S. Peterson, Boyer. Osmundson. Ender son, Lee. FOURTH ROW: S. Hanson. Enqbritson. Styve, Wolgamot Slife, Bell, Farry, Zavitz, lane Nelson, Stolze, Reichl, Iohnson, Ille, A Nelson, Meixell. Casey. FIFTH ROW: Hegland, Gavle, Yost, Iordahl Lind, Keil, Paulson, Ioan Hanson, Wehrhan, Morrison, Iverson Helgeson, Larson, Butler, Dillinq. Homecoming Projects, Panels, Talks ,IWW 1 f E , , if gig, r I Awning. .JHZLK "HOLD THE TURKEY" tludith Olsonl. said Mary Lindeman to Sharon Blizard as she prepared to cut off its head, while Dee Ellertson anxiously awaited a slice of meat at the Hi-Teens potluck. HI-TEENS EXECUTIVE COUNCIL WAS, FIRST ROW: Kristin Sether, Dee Ellertson, Barbara Heqland, Cheryl Lutner. SECOND ROW: Andrea Rutherford, Carole Lee, Linda Melting, Dorothy Reichl, Linda Kirk. Linda Petersen. Hi-Teens members began the year's activities by working for a better Homecoming. They decorated for the Homecoming Dance, made pom poms for the foot- ball game and entered a float in the parade. A Thanksgiving potluck was held on November l6. Members dressed in costumes associated with Thanks- giving. After the supper each class presented a skit. At the lanuary meeting Bernard Bouvet, foreign exchange student, spoke about his native country, France. He told about the customs of France and also gave his views of the American way of life. American Field Service student Barbara Slife also spoke at one of the meetings. She showed slides and told of her experiences in Belgium. Following her talk there was an opportunity to ask questions. The Hi-Teens Executive Council, consisting of two girls from each grade in senior high, met with the officers and advisers to plan programs and projects for the year. Acting as advisers were Mrs, Helen Heath, Miss Buth Bauer and Miss Edyth Olson. Page 104 Av FRONT ROW: Butters, Kappas. Lutner. Ludwig, Alm, Lee, Tolo. Hareid, Kaasa. Hanson. Skogheim. Sweet, Sether, Barry. Wayne. B. Schneider, Kirk. Maas. Rutherford. Knudtson. SECOND ROW: Wil- lensen. Pratt, Bendixen, Hebel, Peterson. Goldman. FOURTH ROW: son, Gooderum. Kennelly. Stencel, Hendrickson. Todd, Schmidt. Sherman, Minear, Sackett. Niebuhr. Gregerson. Kissinger. Anderson. Wacholz, Brown, Thompson, Iohnson, M. Iensen. THIRD ROW: Brooke. Coonradt. Olsen. Zimney, Humphrey. Peters. Gurwell. O O O O O O 1g lg t ct1v1t1es o 1- eeners FRONT ROW: Schenck. L. Anderson, Stadheim. L. Petersen, Erick- Hanson, Knudson. Goldman. FOURTH ROW: Siemer, Gavle. O'- son. Distad, B. Anderson. SECOND ROW: Carlson, Thompson. Eng- Leary, Hendrickson, Reindl, Melting' Veldman' D- OlS01'L Pedk, l- lish. Severtson. Ferring, Reichl, Wing. Higgins. Iacobson. THIRD Olson. ROW: Leif, Ahern, King, Swanson. Iordahl. Harding. Register. S. Page 105 Red Cross Works To Help thers FRONT ROW: Butters, Schlehr, King, Ahern, Rund, Iordahl, Hareid, Hanson, Myers, Anderson. SECOND HOW: Flanagan, Meixell, Ekstrum, Sweet, Lindahl, Helqeson, Frizzell, Olson, Heqland, Hendrick- Striving to serve those in need, both locally and internationally, was the goal of this year's lunior Red Cross. lt attempted to create good will among races throughout the United States and foreign countries. Each homeroom, at the beginning of the year, elect- ed a representative. Anyone was Welcome to attend the meetings. Special courses were available in first aid. Presiding at the Red Cross meetings was ludith Moffit, president. Assisting with other duties were Pamela Lindahl, vice president, and Barbara Hegland, secretary-treasurer. Miss Ruth Woods was the Free- born County chairman, and Mr. Rene Wambach was chosen to be teacher-sponsor for the school. One of the special money-making projects this year was a paper drive held in the early part of October. The money collected helped finance other services to the community, including making gifts boxes, filling the traditional school chest, sending magazines to vet- erans and Working in blood centers. An annual fund drive was held February 7-lU. Donations were collected in each of the homerooms throughout the week. A dance, sponsored by the lunior Red Cross, climaxed the drive. TYPING UP BUNDLES and making bundles of newspapers for the annual. Red Cross paper drive in November were Iudiih Mofiith, Carol Eksirum, Connie Sweet and Steven Munson. IOINING- THE RED CROSS during the membedship drive was Karen Meixell as Suzanne Helqeson and gave her a membership card. son, Moffit. THIRD ROW: Christiansen, Davidson, Slinde, Munson, Haskins, Iorgenson, Paulson, Zimney, Gregerson, Emstad. Page 106 Riflemen Stress Perfection, Safety FRONT ROW: Sorenson, O'Neal, Heilman, Olson, Heather, Steil, Ingebritson, Fredrickson. SECOND ROW: L. Nelson, Krause, War- ren, Krueger. Smith. Sheveland, Xavier, Hareid, Yokiel. THIRD ROW: Peik, Demo, Iordahl, C. Nelson. Vandersyde, Brue, Brown. Marqudant. PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT was the motto followed by Terry Soren- son as he attempted to make a bull's-eye. "LOOK, I HIT THE BULL'S-EYE," exclaimed Terry as he practiced marksmcmship at the Ritle Club meeting. ln its fourth year of existence, the Rifle Club attained its highest number of active members since the estab- lishment of the organization. The boys met weekly, striving to improve their shooting skills, to become good sportsmen and to practice safety in shooting. The club, sponsored by the federal government, was affiliated with the National Rifle Association. Am- munition and heavy .22 caliber target rifles with peep sights were supplied by the government from army sur- plus supplies. lndividual medals offered by the NRA as prizes for certain shooting achievements. A fifty-foot shooting range behind the woodshop in 4 P.A. serve as the meeting place for practices. l-lere the four basic shooting positions and rules and Ways of shooting were learned and practiced. Safey in prac- tice Was maintained by a strict set of rules. Although no regular field trips were conducted, many of the boys took individual and group excursions on their own to increase their accuracy and skills. Much of the success of the Rifle Club this year was due to the cooperation of the officers. Barry Yocum served as president, Gary Vanderside as vice president and Bill Warren acted as secretary-treasurer. Offering his time, assistance and leadership to the club, Mr. Sydney Schwartz, industrial arts instructor, acted as the group's adviser. Mr. Vern Ahrndt, German instructor, offered his services as an assistant adviser. Page 107 Iohnson, Beck, Schermer. FOURTH ROW: Fredrickson, Petersen Stoa, Andersen. Yocom, Hamson, Poole, Morrison, D. Nelson, Edwin I. Nelson. ' SIMM 95. ,Q 'Q s 0 .100 A Girls Usher in New Point System "Cl-IOW TIME" called Miss Olive Iohnson to all Ushers' Club mem- HANDING OUT PROGRAMS for one of the school plays were ushers bers at their potluck supper held before the Tiqer's Roar. Iudith Bartell and JoAnn Broitzman. Page 108 FRONT ROW: Pamela Schumacher, Iol-inn Broitzmcm, Iudith Bartell. SECOND ROW: Faye Seedori, Ioyce Steinke, Ianice Rice. THIRD ROW: Karen Steffen, Barbara De Boer, Loree Henderson, Iudith Broitzman. Highlighting this year's Ushers' Club activities was the new point system. The total points necessary to receive an award had not been set, so all seniors re- ceived their award, a pin, anyway. A point was given every time one ushered, and an additional point was awarded it the usher remained tor the entire program. Under the able assistance ot adviser Miss Olive lohnson, biology instructor, the Ushers' Club members have worked together to serve all those that attended school sponsored entertainment, Civic Music programs and the Passion Play from the Black Hills, Working with Miss lohnson were the club oiiicers: loAnn Broitzman, president: loyce Steinke, vice presi- dentg Ianice Rice, secretaryg and ludith Bartell, treas- urer. With their leadership activities were planned. One of the highlights oi the year was the potluck held lanuary 31 before the Tiger's Roar. The girls met in the home economics room tor this. Another special event oi the calendar year was the Spring Tea. At the tea the results oi the voting tor next year's oiticers was announced. ln addition the seniors received pins which were figured by the point system. To give those students interested in science a better knowledge ot the scientific tields and to encourage students to have science projects and hobbies was the aim ot the Science Club. Acting as advisers tor the group were Mr. Robert Anderson and Mr. Melvin Salmela. Meetings were held every Thursday. Programs ot the club included tours ot various places in the city. On December l5 members toured KATE radio station. Mr. Don Franz explained broad- casting atter which they watched an actual broadcast. On February l3 they spent the entire day touring ditter- ent places ot interest. They visited Universal Milking Company atter which they toured Streater lndustries. To end their day ot touring they went to the Albert Lea Tribune. Another tour ot interest was at Benson Optical Company. Other programs included a tape recording on brainwashing and a talk by a veterinarian. Occa- sionally the members viewed movies pertaining to the various fields ot science. On December 22 they held their annual Christmas party. Assisting Mr. Anderson and Mr. Salmela in plan- ning the year's activities were the otticers: Betty Tolo, presidenty Ioe Trejo, vice presidenty Iudith Ness, secre- taryg and Karen Folck, treasurer. "IS THIS THE RIGHT BUTTON?" said Iudith Ness to Betty Tolo as loe Treio and Karen Folck examined the new oscilloscope. Science Club Features Tours FRONT ROW: Folck, Tolo, Nelson, Ness. SECOND ROW: Fluqum, Sorenson, Riley, May, Heilman. THIRD ROW: Van Ryswyk, Lczcis, LITERALLY TAKING APART MAN was Roger Sorenson as Rachel Peterson, Sorenson, Peiper, Treio. Acklcmd and Dennis Riley told him what to take next. Page 109 Students Render Leadership, Ability HONOR SOCIETY STUDENTS-FRONT ROW: Karen Unseth, Gwen- dolyn Wahlstrom, Robert Wallace, Leland Warner, Roxanne Wehr- han, Steven Westrum, Gernaise Wilhelm, Paul Wilke, Susan Wol- qamot, Barry Yocum. SECOND ROW: Ianice Morreim, Janice Nel- son, Myrna Nelson, Richard Oliphant, Iulie Paulson, David Peterson, Elaine Posthumus, Dorothy Reichl, Rodney Seeger, Sara Shoemaker, Barbara Slile, Alice Sorenson, Ramona Styve. THIRD ROW: Mar- "IT'S NOT THAT WAY!" exclaimed Gene Hanson to Steven Person, audio-visual members, as Steven attempted to plug the movie pro- jector into the wrong electrical socket. Page 110 qaret Indrelie, William Ienner, David Iordahl, Ruth Iordahl, Iohn Iorqenson, Mary Keil, Michael Knutsen, Barbara Kofstad, Gail Lage- son, Marqit Larson, Mary Lindeman, lean Madson, Donna Mayotte. FOURTH ROW: Daniel Bisgaard, Rebecca Boyer, Darlene Butler, Karen Callahan, Nancy Chapman, Iames Daleiden, Patricia Enderson, Mary Gilbertson, Iames Groos, Corrine Hanson, Ioylene Hanson, Iudith S. Hanson, Linda Ille. NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY Members of the National Honor Society were select- ed on the basis of scholastic ability, leadership qual- ities, character and citizenship in the school and com- munity. A grade average of "B" was essential. A committee consisting of five faculty members selected students on an elimination basis, considering grade averages and the above characteristics. Those students selected were presented with the National l-lonor Society key at the Awards Assembly. AUDIO-VISUAL CLUB The Audio-Visual Club, although greatly decreased in size, continued its service to the school under the direction of Mr. Marvin Glesne, mathematics and sci- ence instructor. lts various duties included setting up movie projectors in classrooms and running the big projector in the auditorium for assemblies. Members also cared for the audio-visual equipment. A larger room was built in the new addition for the storage of projectors and films. This room also facili- tated the previewing of movies by faculty members. FRONT ROW: Carlson, Rutherford, Anderson, Hassberq, Lee, Boyum, ROW: Frizzell, Sloa, K. Gavle, Peterson, Olsen, Springer, Niebuhr, Peaslee, Myers. SECOND ROW: Daqner, Nagel, Wentzell, Gun- Roscoe, Iensen. FOURTH ROW: C. Nelson, Bell, Foley, Melting, derson, Meixell, M. Gavle, Kirk, Mayotte, Gooderum, Roorda. THIRD Hirsch, Schulte, Paulson, Tangen, Taylor. Girls Learn of Teaching Profession BUSILY PREPARING LUNCH for the FTA meeting were members l Lois Hassberg, Iulie Paulson and Janice Peterson. 1 WRAPPING PACKAGES lor the substitute Santa were FTA officers Ianet Myers, vice president: Lynda Bell, president: and Peggy Peaslee, treasurer. Not pictured was fanet Roorda, secretary. Helping students to survey the field of teaching is the purpose of the lVlcGuffey Future Teachers of Amer- ica. Wallace Kennedy was the adviser of the club. FTA members sent invitations encouraging students who showed an interest in the teaching profession to join the club. At a punch party December l, these new members were initiated. The purpose of the club was explained and each new member took the pledge. During the year FTA'ers visited an elementary school to observe classes in progress. ln some classes students were allowed to help the teachers. A panel discussion on the advantages and dis- advantages of teaching was given during National Education Week over KATE radio. Posters were also hung in the school halls to commemorate this week. Leading the varied activities were the officers: Lynda Bell, presidentg lanet Myers, vice presidentg Peqqif Peaslee, treasurerg and lanet Roorda, secretary. New officers were elected in the spring for the following year. Page 111 FHA Members Travel to Convention FRONT ROW: P. Thompson, McCormack, White, Gari, Tolo. Peier- Thompson. THIRD ROW: Miovac, Christensen, Schumacher, Wanqs- son, Brandt, Evans, Peaslee. SECOND ROW: Morreim, Blanchard, ness, Builer, Siolze, Weik, Loken, Rund. Iverson, Anderson, Bauman, Prait, Leschefske, Siiebler, Deckcxrd, I. WAITING FOR THE BUS to take Ihem to the annual FHA con- vention at Minneapolis were Paulene Christiansen, Sharon Wang- ness, Freda Gari, Sandra Peierson and Pauletie Loken. Page 112 Participate in Numerous Activities With the motto, "Toward New Horizons," the Albert Lea Future I-lomemakers of America began their seventh year in existence at the Albert Lea High School. ln the tall ot the year, three main events took place. The punch party to welcome all prospective members was held in September with a talk on new tall fashions. The candlelight ceremony in October initiated 28 mem- bers into the organization. Along with this each member received a booklet about the club and an FHA ribbon. On Cctober 22, a district convention took place at Min- nesota Lake. At this convention lanet Blanchard was in charge of the group which discussed "Light for Us Fl-lA'ers." Thirteen other members, two chapter moth- ers and the adviser also attended. November marked the roller skating party. This was opened to all Fl-lA'ers and FFA'ers of Alden, Free- born, Glenville and Albert Lea. Also, on December l9, there was the annual Christmas caroling party. ln order to have a better understanding of FHA, to meet other FHA members and to bring back new ideas, the Fl-lA'ers went to the State Convention March 3 and 4. Those who attended were the adviser, Mrs. Phyllis Hostager, Lois McCornack, Katherine Sipple, ludith Thompson and Sharon Wangeness. IUDITH THOMPSON, Sharon Iverson. Patricia Iverson and Eleanor Lescheiske were busy preparing cofiee for the luncheon. 'lumix M ..., . f : . .sf it -:-. ,!t,:,:.,: ,- .:,.,.,.:.,.,.,.,- - f --:2t' W t 1 ' ? Z... i 5 "': 1 ..., ....:. . ' 1 , ----- - . il l? .,. ':""' I . . A .-.,. : --r-t .,... ':':':':':':': .sg , 't-' t fi . . t .... ,.r. MMM --r::' - in M '- S , 4 E1 ----, :-:- ' 'ug-5:5a5:::'-QQ ' '-1:sasasasaessigasssas:2. N . H - . .... - " 1' 55 ? 0 'it' ' i . st ' H 3 . 'rs t i. Us-' A fi ""'t"' W t. . N - V ..,,.,., . ..... ' if .,,.,. . "WOULD YOU LIKE SOME COFFEE?" Paulene Christiansen asked Miss Elsie Sebert at the FHA teacher's luncheon. PINNING THE FHA ribbon on lane Reckcxrd was Lois McCornack as Janice Morreim and Kathylene Miovac inspected the handbooks. 4 fab, Page 113 FRONT ROW: Hareid, Hoelscher, G. Collins, G. Anderson, Horninq, Hoyne, Brandt. SECOND ROW: Bowman. Lair, lenson, Larson, Flaskerud, Acklcmd. THIRD ROW: Guard, Folie, Harms, I. Ander- son, R. Eckart, Baker I. Collins, Iensen. FOURTH ROW: G. Iohnson. Ladlie, Gunderson, Hoverson, G. Eckart, L. Johnson, Clausen, Bauers. Future Farmers of America Win SHOWING THE PRIZE CALF of the Albert Lea FFA Chapter were Mr. Donald Paulson, Mr. Walter Steele and Ronald Thompson, winner of the dairy showmanship contest at the Purenia Royal Dairy Show. Page 114 Atter conducting cr corn drive, the Albert Lea FFA Chapter raised more than S500 tor Camp Courage. The chapter also participated in the State Corn Yield Con- test, the State Tractor Driving Contest, a cow clipping contest and a public speaking contest. lt exhibited prize-winning animals at the Minnesota State Spring Barrow show, the Freeborn County Fair and the Minnesota State Fair. At the sixteenth annual Albert Lea banquet held at Hayward, the chapter received a superior rating tor all activities. Award winners were lay Ackland, cow clip- ping champion and sheep showmanship, lames Collins, award in dairy production, Darrel Folie, tarm mechan- ics, Steven l-loelscher, swine production and showman- shipg and Keith lverson, dairy showmanship. Receiver ot the sophomore award given tor the most outstanding performance in the iirst year ot vocational agriculture was David lenson. l-le also won the pub'ic speaking award. Other winners were Donald Nelson, national award in farm management and champion crop exhibitor, Richard Nelson, tractor driving, DeKalb Agriculture Association Award and swine showman- shipg Charles Stadheim, national award in livestock productiong Stanley Stadheim, service award, Ronald Thompson, dairy showmanshipg Heike Veldman, National State Green l-land award: and Thomas Was- moen, national award in crop production. FRONT ROW: Brandt, Lunninq, Gnirlke, Schlede, Peterson, Schroeder, ROW: S. Thompson, Morreim, Iensen, H. Smeby, Iacobson, Walde- Venem, Perkins. SECOND ROW: Oakland, G. Thompson, Schewe, mar, Wasmoen, Ohm. FOURH ROW: Morland, Goskeson, Wangen, Hanson, Sipple, Stadheim, R. Thompson, D. Nelson, K. Nelson. THIRD Waltz, G. Wanqen, I. Smeby, Heideman, R. Nelson. Awards, Honors at Annual Banquet AWARD WINNERS at the annual banquet were, FRONT ROW: R. Nelson, Folie, Iverson, Collins, Wasmoen. SECOND ROW: Stadheim, Veldman, Ackland, Ienson, Hoelschew, Thompson, D. Nelson. PRESENTING ONE of the National FFA Chapter Award Plaques to Keith Iverson of the Albert Lea Chapter was Mr. Leo Anil, the State FFA Vice President from Owatonna. Page 115 FRONT ROW: Anderson, Boyer, Lunning, Reinclce. Chapman, Tennyson, Fieldberg, Stout, Peterson, Harpel, Briggs, Hutchins, Mariner, Herfindahl. SECOND ROW: Iacobson, Carroll, Hoium, Groetzinger, Lee. FOURTH ROW: Rye, Berg, Holt, Suthers, Olson, Wright, Uqland, Lind, Gilbert, Indrelie, Krueger. THlRD ROW: Ruerup, Olsen, Dress, Dugstad, Knutson. Diversified Students Gain Knowledge PRACTICING SELLING stuffed animals were the diversified oflicers Patricia Gilbert, Robert Knutson, Karen Boyer and Ianis Hoium. LOADING A TRUCK with groceries was one oi the many tasks per- formed by Larry Sorby on his job at a local grocery store. Page 116 Gaining knowledge for their future vocations was the goal of the diversified classes. They worked at this goal by securing part-time and after school jobs. Each student was given two credits for the course - one for the part-time job and one for the actual class Work. Under the guidance of Mr. Norman Bailey, the stu- dents learned how to further their careers in business and how to get along with their fellow employees. Before taking diversified, it is suggested to the stu- dents that they have one credit in business principles, business machines, bookkeeping or stenography. These courses enable them to find a job more easily. Mr. Bailey watched each student on the job and in class in order to make a report to the state. lf any prob- lems were found, Mr. Bailey tried to solve them. Serving as officers for the club were Ianis Hoium, president, Patricia Gilbert, vice president, Karen Boyer, secretary, and Bobert Knutson, treasurer. PEEKING IN THE OVEN wasn't exactly part oi Richard's Durin's iob at a local bakery, but then who can resist the temptation? MAKING POSTERS for a local clothing store was iust one of the many jobs performed by David Smith at his part-time job. Apply Techniques FRONT ROW: Mills, Eisenbise, Twetten, Rollins, Carson, Hathaway. Undahl Chnstenson Freeman FOURTH ROW S Amundson SECOND ROW: Sorenson, Fredrickson, Nimon. Stout, Nelson, Wolff, Edwin Bachtle Bryan Holton Dress Briggs C Amundson Brandt. THIRD ROW: Willaby, Iverson. Petersen, Johnson, Clifford, Senior Journalists Contribute Time 'Nga .- 'KWWL r gk' gig ,..g'j' hu.. WORKING DILIGENTLY to get their pictures in alphabetical order were Neal Gendler, Lawrence Haugen, Elaine Posthumus, Iulie Paul- son, lean Schlehr and DeAnna Foley as they attempted to complete their respective sections. "WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THIS PICTURE?" exclaimed Cynthia With the experience they gained in their junior year by publishing the Ah La Ha Sa and the student direc- tory, the senior journalists began work on the Tiger. After much wondering and anticipation, the positions for the yearbook staff were revealed at the annual Quill and Scroll initiation held at Edgewater Park. The students began Work immediately. From among the submited themes, the journalists chose "Tiger Reflects" to portray the past and future of Albert Lea High School. The color scheme and cover design were then chosen. A vigorous subscription drive was held throughout the school and business district, The Tiger began to take shape, under the careful guidance of Miss Edna Gercken, as captions and copy- blocks were completed and sent for the final printing. The editors, Barbara Slife and Mary Keil, were kept busy correcting and compiling the final copies. Student photographers, Steve Person and David Larsen, spent much of their time taking and developing pictures for all sections. They were aided throughout the year by Mr. Earl lacobsen, photography adviser. Selling small red pennants was one of the extra projects undertaken to help finance the Tiger. Bowers candy and the candy store also aided in balancing the budget. The familiar concession stands at athletic events were run by journalists. LOOKING THROUGH OTHER YEARBOOKS to obtain ideas for their Bothof. girls sports editor, to uninterested Richard Oliphant, sports organization section were Sharon Blizard, Arlene Dilling and Carole editor. Allen Tullberg, sports writer listened curiously. 6 Page 118 Lee as their section neared completion. 09-i9 Efforts To Help Finance Yearbook l FOLLOWING ALL EVENTS durmq the school BUSY DEVELOPING PICTURES as they attempted HELP' THIEVES' was the cry of Linda year were the members of the Txger Student to make the deadlme alter a hectrc day of pxcture Ille busmess manager as Mary Keil, liter- Lzte sectron Susan Wolqamot Patrrcra Moen takmq were Steven Person and Davrd Larsen ary edrtor and Barbara Shfe, Tiger editor. and Ianet Myers Trger stat-t photographers tned to get mto the candy closet. CHECKING THE FACULTY and GCIIIIIIIISIICIIOH were Barbara Koi BUY YOUR TIGER NOW was the cry of Hazel Stoa and Nancy stad and Roxanne Wehrhan as they attempted to complete therr Bolmger publrcxty managers as Iamce Nelson and Ianice Peterson, Page 119 HANDING GAIL RAVENHORST, Ah La Ha Sa editor, their page lay- out betore she took them to the printer for publication were Cheryl Lutner and Marline Minear, assistant editors. TALKING OVER lay-outs for their respective pages were Linda Kirk and Patricia Kappas, third page editors, and Mary Sprankle and Andrea Kutherford, editorial page editors. Juniors Take Cver Paper, Prepare LEAVING TO SEEK information for their assigned stories for the paper were star reporters, Beverly Butters, Sharon Iverson, Ruth Ann Iep- son, Maridee Alm and Barbara Larson. E j Page 120 Venturing into the field of journalism, 26 juniors, under the excellent guidance of Miss Edna Gercken, were taught the techniques of journalistic writing. Their first big project was the publication of the Student Directory. As they obtained ads from local firms and compiled the names, addresses and tele- phone numbers of all students in Southwest and Central junior l-ligh Schools and in the Senior High School, they learned the value of accuracy, how to write and correct copy and how to function in a business world. On February 9 the new Ah La l-la Sa staff was an- nounced, and on February 23 it published its first issue. The journalists learned that page layouts, pica sticks, galleys and page proofs laid the foundation toward the duties which they had inherited. Of course, they worked on other projects besides the paper. The junior journalists could be seen selling candy and pop at basketball and football games and at wrestling matches to raise money to finance the paper and yearbook. They also sold pennants. Bringing the year to a climax was the annual ban- quet at which the deserving students were initiated into the National Quill and Scroll Association by the senior journalists. They were also told of their new positions on the l962 Tiger. With eager anticipation of another year of fun and hard work, the juniors looked forward to the tasks confronting them as senior journalists. ATTEMPTING TO HELP Lois McCornack, Ah La Ha Sa business man- ager, escape from the many candy boxes that surrounded her, was Mary Tuite, advertising manager. Student Directory PREPARING FOR the paper circulation was Barbara Pratt, circulation manager, as Carol Legreid, exchange editor, attempted to get the exchange papers ready tor mailing. M. LOOKING IN ROGET'S THESAURUS in order to complete their head- lines were star reporters Linda Todd and Marie Lorenzen as Renee Wambach, Ianet Thompson and Elizabeth Peterson watched. "HOW'S THIS ONE?" exclaimed Ronald Tostenson, sports editor, to Barbara Ienson, girls' sports editor, as he endeavored to iind the right headline count for one of sports stories. KAREN PETERS, staff artist, strived for perfection as she attempted to complete the etching for the next issue of the paper. Paqo 121 t"'hnf"' gf It an xii- L. Eggs 1-...., As the halfback surged over the goal line for the win- ning touchdown . . . as the forward raced down the court for a field goal . . . as the matmcm attempted to pin his opponent . . . as the trackster raced to a win- ning iinish, the spirit of sports in Albert Lea High School was fully reflected. Each participant worked to the best oi his ability to bring credit to the school in athletics. 'bkwgsk Mmxm wssgwxm We-8 U2 "U 0 W I-Il U2 ,:mwuw4wwnmw:wmmm:wmwmw'u mmf' mwzwww rfawmwv . Liz! my M-my ff 4' K fff?f53.' if .- nigga if -I' 54 gn Ei 2 ef. 25, vgigwwyf " M 14" gffigiffirf' Qi, ww fif ff 11" f 33, ff it Mtg? St at 9 242 ri, X 'wwfgfigfwwl 232 4 WS' fx is Qxixk lr--A-95 R ey PH? ffm' G if? S 3 R g,,.,,A,A A . V f P2 . xiii . .....1.-,.,. m y, " V, ., ,fa-m,Z'i ' - f: , , X F5 .3l5v?g,E'G?s?'l'52tZ3V' " in ' , ., . ,kr-,tfsgxyffwsf WW' X tm ff , 'i.1f'f,,sS?4,p,i,K? 'H 'wsf,,,.,,s M: I hm5W.aK.b ag, ,j T l W -. . fav '. :'i?5Z?5'f" it "Nm, s, "E 55 ,. ,ffm'.f1,J4:e,rg.f.5f,'ffg-,rj-' ,n,f,1.?f' ' , :M 'ii Q2 .-,,11:-E4,f:".,.-I-'iffa,Jwgffbkffiri ' . .wif-T-,ff-'M s Mfszrs Md -,y9-2, f.Q.,5f,:-wiffqp,-V .- ,,.-QQ, .-3,x.l,,y,.-. ,gm ,fy - " 1 XiaVQfffwi2.iW3.Z'i5Sfefff'i?gm-fg-.14' - , ,i,ybg,.53n,-.W-inc'.".2..',-gg-"' .. gp4-f:m4mg2efffwQ2fl'aigfw,riser Y.','2ai4Sf' F I "3-Q?9fz "5'?f?iv if fgisif ififffff 5 '.- -:, - MsQ-vfawwggzfrgw,Qz5s'G'vQ -Siam fiftsm tim,-, - 3. -' he X . ' wi"3lAj?fi' ?4ffbX4?A'?'?vFtQ3'?SQQ?5Xfif- " Q ,, .. , We ...,.,.. ,. -. - -"' BIG NINE CHAMPIONS-FRONT ROW: Danielsen, Tonheim, Bo- sacker, Palmer, Claybourn, Oliphant, I. Olson, Suthers. Wilke, I. Lar- son. SECOND ROW: Kennedy, Kittelson,, Guiney, D. Larsen, T. Larson, Knutsen, Kappczs, Palmer, McKey. THIRD ROW: Coach Driesbach, Iahns, Summers, Iacobsen, Flaten, Boer, Fretheim, Brooke, Mortenson. FOURTH ROW: Coach Ehrhard, Waterman, G. Olsen, Boyum, Coonradt, Steil, Coach Gustafson. Powerful Tiger- Gridders Capture Page 124 Albert Lea football fortunes, on the upswing in the past few seasons, took an important and climactic step forward during the 1960 grid campaign. For the first time in the annals of Albert Lea football, the Tigers captured the Big Nine Conference championship. Experience and team balance were the key factors in the team's success according to head coach lim Gus- tafson. Evidence of the squad's balance was reflected in the number of boys Who received recognition. Everyone in the Tiger's starting lineup, which was comprised of eight seniors and three juniors, received recognition of some kind. Six boys, Del Bosacker, cen- ter, left Brooke, tackle, Steve Claybourn, fullback, Gary lacobsen, end, Bich Oliphant, quarterback, and Torn Suthers, guard, were chosen to the Big Nine All-Confer ence squad. The remaining five, Bill Danielsen, Iohn Olson, Bruce Palmer, Dave Palmer and Paul Wilke, were named to the honorable mention list. HEAD COACH IIM GUSTAFSON pointed out flaws in the Tiger attack to assistants Paul Ehrhard and Bob Driesbach prior to the title clinching Red Wing encounter. Both Ehrhardt and Driesbach were new to the varsity staff this season. VARSITY BOX SCORE ALBERT LEA OPPONENTS 27 ,v,, - E,,, Northtield ,,, ,.,A,,E ,,,l2 l4,,, ,,.,,Manlcato ,,, ,,, U 26,,, ,,,, Faribault ,,, ,,, 7 7,,, ,,,, Austin ,,,, ,,, 7 l5,,, ,,,, Washburn ,,, ,,,32 26,,, ,,.,Rochester ,, ,,, 7 2U,,, ,,,, Winoiia ,, ,,, 6 27,,, ,,,, Red Wina ,, ,,,l3 27,,, ,,,, Cwatonna -,, ,,,l3 l89 97 JOHN OLSON, rugged tackle and defensive standout, displayed form that made him a feared pass catcher. Olson was an eligible and competent pass receiver in the Tigers 'T'-Spread formation. Big Nine Crown Cofcaptain and tullbaclc Steve Claybourn led the team in rushina with a total oi 262 yards in ll8 attempts tor a 5.3 yards per carry averaae. Haltbaclis Dave Palmer and Paul Wilke were tied tor second in ballfcarryina yardaae. Each aained 588 yards in Ql tries. As a team, the poweriul Tiqers consumed l,937 yards on the around and 430 yards throuah the air lanes ior a total ot some 2,427 yards. Dave Palmer topped the squad in scorina with eiaht touchdowns tor 43 points. Claybourn and Wilke were closeybehind with 43 and 36 points respectively. The closeness ot the scorina race was iust another example ot the tine allfaround balance on the team, Besides winning the conference title, the N350 Tiqers reached two other aoals that will lonq be remembered by the team and fans alike. ln tallyina l9U points, the Tiaers broke the team scoring mark for one season. The record had been l88 points, recorded the previous year. Also, at the close oi the season, the Tigers were ranked with the top ten Minnesota hiqh school teams. Page 125 "LOOK AT HIM GO," lohn Olson KSU seemed to say as Steve Clay- bourn carries the ball to another Tiger touchdown in the Rochester contest. The Rockets' Larry Serbin Cleiil moved up too late. PAUL WILKE C22 AND UPPER LEFTD was stopped after a nice gain against Mankato. Wilke's vicious running and fine defensive play drew prcise from the coaching staff on numerous occasions. The Tigers shut out the Scarlets, 14-U. Team Balance Opening their championship campaign, the Tigers downed a small but scrappy Northfield Raider team by a score of 27-l2. The Tigers held a 2l-O lead at halftime and then scored once in the second half. Mankato proved to be a fairly strong team as it gave the Tigers guite a scare before finally bowing, 14-O. Dave Palmer and Steve Claybourn scored the touch- downs for the Tigers. Defense was the key. Against Faribault it was the Tigers all the way as they defeated the Falcons by a decisive score of 26-6. The big line and the powerful backfield proved to be too much for the Falcons. Dave Palmer scored three limes for the victorious Tigers. ln what was by far the most important game of the year, Albert Lea tied a strong Austin Packer team, 7-7. Steve Claybourn plunged over from the one-yard line for the touchdown and also scored the extra point. Suffering their first and only loss of the season, the Tigers dropped a 32-15 loss to a big, fast Washburn team. Albert Lea started off well, getting off to a 9-O lead on a touchdown, extra point and a safety. Kenny lohnson, fleet Miller halfback, proved to be hard tc handle as he broke away on several long runs. SHIFTY DAVE PALMER tried in vain to elude a Washburn defender in the Homecoming game. Palmer supplied the needed speed in the powerful Tiger backlield. Albert Lea suffered its lone loss at the hands of the powerful Millers, 32-15. Page 126 Key To Albert Lea Football Prowess Back on the winning road again, the Tigers romped to a 26-7 victory over a Rochster squad that couldnt get its offense rolling. Again it was the defense that was the key for the Tigers as they held speedster Duane Dornaclc to four yards rushing in the first half. Winona threw guite a scare into the Tigers before falling by a score of 206. Cne of the highlights of the first half was a 52fyard touchdown pass from Rich Gli- phant to Gary lacobsen. Albert Lea had some trouble containing the Winhawlcs' fleetffooted backs, but they held them well enough to win. The Tigers defeated a fairly strong Red Wing team, 27-13, in a game that clinched the championship for Albert Lea. While the Tigers were beating the Wingeis, a big upset was taking place in Austin. Owatonna beat the Packers, giving the championship to the Tigers. Finishing their season undefeated in conference play the Tigers sped to a 27fl3 win over Qwatonna. Paul Willie, playing his last game in a Tiger uniform, finished his high school career by scoring three times. HARD WORKING MANAGERS Larry Lahs. Bill Satre and Paul Hanson inspected a helmet during a practice session at Abott Field. These boys were a great asset to the team and coaches. FULLBACK STEVE CLAYBOURN plunged for a touchdown against Austin. This play was probably the most important one of the season for the Tigers as it allowed them to tie the powerful Packers, 7-7. Claybourn also scored the point following. wang, wire 'WN BILL DANIELSEN, SENIOR WINGMAN. caught a pass in the Tiger win over Mankato. Danielsen was a consistent and de- pendable pertormer in the Albert Lea forward wall. This play netted l7 crucial yards in the second quarter. Page 127 Entire Tiger Starting Unit Receives RICH OLIPHANT, TIGER QUARTERBACK, accepted congratula- tions from coach Gustafson after receiving the "Player of the Year" award. Oliphant was picked by his teammates. A rugged defensive effort put forth when their goal line was being threatened was typical of the l96O Tigers. At one point in almost every game, the Tigers dug in close to their own goal and succeeded in thwart- ing an enemy drive. These defensive efforts were very important in the Austin and Red Wing games. Proof of the viciousness of the Tiger defense can be found in its accomplishments. Albert Lea held Big Nine opponents to a total of only 66 points in eight games and an average of slightly more than one touchdown per game. The l96O Tigers were tops in the conference in this department. Another trait typical of the Tigers was their ability to get off to an early lead. The Tigers scored first in every game except the Austin encounter. ln seven of the nine games, Albert Lea scored the first time it got the ball. By scoring three early touchdowns against Rochester and Faribault, it quickly took command. SPEEDSTER ON THE MOVE: Speedy Dave Palmer outran Red Wing's Tim Loomis C313 and headed for the goal line. Steve Claybourn Ion ground! looked for someone to block. Page 128 R WARDING OFF A BLOCKER, Oliphant attempted to reach Roch- ester's Duane Dornack MOI. The Tigers held the Rocket speedster to a scant four yards in the first half and won, 26-7. Grid Recognition Fifteen seniors were on the Tiger roster. They were Del Bosacker, Steve Claybourn, Bill Danielsen, Tom Guiney, Dennis Kappas, Mike Knutsen, Dave Larsen, lim Larson, Ted Larson, Bich Oliphant, Iohn Clson, Dave Palmer, Tom Suthers, Tom Tonheim and Paul Wilke. Many of these boys had been on the varsity for three seasons and formed the nucleus for Coach lim Gustafsons rebuilding program, At the annual Quarterback Club Banquet at the end of the season, Rich Cliphant, senior quarterback, re- ceived the Player of the Year Trophy. l-lis teammates voted to award this to him. The trophy is presented annually by the Albert Lea Lions Club. At the close of the banquet, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Wilke Sr., presented the school with an attractive picture of the Big Nine Conference champion Tigers. Looking forward to next season, the Tigers chose tackle leff Brooke and guard Bruce Palmer to captain the l96l squad. Both boys were regulars on the squad this year. They will be in charge of a team boasting nine returning lettermen, all juniors. Their goal natural- ly will be to capture another Big Nine Conference title. MAKING SURE. Tiger end Gary Iacobsen made certain that Red Wing haliback Denny Landers was down to stay. Albert Lea won. 27-13, to clinch the Big Nine championship. Page 129 GARY IACOBSEN, IUNIOR END, went high to snag a Tiger aerial against Austin. Bill Booher, Packer deiensive safety man, came up fast to make the stop. The two teams played to a 7v7 deadlock. BIG NINE TROPHY. Senior gridders Tom Tonheim. Ted Larson, lim Larson, Dennis Kappas, Steve Claybourn and Tom Suthers admired the trophy which was awarded to the football team. Bengals Gain Experience, Post 1-3-Z IN THE CLEAR. Mike Wittkamper broke away from a pair of Austin defenders after receiving a pass from quarterback Iohn Goodmanson. The teams played to a 20-20 deadlock at Abbott Field. FROZEN ACTION. Players from both teams dove for a loose ball during the Albert Lea-Austin game. Note how the ball seemed to be balancing on end. Alertness such as this was a big factor. Page 130 t Under the tutelage of new coaches Luverne Ahrndt and Bill Christopherson, the Albert Lea Bengals posted a l-3-2 record during the l96U campaign. These figures are a bit deceiving, however, because all the Bengal losses were by fairly narrow margins. The Tiger cubs' big weakness was inexperience. This was particularly evident during the early stages of the season. As the season progressed and the boys gained experience, improvement could be seen. ln spite of the mediocre record, varsity coach lim Gustafson has high hopes for this season's Bengals. Besides the fine mental attitude which the team dem- onstrated throughout the season, Gustafson was pleas- ed with the size and improvement of the linemen. The passing combination of lohn Goodmanson and Mike Wittkamper was extremely impressive. The deter- mined running of backs Harold Mueller, Gary Thomp- son and Dave Wilcox also showed promise. The Bengals opened the season on a winning note bg downing Faribault 20-O. One of the highlights of the game was Goodmar1son's 45-yard return of a Falcon punt for a Bengal touchdown. Several key blocks set up the long return. Mueller and Thompson also scored while the Albert Lea defense held the Falcons scoreless. B FOOTBALL BOX SCORE Albert Lea Opponents 20 --- -- Faribault -- ------ U U --- -- Austin --- --- 14 l3 --- -- Owatonna --- -- l3 6 --- -- Fairmont -- --- l7 20 --- -- Austin H- H- 20 6 --- -- Wells -- --- 13 65 -5 easonal Record Against Austin in the first meeting of the two clubs, the Bengals were defeated by a i4-0 count. Albert Lea was unable to take advantage of key scoring opportu- nities while the Packers scored twice to grab the victory. Albert Lea came from behind late in the fourth quarter to salvage a i3-l3 tie with the Owatonna "B" team. Gary Thompson scored the tying touchdown with less than four minutes remaining in the game. Early in the second half, Mike Wittkamper scored on a pass. Albert Lea ran into stiff competition when it invaded Farimont to take on the Martins. Left halfback Dave Wilcox scored once for the Bengals, but it was not enough as the Bengals fell to defeat, l7-6. Beturning home the following week, the Bengals took on the Austin Packers again. Playing inspired foot- ball, they jumped off to an early 20-6 lead. Gradually the determined Austin club fought to come back. The Packers scored twice in the final period to gain a 20-20 tie. Against the Packers, Wittkamper scored on a pass, Wilcox raced 70 yards to paydirt with an intercepted pass and Gary Thompson tallied on a l2-yard run. ln the season finale at Abbott Field, Albert Lea bowed to Wells by a i3-6 count. The Bengals could not contain the Wildcats' exceptional speed. Wilcox scored the lone Albert Lea touchdown. THE 1960 BENGAL GRIDDERS-FRONT ROW: Wilcox, Goodman- son, Erlandson, Mueller, Grinolds, Thompson, Boyer, Conlin, Westrum, SECOND ROW: Haried, Hylbak, Wittkamper. Dulitz, Wogen, Mar- gadant, Gilpin, Matthies. THIRD ROW: Halvorson, Roscoe, Bradley, BILL CHRISTOPHERSON fholding balll discussed some hall handling fundamentals with head coach Vern Ahrndt. The two grid mentors led the Bengal squad through a very interesting season. Dingemans. Houchin, Hanson. R. Iorgenson, H. Iohnson, M. Iohn- son. FOURTH ROW: Scheveland, Beck, Atchison, Laursen, Nelson, Warner, Brue. D. Iorgenson, Timmerman, Van Ryswyk. I l 5 l GUS' THEORIES. Coaches Bill Christopherson and Don Buhr ap- peared somewhat amused as Iim Gustafson related his ideas con- cerning a previous game. Christopherson was the B team instructor. Erratic Tiger- DEADLY AIM. Senior Paul Wilke set his sights on the basket and fired one of his extremely accurate iump shots. Wilke led all Tiger scorers with with a total of 277 points At times looking very promising, but also suttering many unimpressive moments, the Tigers drew the l96U- Sl season to a close with a seven Win, ll loss record. Starting two seniors and three juniors most ot the season, coach Don Buhr undoubtedly telt the loss ot Gary lacobsen, last year's starting center, who could not play most of this season due to an injury, Minneapolis Patrick Henry ruined the Tigers' opener by giving Albert Lea a 50-48 deteat. The team jour- neyed to Owatonna December 2 for its tirst Big Nine game and came home with a 48-44 victory and a brighter outlook tor the season. The optimism was short lived, tor the Tigers went down 49-4l to Mankato December 9, displaying a cold night on the boards. The next encounter took the Tigers to Williams Arena where they scored l8 points in the iirst quarter against St. Paul Harding, but then seemed to collapse and were handed a crushing 57-33 defeat. Arch rival Austin had trouble eeking out a Win in its tirst meeting with the Tigers, who led 27-25 at the halt. But as play continued, the cagers gathered touls, and Austin gained 24 points in the tourth quarter, l6 from tree throws, to win, 65-54. Page 132 VARSITY BOX SCORE ALBERT LEA OPPONENTS ---------- ----Minneapolis Henry ------------ ----- ----Owatonna ---------- ----- ----- ----Mc:1nkorto --------- ----- ----- ----St. Paul Harding ---- ----- ----- ----Austin ----------- ----- ---U ----St. Paul Wilson --- ----- ----- ----R1chf1e-ld -------- ----- ----- ----Northiie1d ----- ----- 48 50 48 44 41 49 33 57 54 65 58 39 41 64 59 33 57 ..... .... W inoncr --- -----6O 44 ..... .... R ochester --- ---,-54 65 ..... .... M cxson City .... -.... 5 7 58 ..... .... A ustin ....... ..... 7 1 58 ..... - -.- -Red Wing .--- --,.. 4 9 48 ..... .... W ells ..... ..... 6 O 66 ..... .... M ankcrto ....... ..... 6 8 68 ..... .... F aribault ........ ..... 5 4 75 ..... .... S L Paul Murray --- -----5l 48 53 ----- ----Austin CDistricO ---- ----- 964 978 K THROUGH FOR TWO. Senior forward Paul Wilke drove the base- line for a two pointer aqainsi Faribault. Husky junior guard Dave Boyum C121 advanced for the possible rebound. Courtmen Compile Mediocre Record TIGER VARSITY CAGERS. Oliphant. G. Olsen, Iensen, Willce, Sum- Tonheim, I.eBeau. Elvebak. mers, I. Olson, Syverson. Iacobsen, Flaten. Clayboum. Boyum, XXX Page 133 Cagemen Escape Early Doldrum, THE BIG HOOKER: Scrappy Iol-in Olson fired cz hook shot during the Wells game. Meanwhile. Iohn Iensen elbowed his way into rebounding position. Wells downed the Tigers. 60-48. ACCURATE ARCHER. Lowell Syverson, hustling Tiger front court- man, took aim on the hoop as Paul Wilke I30l fought lor rebound- ing position against two Mason City defenders. "AW, DARN IT," Tiger Iohn Olson seemed to say as Patrick Henry's big center Mel Northway slapped away his attempted shot. Al- though he was hampered part of the season with injuries. Olson's rebounding was at many times superb. Against St. Paul Wilson, the Tigers hit well from the field and gathered a 58-39 non-conference win. Poor rebounding and cold shooting cost the Tigers the Rich- field ball game. The Spartans used a zone defense throughout the second half, beating the hosts, 64-4l. One of the turning points of the season came in the Northfield game. Albert Lea drubbed the Raiders, 59-33, but the most impressive thing was the new spirit and hustle the Tigers seemed to find. Although they were not able to improve their record to any great extent, a definite improvement was evident in their play. Albert Lea lost two successive games before finally recapturing the winning way against Mason City. First, the Winona Winhawlcs sneaked by the Tigers, 66-57, and then Rochester upset the courtmen, 54-44. Mason City was a definite favorite in the game at Southwest Gym, but Albert Lea dumped the Mohawks, 65-57. A determined Austin quintet jumped off to an early lead in the second meeting of the two clubs, and chalked up an easy 7l-53 victory. The Tigers bounced back the following week, upending Red Wing, 56-49. Page 134 Attain 7-1 1 Mark fwnw-.Q ww gpg A RICH OLIPHANT, TIGER GUARD. shot an underhand layup as two opposing defenders closed in. Paul Wilke l30J got set to tollow in case the attempted shot went astray. Rival Wells dealt the Tigers a stinging loss in their game at Albert Lea. The Tigers were ahead for a while, but the superior height of the Wildcats made the differ- ence in the final period. The score was 60-48. The Cagers next split a pair of overtime encounters. At Mankato, the Tigers held a commanding lead for three and one-half quarters before allowing the Scar- lets to come back and tie the score with ten seconds remaining. Mankato won the game, 68-66, in overtime. Against Faribault, the situation was exactly the same. This time the Tigers tallied l5 points in the three minute overtime period won by a score of 68-54. ln the season finale against St. Paul Murray, the Tigers pumped in 75 points and toppled the metropol- itan foes, 75-5l. This was the first time all season that the cagers were able to win two games in succession. A crowd of more than 8,500 people jammed Albert Lea's gymnasium to see the District Tournament game. The Tigers battled the highly lauded Packers from Austin to a standoff for three quarters, leading most of the way. Fouls took their toll in the final period, how- ever, and Albert Lea lost, 53-48. Page 135 NICE BOARD WORK. Lowell Syverson snaqqed a rebound and prepared to put it back in during the Murray game. Lanky Lowell was a stalwart in the Tigers' late season improvement. BIG REACH. Clair Flaten, Tiqer center, fired a iump shot over the outstretched hand of Mason City's Dick Adams. Flaten held the high-iumpinq Mohawk center to a scant seven points. Height, Experience Marks Promise s sr ss Despite their only mediocre record, the 1960-61 cagers set two new records. Against St. Paul Wilson, Paul Willie dropped in an amazing 39 points to break the school mark. The previous high had been 31. By scoring 75 points against St. Paul Murray, the courtmen smashed another record. lt was the most points scored by either Albert Lea or its opponent since the Tigers started playing in Southwest Gymnasium in 1958, Austin scored 73 in the 1958 District ll Tournament. The season was a rather disappointing one tor the team as well as tor the fans. The Tigers had high pre- season hopes, but injuries throughout the campaign caused the hopes to dwindle slowly. ln just a couple ot games, and then for only brief spurts, was the Tiger lineup ever at tull strength. Looking ahead to next season, there is again a great deal of potential. ln Clair Flaten, Gary lacobsen and Lowell Syverson, the Tigers have three experienced big men returning. Dave Boyum should be a superb "take- charge guy" in the baclccourt. This year's reserves, john jensen, Ralph Summers, Gerry Olsen and Dave Elve- balc should bolster the squad. All in all, barring any untorseen injuries, the future looks much better. VALUABLE ASSISTANTS. Cage managers Lee Carlson, Bill Satre and lim Krueger hooked up the scoreboard during a practice session. All three boys were valuable assistants to the coaches. For Wilke, f U- Syverson, C , Oliphcxnt, q - Flcxten, f ,... Boyurn, q -W Icrcobson, c - Olson, C ,,.. Iensen, f -V Tonheim, q - Clcrybourn, f Summers, f Olsen, f ..., LeBeciu, q -- Elvebcik, q - TOTALS: ALBERT LEA Opponents - TOWERING TIGER Gary Iucobsen leaned hzgh to score cz iurn HEAT OF BATTLE Txger coaches I1m Custcrfson and Don Bukr around jump shot n the D struct Tourncmeni The Txgers scared the watched miently Wlfh 1un or guard Dave Boyum as the team battled Packers before finally bowmq 53 48 wxth Aushn ln Dxsinct Tourncxmeni ac 1on 1950-61 BENGAL COURTMEN-FRONT ROW: Davies, Iones, Thomp- kamper, Mueller, Goodmanson, Erlandson. NOT PICTURED: Tos- son, Woqen, Thomas, Dulitz. SECOND ROW: Hanson, Boyer, Witt- tenson, Wilcox. Cub Cagers Hit Late-Season Slump, Page 138 ,,,,, , RUGGED BENGAL FORWARD Mike Wittkamper scored a iielder against Mason City. Wittkamper's determined rebounding was an invaluable asset to the team's success. With new coach Bill Christopherson at the helm, the 1960-61 Bengals compiled a l0-6 record. After starting the campaign impressively, the team fell into a slump. Albert Lea opened the season by sweeping five games in succession and nine of their first ten. The Bengals defeated Minneapolis Henry, 38-l8p Owatonna, 35-295 Mankato, 28-22, Austin, 33-3lp and Emmons, 49-39. Then, after losing to Richfield, 26-l9, the Bengals proceeded to Win four consecutive encounters. They tripped Mason City, 59-48, toppled Northfield, 42-25, edged Winona, 38-36, and trounced Rochester, 5l-37. With their record standing at 9-l, the roof seemed to collapse on the Bengals. They lost five of their remain- ing six games and saw their season mark drop to lO-6. Their only victory during this dismal stretch was a 33- 32 decision over the Mankato Scarlets. Sophomore guard Iohn Goodmanson led the Bengal scoring attack with l75 points. l-le was followed by Mike Wittkamper with ll5, Denny Tostenson with 93, Harold Mueller with 72 and Dave Wilcox with 44. B SQUAD BOX SCORE ALBERT LEA OPPONENTS 38 ......,.,, ,,.. M innecrpoiis Henry ..E....... 18 35 ,,H. E... O watonna ,.E..... .... 2 9 28 .... ..,. M ankaio - .... 22 33 E... .... A usiin JY .V-u-3l 49 ,.,, .... E mmons , , .... 39 19 ,E,A ,,.. R ichiield --- ---.-26 59 .... .... M ason City -- ,,.. 48 42 .... .... N orihiield - - ..,. 25 38 .... .... W inoncr - Y ..,. 36 51 .... .... R ochester - - ..., 37 30 .... .... M Orson City - - .... 33 33 .... .... A ustin ...-O .... 3 8 34 .... ..,, R ed Wing - - .... 45 30 .... .... W ells .... -..-,35 33 .... YE.. M Cmkato -- .... 32 34 EE.. .v.. F aribcruli , , L - - --37 586 531 TOUGH REBOUNDING WAS TYPICAL to the scraPPY Bengals. Here. Harold Mueller C353 and Denny Tostenson outfought a Faribault Falcon for valuable possession oi the ball. Post 10-6 Record VERSATILE TIGER CUB, Denny Tostenson. tallied a fast break basket against the Mason City Mohawks. Tostenson's seasonal im- provement was apparent in the team's play. RESERVE GUARD. KENT ERLANDSON. iired a long one-hander as Denny Totsenson looked on in surprise. Erlandson performed very respectably in relief oi the regulars. Page 139 W 1 W ,. 'li If V 92' ,, . , ,, 1 K 4 1 Q if , ,,,, Mya, 4 , 'ga W , ,4"'s District Two, Region ne Crowns Continuing their tradition ot tinishinq hiah in the conference and dominatina the District Tournament, the 1960-1961 Tiaer arapp1ers finished third in the Bia Nine and easi1y repeated as District champions. They tinished their season with a record ot 8-3-1. Their three Iosses were at the hands ot three ot the top rankina teams in the state f Cwatonna, Mankato and Robbinsda1e. In an ear1y match they tied 1:aribau1t. In dua1 competition throuahout the year the Tiaers outscored their opponents with a 319 tota1 compared with 202 tor their adversaries. This year's squad was composed most1y ot juniors. 0n1y tour seniors, Tom Guiney, Hoa Christianson, Iohn Gunderson and Larry Wo1tt, were inc1uded on the varsity. They did a tine job with three winnina District tit1es and Christiansen capturing a Reaiona1 crown. This years squad was a surprise to many. It was not expected to eaua1 1ast year's team which captured District and Reaiona1 championships. However, it did just as we11 in tournament competition and produced a State Champion, Iett Brooke. IUNIOR GRAPPLER, BYRON BOER. strained to subdue his opponent during District Tournament action at Albert Lea. Despite his efforts, Boer was eliminated in first round competition. DISTRICT TWO, REGION ONE WRESTLING CHAMPS-KNEELING: STI-XNDNG Roger Kittelson Iohn Gunderson Tom Gurney Bruce Iohn Inqebritson, Mike Callahan, Roger Christiansen, Pete Fahry. Palmer Tom McKey Bob Kennedy Byron Boer Ieff Brooke Tiger Matmen Accumulate 8-3-1 Cpening their season, the Tiger grapplers traveled to Mankato for the Mankato lnvitational Tournament. leff Brooke won the heavyweight championship. They commenced their dual meet season very slow- ly as they were thoroughly trounced by Owatonna's powerful aggregation, 44-5. ln a near upset they lost a close match to Mankato, 23-l9. Capturing their first win of the year, the Ehrhardmen downed Austin by 30-lb. Faribault proved to be tough as it tied the Tigers, l9-19. Wrestling three matches in a row with title con- tenders, the Tiger masters came out unscathed. They downed Northfield, l3-l4, trounced Winona, 30-14 and defeated tough Rochester, 27-14. Putting on a surge at the end of the season they won their last four dual matches. Meeting Austin for the second time, they trounced the Packers again, defeating them 30-l0. ln two non-conference matches, warmups for the coming tournaments, the Tigers defeated Waconia, 30- l2, and continued their domination of Waseca by down- ing the Bluejays, 36-6. ln their final match of the season they downed a hapless Red Wing squad as they pounded out a decisive Sl-2 over the Wingers. FIGHTING DOGGEDLY to hang onto his opponent's leg. Roger Kittelson attempted to control his Austin adversary. Kittelson drew with his Packer foe as Albert Lea smashed Austin, 30-10. SCRAPPY TIGER STRONGMAN Tom Gurney gained additional points REGIONAL CHAMPION, Pete Fabry, rendered his Rochester foe for a near fall versus Rochester Gumeys speed and stamina helpless by taking away his leg power during their mid-season allowed him to score cr Wm over his foe match. Fabry was victorious. and the Tigers won. 27-14. . Dual Meet Mark ln the District Tournament the Tigers successfully defended their title, racking up a total of l3O points to runner-up Austin's 77. Nine Albert Lea grapplers cap- tured individual titles and two more were runnersfup in their respective weight divisions. lohn lngebritson CSSD, Pete Fabry ClU3?, Bog Christ- tianson fll2D, lohn Gunderson Cl2UD, Tom Guiney tl33l, Bruce Palmer Cl45D, Tom McKey Cl547, Bob Kennedy H655 and Ieff Brooke Chwtl captured coveted District titles. Larry Wolff and Bog Kittleson took runner-up honors and advanced to the Regional Tournament. Placing ll ment in the Regional Tournament held at Southwest Gymnasium, the Tiger grapplers continued their domination of the tourney by Winning it for the third year in succession. They piled up 74 points com' pared to runner-up Faribault which finished with 65. VVinning regional titles were lngebritson, Fabry, Christianson and Brooke. Mcliey finished second, and thus qualified for a berth in the State Meet. ln the State Tourney held at Gustavus Adolphus College the Tigers gathered or tenth place finish. AUSTIN'S 127-POUND MATMAN, Merrill Stephens, prepared to take down Albert I.ecz's Roger Kittelson in their first match. Stephens detected the fighting Tiger qrcxppler, 4-Z. u-nl. W' i W f' '. . ' TWO POINTS IN THE MAKING. Roger Kittelson got behind his Owatonna foe and slammed him to the mat for two points. Kittelson showed tremendous improvement during the mat season. TIGER IRONMAN, BOB KENNEDY, lifted his opponent, Doug Wilcox ot Austin, high off the mat during their match. Talented Kennedy acquired the District Il championship in the 165 pound division. Tigers Place Tenth in State Tourney FIGHTING TOM GUINEY landed on top oi his Austin opponent tor two points as both boys toppled to the mat. Guiney captured the 133-pound District ll wrestling crown. Providing the inspiration tor this year's squad were the two co-captains, Tom Guiney and left Brooke. They set good examples and were respected by the hoys. This was supposed to he a rebuilding year tor the Tiger grapplers. lt proved to he more than that, how- ever, as they again captured the District and Region Tournaments and also tinished high in the State. Determination was what Won many matches tor the Tigers this year. There were times when there was a tendency to let down, hut they realized it hetore it was too late and otten came home without a victory. Much credit must go to coach Paul Ehrhard. He im JJ installed the drive in the team when it was needed. Page 144 ANOTHER DISTRICT CHAMP, lohn Gunderson, fought oft his op- ponent during the Albert Lea-Northfield regular season encounter. The Tiger matmen dropped the Raiders, 28-14. RUGGED BRUCE PALMER, one ot the squad's mainstays, handled his opponent easily during District Tournament action. "Red" was a consistently fine performer for Ehrhard's aggregation. Brooke Captures IEFF BROOKE KUpper leit and standingi. Albert Lea's kingpin in the heavyweight division, stalked his adversary, Austin's Bruce Mac- Laren. Brooke was the undefeated State Champion in his class. The stalwart oi this year's squad was left Brooke. He went through the entire season without absorbing one single loss. This included dual competition and the District and Regional tournaments. l-le also emerg- ed victorious from the State Tournament and brought home the metal which was symbolic ot his victory. There were times during the season when it appeared that he might go down to down to defeat but he came through and pulled out those important victories. lett was not too heavy tor his weight class. This was somewhat ot a disadvantage to him, but also an advantage. There were many times when he wrestled tellows that were as much as thirty or torty pounds heavier. lt proved to be an advantage as it gave him tht all-important factor oi speed. Brooke was taster than most wrestlers his size. This helped him tremendously as he usually got the takedown on his opponent. Prospects tor next year's squad are very promising. Nine returnees are back from this year's squad. This should provide quite a nucleus for next year. Page 145 4-:..-sw Heavyweight Title Bengal Gr-applers Gain Experience, Under the tutelage of George Acheff, the Albert Lea Bengals completed the season with ot 8-5 record. The Bengals followed much the same pattern as the varsity. They lost their first two matches but fin- ished strong at the end of the season by winning their last five matches. This shows that some of the boys on the squad show quite a lot of promise of next year's varsity. This is the main purpose of the squad. Opening their season they were defeated by an Owatonna team, 31-14. Losing their second in a row, they absorbed a 26-l9 loss to a tough Mankato team. Winning their first game of the year, the Bengals eelced out a 29-2l win over the Austin B squaders. They suffered their third loss to the l-layfield varsity by 27-21. Besuming their winning ways, the Bengals lam- basted Faribault by an amazing score of 33-9. They dropped a tight match to Northfield, 24-22. Gaining their third win they scraped out a 29-9 win over the Winona Bengals. Meeting Hayfield for the second time of the year they were trounced, 35-8. DAVE HASMUSSEN. BENGAL MATMAN. found himself in an un- healthy predicament during one of his matches. Rasmussen was one of the more promising boys on the squad. 1960-61 FIGHTING TIGER BENGAL GRAPPLERS - FRONT ROW: Houchin. Breamer, Iahns. Westrum, Margadant. Neist. Stauch. Allen, Hurst, Hanson. Gilpin. SECOND ROW: Modin. Page 146 Compile Fine 8-5 The first win in their streak came over Rochester as the Rockets fell by the wayside by a score of 26-11. Ellendale proved to be the next victim as they dropped a 25-20 verdict to the up and coming Bengals. Pouring it on at the end of the season they ran up their biggest margin of the season as they literally trounced hapless Waseca, 49-3. Ending their season they clobbered Bed Wing, 42-6. There were really no outstanding grapplers on this year's Bengal squad. lt was an evenly balanced team with no one compiling an outstanding record. The main problem on the B Squad this year was in- experience. Usually that is always a problem as there are new boys on the squad every year. Most likely prospects for next year's varsity are Dan Gilpin, Gary Modin and Dean Allen. These three could usually be counted on for a win if it was needed. Gilpin finished the season with a only one loss whereas Modin dropped only two matches and Allen lost three. DALLAS BREAMER, 165-POUND BENGAL, found himself the victim of a near fall against Ellendale. Breamer fought back, however, and overpowered his tough opponent. HEAVYWEIGHT IIM MARGADANT fought to keep his feet against an Ellendale opponent. Marqadant's late season performances were extremely impressive to coach Acheff. B SQUAD DUAL MEET RECORD ALBERT LEA OPPONENTS 14 .......... .... O watonna --- ,,....... --31 19--- ---- Mankato --- -----26 29--- ---- Austin --- -----21 21--- ---- Hayfield ---- -----27 33--- ----- Faribault --- --- 9 22--- ---- Northfield -- -----24 29--- -.-- Winona -- --- 9 8--- ---- Hayfield --.- -----35 25--- ---- Rochester --- -----11 25--- ---- Ellendale --- -----20 25--- ---- Austin ---- -----13 49-U ---- Waseca ---- --- 3 42--- ---- Bed Wing --- --- 6 342 235 Seasonal Mark Page 147 Blix if gtk 'Su l TIGER VARSITY DIAMONDMEN-KNEELING: Lair, Wolff, Elvebak, Oliphant, Wittkamper, Tostenson, Goodmanson, Larson, Anderson, McKey. Thompson, Bennett, LeBeau. STANDING: Coach Ehrhard, Nelson, Skelton, Olsen, Palmer, Tullberg, Coach Christopherson. Glovemen Post 3-5 Big Nine Mark, FIERY FIRST SACKER, Ted Larson, stretcher to scoop up a low throw. Larson, a two-year letterman, was a valuable mainstay on the 1961 Tiger diamond aggregation. Losing many of those close games that could have gone either way was the story of the l96O baseball team. lt finished the season with a record of 5-9. Opening their season the Tigers journeyed to Blue Earth and dropped a 6-l decision to the strong Bucs. Getting on the winning trail, they clobbered Mankato, 7-l. Facing what was probably the toughest team they faced all season, the Tigers were beaten, lO-3, by the powerful Austin Packers. After this they dropped a 3-2 heartbreaker to Rochester. On a very cold day the Tigers dropped another close out to Faribault. ln the return meeting with Austin the Tigers put up a good fight before losing to the Packers by a score of lO-4. The fired-up Tigers were ahead at one time and the score was tied at the end of the game. ln the extra inning the Packers scored six runs for the victory. Gaining their second win of the season, the Tigers defeated Red Wing by a score of lO-3. Another of the tough teams, Winona, downed the Tigers, 5-3. Page 148 1960 BASEBALL BOX SCORE ALBERT LEA OPPONENTS 1 ........... .... B lue Earth --- ....... --- 6 7 .... ..L. M cmkato --- -- 1 3 ..,. .... A ustin ..... ,.,. l U 2 .... .... R ochester --, ---3 5 .... .... F aribault -- ---6 4 .... ..,. A ustin M-- ---JU 3 .... .... W inoncr --- -- 5 IO .... .... R ed Wing --- -- 3 0 .... .... F crirmont ..., --- 1 O .... .... B lue Earth -- --- 1 2 .... ..,. N orthfield --- --- 3 TOURNAMENTS 4 .... ,... E llendctle --- --- U 12 ..., .... H oiyfielcl -- --- U O .... .... A ustin --- --- 7 53 56 KEYSTONE COMBO. The Tiger diamondmen boasted a line com- bination around second base. Dick Anderson and lim Lair worked on the double play pivot in early drills. Eliminated in District Tournament HOPEFUL ROOKIE HURLER. Sophomore Tiger hurler, Denny Tos- tenson, prepared to fire a hard one during early workouts. Coach Ehrhard has high hopes tor Tostenson in coming seasons. TWO-HANDED CATCH. Sophomore outfielder Iohn Goodmanson demonstrated the two-hand torm of catching a ily ball. This form was constantly beign stressed by the coaching staff. Page 149 Cmdermen Spear Conference Titleg 1961 TIGER CINDERMEN-FRONT ROW: Pierce, Don Nelson, Bouvet Claybourn, Palmer, Brooke, Iahns, Steil, Seeger, Heather, Harmes: SECOND ROW: Warner, Andrews, Hareid, Danielsen, Gavere Hurst, Kittelson, Hanson, Iorqenson, Dick Nelson. THIRD ROW! I Page 150 Oldenkamp, Hoffman, Bailey, Phinney, Wogen, Wilcox, Matthies, Hanson, Duselr, Iensen. FOURTH ROW: Margadant, Holty, Morten- son, Bosacker, Mueller, Iacobsen, Knauer, Summers, Syverson, Boer, Kennedy. BATON MAGIC. Iunior letterman, Ieff Brooke, passed the baton to Del Bosacker during early workouts at Abbott Field. Both boys were members ol relay teams on this year's squad. 1960 Track Results DUAL MEETS ALBERT LEA OPPONENTS 73 ..,........ - - -Austin ....................... -45 Ql-- ---Owatonna .... ----27 TOURNAMENTS Mankato Triangular ....................... --S9CO1'1d State lndoor Meet ........................ .... E iqhth Albert Lea Invitational ....,...... ...........--- F irst Carleton Relays .............. -............. T Welfth Faribault Relays ...... .... .............. S i Xteelith Indian Relays ................ t ...........-... FOUTTT1 District ........ .... ..................-.... F i rst Reqion ...... -- - .... ..... 4 - -- ............ --FiISl Big Nine ..... -- ..... ......-.-.. F iISl State - - - .,...,....... Twenty-second Numerous School Records Tumble The 1960 Tiger tracksters captured the first Big Nine Conference championship in Albert Lea history. The Tigers had to edge out Mankato and Rochester to snag the coveted crown. Albert Lea scored 52 points, Man- kato 5l3Ai and Rochester 48. Gary lacobsen, with a brilliant individual performance, scored l7 points for the Tigers in the meet at Albert Lea. The Tigers swept their two dual meets and placed second in the Mankato Triangular. They also won the Albert Lea lnvitational by nosing out Wells, 94-9l. While winning the District ll and Region T titles, the Tigers qualified three men, Ron Dahlen, lacobsen and Dave Palmer, for the state meet. Dahlen's fourth place in the high hurdles gave the Tigers their only points. Five school records were broken during the l960 track season. Dahlen set new marks in both the high hurdles and low hurdles. His time in the highs was l5.0 seconds and in the lows, 20.0 seconds. lim Thomp- son shattered the shot put mark with a heave of 47' 4V2". Two relay marks also fell. ln the 440 yard relay, loel DeNeui, Lew Kennedy, Thompson and Palmer teamed to run the distance in 46.3 seconds. Kennedy, Thompson, Palmer and Dahlen completed the 880-yard relay in l.35.5 minutes for another all-time school mark. TOE THE MARKS. Sprinters Bernie Bouvet and Lowell Syverson practiced getting that quick start. Both boys made impressive show- ings throughout the 1961 track season. TIGER DISTANCE MEN. Distance runners Reginald Harmes, Ray Iacobsen and Al Gavere discussed their times after completing a trial run during a Tiger practice session. SEASONAL OUTLOOK. Tiger co-captains Steve Claybourn and Dave Palmer conversed with head instructor Bruce Io ing prospects for the 1961 track season. hnson concern- Page 151 ACCURATE SERVE. Iunior tennisman, Dave Boyum. viciously smashed a powerful serve during net drills. Boyum's fine play was a spark to the Albert Lea Tiger netmen. i .annum 9 1960 Net Squad Paul Wilke's Tiger netmen finished the season last year with an overall record of 2-6. ln their initial encounter the Tiger netsters dropped a 6-3 decision to arch-rival Austin. St. fames, which comes up with a good team every year, eelced out an 4-3 victory over the scrappy Tigers. Powerful Faribault trounced the Tigers, 6-l, in their next outing. Playing Austin in a return match, the Tigers lost, 7-2. Two of the top teams in the conference were next for the Tigers. Rochester, always one of top teams, downed the Tigers, 6-l. Mankato defeated them, 5-2. Finishing their season in strong fashion, the Tigers dropped Red Wing, 4-3, and upset Owatonna, 3-2. In the Big Nine Conference meet the Tigers came through with a strong fourth place finish. Austin, who defeated the Tigers in dual competition, finished two behind them in sixth place. LEADING RACKET MAN. Senior letterman Paul Wilke returned to bolster the Tiger tennis squad. Wilke topped a list of three returning veterans from last year's tennis squad. RACKET MAN ON THE PROWL. Neiman Iohn Iensen struck a peculiar pose as he leaped high to return an opponent's shot during an early season tennis practice session. Finish Fourth in Big Nine Meet 1961 ALBERT LEA TENNIS SQUAD-KNEELING: Glesne, Hansen. Schwen, Ienson, Iohnson. Iensen Boyum Pickavance, Wilke. STANDING: Sorenson. Iordahl. FRIENDLY COMPETITION. Gene Hansen and Curl Pickavunce con- qraiulaied each other after compleiinq u challenge iennis match dur- ing a practice session at Morin Park. 1960 TENNIS BOX SCORE ALBERT LEA OPPONENTS Austin -- St. Icrrnes Faribault Austin -- Rochester Mankato - Red Wing Owcxtonncr Page 153 wr tif I' V f-' ' ' " U " ff yt ,Vw W W f . . 1 . 1 x I 1 ft Y Qt . if an nheim Kline Peterson Kappas STANDING Larson Inqebrxtson, f My NTED QIGER GOL TEAM-KNEELING: I obsen. Davidson. , .n . N Linksters Finish Bill Standly, in his last season as the Tiger golf coach, led his linksters to a season record of 7-l. They also finished a strong third in the Big Nine Meet. ln their opening match they downed a tough Man- kato team, l75-194. Continuing their Winning Ways they dropped a scrappy Northfield squad, l5G-l64. Showing that they could come through when the chips were down, they scraped out a close match with Faribault, defeating the Falcons, l24,l29. ln one of the most important matches of the year the Tiger linksters eeked out a 275-278 Win over arch- rival Austin. Continuing their undefeated Ways, they trounced Rochester by a score of 289-3ll. Losing their first only dual match of the season, Austin dropped the Tigers, 3l7-333. Getting back on the Winning way, they dropped Owatonna, l63-l69. FINE FOLLOW THROUGH. Sophomore letterman Dick Iones follow- ed through after shooting a long tee shot. Iones' experience was a big lift to the golf squad this season. Qs QJZWMAA Westrum, Shea. Nelson, Coonradt, Ogren. Davies, Iones, Coach Buhr. Page 154 Third in Big Nine 1960 GOLF BOX SCORE ALBERT LEA OPPONENTS 175 ...i..... ---Mc1r1kc1io--- ------ ----194 156 ---- ---Northfield --- ---164 124--- ---Foribcruit -- ---129 275--- ---Austin --- ---278 289 --------- . --Rochester ----- -------- 3 11 333 --------- ---Austin --- ----- - ---317 163--- ---Owcltonna -- ----- ---169 138--- ---Northfield --- ---154 1653 1716 TOURNAMENT Big Nine --- --------------- ---Third ADDRESSING THE BALL. Top man on the Tiger link squad, Roger Peterson, addressed the ball prior to teeing off during early season practice. Peterson was a four-year veteran. CAREFUL CLUB CLEANING. Tiger golf instructor Don Buhr smiled approvingly as veteran linkman Bob Kline took time out from prac- tice to clean his club before teeing off. WATCHFUL CHECK. Gary Davidson checked to see that fellow link- man Tom Tonheim recorded the correct score seniors on this year's golf squad. Both the boys were i 4 Page 155 Swanson Sweeps Intramural Title INTRAMURAL GRID STANDINGS W L T Swanson - - .... 10 l l Roelots --- -- 6 6 U Elvebak - - - - 4 6 2 Ienner - , , 2 9 1 TOUCHDOWN STRATEGY. Members oi Gary Roelofs' runner-up intramural football team discussed a play. Mike Morrison offered a new thought as Roelols and Dave Peterson watched. INTRAMURAL FOOTBALL CHAMPIONS-KNEELNG: Captain Ronald Swanson, Iack Iverson, Gary Davidson. STANDNG: Gordon Wolff, Ronald Hoium, Steve Shea. Last fall's intramural football championship was won by the team captained by Ron Swanson. His team finished the season with a record oi 10-l-l. Swanson's team was blessed with a great deal of speed and weight in its line, which is quite unusual for an intramural team. Also it had a very good passing attack, which had Swanson throwing and Gary David- son and Ron Hoiurn receiving. ln second place was the squad led by Gary Roelofs. Roelofs squad ended the campaign with a 6-6-l record. Outstanding players on this team were Dave Peterson, Lowell Syverson and Mike Morrison. Finishing in third place was Dave Elvebak's team. lt closed the season with a record ot 4-6-2. lt lost many close games to other teams but always seemed to get keyed up for the games with Swanson. lt was the only team to defeat Swanson's championship unit, and it also handed it its only tie. Outstanding on this team were Iohn lensen, who consistently was passing tor long yardage, and Elvebak, the breakaway runner. The hard luck team oi the league was Bill Ienner's squad. lt ended the season with a record of 2-9-1. Page 156 Davidson Wins Cage Championship INTRAMURAL CAGE STANDINGS W L Pct. Shea .... .... 9 l .900 Davidson - -- -- -8 2 .800 Swanson -- - .... 8 2 .800 Ruerup - - - .... 6 4 .600 Wolff - -- ..... 2 8 .200 Kline .... .... 2 8 .200 Hayward -- ---l 9 .l00 POSSIBLE SCORE: Steve Shea aimed for two as Gary Davidson and Ted Larson battled for position. Defender Fred Kycek narrowly missed blocking the field goal attempt. INTRAMURAL CAGE CHAMPIONS-KNEELING: Iim Iorqenson. Gary Davidson. captain. STANDING: Bill Danielsen. Fred Kycek, Allen Tullberq. lack Heather. This year's intramural basketball championship was captured by the team captained by Gary Davidson. ln second place was Ron Swanson's team. Davidson's team was one of balanced scoring and good rebounding. The top scorers were Davidson and Bill Danielsen. These two averaged close to 20 points a game while leading their team to the championship. The regular season championship was won by Steve Shea's quintet. Swanson's and Davidson's teams finished in a two way tie for second place. Play-offs were held at the end of the season to deter- mine the overall champion. The play-offs started with SWanson's team beating Shea and Davidson beating Ruerup. ln the Shea-Swanson contest, Shea's squad lost their opening game by one point as the result of a technical foul called on one of Shea's players. Top scorer in the league throughout the season was Orlo Willmert, who averaged close to 20 points a game. Other leading scorers were Dennis Kappas, Swanson, Davidson and Danielsen. Page 157 it JY TIGER LETTERMEN - FRONT ROW: Larson, Guiney, Nelson, Ken- nedy, Kittelson, Pickavance, Lahs. SECOND ROW: Seeger, Harms, Anderson, Iacobsen, Danielsen, Tonheim, Fabry, Knutsen. THIRD ROW: Brooke, Oliphant, Bouvet, Mortensen, Tullberq, Iahns, Kappas. Christiansen, Iones. FOURTH ROW: Wilke, Nelson, T. Larson, Fretheim, Hanson, G. Iacobsen, Syverson, Palmer, Boer, Palmer, Lar- sen. Lettermen Strive for Better- School, Page 158 CROSS COUNTRY-KNEELING: lack Heather, Tom Counters, Req- inald Harms. SITTING: Dick Nelson, Ray Iacobsen, Al Gavere. STANDING: Don Nelson, Dick Anderson, Bernard Bouvet. Under the guidance of their new adviser, Bruce lohnson, the Lettermen's Club made a big effort to im- prove the organization of the club. The purpose of the Letterman's Club is to unify the athletes into one organization for the betterment of the school. The club attempted to improve the reputation of the school, not only in sports, but in social life as Well. Following the Mason City basketball game, on Ian- uary 27, the Letterman's Club sponsored a dance in the Boys' Gym. Wayne Mortenson was in charge of the preparations. The music was by records and pop was sold. All profits Went to the Letterman's Club treasury. Officers of the IQGO-61 lettermen were picked at the first meeting of the club early in the fall. Bill Danielsen was chosen to fill the key post of president. Mike Knut- sen held the position of vice president and lohn Olson served the capacity of secretary-treasurer. The ordering of letter jackets was the job of Wayne Mortenson. Any boy who has Won a varsity letter at sometime during his high school career is eligible for the club. There were approximately 40 active members in the club this year, more than many other recent year. WHAT EVERY ATHLETE STRIVES FOR. Every boy who participates in varsity competition holds the coveted school letter in high esteem. Only deserving team members receive a letter. "DO YOU LIKE IT?" exclaimed Wayne Mortenson to Frank Fretheim and Dennis Kappas as they inspected a new letter iacket. Morten- son was in charge of ordering the jackets. Sponsor School Post-Game Mixer KEEPING A CLOSE WATCH to see that Iohn Olson. Lettermen's Club secretary-treasurer. kept an accurate record ol the minutes and finances was the club's vice president, Mike Knutsen. CONGRATULATIONS. Bill Danielsen, Lettermen's Club president. received congratulations from faculty adviser Bruce lohnson. Bill did a commendable iob ol guiding the club through the year. .Eg 5 ' . ff .. ! Page 159 Cheerleaders Strive To Raise Spirit THE CHEERLEADERS WERE individuals iudging from the varying campaign button while we're cheering?" Sandy Hanson was puz- reactions displayed at a football game. Gail Lageson seemed to be zled, Iudi Olson was ecstatic while Cindy Bothof was iust plain saying, "For goodness sake, Margit Larson, will you take off that happy! "Skip" Wilhelm, alternate, was not pictured. Several innovations were added to the cheerleading squad this year. During the summer, a local clothing store requested permission to donate new uniforms. Wallace's supplied the wool and paid for the sweaters and letters, which were purchased from an athletic sup- ply company. Consisting of blue pleated culottes, white sweaters and cherry and blue letters, the uniforms were first worn at a pep assembly on lanuary l3. After the request, it was decided between the varsity cheerleaders and the administration that "Skip" Wil- helm, a senior, would be alternate cheerleader during the football season and become a regular when the new uniforms arrived. The even number of six enabled the girls to attend the basketball games and wrestling matches equally. Three attended each event, since these were usually held on the same night. ln April, a cheerleading clinic was set up to instruct younger girls interested in cheerleading. Each member of the A and B squads was put in charge of a small group, teaching the fundamentals of cheerleading, school songs and various cheers. At the end of the four-week series, next year's squads were chosen. ENERGETIC B SQUAD CHEERLEADERS, ludy Goldman, Sue Riet- veld, Charlotte Skogheim, Kitty Taylor and loanne Olson, could be seen cheering at all the Bengal sporting events. Page 160 Q 5 . J 1 so 4 PERFORMING FOR THE FIRST TIME at the Albert Lea-Austin basket- ball game, the Tiger card section attempted to form a "T" with cherry and blue cards. "Skip" Wilhelm, a senior Pep Club member, was calling the signals in the front. Q A it XE tv? ACTIVE PEP CLUB SIGN-MAKERS Charlotte Skog- heim, Becki Boyer and Sandy Hanson taped a sign to the bus that carried the Tiger qrapplers to the Mankato wrestling match. J Ji' ,fit ,M M.. - I.-. Projects of Pep Club Aim Toward FRONT ROW: D. Iohnson, Barry, C. Hanson, M. Carlson, Iacobson Blizard, Ferring, Bothof, S. Hanson, Kennelly, Braaten, Erickson, Eng lish, Bonnie Anderson. SECOND ROW: Indrelie, Ahern, Haskins M. Gilbertson, B. Ienson, Higgins, Clark, Gunderson, Boyer, Haugen L. Anderson, Alm, K. Carlsen, Francis. THIRD ROW: Iulie Boyum, 1 Ellertson, Dilling, Hegland, Farry, Ille. R. Iordahl, Harding, M. Iordahl, Blocker, Chrisinger, R. Gilbertson, Hareid, Goldman, Iudy Boyum. FOURTH ROW: Gavle, Bell, Gurwell, B. Iensen, Hum- phrey, Helqeson, I. Hanson, Barbara Anderson, Renee Iohnson, Iuve, Dugstad, Rita Iohnson, Hendrickson, Deckard. Page 162 Promoting school spirit and related activities was the main objective of the Pep Club this year. Consisting of female members from the entire senior high, the club carried on projects to raise money to be used toward the achievement of their common goal. They employed tried-and-true means, such as bake sales and pompon selling at the Homecoming game, and they sponsored a dance for the student body. These funds were used toward various ends, such as purchas- ing a letter sweater for the exchange student, Bernard Bouvet, and supplying the paper for the signs that appeared in the halls and adorned the buses that car- ried players and fans to other towns. The club was organized into permanent committees, the newest being the Card Section Committee directed by "Skip" Wilhelm. lean Madson headed the com- mittee that met to improve the Tiger that hangs on the wall at Southwest Gym, the Constitution Committee with Chairman Mary Gilbertson attempted to review the constitution, Becki Boyer's Sign Committee worked many hours on colorful signs and the Special Assem- blies Committee planned the awards assembly and provided the athletic teams with miniature footballs, basketballs and wrestling mats, signifying the sport in which the athletes participated. Another project was School Spirit Week, held in December. There also was a poster contest between the classes and a Cherry and Blue Day. These activ- ities were designed to place more emphasis on the Albert Lea-Austin basketball games. Under the supervision of Mrs. Phyllis l-lostager, the club members helped the cheerleaders by planning a pep assembly, aiding in the teaching of new yells and buying the culottes for the new uniforms. AN ANNUAL PROIECT OF PEP CLUB is cleaning the trophies. Carol Yost, vice president, Iudy Kennelly, treasurer, and Lynda Bell, presi- dent, were among many who polished and dusted the trophies before arranging them in the new case. Increased Spirit and Participation FRONT ROW: B. Larson, Studer, D. Knudtson, Leif, Sprankle, Offen- becker, Madsen, I. Tuite, Lageson, Ludwig, Unseth, Lutner, Kappas. SECOND ROW: Stowell, Roorda, Iudi Olson, Kofstad, Modlin, M. Nelson, Wing, E. Peterson, Wahlstrom, Carol Lee, Swanson, Sweitson, Kirk, M. Tuite, R. Knudtson. THIRD ROW: Wilhelm, B. Veldman, C. Nelson, Ravenhorst, I. Peterson, I. Wayne, Ianice Nelson, Peters, Zavitz, I.. Petersen, Stadheim, Rietveld, Ioanne Olson. FOURTH ROW: Carole Lee, K. Slife, B. Slife, Sether, Posthumus, Reichl, M. Wayne, lane Nelson, D. Olson, Stolze, Sackett, lane Olson, Skogheim, Wacholz, Lindahl, Pratt. FIFTH ROW: Wolgamot, Register, Miovac, Peak, M. Paulson, P. Veldman, Romer, I. Paulson, Melting, S. Veld- man, Zimney, S. Olsen, Keil, Kissinger, Reindl, M. Larson. Page 163 GRA Members Attend Play Day A CONSTITUTION IS THE BASIS for any organization. Ruth Iordahl, treasurer: Iudi Engbritson. president: and Nancy Chapman, secretary: attempted to improve and revise the GRA constitution. FRONT ROW: Draayer, B. Hanson, Edwin, Golberq. Offenbecker. Hendrickson. Kennedy. Carlsen, Studer. Morreim. SECOND ROW: Stowell. Kolstad, C. Hanson, Iudy Hanson, E. Kycek, Eastvold. White, Blanchard. Stadheim. I. Iensen, N. Iensen. THIRD ROW: Knauer, Drescher. Bushlak. Kaasa, B. Kycek. Engbritson. D. Olson, M. Ior- "WATCH OUT!" WARNED MARTHA WAYNE as Bonnie Hanson tried to get the basketball from Renee Iohnson during one of the GRA tournament games in the Girls' Gym. To have organized fun and to give girls a chance to play in a competitive sports were the the purposes of the Girls' Recreation Association. The girls started the year by having a get- acquainted party, with all interested girls invited. During the evening refreshments were served. At their next meeting, they started playing volley- ball, Wtih teams being selected. After several evenings of strenuous playing, Pam l-lirsch's team emerged cham- pions. With sophomore, junior and senior teams com- peting against each other in an inter-class volleyball tournament, the sophomores were champions. The basketball tournament started shortly after vol- leyball was over. Champions were Pam l-lirsch's team. They also sponsored an inter-class basketball tourna- ment, with the juniors emerging victorious. The final event of the year was an awards banquet at which various members received awards. dahl. Iane Nelson, Posthumus. I. Olson, S. Goldman. I. Goldman. FOURTH ROW: Anderson, Emstad, Miller, B. Iensen, Stolze, R. Iordahl, A. Nelson, Icy Hanson, Dingemans, S. Olsen, Kissinger, Wedge, lanet Nelson. Page 164 Climaxing a year oi bowling, girls belonging to the American Iunior Girls' Bowling League participated in two tournaments. Cn March 25, they bowled three lines at Town Club Lanes and sent the scores to the Mail-O- Graphic Tournament in Chicago. There the scores were rated with approximately lO,UOO other teams in the United States. All eight teams attended the Minnesota lunior Girls' Bowling Tournament April 8. More than 35 senior high girls were members of the eight teams, each consisting ot tive members, that bowled every Tuesday atter school at Town Club Lanes. They bowled two lines each week, under the supervision ot Mrs. Fran Ashcrott. The teams were sponsored by local clubs, organiza- tions and business groups: American Legion, American Legion Auxiliary, Community Co-op Oil, Dahl Mobile Oil, Does, Eagles Auxiliary, Moose Auxiliary and VFW. Each sponsor gave his team a name and SIU which covered transportation costs and entry tees for the State Tournament and paid tor the end of the year banquet. RUTH EMSTAD, PRESIDENT, DISPLAYED GOOD FORM as she dem- onstrated her bowling technique to the other Bowling League otiicers: Corrine Hanson, secretary, and Iudy Holway, treasurer. Bowling Leaguers Attempt Strikes FRONT ROW: Schuhmacher, Kaasa, S. Peterson, Rice, Wilkinson Lindeman, Morreim. SECOND ROW: D. Peterson, Hanson, D. Miller, Dudley, Iensen, Gooderum, Steinke, Todd, Folck. THIRD ROW: Wentzell, Westrum. Enqbritson, Krieger, K. Peterson, Emstad, Tasker Tarvestad, Lewis, Kycek. FOURTH ROW: Johnston, Ernest. Gilbert Meixell, Mathews, Nelson. Taylor, Minear. Olson, Venem, Holway M. Miller. Page 165 w.x,- 5-,wav, -,,,WnZ4YV-X,,42k-K,,.pg,,,..f- 'iff-V W- - ----- -Y rmfsf. E-,wa-., ,, . , , ' . STUDENT LIFE The memories of each king queen and attendant oi each dramatist stage worker and manager of each producer director and participant all these memo- ries reflect the work and enthusiasm of student activi- ties From Homecoming in October to the prom m May the special activities created enloyment and pleasant memories for all senior high students balanc- mg the cumculm- and extra-curncular ' , : I 7 I ' 1 - N .- 2 . I ' ..1. , U '1-:11 z .A it I THE ROYAL COURT consisted of Queen Barbara Ann Hegland and David Iordahl, music: Michael Morrison, dramatics: Paul Wilke, her attendants: Gervaise Wilhelm, Carolyn Furry, Sandra Hanson, master ol ceremonies: Iohn Parry, crownbearer: William Rhiger, or- Linda Ille, Margit Larson and Lois Hassberq. Representatives were qanizations: and Richard Oliphant. athletics. ueen Barbara Graciously Reigns GLOWING WITH RADIANCE after a happy day were the Home- coming Queen attendants: Carolyn Farry, Sandra Hanson, Lois Hassberq, Linda Ille, Margit Larson and Gervaise Wilhelm. Graciously smiling at her royal attendants as the curtain parted to the strains oi "La Czarineu was radi- ant Queen Barbara Hegland. She was attired in the traditional White tormal and held a bouquet ot Ameri- can Beauty Bed Boses. Her six attendants, Carolyn Parry, Sandra Hanson, Lois l-lassberg, Linda llle, Mar- git Larson and Gervaise Wilhelm, wore pastel blue tormals and held a single red rose. A tantare to prelude the introduction ot Queen Bar- bara to the student body was ottered by coronetists Boger Christiansen, Barry Yocum and Bichard Ander- son. Master ot Ceremonies Paul Willie presented the Queen and her attendants to the student body. Queen Barbara descended from her throne to take the traditional Queens pledge and to receive the spark- ling rhinestone tierra as her crown. Alter ascending her throne and giving thanks to her subjects, Queen Bar- bara listened as representatives pledged their support. Bringing a conclusion to the coronation ceremony was Sharon Kurth, who gave a solo, "A Pertect Day." ,sf it V We Page 169 Homecoming got off to a spectacular success as the traditional parade and bonfire took place October 5. The seven Queen candidates attired in furs and rid- ing in open convertibles, 24 floats each depicting a different phase of the desired victory and excited spec- tators made the Homecoming parade successful. The brightly decorated floats constructed with the theme "Wallop Washburn" in mind, were judged by members of the lunior Chamber of Commerce. Home- rooms 204 and 304 were selected as prize winners. As the end of the parade passed, all spectators, young and old, rushed to Morin Park to view the bonfire with the Pep Band providing the music and the cheer- leaders leading the school chants. The chant, "We want the Queens" led to the introduction of the queen candidates. While the crowd of exuberant spectators watched, the billowing flames swept away the remains of the students' efforts. Richard Oliphant was in charge of all Homecoming events. Working under him was David Palmer who planned, organized and supervised the bonfire. WORKING VIGOROUSLY to complete their float before parade time were Sandra Hanson, lane Nelson and Barbara Collins. Students Join in Parade, Bonfire EMPHATICALLY extermmatmq the Millers homeroom 105 portray DEPICTING THE VICTORY of the Tigers were Mary Iordahl. Patricia ed the excitement of Albert Lea Hlqh School fans Frizzell. IoAnn Olson. Linda Modlin and Iudith Chrisinqer. Ctiening the l9?2'l Htirtiecoiniita aaine was the pref sentaticn of the iraq and the National Anthern by the Senior High Band. 'then the field was darkened and the Albert Lea teant ran throuah a spotlit paper tiaer head between the east goal posts. After an excitina first halt, the band rnarched onto the field and fornted a "VV", faced the Washbiirn stands and played their school sorta. The band formed a square and played "The Black Bottom" while the airl rnernbers did tho Charleston. Following this, they forrned a crown and the liahts were dirnined for the presentation of Queen Barbara and her court, durina which "La Czarineu was played. The royalty rode on a liqhtod float donated by Bzoslcie Sian Company. Barbara carried a bouquet of scarlet roses, and each attendant carried a rose The band then forrned an "AL" and played "Corrie on 'lliqersf' "Cctober Odyessy" was the theme of the dance held in the Boys' Gyng following the aanie. Decorations included a crepe pager ceiling in a aiant pinwheel of fall colors, a balloon tree with a balloon for each player and silhouettes of players, cheerleaders and briaht autunin leaves on the wall. ANXIETY was shown on the faces of Del Bosacker cmd Iames Larson To Create emorable Homecommg 1 1 Females pursued the males on Sadie Hawkins' Day, November ll. At l2:l2 each girl raced to the bookroom to obtain tags with which she could tag any boy. As the females spotted their game, the chase was on. lf a boy survived the chase for five and one-quarter full hall lengths or l5 city blocks, he was no longer free game. The library, Girls' Gym, ll7 l. H. and 304 were designated game refugees. Definitely no tagging was allowed during classtime. When a boy was caught, he was taken to the book- room so the girl could buy a marriage license which proved that the boy was her date for that evening. A S2 prize was awarded to Myreen Gavle for capturing the most eligible bachelor, Paul Wilke. Hobo and clashing costumes were worn at the dance. The girl was required to provide transportation for the evening. Each girl not able to furnish transpor- tation paid the boy ten cents a mile. GIRLS MUST PAY all expenses. Obeying the rules were Gervaise Wilhelm and Iudith Olson who were buying their marriage licenses. Local Custom Brings Merry Chase SHOWING OFF their Sadie Hawkins snags at the dance were Myreen "HELP!" cried Paul Wilke, most eligible bachelor. who was sur- Gavle and Dee Ellertson who caught Paul Wilke cmd Ralph Erland- rounded by two determined girls, Ianice Peterson and Myreen Gavle, son, respectively, as their dates lor the evening. as each sought the S2 offered tor his capture. r l ,, N " tr s a if 4. is.. . . ,,. .5 3 ..: "-' . , .:f..-::..:-Elm 1. , -:ss -E: I'-1-'.s:2-f:.-s5:- QW ' "1 """ i Q, gs '-'1':g.sr, 2:'4::g, . -' .:., f,4L..:-IEE? 'v Page 172 sie-1 TAKING TIME OUT to pose for a 1:i:ture before entering into the Oliphant, Karen Mathews. Rebecca Boyer, Iudith Ann Olson, Lynda festivities oi the annual Winter Carnival were the attendants to the Bell and Robert Demo. Not pictured were David Palmer and Paul King and Queen of Snows: Robert Wallace. Iulie Boyum, Richard Wilke. The carnival was sponsored by the Youth Council. Dance Climaxes Winter Festivities Adding to the festivities ot the Christmas holidays was the annual Winter Carnival. Holiday tournaments in hockey and ice-skating and two dances for junior and senior high students constituted the major events. The senior high dance, entitled "Snow Serenade," was held at the Armory on the evening ot December 28. Climaxing the dance was the coronation of Iudy Boyum and Stephen Claybourn as the Queen and King ot Snows. Homecoming Queen Barbara l-legland crowned Iudy and presented her with a bouquet ot roses while Rodney Seeger placed the crown on Ste- phen's head. The couple was then presented with gifts of jewelry trom the royal court. Attendants to the King and Queen were Lynda Bell, Rebecca Boyer, julie Boyum, Karen Mathews, ludith Qlson, Robert Demo, Richard Qliphant, David Palmer, Robert Wallace and Paul Wilke. Each girl received a single red rose and each boy was presented with a white boutonniere by the crown bearers. Various other events were planned for the enjoy- ment and recreation ot all students during Christmas vacation. All activities were sponsored by the Youth Council and a Council ot Clubs. GRACIOUSLY REIGNING over the 1950 Winter Carnival Festivities were Iudy Boyum and Stephen Claybourn who were crowned at the Winter Carnival Dance held December 28 at the Armory. SF" Page 173 Annual Tiger's Roar Presents Tale TAPPING THEIR TOES across the showboat deck, Sandra Wentzell and Katherine Taylor energetically danced to "Walk, Don't Run." "Showboat," the theme of the 1961 Tiger's Roar, was presented lanuary 28, 30 and Sl in the high school auditorium to a large audience at each performance. The set was constructed oi a large showboat named "The Mistress ot the Mississippi." This was the vessel around which the legend oi its past was told. Grandpa, portrayed by Michael Morrison, had been a showboat captain and had had many amusing exper- iences Which he related to his grandson, lay Sliie. ln the tirst act the showboat was portrayed in its early stages during the latter nineteenth century. Acts included the Glee Club, a two-piano number, a singing Negro cook and a pickaninny dancer. The showboat progressed to the l92O's in the second act, A "murder," Peter Gunn chorus line and "torch singer" appeared with the second act. ln the third and tinal act, the showboat went "modern" and depicted the present-day showboat. The Pied Pipers, a modern ballet and a girls' quartet completed the Roar. CLIMBING TOWARD A SUPERB ROAR was the 1961 production staff. Counterclockwise were Karen Mathews, director: Iames Groos, producers: Carole Lee, stage manager: Iohn Iverson, set design: Suzanne Helgeson, properties: Lois Hassberq, programs: Mary Keil, costumes: Margit Larson, tickets: Roxanne Wehrhan, Susan Wal- gamot and Barbara Sliie, script: Elaine Posthumus, publicity: Dee Ellertson, makeeup: William Danielsen, stage manager: Linda Ille, producer: and David Iordahl, director. HARD WORKING Negro children, Karen Folck and Terry Sorenson, took time from their duties to add spice to life on a showboat. 3 Page 174 f 'Showboafs' Historical Journey The idea for the lQ6l Tiger's Roar was submitted by Roxanne Wehrhantand Barbara Sliie. lt was written by Roxanne, Barbara and Susan Wolgamot. A Student Council committee selected the co-direc- tors, David lcrdahl and Karen Mathews, the co-produ- cers, lames Groos and Linda llle, and the other various committee heads. They all Worked very closely with the faculty advisers, Mr. Robert L. Myers and Mr. R. Wayne Cleveland, to make the production one ot the best ever presented in Albert Lea. The cast was picked by the production statt. lt was Thomas Counters, captain oi the early showboaty Mor- ris Haslcins, captain ot the modern showboat, Robert Demo, Michael Iansma, David Peterson and Leo Yolciel, deckhandsp and William Danielsen, lohn lverson, Larry King and Gary Roelofs, card players. DEVASTATING as cr flapper of the 1920's was Rodney Seeger as he joined Frank Ostby and Thomas Van Beek for "Tea for Two." SLAPSTICK COMEDY PREVAILED as Sandra Veldman, Gail Wedge, Virginia Iacobson, David Knudtson, Mary Skophammer, Bruce Glesne and Iohn Bailey combined to present the skit, "Fool for a Night." TWIRLING AND GLIDING their way through all three acts of the ton opened the second act to set the atmosphere of Roaring Twen Tiger's Roar were the four chorus lines of senior girls. The "Charles- ties and the Village Modems closed the 1961 Tiger s Roar 'gum ,mpm W W "FRIENDS, ROMAN, COUNTRYMEN, lend me your ear . . David Larsen, who played the part of Caesar's Ghost, introduced the play while lane Nelson, Cleopatra, followed his command. Bringing up Mother, with the assistance of a ghost or two, presented the problem in the fall play, "Great Caesars Ghost," presented November l8 and l9. The play revolved around two Victorian mothers, Mrs. Phoebe De Royster and Mrs. Penelope Maxwell, and their belief in the supernatural, personified by Mah- jah the Mystic. Mrs. MaXwell's daughter, Helen, was forced into solving her mother's problems and the prob- lems of Mrs. De l:toyster's daughter, Debby. Helen herself had a problem - she was engaged to a man her mother disliked because he was not mystic. When a sympathetic Aunt Polly arrived, the prob- lems were transferred to her shoulders. Debby's prob- lem was easy to solve, but the other two proved more difficult. The timely arrival of Uncle Phineas - with a ghost f helped to solve these. The two families decided to pretend that the Mah- jah had made Phoebe and Penelope invisible, and Tommy Tucker, l-lelen's boyfriend, would pretend to bring them back again. ln that way, the two women would be frightened away from mystics and at the same time Penelope would learn to appreciate Tommy's talents and consent to the marriage. Meanwhile the maid, Esther, had been pursuing the butler, lohnson, until she persuaded him to invite her to the theatre. The cook, Hattie, had been pursuing a neighbor boy who constantly stole her cakes. The play ended happily with Phoebe and Penelope firm in their disbelief of the supernatural and mystics. Dramatists Portray Victorian Era TRYING TO WIN the heart of the disinter- DISPLAYING the feelings of a frustrated cook whose product is being devoured was Iudith ested butler, Thomas Counters, was Lois Enqbritson as she wildly chased Timothy Bothof, a neighbor boy. Carolyn Farry, the daughter, Hassberq, the household maid. watched the typical scene with an attitude of helplessness. Page 176 Bidding the whole world, especially the Parisian district of Chaillot, of all the evil and greedy people was the expressed desire of Countess Aurelia, the "Madwoman of Chaillot." The Madwoman really wasn't insane. ln fact, she seemed to be one of the few sane people in the entire play. A cellar, at 21 Rue de Chaillot, served as the Countess' home in which she entertained her friendse four other "madwomen" and Parisian vagabonds. The peace and happiness of Chaillot was disrupted by the greedy prospector who found oil beneath the streets. f-le planned to blow up the city to get the gold, but Pierre, his agent, was unavoidably detained and thrown in the Seine River. The vagabonds took him out of the river and carried him to the lVfadwoman's cafe, the Cafe Cheez Francis. Pierre's life was saved by lrma, a waitress and the Countess' personal maid. Meanwhile, the Madwoman, aware of the crooked- ness of the Prospector, plotted with the other "mad- women" to rid the world of him and his kind. With the help of the Sewer Man, she discovered the entrance to a bottomless pit in her cellar. She held a trial for the evil people and one by one, as they were found guilty, sent them into the pit from which there was no return. The play ended with a scene of great rejoicing. ANGERED BY THE PRESUMPTUOUSNESS of Iohn Bailey. prospector: and Alva Ienson, president: Roxanne Wehrhan. Countess Aurelia: supported by Neal Gendler. sewer rnan: drove them from her domain. And Gaiety of Parisian Vagabonds THE ENTIRE CAST of the "Madwoman of Chaillot" rehearsed their lines for the tinal scene when GAZING ADORINGLY into the eyes ot Chaillot, purged of the evil people, rejoiced. In this scene the pigeons began to fly and the grass Irma. played by Barbara Gurwell, was began to grow again because of the absence oi evil in the world. Pierre. played by William Rhiger. Page 177 t WORKING BUSILY TO finish sewing the last roll of cheesecloth to finish the ceiling for the prom were Iohn Iverson. Mary Keil and Barb Kolstad. who were grateful that their work was almost done. Sombreros, straw chairs and gaily painted Wall murals in a typical Mexican garden setting helped to depict the theme, "South ot the Border," chosen for the l96U lunior-Senior Prom held May l3 in the Boys' Gym. Girls dressed in billowing iormals and boys in tuxe- dos and dinner jackets found themselves in a replica of old Mexico at the buttet dinner in the cafeteria. Small tables covered with gaily checked tablecloths and decorated with candles in Wax-covered bottles were enclosed in a small, screened-in area ot the cafeteria. The art classes painted the murals in the modern trend. The traditional promenade through Central Park began the evening's testivities. Led by Roger Chris- tianson, lunior Class President, and Carol Rasmussen, the promenade was viewed by many people. Dancing began to the strains ot the Henry Charles Orchestra. The Grand March, one ot the main events, was led by Roger and Carol and Bruce Cotton, Senior Class Vice President, and Sandra Wentzell. 1960 Prom, "South of the Border", ANXIOUSLY ANTICIPATING an evening filled with gaiety. Robert Demo hesitated a moment before calling lor his date. ACTING AS HOST at one of the many pre-prom parties was Ralph Erlandson, who was serving guests Karen Meixell and Carole Lee. Page 178 Pre-prom punch parties added much zest to prom night. Many prom-goers began the evening as early as 5 p.m. to attend get-togethers planned by their friends. Following the dance at the school, many of the stu- dents Were guests of the Elk's Club, which sponsored a dance. This dance ended with a breakfast. The punchbowl of the prom consisted of a miniature fountain with punch spouting from tiny gargoyles. Punch was served by sophomore girls dressed in the Mexican peasant mode of dress. Work on the l96O Prom began in lanuary with the selection of a theme. ln April, the actual construction and decoration were started. Work was supervised by the class officers, Roger Christianson, Mary Keil, Linda llle and Carole Lee, and the committee chairman, Wil- liam Rhiger, intermission: Carolyn Parry and David Iordahl, bandstandg Mary Gilbertson and Barbara Heg- land, buffet, Cynthia Bothof and Margit Larson, punch- bowl, Myreen Gavle and Michael Morrison, Walls: Ger- vaise Willhelm and Stephen Claybourn, ceilingg Lois Hassberg and Robert Demo, cafeteriag and lane Nelson and Dee Ellertson, invitations. FOUR WEARY prom-goers, Donald O. Nelson, Ianet Myers. Donald I. Nelson and Janice Nelson, ate at their post-prom party. Portrays Enchanting Mexican Scene DECORATING the Boys' Gym for the 1960 Prom took many long hours MANY REPLICAS of Spanish furniture were used to create the illusion of hard and extensive planning by the various prom committees. that the happy prom-goers were in the scenes of old Mexico. Page 179 gi? 95,1 Hifi Q, T15 EN a fi: H5571 rm iw HH! 4555: "EQ iiil :wr z ,121 235 4: gg 23 ., ,M H. .. ., , A- r':+,:?fi9'R,'x7v:iV'n,1. fw'f",Q'. 412'-,., W, ni., ,-,., . -- wif' -4114,-W. .-mf. iw- .U ffHiLzf52?.fw'5.f 4: 452.212 swf ffcifsai? M326 f1"Y4r1P?'fvii5"? Fwlfff T 4 ,aaw-ww-vff'-wr f'wwffffzf',fa,: wr'-:m:'fmw,,:Q. :mwrwfqfy-xertrewf .W 'fm 17. ,wfp fig Y L J Wifi 4 1 gjfgis to is Qx is 507559 is vi y f fsicssgiiw VG' t n ear of 1961, we are able to see m a cts o chool life at Albert Lea High School. All may embered with ioy. The future, too. can reflect muc for high school students. Graduates look forward to building a new life for themselves. Under- classmen await the following school years, secure in the knowledge that their school truly reflects the spirit of America. WWQN kW.Mvs,RgV X xtawqtw Q 'fra Aww Nw ' Mmzlwv Nw ' XGSQ. ' Mme, A wxwmiiiffs 'mmf t JM? er St I Vfwujfaffgr NJ All W if QAWIW ,DEE ..,. ..., . A .,,... P ltr tt ixiiiiixiyf .y M f ft .A,, ,,.,. . . ,..,. ., ,,.. .. ft W Wk , X ' OJX etorl. .. ........ .... W .................. . .:.. . W Alf? 5 .. Mt V ' 1 v t 19 t K GA, niors and Sophomores .... . ........ . W QW tm. W Page 182 Organizations Boys' Sports Girls' Sports Student Life . . . . .Barbara Slile . . . .Linda llle .Mary Keil . .Barbara Koistad Roxanne Wehrhan . . . . .Iulie Paulson Elaine Posthumus Iean Schlehr . . . .Deanna Foley Neal Gendler Lawrence Haugen . . .Sharon Blizard Arlene Dilling Carole Lee . Richard Oliphant Allen Tullberg . . .Cynthia Bothof . . . .Patricia Moen Ianet Myers Susan Wolgamot Index .. . .... Ianice Nelson Ianice Peterson Publicity and Circulation . . ...Nancy Bolinger Hazel Stoa Photography .... .... D avid Larsen Steven Person Editorial Adviser .. .... Miss Edna Gercken Business Advisers .... Mr. Arthur Anthony Mr. Charles Fairchild Miss Marie Skieveland Photography Adviser .... ..... M r. Earl Jacobsen 83, 85.100, A Abrego. Frances 10 ..........,.. 72. 95 Ackland, Iay 12 ........... 38, 114. 115 Ackland. Rachel 11. .62, 88. 93, 96, 109 Ackland, Ronald 12 .......,. 38. 84. 86 Adams. Steven 11 ....... Ahern. Sharon 10. .72. 85, 105, 106, 162 Ahl, Roger 11 ..... .... ......... 6 2 . 96 Allen. Dean 11 .... Allen, Kenneth 10 .... Allen, Larry 12 ......... Alm, Maridee 11 ....... Amann, R. Paul 12, .... . Amundson, Carol 11 .... Amundson, Sandra K. 10 Amundson, Sharon 12. . . Amundson, Shirley 11 . . . .....146 ......72 ......38. 82 105,120,162 .....62, 117 .,...72, 100 ....38.117 .,..,62. 85, 92. 93, 105, 162 ....72. 87, 88, 105, 106. 162 Anderson, Barbara 11 . . . Anderson, Bonnie A. 10. Anderson'..Bernette 12. . . Braaten, Mabel 10 ..... 73. 87, 162, 182 ......38.88 Anderson, Deloris 10 ...... 72, 112, 164 Anderson, Gary 10 .... ..... 7 2, 114 Anderson, Ioe 10 ...... .... 7 2, 114 Anderson. Karen 12. . . .... 38, 116 Anderson, Keith 11 .... ...62, 107 Anderson, Laurie 10 ............ 72, 82 Anderson, Lory 10 ...............,. 85, 95, 105, 111,162 Anderson. Raymond 12 ............. 38 Anderson, Richard 12 .............. .........38, 89. 90. 93.148, 149,158 Andresen, Thelma 10 .............. 72 Andrews, Alan 10 .....,.......... ............72,86, 101,102,150 Ameson, Alice ...,...... Atchison, Ernest 10 ..... Aumentado, Iudy 10 .... Ausen, Iohn 10 ....... B Bachtle. Lanny 12 .... Bailey, David 10 ....... Bailey, Iohn 10 ......... ....,72.87.88.95,101.HHH..H Baker, Bruce 11 ......... Bale. lames 11 ..,... Banqert. David 10 .... Barrett, Susan 11 .... Barry. Carol 10 ..... Barry, Dorothy 11 .... . . Bartell, Iudith 12 .,.. .. Bartness, Vicky 10 ..... . . Bates, Iohn 11 ...... Bauers, Sharon 10 .,.. Bauers, William 12 ..... Bauman, Lorraine 11 .... Beck, Larry 10 ........ Behr, Steven 10 ........ Bell, Lynda 12 ......... ,...72,131 ......72 .....72 ....38.117 .....72, 150 102. 174, 177 .....62.114 ,....62. 96 .....,..72 ...79. 99, 162 .....62. 105 ..38, 100. 108 ...72. 86, 88 ........72 ....38, 114 ....62. 112 .....72,107 ..72, 87. 99 38. 95, 98. 102, 104, 111, 162, 163, 173 Bendixen, Linda 11 ..... 98,102,103,105 Index Bennett. Wallace 11 . Benson, William 10.. Benson. loAnn 11 .... Berg, Lowell 12 ...., Berg. Neil 10 ........ Berqo, Sandra 12 .... .,.....l48 ....62. 85, 86 .....38,116 .......25, 38, 94 Bertleson, Edward 12 .......... 39, 98 Bisgaard, Daniel 12.. 16. 39, 96, 98 Bierke, Sharon 10 .....,......., 73. 85 Black, Paul 11 .......... 14. 62. 94. 96 Blanchard. Ianet 12 ........ 39, 112. 164 Bleckeberg. David 10 .......... 73, 86 Bleclceberq, Paul 12.. Blizard, Sharon 12. .. .........36, 39. 84. 95,104,118,l62 Blocker, Ianice lSuel 10. .73, 85, 100, 162 Bluhm. Gloria 10 ....,.......... 73, 95 Boelke, Richard 10, . . Boer, Byron 11 ...... ...........73,87 96,l24,141,150,158 Boettcher, lane 10 .... Bohland, Daniel 11. . Bohlman, Betty 12. .. Bolinger, Nancy 12.. Booen, leanene 12. . . ......39. 101,119 ...39, 85, 104 Boone Patricia 11 ............ ,.62. 102 Bos, Mary 12 ....,... Bosacker, Del ...... 37. 39, 124, 150, 171 Bothol, Cynthia 12. . . 36, 39, 84, 86, 98, 101, 104, 118, 160, 30411511 'f4,.g.gg,4,'i1i i 1 67,69.84.86.87. 176 Bouvet. Bernard 12.. ........39, 49, 83.150.151,158,172 Bowman, Robert 12.. Boyer, Robert 10 ..... 114 ..........,...73.87,98.99,131, 138 Boyer, Karen 12 ............... 39, 116 Boyer, Rebecca 12. .39, 96, 104. 162. 173 Boyum, David 11 .... 96,124.133.152,153 Boyum, Iudy 12 ...... .......40, 95,103,101-1,111,162,173 Boyum, lulie 12. . .40, 95, 104. 162, 173 Braaten. Iudith 11 .... Brabec, Sandra 11 ........... 10. 62. 98 Bradley, Michael 10.. Brand, Ianice 10 ..... Brandt. Harold 12 .... Brandt, Ronald 10 .... Brandt, Ruthann 11. . , Breamer, Dallas 10. . . 79, 83. Briggs, lack 12 ....... Broitzman, Bonnie 10. .....73. 100, 131 ......,73,82 ........ll4 ......73, 115 ..,..62,112,117 97, 102. 146, 147 .,....40116,117 .....73. 108 Broitzman, JoAnn 11 ........... 62, 108 Brooke, Ieffrey 11 .... 62. 65, 83, 105, 124, iii, -1-415.150.1158 Broskofi. Iudith 10 ,......... .... 7 3, 87 Brott, Mary 10 .,..... Brouwers. Rodney 10. Brown, Randy 11 ...........,.. 62. 107 Brown, Susan 11 ..... Brue, Dennis 10 .... Bryan, Ray 11 ..... Budin. Iudy 10 ....... Buntrock. Ronald 10. . Burnett, Ronald 10. . . Bushlack, Carol 10. . . Butenholf, Ruth 10 .... ,....62. 94,105 ....73,107.131 ......62,117 ....73, 79 ....73, 86 164 Butler, Darlene 12 ...... 40, 98, 104, 112 Butler, Iames 10 ..... Butters, Beverly ll., 100 .........62, 82, 85, 96. 105,106,120 Bybee, Kenneth 10. . . Bye, Lowell 12 ...... ...40, 100 C Callahan, Karen 12.. . . .... 40, 98 Callahan. Michael 10 .... .. . .73, 141 Calvin. Nina 11 ........ ....... 6 2 Canipe. Barbara 10.. ...........73,86 Card, Wesley 12 ................... 40 Carlsen, Kay 10 .... 73. 87, 105, 162. 164 Carlson, Lee 10 ....... Carlson, Mary 10 ...... Carlson, Sandy 10... Carroll. Rose 12 ...... Carson, Valerie 11. . . Casey, Cynthia 10 .... Casey, lulie 12 ..... Casper. Lynn 10 ....,. Caya. Gordon 11 .... .....73. 86,136 73, 87, 111, 162 ....40.116 ......62. 117 ....73, 86, 95 ....40, 85.104 . ......... 73 Chapman, Kenneth 10 Chapman, Nancy 12 ...,... 40, 116, 164 Chrisinger, Iudy 10, . . .....73,162. 170 Christensen, Darla 10 .......... - .,.. 73 Christensen, Pauline 11 .... 63, 112, 113 Christensen. Sandra 12 ............. 40 Christenson, Bruce 11 .... ......... 6 3 Christenson, Keith 11 ..... ..... 6 3, 117 Christenson, Milton 11 .... ....... 6 3 Christenson, Robert 11. . . . . . . . . ,63 Christianson, Iames 10 .......... 73, 87 Christiansen, Roger 12 .............. 40 85, 86, 87, 89, 90, 93, 102, 106. 141. Chrz, Bruce 12 ....... ....,.... 4 0 Clark, Ianita 10 ....,.,. .... 7 3, 162 Clausen, Carroll 12 .... .... 4 0, 114 Clausen, Marilyn 10 ............ 73, 100 Claybourn, Stephen 12 ............. 37. 40. 83, 85, 124. 126, 127. 128. 129, 151,171,173 Clifford, William 11 ............ 63, 117 Collins, Barbara 11 ................ 98, 99.102, 103. 170 Collins, Gary 11 ............... 63. 114 Collins. Iames 12 .......,.. 41, 114, 115 Coonradt, Charles 11 .............., ............63,65,96 . 154 , 105 124, Cooper, Peter 10 ......... 73, 89. 90, 96 Cornelius, Lorraine 12 .............. 41 Cornelius, Merle 10. . . Cornick. Alice 12 .... ......73 .......41 Cotton, Terry 12 ................ 41. 99 Counters, Thomas 11 ............... ..63, 69. 88. 90, 91, 92. 102. 158. 176 Cults, William 11 ............... 63, 97 D Dagner, Fredric 11. . . Daqner. Mary 10 ..... ....73,94,11l Daleiden. Iames 12 ....... 20. 41. 96, 98 Danielsen, William 12 ,... .......... 37. 41, 83, 95. 124. 127. 150. 158. 174 Davidson, Gary 12 .......,......... 41, 85. 86. 96, 97. 106, 154, 155, 156, . ............................... 157 Davies, Richard 10. .73, 86, 96, 138, 154 Davison, Thomas 10 ................ 73 De Boer, Barbara 10 ........... 73, 108 De Boer, Gerald 12 ...,......... 41, 42 Deckard, lane 10 ...... 73, 112, 113, 162 DeHaan, David 11 .............. 63, 98 Page 183 Demo, Robert 12 ............. ...... 178 DeNeui, Bette 11 ........ 63. 84. 94. 102 41.96.107.173. De Raad. Ruth Ann 10 .............. 73 Dilling. Arlene 12. .41, 98, 104. 118, 162 Dingemans, Dennis 10 ...... 73, 100, 131 Dingemans. Lola ll ............ 63. 164 Distad. Sharon 10 ....... 73, 85. 98, 105 Dittmar. Iames ll. . . .......... 63, 88 Dixon. lanice ll ...... ......... 6 3 Donovan, Iames 11... ....... 63, 98 Doyscher. Sally 11 ........... 63, 84, 96 Draayer. Arthur 12 ................. 41 Draayer, Ioan 11 .... 63. 85. 94. 95. 164 Draayer, Phil 10 ........,.......... 73 Drescher, Cheryl 10 ............ 73. 164 Dress. William 12 ......... 41, 116, 117 Dudley. Margaret tPeq9Yl 10 ....... Dugstad, Iudy 10 ,... 73, 87, 99. 102, 162 Dugstad, Kent 12 ..,.......,... 41, 116 Dulitz, Everett 10 .... ..... 7 3, 131. 138 , ............. 73. 85. 88, 94. 95 Dulitz. Steven 12 ...... .,.......... 4 1 Durnin, Richard 12 .... . , .... 41. 117 Dusek. Edward 11 .... .... 6 3, 68. 150 E Eastvold, Ianell 10 .... .... 7 3, 94, 164 Ebsen. Delores 10 ............... 73, 95 Eckhart. George 11 ............ 63, 114 Eckart. Rodney 10 ....... 74, 87, 89. 114 Edwin, Dennis 12 .......... 42, 107, 117 Edwin. Donna 12 ...... 42. 101, 104, 164 Eqqum, Elen 10 ............ 74. 86, 100 Eqland. Patricia 10 ................. 74 Eisenbise. Sharon ll ........... 63. 117 Ekstrum, Carol tHollyl 11 .... 93, 99. 106 Eskstrum, Hazel tLynnl 10 .......... 74 Ellertson, Dee 12 ................... .36. 42, 85, 95, 98. 102, 103, 104. 162, 172, 174 Ellingson. Loren 11 .............. 63, 88 Ellingson, Lowell 10 .... .......... 7 4 Elvebak, David ll ......... 36. 136. 148 Emstad. Ruth Ann 12 ......,........ ....42, 55. 85, 100. 104, 106, 164. 165 Emstad. William 10 ................ 74 Enderson, Larry 12 .....,........... 42 Enderson, Margaret 10 ............. 74 Enderson, Patricia 12 ....... 11. 42. 104 Engbritson. Iudith 12 ............... ...........43,l0l.102.104.165. 176 English. Kathleen 10 ................ 85.99. 105.162 Erickson, Claudia 10 ............... 89.98,105.162 Erlandson, Kent 10 ................. 88. 96.131.138. 139 Erlandson, Ralph 12 ................ 43, 85. 86,172,178 Ernest. Bobbi 12 ............ 36, 43, 155 Evans, Diane 11 ............... 63, 112 Evenson, Susan 10 ...... 74. 87. 95, 102 Evenson, William ll ............... 63 F Fabry. Peter ll .................... 65.97. 141. 142. 158 Fahley. Terry 12 ................... 43 Farry. Carolyn 12 .................. 43. 85. 95, 98. 102. 103, 104. 162. 169, Ferring. Kathleen 10 .... 74. 99, 105. 162 Fink, Steven 10 .............. 74. 86. 97 Page 184 Fjelbroten, Sandra 10 ............... 74 Fieldberg. David 12 ............ 43. 116 Flanagan. Patricia 10 .... 74. 86, 95. 106 Flann, lack 12 ..................... 43 Flaskerud. Eugene 12 .......... 43, 114 Flaten, Clair 11 ........... 63. 124, 135 Fleming. Wendell 10 ............... 74 Flugum. Alton 12 ........... 43. 85. 109 Folck. Karen 12 .................... ..........43, 100. 104. 109. 165. 174 Foley. DeAnna 12 ...... 43. 95. 111. 118 Folie. Darrell 12 ........... 43. 114, 115 Francis, Yvonne 10 ..... 74. 87, 94. 162 Frank, David 10 ................... 74 Fredrickson. Frank 10 .......... 74. 107 Fredrickson, Larry 11 ....... 14. 63, 102 Fredrickson. Sharon 12 ......... 43, 117 Fredrickson. Steven 12 ...... 43. 95. 107 Freeman, Allen ll ..,... ......... 1 17 Freeman, Patricia 10 .,............. 74 Fretheim. Frank 11 ......,.......... 100. 124. 158. 159 Frizzell. Patricia 10 ................. 99. 106,111,170 G Gaard, Adrian 12 .... .... 4 3, 114 Gappa, Ianice ll. . . ......,.... . .63 Gari, Daniel 10 .................... 74 Gari. Freda 12 ......... 36. 44. 104, 112 Gavere, Allen 11. .63, 96, 150. 151, 158 Gavle, Karen 10 ................... ........74, 86. 95,102.103,105.111 Gavle, Myreen 12 .................. ....44. 84, 95, 102.104, 111. 162, 172 Gehrig. Regina 12 ................. 44 Gendler. Neal 11 .................. 64, 95,l02.118.177 Gilbert. Patricia 12 ......... 44, 116. 165 Gilbertson, Mary 12 ................ ..........,...44.84.86.99,104.162 Gilbertson. Ruth 10. .74, 87, 99. 102. 162 Gill, Lois 11 ....................... 64 Gilpin, Daniel 10 .... 74. 82. 87. 131. 146 Glenn, Larrie 12 ................ 44, 96 Glesne. Bruce 10. . .74, 86. 101. 153. 174 Gniftke, Curtis 11 ........... 64. 84. 115 Golberg. Shirley 11 ........... 64. 1164 Goldman, Iudith ll ................. ..64. 67. 82. 88, 98. 105. 160. 162. 164 Goldman, Susan 10 ................ ..............74.85.88.99,105.164 Gooderum, Diane 11 ................ ....64. 84. 96, 102. 103, 105. 111.165 Goodmanson, Ianet 11. . .64. 85. 98. 101 Goodmanson, Iohn 10 ,.... ......... 74, 82. 87. 97, 130, 131. 138. 148. 149 Goodmanson, Keith 10 .............. 74 Gordon, Michael 10 ...... ........ 7 4 Goskeson, Morland ll .......... 64. 115 Grasdahlen. Gary 10 ........ 74, 92, 97 Grasdahlen. Paul 11 .... ........ 6 4 Green. lonathon 10 ....... . . .74, 87 Greenwood. Ralph 11 .............. 64 Gregerson. Amy 11 ................ 85.98. 101.105, 106 Grinolds. Iohn 10 ................. 131 Groeztinger, Leigh 12 .......... 44. 116 Groos. Iames 12 ..,................ ...............44,85.86.87,96.174 Gudmonson, loAnn 11 ............,. 64 Guiney, Thomas 12 ................ ..44. 124. 140. 141, 142. 143. 144. 158 Gulbrandson. Beverly 12 ........ 10. 44 Gulbrandson. Virginia 12 ........... 44 Gunderson, Iohn 12 ........ 44, 141, 145 Gunderson. Lowell 12 .............. 84.86.114 Gunderson, Pauline 10. .74, 96, 111, 162 Gurwell, Barbara 11 ,............... ....64. 65. 83. 96. 102. 105. 162. 177 H Hage. Betty 10 ..... .... 7 4, 99 Hagen. Sandra 12... .... 44. 85 Haqge. Larry ll ..... ...... 6 4 Hall, Nancy 11 ........ .... 6 4 Halvorson, Ernest 10 .... .... 7 4 Halvorson, Lorea 12 ..... .... 4 4 Halvorson, Steven 11 .... .... 6 4 Hamson, Donald 10. . . ....... . .74 Hamson. Larry 12 .... ....... 4 5. 107 Hansen. Carol 10 ,........ 74. 101. 162 Hansen, Gene 11 .................. 85.96.110.153,164 Hansen. Gerald 10 ...............,. 74 Hansen, Karole 11 ...... 64, 85. 96, 101 Hansen, Ronald 10 .............. 64. 74 Hanson, Barbara 10 ................ 74 Hanson, Bonita ll .................. ....64. 68. 84. 86. 88. 93. 94. 101. 164 Hanson Hanson Hanson Hanson Hanson Hanson , Corrine 12 ..... 45. 98. 164, 165 , Danny 10 .,.. 74, 131. 138. 150 . David ll .............. 64. 115 , Helen 12 .................. 45 , Ioan 12 ............ 36. 45. 162 . loan 10 ........ 17. 74. 88. 104 Hanson, Ioylene l2..1l, 45. 95. 98. 164 Hanson. Iudith S. 12 ................ 98.104.106,164 Hanson, Larry 11 .................. 64 Hanson. Nancy 11 ,..,............. 64 Hanson. Paul 11..64. 97. 127. 146. 150 Hanson, Sandra 12 ...............,. ..18. 36. 45, 82, 85. 104. 160, 162. 169. Hanson, Sonia 10 .................. 74 Hanson, Susan 10 ................. ..............74.87,89.94.102.105 Hanson Hanson , Virginia 10 .,....... 74, 86, 89 . Vonice ll .......... 64, 98, 105 Harding, Linda 10, .74, 99, 102, 105. 162 Harding, William 12 ................ 100,107,131 Hareid, Hareid. Gary 10. .............. 79. 114 Kay 11 .................... 162 ........64, 92, 98. 100. 105. -06, Hareid. Harms, William 10 ......... 74, 86. 150 Reginald ll ............,... ...............64,114,150,151.158 Harpel, Harris, Ronald 12 ............. 45, 116 Frederick 11 ..,............. 64 Haskins. Mary 10 ...... 74, 86, 102, 162 Haskins, Morris 12. . .45. 84, 86. 98. 103 Hassberg. Lois 12 .................. ..45, 84, 95, 102. 103. 104, 111, 169. Hathaway, Pamela ll .......... 64. 117 Haugen. Lawrence 12 .............. 84. 86, 87. 98.118 Haugen. Sandra 10 ......... 74. 99. 162 Hautt, Gloria 10 ................,.. 74 Head. Carol 10 .................... 74 Heather. lack 11. . .64. 94, 107. 150. 158 Hebel, Phyllis 11 ..... ,..... 6 4, 98. 105 Heckes. Diane 10 ,................. 74 Heemsbergen, Marvin 12 ........... 45 Heemsbergen, Melvin 10 ............ 74 Hegland. Barbara 12 ............... .25. 45. 85. 86. 95. 104. 106. 162. 168. Heideman. Ierry 11 ................ 115 Heilman. Frederick 11. . . .,..... . .64 Heilman. Terry ll ............. .... . 64 Heilman. William 12 ....... 45, 107. 109 Helgeson. Suzanne 12 ....,......... .,..25, 46. 84. 102. 104. 106. 162. 174 Hellrng, Iean 10 ................... 74 Helmers. Lorraine 10 ,.... ...... , . . .74 Henderson, Hubert 10 ........ 75. 87. 88 Hendric kson. Donna 11 ............. 84. 89. 93,100,105 Hendrickson. Duane 10 .......... 75. 78 Hendric kson. Frances 11 ........... 164 Hendrickson, Loree 11 ...... 94. 106. 108 , Howard 10 ............ 75, 131 Hendrickson, Lynda 10 ............. 75 Hendrickson, Mischa 10 ..... 75, 95, 105 Hendrickson, Susan 10 .......,...... 75.82, 86,88,162 Henry, Thomas 10 .................. 75 Heriindahl, Beverly 12 .......... 46, 116 Herman, Bernard 12 .... ...... 4 6 Hershey, Karen 11 ................. 65 Herth, Leonard 10 .................. 75 Higgins. Catherine 10. .75, 85, 105, 162 Higgins, Diana 11 .............. .... 6 5 Hillstrom, Bruce 11 ...... 65, 84, 86, 101 Hillstrom, Terry 10 .... Hirsch, Pamela 12 .... 94 ...,46, 98,111 Hoelscher, Steve 11 ........ 85. 114, 115 Hoffman, Gary 11 .... Hoium, Janis 12 ..... Hoium, Ronald 12 .... Holt, Richard 12 .... Holte, Charles 10. . . Holton. Robert 11. . . Holway. Judith 12 .... Horning, Gene 12 ..... .....103, 150 .....46, 116 ......156 ....46,116 ....75,150 ......65, 117 ....36. 46,165 114 46, Houchin, Thomas 10 ....... 75, 131, 146 Hoverson, Gary 12 .... Hoyne, Norman 11 .... Hubbard. Diane 10 .... Huesmann, Thomas 12. ......46, 114 ....65.114 ..... 75,100 Humphrey, Annette 11 ............. 85, Hunt, Linda 10 ........ Hurla, John 12 ......... Hurst, John 10 ...... . Hurst, Raymond 11 ..... Hutchins, Jay 12 ....... 89, 98, 105, 162 85 146 .65, 89, 93, 150 116 Hutchins. Michael 10 ............... 75 Hyland, Janice 12 .......... 46, 98, 104 Iverson Hylbak, Kenneth 10 ......... 75, 95, 131 Ille, Linda 12 ...................... 46, 85, 86, 88, 95, 101, 102, 104, 119, 169, 174 Indrelie, Janet 12 .............. 46, 116 Indrelie, Margaret 12 ....... 47, 98, 104 Indrelie, Norma 10 ...... 75, 85, 94, 162 Ingebritson, Iohn 11 ................ Iverson, Iverson lverson Iverson ..65, 68, 97, 104, 107, 141, 154 John 12. . .47, 98, 156, 174, 178 Kathy 10 ............... 75, 86 Kenneth 11 ............... 115 . Sandra 11 ............. 65, 117 Sharon 11 .... 65, 112, 113, 120 Jensen, Jensen, Jensen, Jensen, Jensen, Iensen, Jensen, Jensen, Jensen, Jensen, Eensen. Jensen, Jensen, Bonnie 11 ..... 65, 105, 162, 164 David 11 .................. 114 Donald 11 . . . Doris 10 .... Galen 11 .... James 10 .... James 12 .... ...65, 84.86, 87 89 ...47, 89, 98 lay 11 ......,.......... 65,115 John 1 1 .................... ,......65, 93, 96, 134, 152, 153 June 10 ................ 75, 164 Marilyn M. 11 ....... 65, 84, 98 Jensen Marilyn 12 ......... 47, 105, 165 11 Mary Lou Norma 11. . . . .............. 66 ......66, 164 Jensen, Paul 10 ..... ............ 7 5 Jensen, Robert 10 .... .... 7 5, 88, 153 Jensen, Sandra 12. . . ........ . .47 Jensen. Stuart 12 .... . . .47 Jensen, Wayne 11 ........... ..... 6 6 Jenson, Barbara 11 ................. .....66, 68, 88, 98, 101, 111,121,162 Jenson, Ronald 12 ......... 47, 114, 115 Jepson, Doris 10 ...... ............ 7 5 Jepson, Dorothy 10 .... . . . . . . . .75 Jepson, Mary 12 ...... ....... 4 7 Jepson. Ruth Ann 11 .... .... 6 6, 120 Jesse, Roger 10 ..... Joachim, Gerald 10. . Joel, Laura 10 ...... .. ....... 75 .. ..... 75 ...... ..75 Johannsen, Steven 11 ............... 66 Johnson, Cherie Ann 11 ..... 66, 85, 105 Johnson, Cheryl 11 ................. 66 Johnson, Darrel 11 .............. 66, 94 , Diane 10 ....... 75, 85, 99, 162 Johnson, Gary 11.66, Johnson Johnson 114, 117, 152, 153 Johnson, James 11 ........... 66, 86, 93 Johnson, James I. 10 .... . Johnson, Jerry 10 ..... .. Johnson Johnson , Jerry l1 .... ,Judith 12. .. Johnson, Judith 11. . . Johnson, Keith 11. . . .......75 ..15, 107 .......se ....47, 82 .....66 .......66 Johnson, Larry 12 ..... . . .47, 84 Johnson, Lowell 12 .... 47, 114 Johnson, Mark 12 ....... . . . 14, 20, 47 Johnson, Marlene 12, . . ...... . .48 Johnson Johnson Johnson , Mary 12 ...., . , Monte 10 .... .... , Banda 12 .......... 2 Johnson. Renee 10 ........... .......48 ..75, 131 3, 48, 104 89, 99,162,164 Johnson, Rita 10 ............ 75, 99, 162 Johnson, Thomas 11 ................ 66 Johnston, Bonnie 11 ............ 66, 165 Jones, Richard 10.75, 100, 138, 154, 158 Jordahl, David 12 .................. 36, 37, 48, 83, 87, 88, 90, 91, 107, 153, 174, 192 Jordahl, Mary 10 ................... 75, 87, 99, 101, 105, 106, 162, 164, 170 Jordahl, Ruth 12 ................... ..11. 36, 48, 95, 98, 101, 104, 162, 164 Jordan. James 12 .................. 48 .I Jacobsen, Darrel 10 ................ 75 Jacobsen, Gary 11 ....... ,... ...... 124, 129, 154, 158 Jacobsen, Jacobsen. Jacobson, Jacobson, Jacobson, Jacobson Raymond 11 .............. 5, 98, 150, 151, 158 Shirley 11 ............ 65, 85 116 Arnold 12 Barry S. 12 .......... 47, 115 Suzanne 10 ....... 75, 85, 105 Virginia 1 ....,..27, 0 .......... ..... 75, 95, 101, 162, 174 Jahns, Daniel 11. .65, 124, 146, 150, 158 Jahns. Marlene 10 .............. 75, 85 Jakohson, Jerome 11 ............ 65, 85 Jansma, Michael 11 ......... 65, 84, 86 Jenner, William 12 ....... 36, 47, 64, 82 Jensen, Alva 11. . .65, 96, 102, 150, 177 Jensen, Bette 11 ........,........... 65 Jorgenson, David 10 ....... 75, 131, 150 Jorgenson. James 12 ............. 48, 89 Jorgenson, John 12 ................. 48, 85, 86, 88, 94,106 Jorgenson, Ricky 10 .... ........ 7 5, 131 Jorgenson, Thomas 11 .... 66, 85, 86, 96 Joynt, Robert 12 ................ 48, 98 Juers, Russell 10 ..........,. 75, 88, 100 Juve, Catherine 10 ....... 29. 75, 99, 162 Juveland, Darryl 10 ................ 75 K Kappas, Dennis 12 ................. . . . .48, 96, 97, 124, 129, 154, 158, 159 Kappas, Patricia 11 ................ ......66, 96, 102, 103, 105, 120, 163 Kauffman, Daniel 10 ............ 75, 99 Keil, Mary 12 ...................... 36, 48, 85, 86, 100, 104, 119. 163, 174, Kennedy, Jeanne 10 ......... 75, 96, 164 Kennedy, Michael 10 ..... 75, 88, 93, 96 Kennedy, Robert 11 ................ ... , . . .66, 94, 124, 141, 144, 150, 158 Kennelly, Judith 11 ................. 89,98,105, 162,163 King, Larry 12 ..................... 48 King, Patricia 10 .... 75, 85, 95, 105, 106 King. Raymond 10 ................ ,75 King, Richard 11 ................... 66 Kirk, Linda 11 ,.,.. ,............... 63, 65, 66, 98,102,103,105,111,120, Kissinger, Kathleen 11 .............. 68, 105,163,164 Kittelson, Roger 11 ................. 66, 96, 124, 141, 142, 143, 144, 150, Klaven, Sharon 12 .... ...... 4 8 Klessin, Dallene 10 .... ..... , . .76 Kline, Robert 12 ..... . . . 48, 154 Klingbeil, Judy 10 .... ..... 7 5, 85 Klingius, Faye 10 ..... ...75, 100 Klukow, Bonnie 10 .... ........ 7 5 Klukow, Janice 11 .... ............. 6 6 Knauer, Janet 10 ........... 75, 99, 164 Knauer, Richard 11 ..... 66, 96, 102, 150 Knudson, David 10 ................. .. . . .76, 87, 88, 95, 101, 102, 103,174 Knudson, Diane 10 ....., 76, 87, 95, 105 Knudtson, Donna 10. .76, 86, 89, 99, 163 Knudtson, Roberta 11. . .66, 96, 105, 163 Knutsen, Michael 12 ................ 95, 124,158,159 Knutson, Robert 12 ............. 49, 116 Koistad, Barbara 12 ................ .. . .49, 95, 98, 104, 119, 163, 164, 178 Krause. Michael 11 .......... 66, 76, 96 Krause, Monte 10 ..... ....... 1 07 Krey, Theodora 10 ................. 94 Krieger. Charlotte 12 ............... 84, 95, 98,104,165 Krominga, Toby 10 ................. 76 Krueger, James 12 ...... 49, 96, 107, 135 Krueger, Terry 12 .............. 49, 116 Kuiper, Gertrude 12 ............. 10, 49 Kuiters, Jane 10 ............ 76, 87, 100 Kuiters, Keith 10 ...... 73, 76, 82, 87, 89 Kurth, Sharon 12 ............ 50, 85, 86 Kvenvold, Kathleen 10 ........... 76, 86 Kvenvold, Steven 12 ................ 50 Kycek, Barbara 10 ....... 76, 86, 95, 164 Kycek, Edna 12 .................... .........11. 42. 50, 102, 104,164,165 Kycek, Fred 12 ............. 50, 96, 157 L Lacis, John 10 .... .... 7 6, 96, 109 Ladlie, Dale 11 ................ 66, 114 Lageson, Gail 12 ................... .........50, 85, 86, 98, 104, 160, 163 Lahs, Larry 12 ..... 50, 83, 127, 140, 158 Lair, James 12 ........ 42, 50, 148, 149 Lair, Jerry 10 .................. 76, 114 Lamping, Mary 10 .................. 76 Larsen, J. David 12 ................. ....24, 50, 96, 102, 119, 124, 158, 176 Larson, Barbara 11 ................. 85,101,120,163 Kaasa, Norlene 11..66, 98, 105, 164, 165 Kazenbach. Ardith 11 ........ 66, 85, 94 Larson, Blair 10 ............ 76, 79, 154 Larson, Craig 10 ................... 76 Larson, James 12. .50, 124, 129, 158, 171 Page 185 Olson, John 12 ..................... Larson, Larry 10 ,....... . . . .... . 114 Larson, Marqit 12 ...........,..... 36, 50, 82, 85, 86, 95. 104, 160, 163, ....,....169, 174 Larson, Theodore 12 .............. . . ....50, 84, 86, 124, 129, 148, 157, 158 LaRue, Larry 10 ..............,.... 76 Laursen, Michael 10 ..,..... 76, 99, 131 LeBeau, Phillip 11 .......... 66, 96, 148 Lee, Carol 11 ...................... .....66, 67, 96, 98, 105, 111, 163, 178 Lee, Carole 12 .................,... ....50, 84, 95, 102, Lee, Gary, 12 ........ 104, 118, 163, 174 ..........50,116 Leif, Faith 10 .... 76, 85, 88, 99, 105, 163 Legreid, Carol 11 .....,........ 67, 121 Lembke, Duane 10 ................. 76 Lent, Katherine 10 .................. 76 Lenze, Jeanette 12 ................. 50 Leschelske, Eleanor 11. .67, 85, 112, 113 Levens, John 11 .................... 67 Lewis, Carmen 12 ..., Lien, Alan 10 ........ ..........50,165 ....76 Lien, Dennis 12 ....... ........... 5 1 Limon, Griselda 12 ................. -51 Lind, Judith 12 ........,... 51, 104, 116 Lindahl, Pamela 11 ..... 67, 92, 106, 163 Lindeman, Mary 12 ......... ...... . ..............51,84,86,95, 104,165 Lindquist, Sandra 10 ............... 76 Loken, Paulette 12 ............. 51, 112 Long, Nancy 12 ............,....... 51 Lorenzen, Marie 11. . . Ludwig, Mondra 11. .6 Lunning Maril n Jean ..,.....,.67,12l 7, 85, 96, 105, 163 12 ..5l, 116 , y ..... Lunning, Ronald 10 .......,..,. 76, 115 Lutner, Cheryl 11 .................. .65, 67, 68, 92, 96, 102, 103, 104, 105, Mc .........120,163 McCarty, Michael 11 ..... .......... 6 7 McCornack, Lois 11 ................ ,...............10,67,112,113,121 McGill, Dennis 11 .... ...........67,97 McKey, Thomas 11 ....... 124, 141, 148 M Maas, Kathleen 11. . . .. ...67,105 Madson, Allan 12 .,................ 51 Madson, Jean 12 ................... .........,...11,28,5l,100,104,163 Maiden, David 12 .................. 51 Margadant, James 10 .............. ....76, 87, 97, 107, 131, 146, 147, 150 Mariner, Barbara 12 ........... 51, 116 Mariner, Sandra 10 .... ........ 7 6, 85 Massey, Sharon 10. ......... 76, 85, 97 Mathews, Karen 12.. .25, 51, 83, 95, 103, Matthes, Larry 10 .... May, Jeffrey 10 ...... Mayotte, Donna 12. . . ..28, 51, 84, 86, 98, Medd, Marilyn 10 .... Meister, Charles 10. . . Meixell, Karen 12 .... ....25, 51, 85, 104, Meltinq, Linda 10 .... .......76, 99, 103, Meyer, Audrey 11 .... Meyer, Carol 11 ..... Michaelis, Robert ll. . Page 186 104,165, 173,174 131, 150 ,....76, 100, 109 100,103,104,111 ide, -1'1.1ll1'65,'l78 161, ih51'1'1'i.'isa ... ....... ..s1 . .... sv Miller, Diane 10 ............ 76, 87, 117 Miller, Donald 12 .................. 51 Miller, Karen 12 .................... 52 Miller, Margaret 12 .... 52, 100, 164, 165 Mills, Dianne 11 ............... 67, 165 Minear, Marline 11 ................. ......17, 67, 92, 93, 96, 105, 120, 165 Miovac, Kathylene ................. 85.112, 113.163 Moden, Gary 11 ............ 67, 96, 146 Modlin, Linda 10 ....... 76, 86, 163, 170 Moe, Dons ll .................. 67, 98 Moen, Patricia 12 .......... 52, 95, 119 Moitit, Judith 11 .................... ....65, 67, 85, 86, 89, 92, 95, 103, 106 Monson, Gerald 10 .............. 76, 86 Morreim, David 10 ..... ...... 7 6, 115 Morreim, Diane 10 ........... 76, 87, 97 Morreim, Janice 12 ................. .18, 52, 85, 95, 104, 112, 113 , 164, 165 Morrison, Michael 12 ....,.......... 52,103,104, 156, 169 Morrison, Thomas 10. . .76, 100, 103, 107 Mortenson, Wayne 11 .............. 65, 67, 68, 88, 90, 91, 124, Mortenson, Barbara 12 ..... 52 1 150, 158, . . . . . .159 103, 104 Mosher, Elizabeth 11 ............... 67 Mueller, Harold 10 ........... , .... . . .76, 82, 88, 93, 99, 131, 138 139, 150 Muilenberq, Joan 11 ......... 67, 84, 98 Muilenberg, Kenneth 12 ............. 52 Munson, Steven 11 .......... 67, 97, 106 Murphy, Ronald 11 ..... ....,...... 6 7 Myers, Jack 10 ..................... 76 Myers, Janet 12 .................... ......52,103,104,106,111, N Nagel, Patricia 10 ......... Narverud, Kathleen 10 ...... Nellis, Lucille 11 ........ Nelsen 119, 178 .76, 85,111 ....79, 99 .......67 amy 12 ................ 24, sz Nelson Audrey 12 ................. .18, 52, 84, 86, 99, 104 164, 165 Nelson, Bruce 11 ............ .67, 148 Nelson, Carole 10. . .76, 88, 99 111, 163 Nelson, Carolyn 10 .......... ..76, 85 Nelson Curtis 11 .......... 67, 107, 117 Nelson Donald I. 12 .... ............ .... ... . . .52, 83,107,150, 158, 178 Nelson Donald O. 12. ..... 52, 115, 178 Nelson, Donna 12 ............... 52, 98 Nelson James 10 .......... 76 107, 131 Nelson, James 12 .......... ......... 52, 101, 103, 104, 154, 163, 164, 170, Nelson Janet 10 ....... 76, 95, 109, 164 Nelson, Janice 12 .................. .....36, 53, 95, 98, 104,119, 163, 178 Nelson Jean 10 ................ 76, 87 Nelson Jon 12 ......... ....... 5 2 Nelson Kathleen 10 .... .... 7 6, 85 Nelson Keith 10 .... . ....... 76 Nelson, Kenneth 10 .... .. .76, 115 Nelson La Donna 11 ............... 67 Nelson Neg.-Lf, Nelson Larry 12 ........ , .......... 89, 90, 91, 93,107 Myron 12 .,................ 5 3 Myrna 12 .............. 53, 163 Nelson, Richard 12 ................. 53 Nelson, Richard 11 ................. ....66, 67, 85, 94, 115, 150, 158 Nelson, Robert 10 ............... 76, 88 Nelson Sharon 12 .................. 53 Nelson, Theodore 12 ...... 53, 84, 86, 99 Nelson Terry 10 ............,... 76, 89 Nelson, Thomas 12 ................. 53 William 10 ................. 7 6 Ness, ludith 11 ...... 65, 67, 68, 85, 109 Nichols, Cynthia 12 .......... 53, 85, 66 Nelson Niebuhr, Mary 11 .... ....,.65, 67, 89, 93, Nielsen, Else 12 ..,. .. Nielson, Enoch 10 .... Nielson, Sandra 10. . . Nimon, Jack 12 ...... Noland, Jerry 11 .... Noland, Joan 12 ..... Nordahl, Barbara 10. O '59, .1651 165.111 .......5a, a4, as .....76, 85, 95 .....53,103, 117 . ...76 Oakland, Larry 10 ............. 77, 118 O'Byrne, Michael 11. . Oetien, Christine 10 . Oltenbecker, Linda 10. .....67,82, 100 .77, 103, 163, 164 Ogren, Thomas 11 ...... 65, 67, 97, 154 Ohm, Herbert 10 ..... Ohm, Russell 12 ............... 53, 115 Oldenkamp, Henry 10 .... ..... 7 7, 50 Oldert, Gary 10 ...... O'Leary, Geraldine 10. O'Leary, Patrick 11. . . Oliphant, Richard 12.. .....77, 99,105 37, 53, 82, 118, 124, 128, 135, 148, 15816 171 , 9, , 173 Oliver, James 11 ............... 68, 100 Olsen, Gerald 11 ...... 68, 124, 136, 148 Olsen, Robert 12 ...... Olsen, Susan 11 ...... ............116 ....68, 85, 96, 103, 105, 111, 163, 164 Olson, David H. 11 ................. 68 Olson, David P. 11 .............. 68, 97 Olson, Diane 10 ...... .............77,87,95,105,163,164 Olson, Jane 10 ...... .. 77, 105, 163, 164 Olson, Joan 11 .................. 68, 85 Olson, Joanne 10 ...... 86,94,160,163,170 ...53, 55, 124, 125, 126, 134, 136, 159 Olson, Judith 12. .54, 85, 86, 98, 104, 172 Olson, Judith Ann 12 ............... ....54, 83, 84, 95, 104, 160, 163, 173 Olson, Mary 10 ........ 77, 86, 106, 165 Olson, Lewis ll .,....... Olson, Norman 12 ...... Olson, Rayman 10 ...... O'Neal, Craig 11 ..,..... O'Neal, Kathleen 10 ..... .......68,107 .......54,116 .67, 68, 85, 86 ....77, 86, 92 O'Neal, Steven 12 .......... 24, 54, 107 O'Rourke, Geneva 11 .... Osbum, Judith 10 ....... .. ........ 68 .......77,100 Osmundson, Joan 12 ........ 54, 98, 104 Ostby, Frank 12 ..... 54, Ostley, Karen 10 .... .... Overland, Dennis 12 ..... P 84. 86, 87,174 ........77,95 Paczkowslri, Donald 11 ............. 89 Palmar, Linda 10 ...... . 95 Palmer, Bruce 11 ..... ...... ........ ..........97, 124,141 , 145, 148, 158 Palmer, David 12 ....,............ . 54, 68, 78, 822, 97, 124, 126, 128, 150, ......151,158 Palmer, Steven 12 ................. 54 Parry, Kathleen 10 .............. 77, 85 Parry, Patricia 12 .................. 54 Paske, Jon 12 ........ 29, 54, 85, 86, 106 Paulson, Julie 12 ................... ......54, 100, 103, 104, 111, 118, 163 Paulson, Katherine 10. . . . .... 77, 85, 97 Paulson, Mary Ellen 10 ......... . . . . 7, 86, 100, 163 Sorenson, Payer. Clara 10 .................... 77 Peak. Donna 10 .... 77. 87. 97. 105, 163 Peak. George 10 ................... 77 Peaslee, Pggy 12 ....... 54, 99. 111.112 Peik, David 11 .... ....... 6 8. 96. 107 Perkins, Lewis 10 .... ........ .77. 115 Perrin. Duane ll ................ 68. 97 Person. Steven 11 .........,........ ..........65.68.83,87,97. 110.119 Peters, Karen 11 ......,....... ..... 68. 85. 94.105, 121, 163 Petersen. Anita 12 ................. 54 Petersen, Harold 11 ............... 117 Petersen, Lmda 10 ................. .73, 77, 87. 88. 100, 103, 104. 105. 163 Petersen, Ronald 11. ..,. 68, 85. 97. 107 Peterson. Carl 11 ................... 77 Peterson, Charles 10 ....... .77. 82. 115 Peterson, Peterson, Darlene 12 .... 54. 83. 100. 165 Peterson. David 12 ......,.......... 55. 85, 86. 87. 96.156 Peterson. Elizabeth 11 .,............ .......6B. 94, 98.105, Peterson, Ianice 12 ........... .......55. 85.104.111.119, Peterson, Iudith 11 ........... Peterson. Karen 12 ..... 55. 84, Peterson. Karen 11 ........... Peterson, Roger 12 ........ 55, Peterson. Sandra ll ....... 68. Peterson, Susan 12 ..... 55. 99. Peterson. Thomas 12 ......... Thomas 10 .... 77. 96. Phillips. Larry 10 ............ Phinney. Michael 10 ........ 77 Pickavance. Curtis 11 ....,... .......,........68.96,150. 121. 163 163. 172 . . . . .68 103. 165 ..68. 84 154. 155 112. 165 101. 104 . . . . .55 109. 116 . . . . . .77 88. 150 153. 158 Pieper, Gary 10 ............... 99. 109 Pierce, Paul 11 ..., ...68. 98. 150 Pierce, Perry 11 .... ............. 6 8 Ponto. loan 12 ..... .... 5 6. 103, 104 Poole, Dean 10 ...... ........ 7 7. 79 Poole. Roger 11 ......... . . ..68. 107 Posthumus. David 10 ............ 77, 86 Posthumus. Elaine 12 ......,.,...... 56, 83. 85. 86. 89, 101. 104. 118. 163. 164, 174 Pownell. Lyle 12 .,................. 56 Prantner. Richard 10 ........ 27, 77. 79 Pratt. Barbara 11 ................... 97.103,105,1l2. 121,163 Radke. Richard 12 ................. 56 Rasmussen. David 11 .... 68. 85. 96. 146 Rasmussen. Linda 11 ............... 68 Ravenhorst. Gail 11 ................ 96.101, Reese. Ioan 11 .......... ..... Reese. Roger 12 .............. Register. Cheryl 10 ........... 85.95. 103, Reichl, Dorothy 12 ............ ..............22,56,85.86. Reichl, Ianet 10 ............ 77. Reichl, Ronald 10 ............. Reineke, Karen 12 ...... 56. 98, Reinass, Philip 11 ............. Reincke, Kathleen 11 .......... Reindl, Ilene 10 ......., 77. 87. Remmel. David 10 .......,.... Renchin. Robert 10 ............ Rhiger, William 12 ............ 56. 84. 86. 87. Rice. Ianice 12. ........... 56. Richardson, Darrel 10 .......... Rietsema. Patricia 11 .......... 120, 163 .....68 . . . . .56 105. 163 104.163 86. 105 . . . . .77 104.116 .68. 100 , . . . .68 105. 163 ..77. 89 . . . . .77 169, 177 108. 165 . . . . .77 .....68 Rietveld, Linda iSuel 10 ............ 85,95, 160. 163 Riley, Dennis 11 ........ 68, 88. 97, 109 Riley. Michael 10 .................. 77 Roelofs, Gary 12 ,........ .......... 56, 83.85.86.87. 156 Roelols. Iames 10 ............... 77. B7 Rollins. Michael 11 ............. 69. 117 Romer, Iudith 10 .................. 87.99,103,163 Roorda. Ianet 11. . 69. 85, 86. 95,111,163 Roscoe. Carol 11. . Roscoe. Robert 10. Ruerup, Frank 12. Rund, Loretta 10 ....... Rupp. Gary 12 ..... . . . Rupp, William 12 . Rusley, Donna 12 ...... 89. 94, 103. 111 ...,77, 97,131 ....56. 89,116 .74. 77, 106. 112 ........24, 56 ....56. 89, 93 Russell, William 11 ............,... 69 Rutherford. Andrea 11 .............. ..69. 84. 89. 92. 99. 104. 105, 111, 120 Rye, Richard 12 .,............. 56. 116 S sqcken. Iudith 11. . .s5, sa, 97, 105, 163 Sanvick, Ronald 12 ................. 57 Satre, Susan 11 .....,.............. 69 Satre, William 12 ..... .... 5 7. 127, 136 Smeby. Iames 11. . . Smeby. Keith 10 .... Smeby. Kraig 11 .... Smith. David 12 ..... Smith, Nancy, 10 .... Smith, Susan 11 ..... Sonksin, Carla 10 ..... Sorby, Larry 12. . ....69.115 .......78. 99 ...,.58.107,117 87 .......69. 89 ....,78. 89 ....58.116 Sorensen, Eunice 10 .... ...78. 85 Sorenson, Alice 12 .... .... 5 8. 97 Sorenson. Ianet 11 ...... .... 6 9, 117 Sorenson, Iudith 11 .... ....... 7 8 Sorenson. Morris 11 ..... .... 6 9, 96 Sorenson. Raymond 12... .... 58. 153 Sorenson, Robert 10 ................ 78 Sorenson, Roger 10 ............ 78, 109 Terry 12 .... 58. 107. 109, 174 Saxon. Barbara 10 ..... ......... 7 7 Schermer, Nick 11. .. ...... 69, 107 Schenck. Ianice 10... . . .77. 99, 105 Schewe. David 11. .. ..... 69, 115 Schlede, Gene 11 ........ ...69, 115 Schlehr. Christine 10 ............,.. 77 Schlehr. lean 12 ................... 57. 95,104,106, 118 Schmidt. Barbara 11 ........ 69, 98. 105 Schmidt, Donald 10 ................. 77 Schmidt, Rosalyn 10 ........ 77, 85. 103 Schnebly, Diane 12 ............ 57, 95 Schneider. Kathryn 11 .............. .............69,84.88,96,105 Schroeder, Charles 11 .......... 69. 115 Spain, Frederick 10 ................. 79 Speltz. Arthur 12 ..... 58. 88. 90. 93, 99 Speltz. Robert 12 ......... 58. 88. 89. 99 Sprankle. Mary 11 .......,......... ........69, 85. 96.101, 103,120,163 Springer. Ernest 11 ................. 69 Springer, Ruth 10 ..... .... 7 8, 97. 111 Spurr. Steven 11 ............ 69, 83. 101 Stadheim. Charles 12 .......... 58, 115 Stadheim. Susan 10 ..,.........,... 95,105.163.164 Steele. Cheryl 10 ................ 78. 99 Steele, Gary 10 .,..........,... 78. 79 Steffen. Karen 11 .... .... 6 9, 98. 108 Steil. Gregory 10 .... ...... 7 8, 86, 107 Steil. Thomas 11 .....,.... 69. 124, 150 Steinbeck. Ioyce 10 .......,..... 78, 86 Steinke, Ioyce 11 ...... 70. 94. 108. 165 Stencel, Kathy 11 .......... 70. 98. 105 Stensrude, Thomas 10 .............. 78 Stiebler. Sharon 10 ......... 78. 85. 112 Stoa. Clara 10 .... .....,......... 7 8 Stoa. Dennis 11 ............ 24. 70. 107 Stoa. Hezel 12 ........ 58. 100, 111, 119 Stolze, Audrey 12 ................. 58, 104. 112. 163, 164 Stout. Ion 12 .............. 58. 116. 117 Stovem, Dallas 10 ........... 27. 78, 79 Stowell. Diane 10 .,... ...... 7 8. 163 Schue, Linda 10 .................... 77 Schulte, Sharon 12 ....... ..... 5 7. 111 Schultz, Donald 10 ................, 77 Schumacher, Marilyn 12 ..... 10, 57, 112 Schumacher. Pamela 11 ............. 77 Schwen. Iohn 12 ....,.............. 84. 86. 87, 89. 90,153 Seedorl, Faye 11 .............. 69. 108 Seeger, Rodney 12 ............,.... .........57. 84. 86. 97. 150. 158, 174 Seifert, Barbara 11 ................. 69 Selle, Glenda 12 ................... 57 Sether, Kristin 11 ................... .........65. 69. 84. 95, 104, 105. 163 Severson. Gerald 10 ................ 77 Severtson, Barbara 10 .............. 86. 92, 99.105, 163 Shea. Stephen 12 ..... 57. 154. 156, 157 Sherman, Martha 11. .63. 69. 85, 96, 105 Sheveland, Thomas 10 ..... 77. 107. 131 Shoemaker, Sara 12. .36. 57. 83. 89. 92 Siclcels, Richard 11 ................. 69 Siemer. Geraldine 10 .... . . .77. 105 Sigurdson, Karen 11 .... ...... 6 9 Sipple, Frank 10 ..... ...78. 115 Sipple, lane 11 ....,... ....... 6 9, 98 Sipple, Katherine 10... .... 78, 82. 85 Sipple, Tery 10 ...... .......,. 7 8 Skaar. Gary 12 ...... .... 4 2, 57 Skelton. Donald 12 ...,. ...57, 148 Skelton. Margaret 11 ............ 69. 99 Skogheim, Charlotte 11 ............. .......69. 85. 103. 105. 160. 162. 163 Skophammer. Mary Io 10 ........... ..78. 86, 88, 93, 99. 101. 102. 103. 174 Slife, Barbara 12 ................... 13. 16. 36. 50. 57. 85. 86. 100, 103.104, 174 Slite, Kathryn 10 .... 78. 86, 95, 103, 163 Slinde, Darryl 11 ........ 69, 89. 93. 106 Smeby. Howard 12 ............. 57, 115 Stowell. Dorothy 10 Stowell. Mary Ann 103.164 12 .....,........ 58 Studer. Irene 10 .... 78, 85, 99, 163, 164 Studer, William 12 ........,........ 58 Styve, Ramona 12 .......... 58. 95, 104 Sullivan, Iohn 10 ........... 78, 83. 98 Summers, Ralph 11 ,.... 70, 96, 124, 150 Suthers. Thomas 12 ....58, 116,124,129 Swanson, Bonnie 10 .... 78. 85. 105. 163 Swanson, Ronald 12 ........ 36. 59. 156 Sweet. Constance 1 1. . .70. 84, 105. 106 Syverson, Lowell 11 ...,,........... 70, 88. 91. 96, 134, 135.137.150.151, T Tangen. Karen 10 ......,... 78, 94. 111 Tarvestad, Trudy 10 .....,,. 78. 99. 165 Tasker, Diane 10.. .....78. 85, 99, 165 Taylor, Katherine 11 ............... .....70. 83, 88, 96. 111. 160. 165. 174 Tennis. Steven 12 ........ 59. 84. 86, 87 Tennyson, Roger 12 ............ 59. 116 Tesch, Athelene 11 .... . . .... 70. 96 Thistad. Mathia 11 ...., ..... 7 0, 85 Thomas. Eugene 10 ............ 78. 138 Thompson. Alice 11 ................ ....63. 70, 85. 86. 88. 96, 105 Thompson, Clarence 11 ............. 70 Thompson. Donald 10 .............. 78 Thompson. Eugene 12 ..........,... 59 Thompson. Gary 10 ................ 89,115,131,138 Thompson, Gerald 12, .....,........ 59 Thompson. Ianet 11 .... ........ 7 0. 121 Page 187 Thompson Voldahl, Gordon 11 William 11 ...... 70. 97, 103 Thompson Thompson, Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson Thompson , Iudith 10 ................ 94, 105, 112, 113 Linda 10 ......,...... 78, 85 1 1 Margaret 10 ......... 78, 88 Patricia ll ...... 94, 112, 113 Roger 11 ........ 70, 89, 148 Ronald ll ...... 70, 114, 115 Sharyn 10. . . Steven 10 .... Thomas 12. , . ,....78, 115 Timmerman, Bruce 10 ........., 78, 131 Todd, Linda ll ....... 70, 'l'olo, Betty 11 .......... .,65, 68, 70, 84, 96, 103, Tonga, Anthony 12 ..... Tonheim, Thomas 12 ..... 124, 129, Tostenson, Dennis 10. .78, Tostenson. Ronald ll ..... Tostrud, Merlin 10. .... . . 87, Trae, Donna ll ................ 70, 85 Trapp, Merilynn 10 ...... 'l're1o, Ioe 12 ..,......... Tuchtenhagen, Mary 10.. Tuite, ludith 12 ......... 59, 84, 99, 105, 121, 155 11345, '165,' 112 154: -15.51.1158 100, 148, 149 .70, 121, 139 116.. bb, 's12','9s ........78 ......59, 109 .......78, 86 103, 104, 163 Tuite, Mary 11 ........... 70, 93, 99, 121, 163 Tullberg, Allen 12 ..... 59, 118, 148, 158 Tusen, Ruth 10 ................. 78, 85 Tweeten, Sandra ll. . . U Ugland, Donna 12 .... Ulrich, Warren 12. . . ....70, 117 ....59, 116 ......59 Ulrich, Wayne 11. . . ........... . .70 Undahl, Diane 12 ................. 117 Unseth. Karen 12 ...... ll, 59, 104, 163 V Van Beek, Thomas 12. .. .......59, 174 Vandenheuvel, Mary 11 ...... 70, 85, 94 VanderSyde, Gary 11 ..... .... 7 0, 107 Van Riper, James 10 ............... 78 Van Riper, Ianice 12 ............... 60 VanRyswylc, Gary 10. . .78, 96, VanWilgen, Kenneth 12 ...... 109, 131 ..60, 97 Veldman Beverly 10 ................ 86, 99,101,163 Veldman, Patricia 10 ............... 87,89,99, 105,163 Veldman, Sandra 10 ................ 85, 99, 101, 163,174 Venem, Arnold 10 ............. 78, 115 Page 188 Venem, Iudith 10 ...... 78, 86, 103, 165 Verdoorn, Daniel 10 ......,.. 78, 79, 95 Vig, Mary ll ........ ......... 2 5, 70 Volkman, Reid 10. . Vollmer, Gary 12. . W .......70 ....78, 97 .. ...... 60 Wacholz. Sharon ll .... 70, 85, 105, 163 Wahlstrom, Gwendolyn 12 .......... ..........36, 60, 84, 86, 95,104,163 Waldemar, Ierry 10 ............ 78, 115 Walker, Gary 12 .......,. 60, 84, 86, 87 Wallace, Robert 12 ...,.. 60, 82, 97, 173 Waltz, Larry ll ...........,.... 70, 115 Wambach, Renee 11 ....... 70, 100, 121 Wangen, Dean 11 .... ........,.. 7 0 Wangen, Eugene 10 .... ..... 7 8, 115 Wangen, Gerald ll .... ...70, 115 Wangen, LaMone 10 ,,.,. .... 7 8, 87 Wangsness, Bruce 10 .... ...... 7 9, 86 Wangsness, Sharon 11 ......... 70, 112 Warner, Donald 10 ........ 79, 131, 150 Warner, George 10 .... ........... 7 9 Warner, Leland 12 ........,........ 60 Warren, William ll ....... 70, 100, 107 Wasmoen, Thomas 12 .......... 60, 115 Waterman, Bruce 11 .... 70, 83, 96, 124 Wayne, Ierry 12 ................... 60 Wayne, Iune ll ......., 71, 84, 105, 163 Wayne, Martha 11. .l4, 71, 96, 163, 164 Wayne, Mary ll ......,......... 71, 96 Weckwerth, Eugene 10 .... . ....... 79 Weckwerth, Richard 10 ......,...... 79 Wedge, Charles ll .......... 71, 85, 96 Wedge, Gail 10 ................,.. .........79, 85, 89,99,101,103,174 Wedge, Rita 1l..71, 89, 92, 99, 101, 164 Wehrhan, Roxanne 12 ............., 13, 60, 84, 86, 94, 102, 103, 104, 117, 174 Weigel, Barbara 10 ................ 79 Weigel, Richard 10 .... .... 7 9, 89 Weik, Bonnie 10 ....... .. .79, 112 Weitzel, lack 11 ........ ....., 7 1 Wendelboe, Carol 11 .... .... 7 1 Wendelboe, Sharon 12 ....... .... , .60 Wentzell, Sandra 12 ,............... 96, 111, 165, 174 Werner, Dean 11 ................... 71 Werner, Iackie 10 .........,....... 79 Westhuis, Elsie 12 ..... .... 6 0 Westhuis, Minnie 10 ................ 79 Westland, Linda 10 ..,............. 79 Westrum, Dexter 10. . .79, 131, 146, 154 Westrum, Kathleen 10 .............. 86, 92, 93,99,165 Westrum, Steven 12 ............. 17, 60 White, Luella 10 ..., 79. 85, 99, 112, 164 Wilds, Paulette 10. , ....,... . Wilhelm, Gervaise 12. .... .. ...79, 89 .60, 85, 96, 97, 104, 161, 163, 169, 172 Wilhelm, Lauryne 10 ..........,.... 79 Wilke, Paul 12 ..................... 37, 61, 82, 124, 126, 132, 133, 134, 135, 158, 169, 172 Wilkinson, Diane 12 .... ll, 61, 104, 165 Willaby, Florence 11 ........... 71, 117 Willmert, Orlo 12 ............ ..61, 89 Wilson, Cynthia 11 .... ...,....,.... 93, 98 100, 105 Wing, Iohn 10 ...............,.,... 79 Wing, Nancy 10 ..,.......,......., . . . . . . . . . .73, 79, 87, 89, 99,105,163 Winium, Elaine 10 ............. , , . .79 Winium, Nancy 10 ,............. 79, 85 Wittkamper, Michael 10 ......,...... 99,130, 138,148 Wogen, Richard 10 ,.... 79, 95, 131, 138 95, 131, 138, 150 Wolff. Gordon 12 ............ .61, 156 Wolff, Ieanie 11 ,...........,...... 117 Wolff, Larry 12 ........ .. .61, 148 Wolff, Thomas 10 ,................. 79 Wolgamot, Susan 12 ......,..,..... .......61, 98, 100, 104.119, 163, 174 Wright, Patricia 12 ,............... 116 Wyant, Claire .............. .79, 100 X Xavier, Brian 12. .61, 89, 90, 91, 97, 107 Y Yocum, Barry 12. ,61, 88, 90, 91, 96, 107 Yokiel, Leo 12 ..,.............. 61, 107 Yost, Carol 12 ..................... ......16, 36, 61, 84, 95,103,104,163 Yost, William 10 ........,....... 79, 86 Z Zamora, Irene ll .... ....71 Zamora, Lily 10 .................... 79 Zamora, Mora 10 .,,............... 79 Zavitz, Camille 12. .61, 83,103, 104, 163 Zimney, Mary 11 ,,..... , .W ......,... Whiteaker, William 10 ....... 79, 86, 88 ......... 71, 85, 94598, 105, 106, 163 wicks, Kathryn 10 .,,........... 79, as Zimney, Robert 10.4. SL rpi ........... 79 K Wilcox, David 10. . .79, 82, 97, 131, 150 Zoller, Ion 11 ...... ............. f. .71 8 J! Q N J H " X A e SV X , 1 M 1 1 fs e 'fy rx y gd fax-I ' T A ., layer , 1 :lx 1 M 1 A 4,2 5 - . y 1, .V , 1 X4 , , 5 KJ X 'se 6 1 X is 83,5 ,y X ,AJ 9' N X X: 1 4 'ss ,, ,X N X ,, xx: lk' My , 1 xg do X. Q15 3 as V , A XXL V R X W XY 1 'x 4, 751115 X 8 . , 'xx N, 4. 1 ,L 1 .1 1, V 1 X7 if 8 , fl' X 0 ' gr eq I N x WJ X x 1 X51 f 8 X . X, j is 'xg 4 ' S ,A 1 J R 1' , A ' s 1 X N 'L .14 is fx. Achelf, George .. Allen, Ioyce .... Anderson, Irvin . Anderson, Robert Anthony, Arthur Bailey, Norman. . Banqert, Lorraine Banovetz, Lorretta. . . . Bauer, Ruth ..... Beethe, Eleanor. . Faculty A H O ....17, 140 .......14 37 ....21 ....22 ....22 ....10 ....25 ............ ..16 . ................ 29 Buhr, Donald .... .... 2 7, 132, 154, 155 Chrislopherson, William ............ 131, 132, 148 Cleveland, R. Wayne ............,. 14 Cords, Nicholas ...... Dahle, Grace ...... Dreisbach, Robert .... Dudley, Rosalie, . . . ....l8 .......14 .....20, 124 .......11 Ellertson, R. V.. . . .,.....,.,. . . . .9 Emmons, L. I. . . . ............17,88 Ehrhard, Paul ........ 18, 124, 140, 148 Esson, Russell. . , . . ......... . . . .24 Fairchild, Charles .... .... 2 2 F lim, Dina ....... .... 3 1 Folck, Ethel .... .... 1 0 Gammell, Alice ..... .... 1 8 Gercken, Edna .... .... 1 4 Gilmore, Orville ..... ..,........... 1 4 Glesne, Marvin ............. ....... 2 1 Gustafson, Iames ..... .19, 124, 128,132 Heath, Helen ....... . . .15 Horninq, Lorraine. . . . . . 10 Hostager, Phyllis. . . . . . . .25 Hovey, Egil ....... . . . 12, 19 I lngvaldson, Iennelly. . . . . .10 .I Iacobsen, Earl .... ..... 2 4 Iensen, Evelyn ..... ....... 3 1 Iohnson, Bruce .... 19, 151 Iohnson, Olive ..... 20, 108 Iordahl, Martin .... .... 9 , 65 K Kennedy, Wallace. . . . .15 King, Leon ......... . . . 11 Krueger, Marilyn. . . . . .10 L Loy, Iva ........ . . .22 Lysne, Eugene ..... . . .23 Mc McElhinney, I. R. .... .... 9 , 65 M Melby, Winton ,.,... ..... 7 7, 92 Mickelson, Marilyn .... ....... l 0 Mittlestadt, Stanley .... ....... 1 2 Myers, Robert ......, . . , 17, 37 N Nelson, Ruth ...... ....... 1 1 Nervig, Bernice ..... ........ 1 6 Nettleton, Wamer ..... .... 2 0, 69 Norman, Milton ..... ....... 2 1 Olson, Edythe ........ Olson, Gladys .......... P Paulson, Donald .... .... Peterson, Irene. . . Piers, Gertrude .... Roorda, Phyllis .... Ross, Lowell ...... S Salmela, Melvin .... Schwartz, S. F., . . Seberl, Elsie ..... Seifert, Linus .... Shuldes, Dale ...... Skieveland, Marie .... Spear, Byron ...... Slette, Lorraine .... Steqenga, Karen ..... Summers, Ralph. . . . . Swanson, Iames ..... T Tennihill, Hildred .... Thompson, Maurice. . . V Verdoorn, Barbara .... Volkman, Irwin ...... W Wagner, Lois ..... Wambach, M. E.. . . Ward, Lorne S.. . . Woods, Ruth ..... X Xavier, Valdmar ..... .....15 .....31 26, 55, 114 ........13 ....10 ....ll6 .....20 ......24 ...19, 113 ......24 .....12 .....23 .....21 .....1'3l .....10 .....27 ..,..15 .....15 .....21 .....16 .....21 ....27 ......19 36 ....23 . . . .65 Page 189 Academic Content Administration .... Audio-Visual . . . Band ....... Baseball .. Basketball .... Bowling League . . . Cafeteria Stall .... Chorale ...... Chorus .... A Chorus .. B Chorus . . . Girls' Chorus .. Cheerleaders .. Classes ................. Diversified Occupations Faculty ............... FFA . . . FHA ..,. Football .. FTA ...... French Club . . . German Club . . . Girls Sports Glee Club ........... Great Caesar's Ghost . Golf ............... GRA ................ Guidance Department .... Intramural Sports ..,. Hi-Teens ....... Homecoming . . . Ianitors ,.... Journalism .. Juniors .. Seniors .. Page 190 Organization Index .....8-31 ....8-9 ....110 ....88-89 ....148-149 ....132-139 ....165 .....31 .....86 ....84-87 ....84-85 ....86-87 ..,...85 ....160-161 ....32-79 ....116-117 .....8-31 ....1l4-115 ....112-113 ....124-131 ....111 ....94-95 ....96-97 ...,160-165 .....87 .....176 ....154-155 ....164 ....12-13 ....156-157 ....104-105 ....168-171 .....30 ,.,.118-121 ....1l8-121 ....l18-119 Iunior Classical Leaque .... 98-99 Iunior Red Cross Juniors ........ Lettermen's Club ..... Madwoman oi Chaillot National Honor Society ,.... ....106 ....62-71 ....158-159 ....177 Nurses ,,.. . .. . Lei ..................... 28-29 Office sisif ......... .C-246610-11 Orchestra .... ..... . . ?-93 Organizations QQZLJ ...... . . .. . ..82-121 Pep Club ....,, I ....... 162-163 Prem .... ..... 8-179 Rifle Club .... . . ' . E ..,......................... 107 Sadie Hawkins .....,..... .... , . . .172 Science ciub . .... ......... 109 Script and Gavel ............,.....,..................... 102-103 Seniors ........ .......... ........ 36-61 Sophomores . . .... . .72-79 Spanish Club . . ....... ................ 1 00 Sports ......... .... 1 24-165 Student Council . . . .... 82-83 Student Life .. .... 168-181 Swing Band .... ...90-191 Tennis ...... .... 1 52-153 Thespians .. .... 103 Tiqer's Roar .... .... 1 74-175 Traclr ....... .... 1 50-151 TRL ,....... . . Ushers' Club . .... Winter Carnival .... Who's Who .... ....101 .,..108 ....173 ....34-35 Wrestling . . . .... 140-147 ,U CJ A , J Et -x A lv V ' fx ' V' y i l y 'ni A 1 , ' i 1 if I f if Q XSS xr-wig' G"jf"'M7jf2"f'-"4-j12fJ x 5 N9 'B QyQQQ,Q '59, Vgwx V 56' L7 ' T7 Q QwCff"3Xfw Nw our Ref1ect1ons - fV"3'w if A O' 50X:Pg35'i QX M F5 gwwbfofyw ,jvfxjufw 99331302 M CZWJ M54 Wyman 9 WMM WWMMWWA Of fig, MW QVWM fggwgifwfifjkigifwff W Q M ff 9 ,, 0 W 1e SSMf W WM M WWW' cj' AVN UXM5 JW aww Www' ug affeaw L71 we igffwxfw' PWiJ,. - . W Q V' kJ I My , MQW MW Q ,WW 9 ,V Oh V A. , W haw Ugg if g,ff,Wff0f ,Z AMW Z2QL? fMff my A Zf f C ff' 1, Qifi 'M' 'V 1 , V ,X ,V ' x ML nj! , - Y, 4 Q in Q A P 1 X In N ' n A Atfgiiflgi , 4 59,,f"' rf r Iv ' 4. 12' ' ,4 Kyfll l 1' 0 'if , , fy' ffzjxbl-7 by fm fe if , 524 fbof' ycfwf 44470 nm M" JZiwvzfz4nf if L X L -. M! f' , ,s,v, 1 fggzaedfbow ,XJILC4-Cf! ij ff ' L lo cl JJXOQ-AJC!! obj! .N 1 551 046 , X3 J UL JU! ,M If M. 545 'V M ov QM x 'P L O' X N W VJ 2 ' Ml' X '1 0 A fbw 2' K x.-V X ky A , , J XL, , 'J I! X ,VY-.1 i PVS ' ' Q ' fl 1 ' ' X QM ., 'l P I 4 I X - , X fl' U ' 3' . Zz f f Prin ' by Trad Publ' hinq Co anrywllllwgl Lea, Minnesota f .E s Kayena , ' a on City. Iowa Cover nd Bindi q by A. V lCo ny, Minneapolis, Minnesota J ho aphy y C s on. Hockett, ' angen. Albert Lea Evening h une. High School Photographers lj' W Page 192 f wmv -4 WX W if JA W 7ywWWj!Zjf,0' QNX W5jyWW ! W M iw Q35 WSWFL WWF 5951 Wifi W W MW V Q wwwgb WM W M 9 , xfJjMW?MMff5!jjEW QAM My MW WQMMMWMQQ Jam WjK W M


Suggestions in the Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) collection:

Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

1956

Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

1957

Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

1958

Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

1960

Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

1969

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.