Alamosa High School - El Alarado Yearbook (Alamosa, CO)

 - Class of 1924

Page 1 of 118

 

Alamosa High School - El Alarado Yearbook (Alamosa, CO) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 118 of the 1924 volume:

Girl Graduates gu-s Record Book 4% O u o o o u O t o o y " «V fastened 6y° Vicror qq r uoinyi B irsej Hopkins NEW VJDRK Hggfe Illllllll Contents: ■ I1I1IH1I1 Class 0! %otto Class Office® Class Vhoto$mphs Mto aphs Veachers Pass prophecy invitations " programmes focikl Events Week-end " parties Vacations %uto Vrips Press Wices Presents %1DJLS Jokes and 7v ic$ %accalaureate ftffion iiiiiiiniiiii r — 1 6 . .„ ' ' •1 f , co g L L ' 2 £ ? 4 !i 1 J ■ I J ' I C Z -r w _ ' ii J .A AAJ i v m,. ( f . i -? i A. u r 4 IU ytA- jlA. « •. UmsL ' t Z ' t t_ f J A C UUclL ct iXo Xa L JL " ) •-, J LL-A tAA l ( i iA. n " Bob ' P r e $ i e c " Cherry |)uc lass RifigraptB Te-d " pc}vcVi r m. ' Wc zle.. l-f, -6- -a T J ' F r Lri K ' i e £ " u. yj e. 1 " 13 $ t c Oi P C£- ' Fre. S h ats $ v oy -f. HS. " J " -g »A A AAA«UhX I»? ?» ?» jffis rnoiacrare U f 8i£ fclfr ' skjZJbX §d££ ik%ac ENIOJ( ft Wk © »»i sfe © ©. ■ H g- i Scli«c| Orchesfrd. S e 71 i c r P y , M-u-f- years n, ?. Staj} B qsz. 13 3 1 ) 071-e. y «- 4 r. M. I I. Mve i-fi s r g- tya n g-. H gl So hoc) OrtKi rd. » » « « » « « V Y « ,--- XAyJkd YUJX £u w Oil -e. y .• $v d ? «. l C ) v- b Sec. SeTii ' oy-O is, Secrt hsry 0 ss ' 51 The. ■ Robert Mvh r nct-(i t Id. ve-l-W ' Tlg l ) L f f h K V i -s 3 y ars - ' ■ ' -.- t 1 i 1 GrandJunctjon Colo. tya ' T " ' " ' « ' - W V S rg et JS tAp)et 7i r s iK jsr ijc « ° « « O W J o ' ,.; " i- - (5 c r 4, ) d 7i e • e r r m 4 n AP ve.rY 2 € rt Bvcun @ G DOT! c l y-) rs r c i $ s s lu-rK y he. 5 r4W. tm mt LtiM v$ j ' ■■V ' i bgr Dhs fcih-D e B«.Vle.. 5 Te-)l4 o h ' i e A ATii cs tfs. he.) ffs ■S-W ? f« c y " a , » c o) c) l3u.il d ' h y oa Kdonn w h o. f ISM1M1 utonrmris t lr he.te erttfS L K . S -T x 7ZrJw (? " -r )o werS , S w mm r " iv " , X 7[-) e. no 3 , m fes y m $ t i texti ■ ' ■- mm itographs k K I E K E i mmiljij loacngrs f ' Ms Illlllllllliiiiiiiiiiii eachers _s£ e a d " :j £ ? uief o ' ) Ms " achers SP fc« ' • t l f k Mgfy %b m- «g v ™$ ] o w pipe down " fr)i SS Vebe U)l u. g«, tyrS. l?ed Tl t w j- ' ' ■ ' ; " ' -..■; DTl w- S c e M °M , : vv " : v , 5 r 5en4 you. Ik ' X iii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii m INmiHItlHIIltitimilUHtillliMlllMlMfltlJ oarers Lii ill ■ OUR CLASS PRESIDENT Would you recognize in this lit- tle cherub our stately Senior Class President, Class Valedictorian and Editress of the Midget Messenger? Her exalted position in the world, even at this early stage in life, shows that she is above the average child. Perhaps this is why she is used to high positions. Take a slant at that smile; it is whole- hearted , lovable and sparkling. Then look at the grown-up Wilma ' s smile. It has only improved with age. A physiognomist looking at that baby would undoubtedly have said that she would be a responsible, re- liable, humorous and dependable girl. A person with the ability to do things, no matter how hard, a lead- er, a true friend, and an honorable enemy. These characteristics at- tributed to Wilma in her tender years, are true, and we predict that her career is not yet ended. From A. H. S. she will find new worlds to conquer and our lovable, like- able Wilma will never meet defeat. Every pupil in the A. H. S. owes Wilma a vote of thanks. She has preserved our paper when there was no one else to take the reins and be responsible for this task at the beginning of the year. It was feared that our worthy publication which has been a credit to our school for MISS WILMA FARNHAM Our Class President, four years, was doomed to failure and perhaps extinction. But Wilma offered her valuable services and with the assistance of her efficient staff saved the paper. None except a girl with her pep and stick-to-it-iveness could have put the paper across this year. We are proud and glad to say that all honor is due her. In this we wish to take the opportunity to thank Wilma and her staff for their ser- vices so willingly given. dehors 9fc K 5 % " m liming m iaiBaiiiiiiiiBiiiiiyiio lies and Gentlemen : I am so pleased that you will give me aiS portunity to demonstrate to you this evening my new science. In this rid of changing conditions and rapid progress, this science has been lmost crowded into oblivion by such minor matters as cosmetic clay packs, Mah-Jong, shingle bobs and other matters of state. But it has come to pass that the veil of the future can be pierced for each of us by the trained diagnosis of our silhouettes. This training is long and weari- some, but I, who have had it, tell you that it more than repays one for the study, as I shall leave you to judge for yourself. Lois Lawton— This is the profile of one of pronounced musical ability. Just by gazing at this silhouette, I can hear sweet strains of music that hold my soul entranced by the beauty and perfection of their harmonies. Behold here, the queen of the world ' s music, one who will be a famous pianist and a contralto of no mean fame. Can you not see Notwal ' s name emblazoned on the billboards of the future. Louise Sundquis t— This is an intrepid hunter, ladies and gentlemen. Notice the set of that chin, that nose, that noble brow. This is a very fine example of our modern American Flapper. This is a woman of strong mind, strong will, and stronger temper. She will become a lecturer on a strong subject— an old maid, demonstrating her independence of man. Thus at some future time shall we see her at the head of an exploring party to investigate the wilds of Africa. Having conquered all the civil- ized world, she will then attempt to extend her sway over the uncivilized parts. Margaret Stapleton — This girl is destined for a very happy future. She will find her greatest ambition in the highest of all worldly vocations —the maker and keeper of the home. I find a trace of fondness for sheep. She is somewhat woolly, so to speak. Hence it is that I can tell you with utmost confidence that she will be the wife of a rich sheep rancher. Whether this will keep her in the San Luis Valley or lead her abroad, to such famous pastures for sheep as Australia or the Argentine, I cannot tell you, but so her face betrays her destiny. Frances Bolger—Here we have a famous beauty— one who could Whethei M such fai M tell you, Vc ve on everlasting fame and fortune in the movies, but who with a spirit characteristic of the grand old class of 1924 said, " Brains, not beauty, " is my motto, and who then proceeded to carry out her vow. So we shall see her in years to come as the prosperous and efficient manager of a large hotel in Liverpool. The unwary tourist is hers, the moment he comes off the gangplank or out of the hangar; and for his further enticing, this little lady will operate a curio shop, selling curios from all places of the world. She it will be who will offer humanity a chance to " go around the world in twenty minutes, at Bolger ' s Bazaar in Liverpool. " Robert Whitmore—Oh, my friends, what a joy it is to behold such a personage — a model young man, and a very good looking one, too. One, who by precept and example, is destined to influence greatly the world of tomorrow. He has a natural gift for foreign languages and so I foresee that eventually he will make Paris his home. There he will meet the people of all nations, and how great will be his influence. His least word and idea will be broadcasted and copyrighted throughout all the civilized world. Not as an ambassador high in political circles, not as a banker of world-wide influence, not as a scholar — but as an artist will he be known to fame. He and his wife will work together in his art. (By the way, I know that you will all be interested in knowing that his wife will be a famous beauty, noted for her stunning red hair.) Together they will influence the rest of humanity far more than statesman or scientist or student could. So in future days we shall find in this man the Paul Poiret of the future, a designer of men ' s and women ' s apparel, famous the world over. Lloyd Bergman — Eunice Evans — Here are two people whose futures are inextricably bound together. Every line of the girl ' s profile tells that she can never be happy except with this young man, no matter what the circumstances may be. And if I may venture an opinion based on my knowledge of them in high school days, he will be a much hen-pecked husband — albeit a very happy one. The lines of this face (Lloyd ' s) tell me that he will become an eminent physician at the head of a prominent hospital in one of our largest cities. His success will be due, however, to the stimulating, though strenuous companionship of his wife, who by continually " keeping him guessing " in his home life, will also keep him at his highest pitch of human energy in his work. Her happiness lies in bossing him, but she will also find time to become a prominent political worker and speaker. You who know her will not be surprised at this, for she has never been at a loss for words. Mabel MacDonald — This profile moves me to a feeling of sadness — I must cry, I must — this woman ' s grief overwhelms me. Sorrow will come to this poor girl — oh, how heavily. Shall we not on some distant d PlllillM ler as a lovely widow, mourning her husband? No, not so. I see nothing that. ' Tis only as a fair bride weeping for the loss of her pet poodle. So does life lay its burdens upon us. Leland Teal — Ladies, doesn ' t this profile make your heart go flutter, flutter? This is the profile of a very young man — but a man of genius. He is very artistic, temperamental, and will find his vocation in one of the arts. Pardon me, my friends, while I ponder for a few moments over this enchanting profile and seek to determine his fate. Ah! one thing I can see — he is very fond of macaroni. Also he is used to blowing. Does that mean that he talks too much? Ah no! never that! He will be a famous musician and eventually inspired by his love of macaroni, become a member of the Royal Band of King Victor Emmanuel of Italy. In truth, I feel that his genius will carry him even further and who knows but that some day Signor Teal will accompany these musicians to America as the leader of the Royal Band. Fred Luce — This man is one of courage and pleasing personality. We should expect great things from this individual. But, alas! he has a fatal disease which will in time wreck this most promising of careers. Bo .you see it? Alas, I hesitate to even name it, but duty compels me to tell you that he has the wanderlust, brought on by incipient Forditis during his high school days. His endurance will bear him through many trials of which not the least important will be matters of food. We shall see him in future times feeding perhaps upon the very husks that the kine won ' t eat, or similar indigestible breakfast foods. This man will hold many jobs in many countries. This curve, however, indicates a pronounced affection for the ukelele and so I can tell you that he will eventually become the overseer of a large plantation in Hawaii. Paul Egan — Why, what a coincidence is here — the owner of that plantation upon which we left our last friend working, will be this man. He shows a strong interest in groceries, which shows that some day, not so far in the future, he will be producing sugar and Hawaiian pineapple himself, that formerly he sold over the counter. But this will be only a side issue. I see him in a large office among many men of many minds —a prosperous lawyer— noted for his gift of oratory— this, the boy who in our high school had not yet learned to lie. Nay, not even on the right side would Paul say a word that could be untruly interpreted. Thus are the mighty brought to lower planes! Roberta Albee— This is a most winsome lady— yet I see much trouble in store for her. She is wilful and decisive — and so it is for her that I can see a life of service. She does not intend such a course now, but she will be disappointed in a love affair and so in her later years we will find her consecrating herself to the poor and friendless. She will becoi famous nurse, an organizer of the Red Cross in the field and will finally become the head of the Health and Sanitation Department of the Imperial Japanese Government. Thus shall she, far from home, find solace and relief from her personal sorrows in the care of suffering humanity. Gcraldine Herriman— This is the dainty lady of society— envied and flattered by all, the queen of every gathering, the belle of every ball. I find a dangerous tendency, however, that she is in grave danger of going crazy over some old thing or other— probably a man, though there is nothing by v hich this can be definitely proved— if she does not guard herself very carefully from any undue mental excitement. In fact, this tendency is so strong that with the help of my extensive training in this new science, I can see a home in which this business man and our society belle are happy together, surrounded by their numerous children and looking forward to many years of peace and prosperity, Ted having settled down a great deal in his ways. Young ladies, that is the way to deal with these young men of the " need watching " type— catch them young and train them right. Of course, this outcome is not what you might now expect, but Cupid is ever an undependable chap— and I, being trained in reading the future by the face, assure you that this will come to pass. Wilma Farnham— This is one of the intellectuals of the earth. This is a person whose capabilities are many. She has executive ability, a talent for expression through the agency of the pen, and above all, a keen interest in humanity. It is this trait that calls up before my trained eye, a glimpse into the future of this person. I see a school of learning and a noble profes sor before her class. They look at her in reverence for the vast learning she acquired at Alamosa High School. After — And now kind friends, I must tell you a very sad thing — so sad that it must necessarily cast a gloom over us all. But the worst must be told, or how will we become able to cope with the evil tendencies? This direful sign portends that those of us who escape any serious dis- eases and are not killed prematurely by any sort of unforeseen accident, are fated to die in the far distant future of old age. I would have kept this calamity from you if I could, but it is better that we should all be prepared for the worst and know beyond any shadow of a doubt just how to meet the disasters of that future that is so plainly and so cqn yincmgly written for us in o ur silhouettes. 4 Gr$ p u. X o r X)|ou.) cc e ■ %J7 r, •o. , % ' •to ' fll • . 1 , • . .. •- ..; 5 a ) ' 9. • -Z; , ' ' ' ' ••.. ' «« ' 2 Utoimig - pgfytl} (Annual latmjga Jtgij jicljmil » Ifriirag ftotutg, gKa% 23, 1924 OOL OP 1924 ♦ ednesday, May 21st, 8 p. m I • Piano solo . ♦...♦ ., Mrs Irene Cox II. Class History .. • ..« . . Geraldine Herrlman III Address to the Juniors. .LLoyd Bergman IV. Response ....•«••.■ . .♦. Mike McEnany V Class Poem • • , . . •Eunice Evans VI t olo ••«•••••••••«.••• 4 .Mrs Redman VII Class Gifts »• •« •.••. .Robert -hitmore VIII Class " ill. .......... ..Louise Sundquist IX Class Prophecy. •-.• ' ••-.-, Howard Rines • r .Lei and Teal a Class Song . .. ....Class of 1924. - £ THE SENIOR CLASS OF THE ALAMOSA HIGH SCHOOL PRESENTS Wrecking Roberts Budget A COMEDY IN THREE ACTS By Eugene Hafer CAST OF CHARACTERS Be tty Compton Geraldine Herriman Kent Varnaday Lloyd Bergman Oscar Heitman ...Max Dyer Larry Brentley Leland Teal Freddie Foster ¥ved Luce Joanna Compton Margaret Stapleton Robert Quentin Theodore Heilman Martha Alden Roberta Albee K. K. Keedon Howard Rines Bowers ----- Robert Whitmore Mrs. Alden Mabel McDonald ACT I. The music room of Betty Compton ' s home in New York in May SPECIALTY— Orville Beehtel, Dale Norton, Stanley Parker ACT II. Library of a home in Atlantic City five months later. SPECIALTY— Eunice Evans and Ruth Dyer ACT III. Scene 1. Betty Compton ' s home, about two weeks later. SPECIALTY — Theresa Saxon, Merle Moses, Margaret Sumner, Elizabeth Davlin, Mildred Reekers, Dorothy Dorian, Helen Russell Solo Dances by Theresa Saxon. Scene 2. Martha Alden ' s home, just before Thanksgiving. The management of the play wishes to call to the attention of the audience the fact that the furniture used in this play has been very kindly furnished by the Hampton Hardware Company. Alamosa, Colorado. BUSINESS MANAGER Robert Whitmore SPECIALTIES Myrtle Weber STAGE MANAGER ; Xucy Kellogg |Bq CCA ) K. r e S I ' e -S «, r- u c e, . ORDER OP 1 SERVICE Processional Mrs J H Hood Hymn 78 People Prayer Rev T P Kelly Solo Mrs Bess Redman Scripture Lesson Rev Ed McKinney Quateet Notices Mr Hansen Hymn 415 People Sermon Tom Steele Hymn 411 People §§gp ' ™ : " Benediction .J -W 23M M. V- i i 1 111 i i i i i i ii 111 ii ii 111 i 1 111 111 111 iiiiii in in i i i i i i i i i i i i i 5 || t i i i ii i i ii hi in t PROGRAM Third Annual Convention ALAMOSA COUNTY COUNCIL OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION Thursday Evening, Sept. 11, M. E. Church J. L. ELICKER Presiding 8:00 p.m. — Song and Devotional, Rev. T. P. Kelly ,pastor Alamosa Bap tist Church. 8:15 p.m. — " Co-operation, " Ray T. Sechrist, superintendent Alamosa M. E. Sunday School. 8:30 p.m. — " Training Schools, " Rev. T. F. Kelly. 8:45 p.m. — Address of the evening by Z. D. Edworthy, State Young Peo- ple ' s Division Superintendent. Friday Morning, M. E. Church STATE SECRETARY J. G. ARNOLD Presiding 9:30 a.m. — Song and Devotional, Rev. J. A. McNulty, rector Alamosa Episcopal Church. 9:45 a. m. — Appointing Nominating Committee to meet at 1 p. m. 10:00 a. m. — Address by a State Officer. 10:30 a. m. — Divisional Conferences: Children ' s Division — Mrs. H. R. Shaw, Leader. Young People ' s Division — Z. B. Edworthy, Leader. Adult and Administration Division — J. G. Arnold, Leader. 11:45 a. m. — Adjournment. Friday Afternoon, M. E. Church 1:00 p.m. — Meeting of Nominating Committee. 1:30 p. m. — Song and Devotional, Rev. J. E. Rains, pastor La Junta Chris- tian Church. 2:00 p. m. — " Co-operation in Kingdom Work, " State Secretary J. G. Arnold 2:30 p.m. — Business session: Report of Nominating Committee and elec- tion of officers; other reports ,etc. 3:00 p. m. — Divisional Conferences: Children ' s Division, Mrs. Shaw, Leader. Young People ' s Division, Mr. Edworthy, Leader. Adult and Administration Division, Mr. Arnold, Leader. Friday Evening, Presbyterian Church Hall 6:00 p.m. — Young People ' s Banquet — G. H. Sheesley, Toastmaster. Music by Prof. Dipp ' s Young People ' s Orchestra. This is Young People ' s session; all are welcome, however. Price 50 cents. 7:00 p. m. — Song and Devotional, Rev. A. W. Gibbons, Mosca M. E. Church. 7:15 p. m. — " Our Young People, " Ex-Judge W. R. Pyke, Hooper. 7:35 p. m. — " The World ' s Sunday School Convention and Europe ' s Shrines of Religious Freedom, " Mrs. H. R. Shaw. This program subject to change. I « or . " 3 ' Swinrrnhg 1 " 3wK , j« £ccccccccrcccccccccccccc rt(-n Social Evgnfe: C G 1 U. YT1 b $. | V L r. C r Lg07). X9 , ' V| T. L INCA. n ' bb " i c 31 1 CS ) K ' e Wolf Creti ' K K% ' LLU 6 - Tw. VBCsbns DoT w f9H£ «. . v. ,4f§j h te. c -nci t)e-ni or6 Cl r ttl e y ' ■ ' £ w$im ' jppw ' acaSans )ict fc rpie II! ju-st chu.n ( Ccod. 7r ) g h } 3 1 i US •S t PPI s h . y Two jony 3-oo D fellers, W Let y c u-r- £jrc5 ce ) ve. y o vu . yrs wm u CleAli Up D A J fl o n h o r yov-r - mm ' Vacsfcns j£ % it O W PI y%%tfi aratons R) O G r 4lr oe- TR ve-t . o ( t FrdTiceuj-»t. fTn ' Oe-s. Souiih fm«V J ft U-STlt £e. r £ v r «r« ' ' : VocoScns VUr«_ r TaSorS 7 cveraxfe 2q?u f h e fe w. i c. K lllSlfi Q-c e i«€iiai« ffln Trte Jilllb r£ai e,re, Ahe. o. Fr =i Ticca »- |ce (?) 7 T Hdtj cr!% ft j i " £ " VL £ s s vV h o P £ s f-a,- £ OO )T)db7e. tj u m N r ak C ve y ] -)y Slu.}+ rci " J+ " ie read c iaH HTe., Trims. rf jL or Oysfor ) c « -hitch, VKettDey Re 77?o?it), SS tt . i • ' ■ ' K Mies u Although Cu.H | r)s j j n aY W T7 fhe, C H4-nipio-nsK ; fhlS 3e4 T] h been 071 . A. H.s. fiihuwi Th - Y L ±m Ms bHU every tewn i-t, h€ - Ven)e. J 71 iT «. be.f j; r Q «. t d , w? , rhree JhMcs (jerA)di t fl e. r M Aft r . O P M d K D . f? u_ T| 71 1 -}1 P Center i) fix 71 i ' ce £ v$n 3 d u.3 rD £VU £• W €. h S Lament To The Gods Oh, gods, who over earthly things -O XC-» fc do reign, , I come to thee with sorrow and with ' ?1 -0 " € 7 f - pain; Lamenting, as it were, the awful blight That fell upon our team the othei night. In confidence full brimming did we hope That Del Norte with Miss Fortune might elope; But, ah, alas, our fortunes shattered were, And now Maroon and .White with many a tear, Bewails the dread mishap of Frida; eve; But staunch in both her teams she doth believe. Now, you who read this sad and drear lament, Repledge yourselves and give your full consent, To back to the last man Maroon and White, Whether in losing or in winning fight! SAM C. BLACK, Jr. Al BASKET BALL TOURNAMENT AT DEI NORTE Del Norte was the scene of the first annual basketball tournament of the San Luis Valley, held Febru- ! ary 29 and March 1. Coach Kraus, | ! of Gunnison, acted as referee of all the games. A fair-sized crowd | came out for all the games, while standing room was at a premium during the last two encounters. The early contests went accord- ! ing to expectation, Center ' s and ! Monte ' s boys winning from Sargent and Hooper, with the results re- versed in the cases of their girls ' | teams. In the play-off between the winners of the first contest and Del Norte, Del Norte lost to Center, while the Sargent girls were on the short end of the score with the Del Norte girls. In the semi-finals the Alamosa girls won a hard fought game from Hooper, while the Alamosa boys were losers to Monte Vista. The finals were played between girls from Del Norte and Alamosa, and boys representing Monte Vista and Center. The Del Norte girls won after two extra periods had been played, and the Center boys won the championship by a narrow margin. Miss Nathan Hostess at Banquet for Basketball Team Dorothy Nathan, our prominentSAST SIDE chaperon, gave a delightful ban-s played the quet for the basketball girls. Thereh 3 in the The scene of the merrymaking wastn. the Eat Shop, which presented arery fast (?) cozy appearance. The table was! their oppo- tastefully decorated with maroon )f 11-8. The tissue paper, and red and white t show their sweet peas. The miniature basket t at the small balls were pleasing favors and met with the extreme approval of the guests. Miss Nathan was a most entertaining hostess, and Mr. Evans kept up his end of the conversation with his usual wit and humor. The guests enjoyed themselves immense- ly and certainly think " Dorothy " is as good a hostess as a chaperon. 1 the promi- in the girls ' he good luck n Amos San- at when the le of " Bright ill have the Good work, Preshies! Keep up -the class spirit and show the school llyou have the pep. PARE A BANQUET TO ULOTHLETES pied side tables. Maroon and white " pennants containing the menu and program floating from white stan- dards served as place cards. The tables were decorated with red and white carnations. Mr. Allen acted as toastmaster and the following program was admirably rendered: The Trials of an Editor — Wilma .._.., JFaruham— — m - pi use. The following delectable viands were served by the Beauceant ladies: Fruit Cocktail Turkey Dressing Mashed Potatoes ' Gravy Carrots and Peas Buttered Rolls Perfection Salad Ice Cream Cake Coffee Mints After the banquet ,the tables were removed and the assembled party derived a great deal of amusement from the informal Leap Year dance that ensued. Those not interested in dancing adjourned to the billiard room and spent the rest of tha eve- ning there indulging in games of various sorts and descriptions. — M. S. ' 24. PiMcs TO OUR FOOTBALL MEN Play the game, But play it fairly. Fight to win, But meet men squarely. Tackle hard, And hit the line. Do your best, — But never whine. Play to win, But every inning Keep in mind There ' s more than winning. For good or ill, An honest man Is sweeter still. Reach your goal By hard endeavor — But by trick And cunning never. Win or lose, Though bruised and lame, Let night find you Unashamed. DEDICATED TO THE FOOTBALL SQUAD Lives of Athletes all remind us, We can print our name in blood, And departing leave behind us Half our faces in the mud. Football Boys Are Entertained Last Friday evening the football team was given a dinner by some of the members of the Commercial Club and by their dads. Invitations were extended to the team the be- ginning of the week by Milt Herrick and C. T. Myers. At 7 o ' clock the boys all gathered at Trent ' s Cafe with their fathers and friends and were served a most excellent supper and such a one as a real growing boy only can enjoy. The menu con- sisted principally of chicken, mashed potatoes, green peas, shrimp salad, hot biscuits and coffee. During the dinner a number of songs were sung and the boys as- sisted in the singing when they could but we have heard from extremely reliable sources that that was not very often. Captain Quintana is a good singer, but we noticed that he didn ' t sing a note that evening. Milt Herrick acted as master of ceremonies and called on Mr. Sha- han of this city, Mr. Linger of Hoop- er, who especially requested to be present to talk to the boys, and " Shorty " Franklin, of Denver, who told some uproariously funny stories. Captain Quintana thanked the busi- er in Dehalf of the boys. All together it was a most success- ful and thoroughly enjoyed dinner and it will long linger in the mem- ory of the members of the football team. It encouraged the boys and now they know that they have, the town and its good people behind them. ALAMOSA HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL TEAM Bottom Row: Parker, Kirby, Knoop, Moses (Mascot), Bergman, Meehan, Hinkle. Second Row: Allbee; Lepird, halfback; Russell; Quintana, Captain and quarterback; Sanchez, halfback; Wallace, center; Herrick, end. Third Row: McNitt, halfback; Stuart, end; Dyer, tackle; Meehan, guard; Hanson, Coach; Luce, tackle; Whitmore, fullback; McCracken, guard; Crabill. Jhletics fck ftsii rm Note aN PROGRAM DEFENSE DAY FRIDAY, 2 TO 3.30 P. M. Upon sounding of the bugle, stores and places of business are re- quested to close promptly. Patriotic bodies will assemble before 2 o ' clock on Third Street near Colorado Hall. The parade, headed by the city band, will come to rest in front of the Isis Theatre, where open air exercises will be conducted. Mayor H. Emperius is general chairman and will carry out the following program: Song — America. Invocation and Remarks — Father J. J. Murphy. Talk on Citizens Military Training — Evan Allbee. Address— Hon. E. O. Phlegar. Remarks and Benediction — Rev. J. A. McNulty. Forming of volunteer compeny for 15 minutes falling in behind flag. r . Reception for Teachers Members of the Baptist Church had as honor guests the teachers of Alamosa schools at the regular monthly social meeting held in the church basement on Wednesday eve- ning. The B. Y. P. U. members, un- der Mrs. Parker, cooked and served a most delicious chicken dinner to the large number present. Rev. T. F. Kelly made the address of wel- come, while Prof. G. W. Allen re- sponded for the teachers. Members of the B. Y. P. U. then put on a short but amusing program. THE SENIOR " NESS " AND " LESS " FAMILY Eunice — Sarcastic ness Fear less Geraldine — Cold ness Hair less Wilma — Dull ness Fault less Paul- Shy ness Pep less Ted— Mean ness Brain less Fred Crabil — Slow ness Noise less Bob — Bashful ness Sense less Fred Luce — Big ness Study less Margaret — Thin ness Sleep less Louise — Dumb ness Heart less Leland — Foolish ness Bone less Howard — Meek ness Voice less j Mabel — Little ness Speech less Lucie — Quiet ness List less Frances — Dark ness Shift less ' ross NtiteH A. H. S .TEN COMMANDMENTS 1. Thou shalt not fail to laugh long and loud at thy teacher ' s jokes. 2. Thou shalt honor thy Senior schoolmates. 3. Thou shalt not laugh at thy = instructor when he doth give thee counsel; yea, verily, thou shalt wipes, the grin off thy face. K 4 Thou shalt not chew gum, nei- ther shalt thou pass notes nor throw paper wads. 5. Thou shalt pass between all classes in two minutes; but, verily, s verily, I say unto you, thou shalt conduct theyself with a slow and se- date gait in the halls. 6. Thou shalt not curl thy face into a grin should thy science in- 3 " structor see fit to grow a misplaced eyebrow, or thy history teacher 1 " wear ear-pugs. 7. Thou shalt not be averse to putting thy name on the board in r " Miss Nathan ' s classes. 8. Thou shalt obey Roberts ' Rules 1 " of Order. Yea, verily. 9 Yea, verily, thou shalt not gad Q about. r 10. Thou shalt love thy dear teach- WF:LS. roa ibu 8 s ° " -25 «T °°™°° ' n n Q zdib us et te enbu8 so- v ery oyibi sT--- us LATEST EDITION OF THE PROV- ERBS. Silently, one by one, in the infinite rank books of teachers, blossom the little zeros, the forget-me-nots of the seniors. A switch in the hand is twice as good on the bush. A hint in time saves flunking. Look before you whisper. A good bluff keeps away zeros. Nothing copy, nothing have. Out of class, out of mind. Love me, love my notebooks. Rank does not make a scholar. All ' s well that ends well. A. H. S. POISON IVY CLUB YO A game is onl If defeated But you boast est ski If as victor Strive to do y And win th Fight the cle test, To show tht The guy who cheers the team when it ' s winning and razzes it when it ' s losing. The half wit that borrows your pencil and returns it half gone. The goof who reminds the teacher of the extra paragraph in Cicero. We are by no means opposed to gum chewing like our esteemed Fac- ulty, but the fish who chews gum in back of you during quiz, wins the rabbit ' s velocipede. The wop that always says the referee is crooked when his side loses the game. The angel child who reminds Miss Weber of your oral comp. »t jm. oil jm. But if fair and square they defeat you, then Try to muster up a smile, And give to others the praises won square, Without keeping the hatred on file. — Ex. —Ex. Pmss I SCHOOL CREATES THREE SOCIETIES AMONG STUDENTS GREAT FORWARD STEP TAKEN— SPARTANS, OLYM- PIANS AND THESPIANS IS For some time it has been felt jthat our extra-curricular activities were not complete as we had no lit- erary socities of any kind. Last year we did have a dramatic society, but it did not fill the needs of the school nor satisfy the demands of the students, and so to satisfy these } desires three societies were organ- ized at the beginning of this year. The three societies were numbered and the membership in the societies was determined by lot. " Fred Stewart; Treasurer, Geraldine " Herriman. For the Olympian— ' - President, Robert Whitmore; Seere- e I tary, Mildred Deuel; Treasurer, Fred Luce. For the Thespians — Presi- l " dent Earl Metcalf; Treasurer, Har- s old Walsh; Secretary, Paul McNitt. ;s The purposes of organizing these ,s societies may to some extent be self- evident. The constitutions specify U as their aims to promote better k school spirit, to destroy any cliquish- 7 ness which may exist in the school, to build up a better spirit of co-oper- d ation between the students them- ■- selves, to learn to conduct meetings of all kinds according to the rules THESPIAN PROGRAM The Thespian Society is to be con- gratulated on the splendid program they gave for the assembly last Thursday. In fact, they are the only society who have come up to the ex- pectations of the faculty with their entertainment. Earl Metcalf, president of the so- ciety, opened the program with an address on the aims and achieve- ments of the club. The feature of the program was. a play, " The Matrimonial Advertise- ment, " with the following cast: Theodosia Ball. .Aunt Martha Gordon Mabel Myers Mary Jane Cole ! Edna Jane Kahn.... Grandmother Cole Jim Baker Jack Cole William Simmons .....Uncle Cyrus Gordon The play was well acted, and the cast evidently spent time and effort in making it a success. Beteween the acts Jim Baker gave a recitation ,and Harold Russell ac- companied by Mrs. Redman, played two violin selections. The whole program was exception- ally good, and it is hoped the other societies will follow the Thespian ' s good example. s % SENIOR CLASS NOTES I CLASS NOTES i Senior Class Play to Be Held May IBBlBBIBilMBB HIBHUlt Miss Kellogg has definitely an- nounced " Wrecking Robert ' s Bud- get " as the Senior Class play. " Wrecking Robert ' s Budget " is a comedy in three acts and requires a cast of seven boys and four girls. Try-outs will begin immediately following spring vacation, and if everything turns out as planned, the play will be presented on May 2. Hallowe ' en colors, and the " grave and reverend seniors " in attendance reported such a grand old time as made the younger classmen dream dreams of " a great day coming. " ODE TO MY MUSTACHE (Dedicated to Mr .Evans, Amos San- chez and Max Dyer.) Hail to thee, oh fringe of fuzz, ver- dant and thin, That has hibernated on that virgin soil above my chin, Which is known and appreciated as my upper lip. Even as the tasselled corn or shred- ded wheat Doth shoot from out the fertile ground, So, too, dost thou slowly spring out beneath My nasal edific e, silently, without a sound! Again Hail! voluptuous ornament, Monarch, strainer of the toothsome soup ! ' Twill not be many years before you begin to droop — , And then, Oh Earth! Oh Land! Oh Joy Sublime! Will come the heavenly, glorious time — Oh, gee, if fuzz doth come, Can larger hairs be far behind? The Senior Girls ' annual hare and hound chase was the event of the school ' s second week, and can be rated as a success despite the fact that Mother Nature shed briny tears on the occasion, which failed signal- ly to dampen the ardor of either the " hares " or the " hounds. " A 3 p. m. on Friday afternoon the girls of the school assembled, — Miss Weber in charge of the " Whites, " while Miss Nathan led the " Greens — and took up the trail left by the Seniors, which meandered in strange and un- used by-ways, and sometimes all but vanished, requiring keen eyes to fol- low, ending eventually in Maddox ' s Grove, the " Greens " victor over the " Whites " by a narrow margin. Re- freshments were served to both vic- tors and vanquished by the Senior Girls. S f FACULTY MAGAZINE Romance Miss Kellogg Woman ' s Home Companion Mr. Hansen Snappy Stories Mr. Evans Good Housekeeping... .Miss Whitmore Vogue Miss Webber Physical Culture Miss Nathan Good Government ..Mr. Allen Musical America Mrs. Redman The American ..Mr. Elicker LOVE ' S SECRET. Never seek to tell thy love, Love that never told can be; For the gentle wind doth move Silently, invisibly. I told my love, I told my love, I told her all my heart, Trembling:, cold, in ghastly fears. Ah! she did depart! Soon after she was gone from me, A traveler came by, Silently, invisibly; He took her with a sigh. — William Blake. Hjjj Hj.T + i - $h 4 jh h j j» j»-»j» {» » i i «§• . ♦ ♦•♦ i+ i ♦♦♦ i I LITERARY DEPARTMENT « t. .t. .t, .♦ . ,t . tiAA. A A A A .♦. A . ♦ . A - ♦ . . ♦ - ■ ♦ . ■ ♦ ■ ■ ■♦■ A A A A A .t. A A .t. .♦. ■♦. ♦■ .♦. .♦. a , ♦ , ,♦, ♦ t t A j j A A % J " THE VILLAIN STILL jgf THE EXI) OF A PERFBCT WEEK PURSUES THEM ' i£3r- Scene — A darkened room with audible snores issuing from all parts. Scathily a familiar figure glides g Wnrna OfT He e room at „, S and £ r °ans fin I of feeling and by " » expression | a handkerchief ) 6yes with Eumce—Help! Wpinf Endows. ,pI °Pen the! Villain— Now r •, ' I itches, i win you » my Hear me? Y u " «7 y ° U • at e- Get to J ork Z " . DeVer gradu " « magic by heart w my book (snap, the ig ht a s rt eo Work --ah-- r «sh,abangorL ° Ut ' therei «a s " ence. The «?£ " ' " the n a » t the villain f 2 turne °n ha tr and ioX% aI r ° o ne ' ring his Villain r. feroc iOUS.) HanBe n a : n - CUrSes! l gotten A TOAST TO OUR SCHOOLFROM ALUMNI Dear school, you are a pleasant home for us. We love you dearly and in you we trust The modeling and t he making of our lives, An honor which we know you great- ly prize. To thee ,dear school, we pledge our loyalty. Our thoughts, our words, our deeds will be for thee. Tho many years the sands of life run on, Ye can ' t forget thee, no, once happy home. Our hero was the common sort, when all is said and done; He worked his head off daily and! Hj was out to get the l ' s lips ey sweet to sure they ' d pon her hair, [en sheen, speaks to me But For, MON. The reason for this diligence was commonplace, ' tis true He tried to swell his salary so it would do for TUE. And maybe that ' s the reason why one day he lost his head, Avd falling on his knees he cried, i " O maiden, wilt thou WED? He may have thought this sudden, [elen ' s eyes, but it seemed not so to her-P Pools look She lisped a quick acceptance and said forcibly, " Yeth I smeared with THUR. " when they went to keeping " bouse he feared that he would » perfectness, e ' 1 rapture swell oh, this modern maiden could face neither bake nor FRI. She could not run a bungalow, or (doll, even run a flat, cial curl; So on many sad occasions in a res- lain, she ' s just taurant they SAT. e Freeman, ' 23 But he forgave her everything— as ' man has always done, When she presented him one day HAVE AN a bouncing baby , FOR THE FIRST SUN — PIy 5 IN THRrare vmAijcfM for our dear old school at the tour- nament? These and others of the faculty, the Midget Messenger Staff, the baseball team and the glee clubs will all be in the 1924 annual. Then there is the Beauty Contest. Of course you want to see your class beauty go down in history as the prettiest and most popular girl in the 1924 school year. If you work for this contest, you will not only bring fame to your class, but help the financial end of the annual. If you are a patriotic, peppy, school spirited student, this - annual will be priceless to you. Get behind us! Boost! Monte has an annual every year — are you going to let them beat us? reSS NOES ; " - r- r:?x. f : zil ??- . ■?;: : r -Trrrr m BETHMAN, IN TALK, COMPARES MAN TO A 3 CYLINDER ENGINE TALK BY Y. M. C. A. MAN Mr. Hoisington, assistant state secretary of the Y. M. C. A., was with us several days ago and gave us a splendid talk on what one should do to fill in his niches in life. He told the traitor story of Benedict Arnold to illustrate his point. He said that we were all Fords, having a moral, a social, a religious, and an intellectual tire. , . + . .+ . . . . . . 4l . ., ESSAY ON PENITENTES The Penitentes — from a Spanish cross to a chosen place where it is A erected, and he is nailed to it and left for some period of time. He is taken down after unconsciousness is reached. The burial of the crucified is supposed to take place, but rarely does. In my experience I have known of a living baby being suffocated by the Penitentes. I was also acquainted with an old Mexican who lived at Petaca, New Mexico, who suddenly disappeared from this place. It was soon after the Penitentes had cele- brated Lent ,and we learned that he had used barbed wire with which to lash himself. Death followed as a result of blood poisoning and lack of care. In another town one of the prettiest children is always chosen as a victim to be fed to a snake. It almost seems impossible in this day and age that such conditions could prevail in any section of our country. It would seem that some attempt should be made to remedy conditions of this kind. H. M. PINGREE LECTURES On Monday, February 11, the stu- dents again had the pleasure of hearing H. M. Pingree, state super- intendent of the Methodist Episcopal churches, give a talk on principles of accomplishment. This was an exceptional delight, as it came in the morning during the regular reci- tation periods. The following is a brief summary of his talk: ' ' When you are young, take ad- vantage of all that life offers. It is great to be young, and youth is the flowering, the most beautiful, the most enjoyed and the strongest per- iod of a person ' s life. To go to school is a privilege, an opportunity, in fact it is a preparation, not only for one ' s future, but for future gen- erations. To get the benefit of study, get your lessons, and contin- ually have an object in view. Then of most importance, whatever you do, DO WELL. Think while you are doing it, that is what your head is for. Make every accomplishment a masterpiece. " This speech was brief and concise, and delivered in a forceful, inter- esting manner. jfel QTtes J 6te|p jVWJi SJJssSSMSWWSW SSAWSSWJSWrSJSA J McKeel — Reeves I On Sunday, February 15, at 6ne thirty o ' clock, at the parsonage home of Rev. and Mrs. T. P. Kelly, Mr. David M ' cKeel and Miss Lillie V. Reeves were united in marriage by Rev. Kelly, the impressive ring cere- mony being used., in the presence of close relatives of the contracting par- ties. The bride is the daughter of Mr. T. A. Reeves and is possessed of a sweet and charming personality Which has won for her mariy friends. Mr. McKeel is a brother of Mrs. Earl Parker, having come to Alamosa from Oklahoma a few months ago, and holds a position in the railroad shops. Immediately following the cere- mony, Rev. and Mrs. Kelly enter- tained the party at a delicious wed- ding dinner. The dining room and table were decorated In pink and white, a miniature bride being used i in the center of the table. Covers were laid for ten. rtes Hissfih filv Fz®nk €®% m {Qiawa yMau zjVa mn( • N lOUI Jo ADUATION %p Happy fortune Jay by day Ldgnb ana cneer your onward ay Lxyal friends and comrades true Bring aelignb and joy bo you DlxYaVIK £f£A ]ATIDI _ylll longed-for joys u Wish, tor you . Un this tfour glad (ommencement LJa yo bravely forth, with purpose true, Q lnd all good fortune bless your Way J ■ evepa Christmas mopning Mevep the Old Yeap ends Q But somebody thinks of somebody OldDays.Old Times,Old Fpiends wnedd far V O mcc uc i ffatt 3 ttfixtk Jill f 4»i % fcr gr»$ 0- A Christmas Greetings erru GKri sbmcie. « Usw Jh- Virh i v (ZLuyvtit Coui lc - Class Gifts It is during this last week of school that I have taken the greatest pains to gather mementoes for each member of the graduating class to help you meet the duties of lffe as they come to you. I shall proceed to distribute them to you, feeling thrilled with the thought that " It is more blessed to give than to receive ' and trusting that each little gift may be received in the same spirit as I present it. As I call your names, one by one, will you please come forward to receive these tokens : Louise Sundquist — Louise, you are a flirt ! Your eyes are very dan- gerous, particularly as this is leap year. For the sake of protecting others, I give you these goggles, and implore you to wear them. Paul Egan—Your trusty bike has worked hard the past four years to bring you within reach of your diploma. That you may give it com- plete rest, the class presents you with this pair of roller skates. Lloyd Bergman — We have been observing your rather unsuccessful attempts to gain a certain young lady ' s confidence. To help you in your quest, I am presenting you with a book entitled, " How to Make Love. " The book does not give any suggestion on a way to tame a young prize fighter. Fred Luce — Here is a little postage stamp I give yon with this thought ; Always follow its example and stick tight to one thing till you get to the place you ' ve set out for. A Ford doesn ' t always get you there. Wilma Farnhdm — Lest you forget this strenuous year and your wayward classmates, we present you with this Midget Messenger Boy, who shall always carry the colors of the class of 1924. Geraldine Herriman — I had planned to give you the latest book on " The Necessary Qualifications of a Doctor ' s Wife, " but since your inter- est seems to have turned toward finances and bankers, I believe this gift will be more pleasing. It is a savings bank from the Alamosa National Bank. We know you will make the best use of it. Howard Rine$ Knowing that your idea of heaven is an arm chair a stool, a book, and a good cigar, I am giving you the popular office chair, the dunce ' s stool, the dictionary, and a five-cent candy cigar. Eunice Evans — We present you with a pair of boxing gloves, donated by Pete Quintana, for the express purpose of attacking all antagonists on the opposing basket ball teams. Leland Teal — In order that your size may be in keeping with your feelings, I give you this pair of stilts. Frances Bolger — Since you are known by your classmates as the most forgetful girl in school, I present you with this memorandum pad to help you remember to eat three meals a day, that your hat is in your hand, and that you had a date last night with an old friend. Mabel MacDonald— Your ability as a basketball player warrants us giving you first place as forward on the All- Valley Basketball Team. Roberta Allbee — The class of 1924 is donating an eversharp pencil and notebook in which you can record all the pert and saucy sayings you have learned in associating with the present Senior Class. Margaret Stapleton — We present you with this fruit jar in which you may preserve your rich vocabulary for all future use. Mrs. Cox — We present you with another subject to help keep you from getting into mischief during school hours and wasting the time of the pupils around you. Lois Latoton — Since you are the only girl in the Senior Class with long hair, we give you this box of hair pins and hair nets. Bob Whitmore — Knowing that your curly hair is the source of much embarrassment, we give you this bottle of hair tonic that guarantees to take the curl out permanently with ten applications. Miss Kellogg — With great appreciation for your cheerful help during our senior year, I present you with the compliments of the class of 1924, a penwiper. Mr. Elicker—lleYe is a pair of rubber heels to lessen the noise you make in going about the halls and class rooms, disturbing the many ambitious students with your unexpected presence. Ruth Whitmore — We give you this muffler to soften your hai sh, loud voice which grates on the ears of your class when they hear you so distinctly assign a lesson for next day. 5. enior Class Poem Clas smates, Goodbye! School Pals, Adieu! Farewell is linked with pain; The suns will rise, and days be blue, Before we meet again ! Out on Life ' s wild and restless sea, Without our teachers ' aid, We ' ll face it all quite cheerily, And will not be afraid. We want to thank our faculty, Who have given love and care Without complaint to you and me, And they were always fair. So here ' s three cheers for A. H. S. To teachers, pals, and friends, The Valley ' s finest, I confess, So now our good time ends. — Eunice Eva nl nd an A 1 i HEARD IN THE 1 Albert (in English) — I seen a woodpile. Miss Whitmore — No, you saw it. Albert — Now, you may have seen me see it, but you never seen me saw it. Carl B. — Say, Duane, do you know what a quartette is? Duane — No. Carl — When all four think, the other three can ' t sing. Mildred J. — Say, girls, Georgia is playing false to our class. Here we are selling kisses to make money and Georgia is bootlegging them free in the hall. Teacher — My gracious, Dale, did- n ' t you wash your face this morn- ing? I can tell what you had for breakfast. Dale — What did I have? Teacher — You had eggs. Dale — Wrong, I had that for : breakfast yesterday morning. CLASS ROOM — itii j 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 iii n ft j iu i ?ij j li i ig le siat rse )llar )one nly hat ices An English professor wrote on the blackboard in his laboratory: " Pro- fessor Wilson informs his students that he has this day been appointed honorary physician to Her Majesty, Queen Victoria. " In the morning he had occasion to leave the room and found on his return that some student had added to the words: " God save the Queen! " racket? Fred — No, sir; only when it ' s running. Ev- tdur- Ted less , " if ding trth- % to P it. her e ' s| by| w. ior aken. I town in day) — ake this Mr. Hanson — Albert, I believe you are lazy. Albert — I believe you are right. (Albert got an hour and a halt for that.) ; .--;= r !• rv " ' ' ' " .. sc pe Joclfi V AS Others S sv N " tf F £V 97 4.gr ; j ro h.z.r 4_7i i isieh ■9m9mm kiiM iMt. Hd Springs -X¥ Five © - 4 ff jncf . MhK omc £y , Dothcr-Jctfe,, Wftis+r j . 1 ocK 3 t e, b vd . 7]e -)ooK U tro7) er _s fi TT)€ 7r.oce.cfy. Tcu; J? ) ' f C £c G? u. «. s_5 q. 5- cl uv f he Tn M rv)A " n. £e r p ct " e Ai t ;A7iS . U4 r Du. - -ncc D YlC-e. " B r £ Ti . I m N jmm Homt, tee,ctU " CL-n A fcAS .u jJS! BS)Vs l efce CLASS ROLL EUNICE EVANS ROBERTA ALLBEE HOWARD RINES LELAND TEAL ROBERT WHITMORE FRED LUCE GERALDINE HERRIMAN H. MARGARET STAPLETON WILMA FARNHAM MABEL MACDONALD LOUISE SUNDQUIST FRANCES BOLGER LOIS LAWTON PAUL EGAN LLOYD BERGMAN MRS. IRENE COX PROQRAM 1. Invocation. 2. Selection - - Girls ' Glee Club 3. Salutatory Margaret Stapleton 4. Selection Junior-Senior Quartette 5. Address— " America ' s Challenge to Her Schools " .... Dr. C. O. Thibodeau, Sterling, Colo. 6. Selection Girls ' Glee Club 7. Valedictory --------- Wilma Farnham 8. Presentation of Scholarships - - - Mr. Hanson 9. Presentation of Diplomas - - Mr. O. A. Killer President Board of Education 10. Benediction. ffritoro. APOS, 13. ' 23 Uuufcmru Ball Fred. C ha Hnrrpl 1 mora Fruit Cocktail Creamed Chicken Mashed Potatoes Peas on Rosettes Rolls Jelly Pickles Perfection Salad Wafers Ice Cream Cake Mints Coffee Huufcrnru Bull ps «A She is a Daisy Re — — — Harv y Johnson Babie ' s Breath The Seniors Si Mr . Fox Hearts Ease Violin S Newcomb Maid o " 1 the Mist Friday -Mr . White Bachelor Button Wild Flo 1 -Dayton McKean- — -Jack in • Pulpit Adieu to othy Wilson Johnnie Jump Up Relation and A Dish Rag-------- Miss Simpson Bleeding Heart Reading------ ---Francis Schall T ree Piano Selection— Mies May lot Posterity of the Senio rs — Mr. Bailey - — — Sweet Wil liam m ss Simpson, £ Sponger Franc es Schall Willa Price Rhea Hart Towns Smith Madeline Holdeman Harvey Johnson Lewis Hoyle Leona Chase Mary Worth Floyd White Ruth Van Host rand Ruth Sylvester George Cinders Norris Paul Duane As ay Donald Keiry Lawre nee Stoddard Rose Bout ' well Louise Bradley Mary Bradley Dayton McKean Mah el . Goff Sidney Batchelder Esthe r Ostergaa: J Olive Leonard Mary Burgett Fred Chavez T ' helma Correll 3 FRESHIES PliAY EAST SIDE The green Freshies played the East Side School March 3 in the High School auditorium. Both games were very fast (?) and our girls defeated their oppo- nents with the score of 11-8. The boys, however, did not show their usual pep and came out at the small end of the score, 16-2. Eunice Evans played the promi- nent role of referee in the girls ' game. The boys had the good luck to obtain the well-known Amos San- chez as referee. We all feel sure that when the Freshies assume the title of " Bright Seniors, " A. H .S. will have the championship teams. Good work, Freshies! Keep up the class spirit and show the school you have the pep. PARENTS GIVE A BANQUET TO AES. JTHLETES On Wednesday evening, the fifth of March, Masonic Hall was the meeting place of a festive gathering of young people. On this memor- able night the parents entertained the athletes of the High School and the members of the Midget Messen- ger staff at a turkey banquet. The hall was tastefully decorated in the school color s, maroon and white. Posters representing the various school activities occupied promi- nent places on the wall. The table for the guests was in the form of a large A in the center of the room, while the parents and friends occu- pied side tables. Maroon and white pennants containing the menu a program floating from white sta dards served as place cards. The tables were decorated with red and white carnations. Mr. Allen acted as toastmaster and the followin program was admirably rendered: ? ng Tho Trial, of .0 Editor- Farnham. The Cub Reporter— Margare pleton. Our Football Coach — Wilbert Cracken. Our Basketball Coach — Robert aret Sta- Ibert Mc- Whitmbre. White Hopes — Eunice Mrs. .... Hooper ' s Evans. Our Chaperon — Geraldine Herri man. Our Athletics — Mr. Evans. Our Parents — Mildred Deuel Our Sons and Daughters — Mi M. K. Herrick. Mrs. L. L. Herriman, representing the committee in charge, thanked the business men, teachers and par- ents for their enthusiastic support. Mr. Herrick then delivered an ex- temporaneous talk commending the work of the faculty and the school board, which received hearty ap- pl use. The following delectable viands were served by the Beauceant ladi Fruit Cocktail Turkey Dress Mashed Potatoes ' Gravy Carrots and Peas Buttered Rolls Perfection Salad Ice Cream Cake Coffee Mints After the banquet ,the tables were removed and the assembled party derived a great deal of amusement from the informal Leap Year dance that ensued. Those not interested in dancing adjourned to the billiard room and spent the rest of tha eve- ning there indulging in games of various sorts and de scriptions. ness men and the dads for arranging the supper. Coach Hanson was call- ed upon also to talk and he also ex- pressed his appreciation for the din- ner in behalf of the boys. All together it was a most success- ful and thoroughly enjoyed dinner and it will long linger in the mem- ory of the members of the football team. It encouraged the boys and now they know that they have the town and its good people behind them. ibus one sundi diei. to for ridibus in Forde coupie. pibus staritibus, crankibus caro- rum, Jumpibus in et slamibus doorum. Caribus rattlibus, they do carem For lovinrus otheribus et dayibus fairem. Boyibus likibus girlibus muchem; Girlibus closibus room for two mor- em. Boyibus much likibus to steal kiss- orum, Putenl armibus round sweetis girl- orum, In eyibus longa lookorum. Bangibus go tirem, both hito topor- um. Boyibus madem et jumpum out door- um, Fixem tirem et mucho swearorum, Againabus startibus Forde Copour- um. Temperibus coolibus for girlibus nearorum, Boyibus spoonibus et wanta kisso- rum, Girlibus nearero eum draworum. Hugibus tightibus, sed alas for ho- porum ! Downibus roadibus come unwelcolm farmorum. Both blushibus mucho et feelibus so- rum. Htdibus smoothibus et much enjoy- ibus, yo happibus et feelorum flnibus. Boyibus steporum onibus gasibus Caribus leaporum et goibus fastibus. Roadibus get roughibus et caribus bumpen, Runibus in ditchibus et Ford Due em. Boyibus tumblem near sweetis gi: orum, My tailibus endius cum laudo smack- orum. — Ex. ump- girl- YOUR GAME A game is only a game ,you sa If defeated you happen to be. But you boast that game to the high- est skies I f as victor the goal you see. see. Strive to do your best, And win the laurels if you can; Fight the clean fight that ' s a royal test, To show the worth of a man. But eat if fair and square they defi you, then Try to muster up a smile, And give to others the praises won square, Without keeping the hatred file. — Ex, „» After the members had been chos- n, the three groups met for organi- zation. Constitutions and by-laws ere drawn up, voted upon ,and assed by the respective organiza- ions. The plan of each society is to give a program in the assembly once every three weeks and so far three of these programs has been given. ' The officers of the three societies are as follows: For the Spartans — President, Howard Rines; Secretary, Fred Stewart; Treasurer, Geraldine Herriman. For the Olympian — President, Robert Whitmore; Secre- tary, Mildred Deuel; Treasurer, Fred Luce. For the Thespians — Presi- dent Earl Metcalf; Treasurer, Har- old Walsh; Secretary, Paul McNitt. The purposes of organizing these societies may to some extent be self- evident. The constitutions specify as their aims to promote better school spirit, to destroy any cliquish- ness which may exist in the school, to build up a better spirit of co-oper- ation between the students them- selves, to learn to conduct meetings of all kinds according to the rules P3 far as possible these societies conducted by the students them- selves, because the idea of self gov- ernment and democracy is prevalent in our school and at the same time we believe in doing things for our- selves and not becoming too depend- ent on others for aid or assistance. Nevertheless, faculty advisors have been elected to act as critics and to give us such assistance as we can- not give ourselves. The Thespians chose Miss Nathan ,the Olympics JMiss Kellogg, the Spartans Miss Whitmore. It is hoped that these societies will exist as long as the Alamosa High School is in existence and that they will fill the places in the hearts of the students that they should, and that they will always be a potent fac- 1 tor for all that is good. -A da: : omTn| iible snores issuing from all parts Scathily a familiar figure glides gether and chuckles sinisterly. He crosses to the switch and floods the room with light. This discloses the mighty Seniors nodding and snooz- ing over their books. The villain once more crosses the stage and rubs his hands together. Villain (loudly) — Aha! Chemis- — " " The class awakens with a start and gazes terrified at the man, as §e word strikes horror to their arts. Villain — Jow I have you in my clutches, fair ladies and gentlemen. You must pass me before you can graduate. Wilma — Oh, kind sir! Villain — Hush, Madam. (Turn- ing to the others) Have any of you your chemistry lesson? Silence Villain (stroking his mustache) — Ahem, just as I thought. What is NaCl, Fred? Fred — Er — er — -North Carolina. Villain — And you think you ' ll get by? Aha! A-haaaaa! (pulls his mustache) What is C12H22011? Ted — Oh, Dear! (glances at Jer- ry, then at Lois) I haven ' t decided which one is. Villain (reflectively) — Ah, just as I thought. Oh, these dunces! But Bob, what is M23A9? Bob (downcast and sadly) Yes, Monte won. (Sigh and groans fill the room at this remark. Even the villain is touched by this expression of feeling and wipes his eyes with a handkerchief.) Villain— Too bad ,too bad. Leland — Yes, H2S. Eunice — -Help! Help! Open the windows. Villain — Now I have you in my clutches. I will never let you go. Hear me? You shall never gradu- ate. Get to work and learn my book of magic by heart. Work — ah — (snap, the lights go out, there is a rush, a bang of doors, screams, then silence. The lights are turned on and the villain is alone, tearing his hair and looking ferocious.) Villain — Curses! 1% had forgotten Hansen. 4 « F S. WILL HAVE AN ANNUAL. FOR THE FIRST TIME IN THREE YEARS!! ESSAY ON PENITENTES stu- t out or the first time in three years, A. H .S. will have a real annual. Whether it will be a success or a failure lies entirely with the stu- dent body. Three years ago A. H. S. put one of the classiest annuals in Colo- rado — but , unfortunately the stu- dent body was not behind the staff and the school board was forced to pay a $400 debt. Will history re- peat itself, leaving a second mar- tyred staff, or is every individual student going to buy an annual and put this thing across? Is there a single student in A. H. S. who has not enjoyed this school year? Will you ever forget the football season — and don ' t ypu want a picture of that gallant team with a snappy history of its success to keep forever? And don ' t you want another picture of our basket- ball team, who won undying fame for our dear old school at the tour- nament? These and others of the faculty, the Midget Messenger Staff, the baseball team and the glee clubs | will all be in the 1924 annual. Then j there is the Beauty Contest. Of course you want to see your class beauty go down in history as th prettiest and most popular girl i: the 1924 school year. If you wor! for this contest, you will not onl; bring fame to your class, but hel; the financial end of the annual. If you are a patriotic, peppy school spirited student, this annua will be priceless to you. Get behind us! Boost! Mont has an annual every year — are yo going to let them beat us? The Penitentes — from a Spanish word meaning penitent — is a sec whose rites at Lent are peculiar and sometimes horrible. During Lent they punish themselves as an atone- ment for their sins during the year. They imitate or reproduce the cru- cifixion of Christ. A member of the sect, who is chosen to represent Christ, considers himself lucky. If death should result, his salvation is assured. They beat themselves with all sorts of torturous whips. The man who is- to ' becrucified carries the cross to a chosen place where it is erected, and he is nailed to it and left for some period of time. He is taken down after unconsciousness is reached. The burial of the crucified is supposed to take place, but rarely does. In my experience I have known of a living baby being suffocated by the Penitentes. I was also acquainted with an old Mexican who lived at Petac ' a, New Mexico, who suddenly disappeared from this place. It was soon after the Penitentes had cele- brated Lent ,and we learned that he had used barbed wire with which to lash himself. Death followed as a result of blood poisoning and lack of care. In another town one of the prettiest children is always chosen as a victim to be fed to a snake. It almost seems impossible in this day and age that such conditions could prevail in any section of our country. It would seem that some attempt should be made to remedy conditions of this kind. Time: 1924 A. D. Place: Music Start- les, We Iris — Have you any Have No Bananas? " Storekeeper — No, we have " Yes, We Have No Bananas. " Young Russell came home one af- ternoon with his clothes nearly torn off. His Mother — Harold, what on earth happened to you? Harold — Oh, I was just defending a good little boy. Mother — Who was the good little boy? Harold — It was myself. Harold W. — I say, Kirk, what shall I do if they ask me to sing? Kirk — Do? Why, sing, of course — it ' ll be their own fault! " Studentary work, " said Mr. Ev- ans, " tends to lessen the endur- ance. " " In other words, " butted in Ted Heilman, " the more one sits the less one can stand. " " Exactly, " retorted Mr. Evans, " if one lies a great deal one ' s standing is completely lost. " Dear Editor: As Dorothy ' s birth- day draws near, I am beginning to worry over the financial end of it- How much should I spend on hv Mr. Evans? Ans. — Don ' t spend over one dollar on her. Adam only gave one bone to Eve on her birthday. Mr. Hanson — Elva, why don ' t you wear more paint and powder? If you would, the boys would like you better. They like girls that wear paint and powder so much. Elva Case — That ' s what I try to do, but I can ' t get any more to stay on. Frances Bolger — Do you know Fat Burns? Eunice Evans — No. Frances Bolger — Well, it does. Louise Sundquist — Do you know Lena? Frances Bolger — Lena who? Louise Sundquist — Lena Gainster. An English professor wrote on the blackboard in his laboratory: " Pro- fessor Wilson informs his students that he has this day been appointed honorary physician to Her Majesty, Queen Victoria. " In the morning he had occasion to leave the room and found on his return that some student had added to the words: " God save the Queen! " Miss Weber — In Shakespc time they discouraged bad acting throwing vegetables at actors. Bob W. — Wish they did that now. Voice — Better be careful, Bob, you might get some in the Senior class play yourself. Dear Editor: My otherwise manly sweetheart is afraid of cats. What shall I do? — Heartbroken Frances Bolger. Ans. — Surely you are mistaken, understand you are a Senior. Mr. Elicker (riding down town in Fred ' s truck after a tedious day) — Say, does this car always make this racket? Fred — No, sir; only when it ' s running. Mr. Hanson — Albert, I believe you are lazy. Albert — I believe you are right. (Albert got an hour and a hal that.)


Suggestions in the Alamosa High School - El Alarado Yearbook (Alamosa, CO) collection:

Alamosa High School - El Alarado Yearbook (Alamosa, CO) online yearbook collection, 1974 Edition, Page 1

1974

Alamosa High School - El Alarado Yearbook (Alamosa, CO) online yearbook collection, 1975 Edition, Page 1

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Alamosa High School - El Alarado Yearbook (Alamosa, CO) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 58

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1924, pg 74

Alamosa High School - El Alarado Yearbook (Alamosa, CO) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 83

1924, pg 83

Alamosa High School - El Alarado Yearbook (Alamosa, CO) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 106

1924, pg 106

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