Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN)

 - Class of 1960

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Albert Lea High School - Tiger (Albert Lea, MN) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 190 of the 1960 volume:

W' ' . I ii'7 i i i fri i' l Initiates 66Banner Yeari' QW, ... , -, - - 1- - wgiwam W' Jraw Large Crowds Zif"jifj9em -- jffgjMQfw1f,,faJ hllght Horn i lng Para .tllng Toni? 't - t 1 for ccwinningestii Season Ever tg Juniors Create Prom Vals by Two Points L-N - -- - ,, nies Building of New Addition e 1 1 n - k Z5 3 A gm 1 Y S V ' X QA . N Y X fbif QW T ' . ' G, al . Af Q ! wk I ,,.f X f zwkyy YB 'K t gg M7 QQ W sad L QR dy 3 AJ f A Q is f Iv L64 N, Q I Y Q M, fl? W ,MW ,yvrff MW CDV-figwfwj N N I jjoww-50 Mfg Qjwfvl X mf? mga LF wx MJ X M'vamWj'f K QVWAWY fffeifwff' 1. , A A7 J 1 f- U . 7 , 1" " ,,, ,, Q-f A s A 1, 1 , - W, 'i H70 'f9""' ' ' Qffvfq ,ma QL'-Lf .k QM f CJ , df K -2 fl L , , , f - A ' , f A VIC It ' , ,Ld , A1 Lt-71 c"': K . ' :ff V ' .4 . Ci an a- f ' A L, .LLL -.2 M, X5 A X it FrL,g,,.f, K 4 YL, vQ 4 ff f K IA x A Mfg' K2 . ku A fl, ,, N 4 V 1 5 F Q ' 'Y of " W K, 'X -P: A ,, fig .J-105 4: . ,, 13 f tiff? Ax Q-Z-K' W 445.7-fk ' - fy., - L KL- 5- 1-.. 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V 'X VN' V V SFIIIUI' Hlgll School ,,fA,f,,ff L I 'XV Af 31W O !, , wi Allwrt Lea, NIIIIIIGSOIH ,ff 7, If ff? 77 J df X X ,yy f I I 1 1JjCf,1 J f Q91 f N 'jf xv V' ff L ,nwwnmr I x Y, D E, .f ,- f:-W ,- ,' s,'K ' I 5 1 , 572, A-T' V 'ff I "V J' Al '73-iffjgr Q36 45 ,AQ L ,ff 'H ' 215' Q K iff cg of f Table of Contents Administration and Faculty . Seniors . Juniors . . .R -. 4-1 1 D QM? ee,, L,5gjjSophomores . . , 1 41, ' 2-fl X ,u,4M,m,fo rganizations . qlfsol 'VW 7 Sports Features . . . . Organizational Index . Faculty lnflex . Index .t X1 if N4 . 3 34 621 ff 7113 34 1 . g 12417 7 158 176 177 178 J f W ,fyis , , W F -1 -l tl I.-T . , 4. 1 ,,: . Q . '- ' t m7 fl, '4r, f .. 3.2 ' . ww, , x . "'wf'1,:Mt 1, tif W 7 ff? -Ati J eva , Qi,!,xn.,f.- - V fgrv, Q., to xiii, XQ , . M ,X v , D? 5 . " N41 Q 3,4-.,,,. M. N ' 'fr Y it . , , 1' 'K A' f ' Q is ' p it 4.3. . Q, -, ' Q xx ' :ffl e , wt x, 1 1 2 .U I., ,V V Z- w " fs,-inn X Qi' 4 'tg' sb 2' ' R " M x , ,I W . 2. M- . NY' 'fi Y If' f '- an x, b If-qmiifg fgvi We 'vw 'qsisff' ' ' t.'w?.' -'if if :"'f'Q: "'34i'l' , . , 'S itiff f "faq" g aa, my , " " '. 'if W W., 1 lg. 1 ' 1 q. THIS VIEW OF ALBERT LEA HIGH SCHOOL marked the school for the people of Albert Lea. Many civic functions as familiar entryway of the auditorium on the north side of the well as school activities were held here throughout the year. 3,1 Q. f "ft lv ww ,H ggi! 11 me mi is ii 3 2, D 3 MH i 'Wi Q, tt 5 is "9 gm 'l'IIli0UGIIOU'I' TIIIS YEAR students have been annoyed and interested hy steam shovels and piledrivers. But through all of this noise will emerge a new science department, library and classrooms, extending west from the Senior High Sc-hool on Clark Street. to he in use next year. THROUGH THESE HOOKS. on the south side of the building, to increase their knowledge in many varied fields. This view the students of Albert Lea High School passed as they entered is one of the Clark Street entrances. Q ., -:-- WWW My W' .,,, i v ,'1 V K "N . L A x ty '- U '5 -xx: v .Q , A l 4 ' K. , t K Xi ,t xN,w:r'xX xi If'- lf 'T . ' 'tm .- W W Pax i lg K K ' ' ' V 'sf' X -', 2 v' 'V s 1 ' ' X 1 l ,,,fi" XFBXH Y Ns-'X X: ' " CNY' l n Y . ' 'V 'T N. -E ,N 5 .M is V R , 4 X 1 Y X! ysw. Xxx H-HG X ANNUAL CAMPAIGNING for Senior High Student Council olliees is vigorously carried on by Blue and Cherry party members as they support their candidates. The constitution of the Council provides lor the two groups to represent national political parties. Page 6 CANDIDATES FUR THE CHERRY AND BLUE PARTIES are selected at conventions patterned after our national political COIIVCII- tions. Representing a state in the union. each homeroom casts its vote for its Candidate through chosen delegates. ftiuftiifti sg' fi LEADERSHIP, CHARACTER, WILLINGNESS AND SERVICE school honors. The awards were made throughout the school qualified the 1959-1960 Oscar winners for one of the highest year by the Senior High Student Council president. o c A Q4 Q iw 5 Q R' 45 A S 3 'lx La? E M V CZ: SQ fix ,X xx A ' 6 X Sgt A - if , i 2 6 ' fi 0 rl S XLNLLJ I 3 f jf 526 VH Page Y cj 4 , 6 B in T S--. Z X 1? ii .W A 5 I' 1 qw f Wi HMA f f' 04" 0 1,653-fs . L A,, f ff' OM! 14, Wfffff QQMJL l gy MMV! '57 My jf W7 M,,,Q MA Vw Of W W? ---L'.Z ADMINISTRATIUN and FACULTY 4, a ' J N ,V H ' X , 7,1 x Lorne S. Ward Superintendent of Schools Adminstration Leads It takes an efficient administrative department to make a school system effective. Direction of the entire school and leadership of the students was a huge responsibility. The administration has proved itself in helping make this year truly a 'Lbanner year." Mr. Lorne S. Ward completed his second year as superintendent of schools. His duties included super- vision and coordination of senior high functions. The position of senior high principal was taken over on July 1 by Mr. J. R. McElhinney, who replaced Mr. Valdemar A. Xavier. Mr. McElhinney previously served as assistant principal in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He obtained his B. A. in physical education from Iowa State Teachers College and his M. A. in secondary school administration from the University of Iowa. Also taking a new position this year was Mr. Roland Ellertson, former assistant junior high principal. Mr. Ellertson became senior high assistant principal. Supervising bus transportation and cafeteria lunch programs, budgeting school finances and taking the school census were typical of the duties of Mr. Irvin J. Anderson, administrative assistant. Mr. Martin Jordahl completed another year as superintendent of buildings and grounds. His job was the supervision and direction of the maintenance staff. Mr. L. C. Gorder and Mr. Kenneth Hotchkiss were elected to the school board last spring. Adoption of the seven-hour day plan high-lighted board activity. Page 10 Dr. Randolph Gandrud Mr. L. C. Gorder Mr. Kenneth Hotchkiss Mr. Theodore Munson Dr. Clayton Nelson Mr. William Pickavance And Directs Progressive School System 33 QE J. R. Mclilhinney Roland V. Ellertson Senior High Principal Assistant Principal Irvin J. Anderson Martin J0rdahl Administrative Assistant Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds Page 11 ffiee Staff Keeps Educational Records Lorraine Bangert Mary Seifert Lorraine Horning Jennelly Ingvaldson Marilyn Mickelson Karen Oldert NOT PICTURED: Anne Reasoner Relieving the burden of the administration over the past year was the office staff, Miss Jennelly Ingvaldson served as secretary to Superintendent Lorne S. Ward. Acting as secretary to the Assistant Superintendent Irvin J. Anderson was Karen Oldert. Serving as secretary to Senior High Principal J. R. McElhinney was Miss Lorraine Bangert. Miss Marilyn Mickelson was secretary to Assistant Principal Roland V. Ellertson. Aiding the counselors, working in the library and in the office was Lorraine Horning. Replacing Mrs. Mary Seifert after her resignation, Miss Ethyl Folch acted as bookkeeper. Serving as assistant bookkeeper was Mrs. Anne Reasoner. D0 US A FAVOR, and deliver these important notes," im- MEETING MARALYN ANDREWS as she collected attendance ploied office helpers Judy Kirk and Sonita Thompson of the slips were three other office helpers on their daily rounds, 011 duty note-takers, Marian Gnitfke and Joan Noland. Marilyn Schumacher, Barb Mariner and Nancy Chapman. Page 12 KEEPING THE LIBRARY BOOKS in order was done daily by Virginia Perrin, Judy Vig and Laurel Kane. Karen Flim Senior High Library Leon King Librarian Ruth Nelson Senior High Library Remodeled Librar Presents Information Our newly redecorated library with its tile floors and sound absorbent ceiling added to the comfort of many students who made extensive use of the library. Whether it was for reference or just plain reading enjoyment the library was the place to go. At the present time this vast storehouse of know- ledge holds nearly 8,000 books plus an extensive mag- azine service. With the addition of new books the shelves have expanded into the center of the floor on the west end. A new card catalogue, much larger than before, aided anyone in his selection of a book. With patience and with the help of the librarian and his assistants, sophomore, junior and senior English classes were able to use the library to its greatest extent in selection of books, learning the functions of the library and compiling a research paper. Because the library was needed during summer school it was moved into the boys, gymnasium so its former room would be vacant for redecorating. "TERM PAPERS ARE EASY with the help of the Readers' Guide," explained Janice Fogel and Marilyn Ferring to Rex Stotts, who seemed in need of help. Page 13 CAREFUL CONSIDERATION regarding the senior high course OBVIOUSLY PLEASED with the progress of the junior to of study she would choose was done by sophomore Judy Ken- whose records they were referring were the junior counselors, nelly with the help of her counselor, Miss Anne Anderson. Stanley Mittelstadt and Miss Gertrude Piers. Guidance Programs Unite Under Director Dale Shuldes, Guidance Director Page 14 Consolidating the counseling program under a single guidance director proved to be an advantageous development this year. Mr. Dale Shuldes was given the position of guidance director, thus relinquishing his former position as physics instructor. Serving under the guidance director were the counselors of Central and Southwest Junior Highs as well as the counselors of Senior High School. The chief purpose of the arrangement was to coor- dinate all of the counseling activities and to improve the counseling techniques. Aiding students in planning their education and improving their scholastic standing constituted the primary purpose of sophomore counselors, Miss Anne Anderson and Mr. Shuldes, and junior counselors, Miss Gertrude Piers and Mr. Stanley Mittlestadt. Senior counselor, Mr. Egil Hovey, helped many students solve their problems of attending college and advised them concerning their vocation. Beginning with the class of 1960, thirteen credits were required for graduation instead of the former twelve credits. Compulsorarily included among these credits were three credits in English, three credits in social studies and one credit in any of the three sciences -biology, chemistry or physics. "YOUR CAREER should be carefully chosen and prepared for,', advised Egil Hovey to Ron Dahlen and Janet Rusley. Quwawgzwasiwf tsxfffm is or " if xx . + . . 3 A-ga'-rw we at W L shgagxw 'V HELPFUL REFERENCES showing a studcnt's ability and op- portunities could always be found on a counsclor's desk. Show Student Interests In arious Fields As in previous years a College Day was planned during which students had the opportunity to visit in- formally with representatives from the particular college in which they were interested. Much helpful information concerning the college's tuition, campus, activities and curriculum was obtained. New to the school system this year was an Armed Forces Day. Students contemplating entering the serv- ice after graduation were able to have their questions concerning educational and vocational posibilities in the service answered by qualified representatives of the Armed Forces and the Auxiliary Forces. Iowa Tests of Educational Development, previously administered only to sophomores, were extended to juniors and seniors. Through these tests students were able to compare themselves and their school with others over the entire United States. Those students ranking in the upper one-fourth of their class throughout the United States were classified as "superior and talented studentsw by the North Cen- tral Association Project on the Guidance and Motiva- tion of Superior and Talented Students. By this program students with above average abil- ity were encouraged to take more difficult subjects. This category included approximately 35 percent of the students in Albert Lea High School. "WHAT ABOUT LIVING QUARTERS at thc University of Minnesota?" asked John Chester-man and Darlcnc Ileckcs of a College Day representative, Roger Page. Page 15 ' l nglish Skills Provide Student Expression Grace Dahle English 12 Joyce Allen English 10 Ushers Club American Field Service Senior Adviser Page 16 Edna Gerckcn Journalism Ah La Ha Sa Tiger Orville Gilmore English 12 Cultural History Helen Heath English 10 Hi-Teens Learning to express themselves well in their own language was a main activity of every senior high stu- dent. This art of expression was available to students in seven courses of English study. Sophomores began their senior high English studies by mastering basic grammar principles and practicing good sentence structure. Intensive studies made on 6'Silas Marnern and 4'Julius Caesar" were especially remembered by this year's sophomores. Juniors concentrated on American literature, cor- responding with their United States history, and learned correct parliamentary procedure. A new ex- perience faced by every eleventh grader was the com- position of an 1100-word term paper. More short stories and a final review of grammar were all a part of senior English. Shakespeare's plays highlighted a study of literature taken from many his- torical periods. Of course the senior term paper was a major project undertaken by these students as they put their thoughts into 2,000 words. MASTERING VERBALS by a concentrated joint study were sophomore English students Susan Smith and Janice Gappa. Necessary for Future Vocational Success Advanced courses of study were offered in place of English to capable junior and senior students. For juniors this course included their United States history requirements, making American Studies a two-hour class. Two term papers were required. Cultural history took a number of seniors from stories of Greek gods to a study of the communist handbook. ln one year they made an understandable coverage of 3,000 years of culture by reading litera- ture, listening to music and observing art. Speech developed unknown talents in student speakers. As the year progressed, first year speech students learned to use the power of persuasion in speeches, panel discussions and interpretative read- ings. Speech II participants used their speaking skill in the dramatic world of personality changes. Summary leads, pica sticks, photographs and dead- line problems concerned the busy journalism student, who labored to improve and praise conditions by pub- lishing the paper and the yearbook. "WHAT DO YOU THINK of this painting of Monet's?" asked Steve Schwartz of two other cultural history students, Karen Johnston and Janice Henderson, who seem to like impressionism. ,E f' -:,.- . .W M W Wallace Kennedy English 11 American Studies Future Teachers of Stanley Mittelstadt English 11 Guidance America L I . 0.1 M 0 v"' 0 .Aff , 5 w Edythe Olson English 10 I-Ii-Teens Gertrude Piers English 11 Guidance Hildred Tennihill English 11 Speech Drama National Thespians Masquers Tiger's Roar Page 17 f fe Past and Present Histor Point ut a i. . .,., , -'A' yy r g. N xi ,,..... , ,:.,.,,, x :xl- Anne Anderson World History 10 Guidance Paul Ehrhard World History 10 A Wrestling B Football Lettermenls Club Baseball Nicholas Cords Cultural History American Studies U. S. History 11 Alice Gammel James Gustafson World History 10 U. S. History 11 Sophomore Adviser A Football B Basketball To understand the past and to prepare for a better future were two of the purposes of the social studies department in senior high school. World history, a sophomore subject, presents the progress of every nation, its people and their cultures. Prehistoric man, the Classical Age, the Middle Ages, the Crusades and the Renaissance were a few of the topics studied the first year in senior high. The juniors also studied maps of geography and the purchases and annexations of the United States. By the end of the year the students had a brief and undetailed account of years of history, which would be helpful in college and future studies. 'AMEANS OF WAR certainly have changed," remarked American history student Donna Rusley as she and Terry Fahley examine Japanese World War II weapons. THE "CRADLE OF CIVILIZATION,,, Asia,s Fertile Crescent, was pointed out by Judy Ness for Tom Counters. Page 18 To Live A More Perfect Life Tomorrow Egil Hovey Bruce Johnson Social Studies 12 World History 10 Guidance Track B Football Lettermen's Club Ends of the semesters came all too fast for social studies students. At the end of each nine-Week period, scribbled notes and vocabulary words had to be de- ciphered and compiled into notebooks, which were very useful in studying for tests. Dating, married life, income tax papers, the consti- tution, economics and offices and employees of the government were a few of the interesting topics studied in social classes required of seniors. Democracy was put into action in the classrooms by panel and class discussions. Taking a trip to the State School for the Mentally Retarded in Faribault proved to be one of the highlights of the year. Elsie Sebert Modern History U. S. History 11 William Standly Social Studies 12 A Football Golf Lettermen's Club Student Council M. E. Wambach Social Studies 12 World Geography DISCUSSING THEIR VISIT to the Faribault State School were four twelfth grade social students, Rosemary Goette, Morris Evenson, Connie Paulson and Pete Jacobs. DEEP CQNCENTRATION on their weekly questions of cur- rent affalrs was shown by Jim Rollins and Sharon Herth. ti if Page 19 ..'!34a, 6 rr Q Q i Q. V ' ' KWH? C rm. Robert Anderson Olive Johnson - Warner Nettleton Melvin Salmela Irwin Volkman Chemistry Biology 10 Biology 10 Biology 10 Chemistry Physics Ushers Club Red Cross Science Club Senior Adviser Scientific Interest Grows With Space Age With the completion of an addition to senior high school, several new science classrooms will be available for next year's and future years' scientists. The need for additional equipment and rooms has been emphasized by the need for scientific knowledge in today's World of satellites and atomic power. Most sophomores took biology, a study of plant and animal life. Filled with stuffed animals, aquariums, skeletons, plants and detailed charts, the biology rooms proved a fascinating place to even the novice. Chemistry students observed chemical reactions through laboratory experiments. Records of their ob- servations were recorded in lab manuals which were made to serve as a guide for future studying. Demonstrations pertaining to various units were performed in physics so as to know the subject better. Physics students studied matter, motion and energy. General physics laws pertaining to the study of matter and energy, sound, light, machines and electricity were studied and learned during the year. SHOWING APPREHENSION, sophomore Mary Neibuhr watch- ed a classmate, Bill Russell, as he dissected a frog in biology. "HOW DOES THIS OPERATET' asked Lynda Bell as Bob Joynt prepared to demonstrate and give an explanation of the tesla coil, part of his classwork in physics. Page 20 athematics Maintains To increase knowledge, speed and skill were the main objectives of the mathematics courses taken by students in senior high school. The courses taken were necessary for the success in scholarship, intelli- gence, college entrance and other aptitude tests which require quantitative thinking. Sophomores found themselves adding to their apti- tude in algebra in which letters and other signs are used as well as numbers to solve problems. Many also found themselves in a plane geometry class where they acquired reasoning ability, factual knowledge and an inter-related pattern of thought. Juniors wishing to continue their mathematical ability and prepare for future courses took advanced algebra, a continuation of elementary algebra. Senior arithmetic, a general review of mathematics, involved computing income tax through the practical application of mathematics. Many seniors contemplat- ing a college education in science and engineering advanced to trigonometry and analytical geometry. ur od ern World Marvin Glesnc Advanced Algebra Senior Arithmetic Audio-Visual Elaine Nelson Advanced Algebra Byron Spear Analytical Geometry Geometry Trigonometry National Honor Society Maurice Thompson Geometry X Advanced Algebra "PLL MEASURE THE SHADOWX' said Judi Engbritson as Morris Evenson measured the tree to check for accuracy. Page 21 K 'lx t l 1 George Acheif L. J. Emmons Art Band Art Club Pep Band B Wrestling Junior Class Co-Chairman Robert Myffrs Vocal Music Winton Melby Madrigal Singers Orchestra Tiger's Roar "BUT IT WON'T FIT!" declared Neal Gendler in bewildered dismay while Darryl Slinde looked on with sympathy. Page 22 ,...-'lv DELICATE BALANCE was emphasized in these mobiles which Virginia Perrin was showing to Carolyn Robbins. Fine Arts Provide Endeavouring to bring culture to the students were the fine arts and music departments. Diligently working to please the audiences of the chorus concerts, the art classes were responsible for the stage setting while choruses provided enjoyment. The band spent many evenings at football and basketball games to bring entertainment to the enthu- siastic crowds and lead them in the singing of our school songs. They also presented lively programs for the public and the student body. This year, the orchestra was under the direction of a new conductor, Mr. Winton lVlelby. The organization presented programs for the public and assisted the choruses in the annual vocal Christmas concert. Fifty outstanding voices were selected from the "A" Chorus to form the Madrigal singers. They made more than 15 appearances before church and civic organ- izations during the Christmas season. Rochester was the site of the annual Big Nine Music Festival. This event climaxed the hard work of all chorus, orchestra and band members. CORRECT PRONUNCIATION was Betty Tolo's goal as she read in German for Larry Fredrickson and Martha Wayne. N' 'Si "LISEZ LES PLAISANTERIESQ' suggested JoAnne Kennelly while Myrna Nelson looked over the "Paris Match." Basic Education and Experience in ulture German joined French, Latin and Spanish in Albert Lea Senior High School's language curriculum. Taught by Mr. Luverne Ahrndt, first year German concentrated on grammar and sentence construction, conversation was emphasized the next year. Latin students devoted first year studies to basic grammar and vocabulary. During the second year, Mr. Jerome Narveson's students studied Julius Caesar by reading accounts of his travels. Aided by mimeographed vocabulary and dialogue sheets, Miss Ruth Bauer's first and second year French classes learned the fundamentals of the language and a little of the character of the French people and culture. The tape recorder and phonograph were put to use in Miss Bauer's Spanish classes. Speaking the language in class added to the students' understanding of verb conjugations and sentence formations. Looking to the future, a language laboratory, which will contain tape recording and monitoring facilities to augment teaching techniques, and a third year of Ger- man studies are in prospect for the department. xv ggi .1 W r . W W Ruth Bauer French I-II Spanish I-II French Club Spanish Club Hi-Teens NOT PICTURED: Luverne Ahrndt German Intramurals Jerome Narveson Latin I-II Junior Classical League at Page 23 Arthur Anthony Business Machines Business Principles Stenography Journalism Business Norman Bailey Diversified Future Business Leaders Adult Education is ' Adv ei Charles Fairchild Gene Erickson Typing Business Math Journalism Business and English Adviser Junior Adviser E OCCUPIED WITH ARRANGING a showcase as part of their retail sales classwork were Pauline Hayes and Kent Dugstad. Students Receive Clerical Position Trainin Page 24 Bringing experience and instruction to students who plan to enter the business world were the various courses offered in the business division. Business machines familiarized students with the machines most commonly found in an office, thus better preparing them for jobs after graduation. In business principles, students were taught how to draw up contracts and other legal documents. Characteristics of good salesmanship and prepara- tion for future occupations Were taught in the diversi- fied classes. Each member had a part-time job and obtained excellent business training. Speed and accuracy were the goals of all typing students. They gained experience in setting up effec- tive letters and performing many typing skills. NEW POSTINQ. MACHINES proved to be an interesting addi- tion to the business machines course taken by these operators, Darlene Schwemmler and Henry Deliaad. was-GTV-we 1 ' " t'LET,S PRACTICE OUR TYPING faithfully, so we can stay at the top of the chartf, remarked Donna Hendrickson to two other speedy typers, Cheryl Johnson and Janet Roorda. Iva Loy Stenography Transcription Ollice Practice Marie Skjevcland Bookkeeping Typing Journalism Business Adviser Ruth Woods Typing Junior Red Cross In Business Education Courses Whether students planned to go on to college or to seek employment immediately after graduation, the business courses provided a good background. For the first time this year, business math and business English was offered to interested students. Business math included a study of arithmetic funda- mentals, taxes and business expenses. Business English covered the parts of speech and the qualities of writing good communications. Bookkeeping gave experience in keeping balance sheets, profit and loss statements, control of cash and many other important forms of business accounts. All girls planning to become secretaries could be found in stenography, where they learned the funda- mentals and brief forms of Gregg shorthand. DICTATING T0 FUTURE STENOGRAPHERS Sue Millet' and Chris Carlson to improve their speed and accuracy was done by Renee Johnson, a helpful classmate. 'vw Page 25 ' 1 Shop Teachers Practice Construction Skills 3 Russell Esson Electricity Aeronautics Earl Jacobsen Industrial Drawing Photography Adviser Sydney Schwartz Advanced Wood Machine Wood Linus Seifert Metals Vocational Machine Shop OBSERVING THE PROGRESS of Jerry.Draayer on a drawing was another pre-engineering student, Rick Behr. Page 26 Learning a new skill and gaining valuable experi- ence were two benefits that were received from the industrial arts classes in the senior high school. Under the leadership of Mr. Russell Esson the stu- dents learned basic electricity and aeronautics. Mr. Earl Jacobsen taught a well-rounded curricu- lum of industrial drawing classes, including machine drawing, blue print reading, shop math, architectural and pre-engineers drawing. In his classes the boys learned the basic steps followed by advanced drawing. Teaching the fundamentals and advanced tech- niques of wood working was the job of Mr. Sidney Schwartz. The first part of his job was accomplished in the machine wood shop where students learned to handle tools. In advanced wood shop the boys made projects ranging from cabinets to cedar chests. Mr. Linus Seifert headed the machine shop classes where students learned the art of working with metals and using machines related to metal work. In the three hour advanced machine shop an extensive study of metal work was made and experience was gained from the projects made by the students. 5 awww. irls Practice Efficient Home Management Through various activities and projects members of the junior and senior home economics classes helped to prepare themselves for a high goal, that of becoming America's future homemakers. The course oHered val- uable information in dealing with problems and situ- ations and family living and the upkeep of a home. Throughout the course of a year, the girls worked with and were aided by their capable instructors in covering two main fields of interest, sewing and cook- ing, relating to the homemaking course. During the first semester the girls studied table setting, table decoration, home management, proper preparation of foods and general knowledge in family care and living which would be of use later. The second semester dealt with sewing and fabrics. Each student picked out a pattern and material of her own choice and undertook the task of sewing an article Lorretta Banovetz Home Economics 11 Phyllis Breberg Home Economics Future Homemakers of America . . . P Cl b of clothing for herself, This field also involved correct ep u care and cleansing of each article of clothing. Knowledge acquired in this course will have un- ending value as these young homemakers go on to start and care for their own new homes, ACCURATE MEASUREMENTS for a couch slipcover were made by Cindy Wilson, Jean Lunning and Bette Jensen for their sophomore home economics project. HPROPERLY CANN ED FOODS are easily distinguished from I W poorly preserved foodsf' agreed senior home economics stu- A Physical Education Stresses Coordination Building the body and stressing physical fitness was one of the main goals in the physical education classes, Sophomores and juniors found themselves participating in varied programs that ranged from volleyball to track and activities that could be played both in the gymnasium and outdoors. In the fall a touch football program was carried out with the different squads of boys Working as team- mates. The girls played soccer While the nice Weather lasted but were soon driven in when Old Man Winter came around the corner with snow and ice. For the boys Winter brought wrestling, basketball. volleyball and gymnastics. Squad participuation pre- Raxlph Summers vailed in all of their activities except in gymnastics Athletic Director Where there were no teams organized. Intramural Basketball . A Baseball The girls played ping-pong, basketball, shuffle- Hcallh board. volleyball and tumbling during the winter, Driver's Training Athletic director, Mr. Ralph Summers, was in charge of all physical education classes. Mrs. Joan Van Beek headed the girls' gym classes and advised the Girls' Recreation Association and HA" and HB" squad cheerleading. Mr. Donald Buhr was the new "A" squad basketball coach and headed boys' classes. Donald Buhr Physical Education A Basketball Baseball Joan Van Beck Physical Education Girls' Recreation ASS0i'if1li0l1 "HEAD COUPLES D0-SI-DO: side gents swing their partners!" A and B Cheellcaflillil yelled the caller to square dancers Judy Goldman and John lngehritson, Linda Todd and Bob Kennedy, Kathy Kissinger and Ralph Summers. and Cheryl Lutner and Tim Bothof. Page 28 Donald Paulson Agriculture 10, 11 Future Farmers of America DONALD PAULSON pointed out the seven farm business factors as Gene Horning listened attentively. Lowell Ross Agriculture 12 Modern Agriculture Aids Student Farmers Playing an important role to those who were in- terested in farming, was the vocational agriculture department. Students were not only taught the basic fundamentals, but also were kept informed of the new developments in the field of agriculture. Under the supervision of Mr. Donald Paulson, the sophomores were introduced into Future Farmers of America and helped in developing their own super- vised farming. They were taught the fundamentals of crop and livestock production. Agriculture 11 included advanced work in the pro- duction and marketing of livestock and crops, soil management and principles of feeds and feeding. With Mr. Lowell Ross as instructor, the seniors taking Agriculture 12 and Farm Accounts, gained in- formation on the various problems that would confront them when they started farming on their own. Agriculture 12 was a course in the knowledge and skills required successfully to operate a farm. For Farm Accounts, students were required to keep a com- plete set of records on their farm for the year. Other items studied were basic farm law, farmstead planning, farm safety and government programs. LOOKING OVER soil fertility deficiencies, Larry Van Ryswyk and Keith Iverson compared inferior ears of corn. 3 iff? 1 Maw If SME l :'i::"' ..,. 2 Z. fps ,x Page 29 MADLY CRAMMING for their final six week examination dur- 'LA GOOD TOPIC SENTENCE is picked up and amplified," ing summer school, from three social books, were seniors Ron explained Wallace Kennedy through explanatory diagrams, to Olson, Tom Carroll and Kathy Olson juniors Judy Engbritson and Ken Muilenburg. Summer School Experiment Is Successful APPRAISING THE LETTER finished by Alice Thompson, to discover errors that must be corrected, was her summcr school typing classmate, sophomore Carole Lee. Page 30 Summer school was held this year for the first time in the history of our school with 574 students attending the June 15 to July 24 session. During this six week course students came to school five days a week for one, two and four hours a day. The elementary and junior high reading class helped 296 children and 123 others learned to use the type- writer. No academic credits were given. Summer school was a concentrated study of 120 hours in the classes giving a credit. Taking this course enabled many students to take more subjects this year and it gave many a much needed study hall. The same text books were used as were used in the regular classes and the same material was covered. English and history classes, which are required sub- jects, were attended by 155 students. One full credit toward graduation was given to all the students who satisfactorily completed these subjects. In senior high there were a total of five courses offered. Teachers who taught the classes were Mr. Orville O. Gilmore, English 12g Mr. lVl. E. Wambach, Social Studies 12, Mr. Wallace A. Kennedy, English 11g Mrs. Joyce Allen, English 105 and Mr. Bruce S. John- son, Wo1'ld History 10. inisters, Nurses Meet Individual Needs Assisting to prepare young people for a well- balanced and spiritually secure future, local pastors took time out once a week to guide the students in religious education and to help them in problem-solving from a Christian standpoint. This instruction in spiritual and moral values and Bible study was held for 40 minutes before first hour on Wednesdays. Students desiring to further their knowledge of the Scriptures and the Life of Christ gathered at the church of their choice as indicated in September for guidance and instruction. The true meaning of the Christian life, taught in the release time classes, supplemented the students' regular curriculum, enabling them to more effectively meet their many everyday problems. Physical needs of the students were met by the well-trained nursing staff, Miss Eleanor Beethe and her assistant, Mrs. Beryl Hillstrom. Without good health, education suffers. Very im- portant to the school, the nurses stood ready to give the proper medical attention to anyone who became ill or was injured during the day. Though they were an accepted part of the routine of school life, they were very much appreciated by those whom they assisted. WEDNESDAY MORNING WAS CHARACTERIZED by students attending many local churches for spiritual guidance and religious instruction. TEACHING CHRISTIAN YOUTH at Christmas was one of the release time pas- tors, the Rev. Melford K. Knutson of First Lutheran Church. Special services were usually held at certain times of the church year. -fd' "IS IT SERIOUS, NURSE?" anxiously inquired Marie DeBoer of the school nurse, Miss Eleanor Beethe, and her clerk, Mrs. Beryl Hillstroln, as they both reassure her. Page 31 POSING WITH CASHIER Minnie Peterson, who received the compensation for their labors, were cooks Lorraine Slette, Irene Peterson, Evelyn Jenson, Dina Flim and Gladys Olson. The usual question, "I wonder what will be served in the cafeteria today?" was always sufficiently an- swered for the students when they saw the prepara- tion of a well-balanced meal. The cafeteria staff was prepared each day to accommodate the noon rush hour created by the junior and senior high schools. The foods furnished many pleasant odors which represented well-balanced, nourishing meals. These meals, which usually consisted of a main dish, salad or vegetable, sandwiches, milk and dessert, could be purchased for only 25 cents. Milk was also available for students who carried their lunch. Junior high school students were served at 11:30 a.m. and senior high school students were served at 12:30 p.m. After the last group of senior high students had eaten, the tables had to be quickly cleaned for study hall the following hour. Even though our cafeteria is large in size we still had crowded conditions occurring with every table and chair occupied. Much credit goes to the cafeteria staff and also a few students who helped serve foods. Welcome Food and Talk Prevail at oon A CO0K'S-EYE VIEW of the cafeteria noon lunch scene which was continua.lly.highlighted by-peppy school yells and caught the bustling activity of this welcome student period the congratulatory strains of "Happy Birthday to Youll' i N55 we Page 32 Janitors Maintain Good Study Atmosphere Always ready with a smile and a cheery i'Hi!" described the between-class occupation of the men in gray. But as soon as that tardy bell rang, our janitors were on the job again, keeping the school a healthy workshop for this year's many activities. Everyone who worked in the classrooms during the day appreciated the even heating, the speedy replace- ment of burned-out bulbs and the adjustment of a stubborn window shade. Clean blackboards and smooth desk tops are other custodian accomplishments that un- doubtedly would have been missed by all students if these duties were not always faithfully performed. When most students started for home, the custo- dian's main duties began. Out came his cleaning cart from the broom closet, complete with dusters and polishers. As he thoroughly tidied up each room, he was constantly on call by extra-curricular activity workers as the general handyman. Public safety was promoted by the custodians, who kept school sidewalks free of snow and ice and cleaned the school auditorium, cafeteria and gym. KEEPING STUDENTS COMFORTABLE from the controls in the boiler room was one of the many tasks of janitors Kenneth Myron, Phillip Rogers and Melvin Thompson, engineer. CHECKING ELMER NAYLOR'S CART for the proper cleaning equipment before he made his after-school rounds were janitors Eddie Ellertson, Roy Schroeder and George Head. MAKING SURE that O. E. Guckenberg and Frank Whiteaker kept their first Hoor senior high broom closet neat and clean were Lowell Olson, Donald Vee and Bert Jenson. Page 33 117351 wa if 3 x X f f ml X Z X X , xi , xg Xb Xx a x X x x xx X .E W CMM i 2 h"Nw MMM. SENIORS l In Scholastic and EXtra+ urricular Mary Ellen Blunt mmm Dahlen Within our hallowed walls late into the night, a few students were seen striving to improve and sparkle our school life, often without recognition. Now, to honor these students' who worked unself- ishly for the benefit and betterment of others, they have been placed in the Who's Who of our annual. , Faculty committee members weighed the balance ' of scholarship, talents and co-curricular activities, to determine students eligible for this honor. ' To these 13 seniors is presented the banner of out- standing students in the graduating class of 1960. Jerry Draayer Judith Hansen ' Janice Henderson They Upheld dr Banner Year Stephen Schwartz Joan Schneider ' David Olsbn " David Reynen Barbare Ives Lewis Kennedy Ann Lyon Elizabeth Nielsen ' 1 in Nerd LOOKING TO THE FUTURE were these senior class oliicers. Jerry Draayer. president: Joyce DeVries. secretary: Bruce Col- ton, vice president: and Kay Wichmann. treasurer. Through the past year, many events have taken place to make 1960 one of the best years everl The selection of our Homecoming Queen and our class officers were two major events. Under the guidance of our ellicient class officers. the first project was the senior breakfast. David Reynen was master of ceremonies and the Reverend Richard Hofstad of Grace Lutheran Church gave an inspiring talk on "Christmas Then and Now." An effective nativity scene was portrayed. Silvia Sallenave spoke on "Christmas Here and There." and Jerry Draayer spoke on i'NeW Horizons." There was also a light side of the program which included humorous songs, a beatnik poem. a piano solo and group singing. All combined to he a very inspir- ational program for each senior. tudents ttend Rotary and Lion Meetings ROTARIAN REPRESENTATIVES related school activities at the weekly meetings. FRONT ROW: Mr. Vermund Andersen. Mr. Paul Larimore. Mr. Robert Myers and Mr. Irwin Anderson. SECOND ROW: James Thompson, Larry Van Ryswyk, Robert Hovey. Thomas Vorpahl and Raymond Zimney. THIRD ROW: David Reynen. Stephen Schwartz. David Olson and Jerry Draayer. Page 38 Helping many seniors to decide upon a college to attend or the choice of Armed Forces to go into was the annual College Day held November 12, and Armed Forces Day held November 18. Another event that highlighted the year for many senior girls was the senior tea. The Seminar trip. which enabled many seniors to visit the seat of our Federal government. and this years prom hold many cherished men ories for everyone. Lion and Rotarian representatives weie outstand- ing seniors who reported on school activities at weekly meetings. Robert Hovey and Evelyn Sanders were chosen for the American Legion and Auxiliary Awards. The inspirational Baccalaureate Service and receiv- ing our diplomas were our last major events in high school. Now We all look forward with great expecta- tion to the future and its opportunities. 'siwhlgnss-m,,,w 'mmf ,laik ROBERT HOVEY AND EVELYN SANDERS were chosen the American Legion and Auxiliary Representatives. To Tell bout arious School Happenings LION REPRESENTATIVES-FRONT ROW: Joan Schneider, Mr. Norman Bailey. Mr. Niles Shoff, Mr. Lorne Ward. Mr. Roland Ellertson and Mary Ellen Blunt. SECOND ROW: Carol Rasmussen, Silvia Sallenave, Evelyn Sanders, Peggy Cairns, Barbara Ives. Elizabeth Nielsen, Ann Lyon and Judith Vig. x QM Page 39 'Q ARTHUR ALDERS. NANCY ALLEN-Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, 3, A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, GRA 1, FHA 1, FTA 3, Thespians 2, 3, Masquers 2, 3, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 2, John Brown's Body 2, Home- coming Attendant 3, Tigers' Roar 3. EVELYN AN- DERSON. JANE ANDERSON-FHA 1. LARRY ANDERSON -A Chorus 1, 2, 3, Madrigal 3, Science Club 1, Tigers' Roar 3, John Brown's Body 2. STEPHEN ANDER- SON. We, The Graduating Upperelassmen of '60 MARALYN ANDREWS-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, Red Cross 2, 3, Ushers Club 1, 2, 3, FTA 2, 3, Office Helper 3, Thespians 2, 3, John BroWn's Body 2. NANCY ARNESON-A Chor- us 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2. WILLIAM AULWES. ng ram 'QW Page 40 ,espn agua-ay.. ORRIN BAKKE-Diversified Occupations 3, Distribu- tive Club 3. PHYLLIS BAKKEN-Hi-Teens 2, GRA 2, Office Helper 2. MARY KAY BARRY-GRA 2, FHA 1. BEVERLY BARTELL-Bowling League 3, Ushers Club 1, 2, 3, GRA 2. ROBERT BAUMAN-Diversi- fied Occupations 3. RICHARD BEHR-Prom Com- mittee Chairman 2, Junior Classical League 2, 3, Intra- mural Football 3, Intramural Basketball 3. ,mc EUGENE BEHRENS-Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3. KATHLEEN BENNER. JEAN BERG-A Chorus 2, B Chorus l, Band 1, 2, 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, Red Cross 1, 3, Spanish Club 1, 2. PATRICK BERGEN-Diversified Occupations 3, Dis- tributive Club 3, Football 1, Wrestling 2, Intramural Football 2, 3. LARRY BERGO-Diversified Occupa- tions 3, Distributive Club 3. GEORGE BLACK- Science Club 2. R, 535915 WWHW' 3 . X .A ., Endeavor to Meet the Future with ueeess PHYLLIS BOS-B Chorus 1, Spanish Club 2. JAMES BOTTELSON-FFA 1, 2, 3. REBECCA BOYD-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3. BETTY BRAATEN-Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Ushers Club 1, 2, 3, Office Helper 2, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 2, 3. JUDITH BRANDT-Diversified Occupations 3, Entered from Austin High School 3. KENNETH BREAMER-FFA 1, 2, 3. PATRICIA BLANCHARD-GRA 1, FHA 1. MARY ELLEN BLUNT-B Chorus 1, Student Council 1, 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, 3, Tigers, Roar 2, 3, French Club 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Thes- pians l, 2, 3, Masquers l, 2, 3, Father of the Bride 1, Homecoming Attendant 3, Lion Representative 3, Ki- Wanis Representative 2. LARRY BOLTON-A Cho- rus l, Orchestra 2, 3, Band 1, 2, 3, Science Club 1, 2, 3, Chess Club 2, Checker Club 2. Page 41 IGS as-mv REBECCA BUENNEKE-B Chorus 15 Hi-Teens 2, 35 Pep Club 25 Bowling League 1, 25 GRA 25 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Quill and Scroll 2, 35 Library Helper 3. BEVERLY BURNETT-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 Hi-Teens 1, 2, 35 Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3. LAVONNE BUSHLACK-Hi-Teens 2, 35 FHA 1. PEGGY CAIRNS-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 Madri- gal 2, 35 Hi-Teens 1, 2, 35 Pep Club 1, 2, 35 Tigers' Roar 35 GRA 1, 25 Junior Classical League 1, 2, 35 John Brown's Body 25 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Quill and Scroll 2, 35 Lion Representative 3. HARRIET CAL- LAHAN. CHRISTINE CARLSON-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 Madrigal 35 Hi-Teens 1, 2, 35 Bowling League 2, 35 Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3. Annual enior Breakfast at Bethan Hall THOMAS CARROLL-Band 1, 25 Diversified Occu- pations 35 Football 1. TRUDY CHAPMAN. JOHN CHESTERMAN-Science Club 1, 25 French Club 1, 25 Rifle Club 3. Page 42 ROSS CHRISTENSEN-B Chorus 1. HAROLD CHRISTENSON - Football 35 Track 3. JAMES CHRISTENSON. PERRY CLIFFORD-A Chorus 15 Diversihed Occupa- tions 35 Distributive Club 3. MANFRED COLUM- BUS-Orchestra 35 Band 1, 2, 35 Student Council 1. BEVERLY CORNELIUS-B Chorus 35 FHA 3. HUGH CORNICK - Thespians 3, Masquers 3. J. BRUCE COTTON-Student Council 1, 2, Tigers, Roar 3, Wrestling 1, Intramural Football 2, Intramural Basketball 3, Class Vice President 3. SANDRA DAHL -A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Tigers, Roar 3, GRA 1, Thespians 3, Masquers 3, Father Knows Best 3. RONALD DAHLEN-A Chorus 1, 2, Madrigal 2, Band 1, Student Council 1, 2, Tigers' Roar 2, 3, French Club 2, 3, Football 1, 2, 3, Track 1, 2, 3, Intramural Basket- ball 1 ,2, 3, Lettermen's Club 1, 2, 3, Kiwanis Repre- sentative 2. MARIE DE BOER-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 3, Pep Club 3, French Club 2, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3. JOEL DE NEUI-B Chorus 1, Band 1, 2, 3, Red Cross 3, Science Club 1, Football 1, Basketball 1, 2, Track 1, 2, Baseball 2, 3, Intramural Basketball 3, Chess Club 2, Intramural Wrestling 1. Gives Inspiration to EFFECTIVELY PORTRAYING the true meaning of Christmas in this nativity scene at the Senior Breakfast were Judy Johns- rud, Judy Vig, Phyllis Roorda, Morris Evenson and Maralyn Andrews. the Christmas Season HENRY DE RAAD--Band 1 2, 3, Red Cross 3, JOYCE DE VRIES-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Mad- rigal 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 3, Office Helper 2, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 2, 3, Class Secretary 3, Senior Executive Council 3. DAVID DONOVAN-Student Council 3, French Club 2, Jun- ior Classical League 2, Football 1, 3, Basketball l,2, 3, Golf 1, 2, 3, Lettermenls Club 1, 2, 3. Page 43 GERALD DONOVAN- Intramural Basketball 3. JERRY DRAAYER-A Chorus 1, Student Council 2, 3, Prom Committee Chairman 2, Intramural Football 2, Intramural Basketball 1, Rotarian Representative 3, Class President 3, Senior Executive Council 3. ROSA- LIE DUDLEY-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, GRA 2, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3. DONNA DUDLEY-Bowling League 1, 2, 3, Office Helper 3. HAROLD DULITZ. RUSSELL DUNN- Basketball 1, Baseball 1, 2, 3, Intramural Football 2, 3, Intramural Basketball 2, 3, Lettermenis Club 1, 2, 3. We Strive To Gain High Scholastic Ratings ARLENE EBSEN - A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1. KATHALEEN ECKHART - Hi-Teens 1, 2, Ushers Club 1, 2, 3, FHA 3, Spanish Club 2, 3. CONSTANCE ECKI-IOFF-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Madrigal 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 2, 3 French Club 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, New Library Helper 3, Kiwanis Representative 2, Drama Club 1. GARY EDWIN-Tigers' Roar 1, 3. JUDITH EM- STAD-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 2, Bowling League 2, Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3. BARBARA ENDERSON-Hi-Teens 2, FHA 3. at wk SYLVIA ENDERSON-A Chorus 2, Entered from Freeborn High School 2. DAVID ENGLISH-Junior Classical League 1, 2, Football 1, 2, Wrestling 1, 2, 3, Track 1, Baseball 3, Intramural Football 3, Lettermen's Club 2, 3, Tennis 2, 3. NANCY ERICKSON-A Chor- us 2, B Chorus 1, Band 1, 2, 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep M, Club 1, 2, Tigers' Roar 3, GRA 1, 2, Thespians 3. Mm. Page 44 WAYNE ERICKSON-A Chorus 1, 2. MARY EVANS-Pep Club 3, Red Cross 1, FTA 1, 2, FHA 1, 2, 3. MORRIS EVENSON-French Club 3, Spanish Club 2, Intramural Football 2. MARILYN FERRING-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Student Council 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3. MARJORIE FINK- A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Pep Club 3, FHA 1, 2, 3. MARY FITZGERALD - Hi-Teens 3, FHA 1, 2, 3, Office Helper 2, Library Helper 3. Through Diligent Concentration on Studies DOROTHY FOLIE-B Chorus 1, Diversified Occupa- tions 3, Distributive Club 3. SHARON FRANCIS-A Chorus 2, Bowling League 2, French Club 2. ANN GALBRAITH-Student Council 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, Pep Club 1, Red Cross 3, Office Helper 2. CONSTANCE GAPPA-Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Ushers Club 1, 2, 3, Thespians 2, 3, Masquers 2, Deep Are the Roots 2, Library Helper 1. RICHARD GARI. PATRICIA GENDLER-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Orchestra 2, Band 1, 2, Student Council 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, Tigers' Roar 3, FTA 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Thespians 1, 2, 3, John Brownis Body 2. JESSE FLORES--Track 1, 2, Lettermen's Club 1, 2. MERLIN FLUGUM-FFA 1, 2, 3, Spanish Club 2, 3: Baseball 3. JANICE FOGEL-Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3, Bowling League 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Thespians 2, 3, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 2, John Brovvn's Body 2, Library Helper 3. Page 45 DONALD GILL-FFA 1, 2, 33 Intramural Basketball 3. MARION GNIFFKE-A Chorus 23 B Chorus 13 GRA 2, 33 Junior Classical League 1, 2, 33 Pep Club 23 Bowl- ing League 33 Office Helper 33 Tiger 33 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3. ROSEIVIARY GOETTE-A Chorus 23 B Chorus 13 Hi-Teens 1, 2, 33 Pep Club 2, 33 Tigers' Roar 33 Red Cross 13 GRA 1, 23 Spanish Club 2, 33 Senior Executive Council 3. JO ANN GOLDIVIAN-A Chorus 23 B Chorus 13 Band Majorette 13 Hi-Teens 1, 2, 33 Pep Club 1, 2, 33 Tigers' Roar 33 GRA 1, 2, 33 Junior Classical League 1, 2, 33 Cheerleader 1, 2, 33 Senior Executive Council 3. JOHN GOODMAN-Intramural Football 1. PAUL GOODIVIANSON-Student Council 1, 33 Tigers' Roar 33 Intramural Football 23 Intramural Basketball 3g King of Snows 33 Senior Executive Council 3. Knowled e of ur Government is Gained VIRGINIA GRAY-Pep Club 33 Tigers' Roar 33 GRA 33 Entered from American Community School, Buenos Aires, Argentina 3. DAVID GREEN-Chess Club 2. DOROTHY GREENEY-A Chorus 2, 33 B Chorus 13 Madrigal 33 Hi-Teens 1, 2, 33 Pep Club 1, 23 ETA 23 Junior Classical League 1, 2, 33 Class Secretary 21 Senior Executive Council 3. Page 46 BUSILY COUNTING MONEY to see whether or not funds will permit them to go on the Know Your Government Seminar are Sharon Simon, Danny Pierce, Tom Vorpahl and Judith Vig. LOIS GREENGO. JANET GRINOLDS-B Chorus 1, Student Council 1, Prom Committee Chairman 2, Hi- Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, Tigers' Roar 2, 3, FTA 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Thespians 2, 3, Mas- quers 2, 3, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 2, John Brown's Body 2, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 2, Class Treasurer 2, Senior Executive Council 3. CHAR- LOTTE HAGEN-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Prom Committee Chairman 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3, GRA 1, 2, 3, FTA 1, 2, 3, Spanish Club 2, 3, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 2, 3, Cheerleader 1, 2, Kiwanis Representative 2, Office Helper 1. JANET HAHLEN-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Hi- Teens 2, 3, Tigers, Roar 2. THOMAS I-IALVORSON -A Chorus 1, Madrigal 1, Thespians 1, 2, 3, Masquers 1, 2, 3, Father of the Bride 1, Caine Mutiny Court Martial 1, Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 2, John BroWn's Body 2, Football Manager 2, 3, Basketball Manager 2, 3, Baseball 1, 2, 3, Intramural Football 1, 3, Intramural Basketball 2, 3, Lettermen's Club 2, 3. CONSTANCE HAMMER-Hi-Teens 1, Red Cross 2. n the Seminar Tour SHIRLEY HANSEN-Hi-Teens 1, FHA 1, Library CAROL HANSON. DALE HANSON- Helper 1. Baseball 3, Intramural Football 2, 3, Intramural Bas- ketball 1, 2, 3. DAVID HANSON-B Chorus 1, Football 1. JERYL HANSON-Football 1, 2, Wrestling 1, 2, 3, Track 1. JOAN HARRIS-Orchestra 2, 3, Band 2, 3, Pep Club 3, Tigers' Roar 3, GRA 1, 2, Junior Classical League 2, 3, Entered from Ypsilanti, Michigan, 1. of Washington, D. C. GLENYSE HAMMER-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi- Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, Diversified Occupations 3. GARY HAMMOND-Tigers' Roar 3, Football 1, 3, Lettermen's Club 3, Senior Executive Council 3. JUDITH HANSEN-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Mad- rigal 3, Prom Committee Chairman 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 2, 3, Red Cross 2, GRA 3, French Club 2, 3, John Brown's Body 2, Kiwanis Rep- resentative 2, Drama Club 1. Page 47 Active Participation in SUZANNE HENRY-B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, GRA 2, Diversified Occupations 3, Dis- tributive Club 3. DENNIS HERMANSON-Intra- mural Football 1, 3, Intramural Basketball 3. LONNA HERTH-Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Bowling League 1, 2, 3, GRA 1, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 2, 3, Library Helper 2, 3, Tiger Tidings in the Tribune 2, 3. Page 48 KENNETH HATCH-Orchestra 2, 3, Band 1, 2, 3, Swing Band 3, Baseball 1, 2, 3, Wrestling 3, Intramural Football 1, 2, Intramural Basketball 1, 2. FAITH HATHAWAY-B Chorus 1. DARLENE HECKES- Red Cross 1, Bowling League 2, 3, GRA 1, 2, French Club 3, Junior Classical League 2, 3. GERALD HELLAND-A Chorus 1, Diversified Occu- pations 3, Track 1. PATRICIA HELLING-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, French Club 2, 3, Thespians 3. JAN- ICE HENDERSON-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Mad- rigal 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 3, Tigers' Roar 3, FTA 2, 3, French Club 2, 3, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 2, 3. chool Organizations SHARON HERTH-Hi-Teens 2, 3, Bowling League 2, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3. STEPHEN HIGGINS -Student Council 1, 2, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Football 1, Intramural Football 2, Intramural Basket- ball 1, Chess Club 1. PAUL HILL-Orchestra 1, 2, 3, Band 1, 2, 3, Swing Band 1, 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 1, 2, 3, Track 1, 2, 3, German Club 3. MARILOU HILLS-Band Majorette 1, 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, Bowling League 1, 3, Distributive Club 2. BARRY HOFFMAN-Student Council 1, Baseball 3, Intra- mural Basketball 1, 2, 3. BARBARA HOISETI-I. KARROL HOISETH-Wrestling 1, 2, 3. GEORGE HOLTON-Diversified Occupations 3, Wrestling 1. JEROLD HOLTY-Wrestling 1. FRANK HOLWAY-Student Council 3, French Club 1, Football 1, Track 1, 2, 3, Intramural Football 2, 3, Intramural Basketball 3, Lettermenis Club 1, 2, 3. CAROL HOPPERSTAD-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3. ROB- ERT HOVEY-A Chorus 1, 2, Science Club 1, 2, 3, Rotarian Representative 3, Chess Club 2, Checker Club 2. Improves ur haracter and Personalit MARK HYLBAK-Student Council 2, Prom Commit- tee Chairman 2, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3, Wrestling 1, 2, 3, Lettermen's Club 2, 3. KAREN INGVALDSON-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Orchestra 1, 2, 3, Band 1, 2, 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3, Red Cross 2, 3, Junior Classical League 3, John Brown's Body 2. KAREN IVERSON-Hi-Teens 1, 2, GRA 1, 2, Junior Classical League 1. KEITH IVERSON-FFA 1, 2, 3. BARBARA IVES A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, lVIadrigal 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 2, 3, GRA 1, 2, 3, French Club 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Thespians 1, 2, 3, Father of the Bride 1, Library Helper 3, Lion Repre- sentative 3, Kiwanis Representative 2. SUZANNE JACKSON-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3. LA JUNE HOWARD-A Chorus 2, Student Council 1, Hi-Teens 2, Pep Club 2, Tigers' Roar 3, Red Cross 1, 2, Bowling League 1, 2, 3, GRA 1, FHA 1. JOY HURST -A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Orchestra 1, 2, Science Club 1, FTA 2, 3, FHA 1, 2, 3. BONI HUTCHINS-Bowl- ing League 3, GRA 1, Thespians 3. Page 49 T e Juniors Devote JANICE JENSEN-Hi-Teens 2, 3. DOROTHY JEN- SON-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus l, Madrigal 3, Tigers' Roar 3, GRA 2, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, John Brown's Body 2, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 3. CARLYLE JERDEE-FFA 1, 2, 3. Page 50 PETER JACOBS-Hi-Teens 2, Football 1, Basketball 1, Golf 1, 2, 3, Intramural Football 2, 3, Intramural Basketball 2, 3, Lettermenls Club 1, 2, 3, Rifle Club 1. ROSANN JACOBSEN-B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 2, 3, Pep Club 2, Red Cross 3, Science Club 2, GRA 1, 2, FTA 3, Office Helper 1, Thespians 3, Library Helper 2. BARBARA JENNER-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Prom Committee Chairman 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, Tigers' Roar 3, French Club 2, 3, Art Club 1, Drama Club 1, Library Helper 3. ALLEN JENSEN-FFA 3. DOUGLAS JENSEN-A Chorus 1, 2, Madrigal 2, Tennis 1, 2, 3. GORDON JENSEN-FFA 2, 3. an Hours Of Time EUGENE JESSE-Wrestling 2. KENNETH JOA- CHIM-Junior Classical League 1. LENORE JO- HANNSEN-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 2, Bowling League 1, 2, 3, French Club 1. CHARLES JOHNSON-Diversified Occupations 3. RENEE JOHNSON-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi- Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, 3, Red Cross 1, 2, FTA 3, French Club 2, 3, Junior Classical League l, 2, 3, Drama Club 1. SHARON JOHNSON-Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3. JUDITH JOHNSRUD-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Mad- rigal 2, Orchestra 1, 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3, Red Cross 3, John BroWn's Body 2, Library Helper 3. KAREN JOHNSTON-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Madrigal 2, 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, Tigers' Roar 3, French Club 2, Thespians 2, 3, John Brown's Body 2, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 2, 3. MARLOW J ORDAHL. LILY ANN KAASA-Hi-Teens 3, Bowling League 2, Office Helper 2, Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3. LAUREL KANE-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3. BETTY KANGAS-FHA 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3. To Entertain Us With VIOLET KERMES-Hi-Teens 3, Ushers Club 2, 3, Junior Classical League 2, 3, Library Helper 2. RICHARD KILIAN-B Chorus 1, Football 1, Wrest- ling 1, Intramural Basketball 2. CHARLES KING- Tigers' Roar 3, French Club 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1. g W L , : f QQ ,lyk 'Cl I A RALPH KING. XEREIQ ICK KIPP-Intramural Baskbtfball A L! ' 74 ' 17 I Mfr, , iq n'm 'Ah L ijtivftfii K ' , , , 1 , I' 7,44 i f A Cf! xi ,-1 1 52 72 017391 'XG f if 3 !7 1 4 11 utstanding Prom TERRY KATZUNG-Science Club 1, 2, 3, French Club 1, Chess Club 2. LEWIS KENNEDY-Football 1, 2, 3, Wrestling 1, 2, 3, Track 1, 2, 3. JO ANNE KENNELLY-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, 3, Red Cross 1, French Club 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3. Page 51 JUDITH KIRK-Office Helper 2, 3. MARILYN KRUEGER-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 Madrigal 35 FHA 2, 3. DALE KVALE4-Hi-Teens 25 Pep Club 35 Tigers' Roar 35 Red Cross 35 Junior Classical League 1, 2, 35 Football 1, 25 Track 1, 2, 35 Intramural Football 2, 35 Intramural Basketball 35 Lettermen's Club 1, 2, 3. ALTON KVENVOLD. MARY LADLIE-FHA 3. NEIL LANG-Track 25 Distributive Club 35 Intra- mural Basketball 35 Entered from Glenville, Minnesota 2. Silvia Sallenave Portrays Argentine Life JEFFREY LARSON-A Chorus 2, 35 Madrigal 2, 35 Student Council 25 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Tigers' Roar 1, 2, 35 Red Cross 15 French Club 2, 35 Thespians 15 Football 15 Intramural Football 25 Intra- mural Basketball 25 Tennis 1, 2, 35 School Photographer 1, 2, 35 Kiwanis Representative 25 Rifle Club 2. KEITH LARSON. SHARON LARSON-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 Hi-Teens 1, 2, 35 Pep Club 1, 2, 35 Tigers, Roar 35 Red Cross 15 GRA 1, 25 French Club 1. 'AI ENJOY WORKING and painting signs for Pep Club very much," exclaimed Silvia Sallenave, our foreign exchange stu- dent from Arcentina as she diligently paints, "Win Tigers Winn. Page 52 NANCY LEE-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Student Council 1, 2, Prom Committee Chairman 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, Tigers' Roar 1, 3, FTA 3, Thespians 2, 3, Masquers 3, John Brown's Body 2, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 2, 3, Homecoming Attend- ant 3. IVAN LEGRIED. JOHN LEI-IMANN - Junior Classical League 2, 3, Basketball 1, 3, Golf 1, 2, 3, Intramural Football 2, 3, Intramural Basketball 2, Letterments Club 1, 2, 3, Senior Executive Council 3. ANITA LEMBKE-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Bowling League 2, 3, Ushers Club 1, Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3. MARVIN LENZE-Red Cross 1. LAURA LEWIS-Orchestra 1, Band 1, Hi-Teens 2, Science Club 1, 2, 3, FTA 3, FHA 1, French Club 2, 3, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 2, 3. And Promotes Excellent Foreign Relations ANN LYON-B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 2, 3, French Club 2, 3, Junior Clas- sical League 1, 2, 3, Thespians 1, Masquers 1, Father of the Bride 1, Lion Representative 3. JO ANN MAAS -A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3, Red Cross 3, GRA 1, 2, FTA 2, 3, Thespians 1, 2, 3, Masquers 3, John Brown's Body 2, Kiwanis Representative 2, Father Knows Best 3. DOUGLAS MATTICK. JAMES MCMILLAN - Tigers, Roar 3, Football 1, Track 1, 2, 3, Intramural Football 2, 3, Intramural Bas- ketball 3. DARLENE MENSINK. JOHN METZKE -French Club 1, 2, Football 1, Track 1, 2, 3, Rifle Club 1, 3, Cross Country 3. MONA LINDAHL-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Hi- Teens 1, 2, 3, Red Cross 2, Bowling League 2, 3, Ushers Club 1. JAMES LOGE. ALYCE LOMBARD. Page 53 nder the Governing PAUL MOE-Football 2, 3, Basketball 1, 2, Golf 1, 2, 3, Intrarnural Basketball 2, 3, Lettermenls Club 2, 3, Entered from St. Paul Central, Minnesota 1. ROGER MOORE-FFA 3, Track 3. STEVEN MOORE-A Chorus 1, 2, French Club 2, 3, Thespians 1, 2, 3, Masq- uers 1, 2, 3, John Brown's Body 2, Deep Are the Roots 2. Page 54 KAREN MICHAELIS-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Madrigal 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3, Bowling League 3, John Brownls Body 2. DUANE MILLER-A Chorus 3, Madrigal 3, Tigers, Roar 3, Entered from Cleveland, Ohio 3. SUSAN MILLER-B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, John Brown's Body 2. VIVIAN MIOVAC-Ushers Club 1. GUADALUPE MIRANDA--Spanish Club 1, 2. DARLENE MOE- Hi-Teens 2, Bowling League 2. of the Student Council DUANE MORREIM. WILLIAM MUESING-Band 1, 2, 3, Student Council 2, 3, Wrestling 2, 3, Track 3, Senior Executive Council 3. BJORN NELSON-FFA 1, 2, 3. BONNIE NELSON-B Chorus 1, Band 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 3, Tigers' Roar 3, French Club 2, 3. IRENE NELSON-Hi-Teens 1, FTA 2, 3, FHA 1, 2, 3, Junior Classical League 2, 3, Office Helper 2. KAREN NEL- SON-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, I-Ii-Teens 2, FHA 3. KATHLEEN NELSON-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Junior Clasical League 3. CARIVIEN NESJE-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Madrigal 3, Hi- Teens 3, Bowling League 1, 2, 3. ELIZABETH NIEL- SEN-Prom Committee Chairman 2, Pep Club 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3, Red Cross 1, GRA 1, 2, Junior Classical League 2, 3, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Homecoming Attendant 3, Lion Representative 3. LILLIAN OLDENKAMP. ANTHONY OLSON. DARLENE OLSON. We btain ctive Voice In School ffairs KEITH OLSON-Spanish Club 2, Thespians 2, 3, John Brown,s Body 2, Tigers? Roar 3. LARRY OLSON. RONALD OLSON-A Chorus 1, French Club 2, Ti- gers' Roar 3, Basketball 1, Track 1, 2, 3, Intramural Football 2, 3, Intramural Basketball 3, Lettermen's Club 2, 3, Rifle Club 1, 2. RUTH OLSON-Hi-Teens 1, Red Cross 1, GRA 2. MARY JO OMUNDSON-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3, GRA 1, 2, 3, Junior Classical League 2, Thespians 2, 3. MICHAEL O'NEAL. DAVID OLSON-Prom Committee Chairman 2, Hi- Teens 2, French Club 2, Football 1, 3, Basketball 1, 2, 3, Golf 1, Track 2, 3, Intramural Football 2, Letter- men's Club 1, 2, 3, Kiwanis Representative 2, Rotarian Representative 3, Class Vice-President 1, Class Pres- ident 2. KAREN OLSON-B Chorus 1, Band Major- ette 1, 2, 3, Red Cross 3, GRA 1, 2, Office Helper 1. KATHLEEN OLSON-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Madrigal 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3, Red Cross 1, 2, 3, GRA 1, 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Thespians 1, 2, 3, John Brown's Body 2, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 2, 3. Page 55 tudents Attend Their VIRGINIA PERRIN-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi- Teens 3, Tigers' Roar 3, French Club 2, 3, Library Helper 3. CORALD PETERSON--Band 1, 2, Red Cross 3, Basketball 1, Baseball 3, Intramural Football 1, 2, 3, Intramural Basketball 2, 3. DANNY PIERCE -A Chorus 1, 2, 3, Madrigal 2, 3, John Brown's Body 2, Kiwanis Representative 2. Page 56 JERRY OOTHOUDT-Tigers' Roar 3, Science Club 1, 2. CONSTANCE PAULSON-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3, Red Cross 1, GRA 1, FTA 1, 2, 3, FHA 1, Junior Classical League 2, 3. ROBERT PAULSON-Rifle Club 1. JUDITH PENTZ-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Prom Committee Chairman 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, Tigers' Roar 2, 3, FTA 2, French Club 2, 3, Thespians 2, 3, Masquers 3, John Brown's Body 2, Art Club 1, Drama Club 1, 2, Father Knows Best 3. LUPE PEREZ-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Office Helper 2. PHILLIP PEREZ-Intramural Football 3. Respective Churches ROSE PIERCE-Hi-Teens 1, Red Cross 1, Office Help- er 2. SHARON PIERCE-B Chorus 2, Orchestra 2, Band 1, 2, 3, Hi-Teens 2, Library Helper 2. CARO- LYN PIERSON-B Chorus 1, 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, Pep Club 1, 2, GRA 2, French Club 1, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3. SHARON PRIHODA-FHA 1. DORIS QUALLEY- A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, Office Helper 1, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3. CAROL RASIVIUSSEN-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Student Council Treasurer 3, Prom Committee Chair- man 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 2, 3, FTA 2, French Club 2, 3, Thespians 2, 3, John BroWn's Body 2, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Quill and Scroll 2, 3, Homecoming Attendant 3, Lion Representative 3, Class Treasurer 1. JEROME RASIVIUSSEN-Diversified Occupations 35 Distributive Club 3. LARRY REIM. DAVID REY- NEN-Band 1, 25 Student Council 1, 2, 35 Student Council Vice President 35 Prom Committee Chairman 25 Tigers' Roar 35 Football 1, 2, 35 Track 25 Intramural Baskeball 1, 2, 35 Lettermen's Club 2, 35 Kiwanis Rep- resentative 25 Rotarian Representative 3. CAROLYN ROBBINS-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 Madrigal 35 Hi-Teens 2, 35 Pep Club 35 Tigers, Roar 2, 35 Science Club 1, 25 FTA 35 French Club 2, 35 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Quill and Scroll 2, 3. SHARON ROEL-A Chorus 25 B Chorus 15 Hi-Teens 25 Pep Club 25 Red Cross 35 GRA 2, 35 FTA 35 Spanish Club 15 Thespians 2, 35 Masquers 35 John Brown's Body 25 Father Knows Best 35 Library Helper 3. JAMES ROLLINS-Tennis 1, 2, 3. Every Week to Acquire Spiritual uidance SILVIA SALLENAVE-A Chorus 35 Student Council 35 Hi-Teens 35 Pep Club 35 Lion Representative 35 Senior Executive Council 35 Foreign Exchange Student 3. CAROL SANBORN-A Chorus 25 B Chorus 15 Hi-Teens 15 Pep Club 25 Tigers, Roar 35 Red Cross 1, 25 Olfice Helper 25 Thespians 2, 35 John Brown's Body 2. Queen of Hearts 3. CLINTON SANBORN-Student Council 35 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Quill and Scroll 2, 35 Intramural Football 35 Intramural Basketball 3. EVELYN SANDERS-B Chorus 15 Student Council Secretary 35 Hi-Teens 2, 35 Pep Club 25 Tigers' Roar 35 Ushers Club 2, 35 Junior Classical League 2, 35 Ofiice Helper 25 Tiger 35 Ah La Ha Sa 2, 35 Quill and Scroll 2, 35 Lion Representative 35 Homecoming Queen 3. GLENN SCHEWE-FFA 1, 2, 3. JOAN SCHNEIDER -A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 lVIadrigal 2, 35 Orchestra 1, 25 Hi-Teens 1, 2, 35 Tigers' Roar 1, 2, 35 FTA 1, 2, 35 French Club 2, 35 Thespians 35 Masquers 35 John Brownis Body 25 Lion Representative 35 Kiwanis Rep- resentative 25 Father Knows Best 3. PHYLLIS ROORDA-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 Hi-Teens 1, 2, 35 Thespians 2, 35 John Brown's Body 2. JANET RUSLEY-A Chorus 2, 35 B Chorus 15 Mad- rigal 2, 35 Hi-Teens 25 GRA 2, 35 Junior Classical League 1, 25 Office Helper 25 John Brownis Body 2. LEONARD SACKSON-John Brown's Body 25 Intra- mural Basketball 2. Page 57 JANET SCHOLL-Ofiice Helper 2, Diversified Occu- pations 3, Distributive Club 3. HARLAN SCHROE- DER-Distributive Club 3. STEPHEN SCHWARTZ -Student Council 1, 2, 3, Student Council President 3, Prom Committee Chairman 2, Pep Club 3, Tigers' Roar 3, French Club 1, 2, Track 3, Intramural Football 2, Rotarian Representative 3, Class President 1, Rifle Club 1, 2, 3. DARLENE SCHWEMMLER - Bowling League 3, FHA 2, 3. JOYCE SEYMOUR-Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3. SUZANNE SHEA-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Student Council 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 3, FTA 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Queen of Snows 3, Class Vice President 2. nder the Guidance of Competent Teachers JULIE SHERMAN-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Mad- rigal 2, 3, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, Tigers' Roar 3, French Club 2, 3, John Brown's Body 2. SHARON SIGURDSON-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Bowling League 2, 3, French Club 1, Office Helper 2, Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3. SHARON SIMON-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Prom Committee Chairman 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 2, 3, Red Cross 1, 2, 3, GRA 1, FTA 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Thespians 2, 3, Mas- quers 3, John Brown's Body 2, Father Knows Best 3. Page 58 ww Www if f DAVID SKOGHEIM-Student Council 1, 2, 3. KATH- LEEN SMEBY-Hi-Teens 1, 2, Ushers Club 1, 2, 3, Office Helper 1. LU JEAN SORBY-Hi-Teens 2, 3, Red Cross 1, Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3, Art Club 1. BRUCE STENHOVDEN - FFA 2, 3. AUDREY QBEDNEYJ STEVENS - Hi-Teens 1, 2, Bowling League 2, 3, GRA 2, 3, Library Helper 3. GARY STIEBLER-Red Cross 2, Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3, Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, Chess Club 1, 2. KEITH STILES-Orchestra 1, 2, Band 1, 2, Swing Band 1, 2, 3, Tigers, Roar 1, 2, 3, Diversified Occupa- tions 3, Distributive Club 3, Basketball 1, Track 1, Intramural Football 3, King Of Hearts 3. MARILYN STOA-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Madrigal 2, Orches- tra 1, 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 3, Tigers' Roar 3, GRA 1, 2, 3, French Club 2, 3, John Brown's Body 2, Senior Executive Council 3. ALLAN STOLZE-Ti- gers, Roar 3, W1'estling 1, 2, 3, Track 3. W. THOMAS STOWELL-Wi'estling 1, 2, 3, Track 1, 3, Tennis 2, Cross Country 3. S. ANNE SVENDSEN -A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, John Brown's Body 2. JOHN SWANSON. We Fulfill ur Educational Requirements ROBERT THOMAS. H. JAMES THOMPSON - Band 1, Student Council 2, Tigers, Roar 3, French Club 2, 3, Football 1, 2, 3, Basketball 1, Wi'estling 2, 3, Track 1, 2, 3, Lettermenls Club 1, 2, 3, Kiwanis Representa- tive 2, Rotarian Representative 3. JANICE THOMP- SON. SONITA THOMPSON-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi- Teens 1, 2, 3, Bowling League 3, GRA 3, Junior Clas- sical League 1, 2, 3, Office Helper 3, German Club 3. JOLENE TONGA-Band 1, 2, Hi-Teens 1, Red Cross 1, Bowling League 2, 3, Ushers Club 1, 2, 3, GRA 1, 2, 3. SHARON TOSTENSON--B Chorus 1, Red Cross 2, GRA 1, 2. RHODETTE TANGEN-A Chorus 2, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 1, Ushers Club 1, Diversified Occupations 3, Distributive Club 3. SHIRLEY THOFSON-FHA 1, 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Office Helper 2. PATRICIA THOMAS -Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, FHA 2, 3, Spanish Club 1, John Brownls Body 2, Library Helper 1, 2. Page 59 The Senior Executive PAUL VINCK-Tigers' Roar 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Football 1, Basketball 1, Golf 1, 2, 3, Intramural Football 2, 3, Intramural Basketball 3, Let- termen's Club 3, Riiie Club 1. THOMAS VORPAI-IL -Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Intramural Football 3, Intramural Basketball 3, Rotarian Representative 3. HERBERT WAALKENS-Intramural Football 2, 3, Intramural Basketball 1, 2. Page 60 KAREN UGLAND-A Chorus 2. HAZEL UNDER- DAHL-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Hi-Teens 2, 3. GARY VAN BAAK-Student Council 3, Intramural Football 1, 2, 3, Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3. LARRY VAN RYSWYK-Student Council 3, FFA 2, 3, Tiger 3, Ah La Ha Sa 2, 3, Football 2, 3, Lettermen's Club 3, Rotarian Representative 3. PHILLIP VER- DOORN. JUDITH VIG-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Madrigal 3, Student Council 2, Prom Committee Chair- man 2, Hi-Teens 1, 2, 3, Pep Club 2, 3, Tigers' Roar 2, 3, GRA 3, French Club 2, 3, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Homecoming Attendant 3, Library Helper 3, Lion Representative 3, Kiwanis Representative 2, Class Secretary 1, Drama Club 1, 2. Council Helps Select BONNIE WALKER-B Chorus 1, Diversified Occupa- tions 2, 3. ROGER D. WANGEN-FFA 3. ROGER L. WANGEN-Tigers, Roar 3, Football 1, 2, 3, Basket- ball 1, Track 2, Baseball 3, Intramural Basketball 2, 3, Lettermenis Club 2, 3, Rifle Club 1. RUTH WAYNE-B Chorus 1, A Chorus 2, 3. PAT- RICIA WECK-B Chorus 1, Diversified Occupations 3. JEAN WERNER-Ushers Club 1, Diversified Occupa- tions 3, Distributive Club 3. ROBERT WESTERGAARD. PAUL WESTRUM- Football 1, 2, 3, Track 1, Intramural Basketball 1. KATHLEEN WICHIVIANN-A Chorus 2, 3, B Chorus 1, Student Council 2, 3, Hi-Teens 1, 3, Pep Club 1, 2, 3, Tigers, Roar 3, GRA 1, 2, Junior Classical League 1, 2, 3, Class Treasurer 3, Senior Executive Council 3. ROSALIE WICHIVIANN 4- I-Ii-Teens 1, 2, 3. BERT WIERSMA-A Chorus 1, Tigers' Roar 3, Football 1, 3, Track 2, Intramural Football 2, Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3, Lettermen's Club 3. ALF WIIK. raduation nnouncements Sr Name Cards NOT PICTURED: RONALD DOYLE. KEITH HERSHEY. JENS JEN- SEN. SOLVEIG PETERSON. CAROL QUAM. LE ROY SCHULTZ. DAVID SPRINGBORG. MAKING PLANS for graduation were Executive Council mem- bers, Marilyn Stoa, JoAnn Goldman, Janet Grinolds, Dorothy Greeney and Rosemary Goettc. NOT PICTURED: Paul Good- manson, Gary Hammond, Mark Hylbak, Bill Muesing, Jack Lehmann and Silvia Sallenavc. LARRY WILL-Thespians 2, 3, John BroWn's Body 2. WILLIAM WING. ROBERT WOOLARD. RAYMOND ZIMNEY-Junior Classical League 3, Intramural Football 3, Intramural Basketball 3, Rota- rian Representative 3. Page 61 ff , S0 , M fl X v Q, Y Rfb 3" X , X N - Sa X qix QQ: , Q-4 S - X Ki will kj . W by X Qxx ' wi fiioxfky U5 f . Q AMX .X sx ' Hx Vkb X vga Aja? wx Q. JN. E is U QXM .X I f X RTN Cb 1-X wig iv Ex ix gif Ya R fm Q R' 55 wi is P' m X .. K, X X X53 gy ig Xi Si wi Ks .SN VA R' Q N5 T6 Q UNIOR ABLY REPRESENTING THE JUNIOR BODY were this year's officers Roger Christiansen, presidentg Mary Keil, vice-presidentg Linda Ille, secretaryg and Carol Lee, treasurer. Elected ffieers Efiicientl ., I5 --" . , .' . 1: ::"' 'A" -e" ' A"": 1 .--1 .e.: k 'A A ,L..,: an ..., D ,W . "'- V.'....,. , ' -:... , , W A 6, , 5221 S "" x as X Ackland, Allen, Amann, Amundson 2'2:,2 ::,,,,, ,,eQ-, ,,,,,,, Z zz. Q A "l- :,, "Q" lzz :A 3, B-Ar1d01'S0H,K-Ande1'S0n A eee llll A el l f lelee eeee Q Mm lk W ll 0 ..:f: ::,, ,,,, .ui .i ,,,. .,.e,, e Z f A '1" '::'f I -'11 A"- , b - ,.:. L Q A:,,. .,..,, .,..b i E I i ' R. Anderson. Bachtle, Bartcll. Bell N "'-:'-- 2 g:g:,:,- zz. ., 1 it nnnl - "" ab Bergo, Bertelson zb, ' , zzl Iq- Q .:::,,. QQ 3 .,:. C . 7 ,H .'1. is .A'. Q W 2 . lei: ' zzzz , ..... 55 xx' Ize . 1,' 1" 'l,'4 Z 2 "':: ' 2'Q '22'222.e S :.. btitb :,., 5 '.l,- 5 ::, , ,,.:: xi ::---- ,T , -, ::-: I 1 3- - Mf. , . , .-" k y ,I ':: 5 EE ::':"' f I :iff "i 2 ::::" :.::, , fiiff' 1 3 ig 5 Bisgaard, Blanchard. Bleckeberg. B-lizard, Bock, Buhlman Bolinger, Boocn, Bos, Bosacker, Bothof, R. Buyer K. Boyer, Judith Boyum, Julie Boy- um, Briggs, Butenhoff, Butler Page 64 C it YM! 7 . . tb ulde Junior Class Eiiowgi V oals Anticipation of their first prom weighed upon t Junior Class as the prom committee members Wo diligently to complete preparation for 4'South o Borderf, This Spanish theme was carried ou oug the use of simple, effective materials sy b 'zing Q hacienda. Starry-eyed students danced to t usic Henry Charles and his orchestra and end-d a t 1 tional buffet luncheon before the danc . - Arrival of the Junior Class rin ' Wa anoth bmu 4 'J anticipated moment. Final select' a ten c at fi ring with raised insignia and X -go d 'fritials was fz- 7 from a group presented by th ' ass Mr . ft if This was the fourth year nio pre e a ion Q V Kiwanis meetings. Each k ' ere-nt, embe ' the faculty chose 'Bom e was t if e meet Callahan' ' to relate sch pe i g nd t iti . t W 52 rc if , U Chrystianson, Clause Ve ' r ' the f Ju ior ar s s for ur if and pin , Advis g th dent o coll att ce ' cho'ce vocatio , wer iss Ger rude iers and r. ey t dt. YARD Bfflin fi U Claybour , ns. 1 s nick, Cot 0 alei itil it fp Danielsen, Dav ' n, D ' ',,xDem0. DeRaad, Dilli Draayer, Dress, Dugstad, Dulitz, Durnin, Eastvold Dennis Edwin, Donna Edwin, Ellert- son, Emstad, L. Endcrson, P. Ender- son. Engbritson, Erdman, Erlandson, Er- nest, Farry, Fjeldberg Page 65 Profitable Insight is ':"V' LW K :IV """" ' f '," -'::: 2 Lz. .""' ZA' I'l: 1 .'..1 :.,: -E. :., E ,,.. fm, ...:. fglfi. lv G "-1 """"" " 1 zzz zzv' ' ff fx 1,-.,' ,A.--A,:: 5.21. .:::, g f:-1 ,,,. V Q b A.f. .,:..:.::.:..:...,1,.V , . A,:, "':"' i 4 ":"' .--f: zzzzz :., :"' ','..: Q ::::--v ..,..,.,.,,: . ,.,. ..,... 3 , - --:: I, zlzvv ja: E Flaskerud, Flugum, Foley, Folie Fredrickson, Freeman, Freemyer, Gaard Gari, Gavle, Gilbert, Gilbertson, Glenn, Groos Guiney, B. Gulbranson, V. Gul- brandson, J. Gunderson, L. Gunder- son, Hagen ttained b Capable TERM PAPER TIME was evident as Bob Demo took a sneak peek at the finished product over Sue Helgesonls shoulder. Halvorson, Hamson, C. Hanson, H. Hanson, Joan Hanson, Joylene Hanson Page 66 Judith A. Hanson, Judith E. Hansen, Judith S. Hanson, S. Hanson, Hard- ing, Ilarpel Haskins, Hassberg, Haugen, Ilaye, Heemsbergen, Hegland Juniors Through Guidance of Counselors CAREFULLY CONSIDERING THE MERITS of several colleges and universities, Barbara Kofstad was assisted in the effort by Miss Gertrude Piers, junior class counselor. 9. E Q.. W S. A 2 in e Heilman, Helgeson, Hendrickson, Herfindahl Herman, Hirsch, Hoium, Holt Holway, D. Horning, G. Horning, Hoverson, Huesmann, Hurla Hutchins, Hyland, Ille, J. Indrelie, M. Indrelie, Iverson Jacobsen, A. Jacobson, B. Jacobson, Jenner, J. Jensen, M. Jensen Sandra Jensen, Stuart Jensen, Jen- son, J. Jepson, M. Jepson, Jobe J. Johnson, Larry Johnson, Lowell Johnson, Mark Johnson, Marlene Johnson, Mary Johnson Page 67 iddleelassmen Prepare fer Senior Life R. Johnsen, D. Jordahl, R. Jerdahl. Jordan, Jorgensen, Jeynt Kappas, Keil, King, Kline, Knutsen, Knutson Lair, Larsen, J. Larson, M. Larsen T. Larsen, C. Lee G. Lee, Legried, Lenze, Lewis, Lien Limen Lind, Lindahl, Lindcman, Leken, Leng, Luna Lunning, A. Madsen, J. Madsen, Maiden, Mariner, Mathews Page 68 7 Kefstad, Krieger, J. Krueger, T. Krueger, Kuettner, Kuiper Kurth. Kvenveld. E. Kycek, L. Ky- cek, Lagesen. Lahs Throu h Various Clubs and r anizations Mayotte. Meixell. D. Miller, K. Mil- ler. M. Miller, Moen Moller, Morreim, Morrison, Morten- son, Muilenberg, Myers Navarro, Nelsen, A. Nelson, Donald J. Nelson, Donald 0. Nelson, Donna Aul, ' M NBISOI1 .t ':': .gif 'I , ..,: a ..,,: ,.,.:.,., j QA Izillu , Jane Nelson, Janice Nelson, Jon bbni E Nelson, L. Nelson, M. Nelson, 'X R. NelSOIl Allll EW? X A LAST MINUTE SALES ATTEMPT by ROXanne Wehrhan LISTENING ATTENTIVELY, lyI0l'l'iS Haskins Observed Sara caught the eye of Neal Gender as Barbara Slife successfully Shoemake1"s use of basic speech fundamentals while pondering secured his student directory purchase. methods of improving his own deliverance. Page 69 Junior -Senior Promg wo Colorful Party x ..,, 'gzl -, W ve 111 ,,,i V A -2 llvlv ...:.:::: 5 . 1 -If -.---.v , :,, F., I . . A :.,: , ,. . V ,QM 1 if H :,, V " H" , f lql' - V--. 3, I ...' 33 -V'- I ":':"" N ..,. 4 I J ---: 3. . f if - ""' ' 'lmlvlf S. Nelson. Ted Nelson, Thomas Nel- : XW li-ff f 4' :,: . if annz 2 'bbb nnzz son. Nichols. Nielsen. Nimon ,,A. E .A znzln V x l, 111:::::: 2 aww? .... . . .,,A .A ..,. I xg 53 '::1 1 E Q zfifl '1,.I'I 1- i f ' QW l. " 2 .a sa , V E EAEA . X F ,Q Noland, Nowak, Ohm, Oliphant, Ol- M H ,-,. , ' ...... X - Sen' H' Olson PM H 1 ,, :.,: V"V' ,.,,,,.,: A Q 5, ,. , K Es 1-' ,,, MSM , Judith A. Olson. Judith A. E. Olson, N. Olson, O'Neal, J. Osmundson, L. Osmundson Ostby, Overland. Palmer. Parry Paske, Paulson Peaslce, Perkins, A. Petersen, R. Petersen. D. Peterson. J. Peterson FOLLOWING A STRENUOUS PROM-PLANNING SESSION, committee chairmen took time out for a few minutes of well- earned relaxation. The fourteen juniors were responsible for all prom arrangements. FRONT ROW: Gervaise Wilhelm. ew aw ml Gail Lageson, Steve Claybourn. SECOND ROW: Dee Ellert- son. Barbara Hegland. Carolyn Farry, Mary Gilbertson, Jane Nelson. THIRD ROW: Dave Jordahl, Margit Larsen, Mike Morrison, Lois Hassberg. Cindy Bothof, Bob Demo. Page 70 Conventions Are Hi hlight of Junior Year K. Peterson, S. Peterson. T. Peterson Pierce. Ponto, Posthumus Pownell, Reese, Reichl, Reinke, Rhi- ger, Rice Roelofs, Ruerup, G. Rupp, W. Rupp, Ruslcy, Rye Satre, Schlehr, Schnebly, Scholl, Schulte, Schumacher Schwen, Seeger, Selle, Shea, Shoe- maker, Sipple ELECTION TIME INDECISION dehnitely expressed itself on Roger Petersenls face as he attempted to make a choice between the Cherry and the Blue parties. Skaar, Slife, H. Smeby. K. Smeby Smith, Sorby, A. Sorenson, T. Sorenson nee . e "-':':': ':': ff : 2. , ,if V - sese. ---.: , ,...:.. .,,,v VK , . 'Q .. V4 ,,.. I f 'Q . ,,,.. "s""' '1'-- V . ........ 1 ef? . f ,,,,, Q. .. vvv:E 7, ' V ,-- Law? Q 2 , l s e E ' .2253 ,,,. L :..4 J. V! .., Q in zzz W 3 IV 2 Page 71 Kiwanis Representatives Relate Happenings ' ' """ ' ' X , .,..:. A QU' .,., A 7 A . gi ' aate' -A,, 22- T it ,:,,:,, ,, ' " ,.,1 , 1:1l'- .. , :11 -:gi ,,'f -:,,, . " ' 2'f -i"1 '- "f' 5 ,zzz Q o i A. Spellz, R. Speltz, Stadheim, Stoa. H -:::::.s allzzi zzzz :il A.:::::::V. 4 1,, AAA: ..1.V...:: G .:,.,,,,1. x W 3 V. ...--: .:, ,lla .Ap ZZA a Stolze- stuns ":::" 222 ::::: s F .... 5 ::Ea5aE: E 5 W 2 ii - ,.:.:.- 3 :vv :lu :::,..... -2 :::: E ::,: I - .,.,..., i - I '... -" H ' W '-f: ffffft ::' ':':" - .-.: : 4 4:12:55 " --'-:: wi Q 1-1 F - 'M Q 'zvli - A VVA: . -"' 'iiii K 1-: ::- "": zzz . if iza '--- ,,.:: E Q 7 :zz :., A ----:-:-::::-V--v 1.5! ,,,, 3 -.,.: 3 .E .,.. ,::,,,,,,.. . ::, ::: E . ,....... ::- ,X ::: .:.,, WM - x , s '::" .,s. 5 :-. ,... ..,.. is llv -", my x"'sav 'W' 0 as ,, .x ,,:5 a ::'j":':f :., ' ,,,,.. Q H " ..,, , Navi' X .zaa .-- E -' nlpnnzzlnp ' ulluu 'Q as 1 I V H : St0ut, Stowell, Studer, Styve, Swan- 5 nni, ii . ':. E izzll ,:,V2 1 L A :IV V A ' ..:,, son, Tennis - 'zzzzzz' -::-.. p---, 1 . , :'i'.,,.: 5 -- ,.1- :'iQ A ' :1::1V'V' ' '-f2f---' ' f ,.,.,.,.. . :,,Q :iiEiQ1:,fV ff 9 :-- ,, '2--f ff 5, 5 M A X 5 ""f 2 ,:,. I .. 'ffl-' sf s a :-' W-N535 . ' it T ' ' ' www ' . . h ,....,.., -1:2 :IQ W, is X . Y qg lie ,E 4 , E. Thompson, G. Thompson, T. Thompson, Tonga, Tonheim, Trejo Tuite, Tulllmerg, Ugland, Undahl. Unseth. Van Beck UJOURNALISM CONVENTION, HERE WE COME!" mused junior journalists Julie Paulson and Elaine Posthumus as they anxiously awaited the Minneapolis-bound bus. H Van Proosdy, Van Riper, Van Wilgen, Vollmer Wahlstrom, Walker, Wallace, Wangen Ward, Warner, Wasmoen, Wehrhan Page 72 Impoi tant to Function of ehool etivities m y Wh Wendlelmoe. Wentzell. Weseman. ,Y X Wcsthuis, Westrum. Widger ...:..:b: ,,.,,::, ., ., W l " Wilhelm, Wilke, Wilkenson, win, g f - Willmert. G.. Wolff 1 :---1g W - if ,, if Q, -35352 1-::aa,'..3' r .M T MS A A. Q .I '11,, , ---:-- 4 f , .QQ , ., , AAAAA ,J i Z .::, . ' ' ','- I it K P ' ' 3- 1 A2-' WW :,:. V ..,:,, :,,: X ., nbun I :':.:: E 41" I Wolff Wolgamot Wught XHVICI Q any - .:,:, E aazzlll 1.- Z .alzi - it 5 .- -- Q, 2, W' Q in son, Lowell Berg, Emery Bowman, Robert Bowman, Harold Brandt, Bruce Chrz, Sharon Fredrickson, Leigh Groetzinger, Dennis Hansen, Judith E. Hansen, Kent Hershey, Fred Kycek, Lawrence Larson, Jolm Morgan, William Myers, Conrad Nelson, John Olson, Steven Palmer, Richard Radke, Ronald Sanvik, Raymond Sorenson, James Stephenson, Thomas Suthers, Roger Tennyson. Warren Ulrich. NOT PICTURED: Ronald Ackland, Raymond Ander- hcrg, Margit Larson, Elaine Posthumus, Julie Paulson, Ruth Jordahl, Mary Keil, Myrna Nelson, Mary Gilbertson. THIRD ROW: Richard Oliphant, James Daleiden, Paul Wilke, Del Bosacker, William Rhiger. William Daniclsen, Michael Morrison, David Jordahl. Page 73 I lf? .As xt ,J JU? UKQJGQ! Y Q 'X ,ef VQOH fo e VQQQ 'W QW? 9 IAQ XQQVXRGJ A 5 LO 0 Q20 - ,QA QP 7 Bffb 'Xp QQEZZ X 325- +51 0 H K of N S D 9 ON DMM! Qs , by J AHDQ5 QSPQOZW JBQQJ p 6 :C UND' . XF S4 Q' :Digi ,VXXVQJ , vf LW 5 QV ' JS I 000 5 , I' L :JSA 43 F JP QQJDSS-Jn WZ. 3i5555 s3Q X N Q3 ws 5 Nw? J igisge QS? Ackland Adams Ahl Allen Alm C. Amundson S. Amundson B. Anderson K. Anderson P. Anderson S. Anderson Baas Baker Bale Barrett Barry Bates Bauman Bendixen Bennett Black Boer Bohland Boone Bothof Boyum Braaten Brabec Brandt Broitzman Brooke R. Brown S. Brown I Page 76 ophomores Explore With mixed feelings of excitement and bewilder- ment, the new Sophomore Class took its Hrst step in the final phase of their school life. Highlighting this banner year were the election of class officers and the Sophomore Party. Elected officers were President Larry Fredrickson, Vice President David Boyum, Secretary Cheryl Lutner and Treasurer Barbara Gurwell. All strove for cooperation. The Sophomore Party, held April 22 in the gym, featured music by the swing band and entertainment under the supervision of Vice President David Boyum, who was master of ceremonies. Active sophomores busied themselves with various clubs and projects. Homecoming and Tigers' Roar, were perhaps, the most meaningful. Working diligently on Homecoming floats, they strove to achieve highest standards and to do their part in making this a banner year. Since this was their first year of participation in the "Roar," the sophomores brought out their best in the acts they presented. Butters Calvin Carson Caya D. Christenson K. Christenson P. Christensen R. Christenson Clifford Clikeman B. Collins G. Collins Coonradt Counters Cutts Dagner Dahle DeBoer Vistas of Education "BEING PRESIDENT IS A STRENUOUS JOB!" claimed Larry Fredrickson as he attempted to explain his ungentlemanly man- ners to other sophomore class oHicers Cheryl Lutner, secretaryg David Boyum, vice-presidentg and Barb Gurwell, treasurer. DeHaan DeNeui Dingemans Dixon Donovan Doyscher Draayer Dusek Eckhart Eisenbise Ellingson Elvebak Evans Evenson Fab ry Fahley Fredrickson Freeman N I 1 Fretheim Gappa Gavere Gehrig Gendler Gilbertson Gill Gnillke Goldberg Goldman Goodmanson Goskeson Grasdahlen Greenwood Gregerson Groten Gudmonson Hall Halvorson G. Hansen K. Hansen R. Hansen B. Hanson D. Hanson J. Hanson L. Hanson N. Hanson P. Hanson V. Hanson Haried Harms Harris Hathaway Page 77 aluable Courses Aequaint nderelassmen Heather Hebel F. Heilman T. Heilman D. Hendrickson F. Hendrickson L. Hendrickson Hershey Higgins Hillman Hillstrom Hoelscher Hoium Holton Hoyne Hoyt Humphrey Hurst PLAGUED BY LAST-MINUTE JITTERS during Tigers' Roar try-outs, Judith Sackett was urged by companions Barbara Pratt and Karen Peters to "go on in and get it over with." Ingehritson K. Iverson Sandra Iverson Sharon Iverson G. Jacobsen J. Jacobsen R. Jacobsen Jacobson Jahns J akobson Jenner Alva Jensen Ann Dee Jensen Bette Jensen Bonnie Jensen D. Jensen G. Jensen Jay Jensen THIS WAY OR THAT WAY? New this year to the senior high halls, Chuck Coonradt and Maridee Alm engaged in a tug-o-war dispute over the route to their next class. Page 78 ith arious Aspects of Senior High Life John Jensen Marilyn Jensen Kaasa , . Kappas Mai y Lou Jensen Karlberg N. Jensen K d W. Jensen emle y 1 Jenson Benn? ly King Jepson , Johannsen Kirk , , Cherie Ann Klsslllgel' Johnson Klttleson Cheryl A. Johnson KleiUP3Sf9 D. Johnson Klukow G. Johnson Knauer W Knudtson Jerry Johnson Krause Judith Johnson Ladlie K. Johnson Larson T. Johnson Legeau Johnston Lee Jorgenson REAPING THE FRUITS of art class training, Elizabeth Peter- CAREFULLY CONSTRUCTING his wood shop project, John son demonstrated her skill in chalk drawing. Zoller made good use of the shop's facilities. xg? vw L Wax, S ., M-s,.'e" s-sri'm Page 79 Banquet And Entertainment Cause Spirits Legreid Leschefskc Levad Levens Lindahl Linde Lorenzen Ludwig Lutner McCormack McGill McKey McMullen Maas A. Meyer C. Meyer Michaelis Mickelson Mills Minear Moden Moe Moffit Montague Mortenson Mosher Mullcnburg Munson Murphy B. Nelson Page 80 SPARKLING WITH ANTICIPATION of the Sophomore Party, Annette Humphrey and Kitty Taylor devoted their energy to constructing posters for the annual event. ii',i 1 f l 1t,,i i ".i:' i ":' T pqzzzz ...:.... -.,, ,aae -2 --er ::" t" l"'l" C- Nelson , " R- NGISOH ,vil tztdtt 2 l 2 Q W ili ' Alll ..,,-,, W .... iiililliil Niebuhl. 11:1"1 " ' I -:-..t Noland s rr Zae 'V ,:,- ..., , ,- 'I E. ., 1' 'if ' '- -I ..:v:v :', -:sas :-., V: ::: g V, - Q - :"" As 1 ,,.i.., wig 0'By1'Y1C 1 - 5 , f :::::': vvv-'v' I " ff ::: 2 , 0 ' zlb zau .,.. gl on :li " X' jf .. LEE 5 ' E AC lalllll 2 zzzz E , .I .. ..: .,.,,,,,........ Z , . K .vvvvv,vvvvv , Q W. .,.,.d.,.,. M if .d H Q eddri .s as S H uuunlniiiiii Q X 0,Leal'y f d a ad e a 4 Gs 'VV' ".-: s ::.,. : Ipv A A.: -'-.,vv,: E - t zz., ""'- 3 '.,. . zzz. 1 1 r i"' t""' t't': i 'S 'Q' ,::::: 3 S. Olsen X """"' Q M ""' S " David H- 015011 .-:-: :i' ' 'kk i .,.,. :':'-' LESLIE . f e David Olson z ":""' 5 ""' A 'i"i1 I -.,, '34 ,,:1d , rg-mg, Q , ., i ':"' .,.' 5 , :" ' , . .,.:.,...,..1,,,, .'.- I J iaai r'y Q 'r:'pr': iiii e iya,s Q J- Olson W '53 :-. -":: ' QI'-f L- Olson "" ',1a W, 0'Ne21 1 "l:'- . , "'1v To Soar mong Sophomore Part I Prihoda D. Rasmussen ,X , , Plltt 4: A k My .gf . 0 L. Rasmussen Ravenhorst Reese Reincke Rietsema Riley X j 5 Coors ::: A .gg yy... 'Y 1 sf W if ix nf .. ":' A SMOKE SCREEN POSED A PROBLEM for Wayne Morten- Roberts .,:.. . ....,, ------1-'-1-1 2 1 ',.,. sen as he lent his labors to the Sophomore Party preparations. Rollins H :"" 3 . Roorda ulzu if A --:.,:: zzr' 'W ., fi "-. :': sy H, sig, :-' H zzz :...' 5 X ' 3 ' i 0'R0urke ":" RIVV '--.. s "::'::':' i . PaC2k0wSki ... -:2-2 W 'rii .. A r:':- ' , . ,':- --a-1 r- . VVi,, .Q R ,,.. .. Palmer A .iw ' uquuvv. " Oscoe 1 I 2-' . 1 if M I. . V .,,,, , gg Russel , . Aw I A . V .s ':""'::::':':' 1 :"::': ,,,--' W Ruth 'f 'd -1:-- ' I ' . in aii N h A :lv . el Ol A:'::: if '31 Eagle if ,., L :.,. . ..,,,:,, 3 V .bm.., :l.: qlvvl 5 in . ""' -.. qlzzz Vpb: w a ' ......, ....f . . A ---' afuawvw v A ,Jw 577. 4, Pcik .,:u.. r . . :.a:. rz, . a ..a-Q -- e -:1:- Perrin in zzzz if "'.i I ,.,,,, . ...Q .... I ,V .,....... i ..: Sackett J p,,,. Q P95011 zvz t. Q Satre . -t ...... ' :" PW "" .... E Sfhefmcl' 'A W , 1 ,N "': ii' A 'X "11::: E D 'V" I no i n --':E . . , .1 , gs . .... """"""': E '-'-:: 2 ' "i. QI: ' j '::::':' E ..,... t Q. M ,, . .,... . .. ,. X A, aea- 2 o - Peters H ll: ."" . 2. -...: .EH . :-lll: Ez- ., VV Schcw C. Peterson S . . Sdilede E. Peterson l" ::"' Sfhmidl H. Peterson V, . A ":':E Schneider J. Peterson zzzi 2' .V A .,,: Q .Egg Schggn K. P0tCl'SOIl ::: .., S S --.- ' fi. ..,... .,. Q . Schroeder op,,,,.... I LEX -:,. I "'1:', .l-- J -. .. 'lliiii -. R. Peterson S ' Z in Schumacher S. Peterson 'H U ""' ::1" 1 Seberson i Plckavance ' jj.. ig? 52. V 5 Seedorf ' ::.. 6 52' 'gist ..A'.:'.. ---' M U! ".. 1 ' , Allul EE as Gif .. 5 Paul Pierce ell? v,., ...." f :EI-: V ., A A-I ' scifcrt Perry Pierce ..,, ..... . . .5 alfa' ..: I! ..., Q ...,.. Sether Poole izzr f -::'-- 4 I l f' 1, 5 Sherman A ... ".. fl V . J ,. ' ':::' E :" 'f' V' .. -. 12 .. is A2 Page 81 2 . I ff ,Vx To Sophomores, Creativeness and mbition Sweet I Sigurdson Syverson , Sipple Skelton Taylor Skogheim Tesch J. Smeby Thistad K. Smeby A. Thompson S. Smith C. Thompson J. Thompson J. Sorenson P' Thompson M. Sorenson Sprankle Robert Thompson Springer Roger Thompson Spun- Ronald Thompson VV. Thompson Stauch Todd Steil T010 Steinke Tostenson Stencel Trae S103 Tuftc Summers FERVENTLY COLLECTING DATA Ronnie Tostenson appears to be weighed down by both the books and the assignment. Page 82 ark the Makings of Their Banner Year Tweeten Ulrich Urschitz Vandenheuvel VanderSyde VanRavenhorst Vig Voldahl Waalken Wacholz Waller Waltz Wambach D. Wangen G. Wangcn Wangsness Warren Waterman , , 5 gg 5:5 F Jerry Wayne ::.,, 'WWZ June wayllc AZZA , ,. k i! EEE: 1.3 zlll ax I. ,.,,.,. 3 .. Martha Wayne Allzv V,:,,, l ' " f '::""" J -W ' .rrr Mary Wayne -. J, ' ,,::b W ' 2 C. Wedge , I 3 V I .,.,. X R- wcflge fi , 5 :I :lv ""', Jai-51, fx gi W '-r:' at N AQ.., 0, 3 Q V :easier ,.... . Weitzel ,,.,.,. 1 .,,, ,.,,,:, ' ' -"' ' , 'g ..., ..:,:: 1 ,,, , Wendelboe 2 , I M ' gf- aa. ' r ' " Werner J WQ15 M Q Z . .,,v, I n , ' 6 , fi , A Willaby Wilson Wolff M sl ,,,,,, ' Q "" I. Zamora M. Zamora Zimney Zoller Gurwell NOT PICTURED: Raymond Brown, Ray Bryan, Wesley Card, Milton Christensen, Carol Ekstrum. John Flann. Clair Flatcn, Larry Hanson, David Jensen, James Johnson, Ardith Kamen- baeh, Michael McCarty, Lucille Nellis, Myron Nelson, Jerry Peterson, Walter Ress, Darryl Slinde, Marion Smith. Barbara Vandenhul. "IT LOOKS SO REAL," observed Kristin Sether as she exam- ined a furry denizen of the biology room menagerie. Page 83 W 3: f 9' ORGANIZATIONS E HEADING THE COUNCIL were the executive omcers Carol Rasmussen, treasurer: Evelyn Sanders, secretaryg David Rey- nen, vice presidentg and Stephen Schwartz, president. WHO GETS AN OSCAR FOR THIS MONTH seemed to be the problem facing Mary Ellen Blunt, Bob Kennedy, Pat Gendler, Rog Christianson, Jerry Draayer and Kay Wichmann. CHECKING TO SEE which date were Tim Bothof, Mary Gilbertson, Dave Palmer, Dave Skogheim, Mike Knutsen and Kay Wichmann, assembly committee members. Council Renders Aid SELECTING TOPICS FOR PROGRAMS was the duty of Steve Schwartz, Cindy Bothof, Linda Ille, Mary Gilbert- son, Dave Palmer, Margit Larson and Barb Hegland members of the youth forum of the air committee. HHOW DOES THIS SIGN LOOK?" asked Cindy Bothof of Jim Jolmson, Jeff Brooke, Bill Jenner and Phil LeBeau. 352752, 'Q M fir Ke tives PREPARING FOR A DANCE by filling the Student Council pop machine were Ed Dusek. Mary Blunt, Mike Morrison, Carol Lee, Dave Donovan, Norlene Kaasa and Larry Van Ryswyk. "I WONDER WHO THE WINNER WILL BE?" Judith Kennelly, Linda Ille, Larry Fredrickson, Bill Mucsing and Gary Van Baak pondered while Sue Shea counted votes. In Building Student Body's Character Acting as a form of democratic government, the 1959-1960 Student Council, under the advisership of Mr. William A. Standly, attempted to solve student problems and plan school projects. Meetings were held alternately with the Cabinet, a group composed of the executive officers and committee chairmen. Homecoming, the Council's first major project, aided the student body in revealing school spirit. HWin- hawks, Won'tl" was the selected slogan. For the first time the Have-a-Heart Dance was sponsored by the Student Council, all proceeds were given to charity. A Sadie Hawkins, Day and TWIRP Week were guided through various committees. 4'Dolls! Dolls! Dollsln, the fifteenth annual Tiger's Roar production, was successfully presented to atten- tive audiences, January 29, 30 and February 1, Pro- ceeds were given the American Field Service. "THESE ARE OUR NEW SMOKE SCREENS," explained Frank Holway to Maridee Alm, Jack Iverson, Ron Tostenson, Bob Kennedy and Silvia Sallenave, fellow members of his serving on the Traffic-Safety Committee. CHECKING THE RULES of parliamentary procedure were Jerry Draayer, Clint Sanborn, Paul Goodmanson, Dave Olson and Pat Gendler, Parliamentarian Committee members. THE NEW PAPER VENDING MACHINE was tried by lVIargit Larson, Dick Oliphant, Carol Rasmussen and Marilyn Ferring. FRONT ROW: Henderson, Farry, Ille, Lindahl, Helgeson, Yost, J. Paulson, Cairns, D. Jenson, J. Nelson, Wehrhan. SECOND ROW: Morreim, Unseth, Gilbertson, Bothof, Wilhelm, Tufte, Andrews, Blizard, Judith Olson, Myers, Ebsen, Hassberg. THIRD ROW: Lageson, A. Peterson, Dilling, Peterson, Gulbrandson, Fredrickson, C. Rasmussen, Allen, Foley, Robbins, Posthumus, Gendler, Shea. FOURTH ROW: Kurth, Nichols, Wahlstrom, Ellertson, Reincke, Madsen, Casey, K. Peterson, Schneider, Greeney, Schumacher, Stolze, Sherman. FIFTH ROTW: Jensen, Haugen, Miller. Peterson, Gunderson, Person, J. Larson, David- son, D. Rasmussen. Karlberg, Johnson. SIXTH ROW: Hill- slrom, Dusek, Tennis, Pierce. Seeger, Ostby, R. Nelson. Clay- bourn, Anderson, Reiger, T. Larson, T. Nelson, Walker. Members of Chorus Stage Christmas PREPARING FOR THE ANNUAL CONCERT by arranging robes were Sharon Kurth, Joan Schneider and Peggy Cairns. Continuously striving for a perfect blend of both music and co-operation, the high school "A" chorus was reorganized this year into a single unit. Sparkling with enthusiasm and ability, the 135 choristers, under the direction of Mr. Robert L. Myers, successfully Worked to compensate in quality for what they lacked in number in comparison with previous years. During the first of many scheduled appearances, chorus members were provided with a thrilling exper- ience When, in revelation of their queen, anxious voices rose with the curtain in the singing of t'La Czarinefl The group also lent a note of spiritual serenity to the annual school Thanksgiving convocation. Revelry and reverence marked the Yuletide season as the chorus presented both of these aspects in the candlelight Christmas concert. The true holiday spirit was reflected in the songs rendered by the group as it performed for the students at the Christmas assembly and for the Service Club banquet. Page 88 FRONT ROW: K. Olson, Roorda, Johnston, Qualley, Keil, Nielsen, Ives, Nesje, Slife, Hahlen, Sallenave. SECOND ROW: Lee, Judith A. Olson, Mayotte. Underdalxl, Boyd, Hansen, Rice, Rusley, K. J. Nelson, Bowen, Michaelis. THIRD ROW: De Vries, Krueger, K. M. Nelson, Vig, Eckhoff, Meixel. Bolinger, Dudley, Peterson, Wichmann, Emstad, Kuiper, Hanson. FOURTH ROW: S. Larso11. M. Larson, Eastvold, Holway, Carl- and Spring Programs Christmas festivities behind, but not forgotten, the chorus, full of "upward and onwardl, enthusiasm, heralded the new year through preparation for spring appearances. The introduction of new numbers pre- sented a musical challenge to each singer. Flinging wide its gates, the city of Rochester greeted the chorus as it arrived to participate in the Big Nine Music Festival. Climaxing the day's series of concert presentations was an inspiring massed chorus in which the voices of Albert Lea songsters were mingled midst those of other Big Nine school singers. Amply rewarding for both the participants and the audience was the colorful Spring concert where equal- ly colorful voices appropriately blossomed at their fullest in songs of a lighter vein. Ascending the risers at commencement exercises, seniors were swept by a wave of reminiseence as they made their final appearance as "A" chorus members. Page 89 son, Burnett, Wayne, Hegland, Gavle, A. Nelson, Reichl, Krieger, Francis, Van Riper. FIFTH ROW: Haskins, Counters, Roelofs, Groos, Christensen, D. Peterson, Glenn, Paske, Ogren, Thomp- son, Hoelscher, Ackland. SIXTH ROW: Jacobsen. Severson. Summers, Coonradt. Jenson, G. Hanson, Mortensen, Dugstad, Boyum, Pensen. O'Neil. Kittleson, J. Jacobsen. "SILENT NIGHT, HOLY NIGHT," was the refrain sung by Beverly Burnett, Lowell Gunderson, Donna Mayotte, Danny Pierce, Ruth Ann Emstad, James Groos, David Peterson and Julie Casey as they carol in the halls. S . Singing up a storm in 224 junior high, the MB" chorus, under the direction of Mr. Robert Myers, prac- ticed three days every week to perfect numbers. Christmas and springtime found them the busiest working in a Crescendo here and remembering not to breathe there. The rest of the year the chorus, com- posed of sophomore girls, was learning new songs and parts and learning to blend their voices together, Madrigal, a group of 40 voices, practiced every Friday after school and every Tuesday at 7 p.m. Songs such as 'LThe Nutcracker Suitew, "Adoramus Ten, HJingle Bellsn and HO Holy Night" were sung during Christmas. The singers performed at churches, P.T.A. meetings, lodges and over KMMT and KGLO television. Before the snow melted, a toboggan party was held at the Country Club for Madrigals and guests. Spring found the Madrigals singing different songs. Lighter and more jovial songs were sung for the annual concert and at the Big Nine Music Festival. A steak fry at Edgewater Park brought a "better than best" year to an end for the Madrigals. HAVING FUN BEFORE A NIGHTLY PRACTICE were some of the Madrigal singers, Danny Pierce, Judy Olson, Karen Johnston and Rod Seeger, who were having a little snow play. Chorus Creates usie, Song, Enjoyment FRONT ROW: Butters, J. Olson, Rutherford, P. Peterson, B. heim, Calvin, Doyseher, Moflit, S. Olsen. FOURTH ROW: Hanson, P. Thompson, Draayer. SECOND ROW: S. Jacobson, Maas, Bohland, Sweet, V. Hanson, Kaasa, Kissinger, J. Jacobson, Boone, M. Jensen, Hershey, S. Peterson, Rietsema, Wangsness, Reincke, Taylor. FIFTH ROW: Sether, Levad, Christensen, Collins. THIRD ROW: Sprankle, DeNeui, Hendrickson, Skog- Dixon, Humphrey, Goodmanson, C. Meyer, Zimney. FRONT ROW: Myers, J. Olson, Eckhoif, Slife, Krueger, Nesje, D. Jenson, Vig, Greeney, Schneider, Kurth, Hanson, Michaelis. SECOND ROW: Rusley, Gilberlson, DeVries, Henderson, Ives, Johnston, K. Olson, Cairns, Sherman, Nielsen, Reichl, Robbins, Carlson, Nichols. THIRD ROW: Ackland, G. Jensen, Haugen, Miller, Erlandson, Person, Rhiger, J. Larson, Davidson, Chris- tianson, Peterson, Paske. FOURTH ROW: Seeger, Pierce, Ostby, Gunderson, T. Larson, Walker, Nelson, Anderson, Roelofs, Groos. adrigal Relives Past Year's Experiences FRONT ROW: Smith, Jepson, Leschefske, Kirk, A. Thomp- son, Aim, Kappas. SECOND ROW: Trae, Tolo, Vig, C. John- son, B. Jensen, J. Thompson, Mosher, B. Larson. THIRD ROW: Gurwell, Sipple, Lorenzen, Ness, Indrelie, Ludwig, Legreid, Hareid, Eisenbise. FOURTH ROW: Gregerson, Peters, Wacholz, A. Meyer, Kanzenback, Muilenburg, R. Knudtson, Benson. FIFTH ROW: K. Hansen, B. Anderson, Vandenheuvel, Sackett, Hall, Thisted, Montague, Schneider. and for the game October 9. They could also be found FRONT ROVY: Jordahl. lngvaldson. Nielsen. Thompson. Con- son. A. Nelson. Pierce. Hill. Christiansen. L. Berg. Anderson. nors. Hendrickson. Meixall. SECOND ROYY: Taylor. Matthews. Paczkowski. llc Haad. FOURTH ROW: Syrcrson. R. Speltz. Harding. Schneider. J. Berg. B. Anclcrson. Sorenson. B. Nel- Hanson. llortenson. Mr. linnnons. Columbus. Slinde. lluerup. son. Person. THIRD ROVV: Hegland. Ellingson. Smith. Jurgen- A. Speltl, Erickson. igh ehool Band Completes Performances A HORN SEX'l'I'I'l' was a feature of the annual band concert. BACK ROW: Morris Sorenson. Kay Hurst. Larry Bolton. FRONT ROVV: Bonnie Nelson. Donna Rusley. Steve Person. Constituting the Albert Lea High School Bands summer cativities was a Daily Festival parade and show on June 18: a parade at Mankato on July 25. when the band represented the Moose Lodge: followed by a small parade and concert of the combined District 241 bands at Spring Lake Park that night. t if 9 These occasions and regular practices. gave the band the practice that enabled them to present a rous- ing concert. on September 1, the first day of school. Throughout the duration of the year, the band was also . seen marching for the Homecoming parade October T .ff . 4. at every basketball and many football games. X ' Page 92 'xr if, 4 Q 9 5 l 2 s 3 5 f Z 5 'E Q W 'e - Jr s H' il l ii -M x 1 K 9 ilx zip, X 1 T " sy E s 1 1 K X xx '-.Ji-v FRONT ROVV: Morreim, Xavier. Moffit. Niehuhr. Rutherford. Shoemaker. SECOND ROVV: Rusley. Bolton. Hurst, Harris. Pierce. Roscoe. Gilhertson, Ackland. THIRD ROW: Gendlcr, Muesing. A. Jensen. Riley, Schwen. Willmert. Nelson. Mullen. Stephenson. Johnson. Hanson. FOURTH ROVV: Thompson. Hatch. Tostrud. Kennelly, Humphrey. Ille, Goldman. Olson. B. Jenson, VVedge, Hoverson. Waterman. DeNeui. Concerts, Assemblies and thletie Events Introducing their new risers, the band presented an assembly to the student body Jaunary 13. and on April 27 this group gave their annual Spring Band Concert to the public. Nlay ti found this group of musicians traveling to Rochester where they took part in the Big Nine Music Festival. While there, za selected few were chosen to play in the All-conference Band. Under the direction of Mr. Lawrence J. Emmons. and ofneers. Paul Hill. president: David Jordahl. vice- president: Sara Shoemaker. seeretaryg and And-'es' Rutherford. librarian: the 80 members of this hand enjoyed another fruitful music year. -w Page 9.1 PERCUSSION VVAS ONE MAIN PART OF A BAND as shown by Nancy Erickson. Mary Gillxertson. Rita Wveilgc. Rug Thomp- son and Ken Hatch who were members of the sen'or hand. Swin 1 A AQ SVVING OUT WVAS THE CRY of the swing hand combo com- posed of Dennis Edwin, Keith Stiles and Tom Wangen. "DO YOU SUPPOSE he is one of us?" asked Lowell Syverson. Arthur Speltz and David .Iordahl about Wayne Mortensen. Band Displays Versatilit at School By combining their talents, time and efforts. the members of the Albert Lea Swing Band concluded their fifteenth year in existence by making various appearances as the students' dance band. Under the able advisery of Mr. Lawrence J. Em- mons. senior high band director, these thirteen boys could be found on Tuesday nights in practice sessions perfecting some of their songs and preparing for a special coming event at the high school. Among some of these events were the Have A Heart and Tiger Dances. Dressed as Robin Hoods, these boys proved their versatility by playing in the Tigers' Roar. The members of the Student Council and the participants of the Roar also were able to hear and dance to the music of this midget student band at the annual cast party. held January 30. Paul Hill was the student leader of this organiza- tion. A few of the duties for which he was responsible were to confirm appointments for appearances, to arrange practice sessions and to select the music which was to be played at all of their coming engagements. GATHERED ABOUT THE PIANO played by Brian Xavier were Paul llill, Lowell Berg. Hog Christianson ready for a time up. Page 94 R :sang 'reaag anees, Tigeris Roar and Jam Sessions A few of the songs frequently heard played by the band were "Stomping at Savoyf' "Little Brown Jugf' "Intermission Riff" and "Jersey Bounce." Contrary to the past years, when the band boys wore uniform yellow jackets or maroon coats, the mem- bers of this band all wore white shirts with black pants and turtle-neck sweaters as modern dress. This band was the same in size as last year's band, and it consisted of seven new members and six old "veterans.', not counting the three-piece combo that was seen quite often with the band. Playing the saxophones were sophomore Thomas Countersg junior David Jordahl, on alto saxesg soph- omore Lowell Syverson, junior Arthur Speltz, on tenor saxesg sophomore Wayne Mortensen, on the baritone sax and Brian Xavier played the piano. Steven Fredrickson, John Schwen and Orlo Will- mert, juniors, played trombonesg Lowell Berg, Roger Christiansen, juniors, and Paul Hill, senior, played trumpets and Kenneth Hatch played the drums. SEVERAL COUPLES DANCED to the music of the swing band at the Twirp VVeek dance while others seemed quite engaged in conversation with their trapped victims. -,champ ,N A BLARE OF TROMBONES came from the band room as Steve Fredrickson. Orlo Willmert and Jolm Schwen began practice. "YM DEAD". said Jeff Larson and Joan Schneider as they tried to relax after a night of strenuous dancing. f Page 95 USORTING MUSIC FOLDERS isn't always fun." said Judith Tufle and Sharon Blizard. both members of the Senior High Sclmul orclleslru. FRONT ROW: Minear. Tuite, Blizard. SECOND ROVV: Bartell Ilareid, Shoemaker. Rulherfnrd. THIRD ROW: Anderson Orchestra Portrays "LETS START TUNING UP," remarked Andrea Rutherford. Mary Gilhertsun and Sara Shoemaker to Mary Niebuhr. EAM Rasmussen, Alm, Jordahl. Ingvaldson. Hanson. FOURTH ROW: Mr. Mclhy. Moffit. Wedge, Hatch. Niehuhr. uality, Harmon , Beauty in Performances Under the leadership of a new director, Mr. Winton Melby, the senior high orchestra completed another year of successful performances to both the members of the student body and the public. Members practiced diligently outside of school and during the first hour of school every day to maintain the orchestra's high musical standards. Adding the instrumental touch, the orchestra per- formed appropriate numbers before the annual Christ- mas choral concerts, both school and public. On February 24, the orchestra presented a concert for the public in the high school auditorium. Adding to the beauty and sophistication of the performance was the formal dress of the performers. Only through hard Work and diligent practice could a concert like that be given, and a large, gracious audi- ence was the orchestra's ample reward. The annual Big Nine Music Festival in May at Rochester, Minnesota, provided a chance for the orchestra to compare themselves with those of other high school orchestras in the surrounding area. FRONT ROW: Jenner, Lutner, Pratt. SECOND ROW: Gil- 5 2 s ws? i MOH THIS PRACTICING? exclaimed Cheryl Lutner to herself as she worked diligently for the coming orchestra concert. Christianson, Person. Bolton, Hurst. FOURTH ROW: L. Nel- bertson, Ackland, Harris, Tufte. THIRD ROW: A. Nelson, Hill, son, Schwen, Columbus, Ekstrum, Petersen. R FRONT ROW: Shoemaker, Johnson, Blunt, Kennelly, Schneid- er, Rasmussen. Nelson, Johnsrud, Hansen. SECOND ROW Ponto, Helling, Robbins, Henderson. Lyon, Jenner, Eckhoff, Vig. Stoa, Mortenson. THIRD ROW: Ives, Lewis, Perrin, Dahlen, Thompson, Larson, Moore. Pentz, Sherman. French lub Initiates All New Members in if , Page 98 Familiar tunes with foreign lyrics filled the rooms of Albert Lea High School as French Club members Christmas caroled in the school halls. The French Club was composed of all members in each of the two French I and French II classes. Activ- ities were carried out during regular class periods. Reading condensed versions of French literary classics increased understanding of the language and French sentence structure. Among stories read were "The Count of Monte Cristo" and MThe Black Tulip." A tape recorder aided students in perfecting pro- nunciation of memorized poems. Original dialogues, depicting everyday situations, were written and pre- sented to the class by groups of students. Songs were learned by listening to French record- ings and by following lyric sheets. French fables were learned, humorous antecdotes were written. Miss Ruth Bauer acquainted her students with the landmarks of Paris and the customs of the French. A float was entered in the Homecoming parade by French Club members, and they co-sponsored a dance, HSnowball Bounce," with the Spanish Club in Decem- ber. DREAMING OF A TRIP TO PARIS were the French Club officers. Janice Henderson, Mary Blunt and Sara Shoemaker. "I'LL TAKE YOUR ORDER," said Jim Thompson to members Carol Lee and Linda Ille as they admired the new pins. ,,i FRONT ROW: Dahle, Bjerke, Moen, Stadheim, Roorda, Hass- berg, Jacobson, Draayer, Heekes. SECOND ROW: Boyum, Nielsen, Gavle, Moflil, Levad, Wahlstrom, Olson, Kofstad, Into League Society SHOWING THE CORRECT WAY to act out a dialogue were Barb Ives, Carol Rasmussen and Connie Eckhoff. FRONT ROW: Morreim, Heckes, Lageson, Lee, Gendler, Blizard, Jensen, Boyum, Lindeman, Bothof. SECOND ROW: Styve, Nelson, Widger, Foley, Fredrickson, Larson, Slife, Gavle, Schlehr. THIRD ROW: Francis, Ellertson, Bell, Mathews, Jor- dahl, Danie-lsen, Knutson, Hanson, Hendrickson, Sether. Engbritson, Olson. THIRD ROW: Meixell, Farry, Ille, Helge- son, Yost, Evenson, Tonheim, Jordahl, Eastvold, Schnebly, Heg- land, Krieger. """-us' Page 99 FRONT ROW: Heckes, Ferring, Hyland, L. Herth, Kofstad Harris, R. Johnson, J. Olson, M. Jenson, Bothof, C. Hanson Indrelie, Lageson, Kane. SECOND ROW: Rusley, S. Herth Bell, Carlson, Grinolds, Blunt, Kennelly, S. Shea, Farry, Dilling: Thompson, Vig, Ellertson, R. Dudley, Wichmann, Goldman Mayotte. THIRD ROW: Eckhoff, C. Krieger, Wolgamot Gendler. Greeney, Kangas, Jordahl, J. Hanson, Kvale, C. King, Iverson, Butler, Thofson, Fogel, Seymour, Burnett, Osmundson. FOURTH ROW: Widger, D. Jenson, Lyon, Hirsch, Daleiden, Joynt, Bisgaard, Lehmann, Vorpahl, Vinck, Joachim, K. Olson, Cairns, Ives, S. Miller, J. Nelson. Junior Classic League Renews Cultures, Page 100 A REAL ROMAN BANQUET was displayed when all members of Latin classes and Junior Classical League joined together in the Roman style of eating and entertaining. MANNING A ROMAN WARSHIP was a big task that was handled easily by two slaves Larry Haugen and Allen Andrews. Proving over and over again the statement that Latin is not a dead language, were all members of the Junior Classical League, which Was supervised by lVlr. Jerome Narveson Latin I and Il teacher. This club, which was made up of all students who had taken Latin and were interested in Latin, had its annual JCL banquet March 29, in Bethany Hall. The meal was served in Roman style and the banquet-goers were entertained with a speaker, skits of Roman myth- ology and other skits of historic events. Some of the members attended the State JCL con- vention at Macalester College on May 7. To help raise money for this event a car wash was held. Elizabeth Nielsen, State Junior Classical League treasurer, helped to plan the program for the state convention. Also a national convention will be held in New Mexico. All through the year Roman government, laws and culture were studied and revived by JCL members. As another school year closed this club's events and activities would long be remembered. FRONT ROW: Lee. Alm. Kirk. Gilbertson. Kennelly. Goldman, son. Erlandson. Cotton. Heilman. Donovan FOURTH ROW: Johnson. Brahec, B. Larson. SECOND ROW: Bennett. Iverson. Higgins. Gregerson. Humphrey. Goodmanson. Bertelson, Clike- Kaasa. Hanson, Jenson. Kermes. Hareid. Bendixen. Hebel. man, 'I'. Larson, Durnin. Jensen. Jacobsen. Behr. Hansen. THIRD ROW: Ingvaldson. Haugen. Bale, Ahl, Johnson, Gunder- tudies Civilizations of Rome and Greece Junior Classical League, Annette Humphrey. Terry Cotton, Judith Kennelly and Richard Behr. STUDYING THE LATIN VOCABULARY were the officers of E . , if Y FRONT ROW: Russell, Satre. K. Nelson. Peaslee. Muilenburg. A. Nelson. Moe. Reineke, Sanders. Peterson. THIRD ROW: Tufte, J. Olson. Maas, Todd, Stencel. SECOND ROW: L. Pierce. Swanson. Thompson, A. Speltz, Narveson, Saekson, Ne-lson. Ness. Paulson. Schmidt. Peterson. I. Nelson. D. Nelson, Smeby, R. Speltz. Zimney. Wedge. Page 101 German Club Renews s Aequaintanee FRONT ROW: Jacobsen, Wilhelm, Wentzell, Krueger, Glenn, Wilgen, Wallace, Peterson, Niebuhr. THIRD ROW: Kycek, Demo, Hanson, Jenner, Boyer, Johnson Seifert. SECOND ROW: Daleiden, Yocom, Bisgaard, Larson, Ruerup, Palmer, Boer, Thompson, Sorensen. Seeger, Perrin, Zoller, Davidson, Hill, Van Karlberg, Hansen, Groos. DECORATION FOR THE CHRISTMAS DANCE were selected by Beverly Butters, Charlotte Skogheim, Judith Sackett and Sally Doyscher. Page 102 Newness and beginnings were keenly indicative of German Club. The club's adviser as Well as the in- structor of German was new to the Albert Lea school system. With respect to its purpose-to seek all of the students of the German language as club members- the club was highly successful and had an extremely high percentage of eligible students as members. Members and guests within the school swayed as they danced and ate refreshments at the Christmas party held in the girls, gym, under the sponsorship of the German Club. Considering the striking success of the gathering plus other factors, this Yuletide frolicking was designated to be an annual event. As suggested it may be the wish of the group to invite the school-at-large next year. For a beginning project members of the group raised funds for the purpose of purchasing CARE packages.These gift boxes are wooden crates containing articles and materials required and requested by peo- ple, especially children, throughout the whole World. The project was brought to completion in the spring when the funds gathered allowed the specified boxes to depart for Europe from the east coast. As might have been expected the CARE boxes were specifically to be sent to Germany. with Couutryls People, Customs, Lan uage In keeping with the idea of spring and the freshness of the out-of-doors, girl members conducted a bake sale of fresh homemade goods for the purpose of finan- cing the spring picnic and adding support to the membership pin drive held early in the year. The facilities of a local store provided the place from which the German Club bake sale was presented. Owing to the success of the selling of breads, cakes, cookies, rolls and pies and the student salesmanship, the spring picnic was more than adequately financed, In spite of arising late in the regular school year, interest in purchasing individual language club mem- bership pins was stirred up among German students. "LET ME HELP YOU WITH THOSE BOOKS," said Dave Palmer to the other German oflicers Mary Vig and Becky Boyer. DECORATING FOR THE CHRISTMAS DANCE were German Club members Chuck Coonradt, Pat Kappas and Barb Gurwell. FRONT ROW: Kappas, Knudtson, Mosher, Tesch, Ludwig, Legreid, Evans, Calvin, Spranklc, Seedorf, Boone, Lutner, M. Jensen, Butter. SECOND ROW: Tolo, Saekett, Barrett, Lin- dahl, Mary Wayne. Trae. Ravcnhorst. Dingemans, Martha Wayne, Anderson, Amundson. Gurwell, Skogheim, Doyscher, Vig. THIRD ROW: B. Thompson, R. Thompson. Evenson. Hillstrom, Olson, Fredrickson, McKey, Tostenson, VVedge, Le Beau, Dusck, Ogren, Noland, Kittleson, McGill. FOURTH ROW: Petersen, Grasdalen, Knaucr, Brown, Schermer, Cutts, Black, Summers, Coonradt. Munson. Boyum, J. Jensen. Olsen, Moden, Gavere. Fabry. 2 ? 55? F' pnfffi-. l g , 2 3 fa Page 103 if A ' L, FRONT ROW: Zamora. Bartell, Madson. VVolgamot, Emstad, Olson. THIRD ROW: Bye, Jorgenson, Kycek, Brooke, Morri- Ilubbard, Warren, Tostenson. Luna. SECOND ROW: Brott, son. Nelson. Schwen, Berg. Harding. Maiden. Goette, Miller, Flugum, Hagen, Nielsen, Osburn. Stoa, Eckart. Spanish lub Welcomes Exchange Student E USING THE TAPE RECORDER to correct their pronunciation . were Charlotte Hagen, Mike Morrison and Rosemary Goette. CUTTING SNOW FLAKES for the Spanish Club sponsored dance were Else Nielsen. Judy Bartell and Barb Kofstad. Spanish speaking students of Albert Lea High School found it very interesting and educational to visit with Sylvia Sallenave, the foreign exchange student from Argentina, as she compared her school and family life at home with the American way of life. Leading the classes were officers Rosemary Goette, president, Jeffrey Brooke, vice-president: Kathleen Eckart, secretaryg and Michael Morrison, treasurer. lVliss Ruth Bauer supervised all of the meetings. At the Thanksgiving program, members tried to name foods in Spanish that would make the holiday menu complete. Spanish bingo was also played. Second year club members purchased new gold pins which had the club name inscribed upon them. In trying to gain a greater knowledge of the Span- ish culture, plays were put on that were typical of South American life. Students were able to obtain material from the Spanish publication of '6Life.,' Page 104 ational Thespians Show Dramatic Talents Striving for perfection in their many activities and leaving nothing in their many duties undone, were the National Thespians, Troupe 550. The small group worked as a team to meet all of the requirements of the organization pledge and rules. This past year contained a very busy schedule which included Tigerts Roar stage production, the an- nual speech festival and the fall play. HFather Knows Best" was the play presented to the public. The Tiger's Roar stage was designed and built by the Thespians in second year speech classes. All of this Work was done under the supervision of Mr. Robert Meyers and Miss Hildred Tennihill. HFather Knows Best," a family play, was a comedy presented on February 16. The story of the Anderson family proved to be filled with exciting events, like family arguments, Bettyls boy problems, Bud and Kathy's fighting and Jim and lVIargaret's misunder- standings plus many other delightful happenings. The annual Big Nine Speech Festival was hosted by Albert Lea this year and here again it required many hours of work in preparation. THESPIAN OFFICERS-Nancy Allen, historian: Pat Gcndlcr, vice president, Nancy Lee, business manager: Steve Moore, president, and JoAnn Maas, secretary-treasurer, counted money and tickets in calculating profit from the annual play. PART OF THE THESPIANS TRAINING Came in applying make-up as Nancy Erickson, Mike Morrison. Sandy Dahl and Cai'0l Hanson have artistically done to add effect. FRONT ROW: Omundson, Sanborn, Allen, Fogel, Blunt, Dahl. SECOND ROW: Maas, Zavitz. Lee, Ives, Erickson, Simon, Shoemaker. THIRD ROW: Slife, Gendler, Jacobson, Hanson, Roorda, Roel, Grinolds. FOURTH ROW: Helling, Farry, Wehr- han, Gappa. Johnston, Pentz, Kathleen Olson, Schneider. FIFTH ROW: Mathews. Keith Olson. Stotts, Moore. Haskins, Morrison, Will. Cornick. Page 105 Hi -Teeners Celebrate FRONT ROW: Boyd, Andrews, Ferring, L. Herth, Hansen, Goldman, Schneider, Underdahl, Simon, Maas, Johnsrud, Nel- son, Kane, Omundson, Fitzgerald. SECOND ROW: Rasmus- sen, S. Herth, Gendler, Henry, Jackson, Paulson, Grinolds, Jacobsen, Allen, Robbins, Hahlen, Blunt, Carlson, Burnett, Goette, Berg, Johnson. Bushack. THIRD ROW: Erickson, Jen- Ott to a rollicking start in the fall, Hi-Teens geared many Homecoming projects as the cogs of three primary wheels rounded out the work on float prep- arations, pom-pom construction and dance decorations. A senior, junior and sophomore club member com- prised one of three spokes on each committee wheel. Primarily motivated by juniors, the float group met with undeniable success as the HVVeyre Expecting a Victory" float snatched the top award offered to organ- ization floats at the Homecoming parade. CHECKING OVER THE PLANS for a future meeting were the executive council. SEATED: Kathy Olson, Lois Hassberg, Ann Lyon, Sandy Hanson. STANDING: Ruth Ann Emstad, Judy Annual . ardi Gras sen, Wayne, Kermes, Sanders, Thompson, Vig, Shea, Jenner, Greeney, Pentz, Sherman, Ives, Stoa, Buenneke, Fogel, Eckhoff, Kennelly, Wichmann, Braaten. FOURTH ROW: Lindahl, Nesje, Qualley, Howard, Roorda, Hagen, Cairns, Gappa, Johnston, Perrin, Olson, Thomas, DeVries. Miller, Lee. Lyon, Sallenave, Henderson, DeBoer. Through pom-pom parties and the driving influence of sophomores, mounds of pom-poms were formed. The program of the January meeting held the attentive audience as Silvia Sallenave spoke. The people of the Argentine were presented first hand as she spoke in her relaxed manner of things commonplace and strikingly interesting. While the United States' style of dress is imitated the taste in preferable color combinations is more conservative. Sackett, Karen Mathews, Silvia Sallenavc, Myreen Gavle. "I WOULD LIKE TO BUY my membership card," proclaimed Patricia Kappas to Karen Meixell and Renee Johnson. 5 s E Page 106 Encourage New Tasks for Youn Women i , FRONT ROW: Kappas, Knudtson, Breck, A. Jensen, Schneider, Hendrickson, Lee, Alm, Johnson, K. Peterson, Rutherford, Maas, M. Jensen. SECOND ROW: Lutner. Ludwig, Todd, Brabec, Wilson, Barrett, Tolo, Gappa, Hanson, Kaasa, Skogheim, Gold- man, Haried, Kennelly, Kirk. THIRD ROW: Stencel, Sprankle, Excellence is the word needed to best describe the colorful photography presented in the form of slides by Ann Lyon in February. As an American Field Service student living in Germany in the summer of 1959, she found much of interest to relate to Hi-Teen'ers. West Germany leaves little to be desired after rebuilding at the end of the war. Cities such as Kassel, where Ann lived with the Kempf family, have been rebuilt to such an extent that modern housing has elim- inated the formerly common slums. FRONT ROW: Madsen, Gilbertson, Unseth, Lindeman, Lun- ning, Wentzell, Shoemaker, Indrelie, Lewis, Wilhelm, J. E. Ol- son, Schlehr. SECOND ROW: Morreim, Hyland, Hassberg, Kofstad, M. Nelson, J. A. Olson, Lageson, K. Boyer. Waklstrom. Blanchard, Lee, Tufte, Blizard, Bothof, Boyum, Myers, Selle. THIRD ROW: Enderson, Ellertson, E. Kycek, Emstad, J. Peter- son, Mortenson, Posthumus, Johnson, Reichl, Janice Nelson, Brown, S. Anderson, Amundson, Wacholz, Sackett, Taylor, Sherman, Sether, Barry, Hehel, Vig, Roorda. FOURTH ROW: E. Peterson, Roscoe, Grcgerson, Jenner, Niebuhr. Goodmanson, Collins, Zimny, Humphrey, B. Anderson, Olsen, Peters. Gurwell, Kissinger, Minear, Bendixen, Wambach. Since the last week of October had an abundance of dances, the usual Halloween Party was replaced by the Mardi Gras held on Shrove Tuesday. As a gfirst' for Hi-Teens this gathering had a flavorful touch of the annual New Orleans Mardi Gras as the girls ttried a foot' at dancing to the rhythmic South American steps. Caught by surprise by a barrage of candies, the giddy girls gathered up some seven pounds-of candy. Turkish towels, gay dresses and swirling capes were a few of the components of the costumes. Judy Hanson. FOURTH ROW: Ponto, Styve, S. Peterson, Wright, Schnelxly, Gavle, Widger, Hoium, Osmundson, Eastvold, Gilbert, Hegland, Mathews, Meixell, Carroll, Farry, Bell, Eng- britson, Loken, Reincke. FIFTH ROW: Casey, Bergo, Holway, Stolze, Joy Hanson, Ille, Slife, Jordahl, Paulson, Joan Hanson, Cornick, Wehrhan, Keil, Schulte, Jane Nelson, Butler, Lind, Yost, Zavitz, Helgeson, Larson, Krieger, L. Kycek. Page 107 FRONT ROW: Andrews, Blizard. Maas, Braaten. Johnsrud. Galbraith. SECOND ROW: Thompson, Wilkinson. Wahlstrom. Jacobsen. Madsen. Tolo. THIRD ROW: Slife. Boyer. Reichl. Moffit. Bothof. Berg. Simon. FOURTH ROW: Jenner. S. Olson. Junior Re Cross Stresses ational PACKING AMERICAN RED CROSS GIFT BOXES were Jane Nelson. Sharon Simon and Dorothy Reiehl. Collins, Johnson. Mathews. Roel. Ingvaldson. FIFTII ROW: Kvale, Seeger. Davidson. K. Olson. O. Nelson, J. Nelson, Rollins. Schwartz. Help Helping and serving others. both at home and abroad, were two of the commendable goals of the American Junior Red Cross this year. A membership drive elimaxed by a Red Cross spon- sored dance helped them to attain these goals and to provide money to be used for charitable purposes. The counselors that provided helpful guidance were Mr. Warner Nettleton and Miss Ruth Woods. Service projects ranged from hospital favors at Christmas to freshly baked cookies for people in rest homes. Along with the cookies the Red Cross members make 'Lhandy boxesn out of old cigar boxes. Other equally important projects were a paper drive, a clothing drive and extra help at the blood- mobile. Members of the Junior Red Cross helped at the bloodmobile by typing, labeling bottles and helping the donors to be comfortable while Waiting. Officers elected at the beginning of the year by the representatives chosen in the homerooms were pres- ident, Sharon Simong vice-president, Dorothy Reichlg and secretary-treasurer. Jane Nelson. MAKING CHRISTMAS TREE DECORATIONS for the hospital were Rosann Jacobsen. Liz Nielsen and Jane Nelson. Page 108 Scientific Methods Improve Club Activit Albert Lea Science Club membership rocketed when a new membership plan, eliminating project requirements, was introduced by the new advisers, Mr. Robert G. Anderson and Mr. Melvin Salmela. Objective of the organization was to stimulate interest in scientific fields and to give those students interested in science a wider opportunity to devolop hobbies and projects than otherwise possible. To satisfy their scientific curiosity, members of the Science Club devoted February 12, a school holiday, to visiting Rochester, Minnesota. IBM, Rochester Dairy, KROC-TV and the airport were visited. This field trip was the most extensive of excursions in which students participated. Educational programs probed phases of biology, physics and chemistry. Several students took projects to the regional Science Fair at Rochester, although having a project was not mandatory under the membership clause. Movies circulated by Bell Telephone Laboratories were shown at regular Thursday meetings and demon- strations were presented by the club members. SCIENCE CLUB OFFICERS, Bob Hovey, Terry Katzung, Betty T010 and Larry Bolton, explained the microscope. EXPLANATIONS OF SEEN COLORS were given by Laura Lewis to Judy Ness, Bernard Herman and Joe Trejo. FRONT ROW: Fluguin, Heilman, Ness, Tolo, Riley, Nelson. horst Wamback M H Wayne THIRD ROW Tiejo Human SECOND ROW: Calvin, Olson, M. E. Wayne. Lewis, Raven- Jownt Hovey Katrung Bolton FRONT ROW: B. Bartell, J. Bartell, Broitzman. Braaten. SECOND ROW: Andrews, Tonga, Mayotte, Rice. THIRD ROW: Kermes. Sanders. Gappa. Smeby. Eckart. lub Ushers In A Well Planned Season CHECKING TO SEE if uniforms were in order were Evelyn Sanders, Maralyn Andrews. Violet Kermes and Connie Gappa. ,Q F J .H ,.,::-., A, A y S 5 C i e if Page 110 A friendly greeting and worthwhile assistance dur- ing an evening of various school sponsored entertain- ment was the service that the Ushers' Club provided for the school during the busy school year schedule. Miss Olive Johnson, biology instructor, became a new adviser to the club this year and helped Grace Dahle in supervising all Ushers Club activities. The club officers worked with the advisers to plan meetings and to maintain the clubis efficiency. Potlucks and other social events were held during the year. The home economics living room was the scene of many of these activities which took place bc- fore ushering or before the ushers attended a game. Each member must usher a specific number of times to receive enough points to earn an Ushers Club pin, which was a reward given to outstanding ushers. This year the Ushers Club membership was cut down in size because there was not a chance for every member to usher and thus receive recognition through a pin. Boys from the Lettermens Club provided outside help during the busy rush of the Tiger's Roar. Other activities for which the Ushers presented their services were plays. concerts and graduation exercises. Riflemen's Target Is Good Sportsmanship The singular report of a rifle shot was not an un- common sound around school this year-at least not to a score and more of artillery enthusiasts who tested their shooting ability every week in room 4 P.A. There, in the secluded confines to the rear of the spacious shop room, members of the Rifle Club prac- ticed diligently throughout the year in order that they might improve upon not only their marksmanship but also their sportmanship in participation. Target sessions were held in an elongated concrete gallery, also serving as a storehouse for the shop Classes, measuring about 75 feet in length and 13 feet in width. The four rifles used, plus ample ammunition and the necessary amount of targets, were loaned to the boys by the federal government. Shooting sessions transpired every Monday, both sixth hour and after school, and on Wednesday eve- nings after the supper hour. The club is a member of the National Rifle Association, a distinction it has held in all three years of its existence. Mr. Sidney Schwartz was director of the club. FRONT ROW: Warren. Metzke. Petersen, Ogren, Tonga, Inge- bl'ltSOIl. SECOND ROW: Vander Syde, Moden, Stoa, Yocum, 51, Q, Wi . ,.. . .. W ...uf 2 . f . We . . M ' ..:. , ,A I up gf . it if? ,,-:-:- H ,P . tx V ::,: .. . - X :...,, Q :,, s,. ,iff -E ..:... 1 E if :1: T55 N S M .rrrlaa f , or .,,. i t Q qulzvv I zr- R f i' ,., ..,.. ':": 1 su r 'E in ,ir mtv. H "PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT", said Barry Yocum and Steve Schwartz as they shot at the targets set up for them. Groos, Morrison, Brook. THIRD ROW: Lcgried. Schwartz, Nelson, Summers, Madsen, Jensen, Chesterman. Page 111 HONOR STUDENTS-FRONT ROW: Evelyn Sanders, Joan Schneider, Stephen Schwartz, Sharon Simon, Marilyn Stoa, Sonita Thompson, Judith Vig, Thomas Vorpahl, Kathleen Wich- mann. SECOND ROW: JoAnn Maas, John Metzke, Susan Miller, Irene Nelson, Elizabeth Nielsen, David Olson, Kathleen Olson, Judith Pentz, Virginia Perrin, Carolyn Robbins, James Rollins. THIRD ROW: Sharon Herth, Robert Hovey, Jay utstandin Students Page 112 Hurst, Karen Iverson, Keith Iverson, Barbara Ives, Kenneth Joachim, Renee Johnson, Nancy Lee, Laura Lewis, Ann Lyon. FOURTH ROW: Mary Ellen Blunt, Peggy Cairns, Christine Carlson, Jerry Draayer, Constance Eckhoff, Janice Fogel, Charlotte Hagen, Judy K. Hansen, Darlene Heckes, Janice Henderson, Lonna Herth. Give Helpful Service Among the qualities of the members of the National Honor Society were leadership, character, service and scholarship. HB" or better grade average was essential before anyone could be eligible for membership. Every member had to be a senior with outstanding citizenship, showing a willingness to help when needed. The Honor Society is an honorary society and not a club organization. Membership in the society continues beyond the limits of high school. Each member was chosen by the faculty, after the third quarter of the school year. Mr. Byron Spear was the chairman of this meeting. Among the jobs of the audio visualists were helping set up the projectors in classrooms where a film was to be shown, storing the equipment and training someone in each room to run the projector. The main job, how- ever, was to run the projector in the auditorium. Mr. Marvin Glesne was the adviser to the group, as Well as doing much of the work himself because all of the members were bus students. RUNNING THE FILM PROJECTOR was a lot of fun and work for Wally Ress, Gene Hansen, Keith Christenson, Larry Haugen. KEITH CHRISTENSON SHOWED Larry Haugen the correct way to handle a film projector when it breaks down. ,- Future eaehers Constitute A Busy Year "ls the teaching field for me?" was the question the i lVIcGuffy Future Teachers of America Club tried to solve for its members throughout the year in its busy and varied program schedule of activities. The sixth year of its existence was started with a membership campaign that invited prospective teach- ers to an initiational punch party. Mr. Wallace Ken- nedy, the club-'s new adviser, told of his reasons for choosing the teaching occupation and elaborated on the leadership, character and scholarship qualities that are declared in the national FTA pledge. American Education Week in November gave Mc- Guffy Club members a chance to thank their teachers by renewing a grade school show of appreciation, Han apple for the teacherf' Another program featured sev- eral practice teachers, who answered questions on a teacherls necessary college education. Later the future teachers visited four local elemen- tary schools to observe this education's fruitfulness. In April, Teaching Career Month, the McGuffy Club gave a panel discussion on teaching opportunities on KATE,s radio Youth Forum of the Air. Completing their busy but successful year were the the omcers Janice Henderson, president, Joy Hurst, vice president, Sue Shea, secretary, Irene Nelson, f f1'eHSUfG1'5 and CHFOIYH RObb1HS, h1St0riHH- WALLACE KENNEDY EXPLAINED the teaching methods no future teachers, Connie Paulson, Sue Shea and Nancy Allen. FRONT ROW: Dahle, Andrews, Maas, Jensen, Roorda, Myers. Jacobsen. FOURTH ROW: Nelson, Hurst, Hagen, Hansen, SECOND ROW: Simon, Johnsen, Paulson, Grinolds, Allen. Lewis, Lee, Henderson. Schneider. THIRD ROW: Bell, Roel, Gendler, Shea, Robbins, Page 113 FRONT ROW: Fitzgerald. Peaslcc. Tolo. Blanchard. Iverson. ROW: Ladlic. Krueger. Hurst, Fink, Thofson. Schumacher. Thompson, D. Evans. SECOND ROW: M. Evans. K. Nelson. Eckart. I. Nelson. Klukow. Meyers. Bauman. Kangas. THIRD Schwcmmler. Enderson. Homemakers Cook Up Interesting Season NHURRY UP OK WE'l.I, MISS THE BUS," said Diane Evans to Marilyn Schumacher as they left for the FIIA convention. Page 114 Members of the Albert Lea Chapter of the Future Homemakers of America helped their club to its sixth successful year as a school organization. With their octagon-shaped emblem, the rose as their symbol and their motto "Toward New Horizons", the girls offered their services to the school. During summer vacation the girls jointly sponsored a concession booth at the Freeborn County Fair to help finance projects for the coming school year. A welcome punch party was held at the first meet- ing in September for all prospective members. Mrs. R. J. Kennelly presented a talk on current fashions. Owatonna played host to the district convention held in October. Seventeen delegates from Albert Lea traveled to take part in group discussions, to listen to lectures and to see a style show. This annual convention gave the delegates a chance to become better acquainted with FHA members from neighboring towns and to bring back new ideas. CHECKING T0 SEE if everything was included in the FHA posters were Betty Tolo. Karen Nelson and Mary Evans. HWHICH RECIPE LOOKS THE BEST?" asked Kathy Eckart, Peggy Peaslee and Janet Blanchard as they looked at the book. Develop odern Home Improvement During the holiday season the Future Farmers of America joined with the FHA to go Christmas caroling. This annual affair was topped by refreshments at the YMCA. The club advisers acted as chaperons. A beautiful candlelight ceremony was held to ini- tiate new members. This formal ceremony has become traditional. Chapter mothers who helped to supervise parties and teas for the past year were Mrs. George Eckhart and Mrs. Luverne Peaslee. Square dancing in the girls' gym provided more fun with the FFA. The turnout was large. In March, four members, Janet Blanchard, Diane Evans, Sharon Iverson and Peggy Peaslee traveled to the Twin Cities as delegates to the state convention. Irene Nelson was on the state membership committee. Acting as leaders for the FHA organization in the 1959-1960 year were Irene Nelson, president, Marjorie Fink, vice president, Darlene Schwemmler, secretary, Joy Hurst, treasurer, Shirley Thofson, parliamentariang Betty Kangas. song leader, Marilyn Krueger, historian, and Mary Evans, reporter. MAKING THEMSELVES PRETTY for the initiation were Darlene Sehwemmler, Irene Nelson, Joy Hurst and Marje Fink. Page 115 FRONT ROW: Schlede. Shroeder. Horning, Bottleson, D. Jen- Folie. Christensen. JaC0bS0l1. R- lvangen- Harms- FOURTH sen, Hoyne. SECOND ROW: Ohm, R. Jensen, Iverson. Jenson. ROW: Smeby. Schewe, G. Wangen. Eckart, Wallace, Van Ladlie, Baker, Collins. THIRD ROW: Hanson, Klienpaste, Ryswyk- MUUVQ- S1PPle- Future Farmers Establish Better Methods Established in 1928. the FFA plays a definite role to those students who are interested in agriculture. The Future Farmers of America exists today because of a co-operative spirit and desire of farm boys, pre- paring for farming to have a national organization. Through FFA they gain business experience. act as their own instructors and enjoy the fellowship of others. The foundation upon which the FFA organ- ization is built includes leadership and character de- velopment, sportsmanship, improved agriculture, or- ganized recreation, citizenship and patriotism. This year, 28 acres of corn and 10 acres of soybeans were raised on the school farm. The farm's net in- come, S1,163.91. was put into the chapter's loan fund, which FFA members could borrow money to set up their own supervised farming programs. Farming programs, such as dairy, beef, hogs, poultry, sheep and crops carried on at home under the guidance of the instructors, Mr. Donald Paulson and Mr. Lowell Ross, broadened and improved their background. I THESE FOUR FFA'ERS, Charles Stadheim, Gene Horning, t Eugene Flaskerud and Jim Bottelson received their trophies for outstanding work at the banquet. Page 116 FRONT ROW: Gniffe, M. Flugum. J. Jensen. R. Nelson, Flask- Breamer, Iverson. Clausen, Stadheim. FOURTH ROW: Smcby. erud. Wasmoen. SECOND ROW: Bowman, Gill. Bauers. G. Hoverson. Jerdee, Johnson. B. Nelson. Gaarcl. D. Nelson. Jensen, Collins. A. Flugum. THIRD ROW: Schewe. A. Jensen. Return ith A Winnergs Troph , Awards Taking an active part in the livestock shows, FFA members exhibited at the Freeborn County Fair, 17 went on the Minnesota State Fair and still others exhibited at the Spring Barrow Show. The chapter had teams participating in the soils judging, dairy judging, general livestock judging and the farm management contests. Nordean Krueger won the tractor driving contest held at the County Fair and was third in the state contest. Keith Iverson won the district cow clipping contest at St. Peter. The annual parents night was held at the December meeting. The parents observed an FFA meeting and the initiation of the sophomores into the organization. At the annual banquet held in March many students were given recognition for their accomplishments and services to the organization and community. Social activities of the Albert Lea FFA Chapter included a FFA-FHA square dance and Christmas caroling with the FHA to several nursing homes. Also the chapter organized a basketball team and played Q against agriculture students from surrounding schools. HIGHLIGHTING PARENTS NIGHT was the presentation of a trophy by Principal lVIt-Elhinney to Bruce Baker, Wilmer of the 5 Creed Contest in which sophomores participated. 4' Page 117 Vocational Students Crash Business World CO-OPERATION WAS PART of the daily job in the ease of Carolyn Pierson and Keith Stiles who worked side-by-side in order to take care of their customers. FRONT ROW: Scholl. Hopperstad, Jolmson. Hoiseth. Henry Sorhy, Hammer. Pierson. Walker. Kaasa. SECOND ROW Werner, Sigurdson, Stiebler. Emstad, Quam. Clifford. Bauman. 3 s 3 as Q-...A Page 118 "MAY I HELP YOU?" was a question asked many times by Bonnie Walker and LuJean Sorby as they went about their duties. Rasmussen. Week. Brandt. Tangen. Lemhke. THIRD ROW: Bakke, Hershey, Springlxorg, Lang. Helland, Behrens, 0'Neal. Stiles, Bergo. Bergen. Bailey. Holton. Learn Techniques For Future Occupations FRONT ROW: Jacobsen, Hanson, Perkins, Reincke, Sorby, Tennyson, Henry, Jackson, Jensen, Hagen. SECOND ROW: Jacobson. Anderson. Fjeldberg, Bauman, Smith, Ugland, De- To acquire valuable knowledge of future business areas was the primary purpose of active students in the senior diversified occupations program. Under the supervision of Mr. Norman K. Bailey, information was obtained in relation with job opportu- nities. These capable pupils attended classes each morning and took on the added responsibility of a job each afternoon. Local businessmen were co-operative in furnishing these students with their part-time jobs. One credit was given for attending class each day and another for on-the-job training. Students carrying a full schedule during classtime plus the responsibility of a job were able to receive five credits during their senior year by participation in this organization. Belonging to this club enabled students to receive knowledge of future vocations and of relationships in dealing with the public. Officers were elected from among the two combined distributive clubs. This year's officers were President Patrick Bergen, Vice President Lily Ann Kaasa, Secre- tary Nancy Arneson and Treasurer David Springborg. Highlight of the year was the Minnesota Diversified Vocations Convention held February 25 and 26 in St. Paul. Twenty students journeyed to the state conven- tion for two days of tours and lectures relating to their studies of business knowledge. Raad, Wright, Hayes, Gilbert. THIRD ROW: Studer, Peterson, Dugstad, Holt, Harpel, O'Neal, Suthers. Bailey, Holty, Van Proosdy. WASHING A CAR was only unc of the many jobs handled by Larry Bergo while working during the afternoon. Page 119 wig s Journalists Sponsor Style Show, Bake Sale THE FINAL TOUCHES WERE COMPLETE when Carol Ras- mussen and Lonna Herth turned in the feature section to Kathy Olson and Doris Qualley. index section. for filing. After gaining one year of valuable experience working on the Ah La Ha Sa, the senior journalists began their publication of the 1960 yearbook. The new Tiger staff was announced at the annual Quill and Scroll initiation which was held at Edge- water Park. An outdoor steak fry added to the event. Under the guidance of Miss Edna Gercken and the editor. the theme "A Banner Year" and the color of the yearbook were selected with great care. Picture taking was the next step in the production of the book. Each section was in chai ge of scheduling. arranging and supervising each of its pictures. The student photographer, Jeffrey Larson. was responsible for taking and developing many of the pictures. Pro- viding information and teaching new techniques was the duty of Mr. Earl Jacobsen. photography adviser. When all of the copy blocks. captions and headlines were submitted after being rewritten many times. they were sent to the printer for the final printing. TIGER PUBLICITY of the 1960 yearbook was handled by the publicity committee. Laura Lewis and Dorothy Jenson. ORDERING CANDY for school and sports events and handling all money for the paper and the yearbook were the business managers. Nancy Lee. Charlotte Hagen and Peggy Cairns. AFTER ALL OF THE PICTURES VVERE TAKEN it was the job of the class section. Janet Grinolds. Evelyn Sanders. Joyce Ilevries, Carolyn Pierson and Karen Johnston to identify each. ds 32 .LQ Tift I 'Q N na,1y K , ,. - it i 4 .. War lon with Yearbook Helping to Hnance the yearbook was the duty of all journalists. Concessions at football and basketball games and ads received from downtown businessmen constituted the main sources of income. Staff members, in order to meet the budget, took on many additional money-making projects. In the fall, the girls participated in Skinner-Chamberlain's style show and during the Homecoming season victory bells were sold to the student body. Assisting the business staff were Miss Marie Skjeve- land, Mr. Arthur Anthony and Mr. Charles Fairchild, business advisers to the department. In their junior year the journalists traveled to Mankato for the Big Nine Journalism Clinic. Here they attended various meetings and discussed ways of improving the school publications. Many of the journalists also traveled to Minneapolis in April to attend the State Journalism Convention. At the awards luncheon the Tiger of the previous year received many press honors and awards. The two journalism classes worked side-by-side, each helping the other to improve and perfect the Tiger and the Ah La Ha Sa publications. BOTH OF THE EDITORS, Liz Nielsen of the Ah La Ha Sa and Betty Braaten of the Tiger, discussed each other's problems. PREPARATIONS FOR THE FACULTY and administration was the section handled by Janice Henderson and Carolyn Robbins. CHECK LISTS were made and all material was itemized so the organization staff. Becki Buenneke. Charlotte Hagen, Mark Hylbak and Nancy Lee could begin their work on the yearbook. 'Q 1 W s , jf, A ,N m..........s... A AEA COVERING ALL SPORTS EVENTS which included making many telephone calls. was the job of the sports editors. Clint Sanborn, Marion Gnilfke and Larry Van Ryswyk. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, Mary Keil, supervised the associate editors EDITORS OF EDITORIAL AND THIRD PAGES, Sue Wol- Roxie Wehrhan and Barb Slife, in organizing ideas and page gamot, Julie Paulson, Linda Ille and Donna Mayotte, combined layouts for the next issue of the paper. efforts to produce an interesting newspaper for the students. Junior Journalists Initiated To New Posts ADVERTISING AND CANDY SELLING going hand-in-hand as financing, were handled by Elaine Posthumus, advertising manager, Cindy Bothof and Nancy Bolingcr, business managers. yi"""w.Q.f THE HANDLING OF ALL SPORTS EVENTS Was taken care of by Dick Oliphant and Pat Moen, sports editors. Page 122 Er f JANICE PETERSON SHOWS the other star reporters, Neal ADDITIONAL STAR REPORTERS, Larry Haugen, Allen Tull- Gendler, Arlene Dilling, DeAnn Foley, Diane Schnebly and berg, Hazel Stoa, Joyce Scholl and Sharon Blizzard, learn from Jean Schlehr, how to type stories and make proper settings. Janet Myers how to obtain the proper number of typed lines. Take Positions As Newspaper Staff Taking over the school paper was a big job but seemed to be handled easily by the peppy junior jour- nalists during the year of 1960, when they took over their new positions on the paper staff. On February 11 the new paper staff was announced in the first edition of the Ah La Ha Sa they had con- tributed to in the form of writing. Each recipient of the new job proudly began the busy task of getting all items in hand and ready to go. The entire job was in their hands-new hands, learning fast. Of course, the paper was not all that they have taken care of this year. They have assisted in many money making projects together with the seniors. The first job was joining in the candy sales at all sport events, including basketball and football games and wrestling matches. Selling Bowers' candy also enter- ed into the picture as well as their help in a bake sale. The year was completed by becoming a member of the National Quill and Scroll Association. This took place at the annual initiation picnic, at which the next year's yearbook staff positions were announced. Here the old year ended for the seniors but it had just begun for the junior journalists and writers of the future. THE EXCHANGING AND RECEIVING of the paper was han- dled by Janice Nelson and Carole Lee, respectively. Pictures and etchings were edited by Barb Kofstad and Joan Ponto. fy? 1 X Page 123 52 I fs QV 'Q 5 Nfwmg. fi Q S N, SPORTS A I I, . 1 I 1' is ,I -. e ZW V YL is 1 i 1 s. 3 -Q f-. 9 K iw f ds fs its , YA .ATF V a wise: ,Q 'Zi' -sw: sgifx tg a t ' if glen its X t Q 1 Ifwfxw W gjzy 1-.iff is f im 'W Q1 ew an W- :fri -rf I "SJ J 2 E M 3 V Q . -v fr , . QM 0 J' A :iff THE 1959 TIGERS-FRONT ROW: D. Olson, Hammond, Westrum, Dahlen. Reynen, Thompson, Wangen, Moe. Kennedy, Wiersma, Van Ryswyk. SECOND ROW: Standly, D. Larsen, Danielsen, Suthers, Palmer, Claybourn, Welch, Nelson, Brooke, AQ., Oliphant, Tonheim, Kappas, Karlberg, Coach Gustafson. THIRD ROW: Satre, Guiney. Fredrickson. Muilenberg. Dugstad, Bo- sacker. Jacobson, Fretheim, Haskins, Wilke, Lee, J. Larson. Lahs. Not pictured: John Olson and Ted Larson. alented Gridders Rewrite Record Booksg JIM LARSON CWITH BALLJ SCORED an early season touch- down in the Faribault game as LeRoy Yarger C283 vainly pursued. Albert Lea took an easy 33-0 victory. Page 126 Despite the adverse playing conditions that plagued them all year, the 1959 Tigers posted the best record of any eleven in the annals of Albert Lea football. That was quite an accomplishment, considering that Albert Lea has fielded a team ever since the turn of the cen- tury. Tactical Jim Gustafson coached the '59 edition to seven victories and 189 points. both new seasonal highs for an Albert Lea Tiger football team. The Tigers gave evidence of their wrecking power in the very first game when they turned back Mankato, 28-14, away from home. Fullback Jim Thompson smashed for two touchdowns to spearhead the attack. Faribault proved an incompetent foe, losing to the Tigers, 33-0, as Thompson scored twice. Austin handed the Tigers their first loss, a 26-12 setback at the Packer Athletic Field. Thompson and Lew Kennedy each scored a touchdown, but that was not enough to halt a fine Austin aggregation that was worthy of the Big Nine championship. Gustafson's charges smeared St. Paul Johnson at home, 35-20. Kennedy, the little senior halfback. car- ried five times and racked up 146 yards and two touch- downs to lead the charge. End Rog Wangen also scored twice on passes from quarterback Rich Oli- phant. John Welch, reserve fullback, sped 67 yards up the middle for the final tally of the game. ig! it '3 Q gt. K A S. ,, Q? ....., a RICH OLIPHANT CUPPER LEFTJ attempted a conversion in the Rochester game with Paul WVilkc C405 holding. The kick was no good but the Tigers won 18-ti. JIM THOMPSON C30 AND UPPER RIGHTJ was grounded alter churning off a lengthy gain. Both he and Oliphant were back- field choices on the Big Nine All-conference team. Re ister Unpreeedented Seven Win Total In the Homecoming contest the Tigers toppled Wi- nona, 21-7, as workhorse Thompson accounted for two scores and halfback Ron Dahlen raced 80 yards with a kickoff for another. Rochester. too, fell beneath the Cherry and Blue horde by a 18-6 count. A week later they blanked Red Wiiig, 21-0 in the mud and slime of Abbott Field. Dave Palmer, junior halfback, bolted for two touchdowns. Owatonna dished out the Tigers' second defeat of the season. 13-7. at Abbott. Rain made Gustafson's passing attack ineffective and Albert Lea succumbed after holding a halftime advantage. Surprising North- field gave Albert Lea a scare in the season finale. but the Tigers brought home a 13-6 triumph. At seasons end Albert Lea held undisputed posses- sion of third place. their highest conference finish in nearly two decades. Twin Cities' newspapers rated them among the state's top teams. Tackle Paul Moe, along with Thompson and Oliphant, was named to the All-conference squad. In addition, Moe was named to a guard position on the mythical All-state team selected by the Minneapolis Tribune. PAUL WESTRUM C241 HALTED THE MOTION of this St. Paul Johnson ball carrier in the Tigers' only non-conference tilt. Page 127 Thompson, Wangen, Dahlen, Kennedy, Moe. Dave . ' Olson, Dave Reynen, Larry Van Rysvvyk, Paul West- rum, Bert Wiersma and Gary Hammond were the senior members of the team. Thompson was the Ti- gers' top ground-gainer and point-getter, ripping off 649 yards in 122 carries and scoring 65 markers. Ken- nedy, who ate up 431 in 59 tries, averaged 7.3 yards every time he toted the ball. Palmer stepped off 422 in 69 attempts. Oliphant set a new school passing record of 500 yards while completing 26 of 58 tosses. Y Sim, . Seldom have the Tigers had such a vicious, hard- hitting line. Much credit goes to guys like Wangen. Olson, Moe, Reynen, Steve Claybourn, sophomore Jeff Brooke, Welch and Tommy Suthers. They were re- sponsible for springing the backs loose and they did a terrific job. The Tigers ran up an offensive total against all foes that surpassed the 2.000 mark. TWO HARD CHARGING "B" SQUAD LINEMEN attempted to break this pass used by Faribault underclassmen. Tireless Baekfield, Bruisin Forward Wall ROG WANGEN 1535, SENIOR END. could not quite reach this pass in the Northfield contest. Dave Olson Qrightj earlier caught a touch- down toss that sparked the Tigers to a 13-ti victory. THIS OPPOSING BACK was lJl'0Ll11lll down hy Steve Claylmourn Qtop of ball carrierj with help from Del Bosacker CSD. 40 lv Page 128 VARSITY BOX SCORE Albert Lea Opponents 28 ...A7., ---Mankato --- ------- 14 331- ---Faribault -- , 0 " 12--- ---Austin ---.-- --- - 26 35--- ---St. Paul Johnson-W -- 20 21--- ---Winona ------ -- - T 18--- ---Rochester --- - 6 21--- ---Red Wing --- - 0 7--- ---Owatonna -.- - 13 13--- ---Northfield -- -- 6 188 92 RUNNING THROUGH A FEW PLAYS in practice was Lew Kennedy Ccenterj. who had his greatest day against St. Paul Johnson. Albert Lea posted a 35-20 count at Abbott. Illustrative of Tigers Third Place Finish "WHO'S GOT THE BALL?" Rich Oliphant C141 actually had but the photo gives the impression that a Red Wing player was in possession. JIM THOMPSON was brought to a muddy halt by this Red Wing de- fender. Other Tigers were Rich Oliphant Cleftj and Dave Palmer Ccenterl. who scored two TD's in the encounter. MW Page 129 as fy yum X Q A Q ,pw N i 3' V , :A A , sys wg L ,....: 2 ..... 3. afsfssferjfi ""'- 2 .:.., ,.- S A A Wt , G Q Q , ,,,, q.,..A A was ? THESE FOUR TIGER GRID INSTRUCTORS seemed especially its long history as a school. LEFT T0 RIGHT: Bill Standly: pleased with thc fine showing of the 1959 football team and it's Jim Gustafson, head coach: Bruce Johnson: and Paul Ehrhard. no wonder! Albert Lea posted its best record, victory-wise. in Not pitcured: Luvcrnc Ahrndt. 6 9 ' d M h f th C d ' t DALE DEFORE. AUSTIN FULLBACK. got by Ron llalilon AFTER SPIXNING AWAY from one tacklvr. Paul W'ilke was Cgroumledj on this play but found himself trapped as Steve confronted hy Tom Dormady CSU. Austin guard. That's Lyle Clayhourn C801 Paul Vlfilkc C405 and Dave Palmer hem him in. Cline. who scored three touchdowns, in the backgrouml. Page 130 B SQUAD SCORE BOX Albert Lea Opponents 20 A,..... .O.A F aribault ,,.. ....,.. 7 13 --- ,-1Austin -- -- 20 20 .... .... O watonna - 1 1 1 1 20 20 .... ,... F airmont - - - 6 0 .... .... A ustin 2,..,.,.,,2 - - 32 14 .... ...2 W aseca Ag. School .... - 0 87 85 With a 3-2-1 record the Albert Lea Bengals com- pleted the 1959 season. They probably would have had an even better record but several players eligible for the guard served on the varsity throughout the season. Injuiries also took their toll. Jim Karlberg suffered a broken ankle during practice and Bob Ken- nedy received a concussion during the Faribault game. Opening their season on September 24, the Bengals hosted Faribault and won 20-7 as halfback Tom McKey scored all three touchdowns. The Bengals only two defeats came at the hands of a determined Austin team, with the Packers whipping them, 20-13, on October 1 and likewise on October 23 by a 32-0 count. With McKey running the opening kickoff back 70 yards for a touchdown and th Bengals converting on an Owatonna fumble, they took an early lead in the game played with the Indians on October. Owatonna rallied, however, and took a 20-13 third quarter lead. Late in the contest Curt Pickavance tallied the third Bee touchdown and the game ended 20-20. Scoring two quick touchdowns in the first quarter and another in the final minute enabled the Bengals to defeat Fairmont, 20-6, on October 13. They whipped Waseca Agricultural School in the final game of the year on October 20, shutting them out, 14-0. Bengals C3- - Show Promise For Future THE TIGER B SQUAD posted a respectable 3-2-1 season record. FRONT ROW: Fredrickson, Waterman, Piek, Thomp- son, Jahns. Olsen, Boer, Fretheim. SECOND ROW: Good- manson, Le Beau, Pickavance, Hansen, McGill, Fabry, Olson, Ovgren. THIRD ROW: Boytun, Summers, Jensen, Palmer, Bates, Gaverc, Moden, Warren, Wittkamper. FOURTH ROW: Ehrhard, Jacobson, Mortensen, Ingebritson, McKey, Kennedy, Coonradt, Erlandson, Johnson. a s W? W? an M3 ff-not Q at it 169 g - Page 131 Cagers Win ine Encounters, Drop ight Don Buhr, in his freshman season as head coach, gave Albert Lea fans a winning basketball team. His squad was victorious in nine of 17 starts and broke even in ten Big Nine engagements for a fifth-place finish in the league standings. Yet, a closer scrutiny of the record shows that the Tigers were even better than those nine wins would indicate. Of the eight losses they suffered, six were by no more than four point margins and the two teams that beat them badly, Winona and Austin, were defeated by the Tigers on other occasions. All which goes to prove that Buhris scrappy little aggregation held its own in what is perenially considered one of the toughest re- gions in the entire state. They opened the season with a 50-46 loss to Min- neapolis Patrick Henry at Southwest gymnasium, marking the second straight year they have been stop- ped by the Twin Citians. Owatonna nudged them in their next encounter, 44-43, on a free throw that was scored after the official time had run out. The Tigers secured their initial triumph a week later at Mankato, 48-47, when co-captain Dave Olson counted on a field goal in the waning seconds of the contest. Austin, the ultimate district champion, was the second victim of a five-game Tiger win skein. Gary Jacobsen and Paul Wilke paced the scoring as they took a 56-54 verdict over their arch rival, bringing home a coveted and well-deserved victory. C0-CAPTAIN DAVE DONOVAN drove past Austin's Lyle Cline C201 in the district tournament game. Only two players, Leo Schultz and Rabbit Nelson, ever scored more than Donovan. THE TIGERS GATHERED around their new coach. Don Buhr. JUMP BALL! BUT WHICH TIGER? Dave Palmer C505 and during a crucial moment. If the look in Jim Gustafson's eye is an unidentified Albert Lean both claimed possession of the ball any indication, they are losing. Gus is sitting behind Buhr. despite the tenacity of Austin's Gary Schumacher. 5 genius- ii""-.. Page 132 nder Tutelage of New Coach, Don Buhr VARSITY BOX SCORE ALBERT LEA OPPONENTS 46 ...,.......... Minneapolis Henry ...S...... 50 43- - ., .....,,..., Owatonna ..........SA...... 44 48 ...., .... M ankato ..S,....S. - , - 47 56 ....e .... A ustin ....... - - - 54 52 ..... A.v, C annon Falls --- --- 34 60- - - .. - ,..e Faribault .... ,L - 47 60 ..... .... N orthfield --- U- 49 46 ...., .... W inona ..... - , - 60 54 ..,.. .... R ochester .... - - W 56 52 ..i. .... M ason City .h.. --- 50 57 ...,. ,... A ustin ....... , L - 58 53 .... .... R ed Wing ,,,- K , - 47 50 .,... .... W ells ......- - - - 54 53 ..... .... M ankato .... a-- 57 63 ..... .... F aribault - - - - - - 50 58----- .... Winona --- --- 42 48 ..... v... A ustin .... - - - 67 899 866 THIS MINNEAPOLIS HENRY-ITE did not have much chance for the ball as four Tigers, headed by Gary Jacobsen Chand on ballj closed in on him. DAVE OLSON, THE OTHER CAPTAIN, scored on a layup against Austin despite the efforts of Clayton Reed C315 to stop the shot.Gary Jacobsen C241 and Terry Brown watch. DAVE OLSON C131 AND DAVE DONOVAN C413 received the trophy that was awarded to the Tigers as champions of the Christmas Tourney at Faribault. in My Page 133 fxiit +350 x,,BER.i easy M9519 F 2 22 E x ' LES , 0 tit ,LEA , s 1 'Xkdx RX 3 X ? j 1 'Ta an Q' t' X! ' 5 A I-.B 52,41 agaefifg R VK X sy A ,- -4 .ix 3 9 X ii X ,s-5 E - H '-Q W S X X fy J .aa 3 -3-Mi? Q THESE BOYS COMPRISED the 1959-60 varsity basketball Evgenson, Wilke. SECOND ROW: Danielsen, Olson, Tonheim, squad. FRONT ROW: Claybourn. Lehmann, Palmer, Jacobsen, Ollphant, Davidson, Donovan, Anderson. 0 Evenly Contested Games Thrlll Spectators FIGHTING FOR POSSESSION ofthe 8lllSlV9 lJ3SkClb2lll WHS Over the Season, Buhrls followers jour- Gary Jacobsen, the Tigers, Sophomore Comer' neyed to Faribault for the Christmas tournament. They came home with the trophy awarded to the champions of the games, as Cannon Falls, by a 52-34 count, and Faribault, 60-47, caused the Tigers little trouble. Northfield was the first home victim, losing out, 60-49, at the Southwest gymnasium. Winona snapped the Tigers' streak, 60-46, on the E Winhawks' court. Then Rochester, on the following Pi Friday, choked off a late Albert Lean rally to eke out a 56-54 victory. Traveling to Mason City found the Tigers winning once again, this time by a 52-50 score. Olson, who seemed to make a habit of hitting when points were needed most, dumped in the winning bas- ket with three seconds on the clock. i . Austin avenged their earlier defeat at the hands of the Tigers, nipping them 58-57 at Southwest. How- ever, it took an overtime period and a timely jump shot by Clayton Reed for the Packers to pull it out. 55 if 6. p Page 134 Fi hting Five Shoulders Seasonal Burden After a dismal first half at Red Wing, the Tigers opened up in the final two stanzas to bring home a 53-47 triumph. Little Wells turned them back, how- ever, for the third time in as many years, 54-50, on the Wildcats' floor. Mankato made up for their former loss to Buhr's crew, 57-53, at Southwest. The Tigers regained their winning touch at Fari- bault, registering a repeat win over the Falcons, 63-50. Then, playing for the last time at home, they proved the Winona loss a fluke by smacking the Winhawks, 58-42. Co-captain Dave Donovan popped in 21 points in just three periods as the boys from the River never threatened. It appeared, after the equality displayed between the two teams in their two regular season meetings, that the district tournament contest with Austin would be a real battle. But the Packers jumped off to an un- surmountable first period lead and the closest Albert Lea ever got after that was six points. Austin turned on the heat in the final quarter as their tourney domi- nation prevailed, 67-48. HIGH-STEPPING Dave Donovan, the versatile Tiger guard, scored two of his seasonal 205 points, driving past a pair of Wells defenders. The Tigers lost the non-conference encounter. w 5' THE FIRST FIVE: Wilke, Olson, Jacobsen, Oliphant, Donovan. Coach Buhr is holding ball within ball. JUNIOR GUARD Rich Oliphant Crightj soared skyward and scored with this drive, an attempt, seemingly befuddling the Rochester defender. Gary Jacobsen C243 came up from the rear. W 'MII .X Page 135 GOING HIGH IN THE AIR to snare a rebound was Paul Wilke Cleftj of the Tigers as he outmaneuvered two Winona forwards in a game at Southwest. .7 mr' ...ww My V 4 N., , Qs GARY JACOBSEN CCENTERD let go with a short pump shot within the free throw circle. He led the Tigers in scoring with 212 points for the year, as many as 24 in one game. Donovan, Jacobsen Top Tigers In Scoring ONE OF THE MOST promising of Buhr's cagers is shown here grabbing a rebound. Lowell Syverson, only a sophomore, played alternately with the varsity and B squads. The season was climaxed by the near unanimous choice of Dave Donovan to the first All-conference team ever selected. Gary Jacobsen, the league's only sophomore to gain recognition, earned a place on the honorable mention squad. Donovan, incidentally, with a career total of 631 points became the third highest point maker in Albert Lea history. Donovan, Olson and Jack Lehmann have played their last games as Tigers. Jacobsen, Wilke and Rich Oliphant return from the quintet that carried the load throughout the season. Wilke and Oliphant were chosen by their teammates to captain the 1960-61 team. TIGER SCORING Page 136 FG FTA-M Jacobsen 11- .11191 60-30 Donovan 111 90 55-25 Olson 111 52 75-47 Wilke .ccc 11149 75-50 Oliphant 111 11141 62-29 Syverson 1 1 1111 9 20-12 Lehman 11 1 111 6 11-4 Palmer 111 1 111 4 12-3 Claybourn 11 2-2 Knutsen 111 111 1 4-1 Tonheim 111 1111 1 4-0 posted a respectable 9-5 record during the 1959-60 season. In Big Nine play they were 8-2, proving them- selves one of the better sophomore units in the confer- ence. Two victories over traditional rival Austin, by 41-36 and 29-27 margins, and a five game winning streak high-lighted seasonal activities. Those five consecutive victories coming at the very beginning of the year-over Minneapolis Henry, Owa- tonna, Mankato, Austin and Northfield-is what bol- stered their impressive mark. They won only four of their last nine, a sharp taper from earlier exploits. Nevertheless, the HB" squaders evinced signs of promise for future years. They were badly outplayed in just three contests and, much of the time, mechan- ical errors caused their downfall. Clair Flaten and Lowell Syverson were the out- standing scorers, as well as rebounders, on the team. F laten started every game, connecting for 143 points and a 10.2 average. Syverson, in one less game, hit for 140 and 10.8 points per game. The Tiger cubs, ably coached by Jim Gustafson, B SQUAD BOX SCORE ALBERT LEA 29 --------------Minneapolis Henry -- ---Owatonna - 33 33 41 35 32 .... 31--. - 39--- - 29 ---. 36 ---- 35 ---- 43--- - 37 ---- 20 473 Cubs Cool Off But Finish B SQUAD MEMBERS-KNEELING: Donovan, LeBeau, Thomp- - -- -Mankato - - ----Austin ------- - ---Northfield ---Winona - -- -Rochest 91' ..... , ----Mason City --- ----Austin ------- ----Red Wing ---- ----Wells -------. ----Mankato ----- - - - -Faribau - - - -Winona lt ---- OPPONENTS ---------- 24 27 29 -- 36 -- 29 -- 37 -- 29 - - 53 -- 27 -- 33 -- 50 24 40 35 473 With 9-5 Mark Christianson, Jenson, Summers, Boer, Syverson, Flaten, -. 2 Mueller, Z son, Olson, Pickavance, Goodmanson, Bohland. SECOND ROW: Boyum. K, K 'I tif fi ,V 3, ft 3 , om Sc 'Q 1 1 . 3 7' F ae . , 5 I ' are was air' im, ......, . iii f .. x Ei' 4 E., ,A 1 H, ,A 1 ,' xy ,A Tf Q fs ,F ,W if FW 33332033 F 33 QSM 335 523 'gil Wafffnit 2 ...,, af? , of ami . M. A mga 2 9 5 ' ' --v. 1 4' A 74 'W 'Z 9 ' W Vt . ' 1 S752 if ... W lt Sire we fi if 3 T2 is Hmmlf' WEEE tm W 'iff "".f . A , of 1 5 Q 5 ' 5 iz E K wg.-S l N x . nf .k V . N ..,, 1 . -fiwe, .-1 5- 4 EE . i Q33 f ff,-fitr,fifA Q iirfgfnfiifi' i f'3rwii'fr 1 A it Y 1 via- ' 3 W f , 'Q 4 A 9 f if E, Wm 4"Zf 'f 3 if is Q LSA .2 U05 ,...., . fri Q fm i i-it .....: its Wi Q it 4 5 , ,, ' ,,,,.,,, fg ,,... . ,.. ,. ducvxtjm WJ 1 M I, , 7 :--- ,M N A ., mdk x G 4 by I Ei- MM if v,:,v 4 ,rm .W ,ws 9 Zig., W1 3 V :EQ in V r . Q '-ft. -,,M A W W dm, ,W .Z ,k . . X.. ss. iz: E .,,,Mm, 4- x I im if M S 4 E Ni 2 ""' , 1 , A .., . if VVZV .., 4, , ep .": pplp I plvv , V z uzzzz 5 -zvv . --ei .,., rtt:, , ':" i f Page 137 ..av""":' THESE TWELVE GLADIATURS MADE UP THE VARSITY: nedy. Hylbak. J. Hanson. Mcusing. Brooke and Thompson. P. Hanson. Hoiscth. Chrislianson. Stowcll, Stolzc, Guiney. Ken- rapplers ttain Remarkable 11-1 Record Page 138 DUAL MEET RECORD Albert Lea Opponents 515 ,,,, 1111 111lVlinneapolis Henry ,,,, 11 0 27 ,,1, 111Owatonna 111 111111 1 17 18 11 111lVlankato 11 111 1 20 41 1111 1 11Austin 11111 1 3 201 11 11 1Faribault - -- 1 18 36 11 11 Northfield 11 11 9 43 11 111Winona 11 11 1 3 341111 111Rochester 1 1 1 9 321 111 11 Robbinsolale 11 1 6 40 1111 11 Austin 111111 1 10 39 111 111Waseca 11 1 1 9 523111 111Red Wing 1111 1 5 TOURNAMENTS District Meet 11111 11111111111111 1 11First Regional Meet 11 111First State Meet 1111 Seventh LEW KENNEDY WAS STATE CHAMP in the 133 lb. division. Rival coaches tahhcd him the best wrestler, pound for pound. in thc tourney. The year before he was YUIIIICI'-up in the state. ad! DAVE ENGLISH, EHRHARITS LITTLE BULLDOG, attempted TIGER HEAVYWEIGHT Jiln Thompson tried to flatten Tom a switch on Ronnie Scholl of Robbinsdale. English won 8-3. Olson of Red Wing. Later he did and picked up five team points. Kennedy Takes State Title, Thompson 3rd Displaying what was probably the best balanced wrestling squad in the state, Paul Ehrhard's muscular bone crushers came up with the greatest team in Albert Lea history and one of the best ever to come out of the rugged Big Nine Conference. Their only dual meet loss was a 20-18 squeaker to champion Mankato and in only one other match were they ever in trouble as they swept to a second place conference finish and were acknowledged by experts as one of the four best teams in the state of Minnesota. It seems as though all the members were heroes, but if one stood out among them it was Lew Kennedy, the implacable 133 pounder. who went through the course of the season unscathed in twenty matches and state champion in his division. Jim Thompson was number three in the state in the heavyweight class and, ironically enough, the eventual champion was beaten by Thompson in the region. For the season the Tigers compiled an astounding 439 points to their opponents 109. Of 144 individual matches in dual meet competition, an Albert Lea Wrestler came out on the wrong end only 29 times. SHOWN HERE PINNING his Red Wing adversary is Karrol Hoiseth at 112. Joe Kernan was the unfortunate at his mercy. Page 139 iiq Q WIRY PETE FABRY. 103 pounder, is shown here pinning Jerry Munighan of Winona. Young Pete came on fast at the end of the season and was a surprise in tourney action. VVHO ELSE COULD THIS BE but bulky sophomore. Jeff Brooke? He did not get a fall in this particular match. How- eve, he humilated Red Wings .lei Peterson to the tune of 12-2. :-- rrrr ..,i, . H .QV1 ----- .,,r.,.,, '-" . Q ' ... ll In '1 , A --.- ':::E 'liiiililil """"': ' " I tt,' 25999 -'-'-'-' ,Q2"9' i 'i'7'7'7 2:53 2 7'fliIiIE -:.g.:.: -EIEIE"lEl,I ' ,tit Wiiigwf., ,x,, . W ,,,,, T N "'1'e"""'nnt1t' "'22:11:1 VZV' 1 , ...,, ....,,,,, T Mfg .,.,,, 0 X ,Aw-ff' v.:5EE::' H -1.35-5 M N 'I SIS -EE:-2if:2 I 1 I A .,.:, V . if V 1... 1.55,-3,5 ,. E fax, Z qs- Vx . Q if ff ---'- I7 - , ,.,., .,:: . ,if t ,W r wg r U ,J V , 1 Page 140 ne-Sided Triumphs FIGHTING FOR POINTS was Paul llanson. the smaller halt of a brother comliination that won 22 and lost just two in dual meet competition. Paul won via a pin in this match. The Tigers opened the season by clobbering Minne- apolis Henry 56-0 at the Central gymnasium. failing by only four to acquire the maximum amount of points possible in an evenings work, Then in the Mankato Invitational Jeff Brooke and Karrol Hoiseth took seconds in a warmup for seasonal activities. Ovva- tonna, winner over the Tigers for the previous seven years. suffered a 27-17 setback at the expense of Ehr- hard's wrestling wrecking crew. After the heartbreaking defeat to Mankato. they bounced back to knock off Austin. in a most decisive fashion. too, 41-2. Faribault came to town with a determined group of boys but finally conceded to an even more determined group from Albert Lea. 20-18. Northfield. in the next match, came out on the short end of a 36-9 count and Winona had only one member that managed a win as the Winhaxvks were routed. 43-23. in a match at Central gymnasium. The Tigers' next two foes. Rochester and Robbins- dale, were supposed to be stumbling blocks but they were the ones who did the stumbling by scores of 34-9 and 32-6. Then came a repeat win over Austin. hundant as ladiators Scale New Heights COACH PAUL EHRHARD and Karroll Hoiscth viewed an early season match, taking it all in with calmness. Waseca and Red Wing, in methodical order, were the last two teams victimized by their superior foe. The Tigers slammed the Wasecans, 39-9, and won eleven matches in a 53-5 breeze past the Wingers. In the district tournament they reached their pin- nacle, racking up a record 126 points which was more than twice that of runner-up Austin. Paul Hanson 1955, Tom Stowell 11201, Lew Kennedy 11331, Jerry Hanson 1138j, Mark Hylbak 1145j, Bill Meusing 1154j, Jeff Brooke 11751, and Jim Thompson 1hwt.j all took coveted district championships. They defended their Region I crown successfully, piling up 97 points to second-place Owatonna's 49. Kennedy won his third Region I championship and Thompson his second. Hylbak, the most improved grappler on the squad, and Brooke also came home with first-place and championship showings. With Kennedy taking the championship that had eluded him by one point in 1959, the Tigers finished seventh in the state tournament held at Mankato State College. Jerry Hanson, who had figured prom- inently in coach Ehrhard's plans, was disqualified because of an injury in the early match. LITTLE TOM GUINEY, who is going to help the Tigers next year, displayed the form he used while snaking out a decision over Dick La Liberte of Robbinsdale, 6-4. DISTRICT CHAMPS: Meusing, Thompson, Brooke. STAND- ING: Kennedy, Hylbak, Stowell, Jerry Hanson. Absent when the picture was snapped was Paul Hanson. A Eefs 2 2 ' , ,,,...,,. , ., ,Q , Page 141 i JUST A LITTLE FARTHER, KARROLl Five seconds after this pose. Karrol Hoiseth had a pin to his credit. B SQUAD DUAL MEET RECORD Albert Lea Opponents 1311 .,.,, ,L,. O watonna 111 111111 33 3911 1 11 11Mankato 1- 11 12 241 1 1 .,,. Austin 1 1 1 24 22111 .,L, Hayfield 11 11 24 38111 L,,. Faribault 11 11 15 30111 11 11NorthHeld 111 11 14 2111 ,,.. Hayfield 111 11 26 311 1 11 1Winona 11 11 13 251 1 1,,, Rochester 1 1 1 23 251 1 1 1Ellendale 1 1 1 17 '331 1111 Austin 111 11 19 A 11 11111Waseca 111 7 4911 1111 Red Wing 11 5 LEVV KENNEDY, Tiger tri-captain along with Jim Thompson and Jerry Hanson. toyed with one of his many victims. Tigers Repeat as District, Region hamps STRIVING FOR A TAKEDOVVN was Al Stolze, spindly 127 poundcr. Duane Just of Mankato, his opponent here. was victorious alter a hard fought 5-2 decision. MARK HYLBAK SPOTTED twenty pounds to Mankato! Marv Arens in this particular match. He made up for that with ability as he shut out his adversary. 4-0. Page 142 Coasting to a 9-3-1 over-all mark were the Albert- Lea Bengal wrestlers, coached by George Acheff. Highlighting the season was a clean sweep in the last six dual meets. These promising underclassmen are expected to fill in adequately for the senior-studded varsity which loses most of the regulars. The HB" squaders opened with a 33-12 setback at the hands of Owatonna's strong team but bounced back strong to end Mankato, 39-12. Then, in their first engagement with Austin, they were held to a 24-24 tie. In the next match Hayfield's "A" squad squeezed out a 24-22 decision over Acheffs crew. Faribault, by a 38-15 count, and Northfield, by a 30-14 score, were the next victims for the Bees. Hay- field, in a rematch, snapped that short streak with a 26-21 victory. That was the last loss the Bengals suf- fered as they emerged victorious in each of their final six encounters of the wrestling season. Winona was first, losing 31-13, and Rochester was eked out, 25-23. The Ellendale varsity was toppled 25-17 and then Austin was knocked off 33-19 in the second meet between the two clubs. Waseca was plas- tered by the Bengals, 48-7 as they ran up their most decisive score of the season at that point. They poured it on in the finale against Red Wing, 49-5. LARRY LAHS AND BOB KENNEDY made certain that Ehr- hardis aggregation was well-equipped on all occasions. B Squad Feats Overshadowed y Varsity THE BENGAL GRAPPLERS for the 1959-60 season were- son. SECOND ROW: Wolff, McKey, Palmer, Jahns, Karlberg, FRONT ROW: Krause, Allen, Christianson, Kittleson, Gunder- Gilpin. Page 143 Make Up Able Arra CINDERMEN FOR 1960-FRONT ROW: P. Hanson, Gavere, Heather, Metzke, Kvale, Schwartz, L. Kennedy, J. Olson, Clay- bourn, Brooke. SECOND ROW: Hurst, Harms, L. Fredrick- son, Syverson, Summers, Boer, DeNeui, Fretheim, Gilpin. THIRD ROW: Jorgenson, Schwen, D. Nelson, Bosacker, B. of 1960 Cindermen 1959 Track Results DUAL MEETS Albert Lea Opponents 60 .... ---Austin --- --------58 74 ---- ---Owatonna -- ----47 74 ---- ---Fairmont ------- ----54 TOURNAMENTS State Indoor Meet ------------------ ---:nth place Mason City Triangular --- ---3rd place Albert Lea Invitational --- ---- 2nd place Carleton Invitational ----- ---3rd place Faribault Relays ---- ---- 6 th place District ---------- ---- 2 nd place Big Nine ------- ---3rd place Region -- ---- 2nd place State --- ---- 15th place AL GAVERE, REGINALD HARMS and co-captain Frank Hol- way brave the chilly spring weather as they go through some jogging exercises alongside the school. Palmer, Warren, Jahns, T. Steil, J. Gunderson, Kittleson. FOURTH ROW: Counters, Folie, Munson, Van Beek, D. Lar- son, Ulrich, R. Nelson, M. Johnson. BACK ROW: Danielsen, Stowell, Dahlen, G. Jacobsen, Seeger, R. Jacobsen, R. Swanson, I-Iolway. M r c'rHQ 'W HW as ..., A W 'eff -e ff'-M ff ,., ' si .... . , 'iiiwziiiiiziiii' ' . M ,.:.., 'K vi ., ,s -jg., ' '- , 2:15225-" s....,.,...Q2E.,. "f , -,..ZQ.., -'itil :"'....,g"'Ig2gEg2,I "1i5EgIgI::" ' liwifiyg W W if ..........,.. ...,. ..,.. i . ........,. .,.1 ...., G A -'.- 'fr my Ni.. A ":':""':' T "" f'i ' Q :-a Q -::--- t pquu ..,., ..,., :.,., . Giga ..,. -"-- :'- 2 -2-: '::: V A "' " X i f "f: "': --':' : 1 fs if-:s ,,- -A wfmag :Q-fx Z-T' . ,.:: 3 E :,:: .:,-..:: Qc, E 2. , .,-: L .,,:, -2, ,,,.,,,,,.,,, v ,gals , ,::EEgE:Ei.::' '--- Q ., gm ',,. '-" '." ... f xw fp., :gf .-, . . I V- " Wiki 'F' M 2 .... ,. .gag ..,,. . ' ...,., :21 ..,.' 8 :'-':', -:::-:','-: ::.: 'f.:.:-- V . ....: Q -.-: 3 --VV7 '- A .g, W. ' .Edgy unzpz unvlz .,... 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'Q i'2 .... . . 1 , 1 ' , '::,""f. "" -.--- at :.,., 1 tl :i:" T 1 V A V 5 i"i ' 1 ff p "" ' ff :., Q 'zi : ',.,. Eff "'-" Q ami- ..,:-:---.- V , . A H -.:::,:,, f 5' Y REQ: ' ,.,., ,ft --., 73. --:"'-.. eii' ,nlnv ----'-1:' ttf ':':i I X at . . WX j ,, mt. ,,,-: 2 f --:- ::::': . .,.. ,.,.. Q .,.,.... ::.., K X 4 5 A '.ff: 2 '---:- . ii: ..,.... ,.,. '..., :Tl :" :E':lfffQ. , A55:5-95:533553'fiiY ,es A' -iii . f:'-' ' li' 1 -f.,.,.,.,' E 2. f B .,...., ' q ' 'AA' L .,,,,,. Q :" if " .,.,,, ...,....., "': 3 5 53'5'55a2.. """' ' tf'::e AA""', '::"':"" "'::':" i Egfr? . K ' " ,san e A zf' I .3 J -""" -"::: f N WM " 1Q Q ",": -WE. if . :" - . V- ji - if Q We K '-" fair " Q. -'1' .....--.. Q : .,,,,... .... ,,,. 74. .. .fu 1-: ...-- f::-- , ....---- A "... ,f .... - .- '-:" ,,, 3 ....----' ' K f: .,,..' ..., zlil' fr- -"' --K+ ...--- ""'i:::' ', "" Q ,,... ' f "" ""' ' :""' ,.iii' "":' N "'::' . I . ..a, , ,. X ,,,. ,M L., at ' -. .,....--- ' "21 Q "-:i :.. ..a 1 ,. fwtlim iiz :--. . ""' '.-:.:-- I az:-' a ' ' .. 1 ..,. ,,..- z 'iff - ,-:: . ,, . ,... ::'-- lv., ,.., '---' -' X. ---' . -fff - 1 ,,,,,,,.,,, ,, ' .51 ' f aa rr... aaaaa aaaaaa QL ,... X l Y f it ... .. 'p akaaaa . . A... t taaa . . . .. ra. aa . ... Page 144 Seasoned Veterans, Promising Youngsters INSTRUCTING ROGER KITTLESON in the art of rope climbing is assistant track coach, Luverne Ahrndt. Jim Nichols and Ron Swanson watch the placement of the hands. Albert Lea's energetic thinclads sported one of their strongest teams in years during the 1959 season. They were victorious in all their dual meets and made strong showings in every tournament they entered, Austin, Ovvatonna and Fairmont were the dual meet victims. The Tigers, coached by Bruce Johnson, finished a surprising fifth in the State Indoor Meet. Ron Dahlen highlighted the event by capturing the high hurdles championship and taking a second in the lows. Austin, although edged out by Johnson's cindermen in dual meet competition, whipped the Tigers 82 to 631!2 in the district tourney. The Tigers, however, placed high in the Big Nine meet, only 31f2 points off the pace. In the Regional tournament the thinclads put out their best performance but still missed by a scant three points of being titlists. They notched 27 points which was good enough for a second place finish. Dahlen, the slender senior, placed a second and a fourth in the hurdles events in the State Tournament. .W DEMONSTRATING THE TECHNIQUE of throwing the shot put is Jim Thompson. the Tigers' weightman. Steve Clay- bourn, Jeff Brooke and Dan Jahns look on. BRUCE JOHNSON WATCHES with a stern eye at the proce- dure used by these boys. Toeing the mark are Joel DeNeui, Dave Palmer. Ralph King and Wayne Ulrich. Page 145 THE 1960 LINKSTERS WERE-KNEELING: D. Jones, R. Pet- ING: Davies, Westrum, Shea, Davidson, R. Christianson, D. ersen, Moe, Lehmann, D. Donovan, Jacobs. Ogren. STAND- Peterson, J. Donovan. Four Seniors Head 1960 Golf ggregation TEEING OFF in a practice session is exemplified here by Rog 1959 Gglf Recgrd Petersen. His near perfect form enabled him to make par. SCORE BOX A ,XX ,p X H .P ak . wwtix N Vik Albert Lea Opponents R. rf -1 v s 162-. ...cec ..e.. W age-Ca .... ----1--169 341 ..,,. ,.... F airmont ,... .... 3 88 341 ...., ,v... M ankato -11 - ---365 278 ci... .,... F aribault .... .... 3 21 4 243 cc,., ..... A ustin 1, .... 234 mx- 150 ..,.. .,,.. W aseca .... .... 1 62 244 ...., ,,,.. R oehester - -- - ---235 105 11... ..... O watonna --, ----166 163 11..1 .,.c. N orthfield .... ..,. 1 71 o izll Ti TOURNAMENTS Lake City .... ......,...,....... .... S e cond District ..,, .... S econd A Big Nine 11- .... Second gg' X' , H ,iw i s 'f as 'A Q we I 2 if Fin, N J 4. i..,5,-Q ,.,, . Q Page 146 DISCUSSING THEIR SCORES were Pete Jacobs and Paul Moe, two of the mainstays on the 1960 team. OBLIVIOUS OF HIS SURROUNDINGS was Dave CSwingerJ Donovan as he sunk this putt at the Country Club. Lehmann, Jacobs Selected As Co-Captians Bill Standly's 1959 linksters produced one of the strongest and most talented Tiger teams in years, pos- sibly the best since the early '50's when Clayton tBumperJ Westrum and Keith Fligge graced the Albert Lea Country Club course. One senior, captain Clair Friday, and a host of juniors and underclassmen comprised the squad. Fri- day was a representative to the state meet. First victim on the Tiger list was Waseca by a 162-169 margin and then Fairmont was humbled by the Standlymen to the tune of 341-388. They outshot Mankato 341-365 and swept past Faribault, 278-321. Austin gave them their first loss in what was also the first half of the district tournament, 234-243. In a re- turn engagement with Waseca the Tiger linksters came out on top with a 150-162 spread. Rochester beat the Tigers by nine strokes, 235-244, but they clipped Owatonna, 105-166. In the final out- ing of the year they edged Northfield, 163-171. Captaining the 1960 team were Jack Lehmann, who was first man as the season got underway, and Pete Jacobs. They were chosen by fellow teammates short- ly before the season commenced. JACK LEHMANN got himself out of a rut, so to speak, by blasting that little round thing out of a sandtrap. His predica- ment was a big hazard to golfers. Page 147 THE 1960 DIAMONDMEN-FRONT ROW: K. Christenson, R. C. Peterson. BACK ROW: Tullberg, B. Nelson, Hoffman, Anderson, J. Goodmanson, T. Cotton, llatch, Wolff, Elvebak, Skelton, Oliphant, Bowman, Wangen, Dunn, T. Larson. Diamond Nine for ' 9 Compiles 9-8 ark Playing their most extensive schedule ever, Albert Lea's diamond eleven managed to break even in four- teen contests for the 1959 season. Against Big Nine competition they won three while losing five. Paul Ehrhard was the baseball instructor. JUST MEET THE BALL! That's what Rich Anderson and other Tiger hitters are taught. The Tigers opened with a 12-4 conquest of Grand Meadow and then nipped Waseca, 2-1. However, Mankato gave them their Hrst defeat, 5-2, and Austin walloped them, 13-1, to take some of the shine off an impressive start. Tiny Morristown then shut out Ehrhardls nine by a score of 8-O. Austin, boasting one of the statels strongest teams, clobbered the Albert Lea baseball nine in a rematch, 11-1. Against Wells the Tigers regained some of the poise they had displayed in early season contests and, as a result, punched out an 11-1 win over the Wildcats. ln the next game a strong Rochester unit handed them their second shut-out loss of the year, 5-0. Red Wing was the fourth Tiger victim as they fell, 3-2. Winona, another of the Big Nine's more powerful squads, blasted the Tigers, 9-2, but they jumped back to beat Owatonna, 6-2. In a pitcher's duel the Tigers edged out Northfield in a 2-1 thriller. Then they pro- ceeded to lambast Elkton to the Southlands Conference by a 14-4 margin. Their season ended on a losing note, however, as Ellendale blanked them 2-0. The 1959 season proved to be a first in one phase of l baseball at Albert Lea. A "B" squad, the first ever, i was set up and coached by Don Buhr. Also assisting Ehrhard in the program was Lou Olson whose job it was to educate the junior high boys. Page 148 AL TULLBERG STRETCHES OUT to receive an oncoming SLIDE, CORNY, SLIDE! Corald Peterson shows artistic form pitch during a warmup drill at Hayek Field. while photographed in the act of a steal. '60 Team Has Steam, Stabilit and Spark 1959 Baseball Record SCORE BOX Albert Lea Opponents 12,,,, ....i, e.... G rand Meadow .... ,e,,.. , - 4 2,,,, , ...., Waseca ...,i,.. ,,- 1 2,,,,, ,,,,,1VIankato ,,,, ,,, 5 l ,,.. ,,,,Austir1 .... ,,,l3 0 ees, ,,,,,lVIorristown Y,.. W- 8 l,,,,, ....a Austin ,,,,. 7,411 11 ..., , ...,, Wells ,,,. , -,- 1 0 ..a, , ,,Rochester ,,,, ,,, 5 3,N,, ,.,.. Red Wing , ,,, 2 2,,,,, ,,,,,Win0na ,,, -,- 9 G,,,, ..,,, Owatonna ,,, -,- 2 26-,,, ,,,,, Northfield ,,, -1- 1 14 ' W 4 ,,,,, ,,,,,Llkton ,,,, 0 , ,,Ellendale ,, -f- 2 and lets go with his Nh EMERY BOWMAN, the Tigers' lit igh hard one". tle lefthander, rares back Page 149 Paul Wilke's netmen finished out the 1959 year with a record of 3 wins, 5 losses and 1 tie. It was a rebuilding year since Wilke lost some of his best players from a 1958 squad that compiled an 8-2 mark. Nevertheless, the Tigers came along fast to Win the District Two championship over Austin last fall. Then they advanced to the region where they notched a third place. In the tourneys last spring they placed second in the district, fifth in the region and fifth in the Big Nine meet competition at Mankato. In the first match of the season Waseca tied the Tigers, 3-3. Austin thumped them soundly, 8-1, but then they came back to down Waseca in a rematch, 5-3. In successive contests St. James, 3-2, St. Peter, 9-1, and Mankato, 5-2, harnessed the Wilkemen. They got back on the victory road against Blue Earth, 5-2, but Austin beat them for the second time in a close one, 5-4. The netmen wound up the season on a winning note with a 3-2 conquest of Owatonna. Jim Rollins Was Wilke's number one racket wielder. Jim Glesne and Bob Goldman were other mainstays. HEADING A LIST of 1-eturnees from 1959 was Jim Rollins, Wilke's number one racket man for two years. Young Netmen Show Promise for Future ROW: J. Nelson, Iverson, J. Jenson, G. Hanson, Wilke, J. Lar- FRONT ROW: Sorenson, D. Jenson, Behr, Pickavance. BACK son, Rollins. Page 150 Jack Lehrnann's gang of football enthusiasts ousted Jack Swansonls highly-capable aggregation in the final game of the season and thus was proclaimed intramural champion of 1959. Height and bulk, something unusual in intramural competition was the main asset of Leh- mann's crew. However, Swanson's smaller group was not to be denied until the last and decisive contest. "1 Besides Lehmann, members of the championship team included Paul Vinck, Jim McMillan, Dale Kvale, Gary Roelofifs, Frank Holway, Steve Schwartz and Allen Tullberg. Other teams participating were those of Art Draayer and Gary Davidson. Corald Peterson's high-scoring five beat out Paul Vinckis squad in regular season play and whipped Frank Ruerup's team in the playoffs to gain acknowl- edgement as basketball champions of the 1959-60 campaign. While doing so they averaged about sixty points per game and twice topped the century mark. Bruce Cotton and Ronnie Swanson were the champion- ship club's indispensible scorers. INTRAMURAL FOOTBALL CHAMPS: McMillan, Roelofs, Kvale, R. Olson, Jacobs. STANDING: Vinck, Lehmann, Tull- berg, Holway. Lehmann, Peterson Triumph in Intramural The Swanson brothers, Jack and Ronnie, took indi- vidual scoring honors for the year. Jack averaged 26 points per game, high for the season, and Ronnie dumped in a total of 323 for the year to nose out Pete Jacobs who had 321 total points. The ten top scorers were: 1. Ronald fPee Weej Swanson .,...... 20.2 2. Peter Jacobs ...........r,.a ,,.. 2 4.7 3. Roger Wangen -,- 21.4 4. Frank Ruerup -U 22.1 5. Gary QFuzzyj Lee --- 20.2 6. Paul Moe ........ 18.1 7. Bruce Cotton ..,. 14.3 8. Jack Swanson --- 26.0 9. Dale Hanson --- 15.9 10. Paul Vinck --- 14.0 BASKETBALL TITLISTS for the year 1959-60-FRONT ROW: Sorenson, Groetzinger, DeNeui, Har1'is.BACK ROW: Wilmert, Swanson, Cotton, C. Peterson. Page 151 FRONT ROW Reynen, Dunn. Danielson, Stowell, Christiansen, wyck, D. Larson, R. Olson, Wiersma, Palmer, Thompson, Clay Kvale, Hoiseth, R. Kennedy. BACK ROW: Vinck, Van Rys- bourn, Flores. Lettermen Set Example for Student Bod 1 DALE KVALE, SECRETARY-TREASURER of the Lcttermen's Club, takes notes at one of the meetings. Striving to better the reputation of the school in not only sports but social life also was the goal of the Lettermerfs Club, one of the newly-founded organ- izations in the Albert Lea curriculum. All senior high boys who have earned letters dur- ing the course of their high school career qualify for the club. Jackets worn by the group have white leather sleeves and blue Wool backs and fronts. An added feature is the fact that the jackets are reversible. The letters "A.L.', appear over the heart. During the basketball games at Southwest in the Winter, lettermen who were not participating on an indoor team served as ushers. Serving in the capacity of president for the 1959- 60 lettermen was Ron Dahlen. Paul lVloe held the post of vice president, and Dale Kvale's duties were that of a secretary-treasurer. Acting as an adviser to the R organization was the venerable Bill Standly. Page 152 CHEERING OUR VARSITY TEAM on to greater horizons and raising our school spirit were the '4A', squad cheerleaders. FRONT ROW: Sandra Hanson and Gail Lageson. SECOND Coaches and Teams Ten of the peppiest girls in Albert Lea Senior High School describes the "AV and HBH cheerleaders. The cheerleaders strove to raise school spirit through the numerous pep assemblies many of which were held during the noon hour. They cheered our teams on to victory and even though We lost the game, they kept the school behind the team encouraging them to make a harder try the next time. The coaches, Mr. Donald Buhr and Mr. Paul Ehr- hard, and the basketball and wrestling teams expressed a deep gratitude for the help that the cheerleaders had given them in getting student body support in a sports appreciation assembly on March 14. The coaches both stated that even though the spirit of the school was not the highest, that the cheerleaders kept on trying and succeeded in raising the loyalty that our teams so greatly appreciated. The Cheer- leaders adviser was Mrs. Joan Van Beek. Page 153 ROW: Jo Ann Goldman. THIRD ROW: Judi Olson and Margit Larson. Praise Cheerleaders "TIGER ECHO, LET'S GO!" yelled the MB" Squad cheerleaders across the "T" and down, they are Charlotte Skogheim, Kitty Tayor, Norleuc Kaasa, Skip Wilhelm and Cindy Bothof. FRONT ROVV: Dahle. Morreim. Unseth. Mosher. Goette. Simon. J. E. Olson. Todd. Lageson. Myers. Kane. SECOND ROVV: Wilson. J. Tufte. Maas. Blanchard. C. Paulson. Wichmann. Moflit. Peterson. Madson. J. A. Olson. Roorda. Schneider. Boyum. THIRD ROVV: lVI. Tufte. Vig. Rasmussen. Montague. Pep Clubers' Projects Peppcred with peppy signs by Pep Club members, the halls upheld "signs" of school spirit each week as teams were boosted on toward great victories, An outstanding feature was added to Southwest gymnasium in February by the Pep Club. Nineteen feet wide and majestically attractive, the Tiger on the north wall reminded all opponents of the futility of their efforts against thc mighty Tigers on the floor. As students and faculty passed the large bulletin board, their attention was focused on the section to the far right bordered in cherry and blue crepe paper. Labeled 'Tiger Talk" this feature was made up of note- worthy news events concerning the athletic Tigers. In its third year of booming activity, the club had Miss Phyllis Breberg as adviser. BOARDING THEIR BROOM for the Pep Club Halloween dance. were Silvia Sallenave and Judy Hansen. Jenner. Posthuinus. Sallenave. Robbins. Shea. Stoa. Sherman. VVolgamot. Janice Nelson. Skogheim. FOURTH ROVV: VVidger. Eckholl. VVangsness. Meixell. Slile. Yost. Zavitz. Zimney. J. Paulson. K. Olson. Wedge. Jane Nelson. Taylor. Sackett. Sether. Roscoe. Bell. Page 154 Boost School Spirit 'WWK fm. ziiii :,, o", , .4- 11. if PEP CLUB MEMBERS. Judy Vig. Linda Bell, Becky Boyer and Dee Ellertson, paint one of the many posters. FRONT ROW: B. Hanson, Kappas, Lutner, Alm. Brown, C. Johnson, Bothof, Kaasa. Boyd, J. L. Goldman, J. Hansen, Fer- ring. SECOND ROW: Gilbertson. Blizard, Calvin, Hendrick- son, Boone, Blunt. B. Jensen, Allen, R. Johnson, Haried, J. M. Goldman, J. K. Kennelly. Wilhelm. THIRD ROW: Kofstad. . 1 "WEAR IT LIKE THIS." commented Judi Olson. Pep Club vice president. to the other oiiicers. Judy Hansen, president: Jo Ann Goldman, seeretaryg and Margit Larson. treasurer. Lee. Brabec, Hassberg, Ellertson, Hegland, Kissinger, Fink, Dilling. Gavle, Henderson, Boyer, Evans. J. D. Kennelly, Ben- dixen, De Neui. Harris. FOURTH ROW: Lyon, Anderson, Ives. Gregerson. Goodmanson, Collins. Hagen, Ille, Cairns. DeVries, Jordahl. Keil. Hclgeson. Larson. Farry, Humphrey. DeBoer. -5 Q54 sf? Page 155 if if 1. v FRONT ROW: Moen. Michaclis, Heckes. Lindeman, Jensen. Hanson, J. Bartcll, B. Bartell. SECOND ROW: Francis, Went- zell, E. Kycek, Emstad. Ernest, Thompson, Carlson, Stevens, Lewis, Tonga. THIRD ROW: GniHke, Krciger. Mathews. Gil- bert. Schwemmler. Limlahl. Howard. Dudley, Nelson. lIerth. FOURTH ROW: Engbritson L. Kycek. Freemycr, Holway. Lemlike, Johannson, Ncsje. Fogel. Chapman, Mariner. Junior Bowlers Host to State Tournament MIXING BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE were the Girls' Junior Bowling League officers, Mona Lindahl, treasurer: Darlene Heckes, secretary: and LaJune Howard. president. Page 156 Strikes, spares and splits immortalize the sport of bowling in the minds of the 40 girls who were members of the American Junior Girls' Bowling League. These girls met each Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 at the Town Club Alley. They bowled three games each meeting instead of two as the league did in previous years. The league was composed of eight, five member teams which were sponsored by various city clubs, organizations and business groups. Each of the spon- sors gave his team the sum of ten dollars which was used to pay for the tournament entry fees and a ban- quet at the end of the year. lVIrs. Fran Ashcraft was the adviser to the officers of the league. This year the 1960 Minnesota Junior Girls' Bowling Tournament was held in Albert Lea at Bob's Lanes. The Albert Lea teams served as score keepers for the other teams in the state, in addition to bowling in the tournament and acting as hostesses for the other teams. The Mail-O-Graphic Tournament, on March l2, also took place at Bob's Lanes This tournament was bowled on a National basis with junior bowlers from all over the United States entering. In this tournament, the teams bowled three lines and turned in their score sheets, which were then sent to Chicago. Secret To GRA Activities, Sportsmanship Pledging themselves to maintain good sportsman- ship among the girls of Albert Lea High School were the members of the Girls' Recreation Association. The year's activities began with Girls' gym. Goodies ranging from were set on a table in the balcony table was quickly emptied, however a potluck in the cookies to pizza of the gym. The by the droves of hungry GRA girls. Dancing, pop and games followed. Four teams competed in the volleyball tournaments. Jane Nelson's team captured the crown by coming in first, Janet Blanchard's team came in second. Close behind in third place was Ruth Jordahlls team, and Barbara Kofstadls team was in last place. All the scorers and referees for the volleyball tournament were volunteer GRA members. During January the GRA basketball tournament started. There were six teams competing, and their captains were Carole Lee, Audrey Stevens, Nancy Chapman, Joan Noland, Ruth Jobe and Janet Rusley. GRA members also refereed and kept score during the basketball games. They counted the points, called the fouls and administered the penalties during the games. Points were awarded for participation in outside activities, attendance at meetings and holding an office or being a team captain, sports head, or a member of a winning team. According to the number of points held by a member, letters, medals and certificates were awarded. GRA advisers, who instructed the referees and score keepers, set up the activities and generally guided the organization, were Mrs. Joan Van Beek and Mrs. Rene Wambach. FRONT ROW: Draayer, Morreim, B. Hanson, Jensen, Hen- drickson, Lewis. Carson. Tonga. Stevens, Unseth, Schlehr, Omundson, Selle. SECOND ROW: Lutner, J. M. Goldman, Rusley, Jolie. Blanchard, Mariner. Thompson, Vig, Stoa, B. Jen- sen, J. S. Ilanson, J. L. Goldman. J. K. Hansen, Lindcman. ?...,,.. KEEPING TRACK OF TEAM SCORES was a big job as Janice Morreim, presidentg Barbara Kofstad, point secretary: Elaine Posthumus, vice presidentg Ruth Jordahl, point secretary, and Linda Ille, secretary-treasurer: would testify. THIRD ROW: son, A. Nelson, Gray, Roel, Gniffke, Schnebly, Styve, Madsen, M. Jenson, C. Hanson. FOURTH ROW: Engbritson, Meixell. Chapman, Ille, Lind. Postliumus, Dingemans, K. Olson, Hirsch. Stolze. Jordahl, Hagen, Ives, J. Nelson, S. Olsen, Minear. Peters. Wedge. Kofstad, Lee, Ekstrum, Jenner, Noland, D. Nel- Page 157 xx, wfweqtiwg H ?""' 'va FE TUBES M Q SURROUNDING HOMECOMING QUEEN Evelyn Sanders were representatives Steve Schwartz. master of ceremonies: Jim her attendants, Nancy Allen, Nancy Lee, Mary Ellen Blunt, Thompson. athletics: Jeff Larson. musicg Brian O'Neal, crown- Judy Vig. Liz Nielsen and Carol Rasmussen. Standing were bearer: Dave Olson. organizations: and Steve Moore, dramatics. ueen Evel n Wears Homecomin Crown Radiantly beaming at her charming attendants and the enthralled audience as the curtains parted to the strains of 4'La Czarinen was lovely Queen Evelyn Sanders. She was arrayed in the traditional white for- mal and held a bouquet of crimson roses. Her six attendants wore pastel pink taffeta and net ballerina- length gowns and each held a single red rose. Heralding the eagerly awaited announcement of the 1960 Homecoming Queen were trumpeters Paul Hill, Roger Christensen and Lowell Berg. Stephen Schwartz, Student Council president, presented Queen Evelyn and each of her attendants to the student body. Queen Evelyn descended from her royal throne to take the traditional oath and to receive the glittering rhinesone tiera as her crown. Ascending to her throne after thanking her subjects, Queen Evelyn listened as the representatives pledged their loyal support. To end the Coronation ceremonies, Joan Schneider rendered a vocal solo. HA Perfect Day!" Well-known to the students was the gleaming per- sonality and sparkling smile with which Evelyn greeted them. Among her activities were Student Council secretary, Ushers Club president, a member of the Ah La Ha Sa and Tiger staffs, Hi-Teens and Junior Classical League. PRIVILEGED -Steve Schwartz crowned the VYING FOR THE CROWN were candidates. Nancy Lee, Judy Vig, Carol Ras- 1960 Homecoming Queen. mussen, Evelyn Sanders, Nancy Allen, Mary Ellen Blunt and Liz Nielsen. Q Y ..,,,... . ., ,X :::" " 1 E C ..,... -P Z 5 . .,,, Q .,'11'fiit 0 W M .,. ex SW if 'M fa.. M Vg My , , QQ. , ..,. - S'-' ,,, 9,,.s'f 'f , . F . li,' ' g ers j ., .,... .,.' ---- . Q f.: I 51.5 .43 1. ' , Ay ri av gf ' af- , at . . at on at i " ' X vvvv Y M251 M3 I ay. 4 351 I N Y, , if 4, 4 A X' fa f wx.. 4. t fa? ,M4'-45:53 "ws f tgp 'f"i'f if 2 ' H a V 35 3 ,N ' fifxf .W - .f .ef ff . N i 'X 'm 1? i t Q, A V33 X' 4 . 3 ' f... Qq ' W . in 'S . WSW SALTING THE BHHYS TAIL were members of the sophomore class in a demonstrated attempt to "Make the Hawks Squawkf' Homecoming Parade, Page ltS2 Nfl IA "BEAR DOWN ON 'EMU said Yogi the big white bear. as he rode on this senior homeroom float in the Homecoming Parade. Bonfire and ictor Hard-working student Homecoming enthusiasts can be proud of the 1959 parade which they helped to make such a great event as it proved to be. Queen candidates riding in convertibles. 25 brightly decorated floats and excited spectators made the Homecoming Parade a success. This years floats. con- structed with the theme, A'Winhawks Wcin't," in mind. were judged by members of the Junior Chamber of Commerce. The sophomore class and Homeroom 203 floats were selected as prize winners. After the end of the parade had passed, everyone rushed to Morin Park to view the traditional bonfire with the pep band providing the music and the cheer- leaders leading the school yells. The candidates and team were introduced to the crowd. Many eyes watched the crackling fire and followed the leaping sparks that towered into the sky. David Heynen and Jerry Draayer planned, organized and supervised the parade. Jeffrey Brooke, Michael Mor- rison and David Olson had charge of the bonfire. EXCITED TIGER FANS surrounded the traditional bonfire to cheer for their team and Homecoming queen candidates. "YOU WANT THIS DANCE?" asked co-captain Dave Reynen of Jim Thompson. other ro-captain, as he danced with Queen Evelyn Sanders. following the Homecoming game. as 'ts 'Y' GIVING ORDERS to two replacements at the VVinona-Albert DURING A CRITIAL PERIOD of the game. the other "A" Lea game was William Standly. assistant football coach. squad football players viewed the game with keen observation. Thrill - lbert Lea Students and Spectators Ringing victory bells, waving pom-poms and yelling students offered encouragement to the ALHS football team at one of the most thrilling Homecoming games, October 9. Every fan's heart beat wildly as the Tigers trounced the Winona Winhawks 21-7 making this the second Homecoming victory in ten years. Presenting a superb performance at half-time, the senior high band marched across the field. stopping in the center to form a heart in honor of the queen and her attendants. Queen Evelyn and her six attendants. attired in furs. then circled the football field on a daz- zling heart-shaped float boasting numerous lights. Drawing to a close the 1959 Homecoming festivities, the students, faculty and alumni danced to the music of the Ray Lewis Band. Decorating the gym were silhouettes of the queen and her attendants. football players. bonhre and parade, made by Hi-Teeners. LEADING HER TEAM ON T0 VICTORY was JoAnn Goldman. the only senior cheerleader. Other "A" squad cheerleaders were Gail Lageson. Sandy Hanson. Judi Olson and Margit Larson. Page 163 Playfully vying for the attention of capacity audi- ences, the thirteenth annual Tiger's Roar, "Dollsl Dolls! Dollsln, was presented January 29, 30 and February 1 in the high school auditorium at 8 p.m. Participants and Student Council selected produc- tion staff and committee chairmen co-operated to make the 1960 'LRoar" a success. Mr. Robert Myers and Miss Hildred Tennihill served as advisers. The stage became an active toy shop with the final stroke of midnight as life flowed into the superbly costumed toys. Nina, a beautiful ballerina portrayed by Virginia Gray, was the victim of a spell cast by Griselda, the queen of the shop, Karen Johnston. Nina remained lifeless throughout the entire per- formance until her miraculous awakening at the storyis end. Her rapid recovery was aided by the various acts. All the toys were overwhelmed with joy when Nina once again danced. Even Griselda joined in the spirit of the happy ending by giving her queenly crown to the beautiful ballerina in the final scene, ROTATING ON A VELVET PLATFORM throughout the per- formance was ballet dancer. Virginia Gray. a senior. Dolls' Dolls' Dollslw Annual Tigeris Roar, 'TLOVVNING AROUND" were Karen Meixell. Judy Olson. Jo Ann Goldman. Sandi Hanson and Gail Lageson. "THIS LION lSN'T VICIOUSU explained Bert Wiersma, police- man, to Karen Ingvaldson and Nancy Allen who preferred the black. and white spotted horse to the lawny lion. ,Maas ... lT1 WF PRODLCTION STAFF MEMBEIS uolked l111d to make the Tlg6lS Roa1 41 success FRONT ROW QCIIIIQICIBI Gnmolds Qnnon QLLOXD ROV! Lee Shea ELkI1oiT THIRD ROW Jv.nne1 Ocndlm Rasmussen FOURTH ROW V1g Olson Ives IIFTH ROW Haven Pent7 Lallns QIXIII ROW Lalson Andc1son Dahlcn SEVENTH ROVV QCIIWHIII Wangen Khlgel RACGEDY AINN AND ANDY po1t1'1s ed bv Judy JOI1IlSllllI and 1VI111l3n 'itoa playcd on then v1ol1ns 1n the lJOI'f0IlIl3IlU., PACKED WITH DIINAMITE IS she pantommcd Honu Bun xx IH F:-nol Yost dvckcd out 111 '1 sallol Olltflt Playfull Elltfjl talns DEPICTINI MECHANICAL DOIIS was the SCHIOI chorus 11110 FRONT ROW Maas HIIIIS Bond QECOND ROW Sanbo1n Gllnolds P1ulson Gonttc THIRD ROV! Iadlle ?hca Jumu Euckson FOURTH ROW NIGISCU Luson Lnson THERE SHF GOES! Lxclaimul thc. senior Bongo Boys Steve Schwartz. D110 Kvalc, P1111 I inck Jim McMillan and Ron Olson. X. M SIVIILING ROYALTY REIGNING at the annual "Have a Heart" dance were Jim Thompson, Dave Reynen, JeH Larson, Ron Dahlen, Keith Stiles, Carol Sanborn, Janet Grinolds, Joan Schneider, Joyce DeVries and Judy Hansen. W Wi 557 , fi f ... fs, CAPTURING THE HEARTS of everyone at the "Have a Heart" dance were the king and queen, Keith Stiles and Carol Sanborn. Crowning ighlights Have A Heart Dance tens Page 166 A gayly decorated gymnasium heralded the arrival of the royal heart couple, Queen Carol Sanborn and King Keith Stiles, and their attendants at the annual Have-a-Heart Dance, February 12. Red and white streamers formed a ceiling, while small hearts attired with lace covered the north wall around a larger heart which formed the royal throne. Announcing the 1960 King and Queen of Hearts and their attendants were Paul Goodmanson and Suzanne Shea, King and Queen of Snows. Attendants included Joyce DeVries, Janet Grinoids, Judy Hansen, Joan Schneider, Ronald Dahlen, Jeffrey Larsen, David Rey- nen and James Thompson. Each girl held a single red rose, Queen Carol carried a bouquet of red roses. Being a Student Council sponsored project, the music was provided by the Swing Band. A Council committee of girls judged and selected winners in the Beard Growing Contest. Categories included most peach fuzz, most original and heaviest beards. WINNERS OF THE BEARD CONTEST were Dave Rasmussen, luzziestg Barry Hoffman, longest, and Bruce Cotton, fanciest. WINTER CARNIVAL ROYALTY were Joyce DeV1'ies, Judy Hansen, Janet Grinolds, Judy Johnsrud, Joan Schneider, Sue Shea, Paul Goodmanson, Jeif Larson, Roger Wangen, Jim Thompson and Dave Reynen. CROWNED KING AND QUEEN of Snow Sue Shea and Paul Goodmanson happily reigned over the Winter Carnival. Winter Carnival Provides Vacation Frolic Selected by the entire senior high to be our King and Queen of Snows and to reign over all Winter Car- nival festivities were Paul Goodmanson and Suzanne Shea active members of the senior class. I Giving their full support to the royal couple were five senior couples chosen as attendants. The Queen was presented with a bouquet of red roses and each of her attendants received a single red rose. The King and his attendants wore white carna- tion boutonnieres on their suit coats. After the Snow Royalty had been crowned by Evelyn Sanders, Homecoming Queen, they were each presented with a gift of jewelry. This annual event occurred as the highlight of our Christmas vacation and contained many lingering memories. Another Winter Carnival activity was held after the wrestling match, December 22, at the Elks, TRACKS IN THE SNOW disturb the smooth white layer cover- H , ing the ground as the trees outlined against the sky sing songs :ami of winter to the residents of Albert Lea. Page 167 ADORNED WITH FRIENDS, Betty Anderson, portrayed by Camille Zavitz, relaxed at home with Nancy Allen, Morris Haskins and Joan Schneider. HPRACTICE BEGINS AT NIGHT," relayed Bud Anderson, Rex Stotts, as he phoned his team members with the aid of Kathy, Jo Maas, Mrs. Anderson, Sharon Roelg and Kathy's friend, Sharon Simon. 44Father Knows Best" Entertains Audience An amusing, but successful reproduction of the award winning television show, 'Tather Knows Best," , was presented by the Thespians of National Troupe W 550 on February 16 to an accepting audience. Attempting to solve family problems to relieve his wife for a day, Jim Anderson becomes confronted with everything but the "usual," Margaret Anderson begins the mix-up by inviting the members of her Garden Club to her home for the evening to view a centerpiece. In addition to Margaret's critical club members, the washing machine repairman insists on remedying a knock in the broken machine. However, Budls, Rex Stotts, athletic friends must practice for an upcoming important basketball game in the basement. Kathy and her pestering friend add to the com- motion with their wailing cries of having Hnothing to do." Betty seems to have eloped with Mr. Andersonfs clientls son. The client successfully okays a contract and everything becomes normal at the household with the dawning of a new and more hopeful day. A CRUCIAL MOMENT in the household came with Mr. Brink- worth's, Steve Moore, signing of the contract. Mr. Anderson. Mike Morrison, offered him the contract and a pen. "I DON'T KNOW ABOUT THIS ONE!" exclaimed Nancy Lee, Judy Pentz and Pat Gendler, critical Garden Club members. Page 168 fi si K g WY . ami '-L Q.....s REVIEWING THE PANEL DISCUSSION TOPIC was the esterg Barbara Slife, Albert Lea, student chairmang Doug Miller, demonstration panel, Marilou Hunter, Winonag Dan Wool- dridge, Mankato, Ed Flitton, Austing Robert A. Hanson, Roch- Owatonnag and Ted Lee, Red Wing. Speech Festival Hosts Attain High Ratings Chosen as home base for the Big Nine Conference Speech Festival, Albert Lea High School was the scene of extensive preparations by the speech department and its director, Miss Hildred Tennihill. Through welcome addresses by Mr. J. R. lVIcElhin- ney, principal, and by Steven Moore, Thespian pres- ident, participating speech enthusiasts received their first taste of Albert Lea hospitality. Following the opening assembly, the students dis- persed into their individual room assignments aided by the directions listed in the festival programs which were cleverly designed by Judith Pentz. After-dinner responses by representative speakers from all the Big Nine schools sparked the traditional banquet, which was held at noon. A musical note was lent to the already harmonious procedures by Joan Schneider and David Jordahl as they rendered vocal and clarinet solos, respectively. The all-out effort exerted in each of the areas of competition proved Worth-while for the Albert Lea participants as the critic sheets revealed nine superior, eight excellent and five very good ratings. DESERVING RECEIVERS OF SUPERIOR RATINGS included -FRONT ROW: Mary Jo Omundson, JoAnn Maas, Joan Harris, Barb Slife. BACK ROW: Bob Paulson, Karen Johnston, Carolyn Farry, Myreen Gavle, Mike Morrison. Page 169 dxf Sf' Q it X ..:,:EE. Q A:.A On Sadie Hawkins Day, October 30, senior high girls dashed to the bookroom and got tags saying Hllm stuck" to pin on any boy they happened to catch. The boys, of course, made the girls run after them. After tagging their men, tha girls had to get back down to the bookroom. This time it was to buy a marriage license admitting them to the dance that night. Mainly hobo costumes were worn at the dance. Another week of enjoyment for the boys came Feb- ruary 15-19. This was TWIRP Week, the Week that the girls were at the service of the boys. They were requested to address the boys as "Sir," carry their books, open doors for them, provide "protection" and pay for dates and other activities the couple attended. Bringing this hectic week to an end was the dance held February 19. Students disobeying TWIRP Week rules were punished in Kangaroo Court at the dance. Most of the i'guilty" ones were sprayed. ASSISTING Rog Thompson and Gary Roelofs with their coats were Nancy Erickson and Sandy Hanson. "GIVE ME A CHANCEV' exclaimed Clint Sanborn, eligible bachelor for Sadie Hawkins, to Char Hagen and Jo Goldman. Students Keep Busy With Extra Activities WHIPPED CREAM SHAMP00 was what Dave Donovan gave Paul Goodmanson as Gary Van Baak and Bruce C0tton watched. "TEMPEST" is the name Gary Vollmer painted on his 1937 Chevrolet. The idea of naming cars was a fad this year. Page 170 Adding something new to the Hi-Teens yearly agenda was a take-off on the annual, southern Mardi Gras celebration of New Orleans. Gala decorations, costumes and music set the mood for the March 1 party. Costume prizes were awarded to Mary Blunt, Barbara Ives, Carolyn Robbins and Marilyn Stoa. Greater understandings and co-operation between foreign countries were created through American Field Service students, Sylvia Sallenave of Argentina and Ann Lyon, summer student to Germany. Sylvia gave vivid descriptions of her native country and its customs, while Ann relayed her experiences. Senior participants of the annual "Know Your Government Seminarf' sponsored by the YMCA, gained new democratic, as well as cultural ideas of their country as they travelled to Washington, D. C., and New York City, April 8-18. Preliminary study and planning sessions were held prior to the trip, upon returning, students shared their experiences with others through panel discussions. MARDI GRAS ATTENDERS, Janet Goodmanson, Donna Hen- drickson, Ann Lyon and Marilyn Stoa, joined in the gala event of festive costumes and Spanish music at the Hi-Teens Party. ardi Gras Celebration Is New To ALHS THE FLAG OF FREEDOM was Shared by Sylvia Sallenave, "BUT MARK, WE,LL GET LOST!" wailed Connie Eckhoii and Argentine Foreign Exchange Student, and Summer AFS Stu- Kathy Olson to their weary seminar companion, Mark Hylbak, dent to Germany, Ann Lyon. as he refused any and all preliminary study. Page 171 AS FOUNTAIN WATER TRICKLIID over Judy Vig's ungloved CAPTIVATING AUDIENCE A'l"I'EN'I'lON. Sharon Simon added hand. Ron Olson. Connie Eckholl and Jack Lehmann expressed lo the intermission program with a modern dance interpretation. "Prom delight" as juniors attending the Prom. All entertainment was provided by the students. ' 9' P GG 1 1 1 9 9 Prom, mental clyssey , O1 tl ays PICTURING TIIEMSELYES as a part of this Chinese hack- tional evening. were junior Prom-goers Rick Behr. JoAnn Maas. ground screen, which added to the Oriental effect of the tradi- Liz Nielsen, Mark llyllxak. Kay VVichmann and Tom Vorpahl. K Page 172 rf it . THE POST PROM PARTY held at the Elks Club "topped off" the evening by providing entertainment and food. Far Eastern Scenes Promgoers of May 15, 1959 left modern-day Albert Lea to journey to the Far East as they entered the ori- ental decorated high school gymnasium and cafeteria. Japanese screens, depicting Far Eastern scenes, formed walls on either side of the gymnasium. Punch was served from rose bushes by Giesha girls of the sophomore class near a beautiful flowing fountain. The cafeteria resembled an oriental holiday with its Hery dragons and descriptive murals. Checkered cloth covered table boasted umbrella centerpieces. Committee chairmen for the Prom were Richard Behr, Ronald Dahlen, Jerry Draayer, Charlotte Hagen, Judy Hansen, Carole Hanson, Mark Hylbak, Barbara Jenner, Jeffery Larsen, Nancy Lee, Priscilla Lee, Eliza- beth Nielsen, Judy Pentz, Carol Rasmussen, David Reynen, Stephen Schwartz, Sharon Simon, David Skogheim and Judy Vig. General chairmen were the Junior Class officers: David Olson, Suzanne Shea, Dorothy Greeney and Janet Grinolds. Mr. Nicholas Cords and Miss Beverly Knutson served as advisers of the successful Prom. AMBITIOUSLY CONTRIBUTING to Prom progress were Gary Hammond and Larry Will with Carol Sanborn, Marilyn Ferring and Barbara lvcs they construct an oriental screen. if 'gil' ft TASTY BUFFET STYLE FOOD awaited the selections of Peggy Cairns, Steve Moore, Judy Hansen and Jim Thompson. .MMM M 4 ,,, ,. I . 4.5. A of Dazzlin rient ! i mm .Z jg WW' Mg, M V, . ima . s Q5-..,,.:z,. N :sa::saa?':'i:: """ ' ' W V , M 1 ,vw W S4 2 i 5. I , , , t. at-' ---' Rte af g a y .... ' f M1 5:4 4 ' V ...,. r .llt MN-jaw"-' ,Z ,.,, M M, yyll I 5. . Qs K. -P We-A . W We t .s,-1f,::e:ss.1, -az: W S- it ' X AA ,fam -at ...,,,., K, ,um r "" p ,Z ll , . r ,.,.,.,.,. 3 2 f 5 C Q ""f ian N r"" '-"' Merc ,i K Mm, ,,.,. ,,,,,,, .,.. nncw..-.1 -i Y Q ,W ia . -..,,.....,......-,.-- W A 2 - e ' Ham. , Page 173 Qui' ff J if 1 'X ff!! I f ,,f E 'X f aw, --f Q . x l di li ,c JW! gl .A ' fs , f-fx 1 We fb. ,A ey-ya 51' ex NO -:yi Y C QA' V fs 'C 4 1-ef" is ' Lf M fs' " r F f---J ,,.A x"" , " I fr., ' r xl ' X jj, Z' Q G! 25 44 Y ,s yy' jf NXCX C All f f' frnixx 9 M ,, if-1 Xi EY' 41 Cyp, " VW CIN X-J ' 3' S ff A of .4 " g C I' t H VJ' -I Jfd i-fi ,L Ar" I ,, ' ,gf . qtf' A ,,,.- J rs? ,if ff' CNQ ff 5? i ' L ll QV ' 9 ' 'TL JS K ,A Ca," f 1 or , ,Ff,f' ,,,, ,,.z,, Y, ,. ,,,, , , , , ,, , H Q A fs, A ff Ae--V' gy Business Manager ,V .,777 ' ,.., , ,, r,.f ,QM ijivf-S J JA as '5-.- if u 4. " sax fy' +- Literary Editor ,,,,,,,,,,.. , , .SX Faculty and Administration Classes: Seniors , , , , , Juniors and Sophomores Organizations , , Boys' Sports Girls' Sports , Features ,,,, Photography , , , Index Publicity and Circulation Editorial Adviser ,, Business Advisers , , Photography Adviser ,, Betty Braaten , , , Peggy Cairns , , ,Elizabeth Nielsen , , , ,Janice Henderson Carolyn Robbins ,, ,,,Joyce De Vries Evelyn Sanders , , , ,Karen Johnston Carolyn Pierson ,, , ,Rebecca Buenneke Charlotte Hagen Mark Hylbak Nancy Lee , , , , , , ,Clinton Sanborn Larry Van Ryswyk , , , , ,Marion Gniffke , , . . , Lonna Herth Carol Rasmussen , ,,,, David Larsen Jeffrey Larson , , , ,Kathleen Olson Doris Qualley , , , ,Dorothy Jenson Laura Lewis , , , ,Miss Edna Gereken Mr. Arthur Anthony Mr. Charles Fairchild Miss Marie Skjeveland , ,Mr. Earl Jacobsen Academic Content , ,, Administration , , , Audio Visual . -. Band ,...... Baseball .,.v Basketball ..-,. Bowling League ..., ..... rganization Index . , . .10-33 , , , .10-11 ,--.112 . . . -92-93 . M ,148-149 ..,,,w,,-,v,,-, ,-0132-137 LJ pp ..,,... .... 1 56 . JJ aeerla 3 --- .,.... .cf .... ,,,, LQ ,... - --:-- Ehfnfus ..,,,.. ly ...,. J A Chorus ...i.... ,... , ,,,,. jJ'l:J.-88-W" B Chorus ..,ii iiii UA ,,,, ,,,,, , ,ii,,i 97551 Cheerleaders ..,, . ..... ---- 3 Classes C... 4 ,... 221.34-sa Counselo ,,,,,, -, .... QUHJ4-15 Div rsiHgJO .s....., ,.v,Ad....W..118-119 Mxpemyl H . A9 -.-- ,4,., ' ,f ..... -8-33 4U'at no est-., ,Hoi .....-..,g , . vi! Fe res ....,,. .,,. ,.,... , ....... 1 'pol lf 5 C A . . -D ..s., x ..isss .1 ..,,.sss.s J-111,116 17 OJ F. .A. .....1., is ..,111 6.16, 11,1,-.,11 15 lDFoo-tbauiZQ,,- , ,,,,,,,,,, 11,126-131 ,lf -16,0 ssss 16 1s11 ss Q61 sssss sssssssss I 13 ,JV jyyencljvapffb ULU- ...111 11...,,,1,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,, 9 8-99 Mhculwin .,,1..., ...1,.., 1 02-103 OJ fl'LASPOftW ...,,... .,.. 1 53-157 1611! CKE!!! 11.., 1... 1 46-147 . .---157 Intramural ,,,,, ,151 Hi-Teens ,111 .,.. 1 06-107 Homecoming , , . ,,,, 160-163 Honor Society Janitors -. -,, . Page 176 ,,,,112 33 Journalism , , . Juniors .,,, Seniors ..,..,,. Junior Classical League . , . . . 1 , Junior Red Cross. . . Juniors ,,...,,,,,,, Letter-men's Club .. Madrigal ...... . , . Piurses -- ---- --. Office Helpers ,,., Orchestra ...,,. Organizations .,.. Pep Club -.,1,. Prom . ..,. . Rifle Club .........1 Sadie Hawkins' Science Club ..,,... Secretaries . . . Seminar Seniors -,.... Sophomores Spanish Club .,.. Sports ...,-..,... Student Council Swing Band Tennis .,,.. Thespians .... Tigers' Roar . . . Track ...,... , Twirp Week Ushers Club . , , Wh0's VVho ,,,, Wrestling ..., 120-123 122-123 120-121 100-101 .-..108 . , ,, ,63-73 , , ..... 152 --- 91 --- 31 .--,- 12 .,.--96-97 1.,-,84-123 154-155 172-173 .--,,111 Day""' ,.,.. 170 -.-.-109 12 .-.--171 .,,,-34-61 . -74-83 . -- -104 124-157 . .86-87 . .94-95 ,,.,150 ---.105 164-165 144-145 ..-.170 .,,.110 . ,36-37 138-143 A Ackland, Jay 11 ....... ..,.,...,. 6 -1 Ackland, Rachel 10 ,... ,,.., 7 6, 93, 97 Ackland, Ronald 11 ,,.. ,,..,, 8 9, 91 Adams, Steven 10 7,,. ,,A.,.., 7 6 Ah-l, Roger 10 ...V,,. .,,76, 101 Alders. Arthur 12 ,,,. ,.,..v.. 4 0 Allen, Dean 10 ,.... ,,,, 7 6, 143 Allen, Larry 11 ,.,,..,.,..,.,,...,... 64 Allen, Nancy 12 ,.,,,,,,,,.,.,.....w.- 40, 88, 105, 106. 113, 155, 161, 164, 168 Alm, Maridee 10 ,,.....,...,,,,,.... ...--.176, 78, 87, 91, 96, 101, 107, 155 Amann, Robert Paul 11 ,,,....,.,.., Amundson, Carol 10 ,..,,,.,..,, 76, Amundson, Sharon 11 ,,.. ,,,,.. Amundson, Shirley 10 ,,,,....., 76, Anderson, Barbara 10 ,,,,,,.,,....,.. .64 107 -64 103 Index Blanchard, Patricia 12, Bleckeberg, .Paul 11. Blizard, Sharon 11 ,..,,,,,.,.V..f-. 107 108 123 11164, 88, 96, 99, Blunt, Mary Ellen 12, 39, 41, 86, 87, 98, 100, Book, Donald 11 ,,.,,..,..,,,,,,.. 102 131 137 Boer, Byron 10 .,,, 76, .,--.41 .,,,,.,..-.,-164 , , ,155 105, 106, 155, 161 . .64 , , , 144 Bohland, Daniel 10 ...,,.,..,,, 176, 137 Bohlman, Betty 11,,, .64 Bolinger, Nancy 11 ..,,.. 64, 89, 107. 122 Bolton, Larry 12 ,,.... 41, 92. 93, 97, 109 64 89 Booen, Jeanene 11... Boone, Patricia 10 1.oo1,o 76, 90, 103,,155 Bos, Mary 11 ....,,,,. Bos, Phyllis 12 ,,,.,, Bosacker, Del 11 ,,,. 64, 73, 126, 128, Bothof C nthia 11 .41 144 . ,64,, 70? 86, 88, 99, 100, 107, 108, 122. 155 Bothof, Timothy 10 ,,,. ,,,, 2 8, 76, 86 Bottelson, James 12 ...,, ,.,.., 4 1, 116 Christenson, Doris 10 .... -...76 Christenson, Harold 12 ....,........, 42 Christenson, James 12 ...,,,1......, 42 Christenson, Keith 10 .,.. 176, 112, 148 Christensen, Robert 10 ,.1...,....... 76 Christianson, Roger 11 ..,........... .,64, 65, 86, 89, 91, 92, 94 , 97, 138, 143, .,.,,146, 152 Clausen, Carroll 11 ,,,,,,,...., 65, 117 Claybourn, Stephen. 11 ,,.. 165. 70, 88, 126, 130, 134, 144, 145,152 Clifford, William 10 ,,,,,,,....,..... 76 Clifford, Perry 12 ,,.....,,,,.,, 42, 118 Clikeman, James 10 ,,.,....,,,, 76, 101 Collins, Barbara 10.,76, 90, 107, 155, 108 Collins, Gary 10 ...,,,.,,,.,..,, 76, 116 Collins, James 11 ....,.,,,,,4.. 65, 117 Columbus, Manfred 12 ,1.,.,,, 42, 92, 97 Coonradt, Charles 10, ,76, 78, 89, 103, 131 Cornelius, Beverly 12 ,,,,......,..., 42 Cornelius, Lorraine 11 .... .,,,.... 6 5 Cornick, Alice 11 ,,,,.,,,,,....,, 65, 107 Bowman, Emery 11 ..,, ,,,, 1 48, 149 Bowman, Robert 11 ....,,.1,,......, 117 Boyd, Rebecca 12 ...,....,,,..,.,,,.. 89, 106,155. 165 Boyer, Rebecca 11 ,,,,,,,,,,.....,-.. . . , , , . , ,64, 102, 103, 107, 108, 155, 165 Boyer, Karen 11 ,.,,,,,.,,,, 64, 100, 107 Boyum, David 10 ,,..,,,,.,.,,..,4,- - Cornick, .Hugh 12 ,,..,,,,,,,.,,,, 43, 105 Cotton, John Bruce 12 ,,.. 38, 43, 166, 170 Cotton, Terry 11 ........ 65, 101, 148, 151 Counters, Thomas 10 ,..... 18, 76, 89, 144 Cutts, William 10 .,.. .,....,, 7 6, 103 91, 96, 107. 155 Anderson, Bernette 11 .......,,.. 64, 92 Anderson, Evelyn 12 ..,.,,..,,,,,,,, 40 Anderson, Jane 12 ,,.. ,,,.. 4 0 Anderson, Karen 11 ,,.. ..........,, 6 4 Anderson, Keith 10 ,..,,,........,, 76 Anderson, Larry J. 12 ,,,, 40, 88, 91, 165 Anderson, Perry 10 .,....,.......,.. 76 Anderson, Raymond 11 ,,,.,,....,, 119 Anderson, Richard 11 ,.,, 64, 92, 134, 150 Anderson., Steve 12 ....,,,,..,,..,.,, 40 Anderson, Susan 10 ......,, 76, 103, 107 Andrews, Maralyn 12 ,,.,..,,.,,,,,.. 11112. 40, 43, 88, 106, 108, 110, 113 Arneson, Nancy 12 ..,,..,,..,,...... 40 Aulwes, William 12 ,,,,.,,.,,.,,.,,.. 40 B Baas, Pauline 10 ,,.., Bachtle, Lanny 11 .... Baker, Bruce 10 ...,. Bakke, Orrin 12 .,,,, 1..-76 ,,1,,,64 .,,,76, 116 11.40, 118 Bakken, Phyllis 12 ..,. ........... ,40 Bale, James 10 ....... ......... 7 6, 101 107 Barrett, Susan, 10 .,,....1... 76, 103, Barry, Dorothy 10 ..... ....... 7 6, 107 Barry. Mary Kay 12 ...... Bartell, Beverly 12 ........ 40. 110, Bal-toll, Judith 11 .... 64, 96, ,,,,,1,..40 156 104, 110, 156 Bates, John 10 ...,.....,...,.... 76, 131 Bauers, William 11 .......,......... 117 Bauman, Lorraine 10 .,...... 76, 90, 114 Bauman, Robert 12 ......1. 40. 118, 119 150 Behr, Richard 12 .... 26, 40, 101, , 172 Behrens, Eugene 12 ..,.......,. 41, 118 Bell, Lynda, 11 .....,......,......... 11120, 64. 99, 100, 107. 113, 154, 155 Bendixen. Linda 10 ...,, 76, 101, 107, 155 101 Bennett, Walter 10, ............. 76, Benner, Kathleen 12 .......1........ 41 Benson, JoAnn 10 .....,....,. ., ..... 91 92. 106 Berg, Jean 12 ..,,....... 41, , 108 Be1'g, Lowell 11 ....,....,,,. 92, 94, 104 118 Bergen, Patrick 12., ..........,. 41. Bergo, Larry 12 ,....... ,.... 1 8, 19, 41 107 Bei-go, Sandra 11 ........ 11.64, Bertelson, Edward 11 .......... 64, 101 Bisgaard. Daniel 11 ........ 64, 100, 102 Bierke, Sharon 10 ...... ..........., 9 9 Black, George 12 .... .......... 4 1 Black. Paul 10 ................ 76, 103 Blanchard, Janet 11 ..............,. ,....,,,...,64, 107, 114, 115, 154, 157 77, 89, 103. 131, 137 154 Boyum, Judy 1,1 ,.,,..,.,,.. 64, 99, Boyum, Julie 11 ...,..,,,4-- 64, 99, Braaten, Betty 12. .41. Braaten, Judith 101. 106,108,110, 155 Brabec, Sandra 10 ...... 76, 101, 107, Brandt, Judith 12 ...,..,....,.. - ,41, 113 Brandt, Ruthann. 101 Breamer, Kenneth 12 .,., ,------- 4 1 Breck, Joyce 10 ...... Briggs, Jack 11 ....... .....,.. .107 110 Broitzman, JoAnn 10 ........ 76, 91, Brooke, Jeffrey 10... 1176, 86, 104, 111, 126, 138, 140. 141. 145 , ,. .144, Brown, Randy 10 ..,.....,.,, .,.- 7 6, 103 Brown, Susan 10 ,....,,,. 176. 107- 155 Buenneke, Rebecca 12 ...... 42. 121 Burnett. Beverly 12.1 Bushlack. Lavonne 12 Butenhoif, Lois 11.,. Butler, Darlene 11 ,... Butters, Beverly 10.1 Bye, Lowell 11 ...... ,,.42,89, ,106 ,,,,,....,42,106 ,..,,,,,,,.,,,-64 11164. 100, 107 ,, .... 76.90.103 104 ..,..65, C Cairns. Peszzy 12 ..........,,...,44 - - 1139, 42, 88, 91, 100, 106, 120, 155. 173 Callahan, Harriet 12 ...,..,-,..--- - .42 Callahan, Karen 11 ..........,,,... 465 Calvin, Nina 10 .,.. 76, 90, 103, 109, 155 Carlson, Christine 12, .1,,...-,25, 42, 89, 91,' '1'00,4106f156 Carroll, Rose 11 ............,, vf.. 6 5, 107 Carroll, Thomas 12 .......,....,, 30, 42 Carson, Valerie 10 .,.,---,.,-,- -76, 157 Casey, Julie 11 ....... Caya, Gordon 10 ..... Chapman, Nancy 11, . , Chapman, Trudy 12, , . Chesterman, John 12 ,,.,,,, , , 1.65, 88, 89, 107 ...12, 65, 156, 157 .15 42 111 Christensen, Pauline 10 ,.,,,,..,, 76, 90 Christensen, Ross 12 . Christensen, Sandra ll ,.., ,,.,,, ,,42 ,,.,,65 Dagner, Ricky 10 ,,,,.., .-1.1--176 Dahl, Sandra 12 ...,,,,,.,....., 43, 105 Dahle, Louise 10 ...,,,,, 76, 99, 113, 154 Dahlen, Ronald 12 ,,,,,,,,,,,,..... ,,.-115, 43, 98, 126, 130, 144, 165, 166 Daleiden, James 11 ,,,,,, 65, 73, 100, 102 Danielsen, William 11 ,.,,,,,...,.... .,,,.-1,,65, 73, 99, 126, 134, 144, 152 Davidson, Gary 11 .,....,,,,,....... . . . . - . . , . .65, 88, 91, 102, 108, 134, 146 De Boer, Arnold 10,, 1.1-11---176 De Boer, Gerald 11. ,,,,,,---,---, A65 De Boer, Marie 12 ..,,,. 31, 43, 106, 155 DeHaan, David 10 ,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,., -77 Demo, Robert 11 ,...,,..,, 65, 66, 70, 102 Qglggylhnottoe 10 ..,,,..,,,,, 77, 90, 155 DeNeui, Joel 12 ...,,, 43, 93, 144, 145, 151 De Raad, Henry 12 ,,,,,,,,,, 24,-43, 92 119 De Raad, Joan 11 .,,,,,,,,,,,,, 65, De Vries, Joyce 12 .,,..,.. .,38, 43, 89, 91, 106, 120, 155,166,167 Dllllng, Arlene 11 ,,,,,,,--YYY --,,--- 88, 100 Dingemans, Lola 10 ..,,... , 107, 123, 155 ...77, 103, 157 Dixon, Janice 10 .,,,,,,,,.,,, 47777, 90 Donovan, David 12 ....,,, 1143, 87, 132, 133, 134, --Q-v--r.y,,: - 135' 136.7 ' ' ., . 146, 170 ee--43147, , mf Donovan, Gerald 12 ,,.,.,..,,,., ,,,, 4 4 Donovan, J amcs 10 . . , , ,77 Doyscher, Sally 10, , , , 101, 137, 146 ,.,,,,.77, 90, 103 Draayer, Arthur 11 ,,,,,,,,,,,-,---, 55 Draayer, Jerry 12 .... 26, 38, 44, 86, 87 Draayer, Joan 10 ,...,,,. 77, 90, 99, 157 Dress, William 11 ,,,,,,wV,,-Y,VYY--, 65 Dudley, Donna 12 .,,,...... 44, 100, 156 Dudley, Rosalie 12 ..,.,,,,,, 44, 89, 156 Duflstad. Kent 11 ..,, 24, 65, 89, 119, 126 Dulitz, Harold 12 ,,..,,..,.,,.,,,,,, 44 Dulitz, Steven 11 ..,,,,..,,,,.,,,..,, 65 Dunn, Russell 12 .... ,,,,, 4 4, 148, 15" Page 177 70, ss, 99, 100, 107,155 Gill Lois 10 ..,....., Durnin, Richard 11 .,.,.,..,... 65, 101 103 Dusek, Edward 10 ,...,. 77, 87, 88, E Eastvold, Karen 11 ....,,,, 65, 89, 99, 107 Ebsen, Arlene 12 ,...,,.....,..., 44, 88 Eckart, George 10 ......,....... 77, 116 Eckart, Kathaleen 12 .,.,........,,.. 104,110,114,115 Eckholf, Constance 12 ,....,,....,,, 1...44, 89, 91, 98, 99, 100, 106, 154, 165 172 Edwin, Dennis 11 ................,.. 65 Edwin, Donna 11 ,..., ....... 6 5 Edwin, Gary 12 ,,,.... ,.... 4 4, 94 Eisenbise, Sharon 10 ..,. ..,.. 7 7, 91 Ekstrum, Carol 10 ...,...,..,,.. 97, 157 Ellertson, Dee 11 ......,,.....,.... Ellingson, Loren 10 ....,,,,,,,,.. 77, 92 148 Elvebak, David 10 ,1.....,,..,,,, 77, Emstad, Judith 12 .,,,.....,,,,,, 44, 156 Emstad, Ruth Ann 11 ,,,,.,,,,,..,, 89, 104, 100, 107, 150 Enderson, Barbara 12 .,......,, 44, 114 Enderson, Larry 11 .,.... ,,,,..... 6 5 Enderson, Patricia 11 ,...,,..,,. 65, 107 Enderson, Sylvia 12 .,,,,,.,........,, 44 Engbritson, Judith 11 ,,,.,........ ,.....,-...21, 30, 65, 99, 107, 156, 157 English, David 12 ......11.1....1, 44, 139 Erdman, Arnold 11 ........,,......, 65 Erickson, Nancy 12 ..,,,,...,........ .....-....44, 92, 93, 105, 100, 105, 170 Erickson, Wayne 12 ...1,,...,..,...,, 45 Erlandson, Ralph 11 ...,.,.... 65, 91, 101 Ernest, Bobbie 11 ....,.......,., 65, 156 Evans, Diane 10 .,..,,,, 77 103, 114, 155 Evans, Mary 12 ,1,,-...,,.. 45, 114, 115 Evenson,, William 10 .,,,,,.,,,,. 77, 103 Evenson, Morris 12 ,,,,.....,.,...... 21, 43, 45, 99, 134 F Fabry, Pete 10 ,,,,..1,,, 77, 103, 131, 140 Fahley, Terry 10 ....,,.,,,..,,,. 18, 77 Farry, Carolyn 11 ...,..,,,,,,,,,..... . .. .65, 70, 88, 99, 100, 105, 107, 155, 169 Ferring, Marilyn 12 .,,,....,.,,,.., 45, 37, 100. 100, 155, 173 Fink, Marjorie 12 ,,,.,, 45, 114, 115., 155 Fitzgerald, Mary 12 ..,,,,,, 45, 106, 114 Fieldberg, David 11 ..,.,,,. 65, 118, 119 Flaskerlld, Eugene 11 ........ 66, 116, 117 Flaten, Clair 10 ,.....,, ...,,..,.. 1 37 Flores, Jesse 12 ,,,,....,,,..,,,. 45, 152 Flugum, Alton 11 ,..........,.. 66, 117 Flugum, Merlin 12 ..., 45, 104, 109, 117 Fogel, Janice 12 ,,,,..,,,.,..,,....,, 45,100,105,106, 156 Foley, DeAnna 11 ,.,,., 66, 88, 99, 123 Folie, Darrell 11 .,,...,,.... 66, 116, 144 Folie, Dorothy 12 ...,....,.,,,.,..,, 45 Francis. Sharon 12 ....., 45, 89, 99, 156 Fredrickson, Larry 10 ..,,..,,....... 77, 87, 103, 131, 144 Fredrickson., Sharon 11 ,,v,..,,,. 88, 129 Fredrickson. Steven 11 ,,., 66, 95, 99, 126 Freeman, Allen 10 ,,...,.........,,. 77 Freeman, Donald 11 ..,,,,,,,...,.,, 66 Freemyer, Irene 11 ...,,,...,.,.. 66, 156 Fretheim, Frank 10 ,1.... 77, 126, 131, 144 G Gaard, Adrian 11... .,.....,., 66, 117 Galbraith, Ann 12 ,,,,.,........ 45, 108 Gappa, Constance 12...45, 105, 106, Page 178 110 Gappa, Janice 10 ..... Gari, Freda 11 .,,--.,. --..16, 77, 107 .....,...-66,107 Gari, Richard 12 ........,...,....... 45 Gavere, Allen 10 .......1 77, 103, 131, 144 Gavle, Karen 10 ....,,......,...,... 99 Gavle, Myreen 11 ..,,,...,,....... ...,.....,66, 89, 99, Gehri Re 'na 10 100, 107, 155, 109 gs gl -,--,-------,----- 77 Gendler, Neal 101..22, 69, 77, 93, 99, 123 Gendler, Patricia 12 .....,.,,....,. -.-.45, 86, 87, 88, 93, Gilbert, Patricia 11. .. 100, 105, 106, 113 168 105, .00, 107, 119, 150 Gilbertson., David 10 ,,,..,,,,,.,..- 77 Gilbertson, Mary 11 ......,,......,, ..66, 70, 73, 86, 88, 91, 93, 96, 97, 101, -....-...-.-.-..-----,,--.-.,.107, 155 Gill, Donald 12 1.1,.,1,....,.111, 40, 117 Glenn, Larrie 11 ,.,,..... 89-, Gniffke, Curtis 10 ,.....,........ 77, Gnilfke, Marion 12. .-12, 46, 121, 156, Goette, Rosemary 12 ..,...,,,.,.... .. -19, 40, 01, 104, 100, 154, .77 102 117 157 105 Golberg, Shirley 10 ......,...,,,,.... 77 Goldman, JoAnn L. 12 ...,,,,,,,.... .-..46, 01, 100, 100, 153, 155, 157, 163, 170 Goldman, Judith M. 10 ,,,,.,....... .......1.-28, 77, 93, 101, 107, 155, 157 Goodman, John 12 ..,,...,..,,,..,. 46 Goodmanson, Janet 10 ,,,,,....,.., -..-.-...--.-.77, 90, 101, 107, 155, Goodmanson, Paul 12 .,,. 46, 87, 167, 171 170 Goskeson, Morland 10 ..,,,....,..., 77 Grasdahlen, Paul 10 ,.........., 77, 103 Gray, Virginia 12 ..,,,. 27, 40, 157, 164 Green, David 12 ,,..,.,,.,,......,,. 46 Greeney, Dorothy 12 ,,,,....,....... 61, 88, 91, 100, 106 Greengo, Lois 12 ..,,,.,,,..,......, 47 Greenwood, Ralph 10 ..,1..........,. 77 Gregerson, Amy 10-.77, 91, 101, 107, 155 Grinolds, Janet 12 ....,,..,,...,..,. ....47, 01, 100, 105, 106, 113, 120, 165 167 Groetzinger, Leigh 11 ...,.,.,..,,.,. 151 Groos, James 11 ,,.... 66, 89, 91, 102, 111 Groten., Jan 10 ,,......,,.1..,...,,, 77 Gudmonson, JoAnn 10 ,,..,,,,..,,.. 77 Guiney, Thomas 11 ..,,.. 66, 126, 138, 141 Gulbrandson, Beverly 11 ,.,1,,.,.,,, 66 Gulbrandson, Virginia 11 .,,,,.,. 66, 88 Gunderson, John 11 ,,..,,.. 66, 101, 144 Gunderson, Lowell 11. .66, 88, 89, 91, 143 Gurwell, Barbara 10..77, 83, 91, 103, 107 H Hagen, Charlotte 12 ...,,,,,.,..,,.., ..47, 104, 100, 113, 120, 121, 155, 157, 170 Hagen, Sandra 11 ,...,.,.,,,,.. 66, 119 Hahlen, Janet 12 ..... ...,. 4 7, 89, 106 Hall, Nancy 10 ..,,..,, ,,..... 7 7, 91 Halvorson, Lorea 11 .,,, .......-.66 Halvorson, Steven 10 ,...,, ,.... 7 7 Halvorson, Thomas 12 ,...,,.,...., 47 Hammer, Constance 12 ,,.,..,1...,.. 47 Hamm.er, Glenyse 12 .,..,,....,. 47, 118 Hammond, Gary 12 ..,.,,,,,. 47, 126, 173 Hamson, Larry 11 .,..,.,.,1.,..,,,... 66 Hansen, Gene 10 ..., 77, 89, 102, 112, 150 Hansen, Judith E. 11 .,,,,,........,, 66 Hansen, Judith K. 12 ,.,,,,,,.,1..... 1-....47, 39, 91, 98, 106, 154, 155, 157, 167, 173 Hansen, Karole 10 ..,,.. 77, 91, 101, 113 Hansen, Ronnie 10 1............,..... 77 Han.sen, Shirley 12 ....,,..,,....,,., 47 Hanson, Bonita 10 .,,,....,,.,,,.... ......77, 90, 93, 155, 157, 166, 167, 173 Hanson, Carol 12 ,...,,.....,,.. 47, 105 Hanson, Corrine' 11 ...,.. 66, 100, 156, 157 Hanson, Dale 12 ...,...,..,,.,.... -47 Han.s0n, David 12 .... ,,..,..... 4 7, 116 Hanson, David 10 ..,,. ,....... . 77 Hanson, Helen 11 ...., .,...... 6 6, 119 Hanson, Gerald 12 ..,,,,.,,v 47, 138, 141 Hanson, Jean 10 ..1..,,.,,,,....... -77 Hanson, Joan 11 ......,,.. 66, 92, 96, 107 Hanson, Joylene 11 ..,,.. 66, 99, 100 107 Hanson, Judith A. 11 ..,...,,.... 66, 107 Hanson, Judith S. 11 ,,,...,,..,. 66, 157 Hanson, Lowell 10 ..... ..... - 77 Hanson, Nancy 10 .,.,1..,,,.,..... -77 Hanson, Pau-l 10 .....,,...,,,..,.. . 102,131,138,140,144 Hanson., Sandra 11 .,.....,..,,,... . ....-...66, 89, 106, 153, 163, 164, 170 Hanson, Vonice 10 ..,... 77, 90, 101, 107 Harding, William 11 ,,,..,,,, 66, 92, 104 Haried, Kay 10.177, 91, 96, 101, 107, 155 Harms, Reginald 10 ..,,,.... 77, 116, 144 Hai-pe-1, Ronald 11 ..,,,...,...,. 00, 119 Harris, Frederick 10 .,..,,,,.... 77, 151 Harris, Joan 12 ....,,..,..,.....,. - ..-.-,----47, 93, 97, 100, 155, 165, 169 Haskins, Morris 11 ...1..,......... . 69, 89, 105,126, 168 Hassberg, Lo-is 11 ,...........,..... . .....-..00, 70, 73, 88, 98, 106, 107, 155 Hatch, Kenneth 12 ....,... 48, 93, 96, 148 Hathaway, Faith 12 ..,..........., .48 Hathaway, Pamela 10 .,...,....... -77 Haugen, Lawrence 11 .............. ...--....-66, 88, 91, 100, 101, 112, 123 Hayes, Pauline 11 ....4...... 24, 66, 119 Heather, Jack 10 .....,.......... 78, 144 Hebel, Phyllis 10 ............ 78, 101, 107 Heckes, Darlene 12 .... 15, 48, 99, 100, 156 Heemsbergen, Marvin 11 .......... .66 Hegland, Barbara 11 ..,......,.... . -...---1.66, 70, 86, 89, 92, 99, 107, 155 Heilman, Fred 10 .....,........... -78 Heihnan, Terry 10 .............. 78, 101 Hcilman, William 11 ......,..... 67, 109 Helgeson, Suzanne 11 ............. . 67, 88, 99,107,155 Helland, Gerald 12 ,............. 48, 118 Helling, Patricia 12 .......... 48, 98, 105 Henderson, Janice 12 .............. , ...17, 43, ss, 91, 98, 106, 113, 121, 155 Hendrickson, Donna 10 ........... . 78, 90, 92, 107,171 Hendrickson, Doris 11 ............ .67 Hendrickson, Frances 10 ........ 78, 157 Hendrickson, Loree 10 .........1,. .78 Hendrickson, Mischa 10 .......... 199 Henry, Suzanne 12 ..., 48, 106, 118, 119 Herfindahl, Beverly 11 1........... .67 Herman, Bernard 11 ............ 67, 109 Hermanson, Dennis 12 .,... ....... 4 8 Hershey, Karen 10 ...,... ....... 7 8, 90 Hershey, Keith 12 .,.............,.. 118 Herth, Lonna 12--48, 100, 106, 120, 156 Herth, Sharon 12 ........ 19, 48, 100, 106 Higgins, Diana 10 ............... 78, 101 Higgins, Stephen 12 ................. 48 Hill, Paul 12 .......... 48, 92, 94, 97, 102 Hillman, Michael 10 ................. 78 Hills, Marilou 12 .................... 48 Hillstrom, Bruce 10 .... ,... 7 8, 88, 103 Hirsch, Pamela 11 .......... 67, 100, 157 Hoelscher, Steve 10 .,.....,....,. 78, 89 Hoffman, Barry 12 .......... 48, 148, 166 Hoiseth, Barbara 12 .....,........ 48, 118 Hoiseth, Karrol 12 ....,.............. .,--.....-...49, 138,139,141, 142,152 Hoium, Janice 11 ,.............. 67, 107 Hoium, Larry 10 ,.................,. 78 Holt, Richard 11 ....... .,,, 6 7, 119 Holton, George 12 ...,. .... 4 9, 118 Holton, Robert 10 ..... .......,.. . 78 Holly, Jerold 12 ..... .,....... 4 9, 119 Hnlway, Frank 12 ........ 49, 87, 144, 151 Holway, Judith 11 ....., 67, 89, 107, 156 Hopperstad, Carol 12 ............ 49, 118 Horning, Dale 11 ,... 50, 88, 91, 100, 120, 165 Jenson, Ronald 11 .,.,,,......... 67, 116 Jepson, Jerry 11 ,.,,,1... ,....,..., 6 7 Jepson, Mary 11 .,.. ..,,,,., 6 7 Jepson, Ruth 10 .... ...,. 7 9, 91 Jerdee, Carlyle 12 ,.., .V.. 5 0, 117 Jesse, Eugene 12 1.,,... .,..,.. 5 0 Joachim, Kenneth 12 ,,,, ,,,, 5 0, 100 Jobe, Ruth Ann 11 .,,.... ,.,, 6 7, 157 Johannsen, Lenore 12 ,,.. ,,,, 5 0, 156 J ohannsen, Steve 10 ,,1,..,,,..,1.,. Johnson, Charles 12 ,,...,.....,,.., .79 .50 Kline, Robert 11 ,,.,, ..,,., 6 8 Klukow, Janice 10 ..,1., ,.... 7 9, 114 Knauer, Richard 10 ..,,....,...., 79, 103 Knutsen, J. Michael 11 ,,,.,,.. 68, 86, 99 Knutson, Robert 11 ,,,,,.,,.....,..,, 68 Jensen, Allen 12 .,....,,..,,,.... 50, 117 Horning, Gene 11 ..,. .,,.. 2 9, 67, 116 Hoverson, Gary 11 .,,,1 ,.,.. 6 7, 93, 117 Hovey, Robert 12 ..,,,..,,,.. 38, 49, 109 Howard, LaJun.e 12 .,...,.. 49, 106, 156 Hoyne, Norman 12 .....,,, ,,.,, 7 8, 116 Hoyt, Ronald 10 ...,,1,.,,,,.......,. 78 Huesmann, Thomas 11 .,,.,,,,,,,,.. 67 Humphrey, Annette 10 .,,,..1,,,,,,, 80, 90, 93, 101, 107, 155 Hurla, John 11 ,,....,,........,,,... 67 Hurst, Joy 12 ..,,,1, 27, 49, 113, 114, 115 Hurst, Raymond 10 .,,, 78, 92, 93, 97, 144 Hutchins, Bom 12 ....,.........,,... 49 Hutchins, Jay 11 .,.. ,,,,..,..,.., 6 7 Hyland, Janice 11 ..,,,,.,,,, 67, 100, 107 Hylbak, Mark 12 ..,,....,,........,. ----...-49, 121, 138, 141, 142, 171, 172 I lile, Linda 11 ..s...ss,,..,,,,,.,,,,., --64, 67, 86, 87, 88, 93, 98, 99, 107, 122, 157 Indrelie, Janet 11 ,,,,........., 67, 100 Indrelie, Margaret 11 .....,....,, 67, 107 Ingebritson, John 10 .,... 28, 78, 111, 131 Ingvaldson, Karen 12 ....,,,........ ----.-----...-49, 92, 96, 101, 108, 164 150 Iverson, John 11 ..........,.. 67, 87, Iverson, Karen 12 .....,..1,. 49, 100, 114 117 Iverson, Keith 12 .,..,, --29, 49, Iverson, Kenneth 10 ,,... .,..., 7 8, 116 Iverson, Sandra 10 ....,........,,,... 78 Iverson, Sharon 10 .............. 78, 101 Ives, Barbara 12 ...,.,....,,..,..... 39, 49, 89, 91, 98, 99, 100, 105, 106, 155, .I .157, 165, 173 Jackson, Suzanne 12 ......,, 49, 106, 119 Jacobs, Peter 12 ....,,.. 50, Jacobsen DeAnna 1 , 1 ,,,... Jacobsen, Gary 10 ........, - - . .- .78, 89, 126, 133, 134, Jacobsen, Janet 10 ...,..... 146, 147, 151 .67, 102, 119 135, 136,144 .------78, 90 Jacobsen, Raymond 10. -78, 101, 131, 144 Jacobsen, Rosann 12 ................. 105, 106, 108, 113 Jacobson, Arnold 11 ............. 67, 119 Jacobson, Barry 11 .,,,..,, ...---67,116 Jacobson, Shirley 10 ,,....,...... 78, 90 Jacobson, Virginia 10 ,..,,,.,........ 99 Jahns, Daniel 10 .... 78, 131, 143, 144, 145 Jakobson, Jerome 10 ....,,.....,, 78, 89 Jenner, Barbara 12-.50, 98, 106, 154, 165 Jenner, Darlene 10 ,,,,..,,,,..,..... 97, 102, 107, 108, 157 Jenner, William 11 .....,.,,,,.,.,, 67, 86 Jensen, Alva 10 ..,..,,. .... 7 8, 89, 93 Jensen, Ann. Dee 10 ,,...,,,.,.. 78, 107 Jensen, Bette 10 ,,,,,,,..,,,.. 27, 78, 91 Jensen, Bonnie 10 ,....,..., 78, 155, 157 Jensen., David 10 .... - - ,,,...,,... 116 Jensen, Donald 10 ..... .....,,..., 7 8 Jensen, Douglas 12 ..,, ,... 5 0, 150 Jensen, Galen 10 ,...,, ...78, 88, 91 Jensen, Gordon 12 .,,,, ...., 5 0, 117 Jensen, James 11 ..,, -. .--67, 101 Jensen, Janice 12 ,....,...,....., 50, 106 Jensen, Jay 10 ,,.,...,.....,...., 78, 117 Jensen, John 10- -79, 89, 103, 111, 131, 150 Jensen, Marilyn A. 11 .,........., 67, 100 Jensen, Marilyn 10 ........,r,.,, .... ..--..,--.79, 90, 99, 103, 107, 156, 157 Jensen, Mary Lou 10 1.,,,......1..... 79 Jensen, Norma 10 ,,...,...,..,.,. 79, 157 Jensen, Sandra 11 ,..,. ..--67, 119 Jen.sen, Stuart 11 ,..... ..,..... 6 7, 116 Jensen, Wayne 10 ...,..........,..., 79 Jenson, Barbara 10 ......... 79, 101, 113 Jenson, Dorothy 12 .,s1 ,......,,.... Johnson, Cherie Ann M. 10-.79, 91 155 Knudtson, Roberta 10-.-79, 91, 103, 107 Kofstad, Barbara 11- - 67, 68, 73 99, 100, 104,Y107, 123, 155, 157 Krause, Michael 10 ,....,.,,,.,,, 79, 143 Krieger, Charlotte 11 ,,...,,,,....... .---.----------68, 89, 99,100, 107,156 Krueger, James 11 .,,,,...,,,,.. 68, 102 Krueger, Marilyn 12 .,,,,. 52, 89, 91, 114 Johnson, Cheryl A. ,... 25, 79, 101, 107 Johnson, Darrel 10 ........,...,,,.... 79 Johnson, Gary 10 ,..,. ,......,,..... 7 9 Johnson, James 10... .----86 Johnson, Jerry 10 .... ..... 7 9 Johnson, Judith 10... .-.--79 Johnson, Judith 11- -. . - -- --67 Johnson, Keith 10 .... ......... 7 9 Johnson, Larry 11 ....1. ..... 6 7, 88 Johnson, Lowell 11 ..... .... 6 7, 117 Johnson, Mark 11 ..... ....... 6 7 Johnson, Marlene 11 .... ...... 6 7, 102 Johnson, Mary 11 .... ........ 6 7, 93 Johnson, Randa 11 ......... 68, 107, 108 Johnson, Renee 12 .................. - 50, 98, 100, 106, 113, 155 Johnson, Sharon 12 .................. 50 Johnson, Thomas 10 ...,.......,. 79, 101 Johnsrud, Judith 12 .................. 27, 43, 51, 98, 106, 108, 165, 167 Johnston, Bonnie 10 ........1........ 79 Johnston, Karen 12 .................. ---.-..17, 51, 89, 91, 105, 106, 120, 169 Jordahl, David 11 .............,..... 70, 73, 92, 94, 96, 99 Jordahl, Marlow 12 .........,........ 51 Jordahl, Ruth 11 ..................... ..........-.68,73,99,100,107,155,157 Jordan, James 11 .................... 68 104 Jorgenson, James 11. .- Jorgenson, John 11 .................. 144 Jorgenson, Lloyd 10 ............. --.-.----68, -79, 92 Krueger, Terry 11 ................... 68 Kuettner, Thomas 11 ................ 68 Kuiper, Gertrude 11 .... ........ 6 8, 89 Kurth, Sharon 11 ............. 68, 88, 91 Kvale, Dale 12 ....................... 100, 108, 144, 151, 152, 165 Kvenvold, Alton 12 .................. 52 Kvenvold, Steven 11 ................ 68 Kycek. Edna 11 ............ 68, 107, 156 Kycek, Fred 11 ....... ........ 1 02, 104 Kycek, Lois 11 .... -68, 107, 156 L Ladlie, Dale 10 ...... Ladlie, Mary 12 ............. 52, 114, Lageson, Gail 11 .1... . 68, 70, 88, 99, 100, 107, 153, 154, 163, 164 143 Lahs, Larry 11 ......... ..... 6 8, 126, 116 165 Lalr, James 11 ...................... 68 Lang, Neil 12 .................... 52, 118 Larsen., J. David 11- -68, 102, 126, 144, 152 Larson, Barbara 10...- ...... 79, 91, 101 Larson, James 11 ................ 68, 126 Larson, Jeifrey 12 .............,....., 52, 88, 91, 95, 98, 150, 161, 165, 166, 167 Larson, Keith, 12 .,............,.,-,, 52 Larson, Margit 11 .................... ..--68, 70, 73, 86, 87, 89, 99, 107, 153, 163 Larson, Sharon 12 ............ 52, 89, 165 Larson, Teddy 11 .... 68, 88, 91, 101, 148 LeBeau, Phillip 10--79, 86, 103, 131, 137 Lee, Carel 10 ..... 79, 87, 98, 99, 101, 107 Lee, Carole 11 ...................... . .-.30, 64, 68, 89, 107, 123, 155, 157 Lee, Gary 11 ......................... 68 Lee, Nancy 12 ......................, ....----53, 105, 106, 113, 120, 121, 161, 168 Legreid, Carol 10 ..... Legried, Ivan 12 .... Legried, Gary 11 ...... .-.----80, 91, 103 -.......-.53 .---...---68, 111 Lehmann, John 12 ................... -53, 100,134, 146, 147, 151, 172 Lembke, Anita 12 .......... 53, 118, 156 Joynt, Robert 11 ........ 20, 68, 100, 109 K Kaasa, Lily Ann 12 .............. 51, 118 Kaasa, Norlene 10 ...........1...... - . -- . . . . . . .79, 87, 90, 101, 107, 153, 155 Kane, Laurel 12 ..... 13, 51, 100, 106, 154 Kangas, Betty 12 ............ 51, 100, 114 Kanzenbach, Ardith 10 ............. -91 Kappas, Dennis 11 ............., 68, 126 Kappas, Patricia 10 .................. 91,103,106,107, 155 Karlberg, James 10-.79, 88, 102, 126, 143 Katzung, Terry 12 .............. 51, 109 Keil, Mary 11. .64, 68, 73, 89, 107, 122, 155 Kennedy, Lewis 12 ................ - .-..51, 126, 127, 129, 138, 141, 142, 144 Kennedy, Robert 10 .............,.. . - - . . . . - - - . - -28, 79, 86, 87, 131, 143,152 Kennelly, JoAnne 12 .............. - 51, 98, 100,106,155 Kennelly, Judith 10 ................ - - .- . . - . . - - - -14, 79, 87, 93, 101,107, 155 Kermes, Violet 12 ...... 51, 101, 106, 110 Kilian, Richard 12 ................. -51 King, Charles 12 ..... ......... 5 1, 100 King, Larrv 11.-. King, Ralph 12 ..... ff-'-'51, .68 145 King, Richard 10 ---- ..... . 79 King, Theresa 12 ---- -------------- 5 1 Kipp, Fredrick 12 -.--.----------.--. 51 Kirk, Judith 12 -.-.---.------..-- 12, 52 Kirk, Linda 10 --.------- 79, 91, 101, 107 Kissinger, Kathleen 10 ------------- 28, 79, 90, 107, Kittleson, Roger 10 .---..----------.. ...-79, 89, 103, 131, 143, 144, 145 Kleinpaste, Danny 10 ------------ 79, 155 116 Lenze, Jeanette 11 ..........--......- 68 Lenze, Marvin 12 ..-.--..- --........ 5 3 Leschefske, Eleanor 10 ........... 80, 91 Levad, Evonne 10 .-----.-.-.- 80, 90, 99 Levens, John 10 ........--........--- 80 Lewis, Carmen 11 .....-- 68, 107, 156, 157 Lewis, Laura 12 .... 53, 98, 109, 113, 120 Lien, Dennis 11 -----......-.-...-... 68 Limon, Griselda 11 ..---------------- 68 Lind, Judith 11 -----..-.-..- 68, 107, 157 Lindahl, Gayle 11 -...---.----------. 68 Lindahl, Mona 12 ----.-.. 53, 88, 106, 156 Lindahl, Pamela 10 -.......--.... 80, 103 Linde, Ronald 10 ---------------...-- 80 Lindeman, Mary 11-.68, 99, 107, 156, 157 Loge, James 12 ------.......-.-.-..-- 53 Loken, Paulette 11 .-.-.....-.-.. 68, 107 Lombard, Alyce 12 -.--- --...--- 5 3 Long, Nancy 11 ..---.- --------...-- 6 8 Lorenzen, Marie 10 -.---.-.------ 80, 91 Ludwig, Mondra 10 -..-.. 80, 91, 103, 107 Luna, Edward 11 ...............- 68, 104 Lunning, Jean 11 ..... ..... 2 7, 68, 107 Page 179 , 154 169 Lutner, Cheryl 10 ...,,.,,............ -.--..28, 77, 80, 97, 103, 107, 155, 157 Lyon, Ann 12 ................,..,..,, --.---.---39, 53, 98, 100, 106, 155, 171 Mc McCornack, Lois 10 ..,.,....,,,.A,,, 80 McGill, Dennis 10 ..........v 80, 103, 131 MCKey, Thomas 10 ,.,. 80, 103, 131, 143 McMillan, James 12 ...,.... 53, 151, 165 McMullen., Brian 10 ...,...,..,,.. 80, 93 M Maas, JoAnn 12 ...,,..............,. ,-..53, 105, 106, 108, 113, 154, 165, 168 -..-,--,,--UM,,.,,--,,--.,,-169, 172 101, Madson, Allan 11 ,,..,,......,,.. 68, Maas, Kathleen 10 ....,, 88, 90, 107 111 Madson, Jean 11 ,,,...,,.....,...... 33, 104, 103, 107, 154, 157 Maiden, David 11 .,.....,..,..., 68, 104 Mariner, Barbara 11 ..,.. 12, 68, 156, 157 Mathews, Karen 11 ,....,............ 108, 156 106, 107, Mattick, Douglas 12 ,,..,,.......... 53 .-.-.-68, 92, 99, 105, Mayotte, Donna 11 ................. ....---..-----69, 89,100, 107, 110,122 Meixell, Karen 11 ,.....,..,........, , ,, ,69, 89, 92, 99, 106, 107, 154, 157, 164 Mensink, Darlene 12 ..,,,,..,,...... 53 Metzke, John 12 ,,,,..,,1,.. 53, 111, 144 N Navarro, Leonard 11 .,,, ,1.. 6 9 Nelsen, Gary 11 .....,,,...,....,,,1 69 Nelson, Audrey 11 .1,..,.,,,,.....,, --...69, 39, 92, 97, 101, 156, 157 Nelson, Bjorn 12 ..,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 54, 117 Nelson, Bonnie 12 ...., ..,... 5 4, 92 Nelson, Bruce 10 ....1,,,.,1,.... 80, 148 Nelson, Curtis 10 ,,,..,,,.,.,,,,,..,, 80 Nelson, Donald J. 11 ..,..... 69, 111, 144 Nelson, Donald O. 11,,69, 104, 108, 117 Nelson, Donna 11 ....., 69, 101, 107, 157 Nelson, Irene 12 1,,. 54, 101, 113, 114, 115 Nelson, Jane 11 .................... 69, 70, 88, 100, 107, 108, 154, 157 Nelson, Janice 11 ..................,. 33, 99, 107, 123, 154 Nelson, Jon. 11 .,.....,...... 69, 126, 150 Nelson, Karen M. 11 ,,... 54, 89, 114, 115 Nelson, Kathleen J. 12.-55, 89, 101, 106 Nelson, Larry 11 ,.... 69, 93, 97, 101, 109 Nelson, Nelson, Nelson, Nelson, Nelson, Myrna 11 ...., 23, 69, 73, 98, 107 Richard D. 10 .......,.... 80, 144 Richard K. 11 ........ 69, 88, 117 Sharon 11 ....,. Theodore 11 ,,........ 70, 88, 91 Thomas 11 .,... .- -.70 --70 Olson, Ronald 12 ,...,,....,,....,... 55, 151, 152, 165, 172 Olson, Ruth 12 .....,11...,,....,,1.,. 55 Omundson, Mary Jo 12 ,............. 105, 106, 157, 169 O'Neal, Michael 12 ..,,,...,, 55, 118, 119 O'Neal, Craig 10 ...,,,,,.,,,,,..,. 80, 89 O'Neal, Steven 11 ..,,, Oothoudt, Jerry 12 ,,,1,, ,. ..,,. 70 O'Roul'ke, Geneva 10. ,..,,,.,.,,..,. 81 Osmundson, Joan 11 ,,.,..,. 70, 100, 107 Osmundson, Lowell 11 ,,.,,,,,.,,,,,. 70 Ostby, Franklin 11 ..,.., ,,., 7 0, 88, 91 Overland, Dennis 11 ,,.. 70 P Paczkowski, Donald 10 ,........,. 81, 92 Palmer, Bruce 10 .... 81, 82, 131, 143, 144 Palmer, David 11 ..,,,.,,.,,.....,... 70, 86, 102, 103, 126, 129, 130, 132, 134 152 Parry, Patricia 11 ....,.,.,c....,..,, 70 Paske, Jon 11 .........2....... 70, 39, 91 Paulson, Constance 12 ..,.,,..,...... Nelson, Nesje, Carmen. 12.-.55, 89, 91, 106, 156 Ness, Judith 10 ,..... 18, 80, 91, 101, 109 Nichols, Cynthia 11 ..,,...... 70, 88, 91 56, 101, 106, 113, Paulson, Julie 11 ......,...,,,.,..... 122 72, 73, 33, 107, 154, 165 Niebuhr, Mary 10, -20, 80, 93, 96, 102, 107 Paulson, Robert 12 ..,,...,,,,... 56, 114 Peaslee, Peggy 11 ...... 70, 101, , 115 Peik, David 10 .....1.......,..,. 81, 131 Pentz, Judith 12 ..,.,.,.,,,,..,..,,,. 93, 105, 106, 165, 163 Perez, Lupe 12 .......,,,.,.........., 56 Perez, Phillip 12 ,..,,,......,....... 56 Perkins, Ruth 11 .... .... 7 0, 119 Perrin, Duane 10 ,,,......,,,....,,. 81 Meyer, Audrey 10 .... ,.... 8 0, 91, Meyer, Carol 10 ..,,..,.,..,, 80, 90, Perrin, Virginia 12 ,.,.,,,,,,,,, 13 22, 56 98 - ---- ----------- , 102 ' 106 Person, Steven 10 ..,... 31, 33, 91, 92, 97 Peters, Karen 10 ..,,.,,.. 78, 81, 91, 107 114 114 Michaelis, Karen 12 ....,, 54, 89, 91, 156 Michaelis, Robert 10 ,.,,...,........ 80 Michleson, Gordon 10 ......,,.... .... 8 0 Nielsen, Elizabeth 12 ,............... .---...-,39, 55, 108, 120, 161, 165, 172 Nielsen, Else 11 ....,,.,,. 70, 89, 91, 104 Nielsen, Ronald 10 ...,........... 80, 92 Nielsen, Sandra 10 .,.,.............. 99 Nimon, Jack 11 ,,...,, ..,,...,,., 7 0 Noland, Jerry 10 ...... ...,..,. 8 0, 103 Noland, Joan 11 ......,.,..... 12, 70, 157 Nowak, Marilyn 11 ,,,, .........,. 7 0 Nuehring, Karen 10,,,. ,,,.,.. ..80 0 O'Byrn.e, Michael 10 ,,,,...,.,......, 80 Ogren, Thomas 10 ..,.,.....,,........ ,.,.--,,.--.--80,89,103,111, 131,146 Ohm, Russell 11 .,...,......,,., 70, 116 O'Leary, Patrick 10 .,,,,....,.....,,, 80 Oldenkamp, Lillian 12 .,,...,......,, 55 Petersen, An1ta 11 ............... 70, 88 Petersen, Roger 11 .,.....,., 70, 71, 146 Peterson, Carl 10 .........,........., 81 Peterson, Corald 12 .,... 56, 148, 149, 151 Peterson, David 11 .... 70, 89, 91, 102, 146 Peterson, Elizabeth 10 ...,-,1,--,,,- 79, 81, 101, 107 Peterson., Harold 10 .,,,...1,,,,,, 81, 97 Peterson, Janice 11-,70, 89, 107, 123, 154 Peterson, Judith 10 ..,,..,.,,,,,. -,,, 8 1 Peterson, Karen 11 .,..,,,,1,,.,,, 71, 83 Peterson, Karen 10 ..,,..,.,, 81, 90, 107 Peterson, Ronald 10 .,.,., 81, 88, 103, 111 Peterson, Sandra 10 .....,,,-..., 81, 90 Peterson, Susan 11 ..,,,,.... 71, 101, 107 Peterson, Thomas 11 .,.,..,,,.,, 71, 119 Pickavance, Curtis 10 ..., 81, 131, 137, 150 Pierce, Carol 11 ,,,.. 92 Pierce, Danny 12 ..,,.. 46, 56, 88, 89, 91 Pierce, Paul 10 ....,. ...,,,....,-81, 101 Pierce, Perry 10 ,.... ,,,.,,.,...,,, 8 1 Pierce, Rose 12 .,,.. ,,,,..,,.., 5 6 Pierce, Sharon 12 ...,. ,..,,-.,. 5 6, 93 Miller, Donald 11 ...... .........,, 6 9 Miller, Duane 12 ....,, ...., 5 4, 88 91 Miller, Karen 11 .,... .....,,....., 6 9 Miller, Margaret 11 .,,,,,...,,.. 69, 104 Miller, Susan 12 ...,,,,, 25, 54, 100, 106 Mills, Dianne 10 ...,,.,,,,,,,,,,.,,. 80 Minear, Marline 10 ....,, 80, 96, 107, 157 Miovac, Vivian 12 ..,,.,..,.,......,. 54 Miranda, Lupe 12 ,1....,..........,. 54 Moden, Gary 10 ..,..,, 80, 103, 111, 131 Moe, Darlene 12 .....1,...,,...V.... 54 Moe, Doris 10 ,...,....,,,...,,.. 80, 101 Moe, Paul 12 ...,,,,..,, 54, 126, 146, 147 Moen, Patricia 11 ,,.,,,, 69, 99, 122, 156 Molfit, .Indy 10 ...................... .....-.1.-..30, 90, 93, 96, 99, 103, 154 Moller, Jen.s 11 ............,,,.V...., 69 Montague, Melissa 10 ........ 80, 91, 154 Moore, Roger 12 .....,.,........ 54, 116 Moore, Steven 12 ,..,........... ..,V 93, 105, 161, 163, 173 Moran, Deloris 10 ...,,,.........,.., 80 Morreim, Duane 12 .,,,.....,,....., 54 Morreim, Janice 11 ......,....,.... 156 . -. ---. .- ..69, 88, 93, 99, 107,154, Morrison, Michael 11 ....,...,,...... --.69, 70, 73, 87, 104, 105, 111, 168, 169 Mortensen, Wayne 10 ,.........,,..., -.----.....-.-130, 31, 39, 92, 94, 131 Mortenson, Barbara 11 ....., 69, 98, 107 Mosher, Elizabeth 10 ,... 80, 91, 103, 154 Muesing, William 12. .54, 87, 93, 138, 141 Muilenburg, Joan 10 ..,..,..., 80, 91, 101 Muilenburg, Kenneth 11 .,.,.. 30, 69, 126 Munson, Steven 10 ...,,,..,. 80, 103, 144 Murphy, Ronald 10 .......1.,...V... 80 Myers, Janet 11 ,,..,,,,.............. . , . . . .. . . .69, 88, 91, 107, 113, 123, 154 Page 180 Oliphant, Richard 11 .,....,,,....,.. -1-,-w..70, 73, 37, 122, 126, 127, 129, 135, 143 Olive1', James 10 ....,...,,.,,....... 80 Olsen, Gerry 10 ....,.... 30, 103, 131, 137 Glsen, Robert 11 ,,..,.......,,,,.... 70 Olsen, Susan 10 ..... 30, 90, 107, 108, 157 Olson, Anthony 12 ,.,.,,..,..,.,,,,, 55 Olson, Darlene 12 ,,,.,,,.,, 55, 104, 109 Olson, David H. 10 ,.,,..,.,,.....,,, 80 Olson, David 12 ...,,.,.,..,........ H38, 55, 126, 128, 133, 134, 135, 151, 161 Olson, David 10 ,..,,,,....... 30, 37, 103 Olson, Hilda 11 ..... .......,, 7 0 Olson, James 11 ....,, ,...... 7 0 Olson, Joan 10 .,...,,.,. ...... 8 0, 90 Olson, John 11 ....,.,,......,,.. 70, 144 Olson, Judith A. E. 11 ..,............. 33, 91, 101, 107, 154 Olson, Judith A. 11 ,,,............... --,,.,70, 89, 99, 100, 107, 153, 154, 155, 164 Olson, Karen 12 ...,..,,.....,... 55, 93 Olson, Kathleen 12 ...,.....,.....,,, 30, 55, 39, 91, 100, 105, 106, 108, 120, 154 f...-,..-....,.....,,,,..157, 165, 171 Olson, Keith 12 ,........,..,.,... 55, 105 Olson., Larry 12 1..,, .,,,,,,,.,. 5 5 Olson, Lewis 10 ,,,,,, .,,. 8 0 Olson, Norman 11 ..,. ,,,, 7 0 Pierson, Carolyn 12 .,..1... 56, 118, 120 Ponro, Joan 11 ,,......11, 71, 93, 107, 123 Poole, Roger 10 .....1...,..,......... 81 Posthumus, Elaine 11 ,,...,....,,,.,- 1,,-.-71, 72, 73, 33, 107, 122, 154, 157 Pownell, Lyle 11 ,..,,........,1,,,.., 71 Pratt, Barbara 10 ....,,....... 78, Sl, 97 Prihoda, Jeanean 10 ...,. ..,..,,,. 8 1 Prihoda, Sharon 12 .... .,.,... 5 6 Q Qualley, Doris 12 c..ccc1. 56, 39, 106, 120 Quam, Carol 12 ,,... ....,,,..-,--118 Rasmussen, Carol R, 12 ,,,YYYY,--YY-- Tufte, Mary 10 ,,-,,,-,,w- B,,,--A 3 2, 154 --.-..89, 56, 86, 87, 88, 98, 99, 106, 120, 165 Rasmussen, David 10 ,..,,,,, 81, 88, 166 Rasmussen., Jerome 12 ,,,,,,,,,, 57, 118 RaSmussen, Linda 10 ,,,,..,,1. 81, 96, 154 Ravenhorst, Gail 10 .,,,, ,,,, 8 1, 103 109 Reese, Joan 10 ,,,..,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 81 Reese, Roger 11 11.111,1,.,71,,,,,,, ,.71 Roiohl, Dorothy 11...71, 89, 91, 107, 108 Reim, Larry 12 ,,..,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,, U57 Reincke, Karen 11 .,,,., 71, 88, 107, 119 Reincke, Kathleen 10 ,.,.,.,, 81, 90, 101 Ress, Walter 10 ,..,....,.,,,,-,,,,, 112 Reynen, David 12 .,,,.,.,,,,,,,,,,,, ....--38, 57, 86, 126, 152, 162, 166, 167 Rhiger, William 11 ,.., 71, 73, 88, 91, 165 Rice, Janice 11 ,,.,,,,,..,,,, 71, 89, 110 Rietsema, Patricia 10 ,.....,....,. 81 ,90 Riley, Dennis 10 ..,......... 81, 93, 109 Robbins, Carolyn. 12 ,.......,.,,,,., ---22, 57, 88, 91, 98, 106, 118, 121, 154 Roberts, Cullins 10 .,......,,.,....., 81 Roel, Sharon 12 ,.,..,..,,,,..,,,,,1.. 105, 108, 113, 157, 168 Roelofs, Gary 11 ,..,,, 71, 89, 91, 151, 170 Rollins, James 12 ..,,.,.. 19, 57, 108, 150 Roorda, Phyllis 12. .. Roscoe, Carol 10 .,.. Ruerup, Frank 11. .. Rupp, Gary 11 ..... Rupp, William 11... Rusley, Donna 11... Rusley, Janet 12 ..... Russell, William 10 .......... Rutherford, Andrea Rye,11iiLi1XrH 1 ..--.--81 Rollins, Michael 10 ........... Roorda, Janet 10. .25, 81, 99, 107, 113, 154 .43, 57, 89, 105, 106 81, 93, 107, 154 71, 92, 102 ----.....-.------71 .--............--71 ......18, 71, 92, 93 -15, 57, 91, 100, 157 .20, 81, 101 10 .............. 81, 93, 96, 104, 107 ...........-.--.-71 S sookett, Judith 10 ................... .-...-...-78, 81, 91, 103, 106, 107, Sackson, Leonard 12 ............ 57, Sallenave, Silvia 12 ...1............. 154 101 ...-..-.89, 52, 57, 87, 89, 106, 154, 171 Sanborn, Carol 12..57, 105, 165, 166, 173 Sanborn, Clinton 12 ...... 57, 87, 121, 170 Sanders, Evelyn 12 ..1.............. 57, 86, 101, 106, 110, 120, 160, 162 Satre, Susan 10 ................. 81, 101 Satre, William 11 .... .... 7 1, 126 Schermer, Nick 10 ..... .... 8 1, 103 Schewe, David 10 ............... 81, 117 Schewe, Glenn 12 ............... 57, 116 Schlede, Gene 10 ................ 81, 116 Sehlehr, Jean 11 .... 71, 99, 107, 123, 157 Schmidt, Barbara 10 ......,,.... 81, 101 Schnebly, Diane 11-.71, 99, 107, 123, 157 Schneider. Joan 12 ...,........,.,f. 89, 57, 88, 91, 95, 98, 105, 106, 113, 165 11-,.,,-...---.-...-..-...166, 167, 168 Schneider, Kathryn 10 ...,..,,....... ,,1,-..............81, 91, 92, 107, 154 Schneider, Thomas 10 ........-.-f..f 81 Scholl, Janet 12 .............V4... 58, 118 Scholl, Joyce 11 ..,..... K... 7 1, 123 Schoon, Ben 10 ......., ,,,--1. 8 1 Schroeder, Charles 10 .... .... 8 1, 116 Schroeder, Harlan 12 ......,,....Y. -.58 Schulte, Sharon 11 .........,.... 71, 107 Schumacher, Marilyn 11..12, 71, 88, 114 Schumacker, Pamela 10 ...,,... --.. Schwartz, Stephen 12 .....,.,,,,,,,. 161 -.. .17, 38, 58, 86, 108, 111, 144, , Schwemnrler, Darlene 12 ...,,...... 58, 114, 115, .81 165 156 Schwen, John 11..71, 93, 95, 97, 104, 144 Seberson, Larry 10. . .81 Seedorf, Faye 10 ................ 81, 103 Seeger, Rodney 11.. 88,'911,'102f'10'811144 Seifert, Barbara 10 ..1........... 81, 102 Selle, Glenda 11 ............ 71, 107, 157 Sether, Kristin 10. .81, 83, 90, 99, 107, 154 Seymour, Joyce 12 .............. 58, 100 146 Shea, Stephen 11 ......1......... 71, T Tangen, Rhodette Taylor, Katherine 12 ........ ......,, 5 9 10 ....... . . . . . . . . . . .80, 82, 90, 92, 107, 153, 154 Tesch. Athelene 10 ....... ...... 8 2, 103 Tennis, Steve 11 .... 88 Shea, Suzanne 12 ................... ..58, 87, 88, 100, 106, 113, 154, 165, 167 Sherman, Julie 12 ..... 58, 88, 91, 98, 106 Sherman, Martha 10 ....1... 81, 107, 154 Shoemaker, Sara 11 .................. 71, 93, 96, 98, 105, 107 Sigurdson, Karen 10 ................. 82 Sigurdson, Sharon 12 ............ 58, 118 Simon, Sharon 12 .................... -:...46, 58, 105, 106, 108, 113, 154, 165 -,,,,,..,-,-..---,............168, 172 Sipple, Jane 10 ...............,,.. 82, 91 Sipple, Roger 11 .... .-.71, 116 Skaar, Gary 11 ......... 1.fY. 7 1 Skelton, Donald 12 ...... ,... 1 48 Skelton, Margaret 10 ,,........f----- 82 Skogheim, Charlotte 10 ..,,,......... ........-,,,.-82, 90, 103, 107, 153, 154 Skogheim, David 12 .............. 58, 86 Slife, Barbara 11 ....,..........Y...- 69, 71, 89, 91, 105, 107, 108, 122, 154,169 Slinde, Darryl 10 .,,,,,......,,,, 22, 92 Smeby, Howard 11 ...,......,........ 71 Smeby, James 10 ....... ..,, 8 2, 117 Smeby, Kathleen 12 ..... .... 5 8, 110 Smeby, Kraig 10 ..... .... 8 2, 101 ...-...71, 116 Smith David 11 ..., ..1Y..---- 7 1, 119 Smith Susan 10 .... .... 1 6, 82, 91, 92 .71, 119 Sorby, Larry 11 ..... ...,f.-- uJean 12. .. ..,,..--V 58, 118 Smeby, Kent 11 ...1 1 . 7 L Sorby, Sorenson, Alice 11 .... .... 7 1, 102, 107 Sorenson, Janet 10 .,... 4,..,---- - --82 Tennyson, Roger 11. .. ..,,r-,, 119 Thisted, Mathia 10 .... ......1 8 2, 91 Thofson, Shirley 12 ......... 59, 100, 114 Thomas, Patricia 12 ..... ....... 5 9, 106 Thomas, Robert 12 ...,--.,.,--,,,,-, 59 Thompson, Alice 10 .......... 30, 82, 91 Thompson, Clarence 10 ,,,1,,-f-,--,, 82 Thompson, Eugene ll ..-. --,,,--- 7 2 Thompson, Gerald 11 --,1,,,---,,,-- 72 Thompson, H. James 12 ............ -. --38, 59, 98, 126, 127, 129, 138, 139, 141, .....,,.....145, 152, Thompson, Janet 10... Thompson Janice 1 2. Thompson: Patricia 10. Thompson, Robert 10. Thompson, Roger 10. . 162, 166, 167, 173 91 .,.,,..82, 90, .59 114 ......82, 101, 131 ..-.82, 92, 93, 170 103 Thompson, Ronald 10 ........ 82, 89, Thompson, Sonita 12 ......... ......- --1.-----.12, 59, 100, 102, 106, 156, 157 Thompson, Thomas 11 .72 Thompson, William 10 ...... 82, 103, 108 Todd, Linda 10 ...... 28, 82, 101, 107, 154 Tolo, Betty 10 ......,1,-,-Y,, --Y----- ..23, 82, 91, 103, 107, 108, 109, 114, 115 Tonga, Anthony 11 ...,-1.1-,,,,, 72, 111 Tonga, Jolene 12 ........ 59, 110, 156, 157 Tonheim, Thomas 11 .... 72, 99, 126, 134 Tostenson, Ronald 10 ........ 82, 87, 103 Tostenson, Sharon 12 ,,,,--------,, --59 Trae, Donna 10 .......--, ---, 3 2, 91, 103 109 Trejo, Joe .11 ....,..... Tufte, Judith 11 .......,-1,,-, ,,,,,-- 88, 96, 97, 101, 107, 154 Sorenson, Morris 10 1.,. 1,....-- 8 2, 92 Sorenson, Ray 11 ........,,1 ---- 1 50, 151 Sorenson, Terry 11. Speltz, Arthur 11 ........ ""1f72,192Q9Zi,' Sprankle, Mary 10 ....., 82, 90, 103, -71 101 Speltz, Robert 11 ,...1..-,f,- 72, 92, 101 107 118 Springborg, David 12 .........., ---. Springer, Ernest 10- Spurr, Steven 10... ,,,U.,---.-82 Stadheim, Charles 11 ........ 72, 116, 117 Stauch, Judith 10.. Steil, Thomas 10 .... -82 .----82, 144 Stenhovden, Bruce 12 1.----1--- f---- 5 8 Steinke, Joyce 10.. Stencel, Kathy 10 .... . . . .82, 101, 107 Stevens, Audrey 12 ....1... 58, 156, 157 Steibler, Gary 12 ...V,,.--.-, ---- 5 3. 118 Stiles, Keith 12 ..... .-..59, 94, 118, 166 111 Stoa, Dennis 10 .... .,1-----1 -Af- 8 2 , Stoa, Hazel 11 ...... Stoa Marilyn 12.-. ...72, 104, 107, 123 ..1...59, 61, 98, 1061 1'54,1157f -11651-171 138 Stolze, Allan 12 ..... Stolze, Audrey 11... Stotts, Rex 11 ....... Stout, Jon 11 ....... Stowell, Mary 11.-. Stowell, W. Thomas .-.-....59,107, ...--.---72, 88, .....13, 72, 105, 157 168 -72 12 ............. 188, 141, 144, 152 119 Studer, VVilliam 11.. ....-.......72, St ve Ramona 11 ..... 72, 99, 107, 157 y , -- Summers, Raluh 10- ---..-....28, 82, 89, 103, 111, 131, 144 Suthers, Thomas 11 ,,,,,.,.,,.. 119, 126 Svendsen, S. Anne 12 ....,,......-.. 59 Tullberg, Allen 11..72, 123, 148, 149, 151 Tweeten, Sandra 10.. Ugland, Donna U 11 .... Ugland, Karen 12 .... Ulrich, Wayne 10 .... Undahl, Diane 11.-- Underdahl, Hazel 12. ....83 --1-...72,119 144, 145 ........-.72 ,...60, 89, 106 Unseth, Karen 11..72, 88 107, 154, 157 Urschltz, Jerry 10 ...,1,,,,- ,-,,-,-V- 3 3 V Van, Baak, Gary 12 .1........ 60, 87, 170 Van. Beek, Tom 11 .........,,,,, 72, 144 Vandenheuvel, Mary 10 ........,-- 83, 91 Vander Syde, Gary 10 .......... 83, 111 Van Van Van Van vin Proosdy, Kenneth 11 ........ 72, 119 Ravenhorst, Everna 10 ......... 83 Riper, Janice 11 ........---, 72, S9 Ryswyk, Larry 12 .............. ----.,29, 38, 60, 87, 116, 121, 126, 152 Wilgen., Kenneth 11 ........ 72, 102 Verdoorn, Phillip 12 ................, 60 Judith 12 ..... ..... Swanson, John 12 ........,,1........ 59 Swanson, Ronald. 11 ..............,.. 101,144,145, 151 Sweet, Connie 10 ...........,,,.. 82, 90 Syverson, Lowell 10 .......,...,..... .. .82, 89, 92, 94, 136, 137, 144 Vig, ,,,,........ 13, 39, 43, 46, 60, 89, 91, 98, 100, 106, -Y----......154, 155, 157, 161, 165, 172 Vig, Mary 10 .......1.... 83, 91, 103, 107 Vinck, Pool 12 ...... 60, 100, 151, 152,165 Voldahl, Gordon 10 ................,, 83 Vol-lmer, Gary 11 .............. 72, 170 Vorpahl, Thomas 12038, 46, 60, 100, 172 Page 181 1 W Waalkens, Herbert 12 ,,,...,.,..,,,. 60 Waalkens, Marjorie 10 .,,A,.....,,., 83 Wacholz, Siharon 10 .v..... .. 83, 91, 107 Wahlstrom, Gwendolyn 11 ..,,...... 88, 99, 107, 108 Walker, Bonnie 12 .,............ 60, 118 Walker, Gary 11 ...... .....,, 7 2, 88, 91 102 Wallace, Robert 11 ..... ,.,.. 7 2, Waller, Lanny 10 ..,,, ,,........., 8 3 Waltz, Larry 10 ,....,,.,...,,,.., 83, 116 Wambach, Renee 10 ......1, 83, 107, 109 Wangen, Dean 10 ...,.... ..,.....,, 8 3 Wangen, Gerald 10 ..,,.,..,,..., 83, 116 Wangen, Roger D. 12 .,..,,.,.. 60, 116 Wangen, Roger L. 12 ...,.Y,,.....1.. .-,-.,.-----,60,126,128,148,165,167 Wangen, Thomas 11 ,........... 72, 94 Wangsness, Sharon 10 ,,,,,, 83, 90, 154 Ward, Delcie 11 ..1,.......,,,,...... 72 Warner, Leland 11 ,,.....,.........,. 72 Warren., William 10 ,,...,........... 104, 111, 131, 144 Wasmoen., Thomas 11 ............ 72, 117 Waterman, Bruce 10 ,,,,..,.. 83, 93, 131 Wayne, Jerry 10 ....,,...,.V......... 83 Wayne, June 10 ....,.....,,......... 83 Wayne, Martha 10 .,.... 23, 83, 103, 109 Wayne, Mary 10 .... .,.,, 8 3, 103, 109 Wayne, Ruth 12 ,...., .... 6 9, 89, 106 Weck, Patricia 12 ,,.......,,,... 60, 118 Wed e Charles 10 1..1...,83, 103 157 , g AA,vV Wedge: Rita 10,.83, 93, 96, 101, 154, Wehrhan, Roxanne 11 ,,..,,....... -- X .1 N, 1 L38 f -vs , . M -4 M A .x .N 1, . , - V, , 1 -.. 54 1 Y, A Q J W Page 182 9 -5.1 1 M' ' 7 If JJ 01117 Qi MCMA? Q17 ,HEC 1 72, 88,105,107 Weitzel, John 10 ....,.,.,,..,....,.. Welch, John 11 ....,.,,. ,..., Wendelboe, Carol 10 .,,.,,,,..,.... Wendelboe, Sharon, 11 .,.........,. Wentzell, Sandra 11 ,,., 73 102, 107 Werner, Dean 10 ......... , ...,...,.. Werner, Jean 12 .,.,,,,...,,.... 60, Weseman, Claudia 11 ....,......,.. Westergaard, Robert 12 ......,..... Westhuis, Elsie 11 ..,,,...,,,.....,. Westrum, Paul 12 .,..1. 61, 126, 127, Westrum, Steven 11 ...,....,........ Wichmann, Kathleen 12 ..........,,. .38, 61, 86, 89, 100, 106, 154, Wichmann, Rosalie 12 ............... widger, Sally 11 ...1 73, 99, 100, 107, Wiersma, Bert 12 .,.... 61, 126, 152, Wilhelm, Gervaise 11 ,..,,.,,...,.. ,-1,,,.-..70, 73, 88, 102, 107, 153, Wiik, Alf 12 ..,.........,,,......... Wilke, Paul 11 ............,,....... ,v..73, 126, 127, 130, 134, 135, 136, Wilkinson, Diane 11 ....,...,.., 73, Will, Deanne 11 ....,....,...,.,.,,. Will Larr 12 . y ........ ..,,, 6 1, 105, Willaby, Florence 10 .....,.......... Willmert, 01110 11 .,..,,.... 73, 93, 95, Wilson, Cynthia 10 ...... 27, 83, 107, Wing, William 12 ..,,.....,,,....... Wolfe, Gordon 11 ...,. ,.,......... wdff, Jean 10 ,...,,,. ..,........ Wolff, Lawrence 11 ,,...,.. 73, 143, Wolgamof, Susan 11 ....,,,,.,,,... . .- , , . 1 , . . . ,73, 100, 104, 107, 122, Woolard, Robert 12 .......,,,..,.... wiio-ht, Patricia 11 ,1.1...., 73, 107, 7 X Xavier, Brian 11 ..., .,... 7 3, 93, 94 Y Yocum, Barry 11 .........., 73, 102, 111 Y0kiel, Leo 11 ,..................,,.. 73 Yost, Cami 11...73, 88, 99, 107, 154, 165 Z Zamora, Irene 10 ..,.................. 83 Zamora, Mary 10 ........,......, 83, 104 Zavitz, Camille 11-.73, 105, 107, 154, 168 Zimney, Mary 10 ,... 83, 90, 101, 107, 154 Zimney, Raymond 12 ............ 38, 61 Zoller, Jon 10 ......,..... 79, 82, 83, 102 Y K in 5. P! V N 22? A if 1 X. 1 83 ,J r- , 9 '-X-7 8811. M 1 fy 1, , X 'Tb' , X. X , R ,A-.8 8 7 i . X., A Achelf, George .... Ahrendt, Luverne 1 11 Allen, Joyce ..,,..,, Anderson, Anne .,,, Anderson, Irvin ...,,. Anderson, Robert .,.. Anthony, Arthur ..., F acult Gercken, Edna K. 11 Gilmore, Orville ,,,, Glesne, Marvin 111 11.1122 111111145 11111111116 1111114, 18 H 1111111, 38 -------20 Heath, Helen --A-A24 Hillstrom, Beryl 1111 Horning, Lorraine Hovey, Egil .,...,... Index 1111111111111116 111111111111111121 Gustafson, James ..,,,, 18, 126, 130, 132 1111116 111111131 1111115, 19 B I Bailey, Norman ,...,,.. 24, 93, 118, 119 Banged- Lorraine -----------'------- 12 Ingvaldson, Jennelly 111 1111112 Banovetz, Lorretta v,............ .1127 Bauer, Ruth .,....., A........ 2 3 Beethe, Eleanor .... .....,..,., 3 1 .I Breberg, Phyllis .,., ,..,..,....., 2 7 h ,,.,.-, .... 2 8 132, 135 Bu r' Donald , Jacobsen, Earl ..,,,,.,,,.,..,..,,,., 26 Johnson, Bruce .tea,... 19, 130, 131, 145 C Johnson, Olive v,,..,,,,..,,. 1120 Jordahl, Martin ..,,, ,..,,,,..v. 1 1, 73 Cords, Nicholas .... ..... 1 8 K D Kennedy, Wallace 11 .... 17, 30, 113 King, Leon .......... .,.,,...... 1 3 Dahle, Grace ..,... ..... 1 6 I. E Loy, Iva .... 1111-25 Ehrhard, Paul .,,....,.. 18, 130, 131, 141 Mc Ellertson, Roland ..,.,...,.,..,.. 11, 39 Emmons, Lawrence ..... 22, 92 Erickson, Geng ,-,,,,, ,,,,,,, 2 4 lVIcElhinney, J. R. ,..c ..... 1 1, 73 Esson, Russell .,.... ..... 2 6 M F Fairchild, Charles Flim, Karen ,,..,,., G Gammell, Alice 1.1..111...,j..1 Melby, Winton ...,,,. 24 Mickelson, Marilyn 1 1 ' ' ' ' '12 Mittelstadt, Stanley 1 1.1.1 1 N 18 L-V' LJ Q, V K f In J W my QD f lu 9 L f I i, Q I I 1 JL 1, , AMUJW Q, r fb jijb ,A flylj' Q Y VL :lf Qjykfy f LJ x 0, , ,V I ' ' 9 ' Y '1 J C L ' Ui Q 9 ,Agni 41 J , fi ff WK f ' L? W1 ,V , Ac, I vplub JI Myers, Robert ...,, 1 Narvcson, Jerome 111.122, 1111114, 4 1 96 111111112 17 111111138 101 Nelson, Elaine 1 11 Nelson, Ruth .,.... Nettleton, Warner 1 1 1 0 Oldert, Karen .1.. Olson, Edythe 111 P Paulson, Donald 11 Piers, Gertrude 1111121 1111113 20 12 1111117 11 ...111. 29, 73 1111114,17, 67 R Ross, Lowell 1-.1129 S Salmela. Melvin ,,.,, ,.,., 2 0 Schwartz. Sydney 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 126 Sebert, Elsie 11111 11111 1 9 Seifert, Linus 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 126 Seifert, Mary 11111 11111 1 2 Shuldes, Dale 1111111 1,,-, 1 4 Skjeveland, Marie 111111111111111111 25 Spear, Byron 1111111 11111111111111, 2 1 Standly, William 11 126, 130, 163 Summers, Ralph 11111111111111111111 28 'I' Tcnnihill, Hildred 1111 Thompson, Maurice V Van Beek, Joan 11 Volkman, Irwin 1111 W Wambach, M. E. 1 1 1 Ward, Lorne 1111 Woods, Ruth 1111117 1111121 1111128 11-1120 111111119 1111110, 39 111111125 Page 183 1. ,v' !.f X. .fb Nj 'C C 43. 'MQ aj, QSWX BMP 2C2?1h?'QifwG12f ,792 WWW W Q2 MW 6 5 mmww - W up v - f X' 44290 M' ZMWQMWW WMM WM WWWJZQ VWMM 3 ,ami W J MfffW" gwfffb ig' ' A R 7 if M WM' J M f f MW f A MQW! , A W W f 3 J, if' f , . 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