Adrian College - Mound Yearbook (Adrian, MI)

 - Class of 1965

Page 1 of 184

 

Adrian College - Mound Yearbook (Adrian, MI) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 184 of the 1965 volume:

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A DVERTISERS ORGANIZATIONS ...................... 72 I7 I .......... .................. I NDEX 4 Ili 5 Metcalf Hall will be razed during the summer of 1965, "opening the door" to the campus mall. For 106 years Adrian College has used the buildings appearing on front campus. But this year marks the end of an era of the ivy-covered walls. By the end of the summer Metcalf and South Halls will be razed. At the east end of the campus mall, where the present South Hall stands, there will be a carillon tower complementing the spiral of the college chapel, gracing the west end of the mall. To many alumni, these old buildings hold many memories. To help retain the atmosphere of the grand old college, officials have agreed to renovate North Hall within the next two years and retain it for a campus landmark. i ,- Q H .-.J-f A This aerial view of Adrian College, taken in 1946, portrays the vast expansion program the College has undergone in the past several years. l. .J1' N "VR: 'E Msg 4' ,IPA 'Qt'-Qty V The astronomy department grew with an anonymous gift of a planetarium, to be attached to Peelle Hall. May 14 :aw the ground breaking for the Iong-awaited health center, to be built between Rush Union and Dawson Auditorium at a cost of S100,000. 6 The "Cinderella College of the Middle-west" received its name for its rapid growth. ln the past ten years, 21 buildings have been con- structed to serve the student body. The past year at Adrian College two buildings were dedicated and ground was broken for several more. Cargo Hall was dedi- cated 'in honor of Mrs. Ruth Cargo, and in February, Mahan Hall was officially opened. Construction was also begun on the sorority complex costing S550,000.00. Ground was broken for a new health cen- ter and an announcement was made that the College would receive a planetarium, a carillon tower and a new maintenance facility. El YK QAA , '44-r . ic' . , .,:- . Y As a tribute to its great pl-uilanthropist, Ray M. Her- rick, the College will soon have a beautiful Carillon Tower. Funds for the 570,000 Herrick Tower were raised from alumni and friends of the College. It should be completed by October on the present site of South Hall at the east end of the mall. 7 s xwf XM g V,, -N,.f ME ' ' , Xa G!'?',:u A., X 6 U , , Sw ' - M Qc.: 'KQ ,il I ' 5 l 4 F H 'il ' x i"i' r A' I' I - s " '64 " 5 V Q, ' A 1 , 11 , , . it A 'I f .ww Siam 1 X ' 'N' if A' " ,',':- ' l. J.- -. Ti"-'Q ' . :R , . 1 ey . A v fl -e X -y - "4 V , A TW" ,-,, , . ,pi'4d.? hi. jf.- -, 13 . 15 Q io.-in Q ,g ,Mm 5 . J! 1 , IA t 1 lv ., K, x xl ' ,A Two houses north of Williams Street bent under the forceful grip of the crane, making room for a S550,000 sorority complex. Bishop Straughn greeted visitors at the dedication of the Chapel, The wife and 50,15 gf the dgngrl Allen L, Goldgmifh, broke the Bishop Straughn is pictured in one of the chapel windows. ground for the new SlO0,000 health center. l 8 .715 . Y l watched them tearing a building down ' 5 A gang of men in a busy town. P , With a ho heave ho and lusty yell .I 5 i They swung a beam and the side wall fell. 1' ' J . .49 4 li' Q xi- . 1 'Qi , I asked the foreman, "Are these men as ' " skilled as the men you would hire, lg ,,g -t if you had to build?" 'A In 'E y He gave a hearty laugh and said, "No, in- i HQ Q deed, for I can easily wreck in a day X' L Q ' or two, what builders have taken L 'i years to do." -' A T QQSQP And l thought to myself as l went my way l xg- if Which of the roles will I try to play? A l l f I Will l be a builder who works with care measuring life by the rule and square or will l go about town content with the lab- E ors of tearing down? Anonymous Alf. , A. :, .3-'.-. - A crowd was present at the health center ground breaking, Cargo Hall was used for the first time at the opening of the I964-65 school year. 1 ,!' W A www' aff H L A f it , sg, In President Dawson welcomed all new freshmen. ,.i..1-1 In a day he was transformed from a senior to a freshman. This is how a student entering Adrian College feels as he anxiously embarks on his college career. To get him off on the right foot, a number of activities were arranged for the freshmen during Orien- tation Week. It commenced with the Presi- dent's Convocation in Dawson Auditorium. Many parents wanted to pay tuition, so they waited in the comfort of the Admin- istration Building. The day was followed by testing, counseling, and of course, par- ties and get-togethers. With new faces to meet, it did not take long to meet and eventually know most of the student body. Bev Good, a transfer student, is greeted by the administrative heads following the President's Convocation. Go to the end of the line, please. f Z' After the welcome to students, it was a time to write checks. IO What happened to the rock? For a number of years the rock served as a place to Take out a grudge, to blow your horn, or to be devilish by painting and repainting it. However, paint- ing the rock was not enough. One night a number of ambitious underclassmen decided to dig up the rock. Then they tried to burn it. Finally someone decided to take it to the Dean of Men's yard. In the end the rock was buried. After the extra dirt was hauled away, it looked as if it van- ished. Is the rock really dead? Or will a new class of freshmen find it and restore it to its original condition? That remains to be seen. Energetic freshmen frequently painted the traditionally "Greek" rock. 3242 The small rock proved to be much larger F A The rock was dug up, burned, and suddenly one night it disappeared ll' 6 A . i P ffildcc wifi FOZDS 6,4-in ' Fl PRODUCERS 4-"'7,"' Although Saga Food Service was forced to feed outside, it was a well received picnic. Spring is bUS1ifl9 out all OVSV. The Campus that is. Footlong hot dogs were served as the main dish. , . I2 MZ Stevens said, Beat Albion, everyone said, Beat Albion, but it didn't do any good as the Britons defeated the Bulldogs in the "Annual Football Bust." tl .411 Campus life at Adrian College is a variety of events that con- tribute to the total development of a stu- dent. Campus life is study, first and fore- most, but one would say that campus is a home away from home and a launching pad to the future. It has all types of weath- er, like the big snow, that will be long re- membered by students this year. Spring was a welcome relief, bringing picnics and campus strolls. This was the year for new dances. It is a relief to know that the "round dance" is still in style. Campus life includes dormitory life with organized parties and the nightly popcorn blast. Cam- pus life is what one makes it. Somewhere under that "stuff" there is a walk. College life is reports, and more reports. 1 .5 sc-W......s.w ...---- Adrian fraternity men studied hard and won a national award. To many students this was the year of the "Big Snow" but its beauty accented the Chapel. .C . -. V -s-,Q . ,sf QI., Q ' ' , i xx w i,gnssN1fr"E? X I4 4 X. , . y , .1 Q 93:52 V sw ? Study breaks in the dormitories usually consisted of a big batch of popcorn and a bottle of pop. Dormitory lounges were frequently used for parties. Campus men wait in the Union for sorority bids to be announced NE"-.. But dear, there are other dances besides the ierk. The stampede was on after bids were announced. I5 1965 All College Sing sponsored by the Student Government was US SAE's sing out on "O-Joe" and "Poor Man Lazerus." An excellent arrangement of "Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor", aided the SAE's capture of the chorus award. I6 l Chi-O's swing out with "Rock-a-bye My Bal5y" . i held Dawson Auditor. on Apr. 10 before a standing-room-only crowd of 1,4OO students, faculty and friends of the college. While everyone cheered for their favorite group, a select panel of judges evaluated the efforts of seven groups who participated in this annual event. Competi- tion was keen, but Chi Omega sorority captured both chorus and the women's quartet trophies. Having won the chorus trophy for three consecutive years, Chi Omega retired the two foot trophy. Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity captured the men's chorus and quartet competition. Dr. Daw- son announced that this year's All College Sing was dedicated to Dr. James Spencer, retiring chairman of the Music Department. The number selected to honor Dr. Spen- cer, was "One World" composed by him in 1944. Wesley Fellowship sang the song to honor the 44 year college musician. A beautiful rendition of a Civil War Medley ends in victory for the Chi Omega sorority. Many thundering yells of triumph indicated the tremendous elation felt by the SAE's as they received the coveted trophy. Screaming with delight the Chi-O's rush to congrat- ulate one another, upon their victory. A packed house enjoyed seeing and hearing youth performing, for an evening of good music "':'..... Culture on the campus was at The disposal of every Student ander Schreiner at the organ in The chapel, during This past year. ln addition to the tra- ditional activities of the Adrian College Theater, band concerts, choral festivals, etc., there were a number of visiting lec- turers who were entertaining as well as educational Five outstanding artists were invited to The campus to compose the Celebrity Series. These inclued Dr. Alex- the duo-piano Team of Ferrante and Teicher, the Mata gl Hari dance team, and the Chicago Little Symphony. To help the students to become aware of the world around them, the World Travel Series pre- sented three films on the Western Hemis- phere. Lambda Iota Tau and Wesley Fel- lowship also presented their film series. Ferrante and Teicher signed autographs following their stupendous concert in Dawson Auditorium. Earl Wrightson and Lois Hunt were a major Celebrity Series attraction. I8 Effective lighting for the duo-piano team Dr. Schreiner presented a concert on the chapel organ. added color to their superb performance. if 471 Qu- ""svw President Dawson had the honor of crowning the queen. The Beauty of Homecoming I Queen Nancy and her court was the center of attraction. 9-W' ' I r Congratulations were in style for queen Nancy. .- Q79 Nike, 1 at 5' 1 T' 20 Homecoming 1964 centered the theme "Roaring 2O's" and saw i7 organizations compete for top hon- ors in the campus display contest. Jarvis Hall and Jones Hall captured the two dormitory display divisions. Chi Omega won the sorority competition. For the fourth straight year, Alpha Tau Omega won in their division. They also walked off with the best over-all campus award. During half-time activities of the Adrian and Hope football game, Nancy Curry was crowned queen by President Dawson. Her court included, Beth Emrick, Carol Sullins, Carol Hicks and Carol de'Lhorbe. The after- noon game ended in a three to nothing decision resulting from a field goal by Bob Butz. At the traditional homecoming dance, Nancy and her court reigned as Tony Martell and his orchestra supplied the music. Pr ?"i"?i"x 0l'l Hope was hung in effigy by the Student Government. ,,w,,.v- 1:-, . ..,:t,, . ,if 'ff' - 5Ef..'f"fI -T55 ' l v,.U S A ,... 5 QQ?- v- W glut. I ' tn, r . Chi Omega's winning display of the victrola. Jarvis Hall, the winning women's dormitory display. Dr. Emrick delivers the eulogy for Hope It took a lot of hot air to inflate the balloons used by freshmen to decorate the gym for the dance. Dancing from nine to midnight L.l ' ' i "fl, .Q r... it 'W w Q 'Y i I 9. M2 1' tiki, ...A A crudely made coffin held the corps of Hope as it was cremated during pre-game ritual. 'EQ Adrian could have used Herman Munster on the field. Alpha Tau Omega won the best fraternity award and the over-all campus display award with "Adrian Gives Hope 23 Skidoo." Nlwll E Fw htm K. BWI 553. W. W. i:'. 2I wx 'A X Wy ,. Sigma' . 'QQ """:.,.w ,ii i 3 V Q2 9 f...' ,Q " ' This was the year for campus government to shine, for it was the year ot the national election, The Stu- dent Government held their traditional homecoming elections, student officers, and class elections. A mock national elec- tion was sponsored by the College World. The young Republicans and the young Democrats were at odds throughout the national campaign. However, they put aside these differences and joined for elec- tion night returns in Peelle Hall ot Science. in T1 6,3 U if Hoffman and Wilcox are still friends following the election Two Young Republicans mapping strategy with state officials. 'ff-Ms. ,mu I K F .N wg.- IAF ,il rx 3 fuaif ' D AI' J5555' ' ' ', "' :cl s wr, , . -1.8 x.- , '??:'ys, ... gi , up ,, ,a Y,Y WY!! X 1 1 w N Y fl Y W QNX 'N ,em Y,-w f W ,VMVT ye- mg? ww.,-N -.. x. f---s.....,,. '---Q. 'vu Feeding Sfyle was Changed 10 buffet 10 agcommgdate the crowd, The greens were hung during the traditional event opening the Christmas season. Christmas at Adrian College starts with the annual Hanging of the Greens dinner. For the first time the dinner was buffet style instead of a waited meal. After the dinner, Dave Smith led the students, faculty, and guests in Hanging of the Greens has long been a campus tradition Christmas carols. Mrs. Pellowe was hon- ored by the student body on her retire- ment with a gift certificate from a local merchant. The assembly adjourned to the east end of the campus for the birth of a new campus tradition Here Dr. Daw- originated by Mrs. Pellowe in the forties. son spoke a few well chosen words and threw the switch which lighted a large Christmas tree. Nearly a thousand carol- ing voices climaxed the festive occasion which set the wheels of Christmas on cam- pus into motion. 26 F' 'Nl ....., r .vw- I l 964-65 Newsmakers Above: Several Palm Sunday tornados touched down in the Lenawee County area, leaving in its path mass destruction and countless homeless. Right: Adrian College students were among the vol- unteers who helped to clean up the area following the tornado. They also helped the Red Cross in re- turning things to order. Far Right: The force of the tornado leveled churches, homes, and schools throughout the county. 28 1 QN- NN. The lives of college students were influenced by world affairs this past year. Close to every student was the racial situation in Selma and Birmingham. Winston Churchill died on January 24, and his funeral was viewed around the world via Telstar. Nikita Khru- shchev was removed from his position as Premier and was replaced by his two proteges, Brezhnev and Kosygin. His ex- pulsion had an air of mystery and only time will erase what he did. The Viet- nam story made the newspapers daily and by the time school was out, it was the boiling pot of southeast Asia. Adrian College students will remember the Palm Sunday tornadoes and the clean up ef- forts which followed. During the fall the students rolled up their sleeves to donate blood, which the Red Cross used during the tornado. The United States made two Gemini space flights, as did Russia. This was the year that two men made their stroll in space. White and McDivitt. took the spotlight for the U.S. space flight. This year saw Indonesia withdraw from the United Nations. L. B. Johnson, who won the election in a landslide over Barry Gold- water, had his hands full of turmoil throughout the world. A hot spot in this hemisphere was Santo Domingo, which saw blood spilled throughout the city. There were many other news makers, too numerous to mention here. Top: College students rolled up their sleeves to give blood when the call for more was issued. Left Center: A freshman takes a break to give blood. Right Center: Civil Rights was discussed by NAACP leaders when invited to the campus. Left: The race problem throughout the country drew concern from many students following a talk by NAACP representatives at a Wesley Meeting. Below: College students gathered around televisions and radios to witness history in the making. isbn s 29 w"2e x "5 wi' Fvi V 9?- J 'X ' 'ft , f 4, , A '-WW'---y" ' N. XM 1 X. 4 , is 1, 0 . I X ,r - ' I . ' du :Holt an Arly L 1 -- -Y --. --.lk Illi- unu nrhmly Xl A AIOCMI inline ur Mig:-cu n via run nn Sajgaiinm AP vrur smsrxicxxnsba 4,Q, . Xvi. . . X .-. At' . AYAVNM 5 tux anis thrash nun bfllhla in air today at Il Artisan. 'No others lr this ann. 45? YSHPMW Newsmakers Con't Far Left: U.S. military men fought wars on two fronts, Vietnam and Santo Domingo. Left: Nikita Khrushchev was ousted as the Soviet Premier and was replaced by Brezhneu and Kosygin. Center: This copter crash killed eight Americans in Vietnam. Lower Left: The British titan, Winston Churchill died at the age of 90. Lower Middle: U.S. Army helicopters hover after unloading troops near Saigon. Below: McDivitt-White corner on the University of Michigan campus. Right: Two Gemini space flights were successes. Lower Right: John McDivitt and Edward White made history in their space flight in May, at which time, White was the first American to walk in space. .gud nk! Lk, , 5-4 '1""b " -I'- A x.x9'..L XM a -s aiu X Q u if t ?f an .. ,,, ll!! lll llll llll sw ml li' ,te Graduates numbering l8O processed after the faculty to the Audiorium for their Commencement Exercises. 5 The new Cane Ceremony was held in Dawson Auditorium Dr. John Hannah of Michigan State delivered the address. Following the exercises it was t IE? iEE5 E 52 li-xp' . 5' Q ime for pictures. N, ,,,K.,-1. I :D I rig! 4 K- . ' -as'!4q, ,. l , T- - ' 'Isa-4... I' 'T' fr: LV2 r f, .O-. RY K. M . , H 'if A .Q ff if, - V - '33-fE1f, off 4 if . . . sg, ,agp,.N.XNfEsIxs1f'S11tkg'f. c RW, wx Sf.. H . A . .Q U Wi , Z. Wie. .. , A , .A., suis., W Q. 0 ..,. - ,, .. N s- L w s ,C-,. . V s- 2-5.2 i V . . . 1 M -.N 'K .- ff-3.4. N if ' ' J . ' .5 ,. s Faculty members await for the call to line up for the processional. The Cane is passed. All lined up ready to go. The 120th Commencement activity at Adrian saw Dr. John H Hanna, President of Michigan State Univer- sity, spoke to l77 graduates on the topic "To Live Or To Die." After the graduates received their diplomas, the College conferred four honorary degrees. The honorary degree hold- ers included the Rev. Jessie R. DeWitt, Rev. Arthur A. Jane, Amos R. Anderson and pro- fessor James K. Pollock. The traditional Cane Ceremony was conducted for the first time in Dawson Auditorium. The College was prompted to move the ceremony to Dawson to conserve time and to avoid the elements. "You Can't Go Home Again" was the topic of the Baccalaureate Ceremony by Dr. Hoover Ru- pert. This service was conducted in the Adrian College Chapel which saw a capacity crowd. Prof. Powell at the age of 96 still attends Commencement. sv , ,fl f me- ' . ..L1....L...,.,.. .W ......- 7 +..-4 ll. xc , Q. K-....,.. ,K , Adrian College ended a Decade of Development and celebrated the event at Alumni Banquet held May 29. The banquet served to recognize the achievements made by the College since 1955. Three staff members were recognized for their retirement. They in- cluded Miss Mary Teusink, Dr. James Spen- cer and Anna Smith. The banquet served a dual purpose and honored those com- munity leaders who made this unprece- dented development a reality. Eleven per- sons were given citations for their contri- bution. Mr. Howard White, chairman of the Board of Trustees, presented a check in the amount of SlO,723. to Dr. John H. Dawson, president, to be used as the President's Contingency Fund, that will al- low him to purchase much needed items for the College. Mr. Ed. Pellowe, Director of Financial Development, presented 525,- OOO worth of stock to the president to kick off another decade of development. The stock will be used to start the Leila Rorick Foster Scholarship Fund. R 4 'ffgrqfh f ,V gg , I if d,'.,4'o-X 1 u ' ' 631-7- '.gwZ:t-Qitgg lt' ' 22' Ed Pellowe gives Dr. Dawson 325,000 in stocks to establish Scholarship Fund. Chi Omega quartet rises to the occasion and gives forth with song. 'S Dr. Gibson bestows congratulations to Mary Teusink. 'Sv '-S' 'Qu .. ,- I M Howard White presents Dr. Dawson with a check for 510,000 for Contingency Fund. Citations were presented to, Left to Right: H. Robinson, L. Brumbaugh, F. Estes, L. Hughes, Mrs.' Goldsmith, R. Herrick, R. Dancey, H. White, C. Stevens, D. Frazier it I f As the sun sets over the campus 1 "sf . . 'cf .,' if 'V SJ.. Cq5 g,:! 'U 6 qw 4 ,D S ' 3 , 1.6 we are reminded that our task is to support Adrian College THE END 5' Q fa , W: ,x XA: , .,l,,,x rj fe -ri . x-'n 51,3 51 U .W F55 EA 34 5? if Qf. '1 J P5 -e The primary obiective of every college student should be to get the best possible education for his money. Over the four year period at Ad- rian, a student can invest as much as 58,000.00 that will help him find his place in life. This investment will return a bountiful supply of happiness and self- satisfaction. At the disposal of every stu- dent is a broad general education. If the student would avail and apply himself fully, he would be ready to enter the labor market following graduation, and start reaping his rewards. Education may take many forms, and it is hard to pin- point specifics when it comes to portray- ing highlights. Therefore, the MOUND staff will not try to be specific: instead a gleaning of pictures were selected and printed, depicting only a few of the many areas of study. It is recognized that this presentation takes into account that there are five major divisions at Adrian including: Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, Religion, Philosophy and Psychology, and Teacher Education. High- lights and sidelights in this section in- clude an in depth study of Astronomy, Theater, an Art major in Education and a story of facilities and academic rewards. 1 """HP"' vswsqg, fl" T Y : gunna-us..--A - 4:1-.QQ ......n.g ,... .i.e...-1' ' 0 'S r. i, 4. kv- Q5, rvlnw -ur If "' - .-2 ' . ff .-. ,. - - .3 0 i'.'qQL3yrr..? V ,2N,.,Qf 151' .rxsdklj B . gf' p Q Q 1. f -. .. jr' bt 'M JL! ,QW f. -an . " 'slap-v-G , 4' A A' P, " .IA ,Qt Klufn-'.'L'uLl..'4',J 6: '- fir- -:I fx f"inf9w1.:',f-- '.1'E'.Q' .Q ,. .,..,,., h .Ft I, J. 0,5 'J ' I , ' . ' . i 13, -i'P'w -. 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W N fx ... 4. - Q- A A 'W ' ' Q . wx whiff 'X""l-f n'3-Sgxg. - va AQ' " -P ' M- '-' 1 "' va, 8 TS, YV v . . -43q,'.mkm' :':a'mNk,,, ,I w .Q-R, Q' ' ,, Q P ,,A,.,4- 5 .,g,W 3, ., 'Ms ,, "N M , A -Sn.-avg' ' -Ax V. ' ' - M. - .. ' f, ' N " "xx'H'wf' :,,K-.- 1 if - - i x ' , I . " I 'x'n. 1 gh 4 -J.. .. . ' 7? Q., 5. 41 1-f,. . ' . v 1 1 1 v F X n. 1 4 ' , K' :- ff ' X v Vx P, , - . W M 4 " .-Q If 'fic-f . QM K ' , ', x 1 g ' 1 . ., M w, , AZ. , S w 5,-f.g4,51 . F ,Q,2"'.:, " V -'Q A . 3 H- "W--3 R U. v 5. 5. 2 I . Uqgjiq ,x3.,,5L"fx?f,?QJR5:9Jgigyfylfi . , - , i jr, 4, ' '. 'R ,illf-ggvr.-xglv. .' 252.551-U-Q.,g-va 5' ..: j f - ..,q4ff'f5u7:-3, ,l Yq.gEEE5mJ'5jq:i,j,x'v-Ff if!!-'P3p.,-T?i':P'f El- 5, wi ' -11' 'FW Q' V, fem., 5 M','G.x,ywEVLf",..-jj K..-.' I 'f f -' -'1' 'sffuiwm- f SA, ' ' '-,Ye-'Sf-' .21!'l.,g,::-,-.- ' ' V. V A 'max I N- 1 . ., -v- TF' ',.- f- . A---...Q . m1'iAlLI Through education we or our children will travel to the moon The sundial motto serves as a beacon to the future umllllnlliii'"""-----H--'unisonrm '- llllllllllllllllllllllil ll8IIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 'ii SE., I Ax 2 X ii 3' 5,9 Professor Crusinberry explains some technical points of an astronomy law following class. Some of disposal. the finest astronomy aids are af the s1udent's Mr. Robinson, a local astronomy enthusiast, gave the college much of the equipment. ll!!!!!!!!!! X. XLT . 19 ' X ,ESL - fi iq ba., 5 l Man's conquest for space has stimulated a new interest among Adrian College to learn what lies beyond the earth's atmosphere. To help explore the celestial bodies the College has expanded its Astronomy Department. A devoted astronomer, Mr. Crusinberry spent many evening hours with students in the Robinson Observatory, a gift from Mr. Herbert Robinson, a local industrialist. lt was also announced this year that the Department would be further extended to include a fully equipped planetarium. It will now be possible to study the stars during all kinds of weather. If every- thing goes according to plan, the plan- etarium should be ready for use in Sep- tember. , ig ' 1 .,, E 'A tx Informal group discussions help the students to understand the world he lives in Using a visual aid Mr. Crusinberry explains an eclipse. ff' 131,31 The door of Mr. Crusinberry's office was always open to students seeking after class help. 43 R. C. .' "9""ffQXdv,a, waxy' .Hmmm . Adrian College graduated it's first art major this year. Anne Priestley was honored to be the first one. When asked what she was going to do with her degree, Anne said she would be an Art Supervisor in an elementary school, which means that she will instruct the teachers how to teach art. She attrib- uted her interest in art at Adrian to the expansion of the department and the re- cent completion of Mahan Hall. This year a number of art students designed the art for several college publications and concluded the year with an elaborate art show in the Rush Union. Anne Priestley doing a crayon sgraffrato for an art class. ' 1555 ., A I .8 4 ' af is X if x ,,, wi 'Q' . ws t Q .4 if -V il ?lf'f+ili15 . lu will I ' T ' Y x . . . , ,ry ...as wi! " C is in A all ,Q sg 4 - V' i 4 X Having demonstrated how to do a crayon sgraffrato Anne assists first graders at Madison in doing their own creations. i V ' ,M , -and Anne also Taught jewelry making in the high school Art 2 class, Mrs. Bruce, Anne's critic teacher, goes over lesson plans for continuity. . gr? maxiw N.. .-M - i 4"i5l "f 5" ,,, . . , -.W .-,t 212, N .93 tv' ff' gigs ' ,, .-s .X N . w t , - .,.., , get ,c,,,,N..M 'QM t' K Y, On the campus Anne continues to learn the art of plastic painting in the new Art department. 4 The seminar room in the new humanities building aided to the informal atmosphere of advanced classes. Shown llefe IS One Of Several PV6Ci'Ce rooms Classrooms are attractively decorated In an educational setting study can be a chore. However, during the past year the dedication of Mahan Hall lifted the spirits of those who studied in the Humanities. ln this new ad- dition one will find some of the finest facilities of any college of comparable size. lt was surprising to note the changed attitude of students and faculty, when they moved from buildings on front cam- pus to the comfortable new building. Mahan Hall was opened for use during second semester .5 . . . lr-31' lll!lQmm lllll nm From this station Adrian College students will receive radio training next year J I , ,...... 2 i i u 2 1' E -va bi' Thirteen top scholars were initiated into Alpha Chi at an impressive candle light ceremony. Marilyn Pascle signs the registrar after her induction T9 One of the lust muior events of the college year is honors program, designed to give recognition to those students who have achieved supe- rior academic standings. Initiated into Al- pha Chi is limited to the top ten percent of the iunior and senior class. At the im- pressive candlelight ceremony, these mem- bers accept the challenge, which is their motto, "Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free". This year tive seniors and eight iuniors were initiated into Alpha Chi. This page is devoted to recognizing all students who received awards for academic achievement during the past year. into Alpha Chi Next year's Alpha Chi officers were also inducted at the ceremony held in Ritchie Halls uv- 9" F Newly initiated members of Alpha Chi pose with their sponsors. . -sJ1fL 49 ex kilt:-. 4 . 404, '62 4,55 23 2 Y: ,Digi " ff 2 f' V. ,w I 4 yn L . via 9 at ,- 1-1-WZ, W- - f, ,Jn fs. Dfw Ima 'V .,.,- y ZW? A 5.70, x. .yi -'v N ,I . , Vf-'fe,2, ' v, Mfr f Nxwmxx 3 9 5I ,,,..---- 'VL Butz is having 'trouble finding the ball. An educated foe helped to win the games. I . . ij -.. ,if if-e p rife. gd, in, 1 I ',-.Q Spectators await the unexpected, a T.D. '4- 5 4 - r- ..4 .,,.-..,,- . c " '43 . i ' f , - . ' ' ' . 1 A. ' "vm 'fl I, N, I 1.4 . ' . .. V 52 The cheerleaders action tell the gridiron story I-'f 2' tap? , L-4' --Tw' fi ,-I" qw fra. All lined up and ready to go 80 yards -For another big goal. Heading for the sideline didn't stop the clock This time. ' V 6. ' M, Q W ' Be careful, Mr. Gillis hasn't completed his ex , W Q, il perimenr yet. , swam, -W M MY"M. was ,Qi Q 'muff 4. 'ex ,A 53 54 1964 Adrian College Football Team, Row 1: R. Dav- idson, A. Enderle, M, Clear, D. Goodrich, J. Vivian, Co-Capt., W. Hannig, Co-Capt., A. Benzick, B. Ritz, H. Chavis, J. Wynn, D. McClelland, J. Wilkin. Row 2: B. Rowbotham, J. Murphy, T. Myers, J. Blickle, C. The Bulldog football team found that early season iniuries and too many mistakes proved more than they could overcome. The offense lust could not get started, this was due in part to not finding a quarterback until midway in the season. Bob Butz's field goal against Hope in the closing seconds, and the interception of five Dutchman passes, gave Adrian their first win of the season before a jubilant Homecoming crowd of over 3,000. Adrian was to taste Maple Stadium on a Saturday afternoon in October . . . l Rinehart, H. Krupnick, P. lott, B. Butz, W. Jenks, J. Leventry, P. Foor. Row 3: W. Shreffler, R. Kirby, B. Miller, J. Tromeur, K. Mullin, J. Braman, S. Ramant, B. Bishop, L. Tuttle, D. Carney, B. Neuin. Row 4: B. Tinney. T. McGregor, J. Hunter, C. Whittern, D. defeat under Alma and Kalamazoo but an explosive offense and an alert defense teamed together to give Adrian a welcome win to close out the 1964 season against Bluffton. In the last gridiron contest, quar- terback, Roger Davidson, completed 12 of 19 passes and sneaked over for the final score. This year's Most Valuable Player award went to Roger Davidson for his outstanding contribution to the squad. All- League selections went to Roger Davidson, at a defensive linebacker position. This was the second year that Jim Wilkin was a perfect day for football. 1 X 1 . i I vziu-vu Devenney, R. Swegles, E. Geno, B. Burrows, C. Gaiser, M. Doty. Row 5: C. Wood, Student Asst., B. Fauble, Student Asst., F. Shumaker, Scouting Coach, L. Maugherman, Mgr., O. Mattson, Mgr., P. Gorman, Trainer, C. Marvin, Head Coach, B. Teeter, Line Coach. elected to the All-League team. All home games were played in Maple Stadium as the college awaits the com- pletion of a new stadium. Another high- light of this year's football season was the annual Detroit Layman's Football Bust. This event takes place each year as the two Methodist colleges in Michigan, Adrian and Albion, clash for control of the pigskin. Over 1300 Methodist laymen and youth saw the Bulldog's fruitless attempts as the scoreboard read 36-O in favor of Al- bion as the final whistle blew. 1 964 Season Scores Adrian Opp- 12 Defiance 20 0 Eastern Michigan 7 O Albion 36 7 Olivet 20 3 Hope O 7 Alma '13 O Kalamazoo 18 28 Bluffton 26 The cross country season was far from being a successful year, however five of the losses could have gone either way. The season started off with a defeat by Albion on our new four mile course. Victories came with Bob Macomber's winning time of 23:19 set- ting a new record for the course against Oakland University. Bob Macomber was elected as the Most Valuable Runner. Bob Macomber and Sandy Johnstone were se- lected as Co-Captains for the 1965 team. Adrian did not fare well in the MIAA Championship Meet held at Alma, coming out of it in sixth place among the seven MIAA schools. 1964 Season Scores Adrian Opp. 49 Albion 15 27 Defiance 28 25 Oakland 30 30 Olivet 26 15 Hope 50 45 Akron University 15 44 Calvin 16 31 Indiana Institute 24 23 Defiance 32 29 Alma 28 38 Aquinas 19 30 Kalamazoo 25 22 Oakland 39 29 Toledo University 28 17 Schoolcraft College 45 Cross Country Row 1 J Anglin S Johnstone, J. Glendening, Bill Macomber. Row 2: J. Coach Flanagan records the time and placing of each runner Flanagan Coach D Albertson E Wright Bob Macomber. ,sl es 3 1 55 "" ' S Q, ,,, . . 5 ' 4 .41 , 5' :-SY V' ' ' MN, .A . x ek ,g'-g:5Awr?. l?fw4llRp5:iifieg"' 1' . - Sf . ,iw - 1 if .A . 'Q in High scoring was the secret this of all their games. riff, 1 year and here is what helped the Bulldogs win 50 per cent fwfr- Some come prepared to cheer the team. At half-time most fans gathered in the "kennel" for refreshments. The final score at the Windsor game was worth recording on film. Dick Seagert was the big man on the boards. He helped to set a new rebound record for the school. 1964-65 Basketball Team: Row 1: B. Fauble, J. Gun- Coleman, R, Stevens, L. Kennedy, D. Seagert, B. Tl1l'0Pr Nl. Garrett, S, Frank, C. Stille, S. Neff, J. Rowbotham, J. Wynn, D. Anderson, J. Flanagan, Asst. 7 Ingham, P. Gorman. Row 2: G. Arbaugh, Coach, C. Coach: D, NU'-nbersl Assf. Cgach. Season Scores . ' . , . . . d' , the Adnan basket Aclrlans rival Albion went into tour Anfan Oberlin OPJJ6 ball leam broke eVel'l 'lOl' llle overtimes, another record, before Adrian 92 Alumni 58 1964-65 season with an overall total of was able To Win 109,105 This 214 Total gg :iw 83 . , ' aamazoo 5 Ten WINS and len l0SSeS and SGVGVT Wlns points scored broke still another record. 84 Olivet 94 and five losses in MIAA contests, this Adrian Wee in The MIAA Conference l0l Calvin 76 64 Eastern Michigan 73 season was a memorable one as tar as race all 1he Way, but an 39-33 defeat by 92 Albion 69 school records were concerned. A per Hope late in The Season gave Hope the 70 Defiance 101 . , , , 93 AI Qame BVGVGQG Ol 85-9 Polnls bfvke 5 conference championship and Adrian a 96 Wmgsor gg record established in 1954-55, while the third place spot with Albion, 88 Windsor 96 l22 P0lnlS 5C0feCl in the Slflgle Qame Senior, Dick Seagert, a four year let- 2? 22 agalml Alma bloke 5 5Cl100l and lVllAA terman, was Adrian's leading scorer with 85 Olivet 71 feC0fd- The Alma Qame also SGW records a total of 338 points. Dick was elected 183 ,l:f,:g'nazo0 132 Of 75 febOUnClS and 52 fleld Q05lS in the team's Most Valuable Player and was aa Defiance 70 One Qame eslabllshed- The Qame Wllh selected to the All-MIAA first team. W2 Alma 70 80 Eastern Michigan 90 Mrs. Arbaugh shows concern following a "Bad Call". With only a few seconds to go, time is called for last play strategy. 58 4 I ,in H,-W 1 Q ix sl Qi sf -v' . 1- r lv. .3 Wrestling: Row 1: V. Ringkvist, S. Redpath, D. Thorpe, Tower, D. Valentine, D. Palmer, J. Vivian, D. Rosen- K. Nihart, T. George. Row 2: J. Flanagan, Coach, J. dale. The Wrestling Teum's big- disappointment This year was the number of iniuries to all of the key men late in the season. Adrian started the season with Three victories in a row. The first loss came aT the hands df Baldwin Wallace, but that bout had its good point. This was the 4-l win by Vic Ringkvist over last year's Ohio Conference Cham- "Round and round they go and where they stop only the wrestler knows." pion. Adrian was on the losing end un- til they defeated Hope 26-7. The biggest disappointment came when the team was kept from going to the eighth team Lake Forest Tournament in Chicago by the "great snow" fall. Their frustration was further heightened when they learned that Kalamazoo, with whom they had split a dual meet, had won the title. Jack Viv- ian was elected the captain of the team and the Most Valuable Wrestler title went to Vic Ringkvist. C. 1965 Season Scores Adrian Upp, Y 9 Albion 15 27 Defiance 28 25 Oakland University 30 30 Olivet 26 I5 Hope 50 45 Akron University 15 44 Calvin 16 31 Indiana lnst. 24 23 Defiance 32 29 Alma 28 38 Aquinas 19 30 Kalamazoo 25 22 Oakland 39 29 Toledo 28 l7 Schoolcraft 45 ear X Coach Teeter checks out the situation from all sides xr, M -, 59 ki 60 1 9 .s 1 4 5-nh l .. w..fs-:Wt U91 -, Q xi-ei ff"Jv4A 1 ' 5 . .. i ' g,,ass??Q?c?W??fl"Y' FW' l we Tom Smith checks his swing as a fast pitch from an Alma moundman takes to the outside. ":z.::.1:.:-' WN his Time out is called for the Umpire to clean the plate before Dick Goodrich steps into the box. if, i ,N -s Relief pitcher, Chris Gotashall, is on deck. Tom Smith sits in the dugout pondering the last call. . , I v . A 4 J l .., 1 I .1 l l . ' , As ,,, .km ' U , j'.',.V,,.q, sh E ,A 9 4, 35 ,-. x 3 l .J W, J . vs. 1 4 4 .us v K . W 4 ' 1 . . , . W , ' I " ' ' .1 . fm, ' , ' . - ' -' K, s 1 The baseball team finished a mediocre season by post- ing an 8-T2 record. They finished 5-7 in the MIAA. This was good enough to fin- ish in seventh place. The league race was close all the way said coach Chappy Mar- vin who coached the team for the first time this year. With three games to play, the Bulldogs were 5-4 and needed to win a game from Olivet and sweep the double header from Alma to take a share of the title. But, as the story went, the needed wins ended in defeats and gave the team a last place finish. Again this season, the team played all of their double headers home ball games on the diamond at Riverside Park. Here the team played into extra innings several games but had trouble winning the games. Spectators were out when an intermural game didn t interfere or conflict. Coach Marvin has done his best now ,f ,5 up fo Baseball Team, Row T: C. Gotshall, D. Anderson, G. the players Thaler, D. Goodrich, D. Stanfield, H. Krupnick, L. They played five extra innings games and could only win one of them. Post seasons honors went to Dick Good- rick who was voted honorary captain. He also won the President's Trophy, the sec- ond year that it has been presented. Harvey Krupnick was voted the Most Val- uable Player, I966 Captain and first team outfielder on the MIAA Team. Perry Foor was named MIAA first baseman first team and Steve Page was named second team MIAA pitcher. c. - ' W A ., ff-X 'W QKQJLSK In X Most valuable, Dick Goodrich, connects. I 965 Season Scores Adrian 7 Defiance 3 4 I9 4 Kalamazoo T 2 3 7 Ferris T 3 4 T Albion 2 7 5 6 Hope 4 3 6 3 Ohio Northern 7 7 4 7 Calvin 4 3 l I 4 Olivet T 0 T 7 Alma I0 3 4 2 Eastern Michigan T4 5 6 Maugherman. Row 2: C. Marvin, Coach, S. Page, T Ball, T. Smith, J. Leventry, P. Foor, O. Mattson. The tennis team experienced a bouncing season this year, ended up in last place in the MIAA. Coach Arbaugh said at the close of the season that a losing season creates a burning de- sire in the minds of the team members and the coach to do better. The only vic- tory of the season was against Defiance. Nine students reported for practice and eight of them lettered. The coach tried hard to find a winning combination for the doubles and ended with senior Dave McKelvey and freshman Terry Dennison sharing the number one set. These two men were also number one and two in the singles. They were followed by the Chase brothers who filled the bill for the number two set of doubles. McKelvey captured top honors among his teammates and was awarded the Most Valuable Play- er trophy. Coach Arbaugh said that al- though we have one of the finest tennis facilities in the league it takes year-round practice to come up with a winning tennis team. 'T a .A Fx 1 1 K 'X 4 .1 - 4 .. .1- f ' 4 f . N V ky . F t . , Q h A 3 , 1, A A I V 5 W , Q ' c 1 ,- T 43 , ,, - , x . , N- , -.-' S B .1 , ,. .f X, ,. Q I I M V A.....,,,..,...,.... .- .......,e.,...w . .D "'V V Y- ' li'-"' T' g .--- , ,Foss-h, ,' ' -Tres a - in . ' - - v --f-- 'C , g. l- A. LM 'A .. ' ' if ----T ag .5 ,... 1 . .. ,,. . .,. ,. .., . Q. ,I 1-, y , x - - ' , ,, y .' A 1 , , ' ,. 4sf -5 sa. , - -. 'Y .N ., 4- - 1 - al-rf-ar I 15- W me ',.fg,f-' -- ,Q Lf.. ' - V ' V ' : - fp' Mg, 4 T ' 3 ', s wg 4 jf 1234355 v , iv? M :mi- 1 , - Y Q' cz ' ji Q 'A .44 ' P' " s 1 . 3 ' at -Ffrzfs I - - N lv fn , ' ' ' ' f " ' .ef 1' . f l ' wwf :V --W.. ,hu A X wr .-.- , X V Y K 3.1.4 s I H?,,xg- . - L. fa.-v fs- s Tennis, Row 1: R. Janes, T. Dennison, Chuck Chase, D. Boonstra, Bill Chase, D. McKelvey, F. Fitchko, G. Baxter, G. Arbaugh, Coach. Golf, Row 1: J. Smith, J. Drummond. Row 2: R. Gillis, Coach, H. Gates, V. Sanch, S. Dhondt. 62 J 5, if r 3 -,f QV . V, .ts - bfi, , ww3,72,' , 5 fwlww. ' , -sg.: ,wi ' A It sub. s .Q 'I 5' ' .yy , ',..'-.54 --4' xv me F?'f?f"lvj?sy Q gf'a,e..-.frail f ,-SATA? Zi i.'?3r,: ,g . 5'-ij .fs gf. , ,,!:,v6, ,S , 7.14: i V, s'-. .N.r ' w,+J,.vQ'sw4liif4.v,'ggi ki: 2gS2f:e,3y2j',6f53s'fvTrtjf2, are ss' l 4. 5' A' El! c.,fifyf:jvxf' it . T gy-ani. e3,..455 52,5591 4 ' sr. ' 1' .fy ' 1 .G ,L .1'2i..' q,h1vfl120gh 5 1 SL, 5 K5 1 y l . i" , was ' .ri T im, as Tw . . x . . A, 259,1 5 Q,f?YS'f'iiv ' S ' ' . , P gy -,if Y!! . 4,4 ' .:.':.i 11, A, f af' , .,,.'. 4' ,-'nf A T -. ,gl L A .,1,,,,,V, Gary Baxter completes a return from the backcourt. What can one say about a golf team which started a new record setting attempt Ca losing record, that isb? But seriously, said Coach Bob Gillis, the boys put their heart into the game. Steve Dhondt, who was the cap- tain, was named Most Valuable Player at the Spring Sports Banquet. members cannot talk about the varsity men captured "Golden-Ball Trophy" from Lewanee Country Club was The faculty golf because the annual them. The the site for all home matches which saw the season end with no wins, ten losses, and one tied match. Craig Kronewitter sets a college hurdle record. '14 Q Iniuries topped the list of "excuses" for a losing Track season said coach Jay Flanagan. At one time during the season he said that ten of the 26 member squad were out of action. Despite what looks like a bad sea- son There were some outstanding partic- ipants. For example, Hank Lacy set a new school record in pole vaulting with a Pole vaulter, Steve Neff, could not beat the record set by teammate, Hank Lacy. 12 foot four and one half inch vault. Craig Kronewytter, a freshman, set a school record in the intermediate hurdles. Chuck Scheltema also claimed some of the spotlight by placing second in the lOO yard dash and fifth in the 220 yard dash. The team's season record ended with a 4-6-l and a league record of one and five. gs. sy ,, 4 f s 2 r ..., 7.12 3 N . -, " "i'-'sr'-i" - I 'r""' v imma ,- Anchor man Aldrich helped set a mile relay record, pa ' W Coach Flanagan offers last-minute instructions. X T Chuck Stille demonstrates good iavelin form. 63 K l 5 . l ui- The women's field hockey games were played on the high school field. The WRA extramural team practices in Ridge Gymnasium throughout the winter months 64 Each student who enters Adrian College must enroll in some phase of the athletic program. This past year a new coeducational physical education program was initiated on the campus which now makes physical edu- cation more attractive to both men and women. In many respects it is as enioy- able as the famous intramural program. Up to 70 percent of the student body participates in some form of the diversi- fied IM program. With the great number of students participating in the program, the services of four student field super- visors, who conduct the program six days a week, throughout the school year, had to be enlisted. Any group who would like to Organize a team and enter the com- petition may do so. The most popular sport during 1964- 1965 was basketball which attracted 30 different teams. Each person who enters one or more of the sports is eligible to become the Outstanding IM Athlete. He is selected on a point system. Dick Kunzi was selected for that honor this year. Teams also have a contest for the IM Team of the Year and SAE captured the award this year by a margin of only two points. Women too are offered a wide and varied program designed on the same format as the men's program. Through the years the IM program has kept pace with the campus expansion. One can only guess where the program will go in the future. But, there is one thing for sure, it will continue to offer a program tailored to student interests. Tuesday and Thursday nights in Ridge Gymnasium found a full slate of women's intramural activities. i I The intramural volleyball team had "all spikers . ,,-" 7'-' -f-4 y y. I r .zduahu 4 , N 1 A . "2 . aw. Q... A ""' n ' A fx "" My , I '30 . ff ,, , .ms gjjf l 'Y:::1:.-'-'KOH " .X-,, A w... A 'FUQ5 " . I, vmdfpgl ' ,,V' - 1-.,,,,M 'pk ' , , Q' Www-'?1':5w 'L ..f-ogg, ' -,M '- 4 Win f. A mum? v 'l v -.- . , , A I, W1 x15 A ll 7 we-. nr- ' in -v K x I' . ' K, 1 ':4l, I rj d M ef.. -v 9 x - . , Qi 'f '55 X "' ix x X ,.....w.k-..,, L...-.....,.4 5 V W-i.g,,!k vw, .K D- my Q W X X2 N E I K . Ai." . if me ii, .3-.xml-4 Classes in bowling were held at Lenawee Recreation. While waiting their turn on the court, these students catch a cat nap. Scores were kept to show improvement of each bowler. ...M .T T -ee- f all 1 . ff ,. ifiifiiiggiigiia i"' 1..agT1.,4g1ji'ij, rrrrrr ig ff 'e'e of A,r,r . . spammer- gp: ---L- ,,,::s.1!'1 ' , . NL, .N ,.s...,h:x iii'-N A in ,341 I ., 5 ,W '1'?a' ...I Mixed classes in badmin-ton was one of the most popular choices. Intramural Final Standings Touch Football ..........................................,. ATO Archery ......,. - ............ - ......... W.. ATO Tennis ,,... - .... -. ,,,, Machines Volleyball ...- ...... - ......... ,ms ..... ,.... ATO Handball ...... ....,.....,,,, SA E Bowling ....... .... ........ T h eta Chi Swimming .,... - ..........,.. Feeman Basketball ...... ...... SA E Badminton ............ .,.... ....... S A E Water Volleyball ..,. -- .....,.. ...... SA E Softball .............. ...... S AE Team Champion ..,.......... ............. S AE Outstanding IM Player ..... ...,. D ick Kunzi 1' 67 '-C , x, L , f 1, BUHI4 , s Lodfffgf' Coach Gregg Arbaugh taught a new coeducational physical education gymnastics class. "Are you ready for the serve over there?" 68 Helping hand for a headstand sl X, JN K l X. . 'fi' Y, , Badminton class under the new program. ,, ta wk ' J' Nha? ' ' 1 Ny. A ,it , X2 3 V 1 Y, k lf' fif- ,Q rw -'W wb' 4, .,. 1? .Lx 'V W ' f . ' ,gi fi gl 5 fy lil if 'my Wtenidpfgvir .- . , W' ' 'X X va V , ,U . .Vx -Q. . . ' " ss and Aww ,M ,M-an I A T, . Yi M , My-w,3?+-r,..,,e r ,W W-ns and QR ,,-Q V " 's -Y -Y X Aw g .ifehwgu - v 5 . ,,""'w .. , 4.335-w' M 5.f1,K,. , The stage serves as a handball court for a mixed class. Throughout the weeks during spring, the men's intramural team I P H N s xx I-we 1 1- ww -fs--ff . N YF.-2.-.1 X' It v 'YW' fr'-it 4 Q . Saw any A .,v V A .: brawl ' ,, ' . Qu Nfmx, ,W , , n V. .. N. , ,MN 'CEM .J ia 3 A.. ' E . . .l F S is-A Q mire. .ak , li - as As ,, H A ,gp .M - -X Q.. " An intramural player connects with a fast pitch. s take their turns in the field. .I K . , . f X l r,,,g, .ist fu, -4 YA i, -1' rig!! fl ' ll.: ' ls s -ya: x q r- f hz , , ' A ' . rs 3, v ,wg a,f5f"zs .:- 'J ' "Nt ,132 N K av, s 'lag A ' l' at-fl 'ill' 4 atm 69 ' A-'1 ' , - J 5 1-L1 1 L - V ,-.0 , Q. .Gwyn -4' A N . , r 351. , 'r'f'Cg,rQs s. ,- ',f-"1-'-.. , 1,-, s, N ,I 39 V: 1 .61 5 Q' ' Qf'3Q"'5' Y ' .t "W 'SQ W3 N1 ,.,,.mf4'.sT." ws- A -' :rf 55.1753 ' 'QM' 15' W 'W 'M' wt-aww. state-M -Q "' 'fi """"'t ' 4 5, 5' ,f 4 My W x, lr-gi , mf A-Q -x fi4f4.f'::f,f . 'M 'L 'W ff M' W we. eivsriw ,NM 3,3555 .. ,..,l?L.ndL:LTQ LL st .-'-- 3 uf QSWA W WWA 'aim JG., Jghff' 9" 1. The softball flelds west of Charles Street attracted a full schedule of ball games A softball playoff drew spectators which saw the SAE team capture the tntle 1 I , 5 is Q." I 6 M -. az- ... , 9. 70 B A , ,-V. ,... , 7 Q, F 1 ' 'nf 4 i JJ ,, :- .- Q , 11' . y 1, W, 1irQ 4' A1 E! tif E IM' lfl - B 14, 4 f, ME ss? 6 WGA -' Wu VZ-Q .fo in M Milk new M51 1 'lii1,l Kg H iii 2:1 EM Yzlwz BE QS .E 551 nlfgy - will lv :Eli law frm Q!! ma 2711.4 l Va -LJ I WS Av 1 aw EZ Ill ff-1"f4 as Rim :fm kd: MAS ' fini ri Wifi 15741 MT! IKX eg? X fl, .4 f ii X1 '25 N? V ORGANIZATIONS li The paddles frequently change position. In a liberal Arts Institution one of the primary obiectives is to give all students a broad, general education. A part of this educa- tion is social development and the ca- pacity for becoming community leaders. At Adrian, a member of organizations have been established to help fulfill the varied interest of the student population. Participation in these organizations will help achieve an objective of the college. The Adrian College Mound is designed to graphically portray the accomplishments of these organizations in action. This sec- tion of the yearbook serves as a showcase for the many activities of the college and organizations. Here we pursue together the best of these groups, and present them as reminders ofthe importance of or- ganizations to our socialization process and the educational endeavor. This show- case is presented to remind ourselves and our posterity of the 1964-1965 college year. Many civic-minded students spent election night in Peelle Hall awaiting the final results. The Student Government strives for full student participation in elections. rj! X The Student Government was subject to much criticism dur- ing the past year. However, it remains that the student government assisted as the cementing agent in holding all stu- dent organizations tightly knit. It is the purpose of the student government to co- ordinate the activities of all recognized campus organizations. It is primarily re- sponsible to coordinate the activities at hi lf... ..,. Homecoming, All College Sing, and stu- dent elections. ln the May 4th issue of the College World, a number of students registered their views on the student gov- ernment as it exists. Some students said that " . . . the student government was overly criticized," by students, faculty and the administration. It remains, however, that the government on the college cam- pus rests in the hands of the executive .L L Q committee, headed by Dave Smith, who assumed his post after the resignation of the first female president in the history of the College, Kay Smith. The Adrian Col- lege student government hosted the Mich- igan Association of Student Government convention on Saturday, May 15, 1965. During that weekend, representatives from other colleges throughout the state, par- ticipated in a variety of activities. l Student Government, Row 1: N. Curry, Sec.g D. Smith, strom, H. Mast. Row 3: S. Wise, J. Walker, L. C. Anderson, R. Holt, J. Stimpson, E. Celmer, M. Pres., R. Lewis, Treas. Row 2: J. Childs, B. Bremer, J. Green, J. Warner, M. Hummel, N. Glasgo, J. Thomson. HUf'f1l, C. Rutledge, P. McKarns, J. Babcock, S. Holm- Row 4: G. Christensen, R. Green, G. Haisley, Chap., An unidentified freshman was subiected to the commands of Kangaroo Court. 74 lf' 112.376 JL. MacRaild, J. Lapham. A maior protect was the Hanging of the Greens which ended with Christmas carols. . i, ,j rg Association of Women Students Executive Council: Row l: B. Swoish, Treas.: P. Johnson, V.P.: Dean Betty Sanford, Advisor: S. Wise, Pres.: E. Vannors- dall, Rec. Sec. Row 2: M. Munroe, J. Childs, E. Men's Residence Council is the counterpart of the Associa- tion of Women Students. That is to say, it is the governing body of the men's res- idences on the campus. It is the voice of the Men's Resident Halls to the student government. Their primary objective is to Men's Resident Council: Row 1: D. Wheaton, V.P.: T. Stapleton, Pres., J. Neifert, Sec.-Treas. Row 2: R. Gearig, F. Borgia, J. Hunt. Row 3: C. Dubuc, J. Heffelfinger, B. Proter, C. Sullins, P. Foster. Row 4: D. Sumner, J. Walker, D. Boyse, M. Grove, Corr. Sec.: J. Maidment. enforce study hours and to legislate rules, and regulations governing all men on cam- pus. Under the guidance of Dean Mead- ows, the Men's Residence Council served to unify the men into a strong body. Among their maior activities, the men con- ducted an inter-resident ping-pong tour- nament, to which trophies were presented. Thorp, C. Rinehart, D. Langsdale, R. Slone, B. Stahl, The Association of Women Students is somewhat like the high chamber of government consisting of a judicial board and an executive board. Through these two bodies, policies and procedures for all women students are made. The executive board consists of of- ficers, mentors, fire marshals, and town representatives. The iudicial board up- holds the rules and regulations held forth by the executive council. The Association of Women Student's contribution to the showcase is an an- nual event called the Big-Little Sister Tea. Through this social event, freshman stu- dents have an opportunity to become ac- quainted with the upper classmen, and are thereby encouraged to consult them for advice. AWS also encourages and assists with dormitory Christmas parties and spon- sored the first annual "Banquet ot Lights." In addition, they hold an annual Senior Recognition Banquet. This committee, also, began preliminary planning for new student handbook for Men's Resident Halls. They conducted spe- cial social events with WRA and supported student government proiects. This year MRC was responsible for securing a pool table for every men's dormitory. J. Bain. 75 i i i y . l Wesley Fellowship, Row 1: W. Gaston, Pres.: K. Maidment, Treas.: Dr. H. Emrick, Advisor: D. Spitnale, Sec.: D. Miller, V.P. Row 2: C. Hirschy,,D. Mowry, E. Wesley Fellowship is o Methodist affiliated organ- ization which has been serving the cam- pus with a number of entertaining and educational programs. For the past sev- eral years Wesley has continued a film series on a non-profit basis in an attempt to provide additional on-campus entertain- ment. Among their social activities were Religious Life Council: Row 1: Dr. H. Emrick, Ad- visory J. Lapham, Pres.: J. Bird, Sec.: Rev. W. North, Advisor. Row 2: M. Leventry, D. MacDonald, A. Uhler, J. Bunce, M. Anderson, A. Neefe, C. Weisz, A. Hastings, L. Nation, K. Kelley, M. Munroe. Row 3: J. Lapham, MMSM Rep.,-G. Christensen, D. Miles, F. a hayride and Halloween party and a spring picnic at which their officers were installed. Wesley has helped to reconstruct the Homer Kf Powell Memorial Chapel in North Hall. Meetings of Wesley include speakers, films, round table discussions and special music. During the Christmas season, Wesley sponsored traditional All College Christmas Carol Sing and blend- Long, D. Sumner, D. Wheaton. Row 3: R. Thorp, J. Haering, E. Rowe, E. Dammeyer, J. Stimpson. 76 Johnson, G. Washburn, A. Robinson, G. Nelson, L. Wittenbach, J. Hosmer, R. Holcomb, R. Barr. ing their voices at the ALL COLLEGE SING to help serve as entertainment as a ded- ication to Dr. James Spencer. Wesley is also active in the Michigan Methodist Stu- dent Movement Organization and this past year four Adrian College students at- tended the Methodist Student Movement Meeting in Lincoln, Nebraska at the Quad- rennial Conference. Religion Life Council is a representative body made of one person from each Greek service and religious organization on campus. During the i964-1965 school year, the council actively participated and made their con- tribution to the Adrian College showcase. They assisted with Advent and Lenten Vesper services, and were instrumental in publishing a daily' devotional book for Lent which included articles written by students and faculty. Their major proiect for the year was the sponsoring of the Religion in Life Week, March 14-19. Throughout the week their topic, "He, Myself and God," was emphasized. The owner of Studio South made available his theater for the show- ing of "The Robe," at the nominal cost of I5 cents per person. In the Spring, Re- ligion Life Council held a banquet honor- ing graduating seniors who were going into church related vocations. Major Cole represents another tradition on the Adrian College campus and offers an outlet for preministerial students to practice leader- ship. The highlight of the 1964-65 school year for Major Cole was a series of meet- ings held in October and November when they invited a fundamentalist, an orthodox and liberal person to speak on their be- lief relevant to faith. Following individual presentations each of these men came to- gether in a panel discussion which was moderated by Dr. Emrick. The group also conducted a chapel service just prior to Easter vacation. This gave a number of the members an opportunity to speak before the student body. Outside these two ma- jor functions the club held regular meet- ings under the advisorship of Dr. Mac- Naughton. Major Cole was named for the famous Major James H. Cole, who was especially interested in those students who were preparing for the ministry. Alpha Delta Chi is u religious and social or- ganization devoted to the true meaning of their translated Greek letters-"Man Sewing Christ." Women students on cam- pus are eligible for membership in this organization which provides fellowship, inspiration, educational and worthwhile experiences in Christian living. ln 1964-65, Alpha Delta Chi: Row l: M. Hatch, Treas.p C. Walton, V.P.: Dean Betty Sanford, Advisor: J. Bird, Pres.: S. Goodemoot, Sec. Row 2: M. Munroe, A. Slough, K. Kelly, K. Pelletier, A. Hastings, S. Bush, L. Nation, Major Cole: Row l: R. Cosner, V.P.: P. Howes, Pres.: M. Gilbert, Sec. Row 2: G. Haisley, B. Blaesing, G. Christensen, Soc. Chrm.: D. Miller, D. Thorp, Dr. Alpha Delta Chi sponsored their annual Big-Little Sister Weekend. They, too, spon- sored a senior breakfast and a Christmas party sponsored with Major Cole. Not to be outshown by the Greeks on campus, Alpha Delta Chi participated in the Homecoming activities and All College Sing. Their quartet sung at many occasions on the campus and in the community. To fulfill their service obligation to the D. Lueke, K. Dolinski, C. Herschy, D. Mowry, D, Hoffman. Row 3: S. McAdams, S. Moore, S. Day, S. Rabold, M. Hayes, P. Huffman, B. Weedman, D. Sumner,,A. Frye, H. Mast, J. Fisher. Row 4: C. Weisz, MacNaughton, Advisor. Row 3: R. Weyer, W. Schoon- over, Chap.: T. Trerice, M. Berkebile, R. Greer, J. Rink. Christian community, Alpha Delta Chi sup- ported monthly visits to the Girl's Train- ing School in Adrian and an annual visit to the Coleman Manor in Hudson. At Christmas time, all women gathered clothes and shipped them to Haiti and, in the spirit of thanksgiving, presented needy families of Lewanee County with baskets of food for the Thanksgiving table. K. Neumann, A. Neefe, J. Fyke, N. Glasgo, S. McKay, A. Clark, K. Maidment, J. Maidment, H. Davidson, S. Moore, M. Emmons, D. Spitnale. The Adrian College Choir presented several anthems in the College Chapel. The Adnan CoHege Choh has found a new rehearsal place -in the Adrian College Chapel. The choir under the directorship of Dr. James Spen- cer has found a place in the religious program on campus. The choir used their voices with the Methodist Church Choir at the dedicatory service on September 20 and in the annual Community Christmas Concert. They presented music for a spe- cial Sunday morning worship service on March 28-the 126th anniversary of Ad- rian College. The Adnan CoHege Band, under the able directorship of Mr. Jones, came out of the dark this year -to put the band before the public in an image, not recently seen on the campus. Through the efforts of Mr. Jones, the Bulldog Marching Band took to the foot- ball field for the first time and displayed interesting and resounding music for the spectators at several football games. Fol- lowing the football season, the band moved into Dawson Auditorium, where it changed styles and became the Adrian Symphonic Band, which demonstrated the versatility of the director and the musi- cians. This band presented two concerts in Dawson Auditorium and organized sev- eral ensembles. Mr. Jones has great plans for the Adrian College Symphonic Band, as he hopes to increase the number and caliber of its performances. Not all the credit should go to the director, because the music is the product of willing stu- dents, who may participate for either credit or extracurricular recognition. With the addition of Mahan Hall the band has found its new home. However, most of the rehearsals are conducted in Dawson Auditorium. For the first time in several years the Bulldog Marching Band entertained on the The Symphonic Band rehearsals were held in Dawson Auditorium. gridiron. fr-1,H"i1Q'-IF Q .1 r I . . 'v:,'15't ' .. :Iveco ,Q f 7 ,X :YNW ,J .w'r,.,:..5 ,Q site In ax, .... N K W J ! ,A 4 -'f A A, 'ii T v " .! 4,14 pl . I .J-1' ,Y v if .5 . w . ' f' lf K L .K l I fd V ' ' V A ff H T 'Axle V . , .. .Q , A. .,-me ' X' J' " if ' J Ana if h" 'I ' ll qbwl. 1-F ' - j . ' , U ll f'A K ' ' 'I if- ' 1' fu-wx--'1-j.-f-.,, 78 .ul n. - - Usher Corps members represent the tirst line of public relations for the college, as they set about their duties in assisting patrons of Dawson Auditorium. Their primary ob- iective is to serve the college and gain a richer understanding of the theater arts. In addition to the numerous college spon- sored programs, the Usher Corps assists with productions sponsored by the Adrian College Players, the Community Concert and many special activities, coming to the campus. Through their handling of the auditorium patrons, they are able to cre- ate a receptive attitude in the minds of the patrons, thus "setting the stage" for the concert or productions. At the request ot President Dawson, a second Usher Corps was organized in Sep- tember to serve as the Chapel Usher Corps. This club is an all male organization and they carry many of the responsibilities and obligations of the Auditorium Usher Usher Corps, Row 1: D. Morgan, Sr. House Manager, L. Inouye, J. Richardson, D. Charlefour, A. Frye, R. Goodrich, J. Yantis, Advisor. Row 2: D. Sheely, W. Corps. In both organizations membership is open to any student with a desire to serve the college. Pi Delta Phi is the Nu- tional French honorary tra- ternity. Adrian has one of the many chap- ters tound in the U.S., Alpha Nu. Founded at Adrian by Dr. Hope Lowry, it includes residents of Adrian as well as college stu- dents. Student members are selected from those demonstrating superior work in ad- vanced French courses having at least a "B" average in all studies and a high standard of character. Under the super- vision of Mr. John Talayco, meetings are held at various places including the homes of alumni in Adrian. Each year the chapter holds a "Fete de Rois" which is a banquet celebrating the feast of the kings. Nofziger, Jr. House Manager, R. Rose, C. Plotts, Sec.-Treas., M. Manor, M. Richards, T. Carl. Row 3: M. Pi Delta Phi, Row I: S. Hayes, Pres., R. Robinette, V.P. Hummel, B. Cleveland, C. Jacob, J. Hosmer, J. Hooper. 79 Circle K is an Inter- national service club found on college campuses throughout the United States and the World. It aligns itself with views of Kiwanis International, which is a national adult men's service organization. On the Adrian campus it is open to all male students. Among its service proiects, Circle K sponsors benefit dances and fund raising proiects to secure money, which will be used to assist orphans and under- privileged children. The past year Circle K was not as active on the college campus as the club has been in previous years. However, they did maintain their identity in assisting the March of Dimes Drive. Some of the members, on their own, helped the clean up crews following the tornado which leveled the Manitou Beach area. Other members attended various meetings of Kiwanis and the local chap- ter of Kiwanis assisted in the operation of Circle K. The International Club could be called the "Little United Nations." It is through this club that students of other countries, as well as the United States are brought closer together in world understanding. This year, members in the International Club include representatives from Canada, Eng- land, Greece, Hong Kong, Iran, Korea, Ni- geria, Thailand, and the United States in- cluding the newest state Hawaii. Highlighting the year's activities, the International Club visited the University of Michigan to attend the "World's Fair". At the fair, which consisted of displays, talent shows and informal gatherings, the club members conceived the idea for the Showplace of the Nations, which was held on campus on May 6, 7. Under the advisorship of Mr. Hoffman, these students spoke and demonstrated their talents before various service clubs. Plans were formulated this year for the International Club to make more good-will trips. 80 Circle Ky D. Woolfenden, G. Frost, R. Sims, D. Wheaton. International Club, Row I: A. Moazzami, V.P., L. Mak, B. O'Donoghue, A. Adenili L Inouye V Gales S Sec., F. Takesh, Pres., K. Hoffman, advisor. Row 2: Sasaki, V. Bovonratanaruck Student Education Association, Row 1: L. Tuttle, Treas.g T. Strauss, Rec. Sec., Dr. R. Moeckel, Adv., L. Salisbury, Corr. Sec., P. Palpant, Pres. Row 2: M. Tashey, Hist.p S. Woodworth, C. Hirschy, K. Kelley, The Student Education Association is perhaps one of the largest groups on the campus. Membership in this organization gives each student a voice in the Michigan and National Student Education Association. Throughout the year plans were formula- ted for the first annual "Future Teachers Day," which was held on the campus, March 31. Future teachers from area pub- lic schools were invited to the campus, where they had an opportunity to review some highlights of college life. They were welcomed by Dr. Dawson and other mem- bers of the administration and faculty. They were given an opportunity to visit various classes, to witness the teacher education program at Adrian. As a member of the Student Education Association, Lynn Salisbury was elected secretary of the state organization. Dur- ing American Education Week, several members of SEA furthered the cause by presenting speeches over radio station, WABJ. All the speeches and talks were built around the theme, "Education Pays Dividends". Their monthly meetings center E. Uhler, N. Graham, R. Rabold, N. Martin, B. Marsh, J. Bird, C. Pioch, H. Mast, M. Karr. Row 3: A. Hastings, B. Secrist, J. Bunce, M. Leventry, C. Peabody, S. Moore, B. Barden, L. DeYarmond, N. on professional improvement, including: French, M. Collins, E. Gearing, L. Kuney, A. Frye. Row 4: M. Hatch, S. Goodemoot, R. Brucchieri, S. Fyke, H. Davison, D. Rosendale, D. Boonstra, V. Ringkvist, M. Manor, B. Rodgers, R. Rose. guest speakers, educational films, mock i E I interviews, audiovisual techniques and other educational material. E .,.,.. ,.f.95-A 1 . ' 5 Isa.: g 1 l 'iff ,T An informative lecturer. SEA members and advisors heard many enioyable programs during the year. .5-'Q . ,if 8I The German Club, which re- mained on 'Status Quo' during the past year held one meeting, at which officerswere elected. From that point, interest in the club waned. Dr. Rodeck, the new advisor, had the added difficulty of adiusting to a new school and this ex- tra duty. However, hope is not abandoned. When school commences in September, the club plans to reorganize and stimu- late interest among the incoming fresh- men, as well as the upperclassmen. The projects this year were limited, but the club would like to cultivate campus in- terest in German culture and the German language. The French Club exists on the Adrian College campus to serve the students who have an interest in all the French speaking countries. Their meetings are conducted in such a manner, as to help understand the French culture. Although, the French Club is just getting started on the Adrian campus, it met reg- ularly on Tuesday evenings, to conduct business and to hold educational pro- grams. Among their outstanding programs, during the past year was Dr. MacNaugh- ton's presentation of slides on a recent trip to France and Gary Marsh, a member of the Peace Corps, who spoke on a French province in Africa. The French Club assisted the International Club in the pre- sentation of the International Fair, which was conducted in the Union, the weekend ot May 8. Chris Plassman was the ap- pointed chairman, to construct and pre- sent a display on France. Membership in this club is open to any person interested in the French way of lite. 82 German Club, Row 1: D. Morgan, J. Moore, S. Aldrich, L. Gambler, M. King, K. Beck French Club, Row 1: V. Wilt, Sec., D. Lueke, Pres., Johnston, D. Mosier, C. Dubuc, D. Holman K. Plassman, Treas. Row 2: J. Talayco, Advisor, S. Political Sciencep Row T: A. Alling-ham, M. Hayes, J. Samuelson, C. Pioch, K. Hoffman, Advisor. Row 2: B. Gilger, F. Takesh, R. Arrington, H. Arrington, L. The Political Science Club provides an opportunity for students to meet and share experiences and contrasting ideas relevant to the in- ternal mechanism found in various forms of government. These political minded students compare the governmental ac- Home Economics Club, Row T: Miss Clark, Advisor, J. Shoemaker, A. McKinney, C. Berger, J. Gould, S. Charlefour, M. Leventry, Pres. Row 2: K. Neumann, Dury, K. Yoki. Row 3: B. Hadley, R. Holcomb, A. Moazzami, T. Carl, H. Lord, G. Whitaker, A. Adeniii, L. Howell. tivities and practices of various parties un- der the advisorship of several faculty mem- bers of the Political Science Department. They also study the trends in world hap- penings, and seek areas of common un- derstanding for the club, the college and the country. Sec., C. Barnes, B. Secrist, Treas., D. Burns, J. Cole, M. Collins, V.P., J. Hoadley, K. Sutton. Home Economics has long been a humble profession. The Home Economics Club has held its place of rank on the Adrian Campus through the years. The club is probably closer knit than any of the other campus organi- zations, in-as-much as, most of the mem- bers meet for regular class periods in the Tobias House. The chapter held an annual Christmas dinner and tea, in addition to their May picnic. Like many of the other organiza- tions, the Home Economics Club needs money to operate, and their maior proi- ect was to keep the athletic program in "stitches", by mending their torn uni- forms. In April, the club invited a num- ber of underprivileged children from the Girl's Training School to a party. Recipe for the Homemaker Start with an open mind, willing hands and a desire for understanding. Blend two cups of creativity, one T. of perspiration, a dash of humor, two T. humility. Stir in V2 cup each of kindness and generosity. Pour into an eight inch baking dish greased well with ioy and place in a pre-heated heart and bake throughout life. Ice with an abundance of Love. 83 Democratic Club, Row l: J. Wilcox, Advisor, A. Slough, M. Replogle, J. Bunce, D. Mowry, F. Johnson, Republicans on campus are organized into the Adrian Col- lege Young Republicans Club. Its ultimate goal is to stimulate Adrian College stu- dents to think about their political affilia- tions. Of course, they hope that the Adrian College students will line themselves with the Republican Party. Students who are in the Young Republicans' Club, have the op- portunity to express themselves politically Republican Club, Row l: G. Bush, Treas., L. Dury, Pres., K. Hoffman, Advisor, C. Pioch, Sec. Row 2: S. Wilson, J. Jones, B. Gilger, F. Takesh, L. Allingham, R. Ar- i A ..s Pres. Row 2: J. Wagner, D. Rule, J. Balsanek, J. Amyx, D. Pray, G. Washburn. on many current issues. As part of their interest in democracy, the club collects, analyzes and discusses many State and Na- tional political issues. They also assist the local Republican Headquarters by distribut- ing campaign materials. This year the Col- lege Republican State Activities Board met on the Adrian College campus and the Adrian Chapter served as host. A delega- tion of Adrian College students were sent to Lansing and the State Republican Con- vention. rington, H. Arrington, K. Yoki, C. Alexander, J. Samuelson. Row 3: B. Hadley, N. Refior, R. Holcomb, The Young Democrats club organized on Adrian College campus during the Autumn. Perhaps, its organizing was due to the fall campaign and the ensuing victory of the Democratic Presidential candidate. Members of the club worked along with the local Demo- crats in sponsoring an all out voter regis- tration drive, they also assisted in the dis- tribution of campaign literature and helped canvass the area. The Young Democrats' Club claim partial credit for the largest Democratic vote on record for the city of Adrian, which influenced the election of the Democratic Congressman, as well as the state and national nominees. On No- vember 3, the club helped sponsor an election return center in Peelle Hall of Science. Many students watched the elec- tion results on television, with the fellow- ship of both Republicans and Democrats. Although, this was their first year on cam- pus, the Young Democrats generated en- thusiasm, and all indications point to con- tinued campus success in disseminating the Democratic viewpoint on maior issues to Adrian College students and faculty. L. Wittenbach, H. Lord, D. Mosier, T. Carl, G. Whitak- er, L. Howell, M. H-ayes. 84 Lambda Iota Tau, Row I: P. Fordyce, Sec., M. Kre- J. Wilcox, Mod., J. Moore, V.P.p J. Alguire, L. Howell, P. Henshaw, Pres., W. Gaston. mer, C. Alexander, L. Burkholder, S. Hayes. Row 2: Lambda Iota Tau, in its simplest form, is a literary honorary society open to superior English maiors and minors. lt seeks to offer these students' an opportunity for informal dis- cussion of literary subiects that may arise from both their classes and their individual reading. It hopes, in other words, to be an outlet for the intellectually restless stu- Theta Alpha Phi, Row I: S. Strattman, Prog. Chrm., C. Alexander, C. Hindle, V.P., S. Hayes, L. Howell, dent. To meet this goal, LIT held a dis- cussion of the poetry of Mr. Donald Kum- mings, one of Adrian's English instructors, a discussion that was partially a study of the evolution of a poet. The group's activities also included meetings on the "theater of the absurd" and a trip to an Ann Arbor dramatic production. Both the LIT Film Series and a sequence of all-campus book discussions are the re- Sec.-Treas. Row 2: Glenn L. Hiarbaugh, Sponsor, J Wagner, B. Middleton, Hist.p R. Green, Pres. sult of the desire to create a wide-spread interest in literature of all types. For both its own members and the entire campus, LIT published Volume I, Number I of a creative writing magazine, Oblique. Theta Alpha Phi consists of a core of Adrian College theater students. These students have liter- ally been in the spotlight, and deserve their place in the Adrian College show- case. To become members of this National Honorary Fraternity of the Theater Arts, one must have contributed his time and talents to the escalation of the Adrian College theater program. Their purpose for existing is to stimulate interest, creative- ness and artistic ability revelant to the theater program. During their back-stage program, which was held in the Fall, Theta Alpha Phi members exhibited to new stu- dents the different areas of the auditorium and different phases of the theater produc- tions, such as make-up, scenery building, light control, sound system and pin rail. They concluded the open-house with ex- cerpts of previous plays. 85 Alpha Chi completed its first year on the Adrian College campus, by recognizing academic- ally superior students at an impressive candlelight ceremony held on May 14, at Ritchie Dining Center. The organization, which was founded last year, has ideals which were symbolically portrayed in the candlelight ritual.'The initials of the Greek Altheia and Xrakater mean truth and char- acter. Those two virtues well symbolized in the society's official colors, sapphire blue, depicting truth, and emerald green, victory. The Alpha Chi motto is "Ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free." Judith Ann Moore, vice-presi- dent of Alpha Chi on campus, was award- ed the national Alpha Chi scholarship for outstanding achievement among under- class members of the society. Eight iun- iors and five seniors were initiated into the honorary society this year. The Women's Recreation Association members zealously cry, -"We won." This is a familiar sound, in Ridge Gymnasium in winter months, on Tuesday and Thursday nights. WRA is open to all Adrian College students and is responsible for the women's intramural Women's Recreation Association, Row 7: M. Gathman, B. Young, Publicity Chairman, D. Rose, V.P., S. Willis, Corr. Sec., C. Phillips, Pres., P. McKarns, Sec., J. Alpha Chi, Row 1: J. Moore, V.P., M. King, H. Davi- son. Row 2: Douglas MacNaughton, Asst. Sponsor, program. The specific aim of this organiza- tion is to improve recreational opportuni- ties, further interest in women's athletics and promote better school spirit. One of the activities of WRA is to set up intramural and extramural schedules. Another familiar cry of WRA women is "Popcorn, anyone," as they sell refresh- Hunt, ARFMCW Rep., M. Richards, Treas., J. Brasiola, Row 2: K. Dragoo, J. Shockey, N. Newman, M. Co- hagen, C. Schlatter, J. Fisher, M. Replogle, C. Ran- K. Beck, Pres., Earle Labor, Sponsor. ments at all home football and basketball games. ln September WRA sponsored a picnic for the members and guests. Throughout the year, they also hold record hops in the Union. The main annual social event of WRA is the "Bid Dance", which is a "Turn about Dance", open to all students. som, E. Megerle. Row 3: S. Reed, l. Forrest, B. Seiser, N. Martin, L. Radabaugh, C. Ratcliffe, S. Fraser, N. Scheer, J. Childs, R. Sickinger. 86 HistoryfClub: Row 1: J. Rink, Sec.-Treas.: D. Boonstra, V.P.: B. Robillard, Pres. Row 2: J. Davis, C. Gregory, J. Clark, L. Howell, S. Moore, D. Cone, Advisor. Row 3: lettermen in the Adrian College athletic program are eligible to participate in the Adrian College Lettermen's Club. This group of men was founded to promote the Athletic Depart- ment, and to stimulate interest in all areas of athletics. Participants in athletics- may Letterman's Club: Row 1: M. Clear, Pres.: B. Row- botham, Sec.-Treas.: R. Goodrich, V.P. Row 2: G Thaler, G. Baxter, H. Lacy, S. Johnstone, S. Neff, J Glendening, T. George, W. Schimming, M. McAran 1 D. Nanyhtas, R. Rose, M. Manor, B. Rodgers, W. Toussaint, Advisor. receive a letterman jacket by receiving either three letters in one sport, or five letters total in various sports. By pro- moting the club, they. receive a number of points. When a member has accumu- lated twenty-five points he is eligible to receive a sweater, and if he has accumu- lated fifty points, he may receive a blanket T. Fleetham. Row 3: B. Cunningham, B. Macomber, G. Roth, J. Murphy, H. Krupnick, B. Baker, C. Gotshall, B. Morr, C. Scheltema. Row 4: J. Ingham, C. Rinehart, C. Wood, D. McClelland,' F. McCra-te, D. Albertson, The History Club founded on the Adrian College Campus had its origin in the home of Dr. Mac- Naughton early in November. This pro- fessional group of all Adrian College students maioring in history was founded on the basis of an informal atmosphere. At the regular monthly meetings, held on Sunday nights, the club holds informal fireside chats in the homes of department faculty members. Two of their outstand- ing programs this past year included mov- ies shown by Mr. Edward Pellowe on the reenactment movies of the Antietam Civil War Battle. Mr. Pellowe is an active mem- ber ofthe Civil War Round Table in Adrian and a member of the college staff. The second program worth remembering for some time was one sponsored by the club, hosting Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Cutler. The Cutlers presented a color slide presen- tation of their recent trip to Greece. with a large gold They may receive points by participating in the club spon- sored concession stand, which is open at the maior spectator sports. This year, for the first time, the Lettermen's Club housed a number of returning lettermen at Home- coming. J. Mills, E. Wright, B. Macomber, P. Loo. Row 5: M. Garrett, D. Anderson, R. Davidson, A. Enderle, M. Kennedy, R. Seagert, D. Valentine, S. Dhondt, J. Wilkin, D: Kippelman, G. Nelles. 87 'SN 5 'if -'e re than it appears to be . It is a symbol of work a nd blood which goes into p The typewriter is mo h' name spelled correctly. d' is a must when so Proofrea mg many names are involve d and everyone wants as .M V -.1 V. ,M , V 1 . .N nwwztzsqggx . -rt, 7"" .rf ublishing this book. -M 3 -' 52, ,sr ,, Q," -wb 5, Q, ,sg -. . . " s' .Q . , +4 .. Lag X A 1 ,sb Left . -u. K 'Ulf' Huw 88 "'-Y""a"""1"1:, '-1 '- ---...., -..., , . A ' 'V """fax-mg.. . at nfl' The T965 MOUND was pub- lished by a handful of Adrian College students whose sole reward was the satisfaction of seeing The fruit of their work being placed in the hands of T300 people in September. Each year Through the combined efforts of these select stu- dents and the Office of Special Services, The story of The year is told Through The effective use of words and pictures. A step forward was made This past year by securing space outside the Administration Building to work on the MOUND. This year they made use of a room in North Hall which they shared with The College World. By using the office, more partic- ipation was enioyed by the key staff mem- bers. By working on the MOUND these few students gained an insight into what goes into the publication of a maior pub- lication. For the first time this year the MOUND had their own student photog- rapher who also had a darkroom set up in Peele Hall of Science. This new service aided the MOUND staff in presenting a fuller picture of happenings on The cam- pus during the year. Anyone interested in photojournalism may petition to work on the MOUND staff. The major problem of the staff this year was securing co- operation of students and staff. In 'spite of this handicap the MOUND rated third in Michigan for layout and third for best photo essay. Editor, Carol Plotts, concentrates on assignments to be made. Staff members Ruth Hitchens and Carol Plotts check pictures with the Advisor All staff members were taught the importance of good layouts and copy preparation WORLD editor, Jim Rink, scratches his head trying The College World, which is the student voice on campus, celebrated its 75th anniversary this year by producing a regular edition, every oth- er Thursday. The College World is unique to this campus, in that it is produced by a ftfkflkil- to fit a headline for the bi-monthly paper. class, rather than individuals working on their own. Mr. Lee Pettitiean, a reporter for the Adrian Daily Telegram, conduct- ed the class, much the same way a pro- fessional newspaper conducts its staff. Jim Rink, who is a senior, served as Editor for both semesters. He has worked for The staff produces "An outstanding small newspaper in an outstanding small college in the Mid-West." the past three years for the Adrian Daily Telegram, and was recognized as a com- petent editor by the English Department. Major events, sponsored by the College World, included a mock election, held in the fall, which predicted the landslide. victory of Johnson and Romney. Newspaper galleys are marked for identification and are later dummied prior Staff members wait for their assignments from the advisor, Mr. Petitgean and to returning the paper to the printer. 1 ff 90 ,. K editor, Jim Rink. 42' ' W T f 'fir 5. R ' "' iv. 12' 1.323 1 ' ' ,' . few xv : Q2 " , 1:-.. T ss g 'Q 'iliv 413539-..,f-'x . X' ,Q-Q ", ., ' . gzlag. . s :.- ii? 5234 ix , 5 .- . 1 . V I Q- ., .- Q . - Q. Psi Sigma Rho actives lead new pledges in a cheer. Women gather in the union after bids are received. s X' as Ns 'x . . -" ' - . W 3 ' :'-:-:-It WAN5' 4' -f"' I The Alpha Tau Omegas welcome their new pledges in the union It all starts here - Greek life, that is with the'con- clusion of Rush Week, when bids are ac- cepted, the young man or woman enters a new world. They are suddenly surround- ed by brothers or sisters who are anx- ious to share their fraternal life. Almost 50 percent of Adrian's student body belongs to a fraternity or sorority and these Greek organizations benefit the College in many ways. Besides spon- soring social events, a large part of Ad- rian's public relations is dealt with through fraternities and sororities. Each organiza- tion aids some kind of charity during Christmas or Easter holidays. The Greeks are a very important part of the friendly atmosphere created on the college campus and will continue to be an influential factor at Adrian for a long time to come. The Alpha Phi actives serenaded their new pledges in Estes Hall. P 6 T ,V 5 wr 'tt . . , f i -- 'xi ,lf V 9l The lnterfraternity Council is the mortar that cements all the fraternities on the Adrian campus into a strong body. It is the gov- erning force throughout which rules and regulations of fraternities are formulated. They also help to unite the Greek system and the independents through sponsored dances and social activities. With the co- operation of Panhellenic Council, l.F.C. conducted a barbecue, carnival and dance early in the year. Under the sponsorship of Dr. Howard Emrick, l.F.C. and Pan- hellenic conducted a door-to-door drive for the Adrian United Fund campaign. l.F.C. set their standards high and raised the requirements fcr pledging from a T. average to a 1.2 average. This rule will become effective in September, l965. In a report put out by the l.F.C., it was stated that: "Emphasis has been placed on social activities and sports. The fraterni- ties have failed in taking the lead in scholastic excellence." Thus it is hoped that the new ruling will attract scholars. Throughout the next few years, the l.F.C. hopes to improve rushing methods now being used. They also hope to unite the fraternities through combining proi- ects thus de-emphasizing the strong com- petitive positions now being experienced. E 5 . .......-R+.:-Q.-. .... . ...... .,.....,.se-- ..,. -.. ..-,...-W ----...-, - - - iff Tess , Q , :QQ .5 T Q F Etiiit i Q Above lnterfraternity Councilp Row T: S. Dhondt, I.. Eddie, Treas.g J. Roseniack, Pres., L. Irish, V.P. Row 2: P. Loo, J. Haas, H. Chavis, R. Dorn, D. Sloan, R. Burkhart. Below Panhellenic Council, Row T: B. Swoish, Sec.-Trees.: C. Gregory, Pres.p Dean Betty Sanford, Advisory J. Hoadley, V.P. Row 2: K. Redmond, K. Morris, F. Borgia, 92 any The Panhellenic Council of Adrian College is the Sorority counter-part of the lnterfraternity Council. This organization of Greek women strives to stimulate scholastic and social achieve- ments among the four recognized, social sororities on campus. All the Greek women are, by rights, members of the Panhellenic Council, but are represented by two mem- bers of each sorority. This group repre- sents about 40? of all Adrian College women and serves to govern themselves. Their part, in the Adrian College show- case, is one of establishing and enforcing the rushing and pledging procedure to which all sororities must adhere. Joining forces with the lnterfraternity Council, Panhellenic sponsored the first annual Greek weekend held in September. This event was used to unite the Greeks and to promote better understanding among the entire student body. During the month of March, over two thousand Tootsie Pops were sold by all members of the Panhellenic system. This represented each girl selling ten lollipops for a price of ten-cents each. Proceeds from this combined effort are to be used for the publication of the rush booklet for next year. Although every sorority girl's first loyal- ty is to her pin and sorority, she recog- nizes the importance of a higher group body-the Panhellenic System. Tau Kappa Epsilong Row 1: J. Tyrrell, Chap., L. Eddie, V.P., L. La-Beau, Pres., D. Parker, Pledge Trainer. Row 2: J. Rohrback, B. Hess, D. Hammerstrom, P. This year saw the Tau Kappa Epsilon's spending their second year in their new house on Mau- mee Street and insisting that all their pledges spend each Saturday morning cleaning and improving the house in prep- aration for the arrival of a new house- mother in September. The year was begun by helping the Freshman women move in- to the dormitories. Then taking advantage of the Christmas spending spirit TKE men sold candy and held a Christmas Tree The TKE's are helpful. lott, T. George, D. Comerzan, B. Hawk, P. Dennis, Hist. Row 3: B. Butz, P. Olofson, G. Baxter, J. Tower, J. Roseniack, R. Nisar, M. Mans, J. Hanson. Row 4: sale from which they cleared 35450, Us- ing some of their hard-earned money, they spread the Christmas joy with a party for underprivileged children sug- gested by the Salvation Army. The TKE's held their first all-college "Red Carnation Ball" in Ritchie Dining Hall and decided to make it an annual affair. At the Greek Carnival their booth brought in more revenue than any of the other dis- plays with their "Wheel of Fortune." The men also participated in the United Fund M. Duckett, W. Lancaster, L. Salisbury, D. McKelvey, J. Thompson, J. Wiedrnan, E. Dammeyer, E. Wright, T. O'Haver. Drive, many of the intermural activities and the All-College Sing. In an attempt to improve chapter scholarship, the men held regular study sessions in Shipman Library while waiting for their study room to be completed. Brother Jim Tyrell contributed to the chapter by making their Coat of Arms from inlayed wood, consisting of twelve different kinds of wood. The Na- tional president said that a picture of the finished work would be placed on the cover of their national magazine. The brothers provide music for their "Ball." f X 93 11181-XY. 55577 l Z i Sigma Sigma Sigma, Row 1: M. Karr, Scholastic Chrm.f M. Tashey, Rec. Sec.g C. Hindle, V.P.y D. Pontius, Pres., J. McKay, Trees., C. Dubuc, Cor. Sec. Row 2: B. Beck, M. Kremer, A. Miller, J. Pollock, M. Staton, J. Harder, B. Graham, C. Rutledge, P. Turban, C. Sigma Sigma Sigma enioyed a year filled with a great number of social events. ln the fall the Tri Sigma women participated in formal rush and Homecoming. Later they ioined other Greek organizations in spon- soring the Greek Carnival, Perhaps their biggest social activity of the year was a spring formal which was held May 8, in the Park Lane Hotel in Toledo. The Tri Sigma women sponsored a rummage sale which netted Sl60.00. This project was The Tri Sigmas took their new pledges to the union. Pioch, C. Berger, M. Rock, K. Dolinski. Row 3: T. Strauss, N. Trewern, J. Samuelson, R. Lehman, S. Tombaugh, D. Lueke, S. Johnston, M. Dixon, R. LaNew, C. Hagen, L. Kincaid, J. Lucas, C. McGinnis. Row 4: S. Maybee, S. Wilson, J. Blumer, P. Keeley, C. Norton, made possible through the efforts of their alumni chapter. Proceeds from the rum- mage sale were used to send Vice Presi- dent, Sharon Holstrom, to New York City for the Tri Sigma Convention. Their pledg- es were active in selling hot dogs in an attempt to raise money for the Robbie Page Memorial. This Memorial project is a nation wide service proiect by all chap- ters. Robbie Page was the son of a past national president of Tri Sigma and who died from bulbar polio at the age of five. In his memory the women are raising C. Schlatter, A. Priestley, J. Hoadley, D. Hardy, S. Smith, M. Wolfel, S. Holmstrom, R. Hitchens. Row 5: P. Meister, M. Fedell, M. Luepke, M. Grove, D. VanSickle, D. Burns, K. Dedich, A. Long, L. Phillips, G. Monahon, N. Ehl, F. Borgia, L. Green, J. Green. funds for a children's room at the North Carolina Memorial Hospital in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Another money raising project used to support the Robbie Page Memorial was a parcel-post auction. This auction was one where an alumni would mail a package to the active chapter who in turn auctioned the package, unopened, to the highest bidder. This endeavor of raising money became meaningful to the women following the campus visitation of Mrs. Page. Mrs. Page with alumni 94 Theta Chi fraternity men returned to Adrian College campus in October, determined to make a new name for themselves. During the sum- mer, all necessary arrangements were made for changing the name from Ameri- can Commons Club to its present Theta Chi. The group formally became the Zeta Beta chapter of Theta Chi on October 24, 1964. The Adrian chapter became the 140th chapter in the United States and the 5th in Michigan. The day's activities were climaxed at a 6:00 P.M. banquet. The motto of Theta Chi, "Alma Mater first, and Theta Chi for Alma Mater," brought the campus community into a closer relationship. Theta Chi men par- ticipated in the Greek carnival and spent many hours on their homecoming display, "When Bulldogs Raid, Hope Goes Down." Like many Greek groups, Theta Chi held a traditional Christmas party and carolled the Women's Dormitories and various so- cial agencies in town. Theta Chi entered at least one team in nearly every sport in the intermural program. Their bowling team won its league championship for its second consecutive year, and as a chap- ter, they earned the scholarship cup for 1964, for maintaining above average scholarship. Theta Chip Row 1: P. O'Malley, Treas.p B. Mapes, Chrm S Legenc G Thaler Row 3 D Pierce M Pres., Brandy-Ox, Mascot, P. Loo, N. Bukwaz, V.P.p Thompson Chap W Blllig T Smith R Schroth F T. Fleetem, Sec. Row 2: J. Gunthorp, T. Robinson, Clark N Colbry House Manager G Stevenson B. Roekle, Hist.7 L. VanDierendonck, R. Jones, Soc. Theta Chi accepts their charter Chi Omega, Row l: S. Wise, Pledge Trainer, K. Mc- Carthy, Corr. Sec., S. Harris, Treas., S. Farin, Pres., L. Burkholder, V.P., S. Frost, Sec., C. Clifford, Per. Chrm. Row 2: M. Spector, L. Kunzi, J. Thompson, A. Pollard, D. MacDonald, S. Adams, C. Lawrence, D. Haywood, L. Ackelson, L. Douglas, N. Curry, K. Druhot, Chi Omega sorority had one of the most unusual spring for- mals on May lst. Following a buffet din- ner at the home of alumna, Phylliss Driggs in Toledo, the women and their dates boarded the "Goodtime ll" boat and spent the remainder of the evening cruising on the bay of Lake Erie. At intermission, a number of awards were presented to out- standing actives and pledges. As luck Chi Omega pledges gather to begin a new life as L. Raines. Row 3: B. Seiser, F. Rinehart, D. Travnik, S. Gammie, L. Chamberlin, K. Nice, J. Wheatley, D. Douglas, K. James, D. lmes, C. Osmick, B. Bremer, J. Raines, R. Rolf. Row 4: J. Hunt, K. Ellstrom, B. Good, C. Black, J. Martens, P. Foster, 'M. Russ, N. Martin, D. Rozeboom, C. Hicks, K. Smith, C. Gregory, would have it, the weather cooperated and none fell over-board. Chi Omega so- rority had a number of other social ac- tivities which included the Chi Omega Chalet which was a ski lodge theme dance. They also held a number of fashion shows with clothes furnished by the Town and Country Shop of Gordons and iewel- ry from Berndts. They participated in the Greek Week Carnival and had fun in their "Fun House." Nancy Curry and Carol Hicks sorority women and to start a new life with all B. Stevenson, C. Mincheff, K. Dragoo. Row 5: N. Refior, J. Goetz, S. Hardy, R. Sickinger, B. VanLooy, J. Walker, C. deL'horbe, J. MacQueen, K. Redmond, S. Randolph, S. Foster, S. Greening, l. Rapp, C. Chase. represented Chi Omega on the Homecom- ing court-Nancy being the queen. Among the firsts for the Chi Omega women was included the first place Homecoming soror- ity display with the R.C.A. Victor record- er. They also captured the first place tro- phy in both the quartet and the chorus divisions of the ALL COLLEGE SING. On the same day as the ALL COLLEGE SING, they received the outstanding scholarship cup. their sisters 47 96 F fr I VL- - 2 Q, 'Q' I ... 's' M- ff' , , fix! .-4. -' V 2 ' is ' ' sf s N ., fl A . ' ' .5 2 :P ff' 7- . EAL-Q Chuck Wood eyes the situation before he The SAE's enioy a chat in the union with their housemother. pitches. Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Row i: M. Schoales, V.P.p Davids, Pres., B. Lewis, Treas. Row 2: J. Laph-am, Johnstone, M. Marshall, K. Jenkinson, P. Merritt, Hockemeyer, B. Lauber, B. Bain, B. Wells, H. Lacy, Bamford, E. Spaeth, K. Beck. Row 3: J. Bain, Hershkonitz, W. Cabble, C. Davis, S. Neff, Helen Ehr- bright, House Mother: T. LeMessurier, L. Gippert, M Grime, T. Stapleton, C. Gotshall, F. McCrate, A Dresselhouse. Row 4: C. Wood, R. Cronin, T. Nord- strom, C. Rinehart, J. Murphy, M. Clear, H. Krupnick, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, with it's chapter house on Michigan Avenue, serves as an inspiration to non- Greeks on the college campus. They have existed in Adrian, since being established in 1887, and are the third oldest chap- ter north of the Mason-Dixon Line. The activities of SAE are chiefly social. Among their list of accomplishments, SAE reports a successful spring formal, many closed house parties, and several campus wide events. The brotherhood aspect, of their creed, was exemplified as they participated in the United Fund campaign. ln the sea- son of Christmas and the spirit of good- will, they entertained underprivileged children of the Adrian area at their tra- ditional Christmas party. Although, it is always nice to win, members of SAE feel that participation in the intramural pro- gram is more meaningful than any trophy. They entered every contest of Mr. Gillis' program. They also, actively support the beliefs of student government and the inter-fraternity council. J. Weir, B. Burkhart, A. Dudgeon, B. Pollefeyt, D. Albertson, B. Simpkins, B. Rowbotham. Row 5: T. Swan, J. Mills, L. Irish, R. Goodrich, J. Pemberton, G. Nelles, P. Atkins, D. Nagle, D. Miller, M. Garrett, D. Anderson, A. Enderle, M. Kennedy, R. Seagert. 97 .. -gm-K A 2 1.5 'M 1-1- X -.1-------f -V ,.......,..... V i l i I 3 .4 : -.Q1 L S "1 ,I Alpha Sigma Alpha, Row 1: J. Babcock, J. Bowles. Row 2: C. Barnes, M. Hummel, D. Hoffman, l. President Isabelle accepts the charter. I silkx 1 x 'N- 98 .sei if? Forrest. Row 3: E. Uhler, K. Neumann, N. Glasgo, S. M. Anderson, Mrs. Richard Youngs, Alumnae advisor. Reed, J. Brasiola, M. Schroer, K. DeLong, L. Nation, Alpha Sigma Alpha is the newest sorority on the Adrian College campus. It colonized on October 8, 1964 after several years of being known as Beta Psi Zeta. The women were active in campus affairs and participated in nearly all the Greek sponsored activ- ities including the Greek Carnival where they sponsored the Balloon Bust and the canvassing of Adrian for the United Fund campaign. The women were able to secure a meeting room in Cargo Hall where they planned a limited number of social events. Their maior social activity was their spring formal which was held May I5 at the Irish Hills Ski Lodge. At their national activation in February, Alpha Sigma Al- pha women were honored to have their national officers in Adrian, as well as representatives from nearby chapters. Their maior proiect for serving the com- munity was working with the mentally re- tarded children in Adrian. Central Michigan Alumni, Mrs. Richard Youngs, donated her home for a tea following the Installation. ' iii", - Alpha Tau Omega, Row 1: P. Miller, Sec., R. Smith, Chap.: J. Ogarek, Pres., D. Smith, Trees., M. McAran, Hist. Row 2: T. Rea, S. Sasaki, D. Lucas, R. Barrows, J. Romack, A. Scott, B. Gray, H. Helmer, J. Smith. Alpha Tau Omega is a brotherhood with " . . . no narrower limits than the outlines of the world." This year the men of Alpha Tau Omega celebrated its lOOth anniversary. Alpha Mu of Adrian is the oldest chapter north of the Mason-Dixon line. Among their campus activities, ATO captured the first place homecoming award for their display "Adrian give Hope the 23 Skiddoof' This is the fourth straight year that Alpha Tau Omega received the distinction. They also were winners in Row 3: W. Schimming, C. Doinidis, G. Roth, J. Glen- dening, B. Cunningham, B. Ritz, D. Ware, W. Shreffler, Bill Macomber, R. Weinbrenner. Row 4: G. Mascare, E. Celmer, J. Haas, M. Boyle, R. Hodgins, Bob Ma- the best over-all campus display category. They entered a team in nearly every in- termural event and captured the first place position in football, volleyball and archery. The nineteen pledges received during formal rush were a great help to the mem- bers when it came time to clean the house for their many house parties. Services did not stop with campus proiectsp in- stead the ATO men assisted in the United Fund drive, collected clothes for Goodwill lndustry and gave charity baskets to needy families at Christmas time. The Taus set aside part of one of their many closed parties for social singing with their dates. comber, D. Wissman, B. Robillard, G. Stocks, K. Mullin J. Henson. Row 5: A. Benzick, D. Koppelman, B Mason, D. Harms, D. Kunzi, R. Holt, S. Dhondt, C Moore, H. Chavis, J. Stimpson. The Taus cheer and chant after winning the Homecoming display trophies. 99 Alpha Phi, Row l: N. Graham, Rec. Sec.: P. McKarns, 2nd V.P.g E. Gearig, Pres.p B. Swoish, lst V.P.p M. Collins, Trees. Row 2: M. Cohagen, F. Connors, B. Bennink, M. Swander, N. Green, B. Allen, B. Kraft, S. Willis, B. Marsh, M. Schultz, K. Spacht, C. Meyer. Delta Eta of Alpha Phi will long remember the little red "shack" at the corner of Madison and College. Their year started last summer as a group of these Adrian coeds attended their National Convention in Colorado Springs. The Alpha "Phi-Esta" booth at the Greek-Weekend Carnival drew a num- ber of interested students. Lights could be seen in the "house" every night before Homecoming as the Phi's worked on their display, The Tea-Pot Dome Scandal, "Hope's in Hot Water." Sisters Beth Ern- rick and Carol Sullins represented them on the Homecoming court. Once again the girls honored their families with the an- nual Parent's Day Get-Together and later in the year they visited the Maple Lane Row 3: B. Emrick, N. Luce, C. Guttliep, S. Frost, A. Metcalf, A. Warner, F. Frits, B. Barden, B. Shuler, A. Stewart, S. Wollenberg, S. Ludwig. Row 4: J. Cat- enhusen, P. Ernst, C. Thompson, J. Bridenbaugh, M. Leventry, S. McCully, R. Robinette, P. Tea, B. Holben, Manor. During the semester, Beth Em- rick was chosen "best dressed coed" on Adrian's campus for a national contest. Funds to cover the Phi Hootenanny were raised by selling ice-cream and candy as well as holding a car wash. Funds left over were used to underwrite the cost of the "Old Fashioned Christmas Dance" and other social events. The Alpha Phi's were visited by their District Governor, Mrs. Giltrow and their Field Secretary, Sabanna Tucker. Spring semester brought with it All-Col- lege Sing and several of the sisters repre- sented their chapter at the district con- vention at Purdue University. The highlight of the year was the Spring Formal which was held at The Inn America in Ann Arbor. S. Hayes, K. Morris, J. Huml. Row 5: H. Faubel, B. Schurz, M. Pla-tek, D. Boyse, B. Hadley, R. Yackle, J. Warner, E. Vannorsdall, N. French, M. Pascoe, K. Sut- ton, C. Sullins, J. Drake. Santa comes for the Alpha Phi's. HBP and Joel Peffofm if 'he l"00lenannY- The sisters welcome the new pledges. IOO Psi Sigma Rho: Row i: P. Henshaw, Sec.: T. Grams, Pres.: T. Goebel, V.P.: R. Dorn, Treas. Row 2: R. Rose, Chaplain: B. Baker, Pledgemasterp L. Sheely, J. Price, Pi Kappa Alpha and the school year began with the fraternity existing under the local status of Psi Sigma Rho. Existing under this name, the brothers began an extensive search for the National that was the best. After this investigation the brothers chose Pi Kappa Alpha and were colonized on May i, 1965, exactly two years after their forma- tion. During the school year the brothers par- ticipated in many school activities. These Following the installation of Pi Kappa Alpha, the men their colonization emblem. J. Bowden, D. Charlefour, J. Hooper. Row 3: O. Mattson, L. Dury, F. Henck, C. Franke, B. Cleveland, C. Anderson, T. Smith, M. MacRaild. Row 4: S. John- activities included: Homecoming, with the theme being based around the stock mar- ket crash of l929: Intramurals: Greek wel- come day, and the United Fund torch drive. The brothers also sponsored many closed parties, one of which was a Christ- mas party for underprivileged children in the area. The brothers also sponsored a car wash, which was a huge success. Previous to the school year the brothers acquired the East wing of their house at 1324 Williams, which was previously an ston, R. Morr, B. Wilson, H. Crawford, A. Eggleston, F. Fitchko, J. McMahon. apartment for "Mom" Shipman. Follow- ing this addition several improvements were made on the house. The brothers also acquired a mascot, Pike, which they named in honor of their affiliation with the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. The crown- ing event of the social calendar for the brothers was their Spring Formal, which was held at the Aku Aku in Toledo with Miss Barb Holben being crowned the Dream Girl of the fraternity. of Psi Sigma Rho FSYTIOVG Thane Grams relinquishes his post as president following the May initiation. .-'FQXR ' x ,1'f.. J K ' s TP' lIl1ll.UNlZlNE -,..,K-M 11" M43 .-,,, ,A - i ni 1 .. . J. . -. ' 'HW' . , , ,. ., '. - -,N .-.K-f-any-'1'::4lJ" lOl Xu 'gf I 'W f fun Q. mv ii XS f X sg 'NWN 1 Faculty and Administration John H. Dawson President Darrell H. Pollard Dean of the College S 1115. ' -1-ur Q13 J I' A X Gregg J. Arbaugh P M U Associate Professor of Physical Education , .- Frank G. Bell Controller Beverly M. Allen Vlfglnla H- AUSHN insfrucfof in Spanish Instructor of Speech and Physical Education Helen Baro ne Mildred Clark Associate Professor of Home Economics - .less IO4 Associate Librarian W' Michael Cassino Assistant Professor of Art I s 3 .tvs 4' . -5 fn-it' - 3 ., - . ,,. 'l, . , A, RX, V x . 5.5.2 'pf' . 1' 4 . ,sl .s'.A . .'., 1515 2- .sg .4 ' rw X211 352 ff. Lewis H. Brumbaugh Professor of Religion Donald' Cone Instructor of History 'ssc Barnard H. Crusinberry Associate Professor of Physics and Mathematics John A. Davis Associate Professor of History Howard C. Emrick Chaplain and Professor of Religion NYY? Myrtle C. Craig Associate Professor of Education M Paul E. deLespinasse Instructor in Political Science Ja Y QQ' v X if Nollie M. Daisher Associate Professor of Education -1 James A. Dodd Director of the Library meg A, Flanagan James O. Friel Instructor in Physical Education l"5f"'-'ffm' in Mafhemaflcs Ill HEI i 1 IOS 2 I i l Robert J. Gillis Charles E Glassnck Associate Professor of Physical Education and Director Associate Professor of Chemistry of Athletics Glenn L. Harbaugh Lyle D Hoffer Robert C- Gibson Instructor in Theater Director of AClrnlSSlOnS Professor of Chemistry and Chairman, Division ll Gordon L. Hansen Business Manager k.., , - 'Xi 'xi Ar. NS' fi sol ff Y Q. A- Kenneih E. Hoffman Hcward L. Huddle Ralph Horn Assistant Professor of Political Science Instructor in Biology Professor of Education and Director of Teacher Education K 1 M W 3 1' f WI 5 if Eff' lit? ' " 4 I06 4 I I K if 2 X " W Xxx as J s ik x 'Q -. Robert M. Husband Arthur J. Jones Assistant Professor of Biology Assistant Professor of Music John Koehn Paul M. Koehn Instructor in Business Administration Assistant Professor of Physics Mary Pat Jones . 4 .. if -rl' Instructor in English Maurice E. Kramer Bookstore Manager Earle G. Labor Donald D. Kummings Associate Professor of English and Chairman, George G. Lake lnsffuffof in English Humanities Division Associate Professor of English ll! V 5-5 . .51 X- 5 :V r.. . ss., . ' N William E. Mays Douglas A. MacNaugl'1ton Professor of Sociology and Chairman, Social Professor of Religion and Acting Chairman, Dept. of Science Division History and Political Science R. Cody Meadows Charles W. McCallum Dean of Men Director, Alumni Affairs and Placement . tg. ,,. it t t pong, A If If 'vs ,. ,s -jfs. W Viola C. Miller Registrar IO8 Charles E. Marvin Assistant Professor of Physical Education Albert Misseldine Instructor in English Rolf E. Moeckel Associate Professor of Education xi' - WD Sf' in-.X Paul J Nnehaus Jean Mowat W' 'am H- M0qUif1 Assistant Professor of Biology Instructor in Home Economics l"5ffUCf0f in Business Adminisf,-afion Miles L. Peelle Clarence Pldwerbesky Professor of Biology and Chairman, Division of Natural Sciences . AH , , A xf VV E. .11 ' ,fn I09 ...penn 4. 5 cf. , 0 we Kar! Rodeck Assistant Professor in German James H. Spencer Professor of Music and Chairman, Music Department Betty J. Sanford Dean of Women and Associate Professor of Religion Ray B. Sommers Instructor in Mathematics Daniel W. Scully Associate Professor of Speech and Chairman Speech Department George C. Seeck Professor of Psychology and Chairman, Philosophy, Psychol09Y, and Reliaion Division 0 Ioan O. Stepp Instructor in English R li?-.. IO I A' W1 fi 4 1 John Talaycg Robert M. Teeter Instructor in French Instructor in Physical Education 5- ' ..,,,.1""'f DQ! .QL ss F. Mary Teusink Associate Professor of Education Herbert W. Voege Willard Toussaint Donald J. Veldt Associate Professor of History and Political Instructor in Speech Science . -wk: ff t f :-:s:':1..Qs-w ,W f ' e. Q .,., S, Q. ., X ,.., 4.3,-.5,.,, I . 1 . . 1 , M A Q wg' 'rr :- if U P 5852- " " .- sms.. , iz., . .,.,, . Ali-gi-r . ., fZf3f'2Q-,-If-,-..Ll-il' "Q I " ..s:2.' Ib 1 iiixld 5: 4 f"'1-'PS-as-was ,-'ff , 1. ' S ,.asf-.-::...., ' . ' ' sz wt' 'rzfrsg ,,. 1 1' '.':I3S :2' 'ri ' . ll ' 'awk-, LP -Q : ,5,,,.,,,, ' Q15.Qli,1:1Q:f.Q,-:Q.:.s:1,-Q...-,-fgl , ,. . .14 .g:X-Q-.,:,,g:w - . ..., . .,.,...,.,: X, .. . a - X"1-'e:2-efsff,::1s:w -- z.: f M , .- 1-sas.-sas:-t" A . , f 121.1 . :,.:.1g.5sg5g2g15gsz- :gifs er 5 'wig - . f wg.--I-it-:X ,- . 3 . ' Alfred A. Waters NB"lCY Walsh Assistant Professor of Economics and Admissions Counselor lf'5ffUCf0" in Women? Pl"Y5lC6l Ed'-'Gallon Business Administration Charlotte K, Wixom Associate Professor of Women's Physical Education Joseph E. Yantis Assistant in Public Relations Lauren F. Windh-am Assistant Professor in English James M. Wilcox Instructor in English TN J j. gf 5 , QQ. 5 :'.lfSI?t"' pf hx gig . ,. :iii N lfs4e.4rg 4- . 1 9'-. , mx , t:,:,,,,-Q . P' 'PX ,Q A ,g:J. ig la, if 5' . 'F l. 'i QL li , X. tl. 3 Qa, . .il for Q f X "v ,fx W Mrs. Alice Brisbin Dormitory Director-Estes Hall ffl? Mrs. Helen Ehrbrighf Housemother-SAE House . 34'-J' ,, s., n1g5.f1:f2r1f W, 1' 5 Al Mrs. Ruth MacDonald Mrs. lzola Kruse Mrs. Mildred Johnson Dormitory Director-Cargo Hall Dormitory Director-Stevens Hall Dormitory Director Jones Hall Mrs. Mygleefes Goodrich Dormitory Director-Jarvis I Hall II2 f"Qh 95- Q Mrs. Verle Young Housemorher-ATO House 3111 Hlemnriam Dr. Ralph B. Horn Doyle R. Harms Donald C. Albertson Charlene A. Baur "LT.Z" Paul D. Bamford Esther A. Barr For the post four years Adrian College has been called HOME 'Qggi Q Senior Class Officers: Don Lucas, Pres., Tom Rea, Sec., Bruce Norton, Treas., Bill Mason, V.P. X., 1 ',i" Q pg Gary C. Baxter ' - ll4 Keith R. Beck James R. Bowers qnnoh- 3 Arthur Benzrck Carolynn E. Berger by the 1965 Senior. Standing on the threshold of the future, Dorothy A. Boyse George A. Bradley Jean E. Bradley John R, Breece Lynnette S. Burkholder Francis P. Clark Ralph H. Baumgardner MFCFIGGI J. Clear II5 Carole S. Clifford wnvv-fc" . Douglas J. Cline Joanne Cole Sharon L. Collick he recalls many happy occasions, and looks fo the uncertain future Q-5'-2 Michele L. Collins Nancy J. Curry John D, David Brent G. Davids Qs ss Helen L. Davison llb Ca rl F. DeMeriTt Kristin N. Denecke Linda M. DeYarmond A Kathleen A. Druhot He was able fa mmf Lawrence D. Dury Lalrd P. Eddie Susan D. Farin grow in wisdom, sfafure, and understanding Diane C. Fast Frank F. Fitchko Terry C. Fleetham Patricia A. Fordyce Sandra K. Franks Nancy R, French Susan L. Frost Lois J. Ga rrow Warren F. Gaston Y4L,.- ,N-5 as the college Thaine W. Grams Judy B. Haering Nancy C. Graham Elanne M. Gearug Ellen C. Gouldnng grew in both size and academic excellence Nancy R. Green Roger L. Green David L. Hadden Warren N, Hannig Doyle R- HBVVTWS iv Q7-v Susan J. Harris Susan R. Hayes E 44-.Quia cff' 'Nu--f Robert L Hess Ronald G Hoshal Patricia A. Johnson 1 are hr W'f""'iro- His final year was filled with planned steps leading ta the future Steven V. Johnston Jane B. Jones M. Lee Kennedy Mary E. King Donald S. Kordee Peter P. Koval Jeffrey A. Kranitz Linda M. Kuney Larry F. La Beau AN 'S-f Liga- He checked his 40 -ss vgifllli Wm ln t I r he -' i -- l ef fr . K.. .-I el' . .'-.:-1-f ' I 'S' " ,. - ., O J . 4-N .. . wr mi 12425 am. fr X - .. 'f 15- fgjr- :ww A1291 -2' , fi- ' 1 4 . 35 -fee. L.:-fi-eg .-Q I SI- fe 1 'kgfeizz-f.f 1 '1' S ' V 1 Donald W. Langsdale records for course Sianley M. Legenc Margaret E. Levenfry requirements, and those all imporfanf ',.A. Joyce A. Linn Katharine L. Love Donald R. Lucas Janice E, MaCQUeen William E. Mapes James E. Marohnic -L P5 S, Barbara A. Marsh Judith A. Martens George L. Maschke Willard H. Mason Judith A. McKay Michael D. McLean extracurricular points. Then came iob interviews, senior pictures, Eva M. Megerle Bruce H. Middleton Paul F. Miller Gail E. Monahon Judith A. Moore Kay M. MOrrlS Steve Neff 19' James F. Neifert Melinda A. Nofziger Thomas W. O'Haver is-N Bruce R. Norton James M. Ogarek invitations, and caps and gownsp all of which were in preparation 'Q' Carol A. Oyer John G. Pernberfon Marcia C. Peters Douglas R. Pfister Judy A. Pollock Donna M. Pontius Carol M. Ploffs Kay M, Powell l22 Mary L. Price is-K Thomas J. Rea for his long Anne E. PriSSTley Lawanda K. Radabaugh , , walk fo receive his well earned diploma Jacqueline 5- RiCh6I'ClSOI'l James M. Rink RoberT S. Ritz Robert C. Robillard Rhea J. Robinette William A. Rodgers Cal E, Rohrback James R. Rohrback James M. Roseniack Q 'fn xi img' N'- Dianne E. Rozeboorn Stanley K. Sasaki Torn Schneider Where to now, he asks? Will it be to graduate school , +...":1n Robert R. Schroth if--vo Bonnie J. Shumaker I24 Eileen M. Seager Richard R. Seagert Bernice L. Secrist Harold J. Slater Karen M. Slater Robert A. Slone, Jr A David L. Smith 731 Roger D. Smith S. Kay Smith the beginning of his life's profession? Will if Deloras M. Stark Terry Ann Strauss Delores M, Sumner Marsha L. Specfor wma be marriage or Gerald B. Swanson Gene H. Thayer Carolyn S. Tonneberger Margaret J. Tashey Ma rgaret-Ann Turban I25 Lenna M. Uguccionl AnnMarle V VanHouse 'he rg i X Richard E. Valentune Judnth K. Vanderhoof exploration of the world? Who knows? . . Only the Senior can decide li S-r ,Q-as Ernest W. VanHouse Dennis S. VanSickIe Andrew C, Wesfin Charles E, Wood RUTl1 C- Yafikle Samuel A. Yarlotf Q ' , Roger E. Wyman I26 Edward J. Zabinski JUNIORS Class of '66 Junior Class Officers: Don Hammerstrorn, V.P.g Harvey Krupnick, Pres., Jerry Lapham, Treas.g Judy Lucas, Sec. Row l: Charlotte Alexander, Lawrence Al- Iingham, Lynne Anderson, Robyn Arring- ton, Thomas Badley, James Bain, William Bain, Belle Barden. ff' A A : Q , -E ax LA XS- , ,LT- ' I X, K' ' 0 ,,.. ' if 'f AA Juniors Row 7: Nikki Beaudry, Lawrence Becker, Jan Bennett, Melvin Berkebile. Row 2: Janet Bird, Beniamin Blazier, James Blickle, Wal- ter Bone. Row 3: Daniel Boonstra, Faye Borgia, Vikrom Bovonrata- naruck, John Bowden. Row 4: Jane Bowles, Michael Boyle, Thomas Bradley, Charles Braun. Row 5: Edna Brown, Norman Bukwaz, Carolyn Bush, Gaila Bush, Shirley Bush, Willard Cabble, Edward Celmer, Robert Chase, Arthur Chavis. Row 6: Norman Colbry, John Correll, Hank Crawford, Robert Cronin, Ronald Cosner, Gary Cul- len, Wendy Davenport, Charles Davis, Roger Davidson. Row 7: Carl Demlow, Paul Dennis, Ethel Dewey, Steven Dhondt, Christ my .:. .2 A , 7... .liffifif-if-a:.fi'2f'S'fff'Tf., , - si X .xi.z'Qpp.,gi:p:sQ.1,'ff'..15: I it '19 . ,L 'r.',. -.5 If-711 L, , Bri ' ' Q, 1 ' WW' M Q ZS Mg: ae- .' , A ' or J' J' u. Doinidis, Leslie Douglas, Allen Dresselhouse, Gary Driscall, Michael Durham. Row 8: Alan Eggleston, Suzanne Ehrmin, Beth Emrick, 'Eggs Jr Q . Arthur Enderle, Donna Falls, Martha Fedell, Dean Ferris, Duane :L , 151 ,y ' Qi s A 1512! Flanery, Michael Flaherty. I X ,aft iygig , ,ffl if if , . W' A I . . A5 , A I I' f Q .Q A 6 Q -3, ' 'ki lr 5N- A X I. XV' N '. xg., Q 55" it .. ,: - i . ' ,: 'J-n . A "- " :- f ' F diff J" ' 'i .qf?:'.f:57f:-5335 i f' ' i A all ' " 'l5ff?sfis.1'.:f?iffiffE' 5 Tl. Qi'-" ISIN fx' if- ' 4, X.,-- -- 7' . : 1' I t y, .53 . in ' 1 :fix , ffl, If i Y .. H .:'1 ,- lf KV' Ng., s I28 ta '- -" .. V it t'T:n- , Y' ' RSE?- i m vig! g J F X- . -J W . ,' sf. fi 1 at gg wa:- fx Rv . --an-, gp- x i 5, ir!" 5 yea, li- , U, in ,' . ' Cf!! i .. We F , A, if , a ' 17" ' , '4,,"f., ' l l K .x ' l f ' 1: V . 6: -: 'DIY' S 5 I U vglf X EK 'FTA L ' A X lg-:Aggcr MS .,,, x E W iii? 9 Q' , 55 4 wk? li f ' ' . ' J 4 .... if aff 1 ..,.., V i. Q " . ' A " L, -I i N is FEM- A -r.,j- ,gtlxi K ' ' 1. - L V iii .5-W -.J i me-we if fs qw 1 We Q 3?-1 :ffm-f 3' J L . J L :+L - if we I N- Q. .vt . ,G A faffrfa hir' ML-Xp. .xslt 'D , - 7 . .Z bf' Q-. . gl? F11 ff ,s Iii: Q 'Wff"'f .2-o--frmflg. M-L -A - A. L" f 'f B? '-' U. " ' . 'A , ' A A sw . I X. X i f 5, ' f ' X r , f , .,'. Row I: Kenneth Fleming, Elizabeth Foster, Ralph Frank, 'Susan Frost, Alice Frye, Marianne Fuller, Leonard Gambler, Mark Garrett, Howard Gates. Row 2: Maryann Gathman, Rebecca Gilger, Louis Gippert, Thomas Goebel, Sharon Goodemoot, Janet Gorsuch, Judith Gould, William Gray, Elizabeth Gregory. Row 3: Margaret Grim- shaw, Phyllis Grissom, Don Hammerstrom, John Hanson, Judith Harder, Alison Hastings, Mary Hatch, Robert Hawk, Frank Henck. Row 4: Roger Henricks, Paul Henshaw, Richard Hershkowitz, Cheryl Hindle, Carolyn Hirschy, Judith Hoadley, Jeffrey Hooper, James Hosmer, Peter Howes. Row 5: Michael Hughes, JoAnn Huml, Diane lmes, Loretta Inouye, Lawrence Irish, Kenneth Jenkinson, Alexander Johnstone, Mary Ann Karr, Kathy Kelly. Row 6: Kent Kern, Pa- tricia Kirby, Richard Koeppen, Elaine Krasiewski. Row 7: Marilyn Kremer, Harvey Krupnick, Richard Kunzi, Gary Lanz. Row 8: Jerry Lapham, Bruce Lauber, Donna Lindberg, Anna Marie Long. l29 Juniors Row 1: Herman Lord, Norma Luce, Diane MacDonald, Malcolm MacRaild. Row 2: John Magel, Janice Maidment, Karen Maidment, Michael Manor. Row 3: Michael Mans, Nancy Martin, Hilda Mast, Shirley McAdams. Row 4: Michael McAran, Kathleen McCarthy, David McClelland, Patricia McKarns. Row 5: Alberta McKinney, John Meadows, Paul Merritt, John Mershon, Dean Miller, Michael Miller, Michael Mills, Samuel Mills, Barbara Minarik. Row 6: Craig Moore, David Morgan, James Morgan, Charles Morrow, Diane Mowry, Kenneth Mullin, James Murphy, Dennis Nagle, Gary Nel- son. Row 7: Thomas Nordstrom, Peter O'Malley, Donald Parker, Marilyn Pascoe, George Payne, Albert Perkins, Claire Peterson r Connie Phillips, Deak Phillips. Row 8: Christie Pioch, Beth Porter, Terry Robinson, Vivian Robbins, George Roesch, Dianna Rose, Ron- ald Rose, Gerald Roth, Richard Roth. Ns :Q nor- 1 , 5. 1 WX: : f . . A 'L v Q 'gl e 55? 5 SSI, - sf, c W N . X1 sb' 5 V v'L,.-A ' f " f , :rs Ken-f' 'sk :X 5 , R, X K4 ' - , -'i' - K V i w- f Q W , 3 J :,. in, . 1 ,N X Ss if 'A 14, 'H' i 'of x, x. fl l f 'ak gyms - eg.-'.:. H 13-4Stf f ix: 1 'R ca- U, bk , ag.. HW. 0 If l RG, 4- Q 1.5 f- ." . 71 i , , -if fx-as-J QR M - 7 Q j ft A - X r . 1 ' A lA, l ur ? lit .Q ,a ge wg qu ' T V S 5' I I., Q, .- 5- ,, I V' i A ' if " KX X I L . 3-I 1924643 iw 4 0 ,B .5 ' 'X , 1: ,. '7 x- Fi' A bf T. f , ' X X ., 3.4, 1-I. M41 Nj.:- ,.-..p,.a z.,':' .',,. ,.,3..x.., .-,,, :. ..f- .A ..r 1 It 1 . Y , -s,-,. . .f- .5 'f ginlfiyfv 'fl' 1 N' , X., Q A' if J is '.,.f.f79,j , 'Q l N H' n X 1- 'V 1- 'W' f 1'M"?m"6'!fZ! Q- ff, 5 1 1 I' . , nf' I. ,- G? ft' , . ., S an 'rf 4" mf -, -.fbi sg.. "' Q fx " x .f X .7 ,ff f i. A 'J 1,,, f -A .fi '99 rbi X D ' ' 23, UQ. 'un KG..f qrs X F . 6 ,.,. Q, N X, -A , T so-fix ts.: rf: is T -A sf M Q, 'N ' by '- n , .:f' 'C -L 'V'.' .4 54.5 "f' VL s -' . e . t . T if - , K 4 'R-A ,. Q Q r 4 N r H .-A Q 'S Q P ii W V' V' 'U' 6 W 4 " 0' . ' 'r ' ' " T V . .2 V 5 , 'T' X 'T' :K ' l 9 .4 , Z A life., -1-X37-s T' Lf. vgwiqrflq' Q.f?rf5'5 V V ll . Q L ..-. 1:- sn '-I K. wb- , A f " , ' E y RF, A ,,,,X?T'f,.' 314 , . va ,- Us I v i ax Q , 1' Q. l . 4 ,iflffffl ef ' he T 5' te 1 'xr 'S' r 5 lr I "??' I If. ! , , V Row I: Robert Roth, Edwin Rowe, Ian Ruggles, Frederick Ruther- ford, Lynn Salisbury, Wayne Schimming, Michael Schoales, Charles Shaffer, Hugh Smith. Row 2: Stephen Soviar, Patricia Squires, Ter- rance Stapleton, Robert Starmer, Charles Stille, James Stimpson, George Stocks, Sandra Strattman, Carol Sullins. Row 3: Kay Sutton, Thomas Swan, Beverly Swoish, Michael Thompson, Robert Tinney, Sandra Tombaugh, Marian Travis, Dianne Travnik, Robin Trebesh. Row 4: Judith Trevaskis, Robert Turner, Lawrence Tuttle, Florence Uguccioni, Lenna Uguccioni, Sammy Vallos, John Vivian, Marvin Vosburg, Clay Waite. Row 5: Cinda Walton, Donald Ware, Judith Warner, William Watson, Beryl Weedman, Judith Wenger, Ronald Weyer, Jackie Wheatley, Donald Wheaton. Row 6: Charles Whittern, James Wilkin, iloyce Williams, Thomas Williamson. Row 7: Judith Wilson, Sharon Wise, Kenneth Wissman, John Woodburn. Row 8: John Wynn, Ruth Yackle, Barbara Young, Charles Zentgraf. l3l - , ' A . ' V . . f " , ' Qu My .- X .ir ii' 5 S A Vw H 3 1 3 4 ir sg , X A . 1.-x U . W 4 F 3-.Qt w 1 .sf i s ' "veiMx,f,f Z -V 5 NN .QL Q I 'VA I -, x . Q. X Y Sophomore Class officers: Carol Rutledge, Sec.-Treas.g Paul Atkins, Pres. NW i. 'ff F' , I f,5!1l':' . ,Q ,. f43ff'?6 I at -ESI, :Eg ,.' wg:.fj . ' ,,fnx ,,.N" 5 , 5 Sophomores Row 7: Peggy Abner, Adebayo Adeniii, Stanley Ald- rich, James Alguire, Mae Belle Allen. Row 2: Carl David Anderson, Dave Anderson, Paul Atkins, Donald Baker, Charles Barnes. Row 3: Richard Barrows, David Batch, Paul Beitler, Arthur Bell, Suzanne Bettis. Row 4: Louise Biedermann, Williarn Billing, Jay Bonk, Robert Bowey, Robert Bragg, Jane Brasiola, Rebecca Bremer, Robert Burkhart, Jim Burrow. Row 5: Robert Butz, Lee Byerly, Mary Camp, Thornas Carl, Richard Charle- four, Jeffrey Charles, Judith Childs, Bob Cleveland, Marcia Clum. Row 6: Gerald Collins, Edwin Collver, Elsie Collyer, David Comerzan, Gary Condon, Janice Copeland, Sue Corey, Austin Crane, Lawson Crane. Q16 -ff? R15 'LN-'T X , .. ff.-P I ar X ."2f'-v- , 1-10' 2-a'a-zzgf hi'-.x vf '55 'var' Q' lf M l ,gg Q... 1 bs sg .,v,, ff Q., 1 U 3' ff! gf 3 I, :: H m ,, E: Tr' 21-it f 3, I 'glrinli ini' IT! N' EY' ars- gf A Q.,-us.. , ' Y if QQ W-f gan if X . w af A429 Y' u-- : f ' .v Q ,uf i Yrs NE 7? ,, s, s ,- ll- hi a- if-f Sv-rf +I?- I Sophomores Row l: John Cruikshank, Robert Cunningham, Thomas Cyr, Carol Czopor. Row 2: Byron Dailey, Eric Dammeyer, Michelle Delene, Carole De L'horbe. Row 3: Kathryn DeLong, Delilah Dennis, Marilyn Dixon, Karen Dolinski. Row 4: Michael Donaldson, Diane Douglas, Lewis Douglas, Christine Dubuc, Row 5: Art Dudgeon, Sally Dunn, Nancy Ehl, Terra Eikhoff, Robert Elliott, Marie Emmons, Robert Farnhan, Linda Fink, Janet Fling. Row 6: Isabelle Forrest, Pamela Foster, Suzanne Foster, Steven Fretwell, Robert Frost, Sharon Frost, Vivian Gales, Tobias George, Milton Gilbert. Row 7: David Gillette, Nancy Glasgo, James Glendening, Joyce Goetz, Beverly Good, Ruth Ann Goodrich, Mike Goodyear, Paul Gorman, Chris Gotshall. Row 8: Sally Greening, Ray Greer, Michael Grime, Gary Gross- man, John Gulbrandsen, James Gump, John Gunthorp, Richard Gurdvian, Cleopatra Guttliep. ,AQ x , har: 4 I' ig.. v' , I . s - 'J 5 isis., x X - as J N3 . 'r' V :J Q : A ?""'. V- L V ' . A Ng, T' ,ah 1 - .I X ' f'5'55a'1E1 'Q ff' 4:1 . 5. ffl? 2' ,Q it ,I U ff ,f,.g4 eo: sgxs- f J J 1 - 1'-'F X-.gihrfwit :gi :,.1' 1 9HvZix4!'a'ici.?x.6- Q .fe ' ,x l '2 ,,.,,sf,qp,-'egg :-. --we., , " --.cub 1- .4 Y. li' :SIS : Tw.- ,K .I . F." 1 'iff xx ls ' H ff l K , -s. as .. .X 'I F Q . - , :X f, I' X ' wx . ',' 9' x 1'1" yr-1 xg. f R3 'Q 1 --, r - - 9 .. f' 1,7 'I-A ,- ro- J 9 ' 4 ,..,,4 I, N . its V. v. 1 , -ss x S s !N..-.rx ,. "K .. ., XX: ."f fi lyf' ill. la? 1. Y N gs :- . 6 1 . R '. A: ' MC.. l 2 Vg.: V I yu 1 A 7.4.7, .S .Q at, .- 1 bv ft'- I "F" lan? ' v--ef -WT 'S' v 'gs I. ' '11, -1107 X r iliiifi "':l-lf: I .Q TT ""'f .. I34 E gy, ., r 4, 5 9 9 fv .Nga bf. r ni: - 6.5-' -wwf, ,- V Q. , :- .,a J NLM M- L, -.1 -- is v xi E if 5, . xi? J HQ? V"" xg, dl I' ., , , , 'Xf- .qpj-X y ' fix. . . . . ,, ,.-. ,fs . . -'R ei.: 'L 11--I N 1,j0r 't'!' ..- jf ,L . J- ff n" Z1 'sa .Lf :H QI? , 3.-5. F, film. lx .qu gli-gain? M fs: 4 4. W vb ' ' RX' Yr- V Rv? A.-, ws i - 1.4. . a -, 'ws' ,' N. . , 4 0 if A 'T ii- s CP' L. X Z 'fy -' xx: -av?-' ' Aufri' ..5-?33- ' . .' 'L ' it-N l , lj .I .gi-I FH. i iii:- . A 2 3 .i'si ., ax 9-'tr' Tix' , Er' ff ,410 R he-, 4' E' v mn' -4- I 'F' 'ui f xv: X ,. 'N rm.-r A its . hw Z ' , a..... A x'.:"',g:' y - I V. ,A 9 . i , , 9 xex sum P .. r: vi .1 524 if 1 x l v hug-If ef-W ,I V' 'Nur ,K ,. has-'up A' it ,Q,1xx . he ' f , s., . ef .. "rr 5 X .s-cz. - J- If :W I ' + T lic WV! " 1. ., . , V 3 . - -Qs" H . 5 my 2 V' "7 , rv ill' l if " "'v-'N ' 'V' ii' V . c ' . -as " ,. . . , ,. - sz, J W - gl , - -1-14 Jzasga, S, maj af! ff 5417" -V. -"--'- if 4 lt! i ' f-.' - v Sf-5.f:"aw 31..,:::z:gg:Q I 5' - ff a- f . f!dW4F":2 71' ' V- -, 'N' ' - S ' ,, James McMahon, Gordon A Q . It 'J L --'- 'R Q Q' Ag' ,,.- A e , 1 ' A M J. +, 2 2 : ff Wt LM: V I Q. . V, , J -fy 1-.if H ll E - I . .-.:'- 5 -.1'f. V' . A Row l: James Haas, Marian Hadley, Dianne Hardy, Susan Hardy, Diane Haywood, Keith Henline, Joseph Henson, Carol Hicks, Ruth Hitchens. Row 2: Michael Hoben, Ted Hockenmeyer, Robert Hol- comb, Sharon Holmstrom, Richard Holt, Jane Hunt, Barbara Illing, James Ingham, Patrick lott. Row 3: Richard Johns, Frederick John- son, Winston Johnson, Sue Johnston, Daniel Jones, Jim Jones, Russell Jones, Duane Kappelman, Lawrence Kimberly. Row 4: Larry Kliemann, Louis Knoche, Chuck Komon, Thomas Komon, Glen Krauss, Ellen Kuehnle, Henry Lacy, Wayne Lancaster. Row 5: Regina LaNew, Allen Laviolette, Ronald Lawson, Ryck Leathley, Anthony LeMessulier, Claudia Loar, Paul Loo, Sue Ludwig, Robert Macomber, William Macomber, Row 6: Carol Mapes, Jon Marshall, Michael Marshall, Oscar Mattson. Row 7: Mike McCaleb, Fred McCrate, McMullin. Row 8: Allen McVay, Pamela Meister, Ann Metcalf, Caryl Meyer. I35 Sophomores Row 7: Thomas Meyer, Duane Miller, Patt Miller, Mary Monroe. Row 2: Robert Moore, Shirley Moore, Robert Morr, Larry Murdock. Row 3: Mike Myers, Terry Myefs, Gary Nelles, Sandra Neu. Row 4: Kathryn Newmann, Nancy Newman, Ronald Nisor, Joyce Norton. Row 5: Phil Olot- son, Carol Osmlck, John Pawlowski, Larry Peacock, Kath- ryn Pelletier, Robert Peterson, William Peterson, Dave Pierce, Robert Polleteyt. Row 6: David Pope, John Price, Pat Proksa, John Pulling, Sharon Rabold, Judy Raines, Isabel Rapp, Kathleen Redmond, Shari Reed. Row 7: Joyce Reynolds, Marcia Richards, Charles Rinehart, Stephen Ring, Bryce Roekle, Victoria Rogers, John Romack, Robert Rou- botham, Steve Russell. Row 8: Carol Rutledge, Larry Salis- bury, Ann Saneholtz, Dick Sanzenbacher, Norma Scheer, Chuck Scheltema, Martha Schroer, Al Scott, Jay Senac. A mr- V . . :53.,,,. X., fl V, xx fr y 3? VF' ,. K . 8' K-ffl. , X X . rg QP' 9 tm wa c fl . P J "l Al - g g: 5' as-we -' txt? . va N G- V 'fix L . , . SE- 5 -Q N NX of .R A .. iq., f-21,-"-QR . .-1.1553 ffm ,W IFN :f y 1- , . fs' I 4? ul . .cf 59 Aw- A if' -v ' Y' . K Q15 J HX xv' Es , ,,. , N 1 ' W fill 14 I ' ' , ef fb ' -f f 31? U lf , lf. . 2' if A Q we f Q 4. ' - , ' V X l' 1 , I i lf? ta sf' E f xg-M .P-"X ,fl 11' 1 s. f -.f, I .1 A . 3-A ff I Y - 'Li in .N U Q-ffl ? fa me N!-rf -V 1 ' ' WV' ' Lg.: ' P Z9 'C , L -f . . , ,U ,s ... X ' 1' 1 A I , gg 'V ,su 4 tf7fw'fl?f'fsf,.-'T I l36 S iv, xw, rf S X we . x""4Ti' X i cs 1 X X 5 . 'N f Q " Q .a af' ' ....... ,tt X. 6, ff. . N4 ,V t , .. Z: ." 'Si ., , 'QU' hw .A fa--9 "R" :- 5 ,X iff 81 'V' ff' ,if 545, 59 ,X Xl' ff'-fx - 7 Z ltr! -.. tp gulf' 'R A K :iv 'J . P Em an Y , ks 'J 'fl .sf R x f 39, 9- . As ai :inf-Q Wg :f 0 b"'f,, J if if! 3 mise' g . Sun ,s L, 'sl 2 Q, .-.ff ,j5!Qf.xfigf':f:,q,1,a fx? L .,:,v 1, N,-,B .' t. Earn: . Lffg ' T sw fmfeh? ' N75 ' .. T- V K X I ,.,. .. M.: X f . TX 'um 5551 : Y Q" Vg pg, 45 1' we , ke: r if-1 T R te- ,:A lbg T gf ' g. Rayz' an-KX M "i.'."' v,,,. 'T Q , , Q4 . f twigs Q K at ,. 1:25 : ' 11"-, I Q Y I f' 1 1 Q - I' 1, 54 tp. 5 l .VY U gf- w 1' ' - 'V' ' X-'--- . v,-E? " fs ' ' A ft " it Row 7: Jan Servis, Judy Shaffer, Larry Sheely, Judy Shoemaker, Walter Shreftler, William Simpkins, Donald Sinks, Jerry Smith, Tom Smith. Row 2: Tom Smith, Diana Spitnale, Glenn Stevenson, Marta Stromberg, Judy Sutton, Mary Swander, Martha Swartz, Richard Tart, Donald Taylor. Row 3: Wayne Taylor, John Thompson, Karen Thompson, Janet Thomson, Richard Thorp, Klaus Thun, Richard Tinkham, John Tower, Harold Townsend. Row 4: Martha Tremper, Paul Tripner, Judy Ulman, Thomas Van Auken, Leon Van Dierendonck, Emily Vannorsdall, George Vilican, Jetfrey Wagner, Russ Wagner. Row 5: Cheri Wain, JoNell Walker, Anita Warner, Grant Washburn, Terry Way, Thomas Weeber, Richard Weinbren- ner, James Weir, Gloria Weiss. Row 6: Cheryl Weisz, Bill Wells, George Whitaker, James Wiedman. Row 7: Sue Willis, Bernard Wilson, Joseph Wilson, Randolph Wise. Row 8: Lawrencce Witten- back, Suzanne Wollenlourg, Edward Wright, Kathleen Yoki. I37 Dave Laman, Pres. Row I: Stanley Abrornaitis, Laurie Ackel- son, Susanne Adams, Betty Allen, Jon Amyx, Annis Anderson, Jeffrey Anderson, Mary Anderson, Paula Angevine. Row 2: 'A Q r Q M x- , r - , N 'f xv I ', - f , N4 'I' K' ffl., .:f3???": . . , -' t 1 f'l' "rdf-'Q4'r.v' V- T" v- 38 Freshmen Cluss of '68 Sue Johnson, Sec., Lynn Green, Treas., Bob Nuin, V.P. Tom Anglin, Sandra Arnold, Harold Ar- rington, Jane Babcock, Dennis Bailey, Kath- leen Baka, Troy Ball, Joe Balsanek, Carol Barnes. ww: , X'-' if-' -f , vy- ', tm- ,s . , ff 54' gn'- 1 N 1 , .xi Q! 'Uv' : gf B6 . , Q lf' .fi 517, x f- 'ga Ev- list RJ-- sm- N- any R55 'f 4 5 1 1,2 X . af gs 'iiif IDI We YQ . gh' - .2 :ww J- ' - 5"".,,x ' l td- l 5 . sa' f' rl 42' V 2? 1. - ,. , y kg 1 R x .Q l 1 f-. ge - ff- .- N .. A-' , N " 1' 5' y b .1 6 Y "" 'YK F ,, Q LW.- fsgx. as . sw :, 4. XK13 1. 1 5 . 1 ,HN " 1 L f' P ' .-4 55:5 hs- h A 'hh' V- ' .y ' -4 Q' ' 'fit' 'L fl .er , 'I 6 'L YQ' V' .L C., XL ff -aw " . rv. A l 49.45-gf wr' ' -. k fs I V' E' e'.'.-..f Ag , AFHKL ua: 1 ,' L: -L X 5. X .W ., ,ix .X ' 2 X - rg K- .,'- i 37 ' nf- " .A ' v- Xrv' L V st- j 'M A 4 P l '51- .I , 4 ff LAM, -an 'L M 'HMMB 34- .5.1 N .5 9,1 . A Z 'if - . r d , 4.1 , fa: fa ef ' ' ' I Q, . -.- 1 is ., gf' 5 ,Ns---4-f U. V . . Q 4 A-,jr 7 ,' A , r gy' A N A X V. ,N fi t . 1 ' .- . 'X -3 5' .L . , . 559 I st- ,s . sy-as-y.f , aw, "ff L. 2 Vu -kg, j X' AQ. Row l: Susan Barnes, Robert Barr, Carol Batz, Deborah Baughey, William Beattie, Billie Beck, James Beck, Barbara Bennink, Kath- erine Bentz. Row 2: Ronald Berkebile, Larry Bigelow, Richard Bird, Sue Ann Birget, Robert Bishop, Connie Black, William Blaesing Robert Blanchard, Thomas Blanton. Row 3: Nancy Block, Jeanne Blumer, Don Bocchi, Harry Bolton, James Bonadio, Suzette Borton, Barry Bovee, David Bricker, Jill Bridenbaugh. Row 4: Gary Brink, Virginia Brough, Lynn Brucchieri, Ronald Bruhn, Richard Bruot, Gwen Buckley, Jean Bunce, Lawrence Burgan, Daniel Burkholder. Row 5: Dorothy Burns, Kathleen Burns, William Burrows, Donna Bush, Kathy Buswell, John Carnahan, Daniel Carney, Jo Anne Car- ter, Janet Catenhusen. Row 6: Mary Cermak, Lynda Chamberlin, Richard Chandler, Suzanne Kay Charlefor. Row 7: Charles Chase, Cindi Chase, William Chase, Gary Christensen. Row 8: John Chris- topher, Adelle Clark, Dennis Cochill, Marsha Cohagen. I39 1 Freshmen Row 7: Gary Cole, Nancy Collin, Terri Compton, Francine Con- nors. Row 2: Frank Cook, Bruce Cooper, Douglas Cordier, June Corey. Row 3: Betty Cornell, Robert Cottrell, Linda Cowan, Jack Culver. Row 4: John Cunningham, Robert Curby, James Damaska, Mike Danielian. Row 5: Charles Davis, David Davis, Roger Davis, Sandi Day, Diane Dayton, Karen Dedick, William Degner, Terry Dennison, Donald Devenney. Row 6: Diane DeYoung, Linda Dhondt, Diane Dickens, Steven Dopp, Michael Doty, Kathryn Dragoo, Jan Drake, Donna Drewyor, Jim Driskill. Row 7: John Drummond, Michael Duckett, Deanne Durgy, Steve Edwards, Howard Erickson, Patricia Ernst, Terry Euper, Leslie Farbman, Hollace Faubel. Row 8: Charles Felt, Daniel Fisher, Douglas Fisher, James-Fisher, Julie Fisher, Perry Foor, Lawrence Force, Richard Foster, Sherwood Fox. - l v. 'fri iv' ' Z1 ' h YC-'X . ly, we xa- xgw ......-. at als rg: FW ,f U' N' in ' '13 va ' ' f 5 , '1 V.. keg,-, .WK - fs er' S x 5 LWA wwf: 'r if Y X , 'lp sg, A. rs A Ti f ' "1-s,.9,l 4' '. '51 ' A 'F Q- vu-- T' hrw ' ,li hr' 9' " A , rv--va , 6 L, F : ea Q , , V, . . ' .N I 7.-.gx 61-' f Q? "' f sg. 11 P l 3.5.5, f'-nf v- V ,V . l40 'Unit 59.4 T at X Q 1 Xx S X Y lx W1 5 .ci 5 X- . - 'Sf ' 14- 3' x r . X ,Q E15 t is .f X l ef X y YW' x 'Yhr V u..- x N.. A. N x. ...I -W ,Z Q S ta ' an 'N -"Tw: , 3 XF' fe ' if ,. P, Y'- vs-A f , . , iv- fi Gm l N-F 5191 .ff N-mar .rf at a.. ya 1, - 'T ,ff cs. i t 1 1-Q1 v ,B rg s X , 9 kg. 4 19. , ' ,OQQ ' 9 in 'pf ' a,,f!, -. A f- tzullfli'-i:"r,: "!'1p' S'a.."l , V lu U v X ., ",, V, 2 if , 1 -H: .13 kg : l f!! fi , X Q ,:A, A ,..N,1:,A,.., 5, U H X A 'U I 5. ., , F ,,... 2 ,ji .-: , -, - :EEE Qtll VQV, 4 V In N as ta W , a,,,, , y ., ir' 'N X- ,, Sr 'NRG , ilbi 2 QQ., I I nv X ,,...,. , ,. :. . jg' Q I W A I ep 'Q A X 125 ' 5 in .5 kv iw :Y QA ,,1,,, . ' 5 ,fa xv, q,,,1' f , qi ,, zb' Q lf uk ' I' ' 'lt .hi Lf' A '. f ' ' ' E2 :" 31E5iI-"'2ii5'f'f A , 'Q F -5 Q. Row l: Linda Francis, Steve Frank, James Franz, Sally Fraser, Rick Frederick, Francine Frits, Linda Fuller, Joyce Fyke, Robert Gale. Row 2: Sarah Gammie, Michael Garber, Janet Garrod, Mary Gate- cliff, Edward Geno, John Gifford, Michael Gilson, Carol Gisel, Stanley Godlewski. Row 3: Lawrence Good, William Gramlich, Cor- nel Grant, Judy Green, Lynn Green, Stephen Gregg, Terry Grei- singer, Jean Greko, Joseph Greiner. Row 4: Pepper Griewahn, Marcia Grove, James Haas, Robert Hackwell, Christine Hagen, Gregory Haisley, Marge Harris, Dyan Hartung, Edward Harvey. Row 5: Terry Haughn, Mary Hayes, Joan Heffelfinger, James Hen- ry, Richard Herman, Linda Hildebrand, Peter Hill, Howard Hillman, Judith Hockstad. Row 6: Donna Hoffman, Sharon Hogg, Barbara Holben, Patricia Holben, Row 7: David Holman, Charles Honess, Jane Hooper, William Horst. Row 8: Hayward Hough, David Hud- son, James Huerta, Prudence Huffman. I4I Freshmen Row 7: Andrew Hull, Margaret Hummel, Dale Humphrey, John Hunter. Row 2: Joanne Hutchek, James lcerman, John lob, Norris Isley. Row 3: Donald Jackson, Harvey Jackson, Jennifer Jackson, Carol Jacob. Row 4: Kathy James, Robert Janes, Arthur Jenks, Roger Johncox. Row 5: John Johnsen, Sue Johnson, Jeffrey Jo- seph, Frederick Kaufmann, Pam Keely, William Keller, Pat Kim- brough, Lynda Kincaid, Ronald Kirby. Row 6: Marsha Kirchner, William Knight, James Kraynak, Dennis Kreeger, Craig Krone- vviften, Lyvonne Kunzi, David Laman, De Anna Lamb, Carlton Lang. Row 7: Michael Lash, Steve Lasky, Janet Lassey, Linda Lauck, Carol Lawrence, Rebecca Lehman, Deborah Leidecker, Marshall Linclke, Judy Linn. Row 8: Donna Lueke, Margaret Luepke, Brian Lundsted, Billie Lynch, William Lytle, Jean MacEwen, Loretta Mak, -sf- w, ,. y lf' N M. N 55 -5 l Sir ,--I' Thomas Manley, James Mann. 'R . f -sp ga f L Q' A-fx 1 1- r J A ... .A V . Q' 4' - " at .YQ , I t- i 'YT' t sf- Q S '- im -A 1 A, K . , h ,.. .A E , 4: z l s,' 1- V 2. 21 A Sn -as 5 9 Q' . ' Q. I x I Q.-x 5- 37 l tg". 1 L , r '21 , xx, we ' 5 V ff ' 'J f . . i ' .. .-ic ,I ' K 7' H5322 5 ', 'Q I ,A is 1 - Z A C W' Tw.. . 13 l f , X s, Qi? P 3. -, 3x yn, l42 Q-3 bin A-wg XLZL, ff' N .3-' ., , "' 'z at I 9, eff mas: Y C5 ,Q -. rw- ' 'ml X T, r tk. .4 if Y X 1- -5 -:lik . . x 'M -0- 5' su-5 I vxy' , J 1 A n C 'Q I g ix h 4 5. 'V' ev ' ,xy- ' Sv- I M313 ifism ' x ,gy qw , .. , . . ll' l 1 .J A 'by Sr' 11? V., IUZV, I 1 ,vi Q W y V J ff' f . fa- f Q' g -as f Q Q' Q , ' L , f -as -' 'K t Q - LA L ii. X t V -jg? lg U-NN' b y :sl 1 lf! ,. fer' XM' ' ., "ff - 9 .- X.. .2 'f , ' - f ' A '53 - if! - 1? .ff gjfki L. ' - f. , A I .fx 4 .. - 6410-'-af-sfifs-' ss: Q' fi as s f A 4- ' , .H 2 E, fi, h V53 is Visio? 3992,-- .44 .v,, V -, V, , .A , A h A .12 443215 . L' wk WY 1" I 1' f ' it X L in ' J 1' -a vs: L. 1" . 1 ' f , 'V I ij M ,M f , E: , N-'X ' Sv- , 'El 1'-afar' QQ? . ,-.. 4 il, - 4 -L'-av litfgf V , Sr' V. J x f iff? ,fa-xxftx ,L 35" JA ifg X -N Q L W L" tv- L A Q? as -p -r--. X , X . JJ! 4 'Ek : ,ff L -f, , f if ,- J 1, . Xi' lj, Q .ff I - A ,fir ' -. -al! 4 M ., V , ,X 4 ' ' T ,v A V ' ,. 1 ,V J, :. ' lil' V il N- A Qflf, , ig? :X L- E J W if-ff' as- J - , -i: . Row I: Jerome Marek, Jeanine Marlatt, Sandra Marr, Cynthia Martin, Patricia Martin, Edmund Marvin, Ron Mastie, Lynn Mau- gherman, Sandy Maybee. Row 2: Sue McCulley, John McCurdy, Wanda McGee, Carolyn McGinnis, Thomas McGregor, Michael McHugh, Susan McKay, Michael McMullen, William McNeil. Row 3: Edward McPeek, Lynne McPhail, Lawrence Meredith, Robert Mer- rell, Martha Merritt, Daniel Miles, Gary Miles, Alison Miller, Betty Miller. Row 4: Grant Miller, Robert Miller, Robert Miller, Suzanne Milliron, Donna Mills, Carol Mincheff, Jane Moore, Sandra Moore, Gary Morr. Row 5: Gary Morris, Don Mosier, Rosemary Mount- ford, Pamela Moyer, Jacqueline Muir, Iris Musante, Sharon Myers, Edna Nagel, Linda Nation. Row 6: Ann Neefe, William Nelles, Don Newman, Kathy Nice. Row 7: Walter Nihart, Lee Niles, Thomas Nixon, Carrie Norton. Row 8: Edward Norton, Robert Nuin, Bar- bara O'Donoghue, David O'Keefe. l43 Freshmen Row i: Jett Orwig, James Osburn, Larry Osterling, Michael Owens. Row 2: Steve Page, Ronald Palmer, Frank Patterson, Carol Pea- body. Row 3: William Pelham, Howard Pemberton, Karen Pendle- ton, Robert Pentland. Row 4: Lois Perrin, Curtis Peterson, Lynne Phillips, Charles Pineau. Row 5: Robert Pinkerton, Kristina Plass- man, Mary Platek, Alicia Pollard, Janice Powell, David Pray, Robert Radder, Linda Raines, Steve Ramant, Row 6: Dorcas Ramos, Robert Rankin, Carol Ransom, Carol Ratcliffe, Rebecca Raub, Karen Rau, Bruce Redman, Laura Redmond, Stuart Redpath. Row 7: Nan Refior, Dean Reganall, Denny Reiser, Mary Replogle, Palmira Reyes, Dale Reynolds, Robert Richmond, Judy Ricker, Faye Rinehart. Row 8: Alan Robinson, Albert Robinson, Marjorie Rock, Dave Rodlund, Fred Rohrer, Rosalyn Rolf, Donald Rose, David Rosendale, Dennis Rule. X' if H l N! Q X- I5..f i ...- , 5 13' ff 5 J, " , ts Q2 'fl at ':..- 5- gp - 11, -: . . L li .1 fi' R L . ,M i 'EJ' I44 E' 1 tv-9 A . 9-f Q l We F S- . ,' Y:- f 'in I? Q gh ., HR- wif' it-v .fs Sa QT? ,sf , '-XWF.'Z.1" 5 .. ui .. S Xu- 3- 'Rx J , feb S.. 3' . as Rr. ,iss:?'it'Z Aff! 4 if oi ' '-' ,, I U . ,f, X 'Y e x g te f D -x ,I Ne he ,- 3 har: ' lmmi ' .ix Q i Y 1 - 4 " f Aja: " ' - f 'vw :.' . -6471-'-.. ' - 7 Q , 5 N .M , ,, - Gif A., , .I 'i ky 956 ie: f S' 1 si. mn f , . P, NW? .-,N le- ,x, W MY' gs-tv 71 1. ,, r f l 1 'Q 'XY'- 'C' SLB 1: -R sr. -N :ll ff'- .: , ' V ' Q' ' .', I: cv . 6 1 ,, ' -- - was ,lax X, S X. fr. '-" "- ' 5 'r P HS' , Y w . ' .gif ' V' 2' , 's-5: vivs' ' sf ,f" 1 ? 'A ,i V.. . .. . ,. -5.1 5' lp , lf 1 'If' ., .:.r- f- 21' -ll , ' ' ' " I 3? "-fi. ,.. r- ' Row 1: Martha Russ, Thomas Sadler, Jo Ann Samuelson, Verl Sanch, Nancy Sandbothe, Richard Sands, Merrie Saxon, Janet Schaffner, Dale Schaub. Row 2: Carol Schlatter, Barbara Schurz, Mary Schultz, Carol Seager, Beverly Seiser, Angela Serna, Patricia Shanahan, Larry Shea, David Sheely. Row 3: Jo Ann Shockey, Brooke Shuler, Ruth Sickinger, Christine Siegfried, Richard Sims, Roger Sims, Lynne Skel- ton, Aileen Slough, Barbara Smith. Row 4: Carol Smith, Mark Smith, Neil Smith, Ron Smith, Sharon Smith, Sue Smith, Susan Smith, Robert Smoke, David Snoufter. Row 5: Patti Snowden, Wil- liam Southwell, Kathleen Spacht, Bill Spencer, Thomas Spencer, Barbara Sprow, Brian Stahl, Thomas St Clair, Cynthia Stecker. Row 6: Bethany Stevenson, Phyllis Stewart, Linda Stowe, Cindy Strawser. Row 7: Sonia Sullivan, Roger Sunday, Kay Swegles, Marlene Szczesniak. Row 8: Carlene Tabbert, Farrokh Takesh, Pa- tricia Talbett, Robert Tallman. I45 Freshmen Row l: Wayne Tappen, Thomas Tarris, Patricia Tea, Lary Teter. Row 2: Cherryl Thaxton, Joseph Therrien, Keith Thomas, Cynthia Thompson. Row 3: Judy Thompson, Robert Tienvieri, Carol Topliff, Tom Torbet. Row 4: Thomas Trerice, Nancy Trevvern, James Tro- meur, Judy Tucker. Row 5: Dallas Turner, Harold Tuttle, Jim Tut- tle, Elaine Uhler, Harriet Upper, Dale Van Aman, Barbara Van Looy, Daughn Van Riper, Doreen Van Sickle. Row 6: Tim Venaleck, Chuck Vollmer, Linda Voss, Tom Watson, Carol Weaver, Terrell Webster, Carol Weidig, Thomas West, Janice White. Row 7: Joe Whittern, Scott Wilder, Michael Wilkins, Chris Willard, Harriet Willard, Sara Wilson, Linda Wilt, Larry Wine, Russell Wiseman. Row 8: James Wohlgehagen, Mary Wolfel, Sally Woodworth, David Woolfenden, Tom Wulft, Diane Wyman, Mela Zavala, Lucy Zim- merman, Ellen Zook. ex , .., ' Q. - X 5'- l . V, '- ' . ,--4 .Iv , 1 uw' 'Agp ,cj we-J im' iq! 'L1"fi"t I46 asa, - - -:4:R6 " . 1 1 H, lp A 'E' . .Q h sg. V' lk:- . s .' X . J' . . r an N il :gr 5 'V Vt" T A s at y t 70 6' fp, it tev- f' ,.f' .sf X 'GT 427' S0 .N vu-X 5 H' CF' Q:- f" u A Q, ,. :. 53,577 Si' Q ,N . -1 . -wrwvy.. ,g ' ,X 1 , , 1 ' 'QM ftvf kw . - ,x 4: GX, 3--.V 'bv . W ' ,X A iff?-' 'wi?:a"g,xxlv-me--'i',1 P - Q X- - wfkyxfwfxgv zv.,x-QAM wg'-I, :Q V' t. '-Q. . ,.,V.g. l 1 ADVERTISERS ..,. .,,... , n . wx--, ,WU W W '-'-S..-Qi , 'Q 1. , .W x. .- zsgfggap 1: .fx , . V: f -f kv- xx l Q ' "Fm-w..+gR22 4, S x 2'3g-muqwwnr . 5-.,' ' ' I47 BERNDT'S JEWELRY Next to the Commercial Banlc "Adricn's Prestige JeweIer" Carrying All Nationally Advertised Brands of Watches, Diamonds, and Silverware l2I E. Maumee Street Phone 265-280I Compliments of KLlNE'S DEPARTMENT STORE "Adric1n's Leading Department Store" Featuring All the Nation's Leading Brands in Misses Wear, Junior Wear, and Men's Wear. I36-l38 East Maumee Adrian, Michigan Compliments of MORRISON PHARMACY I02 W. Maumee Adrian, Michigan 265-7644 CONGRATULATES TH E CLASS OF 1965 "AdricJr1'S Leading Mer1'S- ond Women'S Shop GORDON'S "BRAND NAME CLOTHING" IIO E. Maumee 263-2967 CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF 1965 LIVE MGDERN FDR LESS WITH GAS CITIZEN GAS FUEL CO. l27 N. Main Sf. Adrian, Michigan I Congratulations to the Class of I965 os c:g+r+ Ih I s fICpI+ IY aug I C My+hF+ BQY I-lllh I-lpp dP ply THE COMMERCIAL SAVINGS BANK Adrian - Addison BANK OF LENAWEE COUNTY Adrian - Morenci ADRIAN STATE SAVINGS BANK Adrian - Adrian Plaza Thank You for Your Potronoge SKY DRIVE-IN THEATRE US 223 STUDIO SOUTH Downfown Adrian Une HOUR I, gnnm me The mosf in DRY CIFIIHIHG Q 417 Ad Plaza IAcIrian, Michiganl 263- I 48 I FREE PICK-uP and DELIVERY A. B. PARK COMPANY Famous for Famous Labels "Everything for the College Coed" II7 Sou+I1 Main S1'ree'I' Adrian, Michig JIM GREEN Fine Apparel for Men and Boys FORMAL WEAR RENTAL "The lvy League Slore for College Men" Adrian, Michigan II6 Norlh Main S+. Phone 265-5933 Compliments of FRIDD LUMBER COMPANY 402 College Ave. Adrian, Michigan 265-2l77 COLONNA STUDIOS Inc. 340 Westbury Avenue Carle Place Long lslancl, New York Your Senior Class Photographer Extends Sincere Congratulations To the Class of l965 Best Wishes . . . Class of '65 Inslilulion of Higher Fashion Adrian, Michigan ADRIAN CAMERA SHOP Cameras, Proiec+ors and Pho'ro Supplies Porlrails and Commercial Phofography "EVERYTHING IN PHOTOGRAPHY" I09 Norlh Main Sfreel-Adrian-265-59II Best Wishes to the Class of '65 E 9 Miller's ice cream is made from all Fresh 51N f milk and cream lnoi 'fhe Hllufled-up" FARM MADE powdered milk Iormulal. A producl of experienced dairymen. 9 ff, I E15 E MILLER DAIRY FARMS STORES 4I85 W. Maumee 40I N. Main Congratulations to the Class of l965 From the l-leart ot Michigarfs Dairy Land" LENAWEE BRAND MICHIGAN PRODUCERS DAIRY COMPANY Congratulations Class of l965 Famous Throughout the Midwest for Our Bummie Burger BUMMlE'S DRIVE-IN .4 ,.4""'1f"9 , . 1.1---. Tfff .- 'ZJV ' - - '79 I . R .ir ,.vs:,1-fv " . '5 V1 bs l A W. 'Q Fill. . I-vggxv wa-:L SB 0 ' z 1 .. 4 1 . ' Rafi 35,529 ,s 4 - .W 43' 1 ' if QW Locally Owned and Operated Junc. Hwy. M-52 and U.S. 223 PHONE 263-3540 Congratulations to the Class of '65 MICHAEL L. MORAN INSURANCE AGENCY 206 Adrian Federal Savings ancl Loan Bldg. Aclrian, Michigan Phone 265-8755 YOUR AGENCY FOR: ESTABLISHED FIRE IN CASUALITY l937 BONDS 45014 Since i932 235 Pearl S+ree+ Adrian, Michigan 265-8909 SWENK-TUTTLE PRESS, INC. Printers-Lithographers Serving The College and Prinlers of Michigan Chrisiian Aclvocaie Since l94I M. DONALD SWENK, Adrian, '39 ROBERT B. TUTTLE, Albion, '38 320 Springbrook Adrian, Michigan 265-7075 'DR 2 T E-:lf - Compliments x of 461 l 1" P RAYMOND AUTO SALES FORD LINCOLN MERCURY H53 Years of Serving Lenawee Ceuntyn Michigan's OLDEST FORD DEALER 2I5 N. Main S+. Adrian Phone 265-206l Congratulations Class of I965 KRIEGHOFF-LENAWEE CO. Constructing Engineers Adrian, Michigan Compliments ot AMERICAN CHAIN 81 CABLE CC., INC ADRIAN PLANT Compliments of KEWAUNEE MANUFACTURING CO Adrian, Michigan Designers, Engineers and Manufacturers of Quality Laboratory Furniture and Equipment Since 1906 Compliments of ELMER KAPNICK AGENCY INSURANCE l38 N. Winter Street Adrian, Michigan Phone 265-7039 Congratulations Class of 1965 COONEY STUDIOS 435 s. Main S+. 263-9333 Congratulations Class of I965 SOUTH LAWN MOTEL HEATED pQQL AIR CONDITIONING U.S. 223 and lvl-52 265-6I9I Aclrian, Michigan Compliments of BALES TRUCKING AND SUPPLY "We'II move The eorth for you ohd put o blocklop oh it" 305 W. Maple Ave. Aclrian, Michigan 265-22l2 OFF T0 A GOOD START! X 4 . . Q HQ Congralulahons Adrian College Graclualesl ., . You're off lo a ood slarl on 'rhe roacl lo 'i ,Cf Q g x success and your diploma as lhe passporl' 'ro The ca reer of your choice. - As you go forlh io new aclvenlures, we al ..,. . '- Consumers Power Company offer you besl f U wishes for a successful lulure. Q CONSUMERS POWER COMPANY O Get into the profitable habit of savings-where savings earn generous returns with maximum safety of funds. While our sound management policies, strong reserves and 76 years of "never a dividend missed-never a dime of savings lost since founding" does safeguard your savings fully,-Adrian Federal's membership in the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation provides an extra measure of protection. It means that this association -meets the exacting standards of competence required by this permanent federal agency to insure your savings up to S'l0,000. lsn't this the protection you want at the same time your savings are growing faster to build a better future? Open your insured account now! 52 SAVINGS Q3 slirm or 0 5-' voun sivmcs 9 uno , 4 ioooo 'S X. ir' IN um gf Q, Q fy ' 4 515' ff com? sz I- in Vlll THIS MEANS SAFETY OF FUN DS AT ADRIAN FEDERAL in addition to generous earnings for saving! -is ESDEHAL n Tnnmun 55 Savings Insured Safe up to 510,000 Adrian Federal Savings and Loan Association 202 North Main if Phone COlfax 5-6126 Adrian, Michigan 'k BRANCH OFFICE 138 W. Chicago Blvd. ir Phone HA 3-2640 Tecumseh, Michigan Congratulations From WYATT VILLAGE PHARMACY "Since l894" lI4 S. Winter 263-2145 Best Wishes From A MERILLAT WOODWORKING COMPANY Adrian, Michigan Congratulations, Seniors H. L. DUNLAP 81 SONS "The Friendly Grocery" 436 Erie St., Aclrian Phone 263-l608 Compliments of DUNBAR BORTON, INC. Industrial Piping Heating, Plumbing and Air Conditioning Adrian, Michigan 265-2 I 7l Compliments of OLIVER INSTRUMENT CO. Manufacturer of MACHINE TOOLS Grinders Cutter Grinders Die Malting Machines Adrian, Michigan 263-2l32 STEPHENS ALLDREDGE OLDS-CADILLAC, INC. Tops in Sales - Tops in Service 265-8I87 45I0 West U.S. 223 Adrian, Michig Congratulations on Your Splendid Growth GENE OLSEN CORPORATION Manufacturers of the WORLD'S MOST COMPLETE LINE OF CONCRETE PRODUCTS EQUIPMENT Congratulations to the Class of I965 STUBNITZ GREENE CORPORATION Acl M I-ig JUDGE'S JEWELRY Congratulations to the Class of l965 IO7 South Main Street Adrian, Michigan 263-l933 SHEPHERD 81 STOLL Prescription Druggists Two Locations l26 N. Main g 265-6322 MILL ROAD PHARMACY 263-2555 CONGRATULATIONS Class of l965 I ADRIAN BEVERAGES Sqiig Adrian, Michigan mu never an alter-thirst A AH LE' I ll " ,.,.r Q' ig ,Li Q -A DONALD C. ALBERTON, B.S. Detroit, Michigan Track Cross Country-Co-Captain Sigma Alpha Epsilon-Pledge Train- er 8. Warden Letterman's Club-President Interfraternity Council M.R.C. M.I.A.A. Representative Dean's List Sophomore Physics Award Nominated for Who's Who President of Jones Hall Mentor Social Committee PAUL BAMFORD, B.A. Toraranda, New York Senior Activities A.W.S.-Executive Council Alpha Phi-Song Leader GEORGE A. BRADLEY, B.A. Boyne City, Michigan Varsity Baseball-Manager Dining Hall Committee-Student Manager JEAN E. BRADLEY, B.S. Boyne City, Michigan Band Lambda Iota Tau Alpha Delta Chi Dean's List JOHN R. BREECE, B.S. Clare, Michigan RALPH HAROLD BUMGARDNER, B.A. Adrian, Michigan Sigma Alpha Epsilon-Eminent Her- ald 8. Chaplain Student Union Religious Life Council ESTHER ANN BARR, B.A. Morenci, Michigan Sigma Sigma Sigma Mound Staff Home Ec Club Student Union Dorm Officer A.W.S. Executive Council Judicial Board Student Education Association CHARLENE A. BAUR, B.A. River Rouge, Michigan LYNNETTE SUE BURKHOLDER, B.A. Bryan, Ohio Lambda Iota Tau FRANCIS D. CLARK, B.A. Pinckney, Michigan MICHAEL JAMES CLEAR, B.A Anaheim, California Football Track Sigma Alpha Epsilon Letterman's Club-President CAROLE SUZANNE Freshman Class Secretary Sigma Sigma Sigma-Keeper of Grades Student Government Spanish Club A.W.S.-Executive Board Student Union Representative W.R.A. Alpha Delta Chi Wesley Fellowship Drama Activities Band South Hall Secretary-Treasurer GARY BAXTER, B.A. Canton, Ohio Tau Kappa Epsilon Cross Country Tennis Letterman's Club Student Union Usher Corps Intramurals KEITH BECK, B.S. Morenci, Michigan Sigma Alpha Epsilon-Eminent Chaplain, Warden 8. Recorder German Club Student Union Alpha Chi-President Dorm Vice-President of Davis Hall ARTHUR BENZICK, B.A. Delta, Michigan Varsity Football Alpha Tau Omega Letterman's Club CAROLYNN BERGER, B.A. Oregon, Ohio Sigma Sigma Sigma Home Ec Club Student Government Alpha Delta Chi JAMES R. BOWERS, B.S. Quincy, Michigan German Club DOROTHY A. BOYSE, B.A. Hillsdale, Michigan Choir W.R.A.-Extramural Basketball CLIFFORD, B.A. Detroit, Michigan Chi Omega-Personnel Chairman Student Education Association Choir DOUGLAS JOSEPH CLINE, B.A. Ann Arbor, Michigan JOANNE COLE, B.A. Wollaston, Massachusetts Home Ec Club Sigma Sigma Sigma Student Education Association Choir Ski Club Attended Quincy Junior College SHARON LYNN COLLICK, B.A. Clarkston, Michigan MICHELE COLLINS, B.S. Detroit, Michigan Alpha Phi-Treasurer Student Education Association W.R.A. Student Government Home Ec Club--Vice-President Intramurals NANCY CURRY, B.S. Darlington, Wisconsin Student Government-Secretary Cheerleader A.W.S. Executive Board W.R.A.-Secretary Who's Who Physical Education Maior Club Sophomore Class Secretary Homecoming Court Homecoming Queen Choir Chi Omega-Vice-President Intramurals JOHN D. DAVID, B.A. Monroe, Michigan Student Manager of Dining Hall Dining Hall Committee Dorm Secretary Young Republican's Club Intramurals Psi Sigma Rho BRENT DAVIDS, B.A. Huntington, Michigan Basketball Sigma Alpha Epsilon-President 8- Intramural Director Student Manager Saga Food Service HELEN L. DAVISON, B.A. Clayton, Michigan Alpha Delta Chi-Program Chairman Student Education Association Alpha Chi, National Honorary Dean's List A.W.S.-Scholarship Chairman Bt Judicial Board Band Choir CARL F. DeMERITT, JR., B.A. Taylor, Michigan Psi Sigma Rho Track Cross Country Young Republican's Club KRISTIN N. DENECKE, B.A. Dearborn, Michigan LINDA M. DeYARMOND, B.A. Adrian, Michigan W.R.A. Intramurals Hanging of the Greens Committee Student at Michigan State Student Education Association Dean's List KATHLEEN A. DRUHOT, B.A. Mansfield, Ohio Chi Omega LAWRENCE D. DURY, B.A. White Pigeon, Michigan Young Republican's Club Psi Sigma Rho Student Government Religious Life Council Political Science Club Wesley Fellowship LAIRD P. EDDIE, B.A. Lansing, Michigan Tau Kappa Epsilon-Vice-President, Chaplain, Rush Chairman lnterfraternity Council-Secretary, Treasurer Men's Resident CounciI-Vice- President Student Union College World Michigan Association of Student Governments-Representative Football Dorm Officer Young Republican's Club SUSAN D. FARIN, B.A. Detroit, Michigan Cheerleader Chi Omega Student Union Panhellenic Council A.W.S. College World DIANE CHRISTNER FAST, B.S. Flint, Michigan FRANK F. FITCHKO, B.A. Warensville Heights, Ohio Circle K Choir Letterman's Club Interfraternity Council Football Tennis Band German Club Psi Sigma Rho-President 81 Vice- President All College Sing TERRY CHARLES ELEETHAM, B.A. Sunfield, Michigan President of Freshman Class Track American Commons Club- Secretary Theta Chi-Secretary Letterman's Club Student Government-Treasurer PATRICIA A. FORDYCE, B.A McKeesport, Pennsylvania Wesley Fellowship Band German Club Alpha Delta Chi Lambda Iota Tau-Secretary House Council SANDRA KAY FRANKS, B.A. Hillsdale, Michigan Lambda Iota Tau NANCY FRENCH, B.A. Rahway, New Jersey Alpha Phi-Pledge Class Secretary 8. Corresponding Secretary Panhellenic Council Choir Student Education Association SUSAN FROST, B.A. Detroit, Michigan Chi Omega-Secretary Panhellenic Council-Vice-President Home Ec Club LOIS GARROW, B.A. Morenci, Michigan Student Education Association Usher Corps Choir WARREN F. GASTON, B.A. Mansfield, Ohio Wesley Fellowship-President Maior Cole Lambda Iota Tau German Club Track ELAINE GEARIG, B.A. Archbold, Ohio Alpha Phi-President W.R.A.-Treasurer Cheerleader Dorm Vice-President 8- President A.W.S.-Council Judicial Board House Council Intramurals Student Education Association ELLEN CAROL GOULDING, B.A. St. Charles, Illinois NANCY C. GRAHAM, B.A. Wexford, Pennsylvania Choir Social Committee Alpha Phi-Social Chairman 81 Recording Secretary Mound Staff Intramurals Student Education Association Usher Corps THAINE WALTER GRAMS, B.A. Monroe, Michigan Cifcle K Psi Sigma Rho--President 8- Treasurer Spanish Club AII College Sing NANCY GREEN, B.A. Birmingham, Michigan Alpha Phi-House Manager 81 Social Chairman Usher Corps Intramurals Choir Social Committee-Secretary ROGER L. GREEN, B.A. Morenci, Michigan Theta Alpha Phi-President Psi Sigma Rho-Historian Young RepubIican's Club Political Science Club Band Student Union DAVID LEE HADDEN, B.A. Deerfield, Michigan JUDY HAERING, B.S. Centerline, Michigan Alpha Delta Chi Wesley Fellowship Alpha Sigma Alpha Student Union Religious Life Council WARREN HANNIG, B.A. Alma, Michigan Four-letter man in Football Co-Captain in Football Class Vice-President College World Varsity Club Who's Who Sigma Alpha Epsilon DOYLE R. HARMS, B.A. Garden City, Michigan SUSAN JEAN HARRIS, B.A. Birmingham, Michigan Chi Omega-Treasurer Spanish Club Intramurals SUSAN R. HAYES, B.A. Morenci, Michigan Alpha Phi-Secretary 8. Guard Theta Alpha Phi Lambda Iota Tau Student Education Association Pi Delta Phi-President Who's Who College Plays ROBERT L. HESS, B.A. Adrian, Michigan Tau Kappa Epsilon-Secretary 8- Social Chairman lnterfraternity Council Intramurals Ski Club American Chemical Society RONALD GAR HOSHAL, B.A. Owosso, Michigan Michigan State University Varsity Debate Team Dorm Representative to Student Government-M.S.U. PATRICIA ANN JOHNSON, B.A. Delta, Ohio A.W.S.-Executive 8- Judicial Boards 8. Vice-President Dorm President lCargol Alpha Delta Chi Student Union STEVEN VINCENT JOHNSTON, B.A. Warren, Michigan JANE BEDFORD JONES, B.A. Detroit, Michigan Life Guard Corps W.R.A.-Recording Secretary Young Republican's Club Student Govemment M. LEE KENNEDY, B.S. Natrona Heights, Pennsylvania MARY E. KING, B.S. Verona, Pennsylvania Alpha Delta Chi-Treasurer A.W.S.-Executive Council 81 Scholarship Chairman Alpha Chi German Club W.R.A. Who's Who Dorm Vice-President lCargol DONALD S. KORDEE, B.A. Flint, Michigan Intramurals PETER PAUL KOVAL, B.A. Cleveland, Ohio JEFFREY ASHER KRANITZ, B.A. Youngstown, Ohio Theta Chi-Treasurer, Historian, Spring Formal Chairman, Student Union Representative Junior Class Treasurer Dean's List Intramurals LINDA KUNEY, B.A. Adrian, Michigan Student Education Association Choir French Club LARRY FLOYD LaBEAU, B.S. New Port, Michigan DONALD W. LANGSDALE, B.A. Vanport, Pennsylvania American Commons Club-Treasurer Drama Club T.A.P. Dorm President lStevensl M.R.C. STANLEY M. LEGENC, B.A. Birmingham, Michigan Theta Chi-Editor 8. President Circle K-Lieutenant Governor, Student Union Representative Maior Cole-Secretary Choir Student Union-Election Committee Chairman Interfraternity Council-Treasurer Social Committee-Chairman Political Science CIub-Vice-Presi- dent and President Wesley Fellowship MARGARET LEVENTRY, B.S. Brecksville, Ohio Home Ec Club-President Religious Life Council Usher Corps Alpha Phi Student Government Dining Hall Committee Choir Student Education Association JOYCE ANN LINN, B.A. Delta, Ohio Alpha Delta Chi W.R.A. KATHARINE LOVE, B.A. Three Oaks, Michigan Choir Orchesis Modern Dance Club "Noah" Production-Pianist Alpha Delta Chi All College Sing DONALD LUCAS, B.S. Chicago, Illinois Student Government Vice-President of Class President of Senior Class Alpha Tau Omega Baseball JANICE ELLEN MacQUEEN, B.A. Adrian, Michigan WILLIAM E. MAPES, B.S. Mantow Beach, Michigan Theta Chi-Recording Secretary Student Union-Elections Commit- tee Chairman Junior Class President JAMES EDWARD MAROHNIC, B.A. Detroit, Michigan Political Science Club-Treasurer Theta Alpha Phi Little Theater Society Intramural Football 8- Basketball BARBARA MARSH, B.A. Detroit, Michigan Alpha Phi Social Committee Usher Corps Home Ec Club Student Education Association Intramurals JUDITH ANN MARTENS, B.A. Southfield, Michigan GEORGE LEONARD MASCHKE, B.S. Northville, Michigan WILLARD H. MASON, B.A. Blissfield, Michigan Alpha Tau Omega-Worthy Sentinel Senior Class Vice-President Football Letterman's Club College World Debate Team JUDY McKAY, B.A. Grass Lake, Michigan Sigma Sigma Sigma-Treasurer Panhellenic Council-Secretary- Treasurer A.W.S. House Council-President 1 Girl's Basketball MICHAEL MCLEAN, B.A. Detroit, Michigan Circle K Wesley Fellowship Choir Intramurals Student Government EVA M. MEGERLE, B.A. Tenafly, New Jersey German Club-President Alpha Delta Chi W.R.A.-Corresponding Secretary House Council Intramurals-Sports Chairman ARFMCN-Housing Committee BRUCE H. MIDDLETON, B.A. Livonia, Michigan Wesley Fellowship Theta Alpha Phi-Historian PAUL FREDERICK MILLER, B.S. Monroe, Michigan I Alpha Tau Omega-Secretary Baseball Ski Club Letterman's Club Intramurals GAIL E. MONAHON, B.A. Weston, Massachusetts Junior Class Secretary Dorm Fire Marshal Uarvisl Fire Proctor Sigma Sigma Sigma-Student Union Representative W.R.A. Junior Class Student Union Rep- resentative Wesley Fellowship Spanish Club Intramurals Extramurals A.W.S. JUDITH ANN MOORE, B.A. Montpelier, Ohio Alpha Delta Chi W.R.A. Mound Staff Student Education Association- Vice-President German Club Lambda Iota Tau-Secretary 8- Vice- President Alpha Chi-Vice-President Social Committee Faculty Award 1964 Alpha Chi Undergraduate Scholarship KAY M. MORRIS, B.A. Buchanan, Michigan Alpha Phi-Rush Chairman Panhellenic Council A.W.S. Intramurals STEVE NEFF, B.A. New Paris, Indiana Sigma Alpha Epsilon Basketball Track Letterman's Club JIM NEIFERT, B.A. Flat Rock, Michigan Student Union Men's Residence Council MELINDA ANNE NOFZIGER, B.A. Archbold, Ohio Artisans Swim Club-Secretary Usher Corps-Secretary-Treasurer Mound Staff Intramurals W.R.A. Student Education Association BRUCE R. NORTON, B.A. Pontiac, Michigan Alpha Tau Omega-Athletic Director Football Basketball Baseball All College Sing Senior Class Treasurer JAMES OGAREK, B.A. Detroit, Michigan Alpha Tau Omega-President Mentor Student Union College World-Co-Editor Intramurals THOMAS W. O'HAVER, B.S. Adrian, Michigan Tau Kappa Epsilon-Vice-President CAROL A. OYER, B.A. Adrian, Michigan JOHN GORDON PEMBERTON, B.A. Pontiac, Michigan MARCIA CAREY PETERS, B.A. Ypsilanti, Michigan Class Officer Mound Staff College World Intramurals Extramurals W.R.A. M.I.A.A. 'Tennis 8- Archery Tourna- ments Wesley Fellowship Life Saving Corps Synchronized Swim Club Usher Corps DOUGLAS R. PFISTER, B.A. Manitor Beach,'Michigan CAROL MAE PLOTTS, B.A. Waterville, Ohio Alpha Delta Chi W.R.A. Usher Corps-Senior House Manager Intramurals Mound Staff-Editor Student Education Association Dean's List JUDY ANN POLLOCK, B.A. Toledo, Ohio DONNA PONTIUS, B.A. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania A.W.S.-President 8- Recording Sec- retary Sigma Sigma Sigma-President 8. Vice-President Artisan Swim Club-Vice President Student Government Class Officer Student Education Association KAY POWELL, B.A. Maumee, Ohio German Club-Secretary W.R.A. Bowling Dean's List Choir College World Lambda Iota Tau MARY LYNN PRICE, B.A. Detroit, Michigan ANNE E. PRIESTLY, B.A. Pontiac, Michigan Sigma Sigma Sigma LAWANDA KAY RADAHAUGH, B.A. Peck, Michigan W.R.A.-Vice President 8- Intramu- ral Chairman A.R.F.M.C.W. Conference-Chairman M.A.H.P.E.R.-Student Section Rep- resentative Maior Club-President Intramurals Extramurals M.I.A.A. Tennis 8- Archery-Chair- man Alpha Delta Chi House Council Great Lakes Field Hockey Tourna- ment W.R.A.-Sports Representative THOMAS J. REA, B.S. Dearborn, Michigan Ski Club-President Senior Class Secretary Alpha Tau Omega American Chemical Society Baseball-Manager JACQUELINE S. RICHARDSON, B.A. Romeo, Michigan JAMES RINK, B.A. Adrian, Michigan Spanish Club Lambda Iota Tau College World-Editor Maior Cole ROBERT 5. RITZ, B.A. Detroit, Michigan ROBERT C. ROBILLARD, B.A. Birmingham, Michigan Alpha Tau Omega RHEA JO ROBINETTE, B.A. Adrian, Michigan French Club Pi Delta Phi-Vice-President Activities Committee Student Government All College Sing Alpha Phi A.W.S. Dean's List Intramurals Homecoming Committee-Chairman Central Michigan University, Fresh- man WILLIAM RODGERS, B.A. Adrian, Michigan Tau Kappa Epsilon Mound Staff Student Education Association CAL E. ROHRBACK, B.S. Adrian, Michigan JAMES R. ROHRHACK, B.A. Blissfield, Michigan Tau Kappa Epsilon Dean's List JAMES M. ROSENJACK, B.A. Adrian, Michigan DIANE E. ROZEBOOM, B.A. Flint, Michigan STANLEY K. SASAKI, B.A. Honolulu, Hawaii International Club Alpha Tau Omega-Social Member TOM SCHNEIDER, B.A. Blissfield, Michigan ROBERT R. SCHROTH, B.A. Rocky River, Ohio American Commons Club Theta Chi Intramurals EILEEN SEAGER, B.A. Blissfield, Michigan Wesley Fellowship Alpha Delta Chi A.W.S. Student Education Association RICHARD SEAGERT, B.S. Britton, Michigan Basketball Letterman's Club German Club Sigma Alpha Epsilon BERNICE LORRAINE SECRIST, B.A. Detroit, Michigan Student Education Association Publicity Editor Home Ec Club-Treasurer BONNIE J. SHUMAKER, B.A. Flint, Michigan Alpha Delta Chi Usher Corps HAROLD JON SLATER, B.A. Adrian, Michigan Football Wrestling Intramurals American Commons Club-Chaplain Assistant Minister at E.U.B. Church -Jasper, Michigan Paswr at East Gilead E.U.B. Church- es-Bronson, Michigan Usher Corps KAREN MARIE SLATER, B.A. Buchanan, Michigan Alpha Delta Chi-Program Chaimtan 81 Director in All College Sing Religious Life Council Choir A.W.S.-Treasurer, Executive Com- mittee Mentor Intramurals ROBERT A. SLONE, JR., B.A. Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan Student Government Football Men's Resident Council DAVID LEE SMITH, B.A. Flat Rock, Michigan Student Government-President, Vice-President, Chairman of Committees, 81 Parliamentarian Activities Committee Development Committee Constitutional Revision Committee Homecoming Committee Rush Union Expansion Committee Advisory Council for Discipline Hanging of the Greens Official Delegate to Michigan As- sociation of Student Govern- ments Social Calendar Committee Alpha Tau Omega-Treasurer, Housemanager, 8. Vice- President Homecoming iudge for Alma Col- Ie ge All-Fraternity Speech Contest All College Sing Dean's List Intramurals ROGER D. SMITH, B.A. Lincoln Park, Michigan KAY SMITH, B.A. Rensselaer, Indiana Student Government-President 8' Vice-President Advisory Council Chi Omega-Treasurer 8- Song Leader Social Committee Social Calendar Committee Dorm President 81 Vice-President Uarvisj Religious Life Council Student Education Association W.R.A. German Club A.W.S. MARSHA LYNN SPECTOR, B.A. Southfield, Michigan DELORES MAE STARK, B.A. Trenton, Michigan Alpha Delta Chi Intramurals Alpha Sigma Alpha-President Wesley Fellowship Student Government Panhellenic Council TERRY STRAUSS, B.A. Fostoria, Ohio French Club Sigma Sigma Sigma Student Education Association-Re- cording Secretary Mound Staff Usher Corps DELORES M. SUMNER, B.S. Edgerton, Ohio W.R.A. Alpha Delta Chi-President 8- Vice- President Religion and Life Council A.W.S.-Executive Council German Club Student Education Association Choir GERALD B. SWANSON, B.S. Royal Oak, Michigan MARGARET TASHEY, B.A. Franklin, Michigan Sigma Sigma Sigma-Recording Sec retary Usher Corps Mound Staff Student Education Association-Par Iiamentarian-Historian GENE HOWARD THALER, B.A. Freeport, Michigan American Commons Club Theta Chi Football Baseball Letterman's Club CAROLYN S. TONNEBERGER, B.A. Tecumseh, Michigan MARGARET-ANN TURBAN, B.A. Manhasset, New York LENNA M. UGUCCIONI, B.A. Onstead, Michigan Mound Staff Newman Club RICHARD VALENTINE, B.S. Clarkston, Michigan Football Wrestling Letterman's Club JUDITH KAREN VANDERHOOF, B.A. East Lansing, Michigan Alpha Delta Chi ANN MARIE VAN House, B.A. Adrian, Michigan ERNEST WAYNE VAN HOUSE, B.S. Adrian, Michigan DENNIS STANTON VAN SICKLE, B.A. Onstead, Michigan ANDREW C. WESTIN, B.S. Ypsilanti, Michigan Football Circle K-Chaplain Choir Ski Club American Chemical Society-Student Member CHARLES E. WOOD, B.A. Janesville, Wisconsin ROGER EDWARD WYMAN, B.A. Toledo, Ohio RUTH YACKLE, B.A. Pigeon, Michigan Alpha Phi Choir Student Education Association SAMUEL A. YARLOTT, B.A. Constantine, Michigan Theta Chi Young Republican's Club Ski Club Intramurals Football Basketball Volleyball EDWARD JAMES ZABINSKI, B.A. Grosse Pointe Shores, Michigan Bush, Donna, 139 Abner, Peggy, 133 A. B. PARK COMPANY, 151 Abromailis, Slanley, 138 Aclcelson, Laurie. 19, 138 Adams, Susanne, 96, 138 Adeniii, Abebayo, 80, 83, 131 ADRIAN BEVERAGE, 166 ADRIAN CAMERA SHOP, 154 ADRIAN CHAIN 81 CABLE COMPANY INC.. 158 ADRIAN FEDERAL SAVINGS, 162 ADRIAN STATE SAVINGS BANK. 150 Alberlson, Donald, 55, 97, 114 Aldrich, Sfanley, 82, 133 Alexander, Kalhie, 84, 85, 127 Alguire, James, 85, 133 Allen, Belly, IOO, 138 Allen, Beverly, 104 Allen, Mae, 131 Allingham, Larry, 83, 84, 127 Alpha Chi, 86 Alpha Della Chi, 77 Alpha Phi, loo Alpha Sigma Alpha, 96 Alpha Tau Omega, 99 Amyl, Jon, 34, 138 Anderson Annis, 138 Anderson Carl, 74, IOI, 131 Anderson Dave, 58. 97, 131 Anderson Jellrey, 138 Anderson Lynne, 127 Aynderson, Mary, 76, 98, 138 Angevine Paula, 138 Anglin, Tom 55, 138 Arbaugh, Gregg, 58, 62, 104 Arnold, Sandra, 138 Arninglon, Harold, 83, 84, 138 Arringlon. Robyn, 83, 84, 127 Associalion of Women's Sludenls Execulive Council, 75 Allcins, Paul, 97, 133 Auslin, Virginia, 104 Babcock, Jane, 74. 98, 138 Badley, Thomas, 127 Bailey, Dennis, 138 Bain, James. 75, 97, 127 Bain William, 97, 127 Balca, Kalhleen, 138 Balcer, Donald, 133 Baker, Roberl, 101 BALES TRUCKING AND SUPPLY, 161 Ball, Troy, 138 Balsanelc, Joe, 84, 138 Bamlord, Paul 97, 114 Band, The, 78 BANK OF LENAWEE COUNTY, 150 Barden, Belle, 81. IOO, 127 Barnes, Carol, 83, 98, 138 Barnes, Charles, 133 Barnes, Susan, 139 Barone, 1-lelen, 104 Barr, Eslher, II4 Barr, Robert, 76, 77, 139 Barrows, Richard, 99, 133 Balch, David, 133 Ball, Carol, 139 Baughey, Deborah, 139 Baur, Charlene, 114 Baxler. Gary, 62, 93, 114 Beallie, William, 139 Beaudry, Nilci, 128 Beck, Billie, 94, 139 Beclc, James, 97, 139 Beclt, Keilh, 82, 86, 115 Beclcer, Larry, 128 Beiller, John, 133 Bell, Arlhur, 133 Bell. Franlc, 104 Bennel, Jan, 128 Benninlc, Barbara, IOO, 139 Benlz, Kalherine, 139 Benziclc, Arlhur, 99, 115 Berger, Carolynn, 83, 94, 115 Berlcelile, Melvin, 77, 128 Berlcebile, Ronald, 139 Bellis. Suzanne, 133 Biedermann, Louise, 79, 133 Bigelow, Larry, 139 Billig, William, 95, 133 Bird, Janel, 76, 77, 81, 128 Bird, Richard, 139 Birgel, Sue, 139 Bishop, Roberl, 54, 139 Blaclc, Connie, 96, 139 Blaesinq, William, 77, 139 Blanchard, Roberl, 139 Blanlon, Thomas, 139 Blazier, Ben, 128 Bliclcle, James, 128 Bloclc. Nancy, 139 Blumer, Jeanne, 94, 139 Bocchi, Don, 139 Bollon, Harry, 139 Bonadid, James, 139 Bone, Waller, 128 Boonslra, Daniel, 62, 81, 87, 128 Borgia, Faye, 92, 94, 128 Borlon, Suzelle, 139 Bovee, Barry, 139 Bovonralanaruclc, Vilcron, 80, 128 Bowden, John, IO1, 128 Bower, Roberl, 133 Bowers, James, 115 Bowlc, Jay, 133 Bowles. Jane, 98, 128 Boyle, Michael, 99. 128 Boyse, Dorolhy, 75, IOO, 115 Bradley, George, 115 Bradley, Jean, 115 Bradley, Thomas, 128 Bragg, Roberl, 133 Brandy, Ox., 95 Brarnan, John, 54 Brasiola, Jane, 86, 133 Breece, John, 115 Bremer, Rebecca, 74, 96, 133 BRENDT'S JEWELRY, 148 Briclrer, David, 139 Brindenbaugh, Jill, IOO, 139 Brinlc, Gary. 139 Brisbin, Alice, 112 Brown, Charles, 128 Brown, Edna, 128 Brucchieri, Roselyn, 81. 139 Bruhn, Ronald, 139 Brumbaugh, Lewis, 104 Bruol, Richard, 139 Brough, Virginia, 139 Brugger, Joyce. 139 Buckharl, Roberl, 133 Buclcley, Gwen, 98, 139 Bulcwaz, Norman, 95, 128 Bumgardner. Ralph, 115 BUMMIES DRIVE-IN, 155 Bunce, Jean, 76, 81. 84, 139 Burgan, Lawrence, 139 Burlcharl, Roberl, 92, 97 Burlcholder, David, 139 Burlcholder, Lynelle, 85, 96, 115 Burns, Dorolhy, 83, 94, 139 Burns, Kalhleen, 139 Burrow, James, 133 Burrows, William, 54, 139 Bush, Carolyn, 128 Bush, Gaila, 84, 128 Bush, Shirley, 77, 128 Buswell, Kalhy, 139 Buli, Roberl, 54, 93, 133 Byerly, George, 133 Cabble, Willard, 97, 128 Camp, Mary, 133 Carl. Thomas, 79, 83, 84, 133 Carney, Daniel, 54, 139 Carnihan, John, 139 Carler, JoAnne, 139 Cassino, Michael, 104 Calenhausen, Janel, IOO, 139 Celmer, Edward, 74, 99, 128 Cermalc, Mary, 139 Chamberlin, Lynda, 96, 139 Chandler, Richard, 139 Charlelour, Richard, 79, 83, 101, 133 Charlelour, Suzanne, 139 Charles, Jellrey, 133 Chase, Charles, 62, 128, 139 Chase, Cynlhia, 96. 139 Chase, William, 62, 139 Chavis, Arlhur, 54, 92, 99, 128 Chi Omega, 96 Childs, Judilh, 74, 75, 86, 133 Choir, The, 78 Chrislensen, Gary, 74, 76, 77, 139 Chrislopher, John, 139 CITIZEN GAS FUEL COMPANY. 149 Clarlc, Adelle, 77, 139 Clarlc, Francis, 95, 115 Clarlc, Judly, 87 Clark, Mildred, 83, 104 Clear. Michael, 54, 97, 115 Cleveland, Roberl, 79, 101, 133 Clifford, Carole, 96, 116 Cline, Douglas, 116 Clum, Marcia. 133 Cochill, Dennis, 139 Cohagen, Marsha, 86, IOO, 139 Colbry, Norman, 95, 128 Cole, Gary, 149 Cole, Joanne, 83, 116 COLONNA STUDIOS, 153 Colliclc, Sharon, 116 Collins, Gerald, 133 Collins, Michale, 81, 83, IOO, 116 Colliar, Nancy, 140 Collver, Edwin, 133 Collyer, Elsie, 133 Comerzan, David. 93, 133 COMMERCIAL SAVINGS BANK. 150 Complon, Terry, 140 Condon, Gary, 133 Cone, Donald, 87, 104 Connors, Francine, 100. 140 CONSUMERS POWER COMPANY, 161 Coolc, Lewis, 140 COONEY STUDIOS. 160 Cooper, Bruce. 140 Copeland, Janice, 133 Cordier, Douglas, 140 Corey, June, 140 Corey, Sue, 133 Cornell, Belly, 140 Correll, John, 95, 128 Cosner, Ronald, 77, 128 Collrell, Roberl, 140 Cowan, Linda, 140 Craig, Myrlle, 105 Crane, Auslin, 131 Crane, Lawson, 131 Crawlord, 1-lanlc, 101, 128 Cronin, Roberl, 97, 128 Cross Counlry, 55 Cruilcshank, John, 134 Crusinberry, Barnard, 105, 113 Cullen, Gary, 128 Culver, Jack, 140 Cunningham, John, 140 Cunningham, Roberl, 99, 134 Curby, Roberl, 140 Curry, Nancy, 74, 96. 116 Cry, Thomas, 134 Czopor, Carol, 134 Dailey, Bryon, 80, 134 Daisher, Nollie, 105 Damaslca. James, 140 Dammeyer, Eric, 76, 80, 93. 134 Danielian, Michael, 140 Davenporl, Wendy, 128 David, John, 116 Davids, Brenl, 97, 116 Davidson, Roger, 54, 128 Davis, Charles 97, 128, 140 Davis, David. 140 Davis, John, 87, 105 Davis. Roger, 140 Davison, Helen, 77, 81, 86, 113, 116 Day, Sandra, 77, 140 Daylon, Diane. 140 Dedich, Karen, 94, 140 Degner, William, 140 Delene, Michelle, 134 deLespinasse, Paul, 105 deL'horbe. Carole, 96, 134 Delilah, Dennis, 134 Delang, Kalhryn, 98, 134 DeMerill, Carl, 116 Demlow, Carl, 128 Democralic Club, 84 Deneclce, Krislin, 116 Dennis, Paul. 93, 128 Dennison, Terry, 62, 140 Devenney, Donald, 54, 140 Dewey, Elhel, 128 DeYarmond, Linda, 81, 116 DeYoung, Diane, 140 Hooper, Jane, 79, 141 Huerla, James, 141 Dhondt Linda, 140 Dhondt Sfeven, 62, 92, 99, 128 Dickers, Diane, 140 Dixon, Marilyn, 94, 134 Doinidis, Christ' 99, 128 Dolinski, Karen, 54, 134 Donaldson, Michael, 134 Dodd, James, 105 Dopp, Slephen, 140 Dorn, Robert 92, 101 Doly, Michael, 54, 140 Douglas, Diane, 96, 134 Douglas, Leslie, 96, 128 Douglas, Lewis, 134 Dragoo, Kalhryn, 86, 96, 140 Drake, Jan, 100, 140 Dresselhouse, Albert 97, 128 Drewyor, Donna, 140 Driscall, Gary, 128 Driskill, James, 140 Druhot Kalhy,-96, 117 Drummond, John, 62, 140 Dubuc, Chrisline, 75, 82, 94, 134 Duckeft Michael, 93, 140 Dudgeon, Art 97, 134 Dunbar Borlan Inc., 164 Dunn, Sally, 134 Duroy, Deanne, 140 Durham, Michael, 128 Dury, Lawrence, 83, 84, 101, 117 Eddie, Laird, 92, 93, 117 Edwards, Slephen, 140 Eggleslon, Alan, 101, 128 Ehrbright Helen, 97, 112 Ehronin, Suzanne, 128 Ehl, Nancy, 94, 134 Eilchoft Terra, 134 Elliolt Robert 134 Ellsfrom, Karin, 96 ELMER KAPNICK AGENCY, 160 Emmons, Marie, 77, 134 Emrick, Belh, IOO, 128 Emrick, Howard, 76, 105 Enderle, Arlhur, 54, 97, 128 Erickson, Howard, 140 Ernst Palricia, 100, 140 Euper, Terry, 140 Falls, Donna, 128 Farbman, Leslie, 140 Farin, Susan, 96, 117 Farnham, Robert 134 Fast Diane, 117 Faubel, Hollace, 54. 58, 100, 140 Fedell, Marlha, 94, 128 Foor, Perry, 54, 140 Fooiball, Team, 54 Force, Lawrence, 140 Fordyce, Pafricia, 85, 117 Forrest lsabelle, 86, 98, 134 Fosler, Elizabelh, 129 Fosler, Pamela, 75, 96, 134 Fosler, Richard, 140 Fosler, Susanne, 96, 134 Fox, Sherwood, 140 Francis. Linda, 141 Frank, Ralph, 129 Frank, Sieve, 58, 141 Goodrich, Richard, 54, 97 Goodrich, Ruih, 79, 134 Goodyear, Michael, 134 Gould, Judy, 83, 129 Goulding, Ellen, 118 GORDONS, 149 Gorman, Paul, 54, 58, 134 Gorsuch, Janet 129 Golshall, Chris, 97, 134 Graham, Bonnie, 94 Graham, Nancy, 81, 100, 118 Gramlich, William, 141 Grams, Thaine, 101, 118 Franke, Charles, 101 Franks, Sandra, 117 Franz, James, 141 Fraser, Sally, 86, 141 Frederick, Richard, 141 French Club, 82 French, Nancy, 81, 100, 117 Frelwell, Sleven, 134 FRIDD LUMBER COMPANY, 152 Friel, James, 105 Granl , Cornel, 141 Gray, William. 129 Green, Judy, 94, 141 Green, Lynn, 74, 94, 141 Green, Nancy, 100, 118 Green, Roger, 74, 85, 118 Greening, Sally, 96, 134 Greer, Ray, 77, 134 Gregg, Sieve, 141 Gregory, Elizabefh, 87, 92, 96 129 Frils, Francine, 100, 141 Frost Robert 134 Frost S haron, 100, 134 Frost Susan, 96, 117, 129 Frye, A lice, 77, 79, 81. 129 Fuller, Linda, 141 Fuller, Marianne, 129 Greko, Jean, 141 Greincer, Joseph, 141 Greisinger, Terry, 141 Griewahn, Pepper, 141 Grime, Michael, 97, 134 Grimshaw, Margaret 129 Grissom, Phyllis, 129 Fyke, Joyce, 81, 141 Gaiser, Carl, 54 Gale. Robert 141 Gales, Vivian, 80, 134 Gambler, Leonard, 79, 82, 129 Gammie, Sarah, 96, 141 Grossman, Gary, 134 Grove, Marcia, 75, 94, 141 Gulbrandsen, John, 134 Gump, James, 134 Gunlhorp, John, 58, 95, 134 Gutlliep, Cleopalra, 100, 134 Garber, Michael, 141 Garrelt Mark, 58, 97, 129 Garrod, Janet 141 Garrow, Lois, 117 Haas, James, 92, 135, 141 Hackwell, Robert 141 Hadden, Dave, 118 Hadley, Marian, 83, 84, 100. 135 Gaslon, Warren, 76, 81, 85, 118 Gales, Howard, 62, 129 Galhman, Mary, 86, 129 Gearig, Elaine, 75, 81, 100, 118 GENE OLSEN CORPORATION, 165 Geno, Edward, 54, 141 Haering, Judy, 76, 118 Hagen, Chrisline, 94, 141 Haisley, Gregory, 74, 77, 141 H. L. DUNLAP 8: SONS, 160 Hammerslrom, Don, 93, 129 Hannig, Warren, 54, 118 Hansen, Gordon, 106 George, Tobias. 59, 93, 134 German Club, 82 Gibson, Robert 106 Gilford, John, 141 Gilbert Millon, 77, 134 Hanson, John, 93, 129 Harbaugh, Glenn, 106 Harder, Judy, 94, 129 Hardy, Dorolhy, 94, 135 Hardy, Susan, 96, 135 Fisher, Godlewski, Slanley, 141 Felt Charles, 140 Ferris, Dean, 128 Fink, Linda, 134 Fisher, Daniel, 140 Fisher, Douglas, 140 Fisher, James, 140 Julie, 77, 86, 140 Filchko, Frank, 62, 101, 117 Flanery, Duane, 128 Flaherly, Michael, 128 Flanagan, James, 55, 59, 105 Fleelham, Terry, 95, 117 Fleming, Kennelh, 129 Fling, Janet 134 Gilger, Rebecca, 83, 84, 129 Gillelle, David, 134 Gillis, Robert 62, 106 Gilson, MichSel, 141 Gippert Louis, 97, 129 Gisel, Carol, 141 Glasgo, Nancy, 74, 77, 98, 134 G1assick,.Char1es, 106 Glendenning, James, 55, 99, 134 Goebel, Tom, 101, 129 Goelz, Joyce, 96, 134 Good, Beverly, 96, 134 Good, Lawrence, 141 Goodemoot Sharon, 77, 81, 129 Goodrich, Mygleefes. 112 Harms, Doyle, 99, 113, 118 Harris, Marge, 141 Harris, Susan, 96, 118 Harvey, Edward, 141 Harvey, Taylor, 141 Harving, Jim, 98 Hasfings, Alison, 76, 77, 81, 129 Halch, Mary, 77, 81, 129 Hauqhn, Terry, 141 Hawk, Robert 93, 129 Hayes, Mary, 77, 83, 84, 141 Hayes, Susan, 79, 85, 100, 119 Haywood, Diane, 96, 135 Helman, Nat 82 Helmer, Harry, 99 Henck, Frank, 101, 129 Hendricks, Roger, 101, 129 Henry, James, 141 Henshaw, Paul, 85, 101, 129 Henson, Joseph, 99 Herman, Richard, 141 Herschu, Carol, 77 Hershkowitz, Richard, 97, 129 Hess, Robert 93, 119 Hewline, Keilh, 135 Hewson, Joseph, 135 Hicks, Carol, 96, 135 Hildebrand, Linda, 141 Hill, Peler, 141 Hillman, Howard, 141 Hindle, Cheryl, 85, 94, 129 Hirschy, Carolyn, 76, 81, 129 Hislory Club, 87 Hilchens, Rulh, 94, 135 Hoadley, Judilh, 83, 92, 94. 129 Hoben, Michael, 135 Hockemyer, Ted, 99, 135 Hockslad, Judilh, 141 Hodgins, Ralph, 99 Holler, Lyle, 106 Hoffman, Donna, 77, 141 Hollman, Kennelh, 80, 83, 84, 106 Hogg, Sharon, 141 Hoilben, Barbara, 100, 141 Holben, Palricia, 141 Holcomb, Robert 76, 83, 84. 135 Holman, David, 141 Holmslrom, Sharon, 74, 94, 135 1-1611, Richard, 74, 99, 135 Home Economics Club, 83 Honess, Charles, 141 Hooper, Jeffrey, 101, 129 Horn, Ralph, 106, 113 Horst William, 141 Hoshal, Ronald, 119 Hosmer, James, 76, 79, 129 Hough, Hayward, 141 Howell, Louise, 83, 84, 85, 87 Howes, Peler, 77, 129 Huddle, Howard, 106 Hudson, David, 141 Huffman, Prudence, 77, 141 Hughes, Michael, 129 Hull, Andrew, 142 Huml, JoAnn, 74, 100, 129 Hummel, Margaret 74, 79, 142 Hunt Jane, 75, 86, 96, 135 Humphrey, Dale, 142 Hunler, John, 54, 142 Husband, Robert 107 Hulchek, Joanne, 142 lcerman, James, 142 llling, Barbara, 135 lmes, Diane, 96, 129 Ingham, James, 58, 135 lnouye, Lorella, 79, 80, 129 lnlernalional Club, 80 lob, John, 142 loft Palrick, 54, 93, 135 lrish, Larry, 92, 97, 129 lsley, Norris, 142 Jacob, Carol, 79, 142 Jackson, Donald, 142 Jackson, Harvey, 142 Jackson, Jennifer, 142 James, Ka1hy, 142 James, Mary, 96 Janes, Robert 62, 142 Jeffery, Nancy, 98 Jenkinson, Kennerh, 97, 129 Jenks, Arfhur, 54, 142 JIM GREEN, 154 Johncox, Roger, 142 Johns, Richard, 135 ssell, 95, 135 Johnsen, John, 142 Johnson, Frederick, 76, 77, 84, 135 Johnson, Mildred, 112 Johnson, Margaret 107 Johnson Palricia, 75, 119 Johnson, Susan, 82, 94, 142 Johnson Winslon, 135 Johnsron, Sleven, 101, 119 Johnsron, Susan, 135 Johnslone, Alexander, 55, 97, 129 Jones, Arlhur, 107 Jones, Daniel, 95, 135 Jones, Ja ne, 84, 119 'Jones, Lyle, 135 Jones, Mary, 107 Jones, Pearle, 95, 112 Jones, Ru Lindberg, Donna, 129 Krasiewski, Elaine, 129 Joseph, Jeffrey, 142 JUDGE'S JEWELRY, 166 Kappleman, Duane, 135 Karr, Mary, 81, 94, 129 Kaufmann, Frederick, 142 Keeley, Pamela, 142 Keller, William, 142 Kelley, Katherine, 76, 77, 81, 94, 129 Kennedy, Lee, 97, 119 Kern, Kent 129 KEWAUNEE MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 159 Kimberly, Lawrence, 135 Kimbrough, Palricia, 142 Kincaid, Lynda, 94, 142 King, Mary, 82, 86, 119 Kirby, Ronald, 51, 129, 142 Kirchner, Marsha, 142 Kliemann, Lawrence, 135 KLINE'S DEPARTMENT STORE, 148 Knight William, 142 Knoche, Louie, 135 Koehn, John, 107 Koehn, Paul, 107 Koeppen, Richard, 129 Komon, Chuck, 58, 135 Komon, Tom, 135 Koppelman, Duane, 99 Kordee, Donald, 119 Kraft Bob, 100 Kramer, Maurice, 107 Kranilz, Jeffery, 95, 119 Krauss, Glen, 135 Kraynak, James, 142 Kreeger, Dennis, 142 Kremer, Marilyn, 85, 94, 129 KRIEGHOFF-LAWRENCE COMPANY. 158 KronewiHer, Craig, 142 Krupnick, Harvey, 54, 97, 129 Kruse, lzola, 112 Kuehnle, Ellen, 135 Kummings, Donald, 107 Kuney, Linda, 81, 119 Kunzi, Richard, 99, 129 Kunzi, Lyvonne, 96, 142 LaBeau, Larry, 93, 120 Labor, Earle, 86, 107 Lacy, Henry, 97, 135 Lake, George, 107 Larnan, David, 142 Lamb, DeAnna. 142 Lambda lofa Tau, 85 Lancasier, Wayne, 93, 135 LaNew, Regina, 94, 135 Lang, Carllon, 142 Lang, Gary, 129 Langsdale, Donald, 75, 120 Lapham, Jerry, 74, 76, 97, 129 Lash, Mike, 142 Lasky, Sleven, 142 Lassey, Janet 142 Lauber, Bruce, 97, 129 Lauck, Linda, 142 Laviolelle, Allen, 135 Lawrence, Carol, 96, 142 Lawson, Ronald, 135 Lealhley, Burlon, 135 Legenc, Sfanley, 95, 120 Lehman, Rebecca, 94, 142 Leidecker, Deborah, 142 LeMessurier, Anlhony, 97, 135 LENAWEE BRAND MICHIGAN PRODUCERS DAIRY COMPANY, 155 Levenlry, Jim, 54 Levenlry, Maggie, 76, 81, 83, IOO, 120 Lewis, Robert 74, 97 Lindke, Marshall, 142 Linn, Joyce, 120 Linn, Judy. 142 Loar, Claudia, 135 Long, Annamarie, 76, 94, 129 Loo, Paul, 92, 95, 135 Lord, Herman, 83, 84 Lord, Thomas, 130 Love, Kafharine, 120 Lucas, Dolnald, 99, 114, 120 Luce, Norma, 100, 130 Ludwig, Susan, 100, 135 Lueke, Donna, 77, 82, 94, 142 Luepkie, Margaret 94, 142 Ludsled, Brian, 142 Lynch, Billie, 142 Lylle, William, 142 MacDonald, Diane, 76, 96, 130 MacDona1d, Rufh, 112 MacEiven, Jean, 142 MacNaugh'ron, Douglas, 77, 86. 108 MacQueen, Janice, 96, 120 MacRai1d. Malcolm, 74, 101, 130 Macomber, Robert 55, 99, 135 Macomber, William, 55, 135 Magel, John, 130 Maidment Janice, 75, 77, 130 Maidment Karen, 76, 77. 130 Major Cole, 77 Mak, Lorella, 80, 142 Mamley, Thomas, 142 Mann, James, 142 Manor, Michael, 79, 81, 87, 130 Mans, Michael, 93, 130 Mapes, Carol, 135 Mapes, William, 95, 120 Marek, Jerome, 143 Marlalt Jeanice, 143 Marohnic, James, 120 Marr, Sandra, 143 Marsh, Barbara, 81, 100, 120 Marshall, Jon, 135 Marshall, Michael, 97, 135 Marlin, Cynlhia, 143 Marlin, Pafricia, 143 Marlin, Nancy, 81, 86, 96, 130 Marvin, Chappy, 54, 108 Marvin, Edmund, 143 Mast Hilda, 74, 77, 81, 130 Masfie, Ron, 143 Marfens, Judilh, 96, 120 Mascare, George, 99 Maschke, George, 121 Mason, Willard, 99, 114, 121 Mallson, Oscar, 54, 101, 135 MAURICE, 154 Maugherman, Lynn, 54, 143 Maybee, Sandy, 94, 143 Mays, William, 108 McAdams, Shirley, 77, 130 McAran, Michael, 99, 130 McCallum, Charles, 108 McCar1'hy, Kalhleen, 96, 130 McClelland, David, 54, 130 McCobeb, Mike, 135 McCully, Suzanne, 100, 143 McCurdy, John, 143 McCra'1e, Fred, 97, 135 McGee, Wanda, 143 McGinnis, Carolyn, 94, 143 McGregor, Thomas, 54, 143 McHugh, Michael, 143 McKarnes, Pat 74, 86, 100. 130 McKay, Judy, 94, 121 McKay, Susan, 77, 143 McKe1vey, David, 62, 93 McKinney, Alberla, 83, 130 McLean, Michael, 121 McMahon, James, 101, 135 McMu11in, Gordon, 135 McMullen, Michael, 143 McNeil, William, 143 McPeek, Edward, 143 McPhai1, Lynne, 143 McVay, Allen, 135 Meadows. Cody, 108 Meadows, John, 130 Megerle, Eve, 86, V121 Meisier, Pamela, 82, 94, 135 Meredilh, Lawrence, 143 MERILLAT WOODWORKING COMPANY, 163 Merrell, Robert 143 Merilt Marlha, 143 Merift Paul, 97, 130 Mershon, John, 130 Merx, lrene, 108 Melcalt Ann, 100. 135 Meyer,Cery1, 100, 135 Meyer, Thomas, 136 Middlefon, Bruce, 85, 121 Miles, Dan, 76, 143 Miles, Gary, 143 Miller, Alison, 94, 143 Miller, Belly, 143 MILLER DAIRY FARMS, 154 Miller, Dean, 77, 97, 130 Miller, Duane, 76, 77, 136 Miller, Grant 143 Miller, Michael, 130 Miller, Palricia, 136 Miller, Paul, 99, 121 Miller, Roberl A., 54, 143 Miller, Roberi l., 143 Miller, Viola, 108 Milliron, Suzanne, 143 Mills, Donna, 143 Mills, Jay, 97, 130 Mills, Mike, 130 Minarik, Barbara, 130 Minchelt Carol, 96, 143 Misseldine, Albert 108 Moazzami, Allen, 80, 83 Moeckel, Rolf, 81, 108 Monahon, Gail, 94, 121 Monroe, Mary, 136 Moore Craig. 99, 130 Moore, Elizaberh, 143 Moore Judilh, 85, 86, 88, 121 Moore, Robert 136 Moore Moore Sandra, 77, 81, 143 Shirley, 77, 87, 136 Moquin, William, 109 MORAN INSURANCE, 156 Morgan, David, 79, 82, 130 Morgan, James, 77, 95, 130 Morr, Gary, 143 Morr, Robert 101, 136 Morris, Kay, 92, 100, 121 Morris, Gary, 143 MORRISON PHARMACY, 148 Morrow, Charles, 130 Mosier, Don, 84, 143 Mound, The, 88, 89 Mounlford, Rosemary, 143 Mowat Jean, 109 Mowry, Diane, 76, 77, 84, 130 Moyer, Pamela, 143 Muir, Jacqueline, 143 Mullin, Kenneih, 54, 99 Munroe, Mary, 75, 76, 77 Murdock, Larry, 136 Murphy, James. 54, 97, 130 Musanle, lris, 143 Myers. Mike, 136 Myers, Sharon, 143 Myers, Terry, 54, 136 Nagle, Dennis, 97, 130 Nagel, Edna, 143 Nanghlas, Dean, 87 Nafion, Linda, 77, 143 Neefe, Ann, 76, 77, 143 Neff, Sfeve, 58, 97, 121 Neifert James, 75, 121 Nelles, William, 136, 143 Nelson, Gary, 76, 97, 130 Neu, Sandra, 83, 136 Neuin, Robert 54, 143 Pendlefon, Karon, 144 Neumann, Kalhryn, 77, 136 Newman, Don, 143 Newman, Nancy, 86, 136 Nice, Kalhleen, 96, 143 Niehaus, Paul, 109 Nihart Waller, 59, 143 Niles, Lee, 143 Nisor, Ronald, 93, 136 Nixon, Thomas, 143 Nolziger, Melinda, 79, 122 Nordslrom, Tom, 97, 130 Norfh, Wayne, 76 Norlon, Bruce, 114, 122 Norlon, Carrie, 94, 143 Norlon, Edward, 143 Norlon, Joyce, 136 Numbers, Don, 58 O'Donoghue, Barbara, 80, 143 Ogarek, James, 99, 122 O'1-laver, Thomas, 93, 122 O'Kee1e, David, 144 OLIVER INSTRU MENT COMPANY, 164 Ololson, Philip, 93, 136 O'Ma11ey, Peler, 95, 130 ONE HOUR MARTINIZING, 151 Orwig, Jeff, 144 Osburn, James, 144 Osmick, Carol, 96, 136 Oslerling, John, 144 Owens, Michael, 144 Oyer, Carol, 122 Page. Sieve, 144 Palmer, Ronald, 59, 144 Plapant Paul, 81 Panhellenic Council, 92 Parker, Donald, 93, 130 Parker, Robert 109 Pascoe, Marilyn, 100, 130 Paflerson, Frank, 144 Payne, George, 130 Pawlowski, John, 136 Peabody, Carol, 81, 144 Peacock, Larry, 136 Pelham, William, 144 Peelle, Miles, 109 Pellelier, Kalhryn, 77, 79, 136 Pellowe, Edward, 109 Pemberlon, Howard, 144 Pemberlon, John, 97, 122 Penlland, Robert 144 Perkins, Edward, 130 Perrin, Lois, 144 Pelers, Marcia, 122 Pe1erson,Cur1is, 130, 144 Pelerson, Robert 95, 136 Pelerson, William, 136 Pfisfer, Douglas, 122 Phillips, Connie, 86, 130 Phillips, Dealc, 130 Phillips, Lynne, 94, 144 Pi Delia Phi, 79 Pidwerbesky, Clarence, 109 Pierce, Dave, 95, 136 Pineau, Charles, 144 Pinkerlon, Robert 144 Pioch. Chrisiie, 81, 83, 84, 94. 130 Plassman, Krislina, 82, 144 Plalek, Mary, 100, 144 Ploffs, Carol, 79, 122 Polifical Science Club, 83 Pollard, Alicia, 96, 100 Polleleyt Robert 97, 136 Pollock, Judy, 94, 122 Ponlius, Donna, 94, 122 Pope, David, 126 Porler, Belh, 75, 130 Powell, Janice, 144 Powell, Kay, 122 Pray, David, 84, 144 Price, John, 101, 136 Price, Mary, 123 Prieslley, Anne, 94, 123 Proksa, Palricia, 136 Psi Sigma Rho, 101 Pulling, Jonalhan, 136 Rabold, Sharon, 77, 81, 136 Radabaugh, Lawanda, 86, 123 Radder, Robert 144 Raines, Judy, 96, 136 Rines, Linda, 96, 144 Ramant Sleve, 54, 144 Ramos, Dorcas, 144 Randolph, Susan, 96 Ranie, Edilh, 77 Rankin, Robert 144 Ransom, Carol, 86, 144 Rapp, Isabel, 96, 136 Ralclille, Carol, 86, 144 Raub, Rebecca, 144 Raw, Karen, 144 RAYMOND AUTO SALES, 157 Rea, Thomas, 99, 114, 123 Redman, Bruce, 144 Redmond, Kalhleen, 92, 96, 136 Redmond, Laura, 144 Redpafh, Slauart 59, 144 Reed. Shari, B6, 98, 136 Relior, Nancy, 84, 96, 144 Reqanall, Dean, 144 Reiser, Denny, 144 Religious Life Council, 76 Replogle, Mary, 84, 86, 144 Republican Club, 84 Relhis, Michael. 109 Reyes, Palmira, 144 Reynolds, Joyce, 136 Reynolds, Dale, 144 Richards, Marcia, 79, 86, 136 Richardson, Jackie, 79, 123 Richmond, Robert 144 Ricker, Judy, 144 Rinehart Faye, 54, 96, 14-4 Rinehart Charles, 136, 97 Ring, Sfephen, 136 Ringkvist Vic1'or, 59, 81 Rink, James, 77, 87, 123 Rilz, Robert 54, 99, 123 Robbins. Vivian, 130 Robillard, Robert 87, 99, 123 Robinelle, Rhea, 79, 100, 123 Robinson, Alan, 76, 77, 79, 80, 144 Robinson, Albert 144 Robinson, Terry, 95, 130 Rock, Mariorie, 94, 144 Rodeck, Karl, 110 Rodgers, William, 81, 87, 123 Rodlund, David, 144 Roekle, Bryce, 95, 136 Roesch, George, 130 Rogers, Vicloria, 136 Rohrback, Cal, 123 Rohrback, James, 93, 123 Rohren, Fred, 144 Rolt Rosalyn, 96, 144 Romack, John, 99, 136 Rose, Dianna, 86, 130 Rose, Donald, 144, 130 Rose, Ronald, 79, 81, 87, 101 Rosendale, David, 81. 14-4 Roseniack, James, 92, 93, 124 Rolh, Gerald, 99, 130 Rolh, Richard, 130 Rolh, Robert 99, 131 Roubolham, Robert 54, 58, 97 136 Rowe, Edwin, 76, 131 Rozeboom, Dianne, 96, 124 Ruggles. lan, 131 Rule, Dennis, 84, 144 Russ, Marlha, 96, 145 Russell, Sieve, 136 Rulherlord, Fred, 131 Rulledge, Carol, 74. 94, 132, 136 Salder, Thomas. 145 Salisbury, Larry, 136 Salisbury, Lynn, 81, 93, 131 Samuelson, JoAnne, 83, 84, 94, 145 Sanch, Verl, 62, 145 Sanford, Be11y,75, 77, 92, 110 Sandbolhe, Nancy, 145 Sands, Richard, 145 Sanehollz, Ann, 136 Sanzenbacker, Dick, 136 Sasaki, Sfanley, 80, 99, 124 Saxon, Merrie, 145 Schallner, Janet 145 Schaub, Dale, 79, 145 Scheer, Norma, 86, 136 Schellema, Chuck, 136 Schimming, Wayne, 99, 131 Schneider, Tom, 124 Schober, Ernesline, 112 Schroer, Marfha, 98, 136 Schrolh, Robert 95, 124 Schlalier, Carol, 86, 94, 145 Schoales, Michael, 97, 131 SHEPHERD 8: STOLL, 166 Shoclcey, JoAnn, 86, 145 Shoemaker, Judy, 83. 137 Shrelfler, Waller, 54, 99, 137 Shuler, Brooke, 100. 145 Shumaker, Bonnie, 79, 124 Shumaker, Ted, 54 Sickinger, Rulh, 86, 96, 145 Siegfried, Chrisline, 145 Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 97 Simpkins. William, 97, 137 Sims. Richard, 145 Sims, Roger, 145 Sinks, Donald, 137 Skellon, Lynn, 145 SKY DRIVE-1N THEATER, 15 Slaler, Harold, 124 Slaler, Karen, 124 Sloan, Doug, 92 Slone, Robert 75, 124 Slough, Aileen, 77, 84, 145 Smilh, Barbara, 145 Smilh, Carol, 145 Smilh, David, 74, 125 Smilh, Elizabelh, 112 Smilh, Hugh. 131 Smilh, Jerry, 62, 99, 137 Smith, Kay, 96, 125 Smilh, Leona, 145 Smifh, Lynn, 145 Smilh, Mark, 145 Smilh, Neil, 145 Smilh, Roger, 99, 125 Smilh, Ron, 145 Smilh, Sharon, 145 Smilh, Terry, 95 Smilh, Thomas, 95, 99, 137 Smilh, Tom, 101, 137 Smoke, Robert 145 Snoufler, David, 145 Snowden, Parricia, 145 Sommers, Ray, 110 Soulhwell, William, 145 Soviar, Slephen, 131 Spacht Kalhleen, 100, 145 Speclor, Marsha, 96, 125 Spaelh, Edward. 97 Spencer. James, 110 Spencer, Thomas, 145 Spencer, William, 145 Schrolh, Rulh, 95 Schullz, Mary, 145 Schurz, Barbara, 100, 145 Scoot Albert 99, 136 Scully, Daniel, 110 Seager, Carol, 145 Seager, Eileen, 124 Seagert Richard, 58, 97, 124 Secrist Bernice, 81, 83, 124 Seeck, George, 110 Seiser, Beverly, 86, 96, 145 Serna, Angela, 145 Senac Jay, 136 Servis, Jan, 137 Shaffer, Charles, 131 Shaffer, Judilh, 137 Shannan, Palricia, 145 Shea, Larry, 145 Sheely, David, 79, 145 Sheely, Laurence, 101, 137 Spifnale, Diana, 76, 77, 137 Sprow, Jean, 145 Squires. Palricia, 131 St Clair, Thomas, 145 Slahl, Brian, 75, 145 Slaplefqn, Terry, 75, 97, 131 Slark, Deloras, 98, 125 S+armer, Robert 131 Slalom, Mindy, 94 Sfecker, Cynlhia, 146 Slepp, loan, 110 Sfevens, Ron, 58 Sfevenson, Befhany, 96, 145 Sleveson, Glen, 95, 137 Sfewart Phyllis, 100, 145 Sfille, Charles, 131 Sfimpson, James. 74, 76, 99, 131 Sloclcs, George, 99, 131 SOUTHLAWN MOTEL, 160 Siowe, Linda, l45 Slraliman, Sandie, 84, l3l Strauss, Terry, 8l, 94, I25 Strawser, Cindy, l45 Siromberg, Maria, I37 STUBNIU GREENE CORPORATION, l65 Sludenf Education Associaiion, 8I Siudeni Government 74 STUDIO SOUTH, I5I Sullins, Carol, 75, IOO, l3l Sullivan, Sonia, 145 Summer, Delores, 75. 76, 77, I25 Sunday, Roger, 79, l45 Sullon, Judy, I37 Suiion, Kay, 83, l3l Swan, Tommy, 97, l3l Swander, Mary, IOO, I37 Swanson, Gerald, I25 Swarii, Martha, I37 Swegles, Ray, 54, I45 SWENK-TUTTLE PRESS INC., I57 Swoish, Beverly, 75, 92, IOO, l3l Szczesniak, Marlene, l45 Tabbert Karlene, l45 Takesh, Farrokh, 80, 83, 84, l45 Talayco, John, 82, IIO Talboit Pairicia, l45 Tallman, Robert l45 Tappen, Wayne, l45 Tarris, Thomas, I46 Tart Richard, I37 Tashey, Margaret Bl, 94, I25 Tau Kappa Epsilon, 93 Taylor, Donald, 95, I37 Taylor, Wayne, I37 Tea, Patricia, IOO, I46 Teeier, Robert 58, 54, IIO Teier, Larry, I46 Teusinlc, Mary, III Thaler, Gene, 95, I25 Thaxlon, Cheryl, I46 Therrien, Joseph, I46 The+a Alpha Phi, 85 Theia Chi, 95 Thomas, Keiih, I46 Thompson, Cynihia, IOO, I46 Thompson, John, I37 Thompson, Judy, 74, 96, I46 Thompson, Karen, I37 Thompson, Michael, 93, 95, l3l Thomson, Janet I37 Thorp, Richard, 59, 75, 76, 77. 79, I37 Thun, Klaus, I37 Tienvieri, Robert I46 Tinkham. Richard, I37 Tombaugh, Sandra, 94, l3l Tonneberger, Carolyn, I25 Topliit Sue, I46 Torbet.Tom, I46 Toussaint Willard, 87, lll Tower, Jack, 59, 93, I37 Townsend, Harold. I37 Travis, Marian, l3l Travnik, Dianne, 96, l3l Trebish, Robin, l3l Tremper, Mariha, 79, I37 Treric, Thomas, 77, I46 Trevaskis, Judilh, I3I Trewern, Nancy, 94, I46 Tripner, Paul, 137 Troineau, James, 54, I46 Tucker, Judy, I46 Turban, Margaret 94, I25 Turner, Dallas, I46 Turner, Robert l3l Tulile, I-larold, 54, 8I, l3l, I46 Tuiile, Jimmie, I46 Tyrrell, James. 93 Uguccioni, Florence, I3I Uguccioni, Lenna, l26, l3l Uhler, Elaine, 76, Bl, I46 Ulman, Judy, I37 Upper, I-larrieit I46 Usher Corps, 79 Valentine, Richard, 59, I26 Vallos, Sammy, I3I VanAman, Dale, I46 VanAuken, Thomas, I37 Vanderhoit Judiih, I26 VanDierendonck, Leon, 95, I37 Vanhlouse, Ann Marie, I26 Vanl-louse, Ernest I26 VanLooy, Barbara, 96. I46 Vannorsdall, Emily, 75, IOO, I37 Van Riper, Daughn, I46 Van Sickle, Dennis, 94, 126 Van Sickle, Doreen, I46 Velclt Donald, III Venaleck, Tim, I46 Vilican, George, I37 Vivian, John, 54, 59, l3l Voege, Herbert Ill Vollmer, Charles, I46 Vosburg. Marv, l3l Voss, Linda, I46 Wagner, Jeffrey, 84, 85, I37 Wagner, Russ, I37 Wain, Cheri, I37 Waite, Clay, l3l Walker, JoNell, 74, 75, 96, I37 Walsh, Nancy, III Walton, Linda, 77, l3l Ware, Donald, 99, l3l Warner, Anita, IOO, I37 Warner, Judiih, 74, IOO, l3l Washburn, Grant 76, 77, 84, I37 Waters, Alfred, III Watson, Tom, l4O Waison, William, l3l Way, Terry, I37 Weaver, Carol, I46 Websier, Evin, I46 Weeber, Thomas, I37 Weedman, Beryl, 77, 98, l3l Weidig, Carol, I46 Weinbrenner, Richard, 99, I37 Weir, James, 97, I37 Weiss, Gloria, I37 Weisz, Cheryl, 76, 77, I37 Wells, William, 97, I37 Wenger, Judith, 94, l3l Wesley, 76 West Thomas, I46 Wesiin, Andrew, l26 Weyer, Rowald, 77, l3l Wheatley, Jackie, 96, l3l Wheaion, Donald, 75, 76, 80, l3l Whitaker, George, 83, 84, I37 While, Janice, I46 Whiifern, Alivin, 54, I46 Whiiiern, Charles, l3l Wiedman, James, 93, I37 Wilcox, James, 84, 85, III Wilder, Scoit I46 Wilkcin, James, l3l Wilkins, Michael, 54, I46 Willard, Chris, I46 Willard, Harriet I46 Williams, Joyce, l3l Williamson, Thomas, l3l Willis, Sue, 86, IOO, I37 Wilson, Bernard, lOl. I37 Wilson, Joseph, I37 Wilson, Judiih, l3l Wilson, Sara, 84, 94, I46 Wilt Linda, 82, I46 Windham, Lauren, lil Wine, Larry, I46 Wise, Randy, I37 Wise, Sharon, 74, 75, 96, l3l Wiseman, Russel, I46 Wissman, Kenneih, 99, I3I Wiiienbach, Lawrence, 76, 77, 84, I37 Wixom, Charlolie, Ill Wohlgehagen, James, I46 Woliel, Mary, 94, I46 Wollenberg, Suzanne, IOO, I37 Women's Recreafion Associafion, 80 Wood, Charles, 54, 97, l26 Woodburn, John, l3l Woodworih, Sally, BI, I46 Woolfenden, David, 80, I46 World, The, 90 Wresfling, 59 Wright Edward, 55, 93, I37 Wulft Tom, I46 WYATI' VILLAGE PHARMACY, I 63 Wyman, Diane, I46 Wynn, John, 54, 58, l3l Wyman, Roger, I26 Yackle, Ruih, IOO, I26, I3l Yaniis, Joseph, 79, lil Yarlot Samuel, 95, I26 Yoki, Kaihleen, 83, 84, I37, I46 Young, Barbara, 86, l3l Young, Verle, ll2 Zabinski, Edward, IZ6 Zavala, Manuela, I46 Zenigrai, Charles, l3l Zimmerman, Lucy, I46 Zook, Ellen, I46 Advisor's Comments on the 1965 MOUND For the past 175 pages the MOUND staff has attempted to record, with pictures and words, the activities and events of the 1965 school year. This page was re- served to give special thanks and recognition to those persons who helped put this publication into your hands. We hereby submit this book for your enioyment and as a record of your college days at Adrian. THE LAST WORD Today is June 25, 1965, four weeks since the last Adrian College student departed for summer fun, work or more study. When the school books were closed there were over 100 pages of this book to be completed for publication. It meant working day and night in order that you might receive this book at the opening of school. Many times I asked myself, "lf this is truly a student publication why, why must the advisor spend his summer doing student work?" It would have been easy to say, "Too bad, I am sorry, but the book isn't printed." But, I have seen the joy on the faces of countless students and faculty members as they view the MOUND for the first time in the fall. It is rewarding to hear people say, "lt doesn't look like me," or "l didn't know they took that picture." These comments and others served as the stimulus, driving me to complete the book for your enjoyment. My special thanks to a few devoted students who "stuck it out" to the end and to my wife who was so understanding because of the long hours required in the MOUND office every night. At any rate, it is my sincere desire that you have enioyed reading this book and I hope you will use it for more than a dust collector. Joseph E. Yantis Advisor SPECIAL THANKS TO Taylor Publishing Company and their representatives, Lee Zimmerman and Ed Mc- Means, for their help and assistance when it was needed most. Cooney Studios who helped us out of a bind near the end of the year when we needed pictures in a hurry. Office of Special Services secretaries who ungrudgingly helped with the typing and handling office affairs while the advisor was working on the MOUND. The following students who devoted countless hours to the goal of completing this book: Carol Plotts, editor, Bob Cleveland, advertising manager, and Ruth Hitchens, organizational editor and proofreader. , 9 I I U . A 4 e . pn' r .I ' C 1 4 I. .QA 4 9 A ' 1 " 1 l W' in 1, . I' F' df I K I 1 3 X . 1 1, 45 fe Y. 1 xr Z Jff " " v 1' ',' 419' -1 1 W x 1 ,A ','. ,9, 'nw' - 1' gi - , A .1 h in '. ff, ' ' - T ' Q. v .4 ,V '- 'aa ,,.-'QYJ ' ' " . I P - Q C9 ' 1.-11 . . t . ,. I' - , A UW. I v'h 1 , if V 'v. ,f . a Y , .fr J, tl f f I 4 ,s -aww? W x -uns, . ' .. , I',,pf an 'VR 5 +A' -Y: 'Y P' f fr ... . .n--- . , ....... Y, .. w -.. wr I-I , ,,,,,.,,-...,f f V ,N,2I,,, QI I. A ,, . 'G-'x 1+ f . f 7,44 r 7 ff ...W " ' V' 'F-. "I " A-Fn"!h'-J 'f Ai '-F ' 'H f ' ' 1 .,.., pf .-ff-,ff -0- "'..4-vw' ' I fb -A l 1' 1. N 4 -1 ,RQIIIIIII -4'I:I"2.'Q'---Q I -It .3 L-,II -5 f, ,II-. Q Li, L I I I . . I., I I I I. FI I I , f I' fm 1 Q-ah , ,V -- II I , IJ' I III N. It Q I II.II "tv II ' -of-Q. 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Suggestions in the Adrian College - Mound Yearbook (Adrian, MI) collection:

Adrian College - Mound Yearbook (Adrian, MI) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

1952

Adrian College - Mound Yearbook (Adrian, MI) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

Adrian College - Mound Yearbook (Adrian, MI) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

Adrian College - Mound Yearbook (Adrian, MI) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Page 1

1966

Adrian College - Mound Yearbook (Adrian, MI) online yearbook collection, 1986 Edition, Page 1

1986

Adrian College - Mound Yearbook (Adrian, MI) online yearbook collection, 1987 Edition, Page 1

1987

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