Agnes Scott College - Silhouette Yearbook (Decatur, GA)

 - Class of 1960

Page 1 of 224

 

Agnes Scott College - Silhouette Yearbook (Decatur, GA) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 224 of the 1960 volume:

Vwwi " r . ■ ' ■ ' 4P - ii V jc r ■ H v; : ' ::: : " rT i . ? . r. s LI m jllL Presented by The Student Body of Agnes Scott College Decatur, Georgia J The Face of the Campus ■n ' yMk .. ■- .y ' ■ 9w - ' ' S tL Ul Editor Carolyn Yvonne West Managing Editor Margaret Goodrich Business Manager Nain Stieglitz Ij 4P " ' -! 1 i _ -r " tj Vi rrr f; f( The 1960 Silhouette mSHIIF Introduction 1-7 FAU Features 18-32 Spirit 33-38 Classes 39-77 Advertisements 1 82-204 Annual Staff 205 Editor ' s Last Word 206 Features . Spirit Academics R 78-98 . 99-104 105-131 mm Features Spirit Organizations. 132-146 .147-154 155-181 Wf! ' MISS MELL ' S WISE JUDGMENT IS VALUED BY PARENTS WEEKEND STEERING COMMITTEE. 1960 Silhouette Is Proudly Dedicated to Miss Mell DR. ALSTON RECOGNIZES MISS MELL FOR UNTIRING SERVICE. The embodiment of intellectual achievement and dif ity Discernino; direction of Lecture Association Presenting social and economic theories Challenging advanced students to continue work in new wide open fields Leaving Agnes Scott a tradition and heritage of a meaningful search for knowledge — With admiration and sincere appreciation We dedicate the 1960 Silhouette To Miss Mildred Rutherford Mell. MISS MELL APTLY ARRANGES MEETINGS OF STUDENTS AND LECTURERS. BLACK CAT . . . picnic spirit on a rainy day . . . echoing chants . . . fried chicken and fruit punch . . . lines of class colors . . . joyfully now our voices ice raise . . . capricious kittens in an art gallery . . . introduc- tions under the elms . . . the feeling of accomplishment and warmth. ADMINISTRATIVE fT ARMTH . . . a hearty laugh icith those iiho care . . . morning coffee breaks when the line between professor and student is erased . . . the flow of ideas . . . the realization that perhaps u-e too have something to give . . . the door that ' s altiays open. ,-jS DORMITORY LIFE . . . echoing alarm clocks . . . the tooth brush brigade . . . the ravenous way a box of food from home is devoured . . . neverendinp noisy hours . . . surprise birthday parties ... a rasping fire alarm . . . conversation into the night ivith roommates. 10 DAY STUDENTS . . . the laughter of each one . . . cluttered shelves . . . coke bottles and cards on the desk . . . constant phone messages-. . . exodus to the Grill for 11 o ' clock luru-h . . . long afternoons ... a circle of chairs to be occupied again . . . " Bye, i an y — see you tomorrow. 11 MADAME PANDIT . . . " the gracious and beautiful lady " . . . exotic rationalism and sari-rlacl dignity . . . explosive issues treated with diplo- matic awareness . . . the link of understanding where two worlds meet . . . " and there ivill be no war " . . . a hand outstretched. $ % BLACKFRIARS . . . moment of intensity, an ish . . . actors living their parts . . . lights glaring on stage, but setting mood for audience . . . period costumes designed and made by meitibers . . . elaborate set — no trace of frantic assembling . . . tvhispers backstage in another icorld. 13 TENNIS . . . informality of classes ( " Hoic in the irorld arc you grip- ping that racket? " ) . . . practice and more practice ... a set played in late afternoon . . . ares, foot-faults, lobs . . . a pause at the icater foun- tain . . . another game or two ... a refreshing shouer in the gym. THE GRILL ... a short walk across the autumn campus, across the road and the railroad track . . . ten o ' clock coffee breaks and unicritten papers . . . the icarm smell of frying steaks ... a haven for rainv campus dates ■ • ■ bubble gum. 15 ■% ., . THE DAY exams bepan . . . that first carly-morninp look over the still, ichite face of the campus . . . the crunch of hoots on unblemished snow . . . iconder melting into child-like delight . . . the black slash of a tree trunk against the nhitc ground . . . the soft plopping as it began to melt. I.:.. ATLANTA AT NIGHT . . . touerins: building silhouetted against the pink haze . . . bright lights . . . a good movie ... a tasty pizza on a red checkered table cloth . . . Brahms at the Toicer and Dixieland at Hank and Jerry ' s . . . forgotten lessons. 17 I 4S. ' At ' ♦. V J ' ' m -t,- ' t v ' ' }-: . M: ■l . f ' V i i . " M . TlK iHllimplllllllin; i|»« M - - ;.:i- ' :- ; « .- ,-«-. •. v,«t l ■ :; . %? r ■ •ajb« - ' ' ei ' SNt " -«;«iN| :;ji i H?? S ' ' i k»i »fs ?a License plates from out of town Wondering eyes, uncertain smiles Luggage on the steps and walks. Another autumn. Blazers, scarfs; cold, pink faces Men raking leaves: The bluest skies; then endless rain And days creep by. Another fall, another year; Habits formed: the bad, the good Each to her own yet each has known The force of them ; These restless days; This fleeting fall. ( onisini± FEATURES: Orientation . . Investiture . . . Lectures . . . Blackfriars Black Cat . . . . . Fall Frolics SPIRIT: Hockey Spirit ... Pep Rallies . . . Swimming Meet . . . Exams . . . Vacation CLASSES: Seniors . . . Juniors . . . Sophomores . . . Freshmen . . . Mortar Board --.•- ' :«g it , -.u ' i ' H»n«i a rait iT giW HI ,:JI. m i Si h:r i Freshman moves in with the eager assistance of mother, dad, friend. IDEAS ON HONOR CLIMAX BUSY RETREAT. Orientation Introduces the THE WORK OF MANY minds ... the effort of many months . . . preparation, planning . . . and then the faces . . . once-brave parents peeping from behind clothes bags . . . poised assured upperclassmen — people in a hurry . . . faces, name tags, lines . . . hours of wait- ing for schedule committee, then the year ' s work plan- ned in a few short minutes . . . getting acquainted with Dr. Alston ... a friendly moment alone with Miss Scandrett . . . high ceilings, long halls . . . rooms piled high with suitcases and boxes ... a roommate ... a moment ' s privacy, a few tears . . . motion , . . screams of returning upperclassmen . . . sunlight on a new world. SMILES OF ANTICIPATION PREVAIL AS ROOMMATES MEET. PARENTS MEET ROOMMATE ' S FAMILY AND SHARE FIRST DAY ' S EXCITEMENT =« Baa M4E«H LEADING THE FIRST VESPERS, DR. ALSTON QUOTES SOME TRADITIONAL BIBLE PASSAGES. Wonders of College Life to Freshmen Scotties juniors and seniors bubbling with enthusiasm over plans and decisions from the retreat . . . faculty and staff with smiles of warmth and anticipation for everyone . . . calendars, l)ooks, welcomes . . . dressing up for teas to meet alumnae, ministers . . . hours of searching for and making costumes for varied rush parties . . . freshmen ' s first taste of whirl of college rush . . . the waiting for that promised phone call . . . campus organizations presenting their purpose to new students through parties, chapel programs . . . the first vespers . . . classes . . . motion . . . the work of many minds: Culmination for some, Orientation for many. TO REGISTER, SOPHOMORES CAMP OUT IN BUTTRICK FROM 4:30 TO 9:00. FRESHMEN ENCOUNTER TEACHERS— AND COOKIES— AT TEA 23 AN ELOQUENT CAT ANNOUNCES THE CLASS SKITS. MRS. MILLER RECALLS GOOD OLD DAYS AT AGNES SCOTT FOR HER CHERUB. Black Cat Songs, Spirit FRESHMAN TRIO ENTRANCES CROWD WITH THROBBING JAZZ. " I was not meant to suffer like this, ' asserts sophomores ' Washington. STRANGE WORDS: BLACK CAT . . . mystery . . anticipation . . . pieces of a puzzle falling slowly into place . . . rush, posters, tryouts . . . last-minute song practices, instructions, script revisions . . . the plunk of a ukelele . . . solemn presentation of class songs; ap- plause . . . lights from the stage seering darkness . . . Black Cat chorus : amateurs with touches of professional . . . white faces, black suits, gestures of a pantomine . . . Agnes Scott Gothic . . . Vallev Forge revisited, new variations on an old theme: talent show . . . curtain calls and roses ... a special announcement; exhilarated seniors . . . transfer of Black Cat spirit to new custodians of tradition . . . belonging to the mystery. EjanMamrffTT I ' 1 THIS ROW OF DANCING BRIGHT-EYED EGGHEADS ARE REALLY EAGER FRESHMEN Unite Campus Community BLACK CAT MEANS WE LOVE SCOTT AND THAT MEANS YOU. SMILING, BAREFOOT, AND HAPPY, ANNEKE LENDS AN EXOTIC AIR. SILENT MOVIE OF THE SENIOR CLASS REVEALS MOANING LISA ' S SECRET. ALL THE EDUCATED KNOW THERE ARE BUT TWO WORDS TO SUM IT ALL UP: GOOD GRIEF! Today ' ' Liftle Girls ' ' Put Away Thoughts of " BUT SIR, I ' M NOT ALLOWED TO TALK TO STRANGERS! " LITTLE GIRLS ' DAY . . . squeals of delight on the pre- dawn campus . . . roller skates and slippery floors . . . hop-scotch before class . . . drop-the-hanky after chapel . . . knee socks and hair ribbons ... a broken leg . . . the end of a playful day ... a sophisticated senior asleep with her arm around her teddy bear . . . perhaps for the last time. INVESTITURE ... a chilly golden morning . . . white columns and black robes . . . cameras clicking ... a solemn march across the quadrangle . . . Dr. Kline ' s talk to us . . . Miss Scandrett ' s smile ... a moment of tradition blending smiles and tears. " WELL, WE GIRLS DO HAVE A LITTLE BIT OF ENTERTAINMENT PLANNED. ' 26 HANDSHAKING PAPAS SHARE PRIDE IN THEIR " LITTLE GIRLS " AT THE TEA. Responsibility to Come NUMB SENIORS SWISH AMIDST PEERING FAMILIES AND SOPHS. MR. KLINE CHALLENGES SENIORS TO LIVE RESPONSIBLY. FINALLY " THE BIG MOMENT " IS SHARED BY EVERY SCOTT SENIOR. 27 Mme. Pandit, Miss Pepperdene, friend enjoy moment of informal humor during reception. India ' s Position, Arts Criticism, Economics Hub talks gave an opportunity for the exchange of ideas between Dr. Greene and Suellen. CARL SWISHER ANSWERS QUESTIONS FOR BUDDING POLITICAL SCIENTISTS, DR. GREENE ENJOYS A WARM MOMENT WITH STUDENT. 28 Brief moment to organize his vast material is welcomed by Dr. Carlson, economy expert. Today-Fall Lectures Span the World FALL LECTURES . . . the cool gentleness of a fall night . . . hushed voices in Gaines . . . " Lecture Association is happy to bring you — " " . . . fading horizons in world politics, the humanities, economics . . . charm of Madame Pandit, her awareness of her country and its role in the changing world, a fresh look at United States foreign policy through Asian eyes . . . Dr. Greene ' s ahility to reach every student ' s searching mind, philosophy from friendship to eternity . . . Dr. Reynold Carlson ' s guiding words that showed the importance of world-wide eco- nomic development . . . Carl B. Swisher on the Supreme Court . . . Dr. Downey on Byzantine art . . . questions, informality in Rebekah. FAITH, HOPE, AND CHARITY ARE POWERFULLY SYMBOLIZED BY THESE THREE. CLASSICAL SCHOLAR DOWNEY DISCUSSES ART FORMS. WHITE GLOVES, TAFFETA ADD ELEGANCE TO GYM. GUESS WHO TOLD THE JOKE. AND WHO DRANK COFFEE DURING THE PUNCH LINE. Fall Frolics High Spots Are Jazz, Dance, and Breakfast FALL FROLICS . . . posters and tickets on sale in the mailroom . . . swaying ladders and campus scenes in the gym ... a cloady day ' s grayness lifting with Hurricane Jackson ' s jazz combo in the Hub . . . dark suits and bright taffeta blending under an ivy-covered archway . . . introductions . . . snappy rock and roll, dreamy favorites . . . weary toes wiggling free of heels . . . the last dance . . . Agnes Scott ' s first midnight breakfast. WE HAD COKES AND DONUTS A LA AGNES SCOTT FOR BREAKFAST. HURRICANE JACKSON BLOWS VIOLENT STORM WITH SAXOPHONE. COSTUMING, STAGING CONTRIBUTE TO TOTAL EFFECT OF BLACKFRIAR ' S PLAY, " THE HEIRESS. ' Blackfriars ' First Drama of 59-60 is ' ' The Heiress ' BLACKFRIARS fall production " The Heiress " ... the culmination of weeks of intensive rehearsal, study and polishing by inspired actors and actresses . . . sweat, late hours for stage crew and committees ... a shouting stage manager ... a frantic costume seamstress . . . quiet instruction and illustration from Miss Winter . . . new hints each day from Miss Green . . . efforts climaxed by Friday night performance in Gaines chapel ... a " house " filled with amused, enraptured students and college guests . . . the pathetic drama of a naive heiress disillusioned by a fortune-hunting suitor . . . executed with precision and feeling. SUSPENSE BUILDS IN CATHERINE ' S INDECISIVE PAUSE With charac+erls-Hc coyness, Mrs. Pennlman talks to her niece, just returned from Europe. 31 ANN BROAD AND OTHER DANCERS GIVE THEIR OWN INTERPRETATION OFTHE NATIVITY DURING CHAPEL CHRISTMAS AI.GELS PAUSE BEFORE SINGING GLAD TIDINGS. Dr. Posey becomes twinkly-eyed Santa to capti- vate many exam-weary Scotties at campus party. Music, Dance, Santa High- light Campus Yule Spirit THE REAL MEANING of Christmas portrayed in song and dance . . . the Christmas story told by graceful, swaying bodies . . . angels arrayed in red and yellow, the shepherds . . . the magi in their splendor falling at Mary ' s feet in adoration . . . light over strife . . . peace over fear ... a brilliant stained glass window . . . " Gloria in Excelsis Deo " ... a joyous proclamation of the birth of the Savior . . . Santa Claus comes to community party . . . dark suits, foreign carols, coffee. 32 Sjiixit SOPHOMORES INTRODUCE FRESHMEN TO THE JOYS OF RELAXATION AND A GAME OF BRIDGE IN THE HUB— FUN. SPEED AND DEFT STICK PLAY ARE ESSENTIALS FOR HOCKEY PLAYERS. Fall Finds Campus Voicing Pep in Dorms, Hub and Field LUSTY, PINK-CHEEKED . . . spirit of fall . . . leaves crunching and lungs aching with cold . . . cheers ringing in the quadrangle or Hub ... a swaying circle in the dim light . . . class songs, school songs . . . " Nineteen- sixty, here we come! " . . . jazz marathons in the Hub . . . sister classes exchanging serenades . . . restlessness of house meetings . . . bright colors on the hockey field . . . halls gathered for prayers and hymns before bed. PEP SONGS INSPIRIT CAMPUS ON EVE OF FIRST HOCKEY GAME. KNITTING, STUDY, AND DAY DREAMS PREVAIL AT DORM GET-TOGETHER. 34 ' s - — - - ' ■ . " - iKifcJ st FOUR CLASSES ARE FIGHTING HARD, THOUGH THE RACE IS ALL WET. DON ' T STOP NOW, SUZANNE! THE SENIORS COULD USE SOME POINTS. Sophs Win Swim Meet with Brilliant Style and Speed SWIMMING MEET ... the gym clouded with humidity . . . the benches jammed with students . . . class spirit at a peak . . . swimmers waiting by the pool . . . com- petition in speed and form . . . every girl straining to the last stroke for her class . . . shouts echoing . . . water churning ... a hush for the curve of a dive . . . team- work of relays . . . relaxed hilarity of comic relay . . . proud sophomore victorious over panting, hard-fighting freshmen . . . 22-year old plaque to be engraved and kept by class of " 62 for at least a year . . . stringy hair . . . dry hands on wet backs . . . blast of night air. JOYCE McQUILKIN LEADS THE SOPHOMORE SPLASH TOWARD VICTORY. FORTUNATELY THE DIVE, NOT THE TANK SUIT, IS BEING JUDGED. JUNIOR CLASS TEAM: Row I, N. Barr, A. Cochrane, S. Rowe, N. Ha B. Henry; Row 2, A. Boykln, B. Dalton, S. Hosterman, T. Walker; Row 3, P. Wilson, N. Stone. VI ' SK-i i JL lil Mjjl JoP HH i 1 1 m ' ' : i 1 iiiJigjti gaMSittrfim Peppy Class Teams Battle THE SOUNDS OF HOCKEY . . . rasping breath of the players . . . the sharp crack of stick on ball . . . wind in the autumn trees across the field . . . shouts of children . . . clicking knitting needles and rustling letter pages . . . songs from the Peanut Gallery and Alfred E. ' s kids . . . then a chorus of excited, hoarse yells . . . kaleido- scopic shifts . . . battling red and yellow or blue around the white ball ... a streak across the green grass . . . multi-colored coats of the crowd surging on the field after the game . . . juniors winning the championship over the sophomores by one point . . . the excitement . . . the sweat . . . the winning or losing . . . the field silent and blank at six o ' clock. LELAND, MARCI, INA CLOSE IN AT A CRUCIAL POINT IN THE GAME. SOPHOMORE CLASS TEAM: P. Fly+he, C. Askew, M. Reitz, P. Mitchell, H. Glover, S. Amidon, A. Hershberger, C. Bowen, K. Gilliland, S. Alex- ander, B. Kneale, V. Allen, J. McQullkin, G. McLemore, B. Hendee. FRESHMAN CLASS TEAM: Row I, A. Freeman, I. Jones, K. Robertson, G. Ellis, A. Debele, B. Webb, D. Brown, S. Creech, B. Schenck; Row 2, L. Draper, W. Barnwell, F. Anderson, B. Faucette, N. SheriH, B. Loving, K. Younger, M. Collier, L. Cole, B. Barnett. Not pictured: K. Mobley. 36 w. Boo Florance Ruth Leroy Ten Top Players Comprise Varsity November 6 Juniors 3 Seniors 1 Sophomores 3 Freshmen November 13 - Sophomores 3 Seniors Juniors 3 Freshmen November 20 Freshmen 1 Seniors Juniors 1 Sophomores Caroline Askew Alice Cochrane Marci Tobey Nancy Hall " Did you say that? I couldn ' t even remember who wrote it! " Weary Students Still Smile While Plowing Through Exams ALMOST VACATION TIME ... the crowded reading room . . . " Do vou have a copy of Anderson? " . . . the long lunch lines ... a few bright spots like fraternity roses . . . bleak eyes at dawn oblivious of the sunrise . . . last minute panic when you ' ve forgotten even Aristotle ' s name . . . the noisy teas where you remember all the things you didn ' t write . . . the exhilarating, light feeling after the last exam . . . the hurried packing . . . the taxi . . . the train that will take you home where at last you can sleep til noon. DEVOTIONS CLOSE A GRUELING DAY SPENT REVIEWING FOR EXAMS. COULD THERE BE A MORE THRILLING MORALE BOOSTER FOR EXAMS? 38 su JL If •■ .-v, , Lisa Ambrose, V-Pres.; Myra Glasure, President; Peggy Edney, Sec.-Treas. L SENIOR YEAR ... the class of " 60 and Snoopy plung- ing ahead . . . joyful reunion of roommates . . . strange- ness of " looking on " during orientation . . . long-awaited thrill of winning first place in Black Cat song contest . . . letting down hair for Little Girls ' Day, pinning it up to fit under Mortar Boards Investiture morning. . . . deserving nienihers honored by election to Who ' s Who . . . gingerly serving for Sophomore parents lunch- eon . . . Saturdays given to Graduate Records . . . Mar- riage Class (very little cutting) . . . big moment of taking major professors to dinner . . . united but each one looking beyond June. AGREE. ELIZABETH HARGREAVES DeLand, Florida Mathematics ALFORD, MARTHA ANGELYN Columbus, Georgia Mathematics 40 LISA VERNON AMBROSE Knoxville, Tennessee English PATRICIA ANN ANDERSON Charlotte, North Carolnia Psychology PETER SWART Senior Class Mascot NELL WILHEIT ARCHER Charlotte, North Carolina History and Political Science JAMIS KAY ARMITAGE Kingsport, Tennessee Mathematics PEYTON WINFREE BASER Lynchburg, Virginia Mathematics HYTHO BAGIATIS Atlanta, Georgia English MARION ANN BARRY Jackson, Mississippi English DOROTHY CLAVE BATES Miami, Florida English SENIOR SUELLEN KAY BEVERLY Charlotte, North Carolina English ALICE EMILY BIVENS Monroe, North Carolina Mathemat ics NANCY DUVALL WHO ' S WHO WENDY BOATWRIGHT Columbia, South Carolina French JANICE ANN BOWMAN Lynchburg, Virginia English MILDRED JANE BRASWELL Decatur, Georgia Psychology DIAN SMITH BREWTON Statesboro, Georgia History and Political Science Honor Roll, 1958-1959 CYNTHIA ADAIR BUTTS Salem, Virginia Psychology SARA ANN CAREY Charlotte, North Carolina History and Political Science Honor Roll, 1958-1959 ■.TV .-. . ■ -r-fiNfc - CLASS CHOON HI CHOI Seoul, Korea Psychology FRANCES LINDA CLARK Macon, Georgia Psychology CORKY FEASIN WHO ' S WHO m ANN DELISLE COBB Asheville, North Carolina English MARGARET WEEKS COLLINS Montgomery, Alabama Bible PHYLLIS JEAN COX Galax, Virginia Philosophy MARY CROOK Atlanta, Georgia Mathematics ANNE SHANNON GUMMING Nashville, Tennessee Biology NANCY BEVERLY DELK Bethune, South Carolina Mathematics SENIOR DORRETH DOAJV Columbia, South Carolina Biology NANCY DUVALL Decatur, Georgia History and Political Science BOO FLORENCE WHO ' S WHO LYDIA DOROTHEA DWEN Avondale Estates, Georgia Sociology MARGARET BOWEN EDNEY Montgomery, Alabama English REBECCA LYNN EVANS Harriman, Tennessee Biology ANNE ELIZABETH EYLER Cookeville, Tennessee Music LOUISE CRAWFORD FEAGIN Falls Church, Virginia English GLADYS FERGUSON Thomasville, Georgia Psychology 44 CLASS LOUISE BOOTH FLORENCE Richmond, Virginia Mathematics JOANNA FLOWERS Kinston, North Carolina English Honor Roll, 1958-1959 MYRA SLASURE WHO ' S WHO LUCY COLE FONTS Decatur, Georgia Mathematics KAY FULLER Ramstein, Germany French PRISCILLA WILLIS GAINER Lakeland, Florida Psychology Honor Roll, 1958-1959 BONNIE LEE GERSHEN Lynchburg. Virginia History MY ' RA JEAN GLASURE St. Petersburg, Florida Biology MARGARET PENN GOODRICH Winston-Salem, North Carolina Psychology SENIOR JANE LAW WHO ' S WHO ELIZABETH GZECKOWICZ Rutherfordton, North Carolina History and Political Science ELIZABETH ANNE HALL Campbellsville, Kentucky English JUNE TULLY HALL Ingrandes, France French LILLIAN BLAKE HART Joanna, South Carolina English MARGARET JANE HAVRON Nashville, Tennessee Philosophy SARAH KATHERINE HAWKINS Clarksville, Tennessee Sociology CHARLOTTE CROSBY HENDERSON Morristown, Tennessee Music ELEANOR MANSFIELD HILL Bowling Green, Kentucky History 46 Z ■ - lA «• CLASS MARY ROSE SPEER HOMES Atlanta, Ge Art orgia RAE CAROLE HOSACK Miami, Florida Mathematics BETTY LEWIS WHO ' S WHO CAROLYN ANNE HOSKINS Bluefield, West Virginia History and Political Science Honor Roll. 1958-1959 SUZANNE HOSKINS Charlottesville, Virginia English JANE MONTEITH IMRAY Longview, Texas History and Political Science KATHRYN JOHN Wilmington, North Carolina Chemistry FRANCES ELIZABETH JOHNS Farmville, Virginia English MARGARET EILEENE JOHNSON Lake Worth. Florida Bible SENIOR CAROLINE MIKELL JONES Wichita, Kansas Biology LINDA MANGUM JONES Albany, Georgia Mathematics HELEN MABRY WHO ' S WHO JULIA PHOEBE KENNEDY Tampa, Florida Mathematics CHARLOTTE ELNORA KING Charlottesville, Virginia Biology KATHLEEN LOUISE KIRK Marietta, Georgia French LAURA ANN KNAKE Lynchburg, Virginia English HARRIETTE SPRAGUE LAMB Lakeland, Florida Psychology JANE ADGER LAW Spartenburg, South Carolina Psychology CLASS LOUISE RUTH LEROY Pikesville, Maryland English CATHERINE ELIZABETH LEWIS Birmingham, Michigan Mathematics Honor Roll, 1958-1959 CAROLYN MASOr WHO ' S WHO LAURA PARKER LOWNDES Atlanta, Georgia English ELISABETH LUNZ Charleston, South Carolina English Honor Roll, 1958-1959 HELEN MARION MABREY Birmingham, Alabama English Honor Roll, 1958-1959 GRACE STRAUSS MANGUM Augusta, Georgia Mathematics CAROLYN MASON Charlotte, North Carolina English MARTHA KATHRYN MASSEY Fredericksburg, Virginia German SENIOR JANIE MATTHEWS Orlando, Florida Sociology CAROLYN SMITH McCURDY Stone Mountain, Georgia Mathematics EVE PURDOM WHO ' S WHO MARGARET McKELWAY Richmond, Virginia English JULIA ANNE McNAIRY Greensboro, North Carolina Psychology MARY EVANS BRISTOW MILHOUS Atlanta, Georgia Psychology HELEN McCALL MILLEDGE Decatur, Georgia Mathematics ELIZABETH ANN MITCHELL San Francisco, California History and Politiciil Science GARY ASHLIN MORRIS Covington, Virginia English 50 CLASS ANNE WENTWORTH MORRISON Asheville, North Carolin English ANITA GAIL MOSES Anniston, Alabama English MARY HART RICHARDSON WHO ' S WHO i BESSIE SRONCE MURPHY Wilmington, North Carolina Psychology WILMA TUCKER MUSE Albany, Georgia Mathematics LOUISA VARNELL NEAL Moultrie, Georgia Chemistry Honor Roll, 1958-1959 LINDA KATHRYN NICHOLS Macon, Georgia Psychology EVERDINA BARTHA NIEUWENHUIS Mount Airy, North Carolina MatheTnatics JANE WARREN NORMAN Pnrcellrille. Virginia Psychology SENIOR MARY GRACE PALMOUR College Park, Georgia Psychology ANN ELIZABETH PARKER Brooksville, Florida English SYBIL STRUPE WHO ' S WHO EMILY DORROH PARKER Aiken, South Carolina English NANCY CAROLYN PATTERSON Kingsport, Tennessee Chemistry HELEN PETKAS Atlanta, Georgia Philosophy ' ir -- r ' ' i MARY JANE PFAFF Winston-Salem, North Carolina Psychology MARY JANE PICKENS Tuscaloosa, Alabama History and Political Science JANICE ELEANOR POWELL Atlanta, Georgia Bible 52 CLASS CAROLYN DAVIES PREISCHE Atlanta, Georgia Psychology JANE SEYMOUR PREVOST Greenville, South Carolina History and Political Science EVE KIRKLAND PURDOM Guilford College, North Carolina English Honor Roll 1958-1959 KATHLEEN McCASKlLL RICHARDS Florence. South Carolina Art MARY HART RICHARDSON Roanoke, Virginia English Honor Roll. 1958-1959 KATHERINE LAMB RUARK Vidalia, Georgia Philosophy Honor Roll. 1958-1959 SYLVIA SAXON Greenville, South Carolina Psychology EVELYN ST. CROIX SCOFIELD Lanham, Maryland Mathejnatics SENIOR DIANNE BAILEY SNEAD Gainesville, Florida Sociology BARBARA ELLEN SPECHT South Orange, New Jersey History and Political Science Honor Roll, 1958-1959 MARTHA ELIZABETH STARRETT Atlanta, Georgia English NAIN ELIZABETH STIEGLITZ Avondale Estates, Georgia Mathematics JO ANNE STOKES Atlanta, Georgia Spanish RITA CAMILLE STRICKLAND Waycross, Georgia Sociology AGNES LYNNE SHANKLAND Newport News, Virginia History and Political Science HOLLIS LEE SMITH New Orleans, Louisiana Psychology CLASS SYBIL CRITZ STRUPE Winston-Salem, North Carolina English Honor Roll, 1958-1959 MARY RIVERS STUBBINS Tallahassee, Florida Philosophy MARTHA GILRETH THOMAS Asheville, North Carolina Latin Honor Roll, 1958-1959 MARCIA LOUISE TOBEY Arlington, Virginia History and Political Science EDITH JERVIS TOWERS Rome, Georgia Spanish GRACE WOODS WALDEN NewTian, Georgia History and Political Science RAINES WAKEFORD WATKINS Atlanta, Georgia English JOANNA WEBB Donalsonville. Georgia History JULIANNAWEBB Donalsonville, Georgia History and Political Science CAROLYN YVONNE WEST Jackson, Tennessee History Honor Roll, 1958-1959 DOROTHY ANNE WHISNANT Charlotte, North Carolina French Honor Roll. 1958-1959 MARTHA ANN WILLIAMSON Dalton, Georgia Sociology BECKY WILSON Augusta, Georgia English MARTY YOUNG Rorkmart, Georgia Chemistry ' t ' . ' ' ' ■. v ' . o ' -j ,- i ' r y- ' SENIORS FEEL A SPECIAL UNITY ON INVESTITURE MORNING. Not pictured in Who ' s Who: Sally Smith Howard. 56 Sara Ann Carey Shannon Cumming Joanna Flowers Elizabeth Lunz Helen Mabry Fifteen Senior Phi Beta Kappas Have Set Top Academic Standards PHI BETA KAPPA . . . the highest academic recognition a college can bestow ... a standing ovation . . . their classmates " pride and hugs . . . fifteen — the largest number ever to earn the honor at Agnes Scott . . . mainstays of their " scholarship cup class " . . . each elected individually . . . character and intellectual interest considered along with grades . . . three FuUbright scholars in the group ... Jo Flowers going to Germany ' s University of Tuebingen . . . Marv Hart Richard- son and modern literature in Wales . . . Anne Whisnant continuing French at Lille . . . May 10th dinner and formal initiation . . . Beta of Georgia, Agnes Scott " s chapter, founded in 1926 . . . first women ' s college invited to apply for a chapter . . . first women ' s college south of Virginia with a chapter . . . second chapter in Georgia . . . con- tinuing recognition of intellectual capacities well employed, especially in the acquiring of an education in the liberal arts and sciences. Warnell Neal Eve Purdom Charlotte King Carolyn Hoskins Anne Morrison Mary Hart Richardson Katherine Ruark Sybil Strupe Martha Thomas Anne Whisnant 1 Pete Brown, Pres.; Nancy Hall, V. Pres.; Flossie Gaines, Sec.-Treas. NIOK 1 JUNIOR YEAR . . . joyous reunion of " those who didn ' t transfer. " braced for the long pull . . . the sobering role of junior sponsor, laden with baggage and questions . . . serenading freshmen " sisters ' . . . settling down in majors (for better or worse) . . . closeness and homey atmosphere of the cottages . . . winning the hockey championship and Scholarship Trophy . . . ushering for Investiture weekend . . . everybody working together to realize a long-hoped-for midwinter night ' s dream . . . Junior dinner dance highlighting spring quarter ... a party for the freshmen . . . mounting class pride as 1961 leaders are chosen . . . the big vear in sight. Susali Abernathy Mary Ann McSwain Antley Ann Ashford Ann Avant Ana Maria Aviles 5S Barbara Baldauf Elizabeth Barber Nancy Jane Barker Nancy Barr Nancy Batson Lauretta Baumgardner Elizabeth Bellune Jane Bennet Pamela Bevier Honor Roll, 1958-1959 Michael Booth Alice Boykin Judith Clark Brandeis Jean Brennan Anne Broad Honor Roll, 1958-1959 Donna Brock Cornelia Brown Sally Bryan Margaret Bullock Honor Roll. 1958-1959 Joan Byrd Kathryn Chambers Faith Chao Willie Byrd Childress Anne Christensen Mary Jim Clark JUNIOR Alice Cochrane Alice Coffin Carroll Connor Edith Conwell Jane Cooper Jean Corbetl Mary Park Cross Mary Wayne Crytaes Mary Culpepper Betsy Dalton Lucy Maud Davis Sandra Davis Marlin Day Marguerite Dickert Renni Dillard Harriett Elder Mary Beth Elkins Patricia Ervin Helen Everett Dianne Foster Rachel Fowler Elizabeth Fuller Florence Gaines Nancy Glass CLASS Caroline Goodwin Linda Grant Gayle Green Marion Greene Alva Hope Gregg Katherine Gwaltney Christy Hages Nancy Hall Martha Brock Hanna Jane Henderson ■■ ' Honor Roll 1958-1959 Janice Henry Harriet Higgins Nancy Boothe Higgins Sarah Helen High Mary Elizabeth Hill Ellen Hines Patricia Holmes Honor Roll 1958-1959 Judith Houchins Linda Ingram Lorna Jo Jarrell Marian Zimmerman Jenkins I Mrs.) Virginia Johnson Juanita Juarez " Honor Roll 1958-1959 Jane Kelly JUNIOR Sarah Kelso Katherine Kemp Rosemary Kittrell Martha Lambeth KT " Anne Modlin Mary Jane Moore Nancy Moore Prudence Moore Barbara Mordecai Letitia Moye Anne Newsome Marion North CLASS Emily Pancake Elizabeth Paterson Anne Peagler irginia Philip Carol Pickens Anne Pollard Charme Robinson ' Honor Roll, 1958-1959 Joanna Roden Patricia Rogers Anne Marie Russell Lucy Scales Molly Schwab Joyce Seay Betsy Shepley Caroline Simmons Page Smith Honor Roll, 1958-1959 Harriet Smith ' Honor Roll. 1958-1959 Sue Ann Smith irginia Sperling IVancv Stillman Nancy Stone Pamela Sylvester Caroline Thomas •Honor Roll. 1958-1959 Esther Thomas JUNIOR CLASS irginia Thomas Patricia Walker Marv Ware Peggy Wells Jane Weltch Penny Williams Paula Wilson Florence Winn Ann Womeldorf Betty Sue Wyatt Lafon Zimmerman MARY HART TRANSFERS MORTAR BOARD LEADERSHIP TOTRISH. NOT PICTURED: Dorothy Ej-ns, Margaret A. Lipha Mary Taylo Lipscomb. Marjorle Reitz, Pres.; Ann Lee, V. Pres.; Carey Bowen, Sec.-Treas. D I 1 SOPHOMORE YEAR, flown ... a year for new courses, new friends, mattresses with backbone . . . catching up with EngHsh, getting behind in Math . . . maturation and learning ... a year for active participation in orientation . . . fireside chats . . . parents ' weekend . . . the excitement and sophistication of Walters and Hop- kins . . . losing the hockey championship by one point and winning the swimming meet hands down ... a year with the sister class: at Investiture, class day picnic, and graduation ... a year for " transferitis " . . . the weekly change of heart, mind, and boyfriend . . . snowy spring . . . year of self-confidence, a place in the sun. Nelia Adams Sarah Adams Susan Alexander Martha Lee Allen Vick Allen Suzanne Amidon Caroline Askew Honor Roll. 1958-1959 Marv Ellen Barnes SOPHOMORE Nancy Barrett Doris Behrman Carolyn Benbow Rosemary Clark Vivian Conner Carol Cowan Lucille Benton Sally Blomquist Harriet Cox Cynthia Craig Elizabeth Boatwright Honor Roll 1958-1959 Beth Crawford Sallie Boineau Nancy Bond Meade Boswell Suzanne Crosby Mary Culclasure Mary Holman Curd Carey Bowen Clara Jane Buchanan Germaine Calhoun Sue Czarnitzki Jacquelyn Day Ellen DeLaney Martha W. Campbell Gail Carter Betty Challen Molly Dotson Diane Duke Judy Duncan CLASS Emily Ann Evan Madelyn Eve Patricia Flythe Betty Jean Harper Mary Agnes Harris Elizabeth Harshbarger Marian Fortson Dawneda Fowler Peggy Frederick Janice Heard Judith Hei nz Beth Hendee Livingston Gilbert Betty Gillespie Helen Hereford Ann Hershberger Kay Gilliland Honor Roll 1958-1959 Cynthia Hind Ethel Gilmour Harriett Glover Sally Gordy Margaret Holley Judith Holloway Betty Hopkins Susan Grey Honor Roll 1958-1959 Jacqueline Hagler Adrienne Haire Lynda Horn Mary Beth Howell Ann Hutchinson SOPHOMORE Carole Sue Jackson Betsy Jefferson Thelma Jenkins Elizabeth Kneale Lynne Lambert Sally LeBron Caroline Johnson Norris Johnston Penny Johnston Knox Jones Isabel Kallman Jane Marie Kelley Laura Ann Lee Linda Lentz Mary Anne Leslie Helen Linton Bonnie Lockhart Patsy Luther India Kemp Martha Kendrick Beverley Kenton Peggy Mathis Lota Sue Maxwell Margaret McGeachy Linda Kerley Louise Kemsey Milling Kinard Jan McGehee Genie McLemore Mary Ann McLeod 68 CLASS Jean Medearis Ellen Middlebrooks Ann Middlemas Suzanne Pickens Dorothy Porcher Joanna Praytor Peggy Mitchell Susan Mustoe Jane Nabors Sylvia Ann Pruitt Marjorie Reitz Carol E. Rogers Nancy Nelms E. Carroll Rogers Honor Roll 1958-1959 Sara Ann Nelms Lebby Rogers Jacqueline Nicholson Robin Rudolph Catharine Norfleet Nancy Northeutt Ethel Oglesby Joanna Russell Doris Sanders Elaine Sayers Pauline Page Elizabeth Pancake Katherine Patrick Lucy Schow Joanne Scruggs Ruth Seagle SOPHOMORE CLASS Ruth Shepherd Anne Thomas Honor Roll 1958-1959 Margaret Ann Shugart Ann Thompson Annette Smith Rose Traeger Elaine Smith Jo Allison Smith Lillian Smith Peggy Venable Bertha B. Walker Katherine White Joyce Spivey Sandra Still Angelyn Stokes Jan Whitfield Anne Williams Carol Williams Mary Stokes Ann Lee Sullivan Elizabeth Withers Ann Dudley Wood NOT PICTURED: Sharon Atkins, Susan Hoagland, Bonnie Meyer, Lana Rae Mueller, Joyce Ann Townsend. urgess, Pres.; Sally Rodwell, V. Pres.; Kay Younger, Sec.-Treas. n ] i IL THE TOWER OF MAIN seen from a distance . . . strange faces, suitcases and relief at being found by junior sponsor and sophomore helpers . . . registration and welcome parties . . . classes so far removed from high school . . . " In our hearts forever sheltered " . . . and second place in our first Black Cat song contest . . . those first never-to-be-forgotten grades . . . ' 63 club . . . the Christmas caroling party . . . wintry rain and " King Lear " . . . and spring at last . . . the teas for faculty advisors, sponsors and helpers ... a record dance and hot dog sale for campaign . . . fast round of picnics, exams, dates, and temporary goodbyes. Mary Knox Abernethy Nancy Abernethy Sally Addison Virginia Allen Patricia Allen Frances Anderson Janice Anderson Mary Mead Andrew Jane Ayres Angelina Bagiatis Frances Bailey Beth Barnett A FRESHMAN Willette Barnwell Leewood Bates Sally Bergstrom Jacquelyn Binkley Judith Brantley Doris Bray Barbara Brown D ' Etta Brown Becky Bruce Patricia Anne Bruening Canty Bryan Cornelia Anne Bryant Bryce Burgess Nancy Butcher Lucie Callaway Teresa Carrigan Sandra Chandler Martha Chew Carolyn Coble Lynne Cole Mason Collier Patricia Conrad Rebecca Craig Sandra Anne Creech Lylla Crum Judith Cruthirds Sarah Stokes Cumming Linda Davis Patricia Davis Ann Debele Lynn Denton Jane Dills Dorothy Mary Doherty Martha Leland Draper Nancy Lee DuPuy Nancy Malloy Duvall CLASS Jo Ann Eckardt Susan Elam Gloria Ellis Kennette Farlowe Letitia Faucette Susan Favor f 4 Mary Jane Fincher Anna Belle Freeman Carole Frye Nancy Fulcher Betty Ann Gatewood Linda Gearreald Nancy Gheesling Jane Gilbertson Sally Glerm Lucy Gordon Mary Ann Gregory Christine Griffith Jane Hancock Sigrid Hanson Karen Haralson Ann Hardesty Margaret Harms Edith Harrison Carolyn Hattox Judith Hawley Sue Heinrich Carol Rickey Jo Ann Hoit Lynn Hormell Alethea Hudson Julie Ewing Hunt (Mrs.) Mary Hunt Jean Hunter Elizabeth Hutcheson Mary Ann Jennings 73 FRESHMAN Sandra Ann Johnson Ina Jones ■Lelia Jones Donna Kelleher Shari Anne Kelly Mary Jean Kinghorn Margaret Kirby Jane Lancaster Irene Lavinder Elizabeth Lee Elizabeth Libby Virginia Emeline Lindskog Connie Judith Little Ruth Georgina Loving Patsy Lowe Carolyn Lown D ' Nena Lowranre Mary Hampton Lowry Mary Ann Lusk Leigh Maddox Deal McArthur Nancy McCoy Page McGavock Sue McKenzie Margaret McKinley Martha McKinnon Valerie McLanahan Patricia McLaurin Betty McMullen Gloria Mendenhall Anne Miller Dudley Milward Kathryn Louise Mobley Laura Ann Mobley Lucy Morcock Lynn Morley CLASS Merle Morrow Martha Mossman Julia Moye Patty Oraera Nickel Susan Novotny Patricia O ' Brian Katharine Almira Ogburn Elizabeth Parsons Nona Evans Pendleton Linda Plemons Doris Poliakoff Carolyn Pollard Ida Pound Julia Lynn Prather Mary Lucile Ranck Rebecca Rau Ann Risher Katherine Robertson Sally Rodwell Nancy Rose Miriam St. Clair Aileen Samford Ann Saylor Betsy Schenck Anneke Schepman Colby Scott Susan Sevier Jane Rutledge Sharp Lee Shepherd Nancy Sheriff Nancy Sibley Ruth Simmons Cottie Slade Nancy Vann Smith Suzanne Smith Susan Smith 75 FRESHMAN CLASS Sue Stacy Kaye Stapleton Coralee Ethel Still Eugenia Stovall Maxime Stubbs Lydia Sudbury Nell Tabor Caroline Teague Elizabeth Thomas Mary Beth Thomas Judith Thompson Rosslvn Troth Mary Troup Cecilia Turnage Margaret Vandeman Edna Vass Eloise Bronson Wade Linda Wallace Mary Ruth Walters Louisa Walton Lydia Wammock Mable Elizabeth Webb Lucile Wehman Nancy Kate Wilkins Ann Williams Julianne Williams Lyne Williams Linda Wilson Miriam Wilson Susan Winbigler Cheryl Winegar Elizabeth Withers Jill Wolfford Jane Womack Nancy Wren Billie Wright Not Pictured: Dorothy Laird 4 5 Mariane Wurst Kay Younger Louise Zimmerma D 1 ji M SllMI rr Jerre Jones Beth Rossheim Lucy Yang JUNIOR ABROAD ice f razcr 77 -K ft III! The after-midnight hours we keep, The rain, the tests, the papers due, The way we look from lac k of sleep, And Jennie ' s due. " Jack " and Robert Frost drop by; Rain boots skid on icy walks, Then biting air and steel gray sky And snowballs fly. Whispers, shuffling feet, and gong, And lights and mist at ten o ' clock The Hub is filled with smoke and song And hlearv eves. But spirits soar And dream of spring. Contents Features: Junior Jaunt . . . Sophomore Parents Weekend . . . Winter Lecturers . . . Beauties Organizations: Four Boards . . . Publications . . . Service Groups . . . Inter- est Groups . . . Mortar Board Spirit: Basketball Season . . Varsity . . . Badminton . . . Fencing . . . Tumbling SO I nw R i? 81 Undaunted, we braved the rain for our first off-campus dance at the Dinkier Plaza. The Junior Cl Deal, Sue, Gloria and Mary Meade thought the joke quite amusing even if their dates didn ' t. The faculty chaperones liven up the v ee hours with a snappy bridge game. - ' -.-fj ' ;, , ■m-M % i ,x A ' : iS¥ ' ' 11 - - SILVER BALLS, WHITE GLOVES AND SWIRLING CHIFFON MAKE THIS A REAL MIDWINTER NIGHT ' S DREAM. Sponsors Big Weekend with an Off-campus Dance JUNIOR JAUNT . . . impressions of a midwinter nighrs dream: last minute preparations all day Satur- day . . . double-dating to the Dinkier . . . rain and a new feeling ... all the wonders of Atlanta at night . . . escorts with umbrellas . . . freedom, maybe . . . guardian angel at the door . . . lavender blue : tux and taffeta . . . satin, chiffon, chantilly . . . music and memories for tomorrow . . . cheesecake at Lebs . . . more rain . . . bridge-playing chaperones . . . Danish pastry at two ... a sleepy ride home . . . lights on campus at three . . . dorm talk and pin-curls ... a midwinter night ' s dream. Each couple, like a snowflake, is perfect in itself, un- like any other, and yet somehow part of a whole. S3 - - - - ' ■■: " . ' ' " •i pT 1 4 mSs L F " ♦ ' 4 . ' , !« iii. H THE TRUE SCOTT SPIRIT, " JUST ONE MORE HAND, " FILLS ANY FREE TIME. Sophs Welcome Parents CONVERSATIONS FLOURISH AS PARENTS MEET TEACHERS. Eating and chatting form the major activities of the faculty reception before a campus sing. SUE GREY, WITH HER PARENTS, VISITS THE ALSTON ' S " AT HOME. " FATHERS LISTENED, QUESTIONED, AND SOMETIMES NAPPED IN CLASS! Swordfish with gleaming foils fence In Dolphin Club ' s Symphony in Sea. Back to College Life SOPHOMORE PARENTS ' WEEKEND . , . steering committee meetings . . . formal in ' itations . . . excited anticipation . . . cheery faces undampcned by rainy Friday . . . coffee and name tags . . . dark suits and bright hats filling Buttrick . . . " Lost in the Stars " . . . the open door of faculty offices . . . friendly informality . . . whispered admiration of Robert Frost collection . . . the splash and glamorous precision of water ballet . . . daddvs waiting patiently in reception room . . . intro- ductions, art display, reception in Walters ... a tradi- tional thanksgiving ser 4ce . . . college luncheon . . . dorm open houses, neat rooms and tired feet . . . then tea at the Alstons " home . . . trips to Lenox Square and dinner in Atlanta . . . proud parents and prouder daughters. SOPHOMORE PARENTS FIND A " REAL " MERMAID IN ASC POOL. An octopus surveys his kingdom habited by graceful fishes. 85 LOPEZ AND HISTORY MAJORS MIX TUNA FISH AND WORLD PROGRESS. Religion, Art, Drama BELOVED ROBERT FROST RETURNS FOR HIS SEVENTEENTH " EVENING. " WINTER LECTURERS . . . variety ranging through art, literature and poetry . . . LAMAR DODD . . . show- ing slides only an artist could take . . . dazzling colors and forms catching the spirit of Russia and the Far East . . . ROBERT LOPEZ . . . leading a seminar on " Medieval Change versus Modern Progress " . . . ROB- ERT FROST . . . quoting his own poetry . . . leaning across the podium to drop a sly bit of wit or wisdom . . . EVELYN DUVALL . . . family life consultant, considering problems with never-failing cheerfulness . . . B. DAVIE NAPIER . . . making Religious Emphasis Week a time of challenge . . . searching deeply in Hub discussions . . . THE CANADIAN PLAYERS . . . swing- ing with vigor through " The Taming of the Shrew " . . . conducting the Blackfriars ' workshop on Shakespearean drama poetry MLLE. insight Camus. ' . . considering modern from our campus . . . GERMAINE BREE . . . describing with the of a friend " The Fictional World of Albert PAUL ENGLE . criticizing poems Lamar Dodd and Mr. Warren share art crit- icism and concepts on a professional level. HUB DISCUSSIONS OF RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS WEEK PROVE A REAL GIVE AND TAKE AFFAIR BETWEEN DR. NAPIER AND STUDENTS. and Marriage Covered by Winter Lecture Program EVELYN DUVALL GIVES CORKY A FEW POINTERS ABOUT MARRIAGE. ,J _ f . : A CANADIAN PLAYER EXPLAINS THE SET TO DRAMA ENTHUSIASTS FROM ATLANTA ' S COLLEGES. THE WORKSHOP AUDIENCE DIRECTS QUESTIONS TO A PANEL MEMBER. Blackfriars Members Hold Drama Workshop for Campus BLACKFRIARS WORKSHOP ... the day the Canadian players came ... an influx of bearded Sewanee men and Emory students . . . the films on the Globe Theatre and Shakespearean production . . . the explanation and tour of the set . . . rummaging through props and cos- tumes ... an informal reception where students met actors ... a spontaneous panel discussion of audience questions . . . and finally, the climax — The Taming of the Shrew. Anita Moses and June Hall are very inquisitive; Miss Cilley smiles her approval of the question. SEVERAL BEAUTIES CHATTER AMONG THEMSELVES BEFORE THE TEA BEGINS. Beauties Chosen by Class Vote and Atlanta Judges AGNES SCOTT BEAUTIES carefully selected on basis of both class and expert opinion . . . nominations and elections in January of four candidates from each class . . . tea on February 13th . . . each girl judged in group and personal interviews by Mrs. Grace Smith, fashion coordinator for Regenstein ' s and Mr. Ivan Tucker, chair- man of the Miss Atlanta contest . . . final eight beauties emerging as representative. MRS. ALSTON GIVES SUELLEN A SMILE AND A CUP OF TEA. BECKY WILSON IS BEING INTERVIEWED BY TWO JUDGES WHO MUST MAKE A DIFFICULT DECISION. z? v:. r l Silhouette Presents Jane Hancock, Beauty of 1960 JANE HANCOCK . . . freshman selected for beauty, personality, and unusual poise . . . coming, at eighteen, from Fort Worth, Texas . . . interests ranging from the piano and English to domestic hobbies of sewing and cooking . . . vice-president of " 63 Club . . . modeling for Social Council ' s fashion show ... a " Best Dressed " nominee . . . planning to teach in elementary school . . . schooldav or weekend, neat and dainlv . . . and smiling. THE FIRST OF AGNES SCOH ' S BEAUTIES POSES AT WINDOW OF DRUID HILLS COUNTRY CLUB. JdeHu cJ-futcnsion BzcL, lfd Lj M ( LL±on Jvyaiij LLsn J ains6. 94 JHlLLls Jl{c Cxavsij J EVExLij J sn.ton zffna . axia zrf-uiL£.6. J scku jSlUCi Basketball provides ■fun and competition. With Winter Quarter Come Snow, Good Times, Honor THE SPIRIT OF WLNTER . . . rain, sleet, ice, and snow putting galoshes and umbrella to a real test . . . ice cream and new songs at the inter-dorm sing , . . dreamy music and lovely dresses found in a " Mid-winter Night ' s Dream " ... a delightful evening with Robert Frost . . . Tom Jones and a crowded Walter ' s Basement . . . good food and good times at the Alstons ' . . . Sophomore Parents Weekend . . . then a singing procession of Mortar Board members and their " surprise party in the library " . . . lots to do and so little time. OPEN HOUSE AT ALSTONS BRIGHTENS WINTRY SUNDAY NIGHTS. STUDENTS WATCH AS ANN AND PAULA SKILLFULLY TURN SNOW INTO A STATELY HORSE. TRICIA IS TAPPED NEW MORTAR BOARD PRESIDENT. 100 SENIORS: Suzanne Hoskins and Mary Jane Pfaff Class Cheerleaders Bring Out the Pep and Lung Power CHEERLEADERS . . . perky yellow skirts ... red and white casuals . . . ivy-league grey . . . naw . . . pompoms, parades, pennants, pepsongs . . . all the pep, all the spirit, all the love of Agnes Scott . . . clapping in time to class songs . . . leading Black Cat processions . . . supply- ing pins, favors, and cheers . . . helping to launch the campus campaign . . . throughout the year . . . support- ing class acti -ities . . . industry and versatility personi- fied . . . alwavs adding that extra hit for success. SOPHOMORES: Betsy Boa+wrlght and Ann Lee Bewildered, Sylvia accepts sp ortsmanship cup for seniors. FRESHMEN: Cheryl WInegar and Pat O ' Brlan JUNIORS: Kay Gwaltney and Ann Broad SENIORS— FIRST ROW: J. Law, S. Saxon, W. Muse. SECOND ROW: M. Goodrich, R. Leroy, B. Evans, B. Florance, N. Duvall. In games such as this some passes catch a " fella " off guard. JUNIORS-FIRST ROW: P. Sylvester, A. Boylcin, N. Barr, K. Gwaltney. SECOND ROW: M. B. Elkins, S. H. High, N. Stone. Class Spirit Abounds in Pep of Basketball Teams BASKETBALL — Late afternoon grayness shattered Ijy !ihoiits and liouncing; Ijalls . . . repeated drills . . . balls l)onibardin !; the goal . . . exhaustion and red faces at the end of long practices ... a sharp whistle . . . the toss from the center of the ring . . . teamwork and precision . . . up for the basket, a rebound, across the center-line, a basket. A SPLIT SEASON . . . dorm teams integrating classes . . . Walters victorious . . . shifting of allegiance, class competition . . . unbeaten team, the seniors " pride . . . spirit trophy awarded for freshmen enthusiasm. SOPHOMORES-FIRST ROW: L. Schow, V. Conner, G. McLemore. SECOND ROW: E. A. Evans, J. Nicltelson, A. G. Hershberger, H. Glc FRESHMEN— FIRST ROW: N. Abernethy, A. B. Freeman. SECOND ROW: K. Mobley.W. Barnwell, N. Duvall. Ten Top Players Make Up Varsity February 12 Seniors 23 Sophomores 11 February 19 Seniors 26 Juniors 14 Februani " 26 Seniors 41 Freshmen 31 Freshmen 42 Sophomores 31 Juniors 41 Sophomores 40 EMILY ANN EVANS KAYE STAPLETON 103 NANCY ABERNETHY FALLING BIRDIE CAPTURES ALL EYES AND TENSION MOUNTS DURING BADMINTON CLASS PLAY-OFF, A WINTER QUARTER ATTRACTION. Winter Indoor Sports Keep Each Scottie on Her Toes INDOOR SPORTS flourishing during winter months . . . taking refuge in the toasty gym on raw, windy after- noons . . . white shirts, tucked in . . . the squeaking of tennis shoes on a polished floor . . . the swish of bad- minton hirdies . . . craning necks . . . fencing — a new experience for most students . . . " thrust, lunge, recover " . . . opportunities in tumbling to develop flexibility, balance, teamwork, and nerve . . . pyramids, somersaults . . . locker doors banging . . . aching muscles. CAGED AND PADDED FOR SAFETY, KAKI AND BETTY FENCE IN EARNEST. Balance and strength mean " you ' ve got it! " H 1 J|Mte| H|g||«M B. - " 1 ' ' " Bk ; ir cademici WALLACE M. ALSTON President 106 Dean Kline Integrates the Campus Academic Program DEAN KLINE . . . the sudden grin . . . conferences about problems . . . the Kleenex box in his desk drawer . . . concern, insight, and comfort . . . the closeness of the philosophy majors . . . students gathered at his home for music, food, and talk . . . working out anv student- faculty difficulties . . . attacking pile-up of sophomore work . . . producing apt illustrations in class . . . Beatrice, live-oak trees, and the " purple wall. " ' C. BENTON KLINE Dean of Faculty SOPHOMORE NELIA ADAMS CONSULTS DEAN KLINE, AT HIS PAPER-PILED DESK, ABOUT HER JUNIOR YEAR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH. 107 _- CARRIE SCANDRETT Dean of Students PAPERS WAIT WHILE MISS SCANDRETT LISTENS TO A TALE OF WOE. 108 lONE MURPHY Assistant Dean of Students CHRISTINE C. DUNLAP Assistant to the Dean of Students Dean ' s Office Staff Aids Students In Regulating Social Activities ELA B. CURRY Assistant to the Dean of Students MOLLIE MERRICK Assistant to the Dean of Students HARRIET H, TALMADGE Assistant to the Dean of Students ANN RIVERS PAYNE Assistant to the Dean of Students LILLIAN S. McCRACKEN Assistant to the Dean of Students 109 LAURA STEELE Registrar and Director of Admission LOUISE HARLEY Assistant Registrar and Assistant Director of Admissions Registrar and Admissions Staff Review Applications ANNETTE TEAGUE Secretary to the Registrar and Director of Admissions SALLIE L. GREENFIELD Assistant i i Admissions EDNA G. BYERS College Librarian pS™ E ■ Hf - 1 1 1 Anne M. Butler, Assistant to the Librarian; Ethelyn J. Roberts, Assistant to the Librarian; Katherine M. Swint, Catalog Librar- ian; Mary Carter, Assistant to the Librarian; Barbara Ann Oglesby, Assistant to the Librarian. LILLIAN NEWMAN Assistant Librarian With sophomore papers comes solitary confinement. Library and Alumnae Office Serve in Making Information Available ANN W. JOHNSON Director ot Alumnae Affairs DOROTHY WEAKLEY Assistant Director of Alumnae Affairs NANCY C. EDWARDS Assistant Director of Public Relations and Development 111 p. J. ROGERS Business Manager A Cheerful, Efficient Staff Keeps Administrative J. C. TART Treasurer W. E. McNAIR Director of Public Relations and Development HELE R. TURNER Sscretary to the President Offices Running Smoothly ANNE STAPLEKJN Secretary to the Dean of the Faculty and the Director of Development :MARIE S. LEWIS Secretary to the Treasurer SUSANNE P. ESSAM RUNITA M. GOODE Secretary in the Offices of the Registrar Manager of the Bookstore and the President 113 MARY LOUISE DODSON Secretary to the Business Manager DR. ROSEMONDE S. PELTZ College Physician NANCY R. IVEY, ALICE B. BRAY, CYNTHIA M. PONDER Resident Nurses The Infirmary and Dining Hall Staffs Promote Campus Health ANNE S. JOHNSON Assistant Dietician RUBYE N. LANIER Assistant to the Dietician 114 R. M. JONES, J. W. FOWLER, C. B. CLIFTON and A. G. MAYNARD, Campus Police Maintenance Staff Keeps Order Around the Clock ANNIE MAE SMITH, Supervisor of Dormitories DOROTHY H. TURNER, Assistant to the Supervisor of Dormitories C. DEXTER WHITE, College Engineer W. B. WILKINSON, College Carpenter 115 FERDINAND WARREN Professor of Art ART . . . slide lectures on the historical development of art giving students genuine firsthand knowledge and apprecia- tion of the works of the masters . . . Art 199 students sketching on the grass in the fall . . . tahlets and charcoal . . . modern art and architecture, and interior design . . . " pot shop " lights burning way into the night . . . bowls, vases, and clay fingers . . . creation of the campaign mural. Students Create and PAULA ADDS FINAL TOUCHE TO HER " POT SHOP " CREATION. j ' 6 -«J in ' n,-? ROBERT F. WESTERVELT Assistant Professor MARIE HUPER Associate Professor Appreciate Art and Music Music . . . appreciation and practice . . . the history of opera to music education . . . opportunities for master- ing organ technique . . . soprano scales and piano exer- cises drifting from Presser in the la te afternoons . . . theory, harmonv and counterpoint . . . courses in direct- ing and playing church music . . . recitals given through the vear hy music faculty and majors. MICHAEL McDowell Professor of Music GEORGE P. HAYES Professor of English ANNIE MAY CHRISTIE Associate Professor MARGARET G. TROTTER Associate Professor ELLEN DOUGLAS LEYBURN Professor of English English and Speech THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT ... Dr. Hayes lectur- ing from a desk top . . . visits with Keats in Rome . . . Wordsworth at Tintern Ahbey . . . Mrs. Pepperdene and Chaucer at Canterbury . . . experiences in poetry, prose, drama . . . impathy through Shakespeare . . . two o ' clock classes at 1:50 . . . Miss Leybum and that wonderful sparkle . . . eternal papers . . . jaunts to the library . . . that range in grades . . . still, a feeling of accomplish- ment. DR. HAYES FINDS ROOM FOR ANXIOUS SOPHOMORE IN BLACK BOOK. JANEF N. PRESTON Assistant Professor 118 MARY L. RION Assistant Professor MARGARET W. PEPPERDENE Associate Professor MERLE G. WALKER Assistant Professor Emphasize Clear Expression of Ideas ROBERTA WINTER Associate Professor of Speech and Dramatic Art W. EDWARD McNAIR Assistant Professor 119 ELVENA M. GREEN Assistant Professor 4 4 MARGARET T. PHYTHIAN Professor of French MARY V. ALLEN Associate Professor French Classes Survey Literature of Varied Ages FRENCH . . . irregular verbs and devilish adjectives that we always forget must agree . . . unpronouncable " R ' s " . . . Monsieur Thomas ' drawings to illustrate the stories . . . also found shovelling snow off the sidewalk behind the library — " la neige . . . pouah! " . . . seminars on Camus by Miss Allen and Miss Clark . . . from Balzac to Proust with Chloe Steel . . . Le Petit Prince sparkling in Mrs. Sewell ' s eyes ... a cozy French novel by the fireside at Miss Phythian ' s. MARGARET B. SEWELL Instructor PIERRE THOMAS Assistant Professor FRANCES CLARK Assistant Professor CHLOE STEEL Assistant Professor 120 FLORENE J. DUNSTAN Associate Professor MURIEL HARM Professor of German and Spanish German and Spanish Reveal New Cultural Patterns GERMAN . . . excitement of learning new style of script and mastering strange sounds . . . dictation . . . composi- tions . . . tenderness of Bambi in the original. SPANISH . . . bright, staccato speech . . . developing fluency and understanding power . . . great literary works revealing much about Spanish people and culture. MARIA C. KANE Instructor ELOISE HERBERT Assistant Professor MELISSA A. CILLEY Assistant Professor 121 WALLACE M. ALSTON Professor of Philosophy In Bible and Philosophy, Students Search for Nature of God and Man PAUL L. GARBER Professor of Bible BIBLE . . . treading reverently through the lives of the Hebrews . . . maps and identification questions . . . applying teachings of Jesus to problems of mankind. PHILOSOPHY . . . students frowning, sighing hopelessly . . . thinking, from Plato to Whitehead . . . the nature of reality . . . essence and existence . . . cosmologies . . . ? KWAI SING CHANG Associate Professor C. BENTON KLINE Assisfant Professor MARTHA JANE CAUVEL Assistant Professor MARY L. BONEY Associate Professor M. KATHRYN CLICK Professor of Classical Languages AFTER THEIR STUDY, JUNIORS MAY FEEL AS OLD AS THESE RELICS. Classics Delves into World of Greece and Rome CLASSICS . . . investigation and insight into all areas of ancient life . . . stressing our heritage from the Greeks and Romans . . . dusty pottery, massive sculpture and archi- tecture . . . literature that liecame the model for suhsequent ages . . . hours whirled away in the reserve room reading from primary sources . . . and the scholars of Greek held in awe hy all. t n 1 1 h iiiiiily 1 1 1 ■L ELIZABETH G. ZENN Associate Professor MYRNA G. YOUNG Assistant Professor 123 WALTER B. POSEY of History and Political Science History Lends Insight into the Problems of Complex World HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE . . . different per- sonalities revealing many phases of history . . . Mr. Swart presenting Russia from Peter to Mr. K. . . . Mr. Posey knowing all about American History . . . and Miss Smith outlining the French Revolution and Napoleon . . . Mr. Cornelius " democraticallv " teaching Political Parties . . . FLORENCE SMITH Associate Professor WILLIAM G. CORNELIUS Associate Professor diplomatic and gracious Mrs. Sims presenting International Relations . . . those Biographies quizzes . . . Walters Base- ment packed the night before 215 . . . Mr. Posey walking two miles through the snow to get to class on time . . . Mr. Swart panting " T reesked my life to get here ' ' . . . that indomitalsle pioneer spirit. Mrs. Sims makes her typical gracious response at A.A.U.W. tea in her honor. CATHERINE S. SIMS Professor of History and Political Science KOENRAAD W. SWART Associate Professor PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS REVEAL ALL KINDS OF SECRETS. Psychology Students Learn Principles behind Behavior PSYCHOLOGY ... an introduction to principles of human behavior . . . maturation and development . . . socialization of the child . . . laboratory work with calculator and animals to illustrate and test theories . . . observation of child behavior . . . trip to the state mental hospital for students of abnormal reactions . . . hours spent poring through abstracts . . . opportunity to hear work of Southeastern Convention each spring. GEORGE E. RICE Professor of Psychology KATHARINE T. OMWAKE Associate Professor MIRIAM K. DRUCKER Associate Professor 125 JOSEPHINE BRIDGMAN Professor of Biology NANCY P. GROSECLOSE Assistant Professor Biology and Chemistry BIOLOGY . . . Frogs and fruit flies . . . dicots and algae . . . evolution with l liss Bridgman . . . field trips to Grant Park and even Florida . . . Mr. Doerp spicing his lectures with jokes . . . Miss Salyerds " hamsters . . . colored heads in genetics lah . . . freshmen panicked over Mrs. Grav ' s lah practicals ... or spending thirty minutes drawing air huhhles on their microscope slides . . . the apple pies Miss Groseclose bakes. MR. DOERP AND NANCY NELMS OBSERVE PROGRESS OF CORN. S. LEONARD DOERPINGHAUS Assistant Professor ANNE SALYERDS Instructor NETTA E. GRAY Instructor 126 ELIZABETH A. CRIGLER Associate Professor , MARY W. FOX Instructor Explore the Secrets of Life CHEMISTRY . . . test tubes and nose-tingling aromas . . . cramming in Convocation . . . Dr. Frierson ' s dramatic tales of phosphorous . . . Bunsen burner attached to a water faucet . . . helpful hints from Mrs. Fox . . . red acid and blue base . . . true . . . false . . . those eternal " problems " of Quan . . . organic tests encompassing past, future, and unknown. CHEMISTS NINA AND DOHIE CREATE NEW DYES. JULIA T. GARY Assistant Professor W. J. FRIERSON Professor of Chemistry 127 MILDRED AND MISS RIPY TACKLE DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION RIDDLE. HENRY A. ROBINSON Professor of Mathematics Mathematics Gives Key to All Scientific Study MATHEMATICS . . . exploring the concepts of Euclid and Descartes ... a new course for advanced freshmen . . : the rigor of five-hour courses, a march through endless prolj- lems . . . blackhoards covered with numljers . . . graphs and charts . . . the application of theories . . . " I ' ve got it, I ' ve got it I " Dr. RoIj ' s apt interpretations of love through mathematical equations, hi s service rendered to campus organizations hy auditing their hooks . . . discussion questions faced by aloebrn students on Miss Ripy ' s tests . . . patient explana- tions bv Miss Gaylord, her direction of student course selection. SARA L RIPY Assistant Professor LESLIE J. GAYLORD Assistant Professor WEIGHTS AND BALANCES OFFER DELICATE PROBLEM TO JANE AND VALERIE. WILLIAM A. CALDER Professor of Physics and Astronomy Physics and Astronomy Explore Physical World PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY . . . coiirses covering sound, light, and heat . . . electricity and magnetism . . . more advanced students even delving into the mysterious realm of atomic physics . . . the labs livened up by all sorts of strange and shocking experiments . . . weights and measures teaching students accuracy, sometimes the bard way . . . mathematical calculations and infinitum . . . Dr. Calder grading tests with accompaniment of clas.-ical music . . . Stormy " s soft padding through the halls . . . motorcycle and harp — illustrating principles of mechanics and sound? . . . eclipse party at 2 a.m. . . . Mr. Hudson ' s contagious enthusiasm for work ! I WONDER IF A SLIDE RULE WOULD HELP AT A TIME LIKE THIS. HENDRIK R. HUDSON Assistant Professor HARRIETTE H. LAPP Assistant Professor LLEWELLYN WILBURN Associate Professor of Physical Education Physical Education Encourages Spirited Teamwork PHYSICAL EDUCATION . . . lost locker keys and for- gotten bathing caps . . . Miss Lapp ' s tunic and sandals and dancing eyes . . . beating feet on the gynt floor . . . Mrs. Campbell to modern dance class. ' " Now lift up vour bodies and show that they are beautiful " . . . and Miss McKemie ' s convertijjle . . . shouts on the tennis court . . . " Now watch. The frog kick goes like this! " . . . Miss Manuel ' s hair never wet . . . Miss Wilburn ' s brilliant performance in Run, Rab- bit, Run . . . swishing golf clubs and arrows . . . sunlight on the hockey field. KATE McKEMIE Assistant Professor NANCY M. CAMPBELL Instructor KATHRYN A. MANUEL Assistant Professor ELIZABETH C. STACK Assistant Professor MIRIAM HOWELL Assistant Professor Sociology and Education Confront Needs of Society Not Pictured: Edward T. Ladd, Associate Professor Richard L. Henderson, Professor of Education ANNA G. SMITH Associate Professor ECONOMICS STUDENTS HEAR DR. CARLSON ' S SPECIALIZED VIEWS. EDUCATION . . . Dewey and James . . . teaching of read- ing ... a thrill of being on the other side of the desk and grading papers — the practice teachers . . . sharing of ex- periences and ideas in afternoon seminars. SOCIOLOGY . . . the structure of society . . . primary- and secondary groups . . . race and regional problems . . . visits to federal penitentiary . . . films on India. MILDRED MELL Professor of Economics and Sociology : . ' •S S mSSSBSl M S r_ . 3fl 9| ffTOfciiSaaa 3 Bb S £kCv - a ' 3? -- D 1 J It ' s spring — crushed wild onions tell The news above a mower ' s roar. And heavy sways the scented bell Of apple tree. Come hail the sun on Inman ' s beach, Or gaze into a dandelion; Study fades beyond all reach In golden glow. A vesper world lies hushed in beauty; Trailing gowns of a Grecian court To Presser lead; and summer slowly Comes from spring. A daisy chain. Black robes. Contents Features : Spirit: Faculty Revue . . . Glee Clubs Concerts . . . Lecturers . . . May Day Court and Produc- tion . . . Graduation . . . Vaca- tions Volleyball . . . Softball . . . Golf . . . Riding . . . Archery . . . Tennis Organizations: Four Boards . . . Publications . . . Honoraries . . . Depart- mental . . . Music Clu bs M Inri l»|il l- ' v . ' ■ ' y. pnna EX-BIBLE TEACHER BUYS SOUL OF HARASSED ASC PROFESSOR. GALLANT SWORD BEARERS AND " MAYBE " COURT PRESENT " MAYBE " 9UEEN. When Faculty Perform WHAT THE DEVIL . . . Committees on writing . . . committees on casting . . . committees on staging . . . committees on committees . . . finally the fantabulous production . . . Cecil B. McNair . . . Mephistophanes, alias Garber . . . Mr. Foster ' s hectic, " typical " faculty household . . . touring Scotties on the moon with chaperone Gaylord . . . hula dancers from the D. O. ' s sunny shores . . . Beatniks Alston and Hayes in dance exhibition . . . Zen devotee Leyhum proclaims " Ripeness is all " . . . $850 for the campaign . . . The Devil to Pay! Devil takes Innocent professor for a ride to find the Sea of Tranquillity. STRANGELY FAMILIAR FACES ARE ENTICING DISTRACTIONS AT EFFICIENT NAVAL BASE IN THE SOUTH PACIFIC. There ' s the Devil to Pay in ASC Campaign " WE LOVE OUR KITTENS. WE IMPLORE YOU TO LET US KEEP THEM SAN FRANCISCO ' S 660 AND A FIFTH CLUB IS HOPPING WAY OUT. 137 Dr. Waddington successfully competes with spring outside for attention of his audience. SCIENCE FICTION COLORS PHILOSOPHIC TIME ANALYSIS. Students and visiting lecturers find time after seminars for additional question and discussion. British, Scotch and ' ' Ivy ' ' Scholars Conduct Seminars SPRING LECTURERS . . . ranging from dramatics and music to biology and philosophy . . . Glynne Wyckham, quest of Blackfriars, thrilling drama enthusiasts with his knowledge and accent from Britain . . . the principles and application of the electron microscope to embry- ology explained by C. W. Waddington, noted Scottish zoologist . . . Donald Williams from the philosophy department at Harvard with fascinating topic, " Are you too late to attend the liattle at Waterloo? " . . . " Aug- mented Seven " ' from Yale presenting popular music on a professional level . . . their records selling madly in the hub . . . syncopated bongos and guitars. 138 The boys sing passionately; the girls iooic on, thrilled. Beautiful Song of Destiny Presented in April Concert GLEE CLUB CONCERT with Brown University . . . directed by Miss Hagopian and Erich Kunzel . . . dinner dates beforehand for several lucky Scotties . . . tuxedoes and white organdy on a lighted stage . . . serious music given by the whole ensemble to the accompaniment of brass quartet . . . religious music of Schubert and a Brahms folk song . . . " Go tell it on the mountain " and " Set down, servant ' coming alive through resonant male voices . . . touch of humor with selections from " Porgy and Bess " . . . ensemble rocking with " Dem Bones " . . . an informal party for both groups and dates in Walters . . . relaxation . . . clusters around the piano ... all the old favorites. ANNE AND THE GROUP GATHER AT OLD PIANO AND NEW FACE. The work and anticipation of many weeks is culminated in a lovely spring concert. 139 %: ■J- J " ' .•iV " jC- ' HJs -i; ' . V c K J fcr . iS S!!:!: . ' ji: ' --; . ,:, ' ., ■• ..■■ ■v:- ■ ' .-., v.( " ' -- ' ' ' ■ ' ■. ' ■ ■ ■ Lffil tt- MAY COURT: Janice Bowman, Suellen Beverly, Mollis Smith, Millie McCravey, first attendant Becky Wilson, May Queen Mary Jane Pickens, Lucy Cole Font Christy Hages, Ana Maria Aviles, Judy Houchins. Grecian Festival to the Gods Presents May Court PROLOGUE ... a representation of the religious cere- monies which preceded the great drama festivals of ancient Greece . . . the lighting of a flaming altar to Dionysus in the May Day Dell . . . the appearance of Peter Swart clad in purple and gold . . . the queen ' s grape offering . . . eight priestesses with garlands . . . pastel gowns standing out in the twilight . . . worshipers in Grecian dress . . . interpretive dance . . . torchlight procession to the theatre. g 1 | -1 1 H m- g ' -1 h i ■Bm 9|h ' ' - ' . .y- ■ ' ' 1 1 I j J iBL. .. Ji MARY JANE PICKENS REIGNS AS HIGH PRIESTESS OF DIONYSUS. BECKY WILSON ATTENDS QUEEN IN CEREMONIES OF PROLOGUE. TWO JOLLY MEMBERS OF THE STAGE CREW DISPLAY TALENT. Performers and Backstage Crew Begin Work Weeks Ahead BEHIND THE SCENES of a production ... the satisfy- ing ring of hammer on hard wood . . . shaking legs on creaking, swaying ladders ... a stream of directions from Miss Green and Page, mostly calm, occasionally frantic . . . hours spent at costume fittings . . . actors scattering to the four corners of Presser to work on lines . . . hands covered with make-up . . . directors, weary stage crew and half the cast prying up tacks and ripping canvas late Saturday night. SALLY LIVES AT SEWING MACHINE AS DEADLINE DRAWS NEAR. DANCERS ROLLICK ON THE GRASS WHILE PRACTICING FOR " ELECTRA. " Bedlam Is the order of the day at one of first percussionist rehearsals. Aegisthus attempts in vain to postpone his death at the hands of the enraged Orestes. Blackfriars and Dancers Join to Stage ' ' Electra CHRYSOTHEMIS ENTERS WITH LIBATIONS. SOPHOCLES " ELECTRA " . . . ancient Greece revived with percussion music, regal costumes, and dance . . . tragedy in triumph . . . the curse of the house of Atreus finding its end in devastation . . . Orestes, the exile returned, sword unsheathed to avenge his father ' s death . . . the tutor bearing a false tale of Orestes ' death . . . Clytaemnestra, murderess yet mother still . . . Chryso- themis, the golden one, with reason her shield for fear . . . Aegisthus, the tyrant . . . the chorus of women of Mycenae fragmented . . . and Electra, alone, a hull of vengeance . . . staggering . . . nowhere to go except the cursed house . . . only the shadow of Apollo remaining, falling across on empty stage. CHORUS OF MYCENAEN WOMEN GATHER AROUND TO CONSOLE STRICKEN ELECTRA ELECTRA RECEIVES BLESSING FROM FAITHFUL OLD TUTOR. ELECTRA, BACKED UP BY THE CHORUS, VOWS HER LOYALTY TO DEAD FATHER. SISTER FALLS AT BROTHER ' S FEET IN HAPPY WORSHIP. AEGISTHUS DRAWS BACK IN HORROR AS HE UNCOVERS CORPSE OF CLYTOEMNESTRA. A long line of anxious black-clad seniors are led by Miss Leyburn across quadrangle. Atflk, i L ' ■ ' " " - " fe - - ■ - f Hm S l.: --l - ■ ' ' ■ ' ■■ ,v • ; : :! a- Bfl a jK- % ' _.: . p f: ' r ' ' - -Kg .- S - L— _ _9M ' " 3:: — ■ — Rewards of Four Years ' Effort and Service Are " Fire burn and cauldron bubble " — majors gather around to commit four years ' class notes and books to flames. SENIORS TRIP AHEAD CAUTIOUSLY TO THE FAMILIAR STRAINS. PROUD CLASS OF ' 62 BEARS HANDIWORK TO SATURDAY CLASS DAY. LUMPS RISE IN THROATS AS DR. ALSTON ADDRESSES I960 SENIORS FOR THE LAST TIME. Received by Class of 1960 GRADUATION WEEKEND . . . final togetherness and unity too precious . . . reviewing key moments of seniors ' four years and the sharing of songs in the May Day Dell . . . sophomore sisters with daisy chain — product of 6 AM breakfast at the Grill and a morning in the country ... an " S " on the grass . . . triumphant grins over books going up in smoke, awe-filled juniors kneeling to be capped . . . Baccalaureate service — worship, seeking guidance, depth . . . families reunited in love and pride ... a tea ... a late vigil in the Hub, slow singing, slow smiles . . . Graduation morning, a sline, a song, a chal- lenge . . . uncertain chins, a mob, clusters . . . lasting ties, closing trunks, the beginning. SENIORS CARRY TRADITIONAL DAISY CHAIN, GIFT FROM SOPHOMORE CLASS. EACH GIRL ' S JOY IS REFLECTED IN SPIRIT OF ALL HOOD AND DIPLOMA SYMBOLIZE ACHIEVEMENTS. 145 HERE LIE THE REMAINS OF A THIRTY-MINUTE SPREE OF PACKING. NGER DOES LAST MINUTE MENDING ON CAMP CLOTHES. Summer Fever Spreads to Every Corner on Campus PEAGLER, PETE, AND NANCY MAKE GLORIOUS VACATION PLANS. JUNE . . . that last exam . . . suitcases and trunks . . . the smell of mothballs . . . " But what can we do with the curtains? " . . . dreams coming true . . . white and lace, a summer wedding . . . ship ' s horn at Le Havre . . . camp- fires and young voices . . . lazy days at home, bridge, the swimming pool . . . seniors and their parents sharing cars with books and clothes . . . tears and good-bye ' s at the end of four years ... a freshman ' s " See you in the fall " . . . vacations before new responsibilities. THERE ARE OTHERS WHO SIT IN THE SUN MAKING OTHER PLANS. Franie combines studies with the sun. Sun, Fun, and the Campaign Make Spirit Soar in the Spring SPRING SPIRIT . . . dandelions, then the first green buds on the trees, and finally dogwood blossoms . . . Thursday chapels held on the sunny quadrangle ... a real show of spirit in the packed hub on " ' slave sale " night . . . money sailing into cardboard boxes . . . books and blankets spread over the grass ... a student under everv tree . . . those Sunday afternoon rides through the country in a convert- ilile . . . " Inman beach " covered with beauties, a portable radio playing softly . . . tans from Ida Cason ' s . . . sun glasses in the Hub and walks in the warm wind at sundown. IT IS FOR THIS MOMENT THAT WE LIVE THROUGH THE WEEK. SLAVE PEPPERDENE AND AUCTl ' ' JEER MABRY SPICE CAMPAIGN SPIRIT REFRESHMENTS AND SINGING SPARK OUTDOOR STUDENT MEETINGS. DECATUR ' S WINDING STREETS AND A SUNNY DAY CALL FORTH CAREFREE SCOTTIES ENJOYING " TESTLESS, " FIRST WEEK OF SPRING QUARTER. Scotties Strive for the Spirit Cup and AA Sports Letters CLASS SPIRIT CHAIRMEN . . . boosting class participation in intramural games . . . counting noses during Thursday chapel . . . pasting articles in scrapbooks and drawing huge banners enlivened by the smiling faces of Snoopy, Eloise, Flowers, and Alfred E . . . eagerly tabulating points for Spirit Cup . . . enthusiasm personified. WEARERS OF LETTER . . . loyal members of class teams . . . archery and bike riding . . . graying tennis shoes and white socks . . . posting activities on chart in the gvni . . . recognition for skill and interest. WEARERS OF LETTER: First row: P. Sylvester. P. Walker. B. Dalton, N. Bar N. Duvall. Second Row: L. Florance, S. Kelso, W. Muse, J. Norman, S. Saxon. CLASS SPIRIT CHAIRMEN: Freshman, L. Callaway; Junior, N. Stone; Sophomore, B. Gillespie; Senior, W. Boatwright. ' iJ i i 1 1 M % - M Juniors Capture Volleyball Crown; Frosh Place Second GENIE DRILLS ON HIGH SET-UPS DURING A PRACTICE SESSION. COORDINATION IS THE ANSWER FOR PEGGY AND THE FIRED-UP SOPHS. " TIRED OLE SENIOR " CAN STILL FACE UP TO A HARD SERVE 1.50 ' • i ' i classes Unite in a Final Athletic Effort-Softball VOLLEYBALL . . . spring and sprained fingers . . . eight girls functioning as one . . . set-ups for the front row . . . " rotate! " . . . watching base lines . . . serves aiming for the wide open spaces . . . balls in the rafters . . . fierce spikes surprising the opposition . . . safety warnings from Mrs. Lapp . . . fast-mo ' ing fluctuating score soon decided by the buzzer. SOFTBALL . . . sunny days at four . . . mass practice the first dav . . . bats and gloves . . . homers for everyone . . . getting into the swing . . . sore limbs, awkward plays . . . class practices . . . the meager makings of a team . . . third baseman playing short and second . . . improvised umpires . . . enthusiasm of class managers . . . growing optimism . . . the big games. PEAGLER BEATS ALICE OFF THE BAT FOR HER TEAM AT JUNIOR PRACTICE. Balance and strength mean " you ' ve got it! " mfm t -taea MARCI LEADS THIS IMPRESSIVE PARADE OF SCOTT EQUESTRIENNES AROUND PRACTICE RING AT VOGT ' S. " GREAT FORM, MARY JANE. WHERE ' S THE HOLE IN ONE? ' Spring Sun Calls Campus RIDING . . . jodpher clad Scotties gathered each day in front of the gym . . . long hours of bouncing in barns before learning to post . . . Teresa ' s familiar shout, " Terrrrot! " . . . thrill of jumping for the very experienced . . . sunlight on beautiful trails . . . proud performers at a climaxing Horse Show. GOLF . . . instruction one day a week by expert from a local country club . . . from practice balls to real ones, from hockey field to golf course with increasing skill. RIDER PUTS EVERY MUSCLE AND HEARTBEAT IN " BIG MOMENT " — HER FIRST JUMP. FRESHMAN BRYCE BURGESS DEMONSTRATES SERVING FORM. Out to Field and Court TENNIS . . . the satisfaction behind a solid serve . . . and a well-placed return . . . the feel of hot asphalt under the tennis shoes . . . the sight of a ball sailing blithely over the fence . . . ARCHERY . . . left eye closed . . . elbow up . . . Arthur ' s wheelbarrow and Mrs. Lapp ' s hat . . . the distant thud of an arrow that found its mark, the endless search for the one that didn ' t. BETSY DALTON WATCHES HER DOUBLES PARTNER RETURN THE BALL. ARCHERY IS FOR ROBIN HOOD, WILLIAM TELL, AND MANY SCOTTIES. AN ADVANCED ARCHER AIMS ' IN PREPARATION FOR A BULL ' S EYE. 153 Campus invades gym ■for picnic kick-off. Entire Campus Echoes ' ' Give Me that Ole Campaign Spirit ' I960 CAMPUS CAMPAIGN . . . weeks of planning meetings . . . preliminary excitement among committee chairmen and soliciters . . . kick-off luncheon . . . the gym transformed by festive picnic spirit . . . faculty cut- ting capers with gusto . . . colored balloons . . . bent coat-hanger and peanut hats . . . the sophomores capped with newspapers . . . more balloons on the ceiling . . . a host of new songs . . . rocket food and fuel . . . the hush of expectancy as mixture of campus loyalty ignites the rocket . . . Suppressed Desires Day . . . smart, new sports clothes . . . singing everywhere . . . victory con- vocation for campus and sophs ... a genuine Holiday. SENIORS COME OUT OF FOG AND DON COAT HANGERS AT LUNCHEON. TWO GLEEFUL SCOTTIES TIE UP THE FACULTY ELEVATOR ON " S.D. " DAY. BRAVE STUDENTS PRESENT FACULTY QUIRKS IN CHAPEL 154 w 1 aj D 3 V » r 1 Tl H F» T 1 ! if i 1 1 FIRST ROW: V. Allen, A. McBride, P. Walker, E. Purdom, C. Mason, L. Scales, M. Moore, L. Morcock. SECOND ROW: H. Mabry, L Jones, M. McCravey, J. Law, B. Dalton, D. Bates, D. Burns. THIRD ROW: S. H. High, J. Holloway, A. M. Aviles, H. Bagiatis, R. C. Hosack, P. Cox, S. S+rupe. Student Government Embodies Real Freedom and STUDENT GOVERNMENT . . . freedom through respon- sibility . . . the strength that depends on each student and her own individual sense of honor . . . Honor Emphasis Week presenting our system to the new students ... a time of re-evaluation and rededication for the old timers . . . flaws and weaknesses faced . . . stimulation of deep thought, hall discussions, and questioning . . . freedom of speech, debate, and assembly embodied in Thursday stu- dent meetings . . . encouragement of student expression by means of open forum chapel or the newspaper . . . dissent- ing opinions welcome . . . radicals admired . . . Exec meetings always open to student bodv . . . special invita- tion to one hall each Monday night . . . new late time limit . . . earlier single-dating privilege for freshmen than ever before . . . white, typed envelopes in the mail box Tuesday morning. OFFICERS: Seated: Eve Purdom, Pres.; Patricia Walker, Treas.; Carolyn Mason, V. Pres.; Standing: Ann McBride, Recorder; Lucy Scales, Sec. A FRESHMAN MAKES HER HONOR PLEDGE IN CHAPEL REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL: FIRST ROW: N. Duvall, C. Ma- son, E. Purdom, M. J. Pickens, C. West. SECOND ROW: M. Relti, D. Burns, M. H. Richardson, J. Law, M. Glasure, P. Walker, C. Brown. THIRD ROW: C. Feagin, M. P. Cross, L. Scales. H. Bagia- tis, B. Lewis, B. Burgess. Responsibility for All STUDENT MEETING ON ELECTION PROSPECTS IS PAINLESS LEARNING. Solemnity and awe are the predominant emotions during installation of Exec. FIRST ROW: S Johnson, F. Anderson, A. Rose, J. Weltch, D. Burns, Chm.; M. Culclasure, J. Seay, M Forston J. Powell. SECOND ROW: L. Grant, B. Hopkins, M. Crook, K. Kemp, E. McLam, P. Nichel, C. Goodwin, M. B. Elkins, B. Kenton, A. Williams. THIRD ROW: S. Bergstrom, B. A. Gate- wood, M. Eve, M. A. Shugart, G. McLemore. E. Whithers, B. Schenck, T. Carrigan, C. Pickens. t t B f? 00 157 1 •Tiirn — rw ' 63 Cub Officers: J. Hancock, V.-Pres.; F. Baily, Pres.; A. Freeman, Project Chm.; A. Miller, Pub. Chm.; B. Hutchenson, Treas.; M. A. Gregory, Sec. C. A. Officers: M. J. Pickens, Pres.; L. Hart, V.-Pres.; N. Marable, Treas. Not pictued: J. Bowman, Fr. Adviser; Nancy Batson, Sec. C. A. Serves Spiritual CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION . . . " believing that Chris- tianity is vital to all phases of life " . . . students of all denominations working together . . . " to understand the will of God for our lives through worship, study, and action " . . . examining Biblical Faith and Human Existence with B. Davie Napier during Rehgious Em- phasis Week . . . questioning in Hub discussions . . . singing at vespers . . . praying together in hall devotions. Cabinet— SEATED: 1. Flowers, M. J. Pickens, L. Hart, J. Bowman. STANDING: N. Marable, C. Bowen, M. Culpepper, J. Medearis, F. Bailey, J. Day, A. Russell, N. Batson, S. Amidon, K. Gwaltney. 158 SEATED: C. A. SERVICE COUNCIL; P. Gainer, L Hart, F. Gaines, R. Leroy. STANDING: J. Nabors, H. Coj, A. Pollard, E. Marks, A. Cochrane, C. Benbow, S. PruiK, D. Sanders, J. Jarrell. Not pictured: K. Chambers, A. Stotes. ESPERS IN THE BEAUTY OF NATURE CLOSE A DAY ON FALL RETREAT. Needs of Whole Campus KAY READS TO CHILDREN AT THE METHODIST CHILDREN ' S HOME. $ lllilt ill 111 " f " LYDIA CHATS WITH DR. PHILLIPS AT THE " MEET THE MINISTERS TEA. ' Tv i: A. A. BOARD, FIRST ROW: L. Flor- ance, N. Duvall, A. Broad. SECOND ROW: A. Hutchinson, B. Boatrlght, C. Askew, P. Sylvester, J. Imray, P. Mitchell, N. Hall. THIRD ROW: S. Kelso, E. Withers, J. Norman, S. Saxon, J. McQuilkin, L. Jones. Not pictured: H. Petkas, N. Stone. Athletic Association Promotes ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION . . . throughout the changing seasons . . . unchanging results: recreational opportunities . . . for friendship, for fun . . . for a change of pace . . . fall projects . . . orientating freshmen . . . going rustic at the cabin . . . cider and dovighnuts . . . our own Dr. Posey ' s guide to greater Atlanta . . . blazers and bonfires . . . rained-out hockey games . . . jazz filling the air around the Hub on certain Saturdays . . . Duvy, Boo, Ann, and Pam at the helm . . . Hutch ' s posters all over campus . . . the smell of new sweat shirts ... so the score goes up another notch ... a welcome oasis in dreary winter schedules . . . class and dorm basketball . . . the gym at A ScoHie recaptures a touch of summer fun as she practices strokes and prepares for class competition in swimming meet. OFFICERS: Pamela Sylvester, Treas.; Louise Florance, V. Pres.; Nancy Duvall, Pres.: Anne Broad, Sec. AFTER MEETING AT THE CABIN, A. A. BOARD MEMBERS GET DOWN TO BUSINESS. Spirit and Sportsmanship five ... a plate of oranges . . . sun through the windows . . . rain through the roof . . . from ice skating at Belve- dere to ice skating on the w alks . . . Dolphins in a sym- phony at sea . . . badminton tournament . . . And spring . . . spend-the-night parties at the cabin . . . instant coffee, instant bridge, instant papers . . . bicycling through Decatur . . . Slave sale for the campaign . . . volleyball, Softball . . . Thursday afternoon archery . . . tennis prac- tices and matches . . . teeing off at Avondale . . . and a community picnic . . . riding show at Vogt ' s ... a certain warmth, a certain way . . . " A rooty tooty-tooty, A.A. is all right — . " sponsors pep rally to herald the hockey season and boost campus spirit. THE HOCKEY SEASON KEEPS A. A. BUSY KINDLING STUDENT PARTICIPATION AND SPORTSMANSHIP. COUNCIL: Row I: D. Snead, J. Dun- can, S. Abernathy, B. Gershen, P. Holmes. Row 2: B. Lewis. M. Wilson, J. Heard. Not pictured: A. Hall, V. Thomas, B. Wilson. OFFICERS: -from left to right: Mary Wayne Crymes, Treas.; Sus nathy. Sec; Betty Lewis, Pres.; Bonnie Gershen, V. Pres. Social Council Stresses SOCIAL COUNCIL ... the newest, fastest growing of the four major organizations . . . with the ever present goal of social development . . . coordinating campus social activi- ties . . . providing for social needs ... a retreat in the fall to plan for the year ' s events ... a fashion show for fresh- men during orientation . . . faculty reception . . . the Dek-it contest encouraging early, tasteful shopping . . . Monday night meetings of officers and class representatives . . . planning and carrying out duties concerning the Hub, publicity, dances, and social standards and calendar events " S. E. " WEEK FINDS BOO AND BETTY EYEING INVITATIONS EAGERLY. JOANNA, WITH LUNCH BASKET BAG, HAS THE PLAID CASUAL LOOK. More Well-Rounded Living committees . . . Saturday night movies . . . presentation with A. A. of Fall Frolics Weekend . . . responsihility for campus dress policy . . . choosing of Glamour Best Dressed candidate . . . something new, " Social Emphasis Week! " . . . Good Grooming Day with male faculty members dis- cussing Agnes Scott dress and behavior . . . Etiquette and Personal Relations Day . . . Hostess Day with tips on enter- taining and the choice of silver and china . . . all to develop " the gracious woman. " KAY ROBERTSON AND DATE MAKE MOST OF FALL FROLICS RHYTHM. GERMAINE SHOWS OFF HER BLACK TAFFETA PARTY WEAR STUNNINGLY. WISTFUL LOOKS ARE IN ORDER AS LINDA MODELS OPERA FINERY. 163 6i i i... ' .V KV 4S XJM AFai LAYOUT STAFF: Row I: M. J. Pfaff, E. McLain, L. Nichols. J. Maddox, N. Bar,-. J. Hall. Row 2: J. A. Smith, M. Barry, P. Holmes. A. Alford. L. Gilbert, M. Bulloclc. B. Mordecal. S. Grey. S. Alexander. A. Stokes. F. Winn. A. Modlin. K. Gilliland. Not pictured: N. Nelms. J. Whitfield, S. Blomquist, M. Roberts, M. Lipham, J. Heini, B. Ford, M. Collins, M. Thomas, P. Baber, J. Roden, B. Hjnna, B. Murphy, M. Boswell, A. Hershberger. Carolyn West, Editor Silhouette Staff Works SILHOUETTE . . . ideas conceived in the spring that crystallize diirinj: the summer months . . . editor and managing editor presenting plans at the fall retreat . . . special excitement over theme, dedication, and beauties . . . Monday night staff meetings . . . those creaking black rocking chairs, smoke, overflowing ash trays, boxes of curled up pictures, and carbon paper . . . paper, pencil, and thesaurus of the copy writers ... a patient and Edi+h Towers, Class Editor; Becky Evans, Spor+s Editor. 164 BUSINESS STAFF: Martha Lambeth, Lucy Benton, Lillian Smith, Betty Sue Wyatt. Not pictured: Patsy Luther. To Capture Essence of 1960 persistent pliotograjjiier . . . pictures and rulers, the layout staff . . . long afternoons spent selling ads . . . twenty-five " no ' s " to one " yes " . . . striving to equal last year ' s All- American book . . . deadlines, a futile ideal . . . that last page of typing . . . exchanging ideas and books with other colleges . . . N.C.P.A. convention in New York . . . heavy boxes, a little gasp, the 1960 Silhouette . . . the story of Agnes Scott College. Nain Sfiegll+z, Business Manager; Mar+ha S+arrett, Copy EdI+or; Caroline Goodwin, Photography Editor. i Page Smith, Feature Editor; Janle Matthews, Organizations Editor. Mary Crook, Productions Staff; Margaret Goodrich, Managing Editor. Kay Richards, Art Editor; Grace Mangum, Faculty Editor. 165 STAFF: S. LeBron, N. Barr, F. Johns, L Lambert, M. Campbell, A. M. Aviles. N. Barrett, P. Rogers, E. Oglesby, M. Love, E. Middlebrooks, H. Ever Mustoe, L. Schow, L. Lentz, N. Archer. Not pictured: G. Carter, C. Conner, S. Blomqulst, P. Williams, N. Hughes, A. Avant. Corky Feagin, Editor EDITORS: Florence Gaines, Asst. Ed.; Mary Jane Moore, Asst. Ed.; Sara Anne Carey, Managing Ed.; Jackie Day, Asst.; Lisa Ambrose, Copy Ed.; Ann Parker, Entertainment; Sylvia Saxon, Sports Ed.; Marci Tobey, In- ternat ' l Ed.; Margaret Havron. Not pictured: Esther Thomas. News Staff Keeps Campus AGNES SCOTT NEWS STAFF . . . dedicated to keep- ing the campus informed, expressing student opinions, gripes, and questions, and hair-pulling . . . journalism hy hook or crook but always with amazingly accurate and thought-proyoking results . . . twenty-eight issues put out by thirty " Trojan " staff members . . . special campaign issue to spark campus effort with full-page drawings of new buildings . . . Corky ' s regular Tuesday meeting with Dr. Alston before planning assignment list . . . reporters given four days to do the stories . . . copy baskets crammed at noon Saturday . . . Sunday afternoon and night given over to " scrabble " as Lisa .1 - SARA ANNE AND CORKY LOOK BEYOND FRENZY OF DEADLINES TO THEIR LAST " ISSUE. WALKING THESAURUS, LISA, IS STILL SMILING. REPORTERS ' STORIES GIVEN " THIRD DEGREE " BY ASSOCIATE EDITORS. Informed and Concerned and Corky check facts, write sub-heads, and throw together last minute stories . . . sometimes resorting to the motto " all the news that fits we print " . . . Corky ' s brisk sunrise walk to the printers ' Monday morning . . . 5 p.m. to ? spent checking galleys and writing headlines . . . agony for Nell and Ann of chasing down subjects for pictures to fill those holes . . . hours on the phone getting ads . . . end result transferred from the press roll to mail boxes . . . sending delegates to New York journalism conferences . . . the smell of news print, complete coverage of campus life, world affairs, pins and rings . . . frenzy. H WHILE THE STAFF RESTS AN ELF IS BUSY. THE EXCHANGE " INDUSTRY " TAKES OVER. " WE COULD MAKE ANY MENIAL TASK FUN! " fff iTi ;P ' OFFICERS: Main StIeglJti, Pres.; Hope Gregg, V. Pres.; , Helen Linton, Librarian: Annette Smith, Librarian: Cornelia ' Brown, Sec: Jane Nabors, Treas.: Emily Pancake, Chapel Sec: Nancy Barr, Librarian. Not pictured: Jackie Day, Thelma Jenkins, Sylvia Pruitt. Glee Club Gives Christmas and Spring Concerts GLEE CLUB . . . late suppers on Monday and Thursday ... a lono; room in the hasement of Presser . . . librarians busily filling chairs with music . . . achieving proper bal- ance between parts ... a sock being knitted on the back row . . . joyous voices blending in Christmas rehearsals . . . robes and hymns followed by annual campus community partv . . . praverful responses in chapel . . . Sophomore members singing at thanksgiving service for their parents . . . preparing for April visit of Brown University . . . dark suits and pastel dresses. MEMBERS: Miss Hagopian, N. Stiegliti, A. Thomas, S. Hanson, H. Gregg, J. Day, N. Johnston, J. McNairy, P. Cox, H. Cox, J. Nabors, C. Turnage, R. Troth, A. Eyier, D. Brown, J. Fincher, B. Lockhart, H. Linton, D. Sanders, N. Barr, M. Ware, H. Glover, L. Schow, A. Pollard, J. Medearls, L. Lentz, M. Campbell, E. Smith T. Jenkins, C. Brown! E. Pancake, V. Johnson. B. Meyer, M. Boswell, S. Rodwell, J. Lewis, A. Cobb, M. J. Clark, F. Bailey, M. E. Barnes, A. Sam- ford, W. ' Barnwell, C. J. Buchanan, E. Vass, M. Braswell, C. HIckey, M. St. Clair, M. J. Pickens, L. Benton, P. Page, J. Ayers, D. McMillan, N. Tabor, S. Smith, T, E. ' Thomas, D. Bray, L. Lindskog, M. J. Kinghorn. Not pictured: K. Harelson, N. DuPuy, J. A. Smith, Pianist, P. Bruning. SALLY HOWARD VISITS MME. PANDIT WALTERS " SUITE. " DR. ALSTON GIVES HIS " WARM-ASC-WELCOME-TO-THE-VISITING-LECTURERS. ' Lecture Association Presents Stimulating Series LECTURE ASSOCIATION . . . bringing outstanding speakers to the campus . . . presenting Robert Frost ' s traditional delightful visit . . . sponsoring Madame Pandit ' s poignant analysis of East and West . . . bringing the Canadian Players with Taming of the Shrew . ' . . student and faculty committees working together . . . led for eight years by Miss Mell . . . respecting the voice of the student body . . • guided by the regular opinion poll . . . supported through the student budget . . . publicizing events . . . ushering and planning receptions for contact between stiulents and visitors . . . contributing stimulating enter- tainment to the community. MEMBERS: Seated: N. Tabor, M. P. Cross, Chmn.r B. Lunz. Standing: M. Love, S. Blomqulst, S. Pruitt, A. Morris, Treas.; M. Van Deman, M. Lambeth. 169 MEMBERS: FIRST ROW: N. Adams, E. Mlddlebrooks, L, Benton, G. Lemmond, M. Fortson, Barnes J. Scruggs, A. Wood, R. Shepherd, M. J. Moore B. S. Wya+t, V. Johnson, S. LeBron ton C Bowen D. Foster, C. Johnson, A. Ashford, J. A. Smith, W. Boatwright, M. Dotson E. McLain. A, L. Sullivan C. Brown. SECOND ROW: M. E L. Lentz, J. Praytor, L. Sc ales. THIRD ROW: L Smith, H. Lin- J. Maddox. Blackfriars Presents BLACKFRIARS . . . long practices, tired voices drifting across empty seats . . . make-up, costumes, and scenery . . . spotlights and dress rehearsal . . . new technical director. Miss Green . . . new ideas and a helping hand . . . " The Heiress " ... a falling curtain and burst of applause . . . members ushering for plays at the Tower theatre in Atlanta ... a showing of the " Orestea " . . . special winter quarter projects . . . revision of the constitution . . . taking inventory among dustv lioxes. piled up platforms, step units, flats. SEATED: Suellen Beverly, V. Pres.; Diane Snead, Pres.; Janice Powell, Treas STAfNDING: Brock Hanna, Sec. EXECUTIVE STAFF: P. Smith, B Hanna, D. Snead, S. Beverly, J Powell, S. Cunning, M. Havron M. McCravey, A. Parker, C. Hind M. Starrett, B. Mitchell, L. Dwen A. Boykin, P. Sylvester, C. Good SHAKESPEAREAN WORKSHOP DRAWS CROWD OF EAGER ONLOOKERS. Play, Sponsors Workshop nineteenth century mirrors, and fading canvases . . . oppor- tunity provided for members to attend Bishops " Company plays at Atlanta churches . . . sponsoring the Shake- spearean workshop with Lecture Association . . . talking with bearded cast, inspecting Elizabethean stage . . . films on the history of Shakespearean production . . . " Taming of the Shrew " . . . spring performance with Dance Group . . . good experience for new leaders . . . hoping for a sunnv afternoon . . . " Electra. " A TOUCH OF SADNESS ADDS TO THE SUSPENSE OF " THE HEIRESS. ' CANADIAN PLAYER GIVES HIS IDEAS ON SHAKESPEARE SETS. Becky Wilson Molly Schwab Doris Sanders Alice Coffin Kay Richards, art editor Page Smith Jean Dillard Susan Abernathy Mary Park Cross Ann Parker, literary editor Not pictured: Linda Grant, Katherine Kemp, Betsy Patter- son, Esther Thomas, Kay Gilli- land, Joanna Praytor, Sandra Still, Nancy Glass, Betty Bar- ber, Jo Stokes, Paula Wilson, Rosemary Clark. Students Find Outlet in Arts Magazine, Aurora Frances Johns, Carolyn htoskins, business manager, Marci Toby, Ana Maria Aviles, Polly Page. Not pictured: Barbara Baldauf, Dawneda Fowler, Ann Whisnant, Harriet Higgins, Jean Medearis, Lebby Rogers, Jacquelyn Nichol- son, Marion North, Kay Fuller, copy editor. AURORA . . . seeking expression for student creativity . . . challenging through criticism . . . encouraging originality . . . sharing poetry, prose, and pictures from the campus . . . unfolding plot and characterizations . . . emotion of drawings or hlock-prints conveyed . . . quar- terly tension of evaluating work submitted . . . pre- paring the magazine for publication . . . eager reading of glossy new copies . . . continuing purpose — to form an outlet for the art of pen and brush. B.O.Z.: S. Strupe, J. Hall, B. Crawford B. Wilson, M. Schwab, Pres.; R. Dlllard Folio and B. O. Z. Members Create and Criticize B. 0. Z. . . . development in literary expression . . . brisk nocturnal walks to faculty advisor Miss Janef Preston ' s home . . . the open fire . . . coffee, cookies, and constructive criticism . . . bi-annual tryouts . . . the mysterious meaning of B. O. Z. . . . informal dis- cussions of each member ' s own poetry and prose . . . suggestions . . . frankness . . . the writers of tomorrow. FOLIO . . . freshman literary organization . . . organized hy Miss Margaret Trotter in 1944 . . . original short stories, plays, poetry, sketches and essays written and criticized by freshmen . . . sharing of ideas and of a common interest . . . tryouts in the fall and w-inter quarters . . . annual publication of FOLIO, anthology composed of selected works of members. FOLIO: L. Cole, B. Barne+t, A. Schepman, M. McKInnon, Sec.-Treas.; N. Sibley, B. Schencit, E. Withers, B. Rau, M. Chew, C. league. Not pic- tured: N. Sheesling, Pres. r iX Vi- -J JL A GIANT OILCLOTH OCTOPUS INVADES AGNES SCOTT POOL AND CAPTURES EIGHT AQUATIC LOVELIES AS PREY DURING WATER PAGEANT. Dolphin Club Swimmers Compose A ' ' Symphony in Sea ' DOLPHIN CLUB . . . Agnes Scott ' s swimming club . . . advised by Miss Kay Manuel ... to encourage, develop, and perfect the art of synchronized swimming . . . the presentation of water pageant " Symphony in the Sea " for Sophomore Parents Weekend . . . performing community service in the spring by teaching swimming to crippled children at the Emory pool . . . providing spring quarter try-outs for " Seal Club, ' " little sister organization . . . membership to Dolphin Club if the requirements are met in the fall . . . splashes and legs. MEMBERS: Row I: S. Baumgardner, Sec.-Treas.; N. Nor+hcutt, B. Shannon A. Hershberger, J. Whitfield, J. Mc. Quilltin, N. Green, K. Chambers, V, Pres.; A. McBride, M. Fortson, S, Abernathy, M. Goodrich, Pres. Row 2: M. Young, H. Milledge, N. Ba+son S. Hoskins, S. Grey, B. Evans, P. Wal ker, P. Fly+he, J. Henderson, J. Roden M. W. Crymes, B. Hendee, S. LeBron R. Shepherd, A. Parker. DANCE GROUP: L. Hormell, A. Broad, Chairman; B. Hanna, K. Kallman, W. B. Childress, P. Nickel, J. Cooper, J. Nicholson, N. Nor+hcu++, B. Fuller. Not pic- tured: J. Corbett, M. Booth, S. Novotny. Dance Group Teaches the Daughters of Scott Grads Art of Expressive Movement Uphold Sense of Tradition CONTEMPORARY DANCE GROUP . . . modern dance taught as an art form from the standpoint of technique, composition and performance ... an opportunity to create beauty from rhythmic movement . . . the presentation of the " Christmas Story in Dance " . . . Electro at May Day . . . spring tryouts . . . expression through movement. GRANDDAUGHTERS CLUB . . . common bond of stu- dents whose mothers are alumnae . . . speakers on earlv traditions of Agnes Scott . . . quarterly meetings . . . Dr. McCain . . . serving the campus with a coffee in the Hub the Sunday of Fall Frolics weekend . . . the last year as an organization . . . mothers keeping in touch. GRANDDAUGHTERS: H. Gregg, L. Moye Holley, Sec.-Treas.; A. Rose, B. Hendee, E. Gumming, N. Duvall, P. Frederick. M. St. Clair, M. Vass, D. McMllla G. Palmour, B. n, N. Sibley, J. Mitchell, C. Lowi Moye, L. Sudbur J. Binkley, J. Webb, M. Young, E. Scofield, M. For+son, M. D. Poliakoff, M. Wilscn, J. Nicholson, M. Collins, Pres.; S. DEBATE TOURNAMENT VICTORS, WITH TROPHIES, BEAM PROUDLY. PETE BROWN LIVENS UP THE REGISTRATION FOR THE S.E. TOURNAMENT. Pi Alpha Phi Helps Debaters to Perfect Technique PI ALPHA PHI . . . campus debating group devoted to perfection of debating techniques and practice with both humorous and important topics . . . invahiable help in speaking to a group and in quick thinking . . . that argu- mentative spirit . . . All Southern Intercollegiate Debating Tournament in January . . . time-keepers and teas in the Hub . . . intra-club debates held through the year . . . Resolved : This house prefers Woolworths to Wordsworth . . . Resolved: Licensed medical doctors should reserve right to perform mercy killings . . . followed by construc- tive criticism with Dr. Hayes advising . . . spring cham- pionship debate and picnic. MEMBERS: Row I: L. A. Knalce, Pres.; A. CoHin, Sec; E. Hines, M. P. Cross, Treas. Row 2: B. Hendee, J. Kelley, L. Benton, D. Sanders, M. Boswell. Not pictured: S. Howard, F. Chao, Debate Manager; B. Barber, Historian. International Relations Club Stimulates World Awareness IRC . . . development of world awareness through study and discussions of other countries and of problems of international concern . . . displays in library to save an otherwise " behind-the-times " campus . . . exhibition show- ing varied world cultures . . . chapels on the U.?s. and U. S. election prospects . . . participation in conference on world affairs at Emory and C. C.U.N. . . . outstanding speakers . . . UNICEF Christmas cards. Eta Sigma Phi Delves into Classical Arts and Culture ETA SIGMA PHI . . . study group to promote and stimu- late interest in the history, art, and literature of ancient Greece and Rome . . . club ' s current theme centered around archaeological findings in ancient world . . . student- prepared programs often illustrated with slides . . . mem- bership based on 200 level course and grade standard . . . helping to sponsor Orestea film . . . refreshments in homes of classics faculty. IRC: 1st row: L. Zimmerman, Treas.; S. A. Carey, K. Kirk, Pres. 2nd row: M. Tobey, K. Hawkins, V.-Pres.; D. Nieuwenhuis, J. Norman. 3rd row: M. Havron, Pub. Chm.; A. Aiford. 4th row: J. Kennedy, A. Avant, C. Hoskins. 5th row: J. Hall, L. Dwen, B. Pancake. Not pictured: A. Newsome, Sec. ETA SIGMA PHI: SEATED: M. Day, Pres.; P. Smith, V.-Pres.; M. Thomas. STANDING: C. Craig, L Moye, K. Kirk, J. Day, L. Kerley. Not pictured: M. Collins, Sec; P. Anderson, Treas.; J. Kelley, L. Lowndes. PSYCHOLOGY CLUB; SEATED: L Nichols, J. Norman, V.-Pres.; L. Clark, Pres.; J. Seay, Treas.; J. Juarez, Sec; J. Law. SECOND ROW: M. J. Pfaff, E. Marks, P. Gainer, B. Murphy, P. Rogers, D. Foster, C. Butts. THIRD ROW: J. Jarrell, B. Fuller, C. Preische, W. B. Childress, L. Dwen. Psychology Club Interests Members in Applied Fields PSYCHOLOGY CLUB ... to promote an interest in psychology, its application and importance in modem life . . . primarily for majors and interested Sociology students . . . talks by industrial and clinical psychologists and a public mental health expert . . . making octopi at Christ- mas time for children at a mental school . . . sharing of independent study . . . spring party. Students Perfect Language Through the Spanish Club SPANISH CLUB ... to engender a familiarity with the culture of Spanish speaking peoples ... to strive toward perfection in the spoken language ... a recent emphasis on understanding and evaluating Latin American problems . . . joint meetings with the Atlanta and Georgia Tech Pan-American Clubs . . . meetings in advisors ' homes . . . songs, games, talks by professors and critics. SPANISH CLUB: SEATED: A. Thomas, Treas.; J. Stokes, Pres.; A. M. Aviles, Sec; STANDING: P. Brooks, J, Hall, B. Crawford, M. G. Palmour, E. Towers. Not pictured: P. Bevier, V.-Pres. 178 MEMBERS: Row I: F. Johns, F. Winn, L. Lambert. Row 2: A. Hershberger, A. Whisnant, M. Moore, M. Lambeth, N. Batson, W. Boatwright, V. Pres.; H. Glover, L. Kimsey. Row 3: E. Middlebroolcs, P. McGeachy, K. Kirk, K. Fuller, Pres.; J. Hall. Not pictured: L. Zimmerman, Pub. Chmn.; J. C. Brandeis, Sec. Touch of the Continent Is Discovered by French Club FRENCH CLUB ... a touch of France . . . the language, the songs and occasional French films . . . meetings in the homes of faculty advisers . . . halting 101 students, mostly listening . . . involving experience for majors . . . dinner at Emile ' s ... a hilarious comedy given at Emory hy a Parisian acting troupe ... la table francaise each Thursday . . . Camus study groups. Meetings of Organ Guild Young Musicians Gather at ORGAN GUILD . . . campus organists meeting weekly to study playing techniques, registration, and types of organs and church architecture . . . sharing problems met in individual lessons . . . participation in master classes . . . playing for Thursday chapels . . . all members learning Bach pieces for Spring entertainment of Atlanta chapter . . . dinner at the Martins ' . MEMBERS; Row I: J. Medearis, D. McMillan, S. Pruitt, A. Smith, A. McBride. Row 2: C. Henderson, C. J. Dickert, Treas.; M. Collins, C. Robinson, S. H. High, B. Delk. 179 MEMBERS (L. to R.): Sarah Hel- en High, V. Pres.; Nain Stieglitz, Treas.; Phlllis Cox, Recording Sec; Charlotte Henderson, Pres. Not pictured: Bonnie Meyer, Chap- Musical ' ' Scotties ' ' Share Style in Sigma Alpha lota SIGMA ALPHA IOTA . . . Agnes Scott chapter of national music fraternity . . . meetings devoted both to study of various styles and forms of music and to performance by members . . . majors and interested non-majors sharing their talent . . . advised and often instructed by Miss Hagopian . . . working on project of compiling song books to be ready for campus use in the Fall. Chi Beta Phi Recognizes the Top Science Students CHI BETA PHI . . . honorary science fraternity for biol- ogy, chemistry, physics, math, and psychology majors . . . to promote interest in all new areas of development . . . Dr. Calder on the Universe . . . radio isotopes lab . . . visit to the crime lab . . . Caroline MikelFs seminar on Darwin . . . key award presented to most outstanding member at special convocation. MEMBERS: SEATED: B. Florance, S. Cumminq, V. Pres.; H. Milledge, M. Young, Pres.; E. Scofleld, L. Acree, J. Flowers. STANDING: M. Love, B. Evans, Corresponding Sec; P. Smith, C. King, Treas.; J. Kennedy, M. Glasure, P. Gainer, A. Broad, N. Marable, W. Neal, J. Henderson. Not pictured: C. Thomas, Recording Sec; K. Armltage. 180 JANICE BOWMAN CRAWFORD FEAGIN LOUISE FLORANCE JOANNA FLOWERS Senior Leaders Serve the Campus on Mortar Board MORTAR BOARD . . . outstanding seniors dedicated to service, leadership, and scholarship . . . standing for wholeness, well-roundedness, and student body loyaltv to the college . . . providing interpretation between adminis- tration and students . . . sponsoring campus campaign. Marriage Class, Saturday chapels, and leadership training conference . . . procession of candles in restless library- . . . Trish Walker chosen to lead in ' 61. LILLIAN BLAKE HART CAROLINE MICKELL JONES BETTY LEWIS HELEN MABRY CAROLYN MASON EVE PURDOM MARY HART RICHARDSON SYBIL STRUPE 181 On the following pages are our duey ti L6er6 The Independent College The independent college belongs to those who believe in it. It can have no other ownership. It has flourished through the centuries because every generation raises up people who understand its power for good. Rooted in this faith, steadfast, humane, the independent college abides as a citadel of the unfettered mind and spirit. AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE DECATUR, GEORGIA FOUNDED 1889 183 KAty SAVE WHERE KATY SAVES 4 ro THERE ' S ALWAYS A SPECIAL WELCOME AT DECATUR FEDERAL SAYINGS FOR STUDENTS. FACULTY, ALUMNI AND FRIENDS OF AGNES SCOTT current rate and Loan Association Main Office: 103 Sycamore St. Decatur, Georgia Branch Office: 1807 Candler Rd. Phone: DRake 8-8821 or com in Colonial you come out tetter ever a time MINNIE QUARTS SAYS: 3e sure to get your daily Vitamins. )rink Irvindale Multi-Vitamin milk Fortified with all the Vitamins you need every day. Call TRinity 2-7703 tor Home Delivery. IRVINDALE FARMS DAIRY 484 Plaster Avenue Atlanta, Georgia Your Statewide INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER Construction Equipment Distributor TRI-STATE TRACTOR CO. Atlanta — Macon Albany — Augusta — Savannah Back Better Roads CATERPILLAR WILL HELP BUILD THEM Yanceii Bros. 1 CO. ATLANTA 1540 Norlhside Drive, N.W. - Phone TR 6-3741 AUGUSTA l MACON 1781 Fifteenth Street fe(«lil)J 4660 Broadway Phone RE 3-2241 ' !USP ' ' ' ' ° " e SH 5-9261 J Jy : ' -. .. ' J. ' .L, - Tempo-Geha Mimeograph Equipment Supplies MAUD BAKER FLOWER SHOPPE Printing . . . Office Supplies . . . Service 252 W. Ponce de Leon Avenue RAY SMITH COMPANY Deliveries throughout greater Atlanta DR 7-3818 2588 Cascade Road, S.W. PLaza 8-1352 Atlanta II, Ga. PLaza 3-4478 Compliments of SHARIAN, INC. Rug and Carpet Cleaning DR 7-6488 Compliments of ROY D. WARREN INSURANCE, INC. - • ' J 418 Healey Building _.-- Phone: JA 3-6262 For Homes Rentals Insurance Investments In Decatur or DeKalb County See or call us WHEAT WILLIAMS REALTY " Realtors " 1 19 E. Ponce de Leon DR 7-2606 DR 7-2607 Decatur, Georgia BELVEDERE MOTEL 3480 Memorial Drive, S.E., Atlanta, Georgia Telephone— BUtler 9-6633 Highway I 54 Spur of 78- 1 2, located 1 1 2 nniles fronn Atlanta A DINKIER MOTOR INN Completely air-conditioned, the rooms are spacious and beautifully decorated with wall to wall carpeting, Icing size beds, air-foam mattresses, tile baths and other con- veniences with free TV and Radio. Excellent restaurant, with tables and counter service. Children ' s playground, swimming pool and ice skating rink. Free morning coffee and newspaper. New shopping center directly across. Baby sitters available. COX RECORD SHOP 161 Peachtree Street TRI-STATE CULVERT MFG. DIV. FLORIDA STEEL CORPORATION 151 DEKALB INDUSTRIAL WAY DRake 8- 1 744 Post Office Box 117 DECATUR, GEORGIA FABRICATORS AND DISTRIBUTORS OF . . . Corrugated Metal Pipe and Pipe Arch Asphalt Coated C. M. Pipe and Pipe Arch Asphalt Coated and Pvd. C. M. Pipe and Pipe Arch Perforated Corrugated Metal Pipe Structural Plate Pipe, Pipe-Arch and Arches hieadgates and Auto. Flap Gates Deep-Beam Guard Rail Highway Signs and Posts Special Fabrication for Drainage and Water Control Installations tor Industry and Agriculture A new Home See The Beaufiful Dial Heights and Dunaire Sub-Divisions I Mile Northeast Avondale on Memorial Drive Dunn and Son DR 8-0596 Established 1910 F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO. INCORPORATED " Beautiful and Permanent Building Materials " ATLANTA 9, GA. 1690 Monroe Dr., N.E. Phone TRinity 6-1084 yn A ' World ' s Finest Steel Die Engraved Collegiate Stationery and Fashionable Writing Papers ATLANTA, GEORGIA Best Wishes to Agnes Scott College from CALLAWAY MOTORS. INC. 231 W. Ponce de Leon Ave. Decatur, Georgia Oldsmobile Lark by by General Motors Studebaker COMPLIMENTS OF GLENWOOD NATIONAL BANK Member F.D.LC. GLENWOOD PAINT CENTER 3182 Glenwood Rd. DR 7-6256 ARMOUR AND COMPANY 944 Brady Avenue •■- ■ BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF I960 THE DEKALB NEW ERA 124 Atlanta Avenue Decatur, Georgia TENNESSEE EGG COMPANY 448 Georgia Avenue, S.W. -- — " SOUTHEASTERN ELEVATOR COMPANY DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS I 441 Memorial Drive, S.E. Atlanta, Ga. Compliments of F. W. WOOLWORTH COMPANY 1740 Peachtree St., N.E. Atlanta, Georgia BEST WISHES - WATSON PHARMACY 309 E. College Ave. DR 3-1665 - - DECATUR, GEORGIA Compliments of LUTHER CONSTRUCTION COMPANY Grading Contractors 4485 Memorial Dr. Decatur, Ga. BU 9-3122 x -. ' D E C c o A A B T O S U P R • 192 J J SHOES (Formerly Newsome ' s Shoes) ' " ' 117 CLAIRMONT AVENUE DRake 8-141 1 DECATUR GEORGIA - — - Compliments of CAGLE ' S INC. I 2000 Hills Ave, N.W. LOVABLE BRASSIERE CO. 845 Spring St. Atlanta, Ga. Compliments of WILLOW SPRINGS MOTEL 4844 Memorial Drive Stone Mountain, Georgia 193 CONNECTICUT MUTUAL LIFE 522 Fulton Federal Building Atlanta Geor " The Flavor you like The Name You Know " CANADA DRY CORP. 1910 Murphy Ave. PL 3-2183 MELTON-McKINNY, INC. PLUMBING Repairs a Specialty 432 E. Howard Ave. DR 3-4622 Southeastern Bakers Supply Company 316 Peters Street, S.W. Atlanta 3, Georgia 194 Don ' t set+le for less Get the best LEWIS SEED STORE at 406 E. Howard Ave. DECATUR LUMBER SUPPLY CO. 245 Trinity Place Decatur, Sa. SERVICE— QUALITY— SATISFACTION i 1 WSdW COMR 1 V®. 1 i SIMPLY WONDERFUL SPORTSWEAR 133 Sycamore St. Decatur, Sa. " On the Square " Avoid Atlanta Traffic — Stop at HOTEL CANDLER DECATUR, GEORGIA 105 Modern Rooms AIR CONDITIONED Excellent Coffee Shoppe Headquarters for All Civic Clubs PLENTY OF PARKING SPACE L L. TUCKER, JR., Lessee and Manager r l— W ■ M W ■■ P I traditional for fine quality and service Since 1882, Miller ' s Book Store has the traditional reputation for fine quality and service with a com- plete line of supplies for all college needs. From the famous volumes of the world to notebook paper and art supplies . . . from personal gifts of distinction to a complete line of office supplies. No wonder students all over the Southeast look to Miller ' s Book Store. Mom and Dad did . . . and now this same reputation is as modern as tomorrow. Make Miller ' s Book Store your home for all college needs. if It is for office, school, or home . . . for birthdays, anniversaries, graduation . . for Christmas, Valentine Day, or Easter . . . You can get it at — Jmums BOOK OFFICE SUPPLY CO. DECATUR lI3Clai. " THE NEWEST WAY TO GIVE YOURSELF A TREAT " WAFFLE HOUSE JUST GOOD FOOD OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY 1 2719 E. College Avenue 2 972 Peachtree St., N.E. 3 3198 Candler Plaza 4 1244 Clairmont Rd. A FRIEND TWELVE OAKS RESTAURANT 1895 Piedmont Road, N.E. Atlanta, Georgia Compliments of BURFORD, HALL, AND SMITH 769 Hemphill Ave. Atlanta, Georgia The Zep Manufacturing Corp. " Where To Buy It " SY 9-5671 1310 Seaboard Industrial Blvd. ATLANTA, SA. BROWN-WRIGHT HOTEL SUPPLY 512 W. Peachtree, N.W. Atlanta, Georgia Coca-Cola Bottling Co. SHIP A-HOY RESTAURANT 95 Luckle Street, N.W. ATLANTA, GEORGIA THE SHERWIN-WILLIAMS CO. OF GEORGIA Paints — Varnishes — Lacquers — Leads — Oils — Enamels Brushes and Painters ' Supplies DR 7-1751 217 Trinity Place Decatur, Georgia P M Congratulations to the class of I960 L H ' 1 RUTLAND ' S CLOUDT ' S FOOD SHOP hS Kl HOUSE 1933 Peachtree Road, N.E. OF Atlanta, Georgia MUSIC - BUILDING FROM STRENGTH President S. Russell Bridges, Jr. CLU A+Ianfa General Agents J. T. Embrey William C. Griscom Earl E. Vicit Virginia M. Carter ' 40 ! Home Office — Atlanta, Georgia ARISTOCRAT ICE CREAM " All the Name Implies " Quality Ice Cream for All Occasions Congratulations from CAMPUS GRILL Two Locations: 1250 South Oxford Road— Emory 106 North McDonough Street — Agnes Scott COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND ;, . HEARN ' S JEWELRY COMPANY 131 Sycamore Decatur, Georgia • Compliments of BARGE-THOMPSON. INCORPORATED ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS , 136 Ellis Street, N.E., Atlanta, Georgia Compliments of Waldorf Motel 201 Ltt-jjija — ;?p ma.. - ■ — J. p. STEVENS ENGRAVING CO. Established 1874 Society Stationers 10 Peach+ree N.W. JA 2-6870 You never outgrow your need for milk. JAclcson 5-4645 Atlanta, Georgia FULTON SUPPLY COMPANY INDUSTRIAL, TEXTILE CONTRACTORS SUPPLIES MACHINERY ATLANTA GEORGIA PATRONIZE YOUR ADVERTISERS N , . - J pecialiit in vSndal { " kotoapapki larapnu ANNOUNCEMENTS FORMALS CANDIDS Dale Roberts j- kotoarapker for i960 ilkouette INE PRINTING SINCE 1887 — That ' s the story of Foote Davies, Inc. Today we have one of the most modern and best equipped plants in the country. And fine Yearbooks have always been an important part of our business. Our craftsmen believe in quality and strive to produce the " best in the Industry. " Our excellent printing doesn ' t just happen — it ' s a combination of production research, craftsmanship, and painstaking supervision. FOOTE DAVIES, INC. iy witei ' itAo i f K ' M Mod- . ami ' acfuivyi 764 MIAMI CIRCLE, N. E. ATLANTA 24, GEORGIA i i — Annual Staff Editor . . . Carolyn Yvonne West Managing Editor . . . Margaret Goodrich Business Manager . . . iain Stieglitz Art . . . Kay Richards Classes . . . Edith Towers Susan Alexander, Pat Holmes, Mary Jane Pfaff. Florence Winn Copy . . . Martha Starrett Kay Gilliland, June Hall. Judy Heinz. Ann Modlin. Angelyn Stokes Faculty . . . Grace Mangum Brock Hanna, Linda Nichols, Josie Roden Features . . . Page Smith Marian Barry. Sally Boineau. Sue Gray. Jo Allison Smith Photography . . . Carol Goodwin Nancy Barr. Sallv Bloniquist. Judy Maddox Edna McLain Production . . . Mary Crook Angelyn Alford, Kay Gilliland. Angelyn Stokes Spirit . . . Becky Evans Carey Bowen, Margaret Bullock. Rae Carole Hosack. Barhara Mordecai Business . . . Nain Stieglitz Carolyn Benhow, Lucille Benton. Martha Lamheth. Patsy Luther, Carol Rogers. Lillian Smith. Joyce Townsend. Betty Sue Wyatt 205 Editor Ends Work of the Year on Note of Thanks It seems almost impossil)le to sum up in an editor ' s last word the slightest idea of what has taken place hehind the scenes in order to put this 1960 Silhouette into your hands. These few words can only express in brief the feeling of the people who have worked on the book, and the great appreciation of the editor for those who, in giving tlieir time, talent, and energy, made the publication possible. The year has been filled with fun, friendship, worry, and work. The idea for the theme took place in the mind of the editor and managing editor last summer, and was thought through between hours of summer school and work for an insurance company. The staff took hold of the idea and it grew at the retreat at Camp Daniel Morgan Jiefore school. When school started the work began. It seemed as if there was an amazing number of pictures to be taken, events to be covered, pages to lay out, copy to write, people to identifv, and words to type. The cover was designed, thanks to Kay, and we discovered we might be putting together an annual amidst all the hustle. Thanks to Mr. Roberts and Jim the pictures were made, and Mr. Yoimg patiently waited on the pages which were slowly completed. The Monday night meetings got to be a habit and the staff progressed as a team. Toward the end, nerves were on edge, papers and tests were neglected, and one practice teacher did not have her lessons prepared at times. My special thanks go to Margaret who was indispensable not only to me but to the entire staff. She held the staff together with a cahn, reassuring word, i when the editor was not completely reassured. She was always there when I I needed her. and she told me things about photography which I don ' t yet under- stand. It would be impossible to express to her my gratitude, and the pleasure I found in working with her. Martha did a job which I consider superb, and when the deadlines got closer she got even more cheerful. Mary typed, and found mistakes that I had overlooked, and Nain kept us on our feet financially with a record-breaking sale of ads. All of these people plus nianv more made this book a reality. The book ' s theme tries to express the real mood of the campus and its changing face throughout the seasons. Each quarter brings a special " beauty to the campus and new experiences to the girls who live there. We hope vou catch a glimpse of it in the 1960 Silhouette. CAROLYN YVONNE WEST. A Abernathy, Susan . 5 1 , 1 62, 1 74 Abernethy, Mary-Knox 71 Abernethy. Nancy 71, 103, 102 Acree, Elizabeth 40, 180 Adams, John L 117 Adams, Nelia 65, 107, 170 Adams, Sarah 65 Addison, Sally 7! Alexander, Susan 36, 65, 1 64 Alford, Angelyn 40, I 64, I 77 Allen, Martha Lee 65 Allen, Virginia 8, 36, 71 Allen, Mary V 1 20, I 37 Allen, Patricia 71 Allen, Vicky 65, 156 Alston, Wallace 6, 23, 106, 122 Ambrose, Lisa 40, 41, 166 Amidon, Sue 36, 65 Anderson, Frances 36, 71, 156, 157 Anderson, Janice 71 Anderson, Pat 41 Andrew, Mary Mead - 71 Antley, Mary Ann 58 Archer, Nell 41, 166 Armitage, Kay 41, 1 80 Ashford, Ann 58, 1 70 Askew, Caroline 36, 1 60 Avant, Ann 58, 177 Aviles, Ana Maria 58, 156, 166 Ayres, Jane 71 , 1 68 B Baber, Peyton 17, 27, 36, 41 Bagiatis, Angelina 71 Bagiatis, Hytho 41, 156, 157 Bailey, Frances 71 , 148, I 68 Baldauf, Barbara 59 Barber, Elizabeth 59 Barker, Nancy Jane 59 Barnes, Mary Ellen 168, 170 Barnett, Beth 36, 71, 173 Barnwell, Willette 36, 72, 102, 168 Barr, Nancy .36, 59, 102, 149, 164, 166, 168 Barrett, Nancy 66, 166 Barry, Marion - 41, I 64 Bates, Dolly - 4 1 , 1 56 Bates, Leewood - -72 Batson, Nancy 59, 174, 179 Baumgardner, Lauretta 59, 174 Behrman, Doris _ -- 66 Bellune, Elizabeth 59 Benbow, Carolyn 66, 159 Bennet, Jane 59 Benton, Lucille 32, 66, 146, 165, 168, 170 Bergstrom, Sally 72, 157 Beverly, Suellen 26, 28, 42, 89, 170 Bevier, Ram - 59 BInkley, Jacquelyn 72, 175 Blvens, Emily 1 5, 42 Bloomqulst, Sally 66, 169 Boatwright, Betsy. 42, 1 60 Boatwright, Wendy 66, 101, 170, 179 Boineau. Sallie 66 Bond, Nancy 66, I 56 Boney, Mary I 122 Booth, Mike 32, 59 Boswell, Meade 56, 168, 176 Bowen, Carey 31, 36, 65, 66, 170 Bowman, Janice 36, 42 Boykin, Alice 36, 59, 102, 151, 170 Brandeis, Judith Clark 59 Brantley, Judy 72 Braswell, Mildred I I, 42, 168 Bray, Alice B 114 Bray, Doris 72, 168 Brennan, Jean 59 Brewton, Dian Smith 42 Bridgman, Josephine 126 Broad, Anne 32, 35, 59, 101, 160, 175, 180 Brock, Donna 59 Brown, Barbara 72 Brown, Pete 25,59, 146, 157, 168, 170 Brown, D ' Etta 36, 72, 168 Bruce. Becky 72 Brueninq, Patricia 72, 168 Bryan, Sally 59 Bryan, Cantey 72 Bryant, Cornelia 72 Buchanan, Clara Jane 66, 168, 179 Bullock, Margaret 59, 164 Burgess, Bryce 25, 72, 153, 157 Bruns, Dotty 1 27, 1 57 Butcher, Nancy 72 Butler, Anne M Ill Butts, Cynthia 42, 178 Byers, Edna G II I Byrd, Joan 59 c Calder, William A 129 Calhoun, Germaine 66 Callaway, Lucie 22, 72, 149 Campbell, Martha 66, (66, 168 Carey, Sara Anne 42, 57, 166, 177 Carrigan, Teresa 72, (57 Carter, Gail 66 Carter, Mary ( ( ( Cauvel, Martha Jane (22 Chambers, Kathryn 59, 174 Chandler, Sandra 72 Chang, Kwai Sing 122 Chao, Faith 59 Chew, Martha 72,173 Childress, Willie Byrd 32, 59, 175, (78 Choi, Choon Hi .43 Christensen, Anne 59 Christie, Annie May ((8 Cllley, Melissa 88. 121 Claridy, Jo „ 66 Clark, Frances 120 Clark, Linda 43, 1 78 Clark, Mary Jim 59, (44. 168 Clark, Rosemary 66 Clifton, C. B ( (5 Cobb, Ann 43, (68 Coble, Carolyn 72 Cochrane, Alice 28, 36, 60, 159 Coffin, Alice 60. 1 76 Cole, Lynne 36, 72, 173 Collier, Mason 36, 72 Collins, Margaret 43, 1 75. I 79 Conner, Vivian 66, 102 Connor, Carroll 60 Conrad, Patricia 72 Conwell, Edith 60 Cooper, Jane 60, 175 Corbett, Jean .60 Cornelius, William G. -124, (36 Cowan, Carol — 66 Cox, Harriet 66, 159, 168 Cox, Phyllis 43, 156, (68, (79, 180 Craig, Cynthia .66, 177 Craig, Rebecca 72 Crawford, Beth 66, 173 Creech, Sandra - 36, 72 Crigler, Elizabeth A 127 Crook, Mary 43, 157, 165, 205 Crosby, Suzanne - -- 66 Cross, Mary Park 24, 60, 157, 169, 176 Crum, Lyila 72 Cruthirds, Judith .72 Crymes, Mary Wayne 60, (62, 174 Cu Ida sure, Mary — 66 Cumminq, Shannon 31,43,57, 154, 170, 175, 180 Curd, Mary Hoi man 66 Curry, Ela B 109 Czarnitzkl, Sue 66 D Dalton, Betsy ,. 36, 60, 103. 149. 153. 156 Davis, Sandra 60 Davis, Linda - - 72 Davis, Lucy Maud 60 Davis, Patricia 72 Day, Marlin 60. 177 Day, Jackie 66, 166, 168, 177 Debelle, Ann - 36. 72 DeLaney, Ellen _ - - — 66 Delk, Beverly 43, 179 Denton, Lynn -8, 72 DIckert, Marguerite 60, 179 Dillard, Renni 28, 60, (73 Dills, Jane ,-72 Doan, Dorreth - -44 Dodson, Mary Louise ( (3 Doerpinghaus, S. Leonard - 6, 126 Doherty, Tina 72 Dotson, Molly ..66, 170 Draper, Leiand 22, 36, 72 Drucker. Miriam K - 125 Duke. Diane 66 Duncan. Julia 66, 162 Dunlap. Christine C 109 Dunstan. Florence J. 121 DuPuy. Nancy 72, 168 Duvall. Nancy 36, 42,44, 102, 103, 149, 157, 160. 175 Duvall. Nancy 72. 102 Dwen Lydia 44. 157. 159. 170. 177. 178 Ecltardt, Jo Ann 73 Edney,- Peggy 40, 44 Edwards, Nancy C II I Elam, Susan 73 Elder, Harriett 60 Elkins, Mary Beth. 36, 73 Ellis. Gloria 36, 73 Ervin, Pat 60 Evans, Betty 66, 174 Evans. Emily Ann 67, 102, 103 Evans, Beclcy 44, 102, 103, 164, 180, 205 Eve, Madelyn 63, 157 Everett, Helen 22, 60, 1 66 Eyier, Anne 44, 139, 168, 180 arlowe, Kennette 73 aucette, Letitia - 36, 73 avor, Susan 73 eagin. Corky 43, 44, 157, 166, 181 erguson, Gladys - - -44 incher, Mary Jane - 73, 168 lorance. Boo 36, 44, 45, 149, 160, 181 lowers, Jo 45, 57, 180, 181 lythe, Pat 36, 67, 174 onts, Lucy Cole - 45 ortson, Marian 31, 67, 157, 170, 174, 175 er, Dianne 31, 60, 170, 178 er. J. W I I 5 owler, Dawneda 67 owler, Rachel 60 ox, Mary W 127 razer, Alice 77 edericic, Peggy 67, I 75 eeman. Anna Belle 36, 73, 102 ierson, W. J 127 ye, Carole 73 ulcher. Nancy 73 uller, Beth 32, 60, 175, 178 uller, J. C I I 7 uller, Kay 45, 1 79 Gainer, Priscilla 45, 159, 178, 180 Gaines, Florence 58, 60, 159, 166, 179 Garber, Paul L 122, 136 Gary, Julia T _ . .127 Gatewood, Betty Ann 73, 157 Gaylord, Leslie J - 128 Gearreald, Linda 73 Gerke, Johanna I 14 Gershen, Bonnie 45, 162 Gheesling, Nancy 73 Gilbert, Livingston 67, 164 Gilbertson, Jane 73 Gilbreath, Lillian R 117 Gillespie, Betty 8, 15, 24, 67, 149 Gilliland, Kay 36,67, 159, 164 Gilmour, Ethel... ...67 Glass, Nancy 60 Glasure, Myra 40,45, 138, 157, 180 Glenn, Sally 73 " Glick, M. Kathryn 123 Glover, Harriett 36,67, 102, 168, 179 Goode. Runita M 113 Goodrich, Margaret 45, 102, 144, 165, 174, 205 Goodwin, Caroline 61, 157, 165, 170, 205 Gordon, Lucy 73 Gordy, Sally 67 Gray, Netta E I 26 Green, Elvena M I 19 Green, Gayle 61 Greene, Marion 61 Greenfield. Sallie 110 Gregg. Alva Hope 61, 168, 175 Gregory, Mary Ann 73 Grey, Susan 67, 164, 174 Griffith, Christine 73 Groseclose, Nancy 126 Gwaltney, Kay 61, 101, 102 Gzeckowici, Betty 15, 25, 46 H Hages, Christy 61 Hagler, Jackie 67 Ha go plan, Roxie 117 Halre, Adrienne 67 Hall, Anne 46 Hall, June 46, 88, 164, 173, 177, 179 Hall, Nancy 36, 58, 61, 160 Hancock. Jane 73, 91 Hanna. Edie 67 Hanna, Brock 24, 61, 170, 175 Hanson, Sigrld 73, 168 Haralson, Karen 73, 168 Hardesty, Ann 73 Harley, Louise I 10 Harms, Maggy 73 Ham, Muriel 12! Harper, Betty Jean 67 Harris, Irene L 117 Harris, Cissle 67 Harrison, Edith 73 Harshbarqer, LIbby 67 Hart, Lillian 46, 159, 181 Hatfield, Ethel J I 14 Hattox, Carolyn 73 Havron, Margaret 46, 166, 170, 177 Hawkins, Katherine 25, 46, 177 Hawley, Judith 73 Hayes, Georgie P .118, 137 Heard, Jan 67, 162 Heinrlch, Sue 24, 73 Heinz, Judy 67 Hendee, Beth 36, 67, 174, 175, 176 Henderson, Charlotte 46, 179, 180 Henderson, Jane 61, 174, 180 Henry, Bunny 61 Herbert, Elolse 121 Hereto re, Helen 67 Hershberqer, Ann 36, 67, 102, 174, 179 Hlckey, Carol 73, 168 HIgglns, Harriet 61 HIgqins, Nancy 61 High, Sarah Helen 61, 102, 156, 179, 180 Hill, Eleanor 46 Hill, Mary .61 Hind, Cynthia 67, 170 HInes, Ellen 61, 176 Holt, Jo Ann 73 Holley, Margaret 67, I 75 Holloway, Judy 67, 175 Holmes, Mary Rose 47 Holmes, Pat 61, 162, 164 Hopkins, Betty 67, 157 Hormell, Lynn 73, 175 Horn, Lynda 67 Hosack, Rae Carole 47, 156 Hoskins, Carolvn 47, 57, 177 Hosklns, Suzanne 26,35,47, 101, 174 Houchlns, Judy .61 Howell, Mary Beth 67 Howell, Miriam 131 Hudson, Alethea 73 Hudson, Hendrik R 129 Hunt, Mary 73 Hunter, Jean 73 Huper, Marie 116 Hutcheson, Betty 73 Hutchinson, Ann 67, 160 I Imray, Jill 36, 47, 160 Inch, Nancy 67 Ingram, Linda 61 Ivey, Nancy R. I 14 M Jackson, Carole 68 Jarrell. Jo 61, 159, 178 Jefferson, Betsy 68 Jenkins, Penny 61 Jenkins, Thelma 68, 168 Jennings, Mary Ann 73 John. Kathryn 47 Johns, Frances 47, 166, 179 Johnson, Anne S. 114 Johnson, Ann W II I Johnson. Caroline 68, 170 Johnson, Elleene 47 Johnson, Sandra 74, 157 Johnson, Virginia 61, 168, 170 Johnston, Norrls 68, 168 Johnston, Penny 12,68 Jones, Caroline 36, 48, 181 Jones, Ina 36, 74 Jones, Jerre 77 Jones, Knox 68 Jones, Leila 74, 160 Jones, Linda 48, 1 56 Juarez, Jjanlta 61, 178 Jones, R. M. I 1 5 Kallman, Kit 68, 175 Kane, Maria C - 12! Kelleher, Donna 74 Kelley, Jane 68, 176 Kelly, Jane... 61 Kelly, Shari Anne 74 Kelso, Sarah . 62, 149, 160 Kemp, India .68 Kemp, Kathy 62, 157 Kendrick, Martha 68 Kennedy, Julia 48, 177, 180 Kenton, Beverly 68, 157 Kerley, Linda 68, 1 77 Kimsey, Louise 68, 1 79 KInard, Milling 68 King, Charlotte 48, 57, 1 80 Kinghorn, Mary Jean 74, 168 Kipka, Sara 68 Kirby, Margaret ...74 Kirk, Kathleen 48, 177, 179 Kittrell, Rosemary 62 Kline, C. Benton 27, 107, 122, 136 Knake, Laura Ann 48, 176 Kneale, Elizabeth 36, 68 Lamb, Harrlette 48 Lambert, Lynne 8, 68, 166, 179 Lambeth, Martha 62, 165, 169 Lancaster, Jane 74 Lanier, Rubye N I 14 Lapp, Harrlette H 130 Lavlnder, Irene ..74 Law, Jane 46,48, 102, 156, 157, 178 Lear, Marsha — 62 LeBron, Sally 68, 166, 170, 174 Lee, Elizabeth .74 Lee, Ann 65, 68, 101, 146 Lemmond, Guthrie 62, 170 Lentz, Linda 68, 166, 168, 170 Leroy, Ruth 36, 49, 102, 159 Leslie, Mary Ann 68 Lewis, Betty 47, 49, 157, 181, 162 Lewis, Joan 62, 168 Lewis, Marie S 113 Leyburn, Ellen Douglas — I 18 LIbby, Betty .74 Lindskoq, Lyn 74, 168 Linton, Helen 6,68, 168, 170 Lipham, Margaret Anne 62 Little, Judy 74 Lockhart, Bonnie 68, 168 Love, Mildred 62, 128, 166, 169, 180 Loving, Bonnie 36, 74 Lowe, Pat 74 Lown, Carolyn 74, 1 75 Lowndes, Laura 49 Lowrance, D ' Nena 74 Lowry, Mary Hampton 74 Lunz, Betsy 49, 57, 164, 181 Lusk, Mary Ann 74 Luther, Patsy 68, 165 49, 57, 148 157, 131 74 62, 164. 170 26, 49, 164 130, 137 62, 127, 180 62, 146, 159, 178 117 ,22, 49, 156, 157, 181 49. 152 68 Mabry, Helen Maddox, Leigh Maddox. Judy Mangum, Grace Manuel, Kathryn A. Marable, Nina Marks, Ginger Martin, Raymond Mason, Carolyn Massey. Martha Mathis, Peggy Matthews, Janie 50, 165.205 Maxwell, Lota Sue 68 Maynard. A. G. 115 McArthur, Deal 74 McBride, Ann 62, 156, 174, 179 McCoy, Nancy 74 McCracken, Lillian J 109 McCravey. Mildred 62, 95. 156. 170 McCurdy. Carolyn 50 McDowell. Michael 1 17 McGavock, Page 74 McGeachy, Peggy 68, ISO. 179 McGehee, Jan 8 McKelway. Margaret -50 McKemie. Kate 30 McKenzie. Sue 74 McKlnley, Margaret 74 McKInnon, Martha 74, 173 McLaln. Edna 62. 157. 164. 170 McLanahan, Valerie 74 McLaurIn, Pat 74 McLemore, Genie 36,68. 102, 103, 157 McLeod, Ann 68 McMillan, Dinah 62, 168, 175. 179 McMullen, Betty 74. 104 McNalr. W. E 112, 119, 136 McNalry, Julia 50. 168 McQuIlkln. Joyce 35. 36. 68. 160. 174 Medearls, Jean 69. 168, 174 Mell, Mildred 6. 7. 131 Mendenhall, Gloria 74 Merrick, Mollle 109 Meyer, Bonnie .168, 180 Middlebrooks, Ellen .69, 166. 170, 179 Middlemas, Ann 69 Mllhous, Mary Evans 50 Milledge, Helen 50. 174, 180 Miller, Anne 74 Miller, Timothy ' 17 Milward, Dudley 74 Mitchell, Betty -50, 146, 170. 175 Mitchell, Peggy -36, 69, 160, 170 Mobley, Kathryn Louise 74. 102 Mobley, Laura Ann 74 Modlln. Anne 62, 162. 164 Moore. Mary Jane -. 62, 145. 170 Moore, Missle 62. 156, 166, 179 Moore, Prudence -- -62 Morcock, Lucy 74. 156 Mordecal, Barbara -62. 164 Morley. Lynn 74 Morris, Ashlln 50 Morrison, Anne 51. 57. 169 Morrow. Merle - 75 Moses, Anita 51. 88 Mossman. Martha - 75 Moye, Julia 75, 175 Moye, TIsh -62, 175, 177 Murphy, Bessie - 51, 178 Murphy, lone 109 Muse, Wllma -36, 51, 102, 103. 149 Mustoe, Sue 69, 166 N Nabors, Jane 69,159,168 Neal, Warnell --- 51, 57 Nelms, Nancy - 69, 126 Nelms, Sara Ann -69 Newman, Lillian -HI Newsome. Anne 62. 144 Nichols, Linda -51, 164. 178 Nicholson. Jackie 69, 102. 175 Nickel, Patty - -75, 157, 175 Nieuwenhuis, DIeneke 51, 177 Norfleet, Cathy - - - - 69 Norman, Jane 36, 51, 101. 103, 149. 160, 177, 178 North, MIckie - - 62 Northcutt. Nancy 69, 174, 175 Novotny, Susan 75 O ' Brian, Pat 75, 101 Ogburn, Kaylynn 75 Oglesby, Barbara Ann I I I Oblesby, Ethel 69, 165 Omwake, Katharine T 125 Page, Pauline Palmour. Mary Grace.. Pancake, Betty Pancake, Emily Parker, Ann Parker, Emily 69, 168 52, 175 69, 177 63, 168 .52, 166, 170, 174 52 Parsons, Bette 75 Paterson, Elizabeth ■!. 63 Patrick, Katharine 69 Patterson, Jane 69 Patterson, Nancy 52 Payne, Ann Rivers 109 Peagler, Ann 63, 103, 146, 151 Peltz, Dr. Rosemonde S 114 Pendleton, Nona 75 Pepperdene, Margaret W 28, 119, 148 Petkas, Helen 52 Pfaff, Mary Jane 14, 17,52, 101, 152, 164, 178 Philip, Virginia 53 Phythian, Margaret T ...120 Pickens, Carol .53, 157 Pickens, Mary Jane 52, 150, 157, 168 Pickens, Suzanne 15, 69 Plemons, Linda 75 Pollakoff, Doris 75, 175 Pollard, Anne 53, 159, 168 Pollard, Carolyn 75 Ponder, Cynthia M. 114 Porcher, Dot 30, 69 Posey, Walter B 32, 124 Pound, Ida 75 Powell, Janice II, 13, 31, 52, 157, 170 Prather, Julia 75 Praytor, Joanna 69, 170 Preische, Carolyn 53, 1 78 Preston, Jane 118 Prevost, Jane 26, 53 Pruitt, Sylvia 30, 69, 159, 169, 179 Purdom, Eve .25, 50, 53, 57, 156, 157, 181 Ranck, Lucy 75 Rau, Rebecca 75, 173 Reitz, Marjorie 25, 36, 65, 69, 156, 157 Rice, George E 125 Richards, Kay 15,53,165,205 Richardson, Mary Hart ...51, 53, 57, 64, 100, 157, 181 RIon, Mary L 119, 137 RIpy, Sara L. 128 Risher, Ann 75 Roberts, Ethelyn J. I I I Robertson, Kay 36, 75 Robinson, Charme 53, 145, 179 Robinson, Henry A. 128, 136 Roden, Joanna.. 63, 1 74 Rodwell, Sally 71, 75, 168 Rogers, Carol 69 Rogers, Carroll 69 Rogers, Pat 63, 166, 178 Rogers, Lebby -. 69 Rogers, P. J 112 Rose, Nancy 75, 157, 175 Rosshelm, Beth 77 St. Clair, Miriam 75, 168, 175 Salyerds, Anne 125 Samtord, Alleen 75, 158 Sanders, Doris 24, 69, 159, 168, 176 Saxon, Sylvia 26, 36, 53, 101, 102, 144, 149, 160 Sayers, Elaine.. 69 Saylor, Ann 75 Scales, Lucy 63, 156, 157, 170 Scandrett, Carrie 108, 136 Schenck, Betsy 36, 75, 157, 173 Schepman, Anneke 75, 173 Schow, Lucy 59, 102, 15, 168 Schwab, Molly ,. 24, 53, 173 Scofield, Evelyn 53, 175, 180 Scott, Colby 75 Scruggs, Joanne .69, 170 Seagle, Ruth .59, 100 Seay, Joyce 53, 157, 178 Sevier, Susan 23, 75 Sewell, Margaret B 120 Shankland, Lynne 25, 54 Shannon, Betty... 59, 174 Sharp, Jane 75 Shepherd, Lee 75 Shepherd, Ruth 70, 170, 174 Shepley, Betsy 63 Sheriff, Nancy .35, 75 Shugart, Margaret Ann 70, 157 Sibley, Nancy 75, 173, 175 Simmons, Caroline 63 Simmons, Ruth 75 Sims, Catherine S 124 Smith, Anna G 131 Smith, Annie Mae : 115 Smith, Horence 124 Smith, Hollls 54 Smith, Jo Allison 70, 164, 170 Smith, Lillian 70, 155, 170 Smith, Annette 70, 168, 179 Smith, Harriet 53 Smith, Page 63, 155, 170, 177, 180, 205 Smith, Nancy Vann 75 .53 75 75, 168 54, 108, 162, 170 36, 54, 157 ; 63 70 13! 75 112 24, 75, 103 Ruark, Kay Lamb Rudolph, Robin Russell, Joanna Russell. Anne Mai 53, 57 69 24, 69 63, 100 Smith, Sue Smith, Suzanne Smith, T. Susan Snead, Dianne Specht, Barbara Sperling, Virginia Spivey, Joyce Stack, Elizabeth C. Stacy, Sue Stapleton, Anne Stapleton, Kaye Starrett, Martha. 54, 155, 170, 205 Steel, Chloe 120 Steele, Laura I 10, 136 Stieglitz, Nain 54, 155, 158, 180 Still, Cokey 75 Still, Sandra 70, 100 Stillman, Nancy 63, 146 Stokes, Angelyn 70, 118 Stokes, Jo Anne 54 Stokes, Mary 70, 18, 164 Stone, Nancy 35, 63, 102, 149 Stovall, Eugenia 76 Strickland, Camille 54 Strupe, Sybil 52, 55, 57, 156, 173, 181 Stubbins, Mary Rivers... 55 Stubbs, Maxime 75 Sudbury, Lydia 76, 175 Sullivan, Ann Lee 70, 170 Swart, Koenraad W 124 Swint, Katherlne N. I ' I Sylvester, Pam 53, 102, 149, 150, 170 Talmadge, Harriet Tart, J. C. Teague, Annet+e league, Caroline 76, Teasley, Linda Grant - 61 , Thomas, Anne 70, Thomas, Esther 63, Thomas, Elizabeth Thomas. Martha 55, 57, Thomas, Mary Beth 76, Thomas, Pierre Thomas, Caroline 63. Thomas, Virginia Thompson, Ann -70, Thompson, Judith Tobey, Marcia 55, 152, 166, Towers, Edith 55, 164, Traeger. Rose Marie -- - -. Troth. Rosslyn 76, 109 112 110 173 157 162 76 177 205 70 168 Trotter, Margaret G. . I 18 Troup, Mary - 76 Turnage, Cecilia 76, 168 Turner, Dorothy H I I 5 Turner. Helen R I 1 3 VanDeman, Margaret 76, 169 Vass, Edna 76, 168, 175 Venable, Peggy 70, 148 w Wade, Sissy 76 Walden, Grace 55 Walker, Bebe 70 Walker, Merle G 119 Walker, Patricia 36, 64, 100, 149, 156, 157, 174 Wallace. Linda 76 Walters, Mary Ruth 76 Walton, Louisa 157 Wammock, Lydia 22, 76 Ware, Mary 64, 168 Warren, Ferdinand 116 Watkins, Raines Wakeford 55 Weakley, Dorothy...... I I I Webb, Joanna 55, I 75 Webb, Judy 56, I 75 Wehman, Luclle 76 Wells, Peggy Jo 23, 64 Weltch, Jane 64, 157 West, Carolyn 56, 157, 164,205 Westervelt, Robert F I 1 6 Whisnant, Anne 56, 57, 179 White, C. Dexter I 1 5 White, Kake 70, 104 Whitfield, Jan 70, 1 74 Wilburn, Llewellyn ...130 Wilkins, Nancy 76 Wilkinson, W. B I 1 5 Wllllans, Anne 70 Wlllians, Ann .76, 157 Willlans, Carol 70 Willians, Julianne 76 Williams, Lyne 76 Williams, Penny 64 Williamson, Martha Ann 56 Wilson, Becky 14, 56, 93, 89, 173 Wilson, Linda 7 Wilson, Miriam 8, 76, 162, 175 Wilson, Paula 36,64, 100, 116 Winblgler, Susan 76 Winegar. Cheryl 76, 101 Winn, Florence 64, 164, 179 Winter, Roberta 119 Withers, Elizabeth 76, 160 Withers, Elizabeth ......70 Wolfford, Jill 76 Womack, Jane 76 Womeldort, Ann 64 Wood. Ann 70, 170 Wren, Nancy 76 Wright, Blllle 76 Wurst, Maria ne 77 Wyatt, Betty Sue 64. 165. 170 Yang. Lucy 77 Young, Marty 56, 174, 175, 180 Young, Myrna G 123 Younger, Kay 36, 77 Zenn, Elizabeth G 123 Zimmerman, Louise 77 ZImmermann, Lafon 64, 177 1 « ' vbrilSCHHinrtfa


Suggestions in the Agnes Scott College - Silhouette Yearbook (Decatur, GA) collection:

Agnes Scott College - Silhouette Yearbook (Decatur, GA) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

1957

Agnes Scott College - Silhouette Yearbook (Decatur, GA) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

1958

Agnes Scott College - Silhouette Yearbook (Decatur, GA) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

Agnes Scott College - Silhouette Yearbook (Decatur, GA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

1961

Agnes Scott College - Silhouette Yearbook (Decatur, GA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

1962

Agnes Scott College - Silhouette Yearbook (Decatur, GA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

1963

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