Agnes Scott College - Silhouette Yearbook (Decatur, GA)

 - Class of 1978

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Agnes Scott College - Silhouette Yearbook (Decatur, GA) online yearbook collection, 1978 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 224 of the 1978 volume:

SILHOUETTE 78 In a world that is rapidly changing, few things remain constant. Agnes Scott College, however, maintains many traditions — from afternoon teas to Senior Investiture. Scott attracts young women who are seeking an above-average college education and who are prepared to face, if necessary, a disciplined life. Students at Scott not only agree on their viewpoints concerning education, but the small size of the campus serves to unite the student body on many issues. The variety of women who attend Scott provides the diversity which is necessary for a unique community. Personalities range from the crowd-gathering extroverts to the seldom- noticed introverts. Characters vary from political activists to reclusive intellectuals. Whatever the case, the woman who attends Scott does not conform to, but relates to, her peers. A Scottie, by definition, is a poised, self-assured young woman who has the ability to destroy any obstacle which blocks her success. The theory is good; unfortunately, it does not always hold true. Despite their stereotypes, Scott girls have active social lives which balance with their careers as diligent students. Moe ' s and Joe ' s, Georgia Tech fraternities, and quarterly formals are terms which are well-known to Agnes Scott students. This is not to say, however, that Scotties ' lives are all fun and games. There is a fine line which needs to be, and is, drawn individually as a student makes her decision concerning the extent of her social life. The choice a student makes must provide a harmonious balance of all the aspects of her life at Scott. 2 THAT ' S LIFE mkii f -HI 1 THAT ' S LIFE 3 Coined Admissions Office phrases provide a prospective student with a non-descriptive view of Agnes Scott. The student who delves further into brochures and who makes journeys to the campus gets a broader view of the school; however, even the most well- prepared brochure can never completely define life at Agnes Scott. The first time a student walks on campus, she begins formulating a response which she will always remember and will probably look back on with laughter — or even tears — at her misconception. No one can ever fully realize the effect of Scott life on a student. Changes occur which may or may not be expected. Various aspects of life are touched and transformed at Scott. One may decide that the partying life is for her and she may pursue it with great fervor. On the other hand, a different student will work diligently, exercising a degree of self- control. Viewpoints and attitudes grow as the weeks pass, and no one knows this change better than the fall quarter Freshman! English 101, mandatory P.E., midterms, finals, and dorm life are subjects of an almost endless list which prevails in a Freshman ' s mind. Emotions play an important role in that they involve subjects which are sometimes depressing — homesickness, back-home honeys, and the dreaded grades. First quarter freshmen live the most supervised lives, but one does not remain a first quarter freshman forever. Sophistication and self- awareness are processes each student must undergo to achieve full stature as an accepted peer. Reversion to knee-socks and loafers is all part of collegiate prestige. Mannerisms and senses of humor play important roles in college life. A look into collegiate sophistication reveals acceptance of individuality with a small dosage of social conformity. How many girls do not own a pair of topsiders? — there have to be at least two or three on campus! N ? " a 1 ii % f 1 Pt ' rfc The young woman who reflects on her place at Scott and does not like what she sees is the same woman who leaves Scott. Those who remain have the freedom to develop into the women they wish to become. Growth, expansion, and change are all parts of the metamorphosis within a person ' s soul and mind. The years spent at Scott force a great deal of change, and the eighteen year old who arrived with eager anticipation mellows into a stable young woman who hopes to make a difference in the world. Family ties are stronger as a result of maturity, and the clan of friends at home has dwindled to a few intimate companions. Parents are understood and deeply appreciated as a result of their friendship and a new relationship built on confidence. Although a Scottie is well acquainted with her fellow classmates, her close friends are few and dear. In the beginning, she had expected so much of college life. Reality was perhaps a far cry from these ideals. As the girl advanced through her years at Scott, she grew into a fine woman, strong of mind and confident in spirit. The growth pains experienced over this time seem far away, as if they never existed. She has matured in the warmth and loving care of Agnes Scott, and her metamorphosis is shared by every other woman in her class. She has come a long way from her first days at Scott. Ideas and feelings have changed and fluctuated until she is ready to leave the security of Scott and venture into the outside world. At long last, she is a young adult ready to face life ' s challenges and soar to her highest potential. 6 THAT ' S LIFE THAT ' S LIFE 7 A-: ' 1 ' --S ' " " f 1 " i K . 1? w ■ ■%: In the Quad, the squirrels and chipmunks rushed around the trees looking for nuts. The pigeons cooing softly provided a background for conversation between students walking by the flagpole, on the way to the Hub. The sidewalks in the Quad pointed in every direction. Students stretched out on the grass to read. Cars drove quietly by. Beyond the Quad were the academic buildings. The solemn stone walls belied the transfer of facts and ideas which went on inside. Muted shouts from the hockey field indicated a game in progress. A couple sat in the amphitheater, talking quietly, oblivious to the hockey game behind them. The newly surfaced tennis courts were dotted with white figures. The path up to the observatory, whose dome rose above the trees, seemed short and welcoming in the daylight. A professor walked down the road to his house on the next block. Students walking from labs in Campbell and Dana, after checking their mailboxes in Buttrick, were joined by others from the library and dorms as they headed towards the dining hall for dinner. After the meal students once again scattered to all parts of campus for meetings, studying or playing. .1 »J-. In a school that has been gradually added to over the years, such as Agnes Scott, there are many unusual and often unnoticed things on campus. Some are known only to students living in a particular dorm, while others are in full view of anyone who has the time to notice. Each dorm has at least one unique point about it. A Walters girl is informed she has a phone call or guest in the lobby by means of the buzzer system in that dorm. For the first time a man is living in a dorm — Winship. Mrs. Goldsby, his wife, is the senior resident of the dorm, making him the " dorm father. " The only locked dorm, Hopkins, has an outside phone so CAMPUS CURIOSITIES visitors can call to have someone let them in the dorm. Inman has no men ' s bathroom. The tower in Main, supposedly locked at all times, has names and dates written on the walls. Rebekah has a fire escape outside the dorm which is not used in fire drills. It is a favorite spot for group pictures and daring Rebekah residents. A person familiar with all parts of the campus probably knows that under the steps in front of the Health Center is a fountain. The golf classes use the sandbox on the east side of the gym to practice blasting out of the sand trap. The Meditation Chapel between Rebekah and McDonough Road provides a quiet place to study. All these unusual aspects of the campus serve to make Agnes Scott even more special to the students and faculty. .. 10 THAT ' S LIFE ■■■ .«-■■-„.,, ;,:.:3:n=;:.,„ -.,A::.-. _. _- . ■ %2 ' m. ]i ' XxoJAtr " " i ■ - -T mm m l m THAT ' S LIFE 11 aUAAER 12 THAT ' S LIFE aTUDins THAT ' S LIFE 13 .kMJ FIVE IN THREE AT SANIBEL (Sung to the tune of " Would you like to wish on a star " and " Ta ra ra boomdeay " .) Would you like to visit Forfar, Carry Mollusks home from the mar? No, we ' d rather be in a bar. Slipping bourbon from a jar. Drinking is more fun than keying plankton and shells; Snorkeling with Simpson is like Farmer in the Dell. Anopheles is eating us each morning at dawn; Our hemoglobin ' s go ing fast, it ' s almost all gone. Oh Dr. Simpson won ' t you help us hang on. ' Cuz I would rather t e ... an economist. a sociologist. an artist. Anything BUT a biologist . . . Ta ra ra boomdeay. And with George Campbell, Our Mollusks died today, we took a ramble; Otir. plankton did decay. We would not let Lynn And UCA passed away. drive — we must arrive alive. Then there was Kathy who Corbett and Kramer, did itch the whole night whose jokes got lamer, through. Were always in the pool. Then there was jenny Scott, playing the natural fool. who found the sun too hot. And have you heard Then there is Carter, that Debbie Ballard who is a martyr. And Mary Romeo She listens to us snitch swam in the fomeo? when we must " ditch this hitch " . Three hours later Sue and the gator Then there ' s our favorite Met quite by surprise — prof. you should have seen her he never lets us off; eyes. It sometimes makes us mad. The gator was near death yet he ' s our SUGAR DAD. when stepped upon by Beth, But proved himself quite well when he produced a smell. V " -7. M f- rf 14 THAT ' S LIFE THAT ' S LIFE 15 The college year was usually a time of constant movement. Students were always trying to juggle classes, studying, and meetings, and still fit in time to enjoy the beauty of nature. Sometimes this involved no more than noticing the azaleas in bloom on campus or admiring the autumn leaves while driving along the Perimeter. Places such as Lake Lanier, Stone Mountain, Callaway Gardens, and the north Georgia Mountains were close enough for weekend trips. Camping out was a favorite way to enjoy these spots, so that the Atlanta area provided the perfect setting for appreciation of nature as well as other diversions. 16 THAT ' S LIFE S liillv2k f » i» Mil THAT ' S LIFE 17 Georgia Tech and Emory offered Scott girls the most popular social outlet. It was not unusual to see girls from Agnes Scott on either campus at any time. By simply walking down Fraternity row, girls could meet Emory students. People gathered at Everybody ' s, Good Ol ' Days and Jagger ' s. Tuesday night at P.J. Haley ' s had become a ritual for many students. If you were ingenious enough to work your way into the Medical School ' s Library, you might strike up a conversation with an " Emoroid. " Stopping by the Student Center for frozen Yogurt was also common. Dooley Days in the spring brought Scott students to Emory in droves. On any weekend, Scott girls could be found in every fraternity house at Tech. They also went to the library, the Student Center and the sports activities. Greek Week drew Scott girls in the spring. Overlooking the calculator on the belt or the law school glasses, Tech and Emory students could become really good friends. 18 THAT ' S LIFE " ' ' .»■. " " " " " " - , " till yi iH ! 1 1 1 r " THAT ' S LIFE 19 NEVER Sitting in Grant Field, sweltering under the sun in a wool suit, getting kicked by the drunk behind you, being doused with Coca-Cola and having your date scream in your ear . . . sound like fun?? That depends on how much Bourbon you drink as you watch those Wrecks ramble on the field. Tech football games. An intregal part of freshman orientation. Tech football games. At least once with a blind date. Tech football games. A necessary evil to get to the Fraternity parties afterwards. Fraternity parties are something else. Whether you are drinking from a keg, a garbage can, or a bottle, you will probably drink a lot. Then you may find yourself doing all those things your mother told you not to do, ever. Like gatoring. Like passing out. Like singing obscene cheers. Oh, it is possible to behave at a fraternity party. But it is not very probable. There ' s something about a room full of future engineers or future lawyers, who decide to " unwind " on a weekend. Some of the rituals of the different fraternities are unusual and there is always the sense that everyone in the fraternity has heard about you from your date. But it is a side of life that we cannot get at Scott, so we must travel to Tech or Emory. Fraternity parties can be terrific. They provide a good opportunity to relax, to socialize and to get off campus. They are definitely part of life at Scott and we all love to go. 20 THAT ' S LIFE X CH THAT ' S LIFE 21 22 THAT ' S LIFE ATLANTA PUT SOME LIFE IN YOUR LIFE! Atlanta, a combination of cosmopolitan and small town airs, spreads out over the horizon of north Georgia. It is very much a city of variety and change. The capitol of Georgia, Atlanta is also the political and social center of the southeast, drawing people from all areas and backgrounds. Entertainment suitable to any taste can be found. The " sights to see " range from the almost new Peachtree Plaza Hotel to centuries old Stone Mountain. The nightlife — from dining to dancing, is still growing and diversifying. Concerts by both rock groups and classical musicians are available year round. For families, there are many parks, as well as Six Flags, the circus, and the state fair. The Braves, Falcons, Hawks, and Flames offer sports events year round. Of course, to get the active Atlantan to all these places and happenings, are MARTA and all the highways from the " downtown connectors " to the Perimeter. On a given night of the year, the Civic Center can be filled with Linda Ronstadt fans for a concert, while another group watches hockey in the Omni. In another part of town, the Atlanta Ballet is performing and a family has a cookout at Stone Mountain. In between these, the bars, night-clubs, and restaurants feed and entertain another group of Atlantans. Atlanta — definitely a city of diverse entertainments. THAT ' S LIFE 23 ATLANTA The name " Atlanta " brings varied images to mind. The city is known for many of its features — some very old and some relatively new. Since its beginning in the late nineteenth century, Coca-Cola has been owned by an Atlanta family and has been based in Atlanta. The Fox Theater, one of the city ' s oldest landmarks, has been popular with both visitors and Atlanta inhabitants for many years. But today Atlanta is known mainly for its more recent additions. Hartsfield International Airport, the second busiest airport in the country, is all of Atlanta that many people making connections see. But those who stay for a while most likely visit the tourist attractions. The Regency-Hyatt Hotel, with the blue bubble on top has long been the most popular hotel. Now it is rivaled by the seventy-three storied Peachtree Plaza Hotel. Underground Atlanta, a restored area of old Atlanta, in recent years has been less popular for natives THE REAL THING and is now visited primarily by tourists. Two sports arenas — Atlanta Fulton Stadium and the Omni, are the homes of the city ' s professional sports teams. Baseball in the spring and summer and football in the fall and winter are played at the stadium. The Omni not only has the basketball and ice hockey courts, but a hotel, many shops and several restaurants under its roof. Also in sports, Atlanta is the site of a specific event — the Peach Bowl. College football teams play in this invitational game each year during the Christmas holidays. Recently Ted Turner, the owner of the Braves and Hawks, has brought Atlanta attention with his flamboyant style. The city of Atlanta is coming to be known by more and more people. The 1976 presidential campaign and subsequent election of Georgian Jimmy Carter focused much attention on the city as the capitol of Georgia. As the city grows so does the list of Atlanta symbols. 24 THAT ' S LIFE THAT ' S LIFE 25 i 26 THAT ' S LIFE WE ' RE WORKING ON GETTING When football games, Moe ' s and Joe ' s, or fraternity parties became monotonous, there was another more refined side to life in the big city. Atlanta offered a variety of things to do and places to see for the Scottie who was " working on becoming cultured. " The Fox Theater billed the Atlanta Opera Company, Atlanta Ballet, along with many different guest performers, symphonies, and concerts during the year. Exploring the historic building was always exciting and many Scott students enjoyed ushering there. Any Scottie with a flashlight could get her culture free of charge by ushering at the Fox or Civic Center. The Alliance Theatre and the High Museum of the Atlanta Arts Center provided culture in other forms. The Atlanta Symphony, conducted by Robert Shaw, performed at the Arts Center regularly, and the Alliance Theater Company presented a variety of outstanding plays during the year, with special rates for students. The High Museum always featured fascinating exhibits and lectures by prominent artists. And if someone was in the mood for an old movie, week-end-long film festivals of favorite flicks were frequently offered. THAT ' S LIFE 27 I ►••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••SSSSSSSSSSSSSSJSSJS ••••• ••••■ ••••• ••••• ' •••••■ •••••■ •••••■ ••••• ' •••••• •••••■ •••••• •••••• •••••• ••••- ••••■ ' ••••.■ •••— •••••■ •••••• •••••■ •••••• •••••• •••••• •••••• •••••■ •••••■ •••••• •••— •••••• •••••■ •••••• •••••■ •••••■ •••••■ ••••■■ •••••■ •••••■ ••••- ••••• •••••■ •••••■ •••••• •••— •••••■ •••••■ ••••■■ •••••■ •••••■ •••••■ •••••■ •••••■ •••••• ••••• ••••• :••.. •••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••■ ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••■ •••• ' •••• It was common knowledge that Scott girls did -not drink, but, as of late, there has been a rumor circulating that occasionally a Scottie did imbibe. Since the only form of alcohol allowed on campus was rubbing, the alternative was to seek a drinking establishment — loosely translated — a bar. One of the many nice things about Atlanta was no matter what the mood was, for beer or scotch, Levi ' s or a dress, there was always a suitable atmosphere. If someone planned a ritzy evening, Alexander ' s Eagle was a cozy, quiet place where prime rib could be had with a drink. Though the atmosphere was expensive, the drinks were not. If people were more important than atmosphere, there were other places to go. P.J. Haley ' s was the spot to meet nice Emory guys. P.J. Haley ' s resembled an English pub and was always packed on Wednesday nights. Every Thursday at midnight, Friday ' s celebrated New Year ' s Eve, complete with horns, hats and half price drinks. ••• • i;;:;:;;;;;;;:;;;:;;;;;:;::::;;:;:::;:;::::::;::s::s:s;s::::;s:;::;;:;::;:s:ssssss::;:u:;;: 28 THAT ' S LIFE •••••••••••••••••••••• ••( •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••J ?A. •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••■•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• THAT ' S LIFE 29 ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••■ ••••■ ••••■ ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••■ ••••• ••••■ ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••■ ••••• ••••• •••.• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••■•• ••••■ ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••■ ••••• ••••• ••••■ ••••• ••••■ ••••• ••••• ••••■ ••••• ••••• ••«.. ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••■ ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• •••.. ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••«•• ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••• •••.. ••••• ••••■ ••••• ••••• ••••• ••••■ ••••• ••••■ •••• ••••• •••• •••• •••• •••• •••• •••• •••• •••• •••• |izza lOMATO f jnri CHEESE H " SMALL $2 60 18 " LARGE 4 10 PIZZA wilh MUSHROOMS, GREEN PEPPERS, ONIONS, SI ICFH TOMATOES, GREEN or Bl7 CK OLIVES, ANCHOVIES, PEPPERONI, SAUSAGE, GROUND BEEF ' ' ONE MEAT TWO MEATS ANY SMALL ONE LARGE 3 65 5 45 4 05 6 25 ANY SMALL TWC LARGE 3 95 5 85 4 35 6 65 4 70 7 35 ANY THREE SMALL LARGE 4 25 6 25 4 65 7 05 5 00 7 75 ANY FOUR SMALL LARGE 4 55 6 65 4 95 7 45 5 30 815 CVFRYBODY ' S PIZZA SMAL L $ 5 15 LARGE 7 70 COMBINATION oil MUSHROOMS, PEPPERONI GREEN PEPPERS SI ICED TOMATOES nnd EXTRA CHEESE EVERYBODY ' S VEGETABLE PIZZA SMALL $4 75 LARGE 6 90 COMBINATION of FRESH MUSHRCOMS, GREEN PEPPERS, SLICED TOMATOES, ONIONS end EXTRA CHEESE (SWISS or PROVOLONE) CJautnont Package Store )•••••• i « ««» « )••••••••••••••••••• 30 THAT ' S LIFE •••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••, • ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • •• •••••••• • •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••■•••••••••••••••••••••••• Since Thursday was a popular night to go out, Scotties could be found in several different bars. So if it was Thursday night and the studying for the week was done, there were quite a few places to go for beer. If a girl wanted some oysters with her beer, she can go to Manuel ' s Tavern — where Scotties are infamous — or whatever it is called when we Scotties make the menu. They have dark and light beer, a constantly blaring TV., expensive sandwiches, and a game room filled with Beta ' s and Fiji ' s. Another gorup of Scotties could be found in their button downs and topsiders, heading for Moe ' s and Joe ' s. There they found bowls of boiled peanuts, formica top tables, and Horace — who is always happy to pour a beer. Thursdays the aisles were impassible and tables at a premium. For the great escape from Sunday supper, Everybody ' s offered terrific pizza, good beer, and slow service. So whether the aim is to meet guys, just get off campus, drown sorrows, or actually quinch a thirst, there were plenty of places around to do it — and Scotties probably found them all! •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• ••••• • •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• • •••• ••••• • • •• • •••• ••••• • •••• ••••• • •••• ••■•• •••••• ••••• ••••• •••••• THAT ' S LIFE 31 when Hunger Strikes As the " average Scottie " worked diligently on her term paper, due (of course) the next day, about midnight she became aware of a terrible gnawing hunger. The munchies had struck. There was only one cure — a midnight run for food. One popular stop was the grocery store still open at 12 (or 2 a.m.). Valuable time was inevitably lost as girls wandered down aisles trying to decide between fresh fruit, pretzels, peanut butter, cheese, ice cream, M M ' s, chocolate mint cookies, or nuts. The Shopping cart usually ended up with at least four or five goodies, and of course, the trip wouldn ' t be complete without several liter bottles of Tab. There were other ways to cure the midnight munchies. The most famous stop was KK- Krispy Kreme. Scotties could find their way there no matter how dark, how cold, how rainy, or how late it was. It was very doubtful that any Agnes Scott student had stopped at KK during daylight hours. A good place to stop and eat was International House of Pancakes (IHOP). IHOP was especially popular at exam times. If the munchies struck and the group had no transportation to take them to the food, the food came to them in the form of sent out pizzas and submarine sandwiches. When the munchies had finally been appeased the " average Scottie " went back to work to try to cope with her paper and her upset stomach. 32 THAT ' S LIFE " " WliM iu m[v kiA " Morning Glory! " i- l ,M - - 4 The alarm clock clicked on at 7:45 AM and buzzed merrily until Deb, with one practiced swing of her hand, shut it off. She did not even roll over. Meanwhile, her roommate was at the desk cramming for an English test. Her eyes were red and bleary from more than study. It was Friday morning, which meant that last night it was Thursday — and THAT meant Moe ' s and Joe ' s. Last night it had not mattered that she had a test at 8:30 the next morning and would therefore have to pull an all- nighter after drinking all that beer. This morning, it mattered. At 7:50, the alarm once again started buzzing, and Deb, with a sign of life this time (a faint moan rose from the blankets), turned it off once again. Deb half-heartedly contemplated getting up and beating the rush to the bathroom. Already, there was a shower running and a couple hair dryers were on in the hall. While under her blankets. Deb heard a knock on the door and shouted " Come in! " Lowering the covers, she saw Cheryl in the doorway. As usual, Cheryl was nicely dressed and wore make-up — and it was not EVEN 8:00! " Are y ' all ready for breakfast? " she chirped. Deb pulled the covers back up in silent reply, her roommate growled and Cheryl left for the dining hall alone — again. 7:55: The alarm tried once more to do its job. Deb debated whether to throw it against the wall or get up. Finally, she crawled out of bed and headed to the bathroom. As she looked at herself in the mirror and prayed that she did not look as bad as her sleepy eyes told her she did, Deb wondered how Miss McKemie felt in the morning. " Morning glory! " my eye! THAT ' S LIFE 33 Linda Woods 34 FACULTY Dr. Barton, in moving to Atlanta, finds himself in an environment different from those he had exper- ienced previously. He feels that Boston, his home, and San Francisco, where he recently completed his Ph.D. at Stanford University, are very cultured; while Atlanta, in his opinion, tends to be more com- mercially oriented. Even so, he is enjoying Atlanta, while Agnes Scott students are benefiting from his presence here. Jo Allen Bradham Lynn Ganim and Jack Nelson ' M Jane Pepperdene Jack Nelson FACULTY 35 Gail Cabisius Myrna Young Elizabeth Zenn lean Meral, who teaches English at the Univer- Jsity of Toulouse, France, taught French at Agnes Scott fall quarter. He was the first professor to come here under the " Chloe Steel Visit- ing French Professor Fund. " He, his wife, and his son, Laurent, became well known figures on campus, especially since they ate their meals in the dining hall. Laurent, who spoke only French when they arrived, was tutored in English by French major Sarah Windham. While here, the Meral ' s especially liked to visit Stone Mountain. When not teaching, M. Meral Cunther Bicknese Viola Westbrook 36 FACULTY Huguette Kaiser spent his time working on the thesis for his doctorate, which is already over one thousand pages long. He has been working on it for ten years. After leaving Agnes Scott, the Merals planned to travel to Chicago before returning to France. French students greatly enjoyed studying under M. Meral this past fall. As one student said, " I always looked forward to going to his class, even though it did meet at 3:10. " LANGUAGES Constance Shaw Eloise Herbert FACULTY 37 Bernice Nuhfer-Halten Jack Brooking Ronald Byrnside Janet Stewart Jay Fuller Raymond Martin Who is the lady with the perpetual smile? The same lady who always walks around campus sing- ing. If others had a voice like hers, they would be singing, too. Janet Stewart not only is well known and loved on the Agnes Scott Campus, her talents are appreciated all over. The Denver Post speaks of her as having " a rich, expressive voice. " It was in Denver that she made her debut with the Denver Lyric Opera Company. Since then she has sung with the Opera Society of Washington, the Atlanta FINE ARTS 38 FACULTY ART Symphony, the Philadelphia Ballet Company and count- less others. Last summer in Austria, she was selec- ted to participate in master classes and then to appear in the final concert. She presently studies with a former Metropolitan Opera singer. As well as teaching at ASC, Mrs. Stewart gives private lessons, sings for her church, performs, and, in the summer, when she can find the time, she en- joys gardening. She was born and raised in Louis- ville, Kentucky and received her masters in music from the University of Colorado. FACULTY 39 PHILOSOPHY Richard Parry David Behan See America " would generally be a great motto for American travelers, but for history pro- fessor Penelope Campbell it should be " See the Entire World. " Miss Campbell enjoys traveling to Europe and particularly to Asia and Africa. When asked how many times she had visited Europe, Miss Campbell said she didn ' t know. Then she began to count her trips. She has recently been to India three times with study groups and to Africa twice on her own. Miss Campbell enjoys studying the his- tory and the culture of each place she visits. She also likes to talk with natives of each country. In December, Miss Campbell presented her paper on Christian missionaries and their social effects in Africa to the American Historical Association. Next year she will be on sabatical. She hopes to travel to Africa this summer and then go on to the Chinese University in Hong Kong in the fall. Miss Campbell will return to the States to fill an in- ternship at Africare, an agency in Washington, D.C. 40 FACULTY BIBLE AND RELIGION Mildred Petty FACULTY 41 Sandra Bowden, Botany professor in the biology department, is fascinated by more than just photosynthesis! She admits that because of poor lighting in her home, she does not even have many plants. Of course, some of her many interests do center around the outdoors, which she learned to love while growing up in Thomasville, Georgia. Al- though her husband was not a biology major, by driving for her field trips after they were married he learned some things about her area of graduate MATHEMATICS Alice Cunningham 42 FACULTY study. They now enjoy birding, focusing on wading and shore birds; gardening; and studying rare or endangered species of plants and animals on their property near the Blue Ridge Parkway. Besides being interested in the outdoors, Mrs. Bowden delights in sewing, cooking, entertaining, and her piano lessons. The main reason for her interest in the piano is her fourteen month old son, David. She hopes that through her, he will learn to enjoy music and will want to play the piano himself. PHYSICS ASTRONOMY Nancy Groseclose Harry Wistrand Patricia Wikie Sandra Bowden ; £ ' Tom Simpson FACULTY 43 John Tumblin not only loves teaching anthropo- logy, but he also enjoys fiddling with any mechani- cal gadget he can find. That love surfaces in his antique Cessna 17B airplane. He rebuilt the engine of the plane, and someday he plans to build his own airplane. In piloting the plane he has won many awards, including the " Spit and Polish " Award. Dr. Tumblin also enjoys kayaking — every Thanksgiving he paddles across the Okeefenokee Swamp. Another of his hobbies, both aesthetic and mechanical. SOCIAL SCIENCES Gus Cochran is photography. The results of this hobby prove to be useful in his classes. In the future, Dr. Tumblin plans to bring his skills in flying, camping, and pho- tography together in a study of cultural geography. He will travel up the Mississippi River, to the Mis- souri River, and end up somewhere in the Northwest. A pictorial account will be the result of the trip. Dr. Tumblin lives his philosophy of life, which is not to become so patterned in any area that he will be closed to new ideas and new ways of doing things. FACULTY 45 Marylin Darling Ann McConnell Kate McKemie Kay Manuel R u y I - I " Oecause of my commitment to myself to enjoy Deach day to its fullest, it is necessary for me to surround myself with many different types of chal- lenging stimulation. " This is how Ann McConnell sums up her life. In view of this statement, it is not so surprising that she ended up buying a Chinese junk when she and a friend went to Florida to buy a sailboat. She keeps the junk on Lake Lanier. The boat was made in Hong Kong and shipped to Lake Lanier, where Ms. McConnell found it. It is 36 feet long, solid teak, and weighs 12 tons. The junk wasn ' t for sale, but she and her friend were so in love with it that they made the owners an offer which they ac- cepted. She lived and worked on the boat last sum- mer, and says after that experience " I have the satis- faction of knowing that I was able, at the age of thirty, to accomplish a strenuous physical task pre- viously foreign to me. " She will sell the boat some- day because " do not feel that I own the boat, but rather that it has chosen to be with me for a time, and that the time will come for someone else to enjoy the charm and spirit of the Red Dragon of Harmony. " 46 FACULTY LAURA MAYES STEELE Laura Mayes Steele came to Agnes Scott as a fresh- man with the class of 1937, having graduated from Girls High School in Atlanta. She was an outstanding student and a campus leader, graduating as a history major with high honor, in June 1937. The nation — especially the South — was in the depths of the Depression still, and when President James Ross McCain offered a job that Fall of 1937, Laura Steele took it gratefully — and for forty years served the College in many important ways. Laura Steele believed in the liberal arts; she wanted students to be enriched by great poetry and drama and novels, to be acquainted with great persons and re-live great events; to encounter great ideals and ideas. Laura Steele is one of a great procession of women — and men — to whom this college owes its character and its very being. But she was Laura Steele — unique — herself — intelligient and wise, charming and com- pulsive, committed to honesty and truth, to her family, to Agnes Scott and to Almighty God, in whose pre- sence she does surely abide. An excerpt from the speech given by C. Benton Kline, Jr., Sept. 77. o ADMINISTRATION 47 HH H HHH NHr mK DJ H ' t BKuiS M B ' ' H B 1 ADMINISTRATION 49 DEAN ' S OFFICE: 1. Katherine Turner, Secretary 2. Mildred Petty, Assistant Dean 3. Cue Hudson, Class Dean 4. Martha Kirkland, Dean of students 5. Julia Pridgen, Secretary 6. Julia Gary, Dean of Faculty 7. Dean Petty 8. Dean Kirkland; Mary Lindig, Secretary; Mollie Merrick, Assistant Dean 9. Barbara Smith, Secretary 10. Dean Gary 11. Dean Petty, Dean Gary 12. Dean Hudson 13. Dean Gary 14. Dean Mer- rick, Dean Kirkland 50 ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATION 51 ' J EL. B - ' jv l - H Y ■ 2 HQ , h|| y 0£. OIL H a LU oi. y 52 ADMINISTRATION STAFF FINANCIAL AID: 1. Bonnie Johnson, Direc- tor 2. Alice Grass, Secretary REGISTRAR: 3. Lea Ann Grimes, Acting Registrar 4. Rhonda Tate, Secretary ADMISSIONS: 5. Mary Jar- boe. Administrative Assistant 6. Jan John- son, Secretary 7. Secretary 8. L-R Marcia Knight, Lois Turner, Katherine Potter, Kath- erine Akin, Jan Johnson, Ellen Fort, Judith Tindei 9. Judith Tindel, Assistant Director 10. Marcia Knight, Assistant to the Director 11. Lois Turner, Assistant to the Director. ■X. ADMISSIONS y n ■ Br - ' 1 " - ,. ■ ' 1 %- ' J ■fiv t; ft " " X . k STAFF 53 54 STAFF ■rV : . jhI II 7V HISTORIAN . CAREER DEVELOPMENT: 1. Fatma Kassa- mali 2. lone Murphy 3. lone Murphy BUSI- NESS AFFAIRS: 4. Linda Anderson 5. Lee Barclay, Vice President PUBLIC RELA- TIONS: 6. Andrea FHeims 7. Sara Fountain 8. Dorothea Markert HISTORIAN: 9. Edward McNair STAFF 55 DEVELOPMENT: 1. Sheila Harkleroad 2. Penny Rush Wistrand ACCOUNTING: 3. Ja- net Gould 4. Miriam Lyons 5. Lil Daniel 6. Kate Goodson PERSONNEL: 7. Joyce Nor- ton OFFICE SERVICES: 8. Pat Gannon. 1 ACCOUNTING 56 STAFF PERSONNEL STAFF 57 58 STAFF STAFF 59 ♦ 60 STAFF LU o X LU z I y SENIOR RESIDENTS: 1. Doug and Jill Goldsby 2. Ann Patterson 3. Hanna Longhofer 4. Ann Buckhanon 5. Jill Goldsby 6. Miriam Durham 7. Ann Patterson 8. Hanna Longhofer ALUMNAE OFFICE; 9. Betty Lackey 10. Fran- cis Strother, Jan Funsten, Evangeline Papageorge 11. Virginia McKenzie ALUMNAE HOUSE: 12. Ela Curry STAFF 61 62 STAFF FOOD SERVICES: 1. Barbara Jean Speers 2. Mary Wimpey SNACK BAR: 3. Fran Luna CUSTODIAL SERVICES: 4. Allen Osborn, Rosa Smith 5. Rosa Smith 6. Julia Reid 7. Allen Osborn 8. Oliver Marks, Jr. 9. Oscar Zimmerman 10. Corrie Cash, Julia Reid, Robert Bell STAFF 63 _J iwj ■i 1 p i B H H 1 r.T ,. " j B 1 SECURITY SECURITY: 1. Frank Blackmon, Di- rector of Security 2. Al Evans 3. Robert Thomas 4. Don Scroggins PHYSICAL PLANT OFFICE: 1. John Hug, Director 2. Sue White, Secre- tary STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE: 1. Rosemary Kriner, Director. 54 STAFF STAFF 65 BSA Xv v • ' ' ♦t, - _• V y A i -• 1st row: Jennifer Scott, Senior mennber-at-large; Theresa Crane, Chairman; Suzanne Cox, Junior member-at-large; 2nd row: Susan Nicol, Freshman member-at-large; Sharon Mait- land. Sophomore member-at-large. Not pictured: Rita Kitts, Sec. and Dean Kirkland, Advisor. Board of Student Activities . . . BSA . . . revised in purpose . . . now coordinating all boards on campus . . . new iy organized ... six member core group . . . plus a re- presentative from each active board or council . . . evaluating boards and classes . . . meeting vi ' ith Dean Kirkland . . . offer- ing suggestions for improvements ... re- viewing alcoholic beverage requests . . . organizing and making out the college ca- lendar . . . more evaluations . . . helping other groups to see themselves more clearly . . . resulting in more efficient cam- pus organizations. Rep Council . . . legislative and execu- tive branches . . . student government . . . constitutional changes . . . SGA commit- tees . . . student opinions . . . liason between faculty and administration . . . open meetings . . . Parliamentary proce- dure . . . policies reviewed . . . parietals . . . drinking policy . . . G-PIRG . . . required attendance at convocations . . . problems . . . student activity fees . . . 4-1-4 calendar . . . financial report . . . surveys . . . energy conservation program . . . fun . . . Fresh- man skit . . . Dean of Students Apprecia- tion Day . . . Southeastern Women ' s Col- lege Conference . . . organizing elections . . . open faculty meetings . . . bridging gaps . . . 1977-1978 a good year. S£ 66 ORGANIZATIONS Student Government Association Day Students iSSSSSSB Day Students . . . officially called Com- muting Students . . . including both tradi- tional and non-traditional people ... in- volved in all aspects of campus life except the dorms . . . lunch in the Hub . . . the Commuting Students ' Lounge . . . bake- sales in the morning in Buttrick . . . Student Life Committee ... a student government committee . . . striving to make life pleasant at Agnes Scott ... re- presenting student wishes to other com- mittees . . . responsible for the frozen yo- gurt machine at the Snack Bar in the Hub . . . box in the mailroom . . . Committee on Academic Problems . . . CAP . . . members from faculty and student body . . . channeling feedback from stu- dents on all aspects of academic life at Ag- nes Scott . . . DAY STUDENTS: Trish Huggins — Chairman, Gwen Spratt — Sec, Not pictured: Ralee Gates 68 ORGANlZATIONS Student Life Com. C.A.P. ORGANIZATIONS 69 Lecture Committee ... a college com- mittee consisting of six faculty members and six students . . . annual visit of the Guarneri String Quartet . . . sponsoring three major events a year . . . Harold Schoenberg, music critic . . . funding source for all major lectures and programs on campus . . . Mark Amitin on the radical theatre . . . Chuck Messing, marine biolo- gist . . . helping in sponsoring department- al lectures and the Phi Beta Kappa lecture . . . Ensemble for Early Music, " Roman de Fauvel " . . . striving to bring interesting and informative programs to Agnes Scott . . . Ronald Tice, Panama Canal Treaty . . . always planning ahead . . . I ili tttttfi. Committee Honor Court -hLr t. develop and -F Jt 1 t .l!«l- and moral stature, to icalizc my ■ L-l-l,, ir, thf community. Jo alimn. " i " - ' }dn , 7 dp therefore actcpl Ibit, J-tonor tp OS nil »foy of lift - tlo -- of 1978 HONOR EMPHASIS WEEK HONOR COURT: Susan Smith — V. Chairman Susan Kidd, Sandy Fowler, Sarah Windham, Aria Spencer — Sec, 2nd row: Lucy Hicks — Chairman, Laurie Huebsch, Jenny Spen- cer, 1st row: Lil Easterlin, Judy Bartholomew. ORGANIZATiONS 73 % ' 41 .1 «i y. 4 i«. ' ' , Interdormitory Council . . . coordinating and regulating dorm life . . . pulling fire alarms once a quarter . . . Interdorm sponsor- ing activities on campus . . . Social Orienta- tion . . . Dorm Swap parties . . . Security Em- phasis Week . . . Yuletide Festival . . . Deck- your-Dorm — one day when everyone ' s room is clean . . . pictures with Santa Ciaus . . . the Flea Market . . . campus Christmas tree in the quadrangle . . . working toward improved communications between Dorm Councils ... a liason between students and administration . . . handling cases referred by Dorm Council . . . instigated new Key Policy with the Security Department . . . began an active counseling program . . . deemphasized " picky " aspects of Interdorm . . . worked to- gether to improve dorm life at ASC . . . strived for a more active and unified board ' . - 1. Marguerite Booth — Main, 2. Mau- reen Birtch — Winship, 3. Susan McCullough — Rebekah, 4. Mimi Holmes — Walters, 5. Mary Jane Nor- ville — Chairman, 6. Cheryl Houy — Hopkins, 7. Sally Workman — Vice Chairman, 8. Trudy Stone — Inman Not pictured: Debbie Ballard — In- man . , :V ' ' ' ■ K 76 ORGANIZATIONS 1st row: Dixie Washington, Laura Hanson, Helen Anderson, Crysta Singleton (sec.) 2nd row: Margaret Seitter, Elisa Norton, Allison Taylor, Kathy Hollywood, Mimi Holmes (Pres ORGANIZATIONS 77 Orientation Council h ' %.iL iM y 1st row: C. Winn, Chairman, ]. Dris- coll; 2nd row: S. Brown, M. Merrick, Advisor. M. Reid, K. O ' Brien, L. Perry, not pictured — G. Lee Planning the whole fall calendar in a few short weeks ... the ABC BOOK ... the NEWCOMER ' S BOOK ... long meetings spring quarter . . . Big Sisters ... Do you think the new students will ever get here? . . . letters . . . and more letters . . . How would we ever make it without Mollie? . . . back to school early . . . the fall workshop . . . Welcome Packets . . . getting everyone to the right places — on time . . . saying " Hello " all day in the Hub . . . days full of activities . . . What can you explain about Tech men? . . . helping to ward off homesickness . . . the skit ... a rush mixer and a picnic in the rain — think of the togetherness! . . . Emory?? . . . Six Flags . . . the Street Dance . . . Who thought it would have to be in the gym? . . . Reynolds Price and his LONG AND HAPPY LIFE on campus . . . freshman elections . . . Black Cat spirit ... WELCOME SCOTTIE!!! Student Admissions Representatives . . . better known ar SAR ' s . . . aiding Admissions in recruiting new students . . . talking to pro- spective students during vacations . . . repre- senting Scott when visiting the old high school . . . giving prospective students a stu- dent ' s view of Agnes Scott . . . answering questions about the school. Helping plan and organize special week- ends for visitors . . . helping Mortar Board with Applicants Weekend . . . " Advance " weekend in November . . . finding beds and distributing linens . . . being guides . . . draw- ing up schedules . . . organizing student pan- els for discussions about life here . . . arrang- ing rides to and from the airport . . . greeting people in the Hub. 78 ORGANIZATIONS Student Admissions Representatives ORGANIZATIONS 79 Who ' s Who, Front Row: Marty Lovvorn, Marguerite Booth, Jenni- fer Scott, Mary Jane Norville, Mimi Holmes. Back Row: Kaki Man- ning, Sally Stamper, Susan Kidd, Cathy Winn, Paige Patton, Shirley Chan, Lucy Hicks. Not Pictured: Betty Philips. Dana Scholars, Front Row: Susan Bethune, Peggy Pfeiffer, Shirley Chan, Susan McCullough, Ginny Lee, Mary Jane Norville, Cindy Peters, Patsy Cralle, Sarah Windham, Judy Bartholomew; 2nd Row: Beth Nease, Elizabeth Wells, Nilgun Ereken, Holly McFerrin, Cathy Harris, Sandy Fowler, Jenny Spencer; 3rd Row: Melanie Hardy, Nancy Perry, Margaret Seitter, Kemper Hatfield, Cindy Dantzler, Dottie Enslow, Betty Philips, Melanie Best, Mimi Holmes; 4th Row: Susan Kidd, Sue Fisher, English Taylor, Kelly Murphy, Kathy Holly- wood, Susan Tucker, Ginnie Risher, Thelma Ruddell, Maureen Birtch, Paige Patton, Susan Smith, Cathy Winn, Peggy Lamberson, Dacia Small, Tish DuPont — Chairman, Sandy Burson — Sec, Not Pictured: Marguerite Booth, Gyni Byrd, Genyne Long, Kaki Man- ning, Jennifer Scott, Kitti Smith, Krista Wolter Who ' s Who in American Universities . . . nationally selected . . . the capable and the talented . . . the leaders . . . Charles A. Dana Scholars . . . organized in 1970-1971 . . . resulting from the estab- lishment of the Dana Scholarship Program . . . consisting of sophomores, juniors, and seniors . . . announced at Awards Convo- cation in the spring . . . receiving scholar- ships . . . chosen on the basis of financial need, academic promise, and leadership potential ... a group of outstanding stu- dents . . . Mortar Board ... a national senior honor society . . . chapter organized at Scott in 1931 . . . tapping at a candlelight ceremony in the Quad . . . chosen in the spring of the junior year . . . election on the basis of three ideals: service, scholarship, and lead- ership . . . supervising elections . . . spon- soring Black Cat . . . organizing and hosting Applicants ' Weekend each spring . . , Mortar Board songs . . . providing the op- portunity for a meaningful exchange of ideas as individuals and as a group . . . Mortar Board m-m- ii- • " «v- b J 1. Martie Lovvorn, 2. Kaki Manning, 3. Mimi Holmes — Sec, 4. Becky Strick- land, 5. Marguerite Booth, 6. Susan Kidd — V.P., 7. Betty Philips — Pres., 8. Paige Patton, 9. Cathy Winn, 10. Kitti Smith, 11. Shirley Chan, 12. Judy Bartholomew, Not Pictured: Leigh Dillon; Advisors — Mr. Clark, Miss Ammons, Mr. Coppie ' m . Social Council 82 ORCANlZATlONS Social Council . . . dances . . . planning . . . get- ting a band . . . what kind of music . . . where to have it . . . making signs . . . pictures from dances . . . selling ti ckets . . . putting up signs at Tech and Emory . . . " But I ' m on Social Council and I don ' t have a date! " . . . meetings once a week . . . Black Cat at Dunfey ' s . . . Blue Grass Party . . . teaching people to clog . . . hay in the Hub . . . getting people to come . . . Social Council Activity Cards . . . TGIF Parties . . . " leave your beer in here " . . . Winter Formal . . . Mardi Gras at Agnes Scott . . . Disco Dances in the Lower Dining Hall . . . film parties . . . CAT BALLOU . . . Marx Brothers in Rebekah Recreation Room . . . " Cancelled due to lack of funds " . . . plastic cups . . . Spring Dance . . . changing the dates of events . . . Admission $1.00 . . . lots of hard work . . . " V i J V ORGAN12ATIONS 83 Spirit Committee Spirit Committee . . . surprises . . . Watt Watchers . . . Arnold ' s Night at Letitia Pate ' s . . . Christmas Party . . . Winter Festival . . . Black Cats on every door . . . secrets . . . mo- rale boosters . . . Mr. Weber as Santa Claus . . . hearts for Valentine ' s Day in boxes . . . haunted house in Buttrick and costume con- test on Halloween . . . tree lighting in Quad . . . birthday cards . . . campfire in amphith- eater . . . Halloween candy in boxes . . . ori- entation skit with Rep for Freshmen . . . pa- rade by Decatur High School . . . campus camp-out . . . Founder ' s Day Celebration . . . yl Art Club . . . sponsoring student art sales at Christmas and in the spring . . . informal gatherings with local artists . . . broadening students ' interest in the arts . . . bringing in art sales from off campus . . . field trips to art museums and galleries . . . VvV,, M. A - -f SPIRIT COMMITTEE, Front Row; Nancy Perry, Tina Robert- son, Mary Alice Vasilos — Chairman; 2nd Row: Dixie Wash- ington, Deni Lamb, Cathy Beck, Laramie Larsen, Diane Banyar, Christy Johnson, 3rd Row: Leslie Doyle, Sharon Maitland, Kay Cochrane, Marina Costarides, Ginnie Risher, Rosalie Nichols, Mary Brown. Not pictured: Nancy Brock, Marty Knight Art Council . . . coordinating fine arts orga- nizations on campus . . . representatives from each of these clubs . . . sponsor receptions . . . Spring Festival during Applicants ' Week- end ... all clubs taking part in the Spring Festival . . . aiding and directing clubs . . . Arts Council ss k HM » • , 1 p ] i 1 ' Qj- ' iiiaa S 1 P ' t. n p ARTS COUNCIL, Front Row: Peggy Lamberson — Pres., 2nd Row: Peggy Emrey, Barbara Duncan, Laura McDonald, 3rd Row: Genyne Long, Ellen All, Robin Kessler — Sec, Sally Workman, Mary Lipscomb. Not pictured: Angela Carter — Treas., Ross Cheney, Sandra Eichelberger, Julie Johnston, Sally Stamper ART CLUB, Front Row: Donna Wyatt — Sec- . Treas., Janet Kelley, Barbara Duncan — V.P., 2nd Row: Cathy Carr — Pres., Grace Haley, Zoy Tiniacos, 3rd Row: Lillian Kiel, Mary Anna Smith. Not pictured: Maria Tiniacos, Jan Strain, Christine Hatch Christian Association Focus On Faith i " ! ' i! ' i Jp JSS s ' " «S :SSiSf 3 Christian Association . . . promoting fel- lowship and a Christian atmosphere on cam- pus . . . welcoming new students in the fall . . . sponsoring weekly Bible Studies in dorms . . . Square Dance in the fall . . . Meet the Ministers . . . Exam Chapels . . . Focus on Faith . . . January 15-19 . . . " Wor- ship: Our Response to Him " . . . guest speaker Dr. John Lancaster ... a week of worship and togetherness . . . nightly discus- sions . . . prayer breakfasts . . . what is a prayer? . . . communion . . . posters . . . vol- leyball game Monday afternoon . . . Sanc- tuary dance . . . poetry ... art show upstairs in the library . . . fellowship . . . renewal . . . sharing our faith . . . m A ORGANIZATIONS 87 Students For Black Awareness ... not just for black students . . . lecture by Reverend Joseph Lowery, President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the fall . . . making the campus community more aware of the con- tributions of black Americans . . . sponsoring a project to include courses in black history and literature by blacks in the Agnes Scott curricu- lum . . . Black History Week . . . winter quarter . . . Wednesday convocation . . . guest speaker Isa- bel Stuart, wife of the President of Spellman College speaking about " Developing Woman " ... a gospel concert . . . :H Black Awareness Week K ' . , j -«w - 1 : 4 ■ 1 " J { » %11 S.B.A., Front Row: Crystal Watkins, Janet Blount — pres., advisor, 3rd Row: Belita Stafford, Crystal Singleton, Day Ms. Durham — Advisor, Traci Rowland, 2nd Row: Diane Small — B.A.W. chairman, Sam Barnhill, Emily Moore. Not Petersen, Cheryl Walker, Karen Mosley, Ms. Buchanan — pictured: Cathy Walters, Jennifer Williams Chimo Language Clubs Chimo . . . bringing together students of all nationalities and backgrounds ... a trip to Berry College . . . International Dinner . . . campus parties . . . varied speakers, such as an immigration lawyer . . . mixers and correspondence with foreign students at Georgia Tech, Emory, and Oglethorpe ... a dinner in the Faculty Club to cele- brate the Chinese New Year . . . French Club . . . Marion ' s help and guid- ance . . . French Hall — daily contact with the language and customs . . . French table in the dining hall . . . learning to cook French foods — and enjoying eating it later . . . the Christmas party with Christmas car- ols, decorations, and Santa Claus played by M. Meral ... a play by Moliere . . . German Club . . . the Goethe Institute ' s exhibits . . . morning snacks of German bread and coffee . . . Brigitta and her help . . . learning the language through the Ger- man Hall and lunch table . . . parties . . . understanding the customs of another civilization . . . Octoberfest . . . summer study abroad in Marburg . . . KATHERINA BLUM and other works of art ... FRENCH CLUB, First Row: Sarah Windham, Marietta Town- send, Dacia Small — Pres.; Second Row; Marion Dachary — French Asst.; Third Row: Ruth B. FHoffman, Katie Bonta, Don- na Adams, Sandy Kemp, Joyce Thompson. Not Pictured: Sue Jordan, Cindy Camper, Patsy Cralle, Julie Johnston, Emily Moore GERMAN CLUB, First Row: Mern Obermeier — Pres., Sally Harris, Lisa Lee, Brigitta Borck; Second Row: Ms. Wieshofer, Claire Wannamaker, Bee Chin Yeoh, Melissa Breitling, Elaine Pantazopoulos, Jenny Spencer, Becky Payton, Kok-Weay Looi, Cheng-Suan Ooi . Language Clubs w- ' Eta Sigma Phi . . . national honorary frater- nity for Greek and Latin students . . . promot- ing classical civilization . . . initiating new members . . . students become eligible for membership in their sophomore year . . . keeping in touch with classical activities all over the country . . . Spanish Club ... a Columbus Day Party with skits, refreshments, and songs . . . help- ing with the international dinner . . . per- forming DIONYSIA at the Drama Competi- tion at Clemson . . . learning the everyday language at the Spanish Table and on the Spanish Hall . . . G-PIRG . . . action and interaction . . . changing what you do not like . . . evaluating the public — a main goal . , . sponsoring the newspaper recycling project . , . conscious raising sessions with women off campus . . . participating in consumer conferences . . . keeping up with the issues . . . involvement with other PIRG groups . . . legislation, com- mittees, and research . . . SPANISH CLUB: 1st row: Traci Rowland, Alison Law, Patti Tucker; 2nd row: Dee Johnson, Mollie Sherrill, Elizabeth Mosgrove; 3rd row: Laramie Larsen, Cathy Rowell, Kathy Hol- lywood, Mimi Holmes, Nancy Campbell. Not pictured: Christy Johnson, Rosie Perez, Karen Margolis ETA SIGMA PHI: Donna Richards — V. Pres., Linda Moore — Sec. Treas., Elizabeth Cameron, Linda Logan — Pres. 92 ORGANIZATIONS G-Pirg ORGANIZATlONS 93 Blackfriars . . . hammer and saw . . . memoriz- ing lines . . . auditions . . . cross, upstage left . . . " No, I can not go out tonight because 1 have rehearsals! " . . . Winter Theatre . . . thirty hours of work . . . PUSS N ' BOOTS . . . grease paint and cold cream . . . working in the box office . . , " How many tickets did you sell? " . . . the green room . . . scripts . . . THREE SISTERS ... set design . . . read throughs . . . blocking . . . scenery painting . . . patrons and advertisers . . . the workshop ... 27 WAGONS FULL OF COTTON . . . designing posters and programs . . . lighting . . . Props Chairman . . . long hours . . . walk it through . . . EVERY MAN TODAY . . . senior drama majors directing the one acts . . . having late night rehearsals and a test the next morning . . . meetings once every two weeks . . . self-supporting . . . period furniture . . . seating charts . . . THE LOVE OF DON PER- LIMPLINE AND BELISSA IN THE GARDEN ... cast parties . . . studying while waiting to go on . . . imagination, improvisation, and creativity . . . dedication . . . opening night . . . ushers . . . nervousness ... on stage . . . curtain calls . . . applause . . . ;? ir. AS , C " BLACKFRIARS: Judy Bartholomew, Ralee Gates, Elizabeth Cameron, Nancy Campbell, Debby Daniel — Treas., Leslie Dillard, Sandra Eichelberger, Irish Elebash, Maggie Evans, Sandy Fowler, Jeanine Garbutt, Grace Haley, Laura Hanson — Publicity, Mimi Holmes — Pres., Sarah Hunter, Jennifer Knight, Lisa Lee, Linda Mclnnis, Jenny McWilliams, Jenni- fer Middleton, Mary Lipscomb — Sec, Lucia Rawls, Mary Reid, Diann Sanders, Liz Steele, Christine Suggars, Karen Tapper, Jo Weinstein 2 94 ORGANIZATIONS I lie HI AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE BLACRFRIARS Present THE THREE SISTERS written by Anton Chekhov v j " Nov. 11, 12 and 17, 18, 1977 8:15 Winter Theatre Dana Fine Art Bldg. , ' H 96 ORGANIZATIONS HH 1 H ■ i H I B jH HH H BSpnifefe L |i8| H HS S H R H K H| 1 9 u M H H 1 H H { T . I B H ' B l HH i 1 1 sll p r H wm H Hw flPiS k H I JjJ ' kaJ " f 1 9 1 Mr " ' B|9 v II Hk ' " " " ' HMMm«. ' ' IIR HB m H, teton _ ■ %»» J k 1 ' ' 1 Hw 3BBi Bh| v 1 ■ ■, ' -■ . ' • H ■k ' i M v ' ' ' Irln ' iiMiniiVr " ' :ll V fcjpWSftf ' . fl Hk. ' .i ■ p B W " ' ' 6 ' ' ' I B V r K S. ' ' I H B Bjcl " . .• ' • ' ' ;■ ' ■? 1 H H " ll Hi 2 1 K I A yM H if A lfe, H 1 ■1 ORCANIZATIONS 97 ' : Madrigals . . . classical to pop . . . rehearsals and more rehearsals . . . nine plus one . . . black skirts and white blouses . . . singing for schools, clubs, and other organizations . . . entertaining on campus at numerous func- tions ... a cappella . . . memorizing . . . lov- ing to sing and make music . . . participating in Agnes Scott Christmas Concert . . . singing at the Atlanta Yacht Club . . . taking part in Focus on Faith . . . singing at Callenwolde at Christmas . . . ' 1. Donna Crawford, 2. Nancy Rogers, 3. Susan Nicol, 4. Gina Philips, 5. Maryanne Gannon, 6. Ginny Lee — Dir- ector, 7. Peggy Emrey, 8. Marguerite Booth, 9. Susan Harris. Not pictured: Julie Johnston. Opera Workshop ... no members or meetings . . . existing to organize operas on the Agnes Scott campus . . . " Suar Angelica, " by Puccini, the 1978 production . . . Mrs. Janet Stewart playing the lead . . . many Scott students involved . . . Glee Club also taking part in the performance . . . held in Winter Theatre for the first time . . . Baroque Ensemble ... a unique musical group . . . instruments played included flutes, violins, cellos, and bassoons . . . playing together for their own enjoyment . . . and for others to enjoy . . . performing at chap- els ... music convocations . . . played at Callenwolde Mansion during the Christmas season ... Opera Workshop . . . Baroque Ensemble Baroque Ensemble — Kathy Zarkowsky, Lisa Merrifield, Aria Spencer, Jen- nifer Knight, Brigetta Borck, Linda Moore, Lynn Stonecypher, Sherri Brown, Jenny Spencer. ORGANIZATIONS 99 Glee Club 1st row: Catherine McLauchlin, Martie Lovvorn, Marie Castro, Ann Huffines, Leslie Berry, Martha McGaughey, Nancy Camp- bell, Sarah Elizabeth Toms, Winnie Cho, Mary K. McNeil, Angela Carter, Maribeth Kouts, Jean Cho, Peggy Emrey. 2nd row: Han- nah Griffith, Susan Gledhill, Crystal Watkins, Susan Dodson, Marguerite Booth, Marietta Townsend, Holly McFerrin — Treas., K.C. Docie, Anita Plunkett, Susan Bethune, Beth Jewett, Ginny Lee, Anna Bryan. 3rd row: Susan Nicol, Mary Ann Hill, Julie Johnston — Sec, Hope Lamade, Dottie Enslow, Donna Crawford, Helen Anderson, Jennifer Knight, Kemper Hatfield, Kathy Zarkowsky, Debbie Daniel — Pres. Not pictured: Susan Barnes, Missy Beysselance, Sherri Brown, Carol Chapman, Amy Cohrs, Leslie Dillard, Sandra Eichelberger, Maryanne Gannon, Carol Gorgus, Lisa Lee, Genyne Long, Jenny McWilliams, Mary Ann Obermeier, Gina Philips, Kim Robinson, Stephanie Segars, Claire Wannamaker, Susan Wing, Nellie Yeoh. P% Glee Club . . . rehearsals on Tuesday and Thursday nights . . . mee-ee-ah-oh-oh . . . joint concert with the University of Geor- gia Men ' s Chorus . . . the annual Christmas Concert — with something new every year . . . singing in " Suar Angelica " ... a spring concert . . . singing at Senior Investiture . . . concerts in the Atlanta area . . . always bringing music to the campus . . . ORGANIZATIONS 101 Studio Dance Theatre . . . performing the Children ' s Show at elementary schools in the fall . . . selling ads for the spring concert program . . . leotards, tights and bare feet . . . Master class with David Roche . . . and " spaghetti legs " afterwards . . . choreographing dances . . . dance group on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5:15 . . . triplet, triplet, sparkle . . . pigging out at Farrells . . . " Darling ' s Diet Laws " . . . down, up, up, down, up, up . . . spiral . . . " the form is the content " . . . Dance We Must . . . long rehearsals . . . and more re- hearsals . . . white feet on maroon t-shirts . . . designing costumes for the concert . . . contract, release . . . ' y ♦ ♦ ' 102 ORGANIZATlONS Studio Dance Theatre ORGANIZATIONS 103 • jr.;i 1st Row Margaret Seitter, Lisa Beswick, Paxson Collins — Sec, Mary Ann Mappus, Liz Mosgrove; 2nd Row: Elisa Norton, Cassidy Ward, Kate McCunniff, Mollie Sherrill, Laurie Kramer, Angela Fleming - V.P., Sally Workman - Pres.; 3rd Row: Kelly Murphy, Nancy Rogers, Leslie Berry, Ellen Poole, Kathy Fitch, Laura Boyd, Sarah Marshall. Not Pictured: Kay Cochrane, Alison Law, Laura Peterson - Treas., Betty Philips, Peggy Sommers - m ' h 1 gggj W w n 1 • ' 1 . , 1 4 m ■J- , m 1 t M Publications Dolphin Club . . . water . . . tryouts . . . pool in the gym . . . practices . . . stroking, sculling, sculling, sculling . . . nose clips . . . trying to hold your breath longer . . . show during Sophomore Parents ' Weekend — what will the theme be? . . . Fantasyland . . . choreographing . . . two hour practices . . . shriveled fingers and toes . . . dry skin . . . LONG dress rehearsals . . . NICA Workshops . . . meets with Suwanne and Brenau . . . The PROFILE, 1st Row; Nan Fabisinski, Lee FHarber, Diane Beaudoin, Kelly Murphy, 2nd Row: Mari Perez — Ed., Betsey Broadwell, Ruth Ann Relyea, Sharon Maitland, Sandy Burson, Sally Neal, 3rd Row: Mariana Costarides, Tina Robertson, Vicki Fitzgerald, Andi Julian, Barbara Mandel, Not pictured: Alison Bannon, Cheryl Brown, Ross Cheney, Ana Prieto, Marty Lovvorn, Melanie Meadows, Lisa Wise AURORA . . . deadlines . . . everything coming in at the last minute . . . stanzaic potentials . . . miles of poetry . . . love and death ... a dash of fiction . . . hours of reading and reading and hairpulling , . . trying to be objective . . . monetary limita- tions . . . where to draw the line . . . proof- reading . . . comas or semi-colons . . . cre- ating a cover . . . sniffing out the visual arts . . . typing, typing, typing ... a new printer . . . great expectations . . . PROFILE . . . meetings after dinner on Mondays . . . headlines . . . making assign- ments . . . covering the campus and local news . . . ads . . . pictures and cartoons . . . " What goes on page one? " editing . . . typ- ing . . . stuffing mailboxes . . . editorials and letters to the editor . . . Ik A k? • n . 1 . The AURORA: Kim Long, Ruth Hoffman, Genyne Long — Ed., Karen Webster, Melanie Best, Joan Loeb, Teresa Layden, Not pic- tured: Donna Wyatt, Pam Moore 1978 SILHOUETTE 106 ORGANIZATIONS SILHOUETTE . . . planning . . . " Break- away 78 " with josten ' s American Yearbook Company at Stone Mountain . . . choosing editors and staff . . . layout styles . . . selling ads . . . " mug shots " . . . first deadline . . . " will we have a theme? " . . . Monday night meetings . . . phrase copy . . . dummy lay- outs . . . croppers . . . photography assign- ments . . . another deadline ... " i don ' t care if it IS late, it isn ' t humanly possible to finish this on time! " . . . meeting the bus . . . copy sheets . . . typing . . . proofs . . . " what happened to the snorkeler ' s head? " . . . another deadline — up until three a.m. (or later) , . . Formatt . . . dark room . . . " we don ' t have enough pictures! " . . . headlines . . . " the copy doesn ' t fit " . . . final deadline — at last . . . waiting . . . ORGANIZATIONS 107 Athletic Athletic Association . . . A. A. . . . bus tour of Atlanta for the freshmen . . . spon- soring intramural and intercollegiate sports . . . basketball . . . publishing the A. A. Cal- endar for the school year . . . tennis . . . the annual Blood Drive . . . promoting physical fitness . . . Softball . . . tennis tournaments . . . field hockey . . . the A. A. picnic for the campus in May . . . exercise classes . . . jog- ging around the field in the spring . . . I--V , I ' ' e5- " t aite- ■IPti I ' m-: M- ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION, First Row: Sue Edwards — V. Pres., Deni Lamb, Laurie Kramer — Sec. Treas., Peggy Pfeiffer, Grace Allen — Pres.; Second Row: Dixie Washington, Sally Harris, Lulu Perez; Third Row: Nancy Perry, Paxson Collins, Ms. Manuel — Advisor, Jennifer Williams 108 ORGANIZATIONS ssociation ORGANIZATIONS 109 THE UNORGANIZED 110 ORGANIZATIONS ORCANIZATIONS 111 . Oiar There is no place like a dorm. Even though they did not have all the con- veniences of home, each dorm was unique in both its architecture and residents, by the end of the year, Scotties had come to love their new homes. Often, to the dismay of par- ents, a student could be heard to say it was time to go home — home mean- ing back to school. Students had to learn to adapt to dorm life. If someone got up early e- nough to avoid the rush in the bath- room, she then had to wait at least ten minutes for the hot water to come on. Laundry, for some, was a major prob- lem to cope with. When a girl found her only clean clothes were a summer party dress and the pants that no longer fit, she knew the time had come to find the laundry room. An extremely loud buzzing at ap- proximately 3 a.m. awakened all stu- dents at least once a quarter. When everybody finally realized turning off the alarm clock did not stop the noise, they knew it was time to go through the ritual of a fire drill. But life on the halls was not all work and annoyances. In fact, at times it tended to be more of a constant party. Halls gathered together for birthday parties and celebrations of special events. By the end of the year, many new friendships had been formed through the experiences of living to- gether. MAKING SCOTT 112 THAT ' S LIFE FEEL LIKE HOME As one walked down any hall in an ASC dorm, a variety of decoration schemes surfaced. Creativity began at each door. Some were covered with pertinent comics painstakingly cut out of the newspaper. The doors with weekly class schedules and enormous memo boards piled with messages upon messages until cleaned (usually every three weeks) were more staid. Once inside the room, one was struck with the ingenious, and sometimes amazing, use of space. A bookcase turned upside down on a desk opened up extra floor space. Hanging old wooden coke crates on the wall to fill with innumerable odds and ends left a dresser top clear for other things. And, of course, where would a Scottie have been without her under-the-bed boxes filled with the overflow from her dresser drawers? : L. fl ip P mH 114 THAT ' S LIFE Not only were Scotties great spacesavers but they were also fantastic room arrangers. Always trying to get away from that " bedroom " look, a Scottie would behead and befoot her beds by night. In the older dorms, one could find lofts above the closets and enough wall space so that if the room were turned on its side, it would be twice the size of the original room. Students here were most concerned with stacking furniture to gain more floor space. Plants soon became best friends by adding life and color everywhere. Rockers, rugs, curtains, bedspreads, posters, and stuffed animals brought from home added to the " lived in " look and helped to make any room a home away from home. THAT ' S LIFE 115 Learning to sleep with the lights on while a roommate crammed for a test until 3 a.m. . . . Accepting the fact that the person you lived with was an even bigger slob than you and knowing the room would never be clean . . . Discovering you and the person you were going to have to live with for the next nine months had some similar interests. For upperclassmen and freshmen, roommates were an essential part of existance at times. Who else would wake you up at 8:10 for your 8:30 class when you had turned off the alarm and had gone back to sleep? She always had a shoulder to cry on, or the time to listen to you complain about all your problems. She was willing to study in the library on Sunday afternoons so you could entertain your boyfriend in the room. Of course there were some disadvantages to having a roommate — like talking all night when you both had mountains of homework to do. For some, a roommate was like the sister they did not have and for others a roommate was practically a second mother, but whatever the roles, roommates helped to keep away loneliness — and most of all, were fun. THAT ' S LIFE 117 118 THAT ' S LIFE Pages And Pages Black What? was usually the first reaction of freshmen when Black Cat was mentioned. Over 500 young women dressed as devils, crickets, and cops cavorting and screaming for two days? It sounded ridiculous until the big weekend arrived. After weeks of sewing costumes, painting signs, practicing songs, and rehearsing the production — the weekend was a chance to relax and have fun. The spirit grew during the week before Black Cat. In the dining hall, classes competed nightly in singing and shouting matches. Sophomores harrassed the freshmen as they tried to confirm a clue about the mascot. Hall raids and water balloon battles were common attack procedures. Black Cat officially began with the bonfire on Thursday night. Each class tried to out shout the others, in hopes of winning the Spirit Award. After the song competition, the Sophomores successfully guessed the freshmen mascot — the Yellow Pages. THAT ' S LIFE 119 120 THAT ' S LIFE I it filW tm elegance espionage excitement Friday night the juniors entertained everyone with a humorous view of Agnes Scott. Before the play, the awards were given. The seniors won the song competition and the sophomores won the spirit and games categories. The Black Kitty award went to the senior class. After the production, a campus party was held in the quad. Scotties then went back to put away their costumes for another year. But the weekend was far from over. Social Council sponsored the Black Cat formal dance on Saturday night. Sunday afternoon everyone relaxed in the quad with a picnic lunch and a folk singer. The freshmen had been officially oriented and was time to get back to studying. THAT ' S LIFE 121 entertainment elegance espionage excitement entertainment elegance espionage T ' After weeks of searching for a spe- cial dress and a special date, the Black Cat Dance was the climax of much anticipation and preparation. Following two days of dressing as crickets and cops, screaming and playing, Scotties had a chance to settle down and show another side of their personalities. Since the ordeal of the evening ' s dinner has traditionally become the girl ' s responsibility, it was suddenly easy to order poultry instead of steak or lobster and decide on a cheaper bottle of wine. Everyone had spec- ulated as to what kind of music the band would play, and upon arrival at Dunfey ' s Royal Coach Hotel, every Scottie made a beeline to the ball- room to find out for herself. And what a great discovery — everything for everybody! " Staircase " let us dance to bluegrass ( ever try clogging in a formal?), fifties tunes, and rock. Of course, if the dance floor was too crowded for shagging (or there had been room to dance and you wound up with a swelling foot), there was always plenty of action in those rooms reserved by twenty girls (at $2.00 per couple). Another alternative to that environment was the Fred Astaire Dance Convention, also located in the Royal Coach. It provided the atmosphere for one last cheek-to-cheek dance as another Black Cat came to a close. 122 THAT ' S LIFE THAT ' S LIFE 123 Agnes Scott offered other things to do be- sides study. Some of the free time diversions included sports, lectures, parties and special events. In sports, intramural and intercollegiate field hockey, tennis, basketball, badminton, vol- leyball, and Softball gave students the choice of exercising or observing. For the more academi- cally minded and sedate individuals, different groups offered programs from the Guarneri String Quartet to Reynolds Price. In addition to those programs, there were the traditions of Agnes Scott campus life. (By Agnes Scott ' s stan- dards, a tradition is anything which has oc- curred at least twice.) The main emphasis of these events varied: Black Cat was just for fun; Focus on Faith a serious reflection on religion; china and silver surveys to make money; Appli- cants Weekend for recruiting new Scotties; Black History Week, and graduation (the tradi- tion of traditions). And the campus did manage to get together at least seven times during the year for mandatory convocations. But when Scotties were not found at any of the above, one could easily find them at the parties which were an important part of Agnes Scott life. There were TGIF parties, dorm parties, surprise birthday parties, class parties, campus camp- outs, and dances. As a matter of fact, whenever two or more Scotties gathered together, there " was a guaranteed party. Of course, all these activities were diligently watched over by the never-ceasing security force. The ASC midnight cowboys helped to keep the campus rotating by alternating their breaks between the dining hall and the Fiub every five minutes. With all this to do, sometimes it was hard to see how students had a chance to find time to study. ' ejr v l -J L rk 124 THAT ' S LIFE THAT ' S LIFE 125 DECATUR CITY OF CHURCHES Decatur gives Agnes Scott an aura of small town life which may soon disappear with the coming of M ARTA ' s modern subway sys- tem and the business it will bring with it. But for now it is known for its preponderance of churches. Supposedly, Decatur has more churches per square inch of property than any other city in the world. But Scotties know the town for the conven- ience of Kroger, Super X, and many small shops that honor the checks of Scott students. In the last year, Bruce the Bagel- bender ' s has become popular for its great bagels and sandwiches. Nearer to the school are Dairy Queen and Pizza by Candelight (P by C), the longtime favorite study break for Scotties. Of course, one part of Decatur that will never be forgotten are the railroad tracks. As any student will attest, they must be the most over-used tracks in the country. 11 12 10 TIME FLIES 1 128 THAT ' S LIFE WHEN YOU ' RE HAVING FUN Time was always important at ' Scott. Lives seemed to be run by the clock. Classes at 8:30 were too early and classes at 2:10 were too late. Struggling to keep awake in class was almost as tiring as actual physical activity. Some classes seemed to take an eter- nity, while others, particularly when there was a test, flew by. That last bell, signalling the end of a Scottie ' s class-day, never seemed to come. But when the day was over and the night was upon a student, my, how time seemed to fly! Whether the Scottie was studying or party- ing, there was never enough time. And if partying was the acti- vity of the evening, there was al- ways the one last drink or just one last thing to say to someone. Time flies! THAT ' S LIFE 129 ■ ■■(mm i -Mi wmmi miimmmt mmmmm 130 UNDERCLASSMEN UNDERCLASSMEN mmmmmmmmmmm-mmmM r fMmmm!xmmmmmmmmmMMm UNDERCLASSMEN 131 ■ mmm i-mmiiwm inmmmmmmmmmf Junior Class Officers: Pres. — Elizabeth Wells; Vice-Pres. — Holly Sophomore Class Officers: Pres. — T. Lancaster; Vice McFerrin; Sec.-Treas. — Diane Banyar Pres. — Sandy Burson; Sec. — Lisa DeCrandi; Treas. — Kemper Hatfield mmmmm mmmmm! m)immmmmmmmmm!-mmm! .mmmm 132 UNDERCLASSMEN Freshmen Class Officers: Pres. — Gina Philips; Vice-Pres. — Sar Barnhill; Sec.-Treas. — Laura Klettner UNDERCLASSMEN 133 Ellen All Helen Anderson Leigh Armour Virginia Balbona Candi Barbot Susan Barnes Lydia Bequillard Leslie Berry ;»«S«»=eJ5:3Kg«» X :3X :3X Frosh . . . It ' s Just A Matter Of Adjustment Freshmen naturally had a hard time at Scott in the beginning. Moving into a room was difficult — knowing what to bring and what to leave behind. Having to do laundry was mystifying. Things of- ten changed colors or shrank. The shrinking syndrome was a real problem when coupled with the five to ten pounds freshmen usually gained fall quarter. The rules tended to make fresh- men wary of doing something that would lead to that frustrating " first ar- rest " - After fall quarter, when they no longer had to sign in and out and did not have a " late time limit " , life became much simpler for the freshmen. 134 FRESHMEN Missy Beysselance Diane Blessing Katherine Bonta Leisa Bradley Melissa Breitling Nancy Brock Darby Bryan lla Burdette Cleste Burns Sarah Campbell Jan Carpenter Celeste Carter Marie Castro Wee-Leng Chan Carol Chapman Lee Ann Chupp Leigh Clifford Kelley Coble Jeanne Cole Margaret Conyers Catherine Craig Ann Curnutt Rebecca Dayton Laura Dickens FRESHMEN 135 Leslie Dillard Susan Dollar Elizabeth Dorsey Mary Beth DuBose Rebecca Durie Julie Ellington Joy Freeman Maryanne Gannon Alline Garrison Beth Gerhardt Jeni Giles Amanda Goerler Alex Gonsalves Carol Gorgus Nancy Griffin Hannah Griffith Judy Hakanson Paige Hamilton Mary Beth Hebert Kathy Heffron Karen Hellender Deborah Higgins Terry Hillman Laurie Huebsch 136 FRESHMEN Christine Jackson Beth Jewett Priscilla Kiefer Donna Kinzer Laura Klettner Stephanie Komar Alison Law Teresa Layden Chu Kee Loo Joyce Ludvigsen KX :3X8:|X{::r:tS:3XHXS:3::S: Brains And Strains Lab sciences and physical education were two courses that usually appeared on freshmen schedules. Both were in- cluded in the liberal arts requirements for graduation. So most freshmen spent one afternoon a week, from two to five p.m., in Campbell Hall working on bio- logy or chemistry experiments. Some freshmen in their gold and white gym suits played field hockey, golf, and ten- nis; while others in bathing suits and leo- tards learned synchronized swimming and tap dancing. FRESHMEN 137 Laura McCrary Kate McCunniff Bess McDonald Lynda McDonald Martha McGaughey Mary McNeill Maureen McQuillan Melissa Mann Sharon Manus Wendy Merkert Yellow Pages From the very beginning of the year, freshmen heard about Black Cat. But what was Black Cat? They soon found out and from then until Black Cat, pre- parations for it occupied all their spare time. At times they had two to three meetings a week when they were choos- ing a mascot. As usual, one of their major problems was maintaining secrecy, not only the mascot name, but also the places where they worked on decora- tions and costumes. Freshmen learned to be on the lookout for short-sheeted beds and switched dresser drawers, compliments of the sophomores. Finally Black Cat arrived and freshmen were able to see for themselves how much the weekend meant. l3»=lX :aS:«|::jK »«=« :» 4 138 FRESHMEN Lisa Merrifield Melanie Merrifield Deborah Miller Susan Mitchell Kathy Mobiey Pamela Moore Karen Mosley Pam Mynatt Nancy Nelson Laura Newsome Susan Nicol Jenny Nystrom Julie Oliver Monica O ' Quinn Barbara Patton Lulu Perez Shannon Perrin Carol Petty Gina Philips Lucia Ra ' ' - Ruth Ann Relyea Melody Richardson Meiinda Roberts Katherine Roweil FRESHMEN 139 Stephanie Segars Diane Shaw Martha Sheppard Janet Smith Dawn Sparks Patricia Springer Katherine Stearns Elizabeth Steele Lynn Stonecypher Lilly Suarez Christine Suggars — ' Lee Kiang Tan Wool Yi Tan Karen Tapper Guat Bee Teh Joyce Thompson Cynthia Thomson Zoy Tiniacos Sarah Toms Marietta Townsend Jane Tyson Christina Valentine Maria Velasco Susan Wall NOT PICTURED Sam Barnhill Margaret V. Bynum (Mrs.) Yu San Chooi Linda Herrington Yin Phing Kean Susan Kennedy Martha Lenoir Fritzi F. Lewis (Mrs.) Kok Yean Looi Choy-Lean Lye Beverly Miller Niranjani Molegoda Sherry Schulman (Mrs.) 140 FRESHMEN Claire Wannamaker Luci Wannamaker Catherine Watson Karen Webster Susan Welch Catherine Wendt Susan Winn Terri Wong Nellie Yeoh Debra Yoshimura I Dear Mom And Dad, Please $end $ome Money When a freshman was confronted with a sixty dollar phone bill and a bank bal- lance of $3.84, she usually had one alter- native — to write home for money. The first " Dear Mom and Dad, Please send money! " letter was always difficult for a student to write, in writing such a letter she had to admit that she had not han- dled her money as successfully as she had planned. There were many ways to spend a month ' s allowance in one week in Atlanta. When a phone bill with many long distance charges was added to other expenditures, the result could be disasterous. One small consolation was that most parents came to expect re- quests for money once in a while. l3X8 ' eXS4X :SX8::3X£:3XS:SXS==SXS: FRESHMEN 141 Donna Adams Beth Arant Pat Arnzen Alison Bannen Cathy Beck Lisa Beswick Debbie Boelter Evelyn Booch Brigitta Borck Kathleen Boushell Brenda Brayton Wendy Brooks Cheryl Brown Sally Brown Sherri Brown Anna Bryan Sandy Burson Rebecca Burtz Gyni Byrd Julie Carter Ross Cheney Jean Cho Kim Clark Amy Cohrs Paxson Collins SOPHOMORES 142 SOPHOMORES Sheryl Cook Marina Costarides Carmen Crumbley Cindy Dantzler Lisa DeGrandi Veronica Denis Hiija Dodd Susan Dodson Lil Easterlin Irish Elebash SOPHOMORES 143 Investigators Although Black Cat is held every year, a student ' s per- spective of the week changes over the years. So how was it the second time around, Sophomores? We knew what to expect and were no longer the under- dogs trying to be the class that finally kept the secret. Our turn had come to be the instigators of the pranks. We had to patrol the cam- pus at very late hours to check for lights in unusual places, lie in wait for hours under beds, and try road- trippings, surprise attacks, snooping, and liquor to dis- cover the freshman mascot. What if we had pieced everything together incor- rectly? After a lengthy song, the Yellow Pages confirmed our guess and we were able to relax and enjoy the week- end. Gloria Fernandez Vicki Fitzgerald Maile Frank Beth Furlow Regina Gallo Susie Ham Cindy Hampton Sanne Hansen Laura Hanson Lee Harber 144 SOPHOMORES Melanie Hardy Sally Harris Susan Harris Kemper Hatfield Liza Hawley Ellen Highland Mary Ann Hill Ruth Beckley Hoffman Kathy Hollywood Cookie Hooper Ann Huffines Jodie Jeffery Lisa Johnson Robin Johnson Bev Jones Andy Julian Sandy Kemp Mary Ann Keon Jennifer Knight Maribeth Kouts T Lancaster Susan Landers Rori Lane Janet Lapp SOPHOMORES 145 Laramie Larsen Teresa Lass Elizabeth Lassetter Lisa Lee Kimberly Long Janet McDonald Maribeth McGreevy Jennifer McWilliams Barbara Mandel Mary Ann Mappus Emily Moore Linda Moore Elizabeth Mosgrove Kelly Murphy Sally Neal Elisa Norton Mary Ann Obermier Becky Payton Rosie Perez Lynne Perry Ana Prieto Vicki Pyles Tina Robertson Kim Robinson 146 SOPHOMORES r ' «! ? i Tracy Rowland ' . w A- Margaret Seitter Mollie Sherrill :: Sophomores were faced with the problem of picking a major this year. Some students knew when they began their freshman year what they would study. Others did not decide on a major until Course Selection Week of this year. Few sophomores rea- lized that the major did not have to determine the rest of their lives. Among graduates, English majors working in banks and che- mistry majors working for travel agencies were not unusual. Some sophomores mapped out their lives and studied subjects that would assure careers. Others were willing to take a chance, and picked a major simply be- cause they enjoyed that certain subject. Choosing a major sym- bolized leaving general studies behind and becoming involved in in-depth courses in a specific field, if nothing else, a sopho- more needed to choose a disci- pline that would hold her inter- est for the next two years. Judy Smith Peggy Somers ' ■- ■ ' A Jenny Spencer Joanna Splawn Dawn Starrett Jan Strain Kathryn Sutton SOPHOMORES 147 Allison Taylor English Taylor Janice Thompson Bev Thomson Mary Tiniacos Patty Tucker Susan Tucker Cora Uceda Cheryl Walker Casidy Ward 148 SOPHOMORES SOPHOMORES 149 Capping Highlights Junior Year Capping? Is that another tradition at Agnes Scott? The answer is an emphatic yes. Capping, a secret ceremony, is held one night during Spring Quarter. It is a ceremony designed to officially welcome the juniors to senior status. A solemn dinner is held before the capping and everyone parties afterwards. During the cele- bration, everyone seems to become at least slightly inebriated. Of course, it is the first time juniors officially sing " We Are Tired Old Sen- iors, " an honor they feel they have more than earned after three years at Scott. S:r::: gfc::r:: H :3::z Debbie Ballard Diane Banyar Sue Barefoot Diane Beaudoin 150 JUNIORS Elizabeth Belk Clenda Bell Melanie Best Susan Bethune Maureen Birtch Kathy Boone Laura Boyd Janet Bradley Betsy Broadwell Elisabeth Cameron Lisa Cameron Angela Carter Linda Chupp Suzanne Cox Donna Crawford Catherine Crook Debbie Daniel Julie Daniel K.C. Docie Leslie Doyle JUNIORS 151 Tish DuPont Sandra Eichelberger Angela Fleming Sandy Fowler Susan Fuller Jeannine Garbutt Mary Beth Gardiner Lesley Garrison Julie Gary Susan Gledhill Eleanor Graham Anne Griner Andrea Groover Kim Gzeckowicz Claire Hall Karol Hammer Katharine Handly Helen Hill Valerie Hinckley Eiise Holland 152 JUNIORS Ellen Hunter Liz Jenkins Caye Johnson Julie Johnston Juniors Pursue Majors This year most members of the Class of 1979 began to take many in-depth courses in their ma- jor area. For the first time they were mainly taking upper level courses which usually lasted one quarter instead of the full year. About one fourth of the juniors had chosen to major in psychology. A large percentage of the class had decided to double major. As usual, many planned to be certi- fied to teach either elementary or secondary edu- cation. Both of these meant students were able to take fewer electives in their last two years at Agnes Scott. But at least they had filled P.E. and other basic requirements for graduation. f f " v H mm . l xfSBBM gte::n::®te::r::[S:r JUNIORS 153 Anne Jones Robin Kessler Evelyn Kirby Kay Kirkland II A Genuine m mmm mmmmmmmm amK E am Shortage Of Men What did Agnes Scott not have that other colleges did? Boys! Mens! Males! Scott certainly did not have many around. But there was no need to des- pair; there were places to find them, providing one did not have a certain HTH that lured her home each week- end. The first stop was Georgia Tech, mainly because Scotties have been dat- ing there forever. Then it was on to bat- tle the females at Emory for that wealthy doctor or lawyer, or both. Pretty soon imagination stepped in and one met men jogging in town, at lectures on campus, climbing Stone Mountain, or answering a call for help in CREATIVE LOAFING. But if one still did not suc- ceed, she should have come home to ASC and not worry. After all, one could always flirt with the security guards! 154 JUNlORS Rita Kitts Denise Koon Nan Kouts Laurie Kramer Karen Kulick Deni Lamb Ginny Lee Linda Logan Genyne Long Karen Margolis Melanie Meadows Katie McCann Linda McColl Laura McCord Holly McFerrin Rosalie Nichols Rebecca Ozburn Mari Perez J Nancy Perry Carolyn Pervis JUNIORS 155 Diane Petersen Laura Peterson Peggy Pfeiffer Ellen Poole Barbara Propst Mary Reid Donna Richards Ginnie Risher Nancy Rogers Shannon Ruddell Diann Sanders Donna Sanson Emily Sheffield Crystal Singleton Dacia Small Aria Spencer Paula Starnes Renee Stewart Susan Sturkie Melinda Tanner 156 ]UNiORS Black Cat Production This year, as usual, the junior class wrote, directed, and produced the Black Cat Production for the campus com- munity. Over the summer, the Script Committee and Lyri- cist wrote the play and songs. All the songs were written to the tunes from the musical, SOUTH PACIFIC. The play, about a northerner and a southerner rooming together, was entitled THE SOUTH ' S TERRIFIC. Early in the fall, the cast was selected and rehearsals began. Finally on October 21, the play had its opening — and closing night. Penny Terry Katrina Thomason Mary Louise Tucker Susi Van VIeck Elizabeth Wei Mopsy Widener Sarah Windham Lisa Worthey Donna Wyatt Ann Yarbrough NOT PICTURED Gioriana Erim Susi Gomez Katherine Harris Lynda Harris Lynn Hutcheson Linda Mclnnis GinnI Rockwell Trudy Stone Kay Wilbanks JUNIORS 157 he senior year at Agnes Scott was always the busiest as far as class activities were concerned. So the class needed to have efficient and enthusiastic officers to lead them. The seniors got exactly what they needed when they elected Thelma Ruddell as their president, Sue Fisher as Vice Presi- dent and Janet Kelley as the Secretary- Treasurer. These women began their work spring quarter of their junior year and continued work until graduation. In planning class meetings from week to week and leading the class activities, the officers kept their classmates spirited and involved. Ear- ly in the year they organized the ordering of caps and gowns and graduation invitations. In both of these efforts, the officers had to deal with the usual problems of collect- ing money. Besides Black Cat, the main project in the fall was Investiture. Later in the year, they supervised the choosing and executing of the traditional class project for the school. The final project for the Class of 78 was gradua- tion on June 4. Through their diligence, these officers helped to make this year a memorable one for the seniors. A. Page Airheart — Sociology 158 SENIORS Ellie Autry Alderman — Bible Religion Grace C. Allen Chemistry Marguerite A. Booth English Janet A. Blount Economics Sarah N. Arthur English — History R ersonality, good looks, and brains — the class of 1978 had it all! Lurking behind their big, gorgeous eyes and beautiful wavy hair were the brains that won the Class of 78 the Class Scholarship Trophy three times in a row. The Class of 1978 accomplished a rare feat indeed, since only one other class in Agnes Scott history has won the award three times consecutively. When the Class of ' 78 received their first graded Eng- lish papers, many wondered if they would ever make it to Graduation Day. But long hours in the library and fre- quent all-nighters paid off as illustrated in the final pink grade slips. Even those members of the class who could not boast of making the honor roll, could take pride in the fact that they contributed to the overall winning class average. The Class of 1978 made its mark in the history books of Agnes Scott College as being one of the most outstanding classes ever to hit the campus. H. Eugenia Briiey — Sociology Mary G. Brown Psychology Beverly E. Brown Political Science SENIORS 161 Ralee A. Gates English, Theatre Shirley K. Chan Economics 162 SENIORS . — Independent studies gave seniors a chance to do in depth work in some area of their majors. A piece of written work, usually quiet lengthy, was turned in at the completion of the study. A person doing an Independent worked entirely on her own, except for guidance from her advisor. The work of an Independent was spread over two or three quarters. Research was done during the first quarter and the paper was written in the last quarter. It was possible to get three, four, or five hours of credit per quarter for work done on an Independent. An Independent Study gave a student a chance to employ the skills she had learned from the study of her major. Independents in bio- logy and chemistry involved doing an experiment, while English majors usually chose one author and did a critique of some aspect of his work. While any senior could do an Independent, only a few with special interests chose to undertake such an involved project. Rebecca C. Childress — Economics, Political Science Winnie K. Cho — Mathematics Patricia A. Cralle Biology — French Katharine M. Cochrane English Cherol C. Crutchfield — Philosophy M. Elizabeth Davis — History PLASH! A very strange disease, commonly called LOVE, reached epidemic proportions here on the Agnes Scott campus. Although this disease hits a few " Scot- ties " every year, it seemed the 1978 strain was out to get us all! The first signs of the disease were the keeping of late night hours, giddiness, daydreaming in class, and a loss in appetite. Chains of Greek letters and jewel-studded pins were often seen worn by the less affected victims; but, in the most severe cases, the victims were marred by a large, glowing protrusion on the fourth finger of the left hand! These victims also lost all sense of propriety: they had the audacity to openly discuss this disease called LOVE and to subject others to long, drawn-out treatises on the nature of this contagion. These " seminars " , occuring at supper, aroused so much emotion that frequent dumpings were made into the Alumni Pond in an attempt to cure Agnes Scott of the disease. But, nevertheless, it could not be stopped — LOVE was incurable! V. Jennifer A. Driscoli — History SENIORS 165 " H ey Mom, I spilled my bowl of peas on the floor but don ' t worry cuz I stopped them from rolling around — I squished ' em. " Children frequently present us with unique situations, problems, and joys. As we sat in the dining hall, we found ourselves discussing the pros and cons of motherhood. Many seniors joined in the con- versations knowing that this decision was not confronting them immediately. However, for those engaged, the pro- spect of having children was a real concern. The realities of holding the responsibilities associated with raising children stood forth. Who will give the 2 AM feeding? Will there be enough money for Sharon ' s new clothes next fall AND Bobby ' s braces? But what would you do without those sweet and sincere little eyes peering at you as you bend to give them their goodnight kiss? Children offer some of the most priceless moments of a parent ' s life. We became aware of many of these realities as we matured during the year at Scott. We were not expected to leave college and automati- cally fall into marriage and motherhood. The question of bearing and raising children should be evaluated seriously, and for most of us, the decision-making process continues. 166 SENIORS M. Sue Edwards — Mathematics Nilgiin Ereken Chemistry Joyce T. Cant English Anne R. Getchell Economics Kathryne C. Fitch Biology Lisa D. Griffin — Sociology ■ ■ ' :s;-- - a BP — J5SI " « n 1,.. Apartment anxiety became a prevalent syndrome among seniors as soon as jobs were found and plans were finalized. Apartment hunting entails circling classified ads, calling after 5:00 P.M. or visiting the resident manager, getting a headache, and, the sales pitch: " We have a very elite class of tenants here at L ' Armpit Arms — 1 know you, being an Agnes Scott graduate, will feel right at home here. " When you find that perfect pad (its only fault is the clanging radiators), there is rent to look forward to, and cooking your own meals, and taking out the garbage, and . . . enjoying. Outside world here we come! M. Catherine Harris — Bible Religion Patricia E. Muggins Art Cheryl L. Houy Political Science SENIORS 169 Christy L. Johnson Psychology — Spanish Rebecca L. Johnson Sociology Susan A. Kidd History 170 SENIORS It took them four long years to build it up to the top, but the Class of 1978 finally did it. Their Black Cat spirit was burning this pasfyear and the Seniors ran away with the iwards. First place in the song competition and the tug-of- var were just a few of the achievements which led them to he ultimate recognition. Yes, the Seniors finally won the Jiack Kitty Award. rhe honors were well deserved as the entire Senior Class vorked together practicing songs, decorating Gaines and larassing Freshmen. Believe it or not, those " mature young vomen " did manage to tear themselves away from their )Ooks a few times in the weeks preceeding Black Cat to lelp their sister class. There they were, those tired old ieniors leading water balloon fights and other late-night jranks. Seniors had a lot to celebrate at their last Black Cat Jance, for Hot Stuff did indeed end his Black Cat career by 5oing out in " a blaze of glory " . Margaret S. Knight — Psychology M. Margaret Lamberson Music Marlene M. Laboureur Psychology Mary L. Lipscomb Art Martha W. Lovvorn — Art Susan R. McCuIlough — Psychology The Class of 1978 received the official recognition of " seniorhood " on the weekend of November 5-6. Commonly known as Senior Investiture, this week- end has been a tradition at Agnes Scott for ages. This event proved to be a more rewarding experience than merely attending breakfast and brunch and walking across stage to have a hat placed on the Senior ' s head. As parents listened to the speech delivered by Dr. Brown, they realized that their " little girl " was an adult and ready for the world await- ing her. Peers recognized that their fellow students were now Seniors and would soon be leaving the Agnes Scott community. And the Class of 1978, appreciating the times at Agnes Scott made possible by family and friends, realized that they were capable of making the break into indepen- dence. Laura M. McDonald — Physics, Astronomy a RE, LSAT, MCAT, and GMAT all are graduate school admissions tests. Some seniors, instead of looking for a job, went through the process of finding a school where they could earn an advanced degree. Once again, as in high school, the senior filled out applications, figured grade point averages, and went to interviews with admis- sions representatives. The main difference was, it was harder to get into graduate schools. Approximately twenty- five percent of the senior class would be enrolled in a graduate or professional school the next fall. The general graduate school test was the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). For specific programs, there were other tests such as the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT), and the Graduate Man- agement Admissions Test (GMAT). This year the school required all seniors to take an advanced form of the Graduate Record Exam on the subject of her major. The individual did not have to pay for the test. The school wanted to know how well it was preparing its grad- uates in each area of study. The student who took the test only because it was required did not experience the pres- sure felt by the student whose future education depended on her test score. new mm Professional and Administrative Career Examination N hi. Addie P. Mathes - History 174 SENIORS W. Emma McLemore Economics-Mathematics Katharine B. Manning History Sarah S. Marshall Economics v ' i ' «» ' H HLcj l yU " H H H ■ i - ' Jennifer J. Middleton Bible Religion — Theater Judith K. Miller Economics 175 Bell Laboratories IBM. [SeaK CKS I ICXtl ' Si 3 apis0n s What is your goal in life? Tell me why you are inter- ested in our company. Why do you think you are qualified for this job? What are your best and worst attributes? You were expected to answer these ques- tions and many more without becoming flustered and tongue-tied. There you sat on the edge of your chair with a straight back, legs together, palms sweaty, your head held high, and wearing your most sophisticated outfit. The ob- ject was to convince the interviewer that you were a great prospect. But the super-ego necessary to give this impres- sion had managed to escape you. Glancing at the clock, you realized the interview lasted only thirty minutes. It seemed to be hours. Interviews were just part of job hunting. Before the inter- view, you spent hours filling in applications and writing a resume. The Career Planning Office helped by holding seminars on interviews and how to write a resume. They also invited firms to the campus to interview students inter- ested in the firm. Graduate schools also sent representatives to interview prospective students . These interviews were just as nerve-racking as the others. Interviews were not only an essential part of getting a job, but they could be informa- tive too. After hearing about the job, you might decide you were not interested in the job after all. Even if you got a refusal from the interviewer, you gained experience that would make the next interview easier. Elizabeth R. Nease — Psychology Alice L. Newton — Biology Mary Jane Norville — Political Science Lynn Oswald History Marybeth W. Nowell History — Political Science SENIORS 177 M. Paige Patton Psychology Virginia E. Philips German 178 SENIORS Realizing that graduation would soon arrive, Seniors were faced with the big question — what to do after leaving Agnes Scott. The days of graduation — straight to the kitchen no longer held true for most career minded Scott graduates. There were so many fields open to the liberal arts graduate — law, medicine, business, teach- ing. Seniors found themselves faced with a multitude of questions as they made future plans. " Is graduate schoo necessary? " " What will be my starting salary? " " Do I want to work in my hometown or move to a new exciting city? " A world of opportunities lie before the college graduate. But each person must evaluate the career choices and then choose the route that will best meet her personal objec- tives. BUSINESS NMOMEN M. Anita Plunkett Psychology Jible Religion, SENIORS 179 H. Anne Richardson Art Melody S. Porter Economics Bun E. Rabbit Population Control Wiinona K. Ramsaur — English Friendships at Agnes Scott College: spring breaks at Fort Lauderdale, Moes Joes on Thursday night, road trips to Georgia, laughing together over blind dates, rearranging the room five times, two hour procrastination periods in the dining hall, Krispy Kreme at 2:00 a.m., love jokes — papered rooms, cold water in the shower, undefin- able objects in your bed, surprise birthday parties, watching " Saturday Night Live " with each other on dateless Saturday nights, lending out your favorite kakis and loafers, kidnap parties to Manuels, introducing the faculty to Bunny on Friday afternoons, waking your roommate up for her 8:30, when your first class is at 12:00, Cheerful Cherubs, Bible Studies, knowing you ' re not alone, trying to solve the world ' s problems in that 8 to 12 study break, reminiscing. J Rebecca A. Robinson — Economics SENIORS 181 eniors often wonder what they are graduating from S or are graduating to. it is a time of leaving behind — things once tatcen for granted and approaching new experiences. A period of life is now over, and the graduate must stop to consider how she has changed over the years spent at Agnes Scott. She must evaluate her actions, her opinions, and decide whether or not she is pleased with what she has become, for it is not possible to have remained the same. The roll of parchment is handed her solemnly, as recognition of academic achievement. She alone can mea- sure the spiritual and intellectual growth attained in pursuit of that diploma. The embraces, the congratulations buffer the doubts pummeling her brain as she realizes it ' s all up to her now. There will be no more instruction, no study aids. The goal of education is to prepare the student for life; and graduation affirms the success of that education. The grad- uate will continue to learn, at times more from experience than from books. Some graduates have a plan for the rest of their lives, some have no idea what they will do tomorrow. But for all of them, there is the realization of doors shutting behind and opening before. Exhilurating, frightening and not always prepared for, there it is. The future for which we all change in the present. 182 SENlORS Mary Anna Smith — Art M. Susan Smith Chemistry — English Paula Starr Psychology Sally J. Stamper English — Psychology Rebekah G. Strickland — English very student looked forward to that wonderful day when she would finally be through with school. Life would be so different — no more studying until two or three in the morning or spending weekends in the library researching a paper. She would not have to wait until Sun- day afternoon to ask a man into her home, and once he was there, she would be able to serve him something stronger than Coke to drink. At last there would be no more waiting in line for a shower in a community bathroom. But maybe some changes would not be for the better. She would have to do all the cooking and cleaning. She would have to file income tax returns. No matter what happened, after four years at Scott, it was time for a change. Mary Alice Vasilos — Psychology Susan L. Willoch History Kathryn S. White Psychology SENIORS 185 Catherine M. Winn English Susan E. Yannone Biology 186 SENIORS In Memoriam 1957-1977 An excerpt from the prayer given by Dr. Mary Virginia Allen: We lift up our souls to Thee this morning. We are con- fused and awed by the mystery of sudden death. Thou hast made each one of us in Thy likeness and breathed into us the breath of Thy own life. Thou hast given to each a portion of immortality. Therefore, with the light of Thy glory illumine our understanding, as we gather in this place to thank Thee for the life of Cathryn Crane. We bless Thee for forming her soul to seek Thee. We bless Thee for Thy hand upon her mind, making her eager for knowledge. We recognize the sacrifices she made in order to be able to continue her education. Comfort us with the certainity that Thou, and perhaps only Thou, didst know what she suffered and what work she had to accom- plish before her spirit could merge again with the spirit of her loving Creator. Give us the assurance that in Thy hands were the threads of her life. In the quietness of Thy presence grant us the realization that here on this earth we have no abiding place, that a thousand years in Thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past and that Thou, who knowest the hairs on our head art also the One who keepeth the stars in their place. Make us willing to leave Cathryn in Thy loving care, assured that Thy love for this. Thy child, is far greater than the love of her family and friends for her. Stephanie A. Zipperer — Psychology Christina Wong — Biology The staff appreciates your support of the following advertisers who have helped make possible the 1978 SILHOUETTE. Ysamool CONKMY 1312 DICKSON HIGHWAY CLARKSVILLE, TENNESSEE 37040 Dan Troy PUBLICATIONS CONSULTANT 1752 EAST BANK DRIVE MARIETTA, GEORGIA 30067 (404) 993-1578 (HOME) 872-7066 (OFFICE) JJecaiur JOaL eri 1 1 2 Clairmont avbnub DECATUR, GlOROIA 30030 CONYERS BRANCH: 922-5384 DICATUR: 378-1B1C 3 Stores to Serve you in Metro Atlanta • Decatur — 701 Church St. 377-4231 • Buckhead — 3330 Piedmont 233-1968 • Chamblee Plaza Sh. Cntr. 451-0104 The savings on his toes. DECATUR FEDERAL SAYINGS Get theMsavings bug. ' m . DECATUR INN 921 CHURCH ST. DECATUR, GA. 30030 378-3125 ATHEN ' S PIZZA HOUSE 1369 Clairmont Rd. 636-1100 WATSON PHARMACY 309 E. College Ave. 373-1665 W % o .O ESATRH ■ G STUDIOS WEDDINGS • PORTRAITS • MY SPECIALTY COLLEGE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER r ii l, M. G. WILLIAMS, JR. PHOTOGRAPHER 5059 MEMORIAL DR. 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PIZZA BY CANDLELIGHT 303 E. COLLEGE AVE. DECATUR, GEORGIA CONGRATULATIONS and GOOD LUCK to the DAY STUDENT SENIORS Page Airheart Ellie Autry Alderman Jan Borum Ellen Brinks Karen Butler Ralee Gates Joyce Gant Trish Muggins Addie Mathis Lorraine Mixon Marybeth Nowell Winona Ramsaur Madelyn Redd Elaine Wilburn Compliments of Mr. Mrs. Pete Costarides OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR YOUR YEAR BOOK )i irtnmilk 9 THE NATIONS STUDIO Suite 1442 5266 Jimmy Carter Boulevard Norcross, Georgia 30093 (404) 449-3968 • 449-3987 Coke l)JM M io jumf that PfnAku- (Mm Jmm fuMx . i-Cola ana Co % The World Of Travel Is AWorld Of Pleasure EXECUTIVE TRAVEL, INC. HOW MUCH DOES A TRAVEL AGENT COST YOU? USUALLY NOTHING. HE SAVES YOU MONEY! 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Yates, Jr. Judge and Mrs. James H. Nease Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Newton Dr. and Mrs. Michael E. Yannone Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hedric Dr. and Mrs. M.G. Middleton Harwell Huggins Mr. and Mrs. John Clarke Carr, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Lynwood Johnson Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Hatcher Mr. and Mrs. Walter L. Fitch Mrs. George Bartholomew Hugh L. Johnson Tanner ' s of South Carolina Mr. and Mrs. A.C. Briley, Jr. Captain and Mrs. R.L. Cochrane Mr. and Mrs. J. Pfeiffe r, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. George M. Scott Henry Howard Smith Student Index Adams, Donna Ruth, ' 80 — 91, 142 Airheart, Anita Page, 78 — 82, 158 Alderman, Ellie Autry, 78 — 158 All, Mary Ellen, ' 81 — 85, 134 Allen, Grace Casburn 78 — 106, 108, 159 Anderson, Helen Ruth ' 81 — 17, 100, 134 Arant, Mary Elizabeth, ' 80 — 142 Armour, Martha Leigh, ' 81 — 134 Arnzen, Patricia Anee, ' 80 — 106, 142 Arthur, Sarah Nelson, ' 78 — 159 B Baibona, Virginia Maria, ' 81 — 134 Ballard, Deborah Irene, ' 79 — 76, 150 Bannen, Gudrun Alison, ' 80 — 142 Banyar, Diane Hope, ' 78 — 84, 86, 132, 154 Barbot, Candace Benita, ' 81 — 134 Barefoot, Suzanne Dunn, ' 80 — 150 Barnes, Susan Sanders, ' 81 — 134 Barnhill, Sandra Kay, ' 81 — 89, 133 Barthol omew, Judith Anne, ' 78 — 73, 80, 81, 94, 159 Beaudoin, Diane Marie, ' 79 — 69, 105, 108, 150 Beck, Catherine Elizabeth, ' 80 — 84, 142 Belk, Elizabeth Eve, ' 79 — 93, 151 Bell, Glenda Revecca, ' 79 — 151 Bequillard, Maria Lydia, ' 81 — 134 Berry, Leslie Gayle, ' 81 — 100, 104, 134 Best, Melanie Sue, ' 79 — 67, 80, 105, 151 Beswick, Lisa Ann, ' 80 — 76, 104, 142 Bethune, Susan Kathleen, ' 79 — 86, 80, 100, 151 Beysselance, Katherine Fern, ' 81 — 135 Birtch, Maureen A.E., ' 79 — 75, 77, 79, 80, 151 Blessing, Betty Diane, ' 81 — 135 Blount, Janet Anita, ' 78 — 79, 89, 159 Boelter, Debbie Jean, ' 80 — 142 Bonta, Katherine Kelly, ' 81 — 91, 135 Booch, Evelyn Margaret, ' 80 — 142 Boone, Kathryn Vallarie, ' 79 — 151 Booth, Marguerite Anne, ' 78 — 75, 76, 80, 81, 98, 100, 159 Borck, Brigitta Gabriele, ' 80 — 90, 91, 99, 142 Borum, Jan Celeste, ' 78 — 160 Boushell, Kathleen Marie, ' 80 — 142 Boyd, Laura Giles, ' 79 — 104, 151 Bradley, Janet Marie, ' 79 — 151 Bradley, Leisa Daren, ' 81 — 135 Brayton, Brenda Alice, ' 80 — 142 Breitling, Melissa Amelia, ' 81 — 91, 132 Briley, Helen Eugenia, ' 78 — 160 Brinks, Ellen, ' 78 — 161 Broadwell, Bette Williams, ' 79 — 105, 151 Brock, Nancy Louise, ' 81 — 135 Brooks, Joy Wynell, ' 80 — 106, 142 Brovk n, Severely Elaine, ' 78 — 86, 161 Brown, Cheryl Lynn, ' 80 — 67, 77 , 142 Brown, Mary Gracey, ' 78 — 84, 82, 161 Brown, Sal! -Xnne, ' 80 — 142 Brown, Sheri Gay, ' 80 — 78, 99, 142 Bryan, Darby Dale, ' 81 — 79, 135 Bryan, Mary Anna, ' 80 — 86, 100, 142 Buchanan, Margaret Lynn, ' 78 — 67, 161 Burdette, lla Leola, ' 81 — 86, 135 Burns, Celeste Elizabeth, ' 81 — 67, 108, 135 Burson, Sandra Anne, ' 80 — 79, 105, 132, 142 Burson, Susan Elaine, ' 78 — 76, 161 Burtz, S. Rebecca, ' 80 — 79, 142 Butler, Karen Michelle, ' 78 — 162 Byrd, Alma Virgina, ' 80 — 86, 142 Cameron, Elisabeth Lynn, ' 79 — 92, 94, 151 Campbell, Nancy, ' 80 — 92, 94, 100 Campbell, Sarah M., ' 81 — 103, 135 Camper, Cynthia Randolph, ' 78 — 162 Carpenter, Millie Jan, ' 81 — 135 Carr, Mary Catherine, ' 78 — 85, 162 Carter, Angela Marie, ' 79 — 99, 100, 106, 151 Carter, Celeste Helen L., ' 81 — 90, 135 Carter, Julie Rose, ' 80 — 142 Castro, Marie Evelyn, ' 81 — 86, 100, 108, 135 Gates, Ralee Ann, ' 78 — 94, 162 Chan, Shirley Kam-Yeap, ' 78 — 76, 80, 81, 90, 162 Chan, Wee-Leng, ' 81 — 135 Chapman, Carol Ruth, ' 81 — 135 Cheney, Louise Ross, ' 80 — 79, 142 Childress, Rebecca Claire, ' 78 — 163 Chiu, Cheng-Mei, ' 80 — 90 Cho, Kyujm, ' 80 — 100, 142 Cho, Winnie Kyu, ' 78 — 100, 163 Chupp, Lee Ann, ' 81 — 135 Chupp, Linda Diane, ' 79 — 151 Clark, Kimberely Jeanne, ' 80 — 143 Clifford, Leigh Ann, ' 81 — 103, 135 Coble, Kelley Ann, ' 81 — 135 Cochrane, Katharine McCaillie, ' 78 — 84, 162 Cohrs, Amy Jean, ' 80 — 142 Cole, Jeanne Marie, ' 81 — 132 Collins, Laurel Paxon, ' 80 — 104, 108, 142 Conyers, Margaret Wylding, ' 81 — 135 Cook, Sheryl Ann, ' 80 — 79, 143 Costarides, Marina Pete, ' 80 — 84, 105, 143 Cox, Suzanne Elizabeth, ' 79 — 66, 151 Craig, Catherine, ' 81 — 67, 103, 135 Cralle, Patricia Ann, ' 78 — 67, 80, 164 Crane, Theresa Elizabeth, ' 78 — 66, 164 Crawford, Donna, ' 79 — 98, 100, 151 Crook, Catherine Lynn, ' 79 — 71, 151 Crumbley, Carmen Elisabeth, ' 80 — 79, 82, 106, 142 Crutchfield, Cherol Carrere, ' 78 — 86, 164 Curnutt, Ann Elizabeth, ' 81 - 135 D Dachary, Marion, 91 Daniel, Deborah Ann, ' 79 — 94, 99, 100, 151 Daniel, Julie Ann, ' 79 — 151 Dantzler, Cynthia Gay, ' 80 — 79, 80, 108, 143 Davis, Mary Elizabeth, ' 79 — 164 Dayton, Rebecca Suzanne, ' 81 — 135 DeGrandi, Lisa Marie, ' 80 — 79, 132, 143 Denis, Veronica Mercedes, ' 80 — 143 Dickens, Laura Margaret, ' 81 — 79, 135 Dillard, Leslie Karen, ' 81 — 94, 136 Dillon, Lillian Leigh, ' 78 — 69, 106, 165 Docie, Kathryn Clair, ' 79 — 76, 99, 151 Dodd, Hiija Marja, ' 80 — 77, 143 Dodson, Wanda Susan, ' 80 — 100 Dollar, Susan Elizabeth, ' 81 — 136 Dorsey, Nancy Elizabeth, ' 81 — 136 Doyle, Leslie Anne, ' 79 — 84, 151 Driscoll, Jennifer Ann, ' 78 — 78, 165 DuBose, Mary Elizabeth, ' 81 — 136 Duncan, Barbara Lynn, ' 78 — 76, 85, 166 DuPont, Patricia Ann, ' 79 — 67, 80, 152 Durie, Rebecca Curry, ' 81 — 136 Easterlin, Lillian Carswell, ' 80 — 73, 103, 143 Edwards, Marilyn Sue, ' 78 — 106, 108, 166 Eichelberger, Sandra Elizabeth, ' 78 — 94, 99, 152 Elebash, Patricia Ann, ' 80 — 79, 94, 143 Ellington, Julie Ann, ' 81 — 136 Emrey, Margaret Hancock, ' 80 — 85, 98, 99, 100, 143 Enslow, Dorothea Bliss, ' 80 — 80, 82, 100 Ereken, Nilgun, ' 78 — 80, 90, 167 Evans, Cynthia Lou, ' 80 — 76, 143 Evans, Margaret Elizabeth, ' 80 — 94, 143 Fabisinski, Nancy Elizabeth, ' 80 — 77 , 105, 143 Fairburn, Sarah Ann, ' 80 — 106, 143 Fernandez, Gloria Maria, ' 80 — 108, 144 Fisher, Sue Ellen, ' 78 — 80, 167 Fitch, Katheryn Craig, ' 78 — 104, 167 Fitzgerald, Vicki Lee, ' 80 — 79, 105, 144 Fleming, Angela, ' 79 — 67, 104, 152 Fowler, Sandra Lynn, ' 79 — 73, 80, 94, 152 Frank, Maile Ann, ' 80 — 144 Freeman, Joy Suzanne, ' 81 — 136 Furlow, Elizabeth Walton, ' 80 — 108, 144 Gallo, Maria Regina, ' 80 — 144 Gannon, Maryanne Elizabeth, ' 81 - 98, 136 Gant, Joyce Tarbox, ' 78 — 167 Garbutt, Marjorie Jeannine, ' 79 — 94, 152 Gardiner, Mary Beth, ' 79 — 93, 152 Garrison, Charlotte Alline, ' 81 — 136 Garrison, Lesley Glenn, ' 79 — 106, 152 Gary, Judith Burns, ' 79 — 152 Gee, Nanette Larue, ' 80 — 144 Gerhardt, Elizabeth Morton, ' 81 — 79, 136 Getchell, Anne Riviere, ' 78 — 82, 167 Giles, Jennifer Louise, ' 81 — 136 Gjelstad, Kari — 90 Gledhill, Susan Gwen, ' 79 — 77, 100, 106, 152 Goerler, Amanda Jane, ' 81 — 136 Gonsalves, Alexandria Yolanda, ' 81 — 136 Gorgus, Carol Anne, ' 81 — 136 Graham, Elenor, ' 79 — 152 Grams, Susan Claire, ' 80 — 144 Graves, Pamela, ' 80 — 77, 79, 144 Gray, Ann Eleanor, ' 80 — 144 Griffin, Lisa Dail, ' 79 — 168 Griffin, Nancy Lee, ' 81 — 79, 136 Griffith, Hannah Mayling, ' 81 — 99, 100, 136 Griner, Anne Christopher, ' 79 — 82, 152 Groover, Andrea Kathryn, ' 79 — 67, 108, 152 Gzechowicz, Nancy Kimverely, 79 — 69, 152 H Hakanson, Judith Ellen, ' 81 — 136 Haley, Grace Freeman, ' 80 — 85, 94, 144 Hall, Claire Elaine, ' 79 — 108, 152 Ham, Susan Elizabeth, ' 80 — 67, 106, 144 Haiiton, Susan Paige, ' 81 — 136 Hammer, Karol Ruth, ' 79 — 152 Hampton, Cynhia Marie, ' 80 — 144 Handly, Katherine Ann, ' 79 — 82, 152 Hansen, Sanne Lindhardt — 144 Hanson, Laura Jeanne, ' 80 — 77 , 94, 106, 144 Harber, Carolyn Lee, ' 80 — 105, 144 Hardy, Melanie, ' 80 — 67, 79, 80, 145 Harris, Mary Catherine, ' 78 — 79, 80, 168 Harris, Sarah Anne, ' 80 — 91, 108, 145 Harris, Susan Elizabeth, ' 80 — 98, 145 Hatcher, Sharon Ruth, ' 78 — 169 Hatfield, Agnes Kemper, ' 80 — 80, 100, 132, 145 Hawley, Elizabeth Faison, ' 80 — 106, 145 Hebert, Mary Elizabeth, ' 81 — 136 Heffron, Katherine Susan, ' 81 — 136 Hellender, Karen Arlene, ' 81 — 136 Hicks, Lucy Bullock, ' 78 — 73, 80, 169 Higgins, Deborah Gay, ' 81 — 136 Highland, Ellen Brennan, ' 80 — 145 Hill, Helen Elizabeth, ' 79 — 71, 152 Hill, Mary Anne, ' 80 — 100, 145 Hillman, Terry Ann, ' 81 — 136 Hinckley, Valerie Eve, ' 79 — 152 Hoffman, Ruth Beckley, ' 80 — 91, 105, 145 Holland, Elizabeth Gordon, ' 79 — 152 Hollywood, Kathleen Patrica, ' 80 — 77 , 80, 92, 145 Holmes, Emily Druilhet, ' 78 — 75, 77 , 80, 81, 92, 94, 99, 169 Hooper, Lygia Roz, ' 80 — 145 Houy, Cheryl Lynn, ' 78 — 75, 77, 169 Huebsch, Laurie Kathleen, ' 81 — 73, 136 Huffines, Ann Delta, ' 80 — 77, 100, 145 Huggins, Patricia Emily, ' 78 — 67, 68, 169 Hunter, Ellen Earle, ' 79 — 153 Hunter, Sarah Ellen — 94 Hutcheson, Martha Lynn, ' 79 — 71 J Jackson, Christine Margaret, ' 81 — 137 Jeffrey, Jodie Elizabeth, ' 80 — 79, 106, 145 Jenkins, Elizabeth Landrum, ' 80 — 153 Jewett, Beth Anne, ' 81 — 100, 137 Johnson, Carol Dee, ' 78 — 92, 170 Johnson, Caye Elizabeth, 79 — 106, 153 Johnson, Christy Lyn, ' 78 — 84 Johnson, Lisa Hope, ' 80 — 145 Johnson, Rebecca Lee, ' 78 — 93, 170 Johnson, Robin Gail, ' 80 — 145 Johnston, Julie Lynn, ' 79 — 76, 99, 100, 154 Jones, Anne Curtis, ' 79 — 79, 106, 153 Jones, Beverley Coltrane, ' 80 — 79, 145 Jordan, Susan Faye, ' 78 — 171 Julian, Andrea Glenn, ' 80 — 105, 145 K Kean, Yin Phing, ' 81 — 90, 103 Kelley, Janet Elizabeth, ' 78 — 85, 170 Kemp, Sandra Dea, ' 80 — 91, 145 Keon, Mary Ann, ' 80 — 145 Kessler, Robin Elaine, ' 79 — 69, 85, 90, 154 Kidd, Susan Audrey, ' 78 — 73, 80, 81, 170 Kiefer, Priscilla Jane, ' 81 — 137 Kiel, Lillian K., ' 79 — 85 Kinzer, Donna Lee, ' 81 — 137 Kirby, Evelyn Louise, ' 79 — 93, 154 Kirkland, Kay, ' 79 — 76, 86, 106, 154 Kitts, Rita Gayle, ' 79 — 103, 155 Klettner, Laura Hays, ' 81 — 133, 137 Knight, Jennifer Ann, ' 80 — 94, 99, 100, 145 Knight, Margaret Stiles, ' 78 — 79, 171 Koon, Denise Marie, ' 79 — 155 Kouts, Maribeth Madeline, ' 80 — 99, 100, 145 Kouts, Nanette Maria, ' 79 — 79, 155 Kramer, Laurel Ann, ' 79 — 104, 106, 108, 155 Kulick, Karen, ' 79 — 155 Laboureur, Marlene M., ' 78 — 172 Lamade, Elizabeth Hope, ' 78 — 99, 100, 172 Lamb, Deni-Lynn, ' 79 — 69, 84, 108, 155 Lamberson, Mary Margaret, ' 78 — 80, 85, 103, 172 Lancaster, Christiana, ' 80 — 132, 145 Landers, Susan Joanne, ' 80 — 145 Lane, Catherine Aurora, ' 80 — 79, 106, 145 Lapp, Janet Raye, ' 80 — 145 Larsen, Laramie Leigh, ' 80 — 67, 84, 92, 106, 146 Lass, Teresa Lee, ' 80 — 103, 146 Lassetter, Elizabeth Ann, ' 80 — 146 Law, Alison Vanmetre, ' 81 — 92, 137 Layden, Teresa Ann, ' 81 — 79, 105, 137 Lee, Beng-Sim, ' 80 — 90 Lee, Lisa Ann, ' 80 — 91, 94, 146 Lee, Virginia Louise, ' 79 — 80, 98, 99, 100, 155 Lipscomb, Mary Lynn, ' 78 — 77, 85, 94, 172 Loeb, Joan Hance, ' 80 — 105 Logan, Linda Applewhite, ' 79 — 92, 155 Long, Kimberly Lane, ' 80 — 105, 146 Long, Rhea Genyne, ' 79 — 85, 105, 155 Loo, Chu-Kee, ' 81 — 90, 137 Looi, Kok-Weay, ' 80 — 90, 91 Looi, Kok-Yean, ' 81 — 90 Lovvorn, Martha Waters, ' 78 — 69, 80, 81, 100, 172 Ludvigsen, Joyce, ' 81 — 108, 137 Lye, Choy-Lean, ' 81 — 90 M Maitland, Sharon Lynn, ' 80 — 66, 79, 84, 105 Mandel, Barbara Jo, ' 80 — 69, 77, 79, 105, 106, 146 Mann, Melissa Jane, ' 81 — 158 Manning, Katharine Barton, 78 — 67, 80, 81, 175 Manus, Sharon Laquita, ' 81 — 138 Mappus, Mary Ann, ' 80 — 104, 146 Margolis, Karen D., ' 79 — 155 Marshall, Sarah Scott, ' 79 — 175 Mathes, Addie Price, ' 78 — 174 McCann, Catherine Reed, ' 79 — 155 McColl, Linda Anne, ' 79 — 155 McCord, Laura Lee, ' 79 — 155 McCrary, Laura Lee, ' 81 — 138 McCullough, Susan Rollins, ' 78 — 75, 76, 80, 173 McCunniff, Kathleen Anne, ' 81 — 82, 104, 138 McDonald, Janet Ann, ' 80 — 146 McDonald, Laura Marie, ' 78 — 103, 85, 173 McDonald, Lynda Marie, ' 81 — 79, 138 McDonald, Susan E., ' 81 — 138 McFerrin, Julia Holloway, ' 79 — 71, 80, 100, 132, 155 McGaughey, Martha Patterson, ' 81 — 100, 138 McGreevy, Marion Elizabeth, ' 80 — 79 Mclnnis, Linda, ' 79 — 94 McLauchlin, Catherine Jones, ' 78 — 100, 174 McLemore, Wanda Emma, ' 78 — 67, 175 McNeill, Mary Catherine, ' 81 — 100, 138 McQuillan, Maureen Miller, ' 81 — 138 McWilliams, Jenny Elizabeth, ' 80 — 94, 99, 146 Meadows, Melanie Ann, ' 79 — 155 Merkert, Wendy Anne, ' 81 — 138 Merrifield, Lisa Lynn, ' 81 — 76, 99, 139 Merrifield, Melanie Ann, ' 81 — 139 Middleton, Jennifer Jane, ' 78 — 94, 175 Miller, Deborah Lynn, ' 81 — 77, 139 Miller, Judith K., ' 78 — 175 Mitchell, Susan Elizabeth, ' 81 — 139 Mixon, Larraine Kay, ' 78 — 176 Mobley, Kathryn Ann, ' 81 — 139 Molegonda, Niranjani Shariya, ' 81 — 90 Moore, Emily, ' 80 — 79, 89, 146 Moore, Linda Elizabeth, ' 80 — 92, 99, 146 Moore, Pamela Jean, ' 81 — 103, 105, 139 Mosgrove, Elizabeth Ann, ' 80 — 79, 92, 104, 146 Mosley, Karen Jennie, ' 81 — 79, 89, 139 Murphy, Keller Leigh, ' 80 — 67, 80, 104, 105, 146 Mynatt, Pamela Deborah, ' 81 — 139 N Neal, Sally Rebecca, ' 80 — 105, 106, 108, 146 Nease, Elizabeth Ruth, ' 78 — 80, 82, 176 Nelson, Nancy Alexander, ' 81 — 106, 139 Newsome, Laura Dupre, ' 81 — 79, 139 Newton, Alice Louisa, ' 78 — 177 Nichols, Cheryl Celeste, ' 80 — 103 Nichols, Rosalie, ' 79 — 84, 155 Nicol, Susan French, ' 81 — 66, 98, 100, 139 Norton, Elisa Anne, ' 80 — 77, 104, 108, 146 Norville, Mary Jane, ' 78 — 75, 80, 103, 177 Nystrom, Jennifer Louise, ' 81 — 139 o Obermier, Mary Ann, ' 80 — 91, 146 O ' Brien, Kathleen Ann, ' 78 — 78, 177 Oliver, Julie Anne, ' 81 — 139 Ooi, Cheng-Suan, ' 80 — 90, 91 O ' Quinn, Monica Susan, ' 81 — 139 Oswald, Lynne, ' 78 — 69, 177 Overman, Carol Leslie, ' 78 — 178 Ozburn, Rebecca Calhoun, ' 80 — 103, 155 Pantazopoulos, Elaine, ' 78 — 91, 178 Patton, Barbara Massey, ' 81 — 139 Patton, Mary Paige, ' 78 — 67, 80, 81, 178 Payton, Rebecca Jean, ' 80 — 79, 91, 146 Perez, Lucille, ' 81 — 108, 139 Perez, Mari M. ' 79 — 105, 155 Perez, Rose Marie, ' 80 — 79, 82, 146 Perrin, Shannon Elizabeth, ' 81 — 139 Perry, Anne Hall, ' 79 — 67, 69, 80, 84, 108, 155 Perry, Paula Lynne, ' 80 — 78, 103, 146 Pervis, Carolyn Elizabeth, ' 79 — 108, 155 Peters, Cynthia Ann, ' 78 — 80, 86, 178 Petersen, Diane Elizabeth, ' 79 — 79, 89, 156 Peterson, Laura Lynn, ' 79 — 104, 156 Petty, Carol Lee, ' 81 — 139 Pfeiffer, Margaret Webb, ' 79 — 76, 80, 106, 107, 108, 156 Philips, Virgina Dickson, ' 81 — 98, 99, 133, 139 Philips, Virginia Elizabeth, ' 78 — 67, 80, 81, 104, 178 Pirkle, Marjorie Anne, ' 80 — 106, 108 Pittman, Sharon Dianne, ' 78 — 106, 179 Plunkett, Marilyn Anita, ' 78 — 100, 179 Poole, Ellen Sheppard, ' 79 — 104, 156 Porter, Melody S., ' 78 — 180 Prieto, Ana M., ' 80 — 146 Propst, Barbara Norton, ' 79 — 156 Pyles, Vicki Lynn, ' 80 — 146 Rabbit, Bun E., ' 78 — 180 Ramsaur, Winona Krby, ' 78 — 181 Rawls, Lucia Wren, ' 81 — 94, 106, 139 Redd, Madelyn Claire, ' 78 — 180 Reid, Mary Elizabeth, ' 79 — 78, 79, 94, 156 Relyea, Ruth Ann, ' 81 — 93, 105, 139 Richards, Donna Lynn, ' 79 — 92, 156 Richardson, H. Anne, ' 78 — 106, 180 Richardson, Susan Melody, ' 81 — 139 Risher, Virginia Varn, ' 79 — 80, 84, 86, 106, 156 Roberts, Malinda Stutts, ' 81 — 139 Robertson, Christina Marie, ' 80 — 67, 84, 105, 146 Robinson, Marcia Kim, ' 80 — 146 Robinson, Rebecca Ann, ' 78 — 181 Rogers, Nancy Elizabeth, ' 79 — 82, 98, 104, 156 Rowell, Katherine Frances, ' 81 — 92, 139 Rowland, Tracy Romaine, ' 80 — 89, 92, 147 Ruddell, Shannon Jean, ' 79 — 156 Ruddell, Thelma Fay, ' 78 — 80, 108, 180 Somers, Margaret Rose, ' 80 — 76, 104, 147 Sparks, Dawn, ' 81 — 140 Spencer, Aria Lee, ' 79 — 73, 99, 156 Spencer, Jennifer Lynn, ' 80 — 73, 80, 91, 99, 147 Splawn, Joanna Marie, ' 80 — 147 Spratt, Gwendolyn Dahl, ' 80 — 68 Springer, Patricia Ann, ' 81 — 140 Stamper, Sally Jackson, ' 78 — 71, 103, 183 Starnes, Paula Chareece, ' 79 — 106, 156 Starr, Paula, ' 78 — 86, 183 Starrett, Cynthia Dawn, ' 80 — 103, 147 Stearns, Katherine, ' 81 — 140 Steele, Elizabeth Dotson, ' 81 — 94, 140 Stewart, Renee Cecile, ' 79 — 156 Stone, Gertrude Oehmig, ' 79 — 75 Stonecypher, Lynn Pace, ' 81 — 99, 140 Strain, Janet Denise, ' 80 — 147 Strickland, Rebekah Gibson, ' 78 — 81, 184 Sturkie, Susan Ann, ' 79 — 82, 156 Suarez, Lillian Milagros, ' 81 — 140 Suggars, Christine, ' 81 — 94 Sutton, Kathryn Adams, ' 80 — 147 Tan, Lee Kiang, ' 81 — 90, 140 Tan, Wool Yi, ' 81 — 90, 140 Tanner, Melinda D., ' 79 — 156 Tapper, Karen Lee, ' 81 — 94, 140 Taylor, Allison Inez, ' 80 — 77, 148 Taylor, Ethel English, ' 80 — 67, 79, 80, 148 Teh, Guat Bee, ' 81 — 90, 140 Terry, Penny Jo, ' 79 — 157 Thomason, Katrina Clifford, ' 79 — 103, 157 Thompson, Janice Lynn, ' 80 — 148 Thompson, Joyce Barbara, ' 81 — 91, 93, 140 Thomson, Beverely Leigh, ' 80 — 148 Thomson, Cynthia Louise, ' 81 — 140 Tiniacos, Maria, ' 80 — 90, 148 Tiniacos, Zoy, ' 81 85, 140 Toms, Sarah Elizabeth, ' 81 — 100, 140 Townsend, Marietta Irene, ' 81 — 91, 93, 100, 140 Tucker, Mary Louise, ' 79 — 67, 157 Tucker, Patricia Anne, ' 80 — 92, 103, 148 Tucker, Susan Marie, ' 80 — 76, 79, 80, 148 Tyson, Jane Franklin, ' 81 — 140 Ward, Casidy Ann, ' 80 — 79, 104, 106, 108, 148 Washington, Dixie Lee, ' 80 — 77, 84, 108, 149 Watkins, Crystal Cecilia, ' 80 — 67, 89, 100, 149 Watson, Catherine Louise, ' 81 — 141 Webster, Karen Stacy, ' 81 — 105, 141 Weinstein, Betty Jo — 94 Welch, Susan Hayes, ' 81 — 141 Wells, Elizabeth May, ' 79 — 80, 132, 157 Wendt, Catherine McGregor, ' 81 — 141 White, Kathryn S., ' 78 — 185 Widener, Marianne Johnson, ' 79 — 103, 157 Wilburn, Elaine Cooper, ' 78 — 185 Wilkie, Susan Raye, ' 80 — 149 Willey, Carol Ann, ' 80 — 149 Williams, Jennifer Denise, ' 80 — 108, 149 Willoch, Susan Louise, ' 78 — 185 Wilson, Anna Lisa, ' 80 — 149 Windham, Sarah Caroline, ' 79 — 73, 80, 91, 103, 157 Winn, Catherine Marie, ' 78 — 78, 80, 81, 186 Winn, Susan Elizabeth, ' 81 — 141 Wolter, Krista Joy, ' 80 — 86, 106, 108, 149 Wong, Christina, ' 78 — 86, 187 Wong, Terri, ' 81 — 82, 141 Workman, Sarah Weems, ' 78 — 75, 85, 104, 108, 186 Worthey, Lisa Kay, ' 79 — 71, 93, 106, 157 Wyatt, Donna Faye, ' 79 — 85, 105, 157 Yannone, Susan Eileen, ' 78 — 186 Yarbrough, Lu Ann, ' 79 — 157 Yates, Nancy Maurine, ' 78 — 186 Yeoh, Bee Chin, ' 80 — 90, 91 Yeoh, Nellie Poh-Lin, ' 81 — 90, 106, 141 Yoshimura, Debra Namoi, ' 81 — 141 Zarkowsky, Katherine Louise, ' 80 — 99, 100, 149 Zeller, Carol Gay, ' 78 — 103, 186 Zipperer, Stephanie Ann, ' 78 — 186 Sanders, Patricia Diann, ' 80 — 94, 156 Sanson, Donna, ' 79 — 156 Scott, Jennifer, ' 78 — 66, 106, 107, 182 Segars, Stephanie Anne, ' 81 — 140 Seitter, Margaret Mitchell, ' 80 — 11 , 79, 80, 104, 106, 147 Shaw, Shari Diane, ' 81 — 79, 140 Sheffield, Emily Claire, ' 80 — 156 Sheppard, Martha Thomson, ' 81 — 140 Sherrill, Mary-Carroll, ' 80 — 92, 104, 147 Singleton, Crystal Lynn, ' 79 — 11 , 79, 89, 156 Small, Dacia r,orita, ' 79 — 76, 80, 82, 89, 91, 156 Smith, Janet Rae, ' 81 — 140 Smith, Judith Ann, ' 80 — 147 Smith, Mary Anna, ' 78 — 85, 182 Smith, Mary Susan, ' 78 — 73, 80, 183 Smith, Nancy Kathryn, ' 78 — 81, 183 Smith, Sharon Lynn, ' 78 — 82, 106, 183 Uceda, Cora Elizabeth, ' 81 — 148 V Valentine, Christina, ' 81 — 140 Van Vieck, Susi Lynn, ' 79 — 157 Vasilos, Mary Alice, ' 78 — 84, 184 Velasco, Maria Lenor, ' 81 — 90, 140 W Walker, Cheryl Denise, ' 80 — 79, 89, 148 Wall, Susan Thorp, ' 81 — 140 Walters, Cathy D., ' 78 — 185 Walters, Elizabeth Ann, ' 78 — 185 Wannamaker, Luci Neal, ' 81 — 108, 141 Wannamaker, Susan Claire, ' 81 — 91, 141 THAT ' S LIFE THAT ' S LIFE 201 Jimmy Carter began his first term as President of the United States. Peace in the Middle East seemed possible when President Anwar Sadat of Egypt visited Prime Minister Menahem Begin of Israel in Jerusalem. Elizabeth II, in her Silver Jubilee, celebrated her twenty-fifth year as Queen of England. Two 747 airplanes crashed on the ground at a Tenerife airport, killing 577 people. Bert Lance, budget director for Jimmy Carter, was forced to resign because of question- able banking practices. Devastating blizzards and fuel shortages combined to make the winter of 1977 one of the worst in history. Gary Gilmore, a mass killer, after much debate was executed by a firing squad. During the summer, a blackout left New York City without electricity for 25 hours. David Berkowitz, better known as ' Son of Sam, ' was arrested for killing six young people. The deaths of four well-known entertainers — Groucho Marx, Bing Crosby, Elvis Presley, and Charlie Chaplin were mourned throughout the country. George Willig climbed the side of the World Trade Center. In horse racing, Seattle Slew won the Triple Crown. Atlanta ' s Ted Turner, skipper of the Courageous, won the Americas Cup in sailing. The movie of the year, STAR WARS, reintroduced fun at the movies and made R2D2, C3PO, and Darth Vader stars. Mmmlmnmh 202 THAT ' S LIFE - fLAlNS CEdi OCTOBER 31, " THE DOUBLE McGUFFIN " " I FILMED AT AGNES SCOTT For a change of pace, during Winter Quarter, Agnes Scott got a taste of Hollywood as Mulberry Square Productions of Dallas filmed a portion of a movie on the Scott campus. The movie was " The Double McGuffin, " a mystery tale involving lost money, a dead body, and a plot to assassinate a Prime Minister of a foreign country. Hike Sommer played the Prime Minister, while Ernest Borgnine portrayed the villain. Agnes Scott, representing a Virginia boarding school, was where Miss Sommer ' s daughter attended school. Several members of the Scott campus community got walk-on parts in the movie, much to the student-body ' s excitement. Joe Camp, of " Benji " and " Hawmps " fame, wrote, directed, and produced the movie. His crew was on campus for a total of five days, providing a less- than-usual diversion during the mid-term crunch. Throughout the filming, crowds of students watched Hollywood in action as cameras were moved, make-up was applied, scenes were rehearsed (and rehearsed, and rehearsed), and the actual footage was shot with precision lighting and camera work. Many students in Winship were forced, for the sake of stardom, to either forfeit their rooms to Hollywood, o r accept the black-out curtains that technology required in order to achieve just the right amount of light for that scene. Other students in Walters were told to stay either in or out of their rooms from 11 PM until 3 AM as filming took place: even the slight opening of doors on the south side of the building would affect filming. Main was used in a similar manner, and the gym acquired a " new " front arch for the sake of the film. Agnes Scott was chosen for the movie because it looked more like a Virginia boarding school than any in Virginia, as well as providing the angle shots that Camp wanted. The action was sup- posed to take place in the early Fall, which posed problems when one considers that it was mid-January in Georgia. It was especially cold during the filming, and the actors and actresses found it necessary to wear long underwear under their Fall costumes. The largest problem proved to be the mist in the air from the actors ' breath. This problem was finally solved when the actors held their breath, and these portions were filmed in fifteen second segments. Overall, the introduction to Hollywood proved to be a diversion in the monotony of Winter and a learning experience that is rare even on a liberal arts campus. " SCOTT SHO S, " a photography c(witei ' for members of tm Agnes Scott Camp " " was sponsored joii by the SILHOUETT the Admissions Offi Alumnae Office, anc Office of Public Rela. The winners were: i Best in Show: Carolyn , shown on this page. First Place: Carolyn Per ' ' , (Faces) Second lace: Lisa Lee (H, Honorable Mention: Laura Hanson (Faces) Ellen All (Dorm Life) Laura Hanson (Dorm Life) m , -s m te f l aryMA allace Kirk Miss Mary Wallace Kirk, a member of the Board of Trustees of Agnes Scott College, died January 30, 1978, in her Tuscumbia, Alabama home. Born in 1889, the same year that Agnes Scott was founded. Miss Kirk was a graduate of the class of 1911, and was elected to the Board in 1917, her term having spanned the administrations of all four Agnes Scott presidents. She also served two terms as president of the Alumnae Association, from 1921-24. Miss Kirk was a poet and an artist of note, many of her works having been published in newspapers and anthologies. In 1937, she won the Silv Loving Cup of Poetry from the Alabama Poetry Soerety for her collection entitled THE S UM OF LIVING. In 1975, the Alumnae. Association presented Miss Kirk with the Distinguished Service Award for her creative vision and sustained service to the college. THAT ' S LIFE 207 208 THAT ' S LIFE THAT ' S LIFE 209 1 ' an M r % M. ' cluster of my clii n|s but |oj|Fisi collec -. tion of our mmi ies. This 1978 SIL- HOUETTE has be ....... the unified efforti and ' staff, to whom j am indebted f( their patience, diligence, and reliabili There are sevecal frienflrvipo were oi standing — Peggy Pfeiffe or her qui yet unbending dependabijUy as Assoc, ate Editor, Pat Arnzen for her fantastic creations and lousy kes. Sue Edwards for her amazing adeptij ss in obtaining those last minute pmotograplfs, Sharon 4 Smith for her weekly Mtices and co- ordination of tR% senior section, Anai Jones for her persisteac and vvpy vv words, and Dan Troy, oul pibficatioas consultant, for is pa 0n advice and taking the aerial jSffiotographs. La , I must thank my colleagues on 3rd Main, as well as my parents and sister, Ellen for giving me that extra boost when neces- sary. ■ ' ' " ■ " As a staff, we have tried to pr vitally changing, yet tradkjonaf.. an entity,.Agnes Scott. I hope you ettjoy our 197 8 SILHOUH3JE. Cfc« 1-Trt_i ' i OSTsWS ysiiwooc


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