Abraham Lincoln High School - Railsplitter Yearbook (Des Moines, IA)

 - Class of 1943

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Abraham Lincoln High School - Railsplitter Yearbook (Des Moines, IA) online yearbook collection, 1943 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 40 of the 1943 volume:

RfllLSPLITTER Dearest of Schools War lias brought changes to Lincoln whidi luive upset the regular routine of school, creating new classes, and effecting a change in llie lives of all students. But one thing remains the same — the school song. Its every students song; no matter what his color, race or creed, he s still ever true to the maroon and gold. To l.incolnites in the arme l forces, to all alumni members, to this years students and all those in years to ( oine — Lincoln s name v ill ever stand for the best in the land. Because the school song will always remain a beloved and never-changing heritage in spile of years and wars and woes, members of the January 43 staff of the yearbook have chosen to make this issue of the Senior Railsijiittcr. the Hit Parade. HIT FAIIAIIE EDITION OF THE KEXIOII IIAII.«(I MTTEK |tukliNli «l liv III ' fliiNN «»f •laiiiiarv. lUlU EflitotI hv •l« iirMtiliNiii 2 nIikIoiiIm III Aliralisiiii IJiKMiln lli|l£li S li«t« l in llt ' s . l« iii ' ! . Itiwn 4 ' v r llt ' Ni ii l»v llcrnaril WilNoii Lorraine ller; !ii(roni. Co-odilnr Frank PaliiKT. 4°«»-( iil« r IJiK ' olii m0u Rsih. Rah! ' Off f Iff Parade Wc re loyul to yon. Lincoln High, We re maroon anc goW, Lincoln High; We ll hack voit to stand Gainst the best in the land, For we hnoiv you have sand Lincoln High, Kah! Rah! So smash that blockade, Lincoln Hiqh, Go crashing ahead, Lincoln Hiqh; Our team is our fame protector. On boys! for a e expect a touchdown From you Lincoln High. Well ever be true. Lincoln High; All Imnors to you, Lincoln High; Your name tvill ever stand For the best in the land And ive think you are grand, Lincoln High, Rah! R.ah! Press onward to fame, Lincoln High: Your praises we ll sing, Lincoln High; We pledge every son and daughter Our best to Alma Mater Dearest of schools! Lincoln High. ' We re hoy at to VV ff. tJnt oln Uiffh Once, nearly 200 sirona — now . just a l)and of ()3. Once, ever so inanv girls and ever so many lioys. Now. 50 girls and 13 boys comprise the list of January IQ43 graduates. In a period of six years since the present graduating class entered Lincoln, many students liave qui t. Others left to join the ever- swelling band of young workers. Some few have transferred to olher edifices of education. But one thing above all else has had the greatest effect on the reduced percentage of boys in the class . . . WAR. Manv fell ows w ent into the arin and naw . soiiu ' joined the ( oast guards, and even more became marines. War. jobs, and adventure ha c lured many a a ' from school, bul 03 have remained — remained for the banquet, the informal, class day, graduation, and of course the diploma. From their greatly depleted ranks, graduates-elect chose four students to take o cr the leadcrsliip of the laiiuary 13 ( lass. I alph Porter was elected president. He is a tall, shy lad. w ho wouldn t be suspet ted of having lofty ideals, bul he does. . sk his Iriends. Vice-president Harold (lollidav enjoys (and probably always will) himself greatly everywhere. Buck, a great hunter, hopes to put his marksmanship lo prat tice soon. The dream of every girl in every senior class was realized by Ella Louise Oalenbeck when she was elected class secretary. She is quiet; she is reserved, and her classmates like her better for it. Robert Mitchem. ( lass treasurer, is always in a good humor. " Mite h s ' ever present ( ompanion is his smile. He is the type of person who always does the easy thing the hard way. bul usually succeeds. These four leaders of the class of lanuarv ' -43 are l pi(al of their generation whose duly il will be to win the peace when war is over. Opal Abild— co-op student at West . . . little and cute . . . secretary of Victory Corps at West . . . likes music . . . wants to be a stenographer or go to college . . . got an " E " rating in a music contest . . called " Plop " . . . member of the library staff while at Linc oln . . . came from Park Avenue . . . seen with Jeanne and Katty. Eatbryn Andergen — a tall blonde . always has a ready grin . . . Kay likes dancing, sewing, baseball, tennis, and ice skating . . . doesn ' t reveal embarrassing moment . . . her greatest thrill was traveling to Colorado alone . . . desires to be a music teacher . . . sings and plays the piano . , . came from Park Avenue . . . generally seen with Opal and Auggie. class . . . proud that she doesn ' t wear make- up .. . has earned eight monograms . . . ping pong champ . . . biggest thrill of all things was when Miss McFarland told her " she wasn ' t very bright " . . . Bergie ' s mother agrees to same . . . longs to be a history teacher with an eye to her ideals Miss Selby and Miss Dewey . . . collects war cartoons and poems . . . co-editor of year book . . . author of " Es Verdad " . . . ••Brainchild " . . . ' •Bergie " . . . ••Moron. " Virginia leanne Brandt— a tiny, blue-eyed girl . . . sang in •Robin Hood " . . . can really beat the ivories . . . West high stude . . . Jeff of the combination Mutt and leff . . . takes snapshots of people in odd poses . . . wants to be a lap sitter (a good steno) most embarrassed in Idaho ... a six-foot cowboy with high heels asked minute Jeanne to dance . . . " Jeannie " . . . " Shorty. " Mary Cer li— studies very hard ... is am- bitious to graduate . . . says her most em- barrassing moment is too too embarrassing but did happen . . . claims biggest thrill is yet to come . . . chums with Norma Plem- one . . . very neat . . . dresses well . . . seen smiling all the time . . . never a dull moment with Mary or her scads of friends. Frances Comito— hails from Park Avenue . . works part time . . . won ' t tell embarras- sing moment . . . collects pictures and plays tennis . . . longs lor travel . . . ranks high in scholastic rating . . . played in ' •Peggy and the Pirates " . . . sang in the junior chorus . . . character and student council member . . . friendly . . . well liked. Jacqueline Helen Andersen — responds to ••Jackie " . . . rather good student . . . well dressed council student . . . wants to work at Bankers Life . . . embarrassing moment just too awful . . . ask Lois . . . Railsplitter news editor . . . circulation manager of the year book . . . befriends everyone . . . loves biking, and ice skating ... in grade school ••Blondie, " Irene and ' •Bergie " got caught telling stories and . . . and . . . was teacher ' s pet at Howe. Augustina Barber — a very good seamstress . . proudly makes many of her clothes . . . never has much to say . . . but still water runs deep . . . pals with " Katie " Anderson wants to travel . . . efficient manager of home ec staff . . . biggest thrill yet to come . . . comes from Park Avenue . . . one of 205 " s most loyal patriots ... a working girl. Dorothy Berry — loyal auburn-haired miss of the library staff . . . loved French classes . . . collects toy animals . . . also has many pen pals . , . this Irish stude (and a good one too) would like to see the world . . . then bookkeeping or . . , ? . . won t di- vulge embarrassing moment . . . has grade school skeletons but she won t unlock the closet . . . " " Duster " . . . " •Dotty. " Thelma Casner — loves baseball . . . that ' s where she got her nickname ' Casey " . . short . . . very athletic ... is a home ec enthusiast . . . hard worker of family . . . in Leaders Club . . . G.A A. monograms 300, 500. 1000, 1500 . . . attends West high . . . but will graduate with class . . . quiet and reserved . . . but " Casey " ' is human . . . ask the Leaders club . . . about those missing ice cream bars ... a steady and sure friend. Angelina Colosimo — small but dynamic . . , her expressive eyes speak volumes ... if collecting photographs . . . sewing ... or selling she is completely happy . . . " to be a business girl or a telephone operator " " is and always has been Angeline " s hope . . . once, while on an icy hill, " ' Angle " " waved at some one and slid clear down the hill . . . and was she embarrassed!! . . . ••Philley " will have her greatest thrill when she graduates. Bruce Creveling— hobbies are airplanes . . . wants to join the merchant marine . . . got caught putting a time bomb on his instruct- or ' s car . . . biggest thrill was the day he went to work for consolidated aircraft . . . spends much of leisure time overhauling cars . . . roller skates . . . was on second football team . . . enrolled in course at West. Christina Crivaro — bundle of energy . . . us- ually seen with a smile on her face , . . attends West mornings, works afternoons in a department store . . . hobbies are sleeping, movies . . . ambitious to be a success in anything attempted . . . biggest thrill is graduation . . . nicknamed " Chris " , " Bunny Cheeks " . . . has any number of real good friends. Betty Darling — reddish blonde . . . short . . . wants to be a private secretary . . . likes baseball and roller skating ... on the in- formal committee . . . girls " athletic mana- ger in ninth grade . . . girls ' glee club . . . wears a pair of wings . . . rather shy . . . but knows what is right and acts according- ly. Jeanette DeYoung — True to army . he ' s in California . . . boat ride on Pacific thrilled her most ... is constantly being pursued by Donal . . . spilt hot fudge on nice white blouse . . . finally noticed it . . . giggles excessively with Irene Darnes . . . " Net " is so neat and such a meticulous dresser . . . helps Dad as a clerk in store . ■ . thought it terrible when Dad bought a goat . . . nicknames are " Blondie " and " Fattie. " Ruie Farson — life is ' already planned by Bob . . . has his diamond . . . pals with Bob ' s sister, Vivian . . . giossie editor of year- book . . . head of senior informal . . . Mother used to find her behind the library licking candy wrappers . . " Nellie " joys in biking, ice skating, and Bob . . . enthu- siastic gym student . . . summer usually finds her in shorts or swimming suit. Kenneth Foust — " Kenny " - . . nice looking . , swell personality . . . led cheers for many seasons . . . won two monograms . . . industrious . . . exchange editor of the regular Rail . . . hobbies are hunting and fishing and Dora Ann . . . plans to get all he can out of life, and Kenny will . . . says there are no embarrassing moments . . . we know better . . . everyone knows his big thrill . . . special pal of Dee Layton . . . affectionately called " Orville. " Evelyn Gale — " Eve " was a homecoming queen attendant . . . pals with Maxine and Marie ... is usually on the run so can ' t find time to be bored . . . Mr. Mefferet once caught her hooking up her hose . . . fashions own clothing . . . wants to own a beautiful dia- mond and she does mean beautiful ... in grade school Eve brought teacher hot rolls. Dora Ann Crookshank — one of the old Park Avenue crowd . remembers being in " Mitch ' s " harem , , member of Triple C ' s and leader of lots of pranks . . . big ambi- tion is to open a dance studio with Marie . . . seen with DeDe since three cornered stage , . . doesn ' t embarrass, so has no bad moments . . . thrilled when she received her diamond . . . one of " Sue ' s " great mo- ments will occur in February. Irene Darnel — a short, sandy haired maiden sparkling and mischievous eyes . . . enjoys life . . . feature editor on Rail . . . literary editor on year book . . . likes ice skating, dancing . . . has a desire to marry a certain Coast Guardsman . . . most em- barrassed when she fell off chair at State Finance . . . can be seen any day either reading or writing a letter . . . pals with Jeanette. Theodore Dhainin — Good-looking blond . . . curly hair . . . worked on stage for years and years . . , chummed with " Snook " . . . left Lincoln for West High comes back to graduate , . . Leona is biggest thrill . . . has been for ages ... is a happy individual . . . swell-friend . . . always seen around stage when in school . . . answers to the call of " Ted. " Catherine Foronalo . . . short . . . cute . . . South American eyes ... is always seen with Mary or Norma ... if you don ' t know where " Katy " is ... go to the nearest dance hall . . . loves dancing . . . cute males . . . and school ...?...?... her ambition is . . . none . . . ??? . . . often called " Nonny " . . . fought with Norma for years . . . now best friend . . . proud of three handsome brothers who are serving their country. Robert Fryman — almost a red-head ■ . . lots o! freckles . . . resembles " Peck ' s Bad Boy " . . . collects post-marks and friends . . . would like to be a marine pilot, also would like a wife . . . family too . . . here ' s your matrimonial chance, girls . . . remembers date3 with Norma as biggest thrill . . . es- pecially one in particular . . . cans a swell Kord around . . . when ho has the gas . . . " Red " . . . " Pinky. " Ella Louise Galenbeck — tiny . . . quiet . . . shy - . , oh so nice . . . secretary of class . . . lots of friends . . . and makes an ideal friend herself . . . lovely hair and beautiful eyes . . . dresses nice . . . photography is her only hobby ... is kidded a lot about " Buck " . . remembers Park Avenue when she was bank messenger . . generally seen with special pal Frances or Dorothy . . . " Myrna. " Harold Golliday— tall . . . dark . . hand- some . . . built like Hercules . . . ambition is 1o take life easy . . . does . . . really cans a car around . . - generally with P. J. and Mitch . . . plus lots of gals . . . has only one embarrassing moment . . . being beat- up by a certain girl , . . (Marie) kinda likes Wanda . . . kinda likes girls . . . likes to hunt, fish . . . plays with electric train . . . better known as " Buck.. " Josephine Marilyn Gray — petite librarian . . . long hair . . . expressive voice . - . second youngest in class . . . likes reading and creative writing . . . her mental maturity belies her youthful appearance ... to go to college is lo ' s desire . . . then . . . become a great author . . . was most embarrassed when slip slipped on a downtown street . . . greatest thrill was graduating a year ahead of her class . . . " Joie " . . . " Shorty. " Beatrice GrMn«— saucy little green-eyed minx , . meticulous seamstress . . . makes many oi her own clothes ... on class day com- mittee . . . " Bse " eagerly pursues ice skat- ing, swimming . . . and . . . youthful males ... to be a mortician is her burning de- sire ■ . ■ was a duration girl friend until a new convertible Chevie drove in . . . still has scar where she stopped a brick . . . tossed by " Bergie. " Betty Hinaa — seems kind of quiet . . . but oh) when you know her . . . awful nice . . . swell personality . . . makes ideal friend . . . has lots . . . wears a pair of wings . . . lucky girl . . . has man in air corps . . . seen with Marilyn for years and years . . . works in office . . . Mr. Betz ' s little helper . . . blushes kinda easy so embarrassing moments are many . . . " Pickle. " Phyllis Knotti Phil ' s ambit! training ' s jai sing moi " ' sides - ing " Pe hail man in white is tfiVg d duate from nurse ' s " of it ; VJ- her most embarras- to orf ' —censored-- . . . be- to satfors, " Phil " likes bowl- e skfltina . . chums with Mildred rticiDatff(| in junior operetta and and tlfe Pirate " . . . boy friend the e ItP - Frances Leo — better known among her friends as " Frankie " or " Fran " . . . ambitious to receive good position in retail store . . . will say " yeS " to any invitation to dance, travel, or skate . . . very embarrassed when she gave a street car conductor a penny . . . liked milk in grade school . . . biggest thrill was traveling to Chicago where she met a certain " guy. " Tony Marturello — hails from St. Anthony ' s . . . hobbies are drawing comic pictures and woodworking . . . says he can ' t be embar- rassed (is he kiddin?) ... his big ambition is to be a success in the marines . . . big- gest thrill hasn ' t come yet ... he was the little man who was always there at make-up night in grade school . . . really a swell guy . . . nicknames are " Pig-Fuzz, " " Mad Russian. " Marie Harmon — big, snapping brown eyes . . . rather saucy . . . chums with Dora Ann . . has a beautiful voice . . . sang in the hilari- ties, talent shows, senior choir . . . council member for two years . . . thrilled when requested to sing with the all-city choir . . . biggest ambition is to sit around and let someone else support her . . . (Gene?) . . . wants to get to Missouri . . . two guesses why . . . hobby is dancing with Dora Ann . . . attractive. James Johansen — blond . . . ruddy cheeked . . . has an eye to the future . . . hobby is guns . . . guns . . . and more guns . . . wants to be a bombardier . . . likes his- tory discussions ... no embarrassing mo- ments on record . . . but blushes very easi- ly .. . his biggest thrill will be when he meets the Jerries and the sons of Nippon with a F air of twin .50 calibers under his arm . . . engaging grin . . . nice fellow to know. Phyllis Knouf — beautiful hair . . . Leonard siys lis red . . . nice clothes . . ■ makes remarks at the the oddest times . . . blushes easily . . . usually could be seen with Tommy . . . the army got Tommy, — darn — . . . so . . . " Phil " keeps feminine com- pany . . . first name Myrna , . . wonder why she ' s known as Phyllis . . . , ' ne of Park Avenue mob . . . pals with ary Ellen . . . arnbrfrop- " . . . to bgjible lo hunt and ly as t3 i s Tomfhy. Irene Marjorie Md nuson — a tall nurse-elect ... a happy individual . , . beautiful teeth . . . rather shy . . . organizations editor for year book . . . piano playing and biking are pet diversions . . . eager to become an R.N. . . . wants to see the world . . . Irene blushed reddest when her beads got away and fled to all corners of the history class . , , biggest thrill was seeing the west behind and Iowa ahead. George Mason — tall, dark, and handsome . . . describes George . . . been out for track and football . . . did well in both . . . one of the best-liked boys in the class . . . ideal friend . . . leading hobby is photography . . . ambition is to be a missionary in French West Africa . . . will succeed in whatever he attempts . . . remembers vividly when Ruie Farson ' s mother used to find her by the library licking candy pa- pers . . . " Georgie. " Lawrence McConnell — has track monogram — . . . likes traveling and reading adventure stones . . . likes Ralph ' s sister . . . wants to My a lighter or bomber plane . . . " Lorry " thinks Ralph is lops . . . started year out with broken ankle ... is quiet and sits back in class taking it all in . . . pinch hits for Ralph when he is too busy to take Evelvn out. Harold McMurray — pals with Joe Epps ... is engaged . . . very witty . . . arrives late in history because he stops to eat his lunch . . . works at a parking lot . . . cans a Chevie around when he has gas . . . goes to school hall day . . . Helen used to catch him with other girls and oh boyll . . . has pretty blond wavy hair. Bob Mitchem — ' ' Bobby " ... " Mitchie Lou ... IS smart but can ' t seem to find time to use this knowledge . . . pesters Frankie and Frank ' s Ford . . . doesn ' t like work . . . doesn ' t work . . . and doesn ' t intend to work . . . screwball member . . . wants to become a Rear Admiral in six easy lessons . . . claims to have studied in grade school • ■ ■ 9ypp®cl school to go hunting . . , then got only three pheasants. Frank Palmer — " Leonard " to close friends . . . likes football . . . basketball . . . has fool- ball monogram . . . co-sports editor of regu- lar Rail . . . co-editor of yearbook . . . was Crank of " Spin and Crank " column . . . screwball member . . . cans a Ford around with Mitchem and Golliday in rumble seat . . . wants to be as far from Jackie as possible . . . doesn ' t mean it though . . . persistent teaser. Norma Plemone — Lincoln ' s new school secre- tary . . . so . . . know all . . . and so . . . could tell . . . ??? . . . loves to dance and read . . . appeared on two radio pro- grams ... a news quiz . . . and a panel discussion on Latin America . . . stayed after school at Maple Grove for popping gum in Catherine Foronato ' s ear . . . (can she pop gum . . . wow) ... an A-1 student as well as the youngest in the class . . . everyone likes Norma. Maxine Prothero — short . . . attractive . . . has great variety of clothes . . . never seen without a smile . . . she just won ' t keep her dimples still . . . works at ordnance plant . . . makes so much of the well-known fold- ing stuff . . . she has to pay an income tax ... if she doesn ' t . . . well . . . quit schcol for two years . . . but " Max " is a great student. Vein Edward McCormick — blue eyes . . . short . . . has pineapple clip . . . twinkling eyes ... is a star scout . . . has a radio phobia . . . hobby? . . . radio . . . his ambition? . . . to be a radio technician , . . was so em- barrassed at having picture taken . . . his mother couldn ' t keep him still . . . Vern is the monkey type . . . loves to climb . . . " Corky " doesn ' t have one girl ... he woos them all. Margaret McNeeley — kinda quiet but loads of fun . . . lovely dark hair which is always well groomed . . . sparkling teeth are evi- dent when she flashes her smile . . . read- ing, writing letters, and dancing take up lots of time . . . ambition is to be a singer or to go west . . . remembers when trying to impress boy-friend her sister showed baby pictures . . . first dance and being in oper- etta are most thrilling moments for " Mag- gie. " Elizabeth Noack — an ardent band member, " Lizzie " can generally be seen around the music room . . . remembers junior operetta . . . hobbies are driving cars (anybody ' s), and drawing plans for houses . . . " Liz ' s " ambition is to be a second Mary Lewis . , . has played lots of instruments including the bass drum . . . loves playing in clinic bands and orchestras special friend of Jean. Imogene Perdue — sable tressed damsel very attractive . . . beautiful voice . . . me- ticulously groomed . . . mixed chorus, sex- tet .. . likes singing and dancing . . . plays cute tricks on friends . . . most embarrassed when she fainted in Wolfe ' s store . . . was out cold for two hours . . . highest aspira- tion is to be vocalist with an orchestra . . . " Imy " proudly displays Harold ' s diamond . . . was thrilled speechless when chosen lead for " Peggy and the Pirates. " Ralph Porter — president of class . . , co-sports editor of regular Rail and of yearbook . . . was Spin of " Spin and Crank " column . . . usually seen at Evelyn, Jeanette, or Irene ' s right hand . . . track enthusiast . . . captain of track team . . . out for football . . . screwball member . , . believes army has his future planned . . . winning state medley relay was biggest thrill . . . loves to be with Jim Johansen. Alice Reeves — pert little skirt nicknamed " Al " . . . went horseback riding and was most embarrassed upon descending . . , hobbies are photo collecting, dancing . . . says her biggest thrill was her first formal . . ■ council member for 232 in tenth and eleventh grade . . . was outstanding in school play " Almost Eighteen " . . . was one of ten best dressed girls in Lincoln ' s survey. Dclorei Rich — cute as can be . . . swell per- sonality . . . swell clothes ... not terribly ambitious . . . plans to scrub floors for her occupation . . . was head usherette at local theater . . . belongs to " Triple C ' s " . . . problem child . . . grade school pictures are skeletons in closet . . . has " Gobs of Love for the Navy " — namely Rich . . . loves to loaf . . . does . . . known to all as DeDe or Rosie . . . chums with Dora Ann, Evelyn, Marie. Irene Sheraden — medium height . . . green eyes . . . cute - . . dresses in simple but eye catching way . . . council member . . . splendid make-up editor on the Rail . . . loves Danny, ice skating and sports . . . ambition is to marry Danny . . . wants to make him the best wife possible . . . lovely attendant to homecoming queen ... in grade school crawled by tea cher ' s door . . . cause she wanted to play in the forbidden gym. Lueiezia Serra — oh so tiny . . oh so cute left Lincoln to go to West . . . comes to Lincoln to graduate . . . movies and danc- ing are her hobbies . . . hopes to hold im- portant position in commercial world . . . biggest thrill is Leland . . . remembers be- ing teacher ' s pet in grade school . has already entered the business world wears high heels effectively . . . " Lu " Jean Shreiller — enthusiastic b4nd member " Shrefl " can generally be seen carrying her oboe to some unknown destination . . . beautiful hair and styles it accordingly . . . generally seen with " Gin " and " Phil " . . . ambition is to attend Iowa State College . . . embarrassing moments have been had but are not revealed . . . been council member for many semesters . . laborious secretary of band . . . that ' s " Shrefl. " Sara Sirianni — nice to look at . . . swell to know . . . one of the onery crowd . . . good-looking clothes . . . sews her own . . . hobbies are dancing and taking pictures of friends . . . biggest thrill and ambition is loe . . . her latest flame . . . sold candy after school for ages . . . been in several " April showers " , , . " Sara Lou. " Robert Snook — indispensable person . . . left Lincoln but came back to graduate . . . has bossed the stage for many years . . . play- ing guitar is his biggest hobby . . . Bob ' s biggest thrill either hasn ' t happened or isn ' t revealed . . . " Snook " says there ' s no em- barrassing moment . . . but we wonder . . . ambition is to be a good glass bender like his brother . . . council member but doesn ' t believe in attending the meetings. Chis Stanley— tall . . . chubby . . had big- gest thrill first time he drove a car . . . ambition ... to be a good pilot in the air corps . . . sang in " Robin Hood " . . . cir- culation manager on regular Rail . . . " Stan " loves to drive a car . . . always seen at sister ' s side ... is proud to be a member of De Molay . . . sons of America . . . legion . . . and screwball club . . . usually seen eating candy bar. Marilyn Mae St. John— short and immaculately groomed . . . looks younger than her 17 years . . . called " Johnny " , . . wants to be a private secretary and sit on the boss ' s knee . . . has had too many embarrassing moments . . . came from Fort Des Moines . . . heart belongs to " Soupe " ... on the parent party committee . . . home room secretary for two years . . . swell girl Mary Smith— G A A and leaders club . . . won 300, 500, and 1,000 point monograms . . hobby is sports of all kinds . . ambi- tion is to be a nurse . . . biggest thrill will be when she receives a nurse ' s diploma . . . went to West high, returned to Lincoln to graduate . . . another girl who works at Kresge ' s . . . hair blonde . . . nicknamed " Blondie. " Jennie Sovich — the only one in the class who can tell the high lights of her life in seven words . . . dancing is her hobby . . . Jen wants to be a success at whatever she un- dertakes . . . but won ' t tell embarrassing moments . . . Jennie ' s biggest thrill was her first date . . . has large brown eyes . . . raven black hair . . . very tall . . . chums with Verna Ulrich. Mary Jean Stanley — answers to nickname Stanley " . . . hobbies are swimming and Jack . . . dancing and cooking . . . ambitious to be a certain red-headed louey ' s wife . remembers well the time she and bosom pals stayed after school lor writing love notes in grade school . . . biggest thrill ■ Jack " . . . member of home ec staff . . . belongs to " Rainbow Girls " ... in first band ever so long. Mary Ellen Thomas — holds a mutual friendship with everyone ... is tall, attractive . . . has a charming voice and personality plus . , - was homecoming queen . . . the second girl to be student council president . . . sang in three operettas ... is prexy of senior chorus and Double D ' s . . . Tommy, who collects autographs on her bedroom wall, wants to work ... go to college . . . after that . well-1-1-1 maybe Max knows . . . " Sadie " got her biggest thrill when chosen queen CharUs Tripe — lo be a flight engineer or bombadier is Chuckie Lou ' s ambition . . . quiet . . . nice . - . lots of freckles . . ■ and lots of fun . . . spends leisure time working at tent awning company . . . likes trapping . . . trapping what? Chuck . . . can usually be found in Bob Mitchem ' s company . . . the quiet one on all pranks . . . sleeps all the way home from work on street car. BUI Walker ... a tall blond fellow ... his manners contradict the saying that the age of chivalry is dead . . . loves ping pong . . . one of few students to complete book- keeping course . . . pals with " Mitch " and Ralph . . . works at National shirt shop . . . likes his neighbors ... no wonder . . . (it ' s a family of girls) . . . commonly re- ferred to as " Bing. " Donal Whicker — every phase of Don ' s life in- cludes airplanes . . . was expelled from grade school for water fighting . . . went to West . . . hobbies centered around air- plane models . . . participated in " Peggy and the Pirate " . . . was master of cere- monies of 9A party . . . president of air- plane club in junior high . . . " Whick " excels in history . . , pestering leanette . . . seen at numerous times with Charlene Perdue. Wanda Van Note — Easy to look at with plenty of personality . . . super piano player . . . composes her own " boogie woogie " . . , it ' s really hep . . . belonged to leaders club and earned monograms . . . loves to bowl and skate . . . ambition is to be a good housewife . . . whom for? Wanda? . . . mak- ing up with a certain man was biggest thrill ... no embarrassing moments for this jazz- loving gal. Evelyn Walker — tall, good-looking, that ' s " Stinky " . . , has lots of ambition . . . great future, she hopes . . . one of the smart ones in the class . . . tickles the ivor- ies in a satisfactory way, pleases the " Triple C ' s " anyway . . . has already entered the business world . . . was usherette in local theater where DeDe gave orders . . . em- barrassing moments are not for publication and greatest thrill is in the Marines. Lois Wright— biggest thrill is Ray . . . sports his diamond . . . ambition is to have Ray return from navy . . . pals with Jean . . . wonderful roller skater . . . also collects cigars . . . blushes to the ears . . . very proud of Beverly , . . found herself on floor in front of boy friend due to Dee Layton . . . drives a red Mercury. Frances Villalabos — tall, dark . . . doesn ' t say much . . . quiet . . . retiring . . . nice voice and eyes . . . likes dancing . . . also enjoys pen pals ... a patriotic miss . . . wants to hit enemy by working in a war plant . . . born deep in the heart of Texas . . . but likes it where the tall corn, grows . . . " Frankie " . . . " Fran. " (Not pictured) OI«l 21 ml o v During the past year l.iiuoln hid goodhye to four teachers wlio left lo join llic armed forces. The first to " o was l,t. Frederick Engel who for many years directed Lincoln ' s hand, one of the hest in the city. His successor, Mr. Jack Dalhv. was at Lincoln only a short time until he. too, donned the uniform of the army air (orps. i)d next went Mr. Phil Siinker. commercial teacher and assistant coach. Lincoln remembers with gratihidc how Mr. Siinker worked with the football Icaiii durin ; its greatest season. He is now in Red Cross foreign ser i(e. serving in the capacity of recreatioti director. I eboiiair Mr. Cieorge Chatman, Spanish and l rent h instructor, who was the last one to leave, reports that he is enjoying life as a private in the army. . llhough loall) lo hid llie old friends goodhy. Lincoln students are enthusiastic about their suc- cessors: Mr. William .Jacobs, music instructor; Mrs. rhelma Payne, commercial; and Miss Helen Osher. language. Your Namp Will Ever Stfindr Faculty — Front Row, leit to right: Sutter, Heaps, Hufchens, Betz, RuH, Plemone, Hall, Mapel, Dunkelberg. Second Row; McEniry, Hurd, Linquist, Amlie, Ebers, Smith, Hamilton, Roberts, Meffert. Third Row: Barton, Tomhnson, Talarico, Scholfield, Selby, Holmes, Scanian, Morgan, Coventry, Lewis. Fourth Row: McFarland, Mitchell, Farley, Sanders, Baskerville, Gerharl, Grabau, Snyder, Dewey. Filth Row: Morganthaler, Nieweg, Cripe, G. Harris, Fox, C. Harris, Cox, lohnson, Robbins ' Our Best io Aliiisi lai4 r Monitors — (Top picture) First Row, lelt Io right: Waddel, Osher, Tate, Newberg, Botkin, Van Note, Brosco, Higgle, Costanzo, Alatorre, Collins, Balduki. Second Row: Balentine, Spoonholtz, Shoning, Newton, Forsythe, Bridle, Kay, Slavens, Tarr- Greentield, Barquist. Third Row: McClelland, Knight, Madison, Martin, Riggels, Lester, Right, Clift, Brickman, Ander- son, Burgett, Shaw. Fourth Row. Kierulfl, Hanifan, Hemming, Gilman, Welch, Mills, Sopher, Stout, Shekler, Cros: Kissel, Mr. Betz. Projectors ' League — (Bottom picture) First Row, left to right: den Boer, Macy, I. Hamlin, Seal; Second Row: BfHwan, Cannon, Elder, Textor. Parker, Folkoski, R. Hamlin. Third Row: Mr. Tomlinson, Evans. Towne, Herker, Caskey, Hemphill, Hainas. Nurses ' StaH— (Top picture) Lelt to right, sitting: Mitchell, Klingensmith. Davis, Wenger, Rump. Standing Hilton, Pearson, Morris, Qimmel, Knoul, Cherry, Miss Dunkelberg, Graham, Likes. Advisers ' Staif — (Second picture) Ficnt Row, sitting: Freeman, York, Sonneborn, Carman, Mrs. Second How: Hines, Parrick, Lolfredo, Heathcot, Mr. Betz, Mr. Meilert, Dever, Clemer, Hummer. Library Stall— (Center picture) Back Row, lelt to right: lean Gray, Gray, Rogers, Noach, Breb- ner, Wetherton, Freeman. Front Row, left to right: Berry, Harmon, Falkenhainer, Marraw, Miss Linguist. Office SlaH — (Bottom) First Row, left to right: Bradish, Galenbeck, Anderson, Bloomquist. Second Row: M:s. Arnold, Plemone, Dames, (ones, Hollabaugh, Hull. Evorv Son anil llaii liter America was attacked December 7, 1941. Immediately T incoln acted. In a short time $523.21 was donated to Lincoln ' s victory fund. Also, thirty chairs were given to the downtown branch of the USO and books by the hundreds were presented to service men. 1LaXIMUM effort for victory became Lincoln ' s goal as defense areas were organ- ized and quickly grew into active working units. For weeks the areas supplied cookies to the Fort and later $200 was given to the American Red Gross. Every Lincolnite to enter the armed forces has had his name put on huge service rolls. The rolls, comprised of over 600 names and now- hanging in the front corridor, were started and kept up by Mr. Wm. S. Morgen- thaler and his students. Reverently as the casualty lists were published, gold stars w ' ere placed by the names of former Lincolnites who have died in their country ' s service. The boys who died in the name of freedom are Donal Donald- son, Austin Lettow and Eugene Murray. J-N little over a year of war some service men have been taken prisoner or have been recorded as missing. Consequently, silver stars have been placed by the names of Rob- ert Blacksmith, P ' loyd Damerville, William McP ' all, Roy Knight, Joseph Lavia, and Wil- liam Wright. HANGED draft classifications caused three students of the January graduating class to enter the armed forces before graduation. With only three weeks of school left Robert Fryman, George Mason, and Robert Snook left for the merchant marine, the navy and the army respectively. Mason and Snook were to have been speakers at the senior ban- quet. A.S more names are added to Lincoln ' s service rolls, more silver stars will be placed on the service slates. Gold stars, too, will grow in number as every one and every or- ganization works for victory. But come what will, Lincoln ' s students and faculty will be in the fight doing all they can. Leaders Club — (Top picutre) First Row, ]i to right: Berard, York, Sonneborn. Second Row: Morris, Rump, Wengc: Slavens, Miss Cripe. Third Row: Bergstrom, Snyder, G. Shafle; Nelson, P. Bergstrom, J. Shaffer. Senior Student Council — (Center picturt First Row, left to right: Rump, Lewi: Wenger, Thomas, Wilson, Cartmill, Rn: clilfe. Second Row: Mohler, Kissel, Thoma Mote, Hallonquist, Rich, Ponzeline, McCo: miclc. Third Row: Anderson, Sheraden, Textoi Maloy, Scogin, Bradley, Hedberg, Cavei der. Fourth Row: Triplett, Martin, Pearsoi (Coontz, Flaherty, Buckley, Heathcote, Han. fen, Mr. Hutchens. Junior Student Council — (Bottom picture First Row, left to right: Montognese, Rus- ton, Olson, Mrs. Robbins, Titus, Bernard, Hurd. Second Row: Bohner, Christenseu, Russo. Priarl, Sater, Bloomquist, Mitchell, Veach Maucuso. Third Row: Huxford, Cavender, Noe, Hul Snyder, Gillaspy, Brown. Easton, Joyne Helton. Fourth Row: Magnuson, Keesee. Hane . Isaacson, Throndson, Phillips, Leonett Tait, Ratcliffe, Pearson. Back Row: Winegardner, Williams, Crol ' Caufieed, Auderson, Mitchell, Chittende: Sherman. Deprived of llieir lorriier direi lor. Mr. f ' recleric L. I ' .nj ' ol. and his su( cessor. Mr. .la. k Dalhy. l)otl. of wliorii onlered llie services, itie iiuisit depart- ment continues to go forward under tlie direction of Mr. William lacohs and Mrs. B. f earl Maj 1 lie hand lias a personnel of 50 meml)ers. a marked arowlh from its ijeuinninC 10 members in 1050. I he organizations four leading officers are; hand manager. Lynn Clemens: properly manager. Boh Cannon: secretary. .lean Shreffler: and libra- rian. Klizaljelli Noack. 1 hose leaving the hand because of graduation are: Mary .lean Stanley, .lean Slireffler. and Elizabeth ! oack. The voc al groups not only sing for school but for outside organizations as well. This year the senior chorus had the privilege of singing before the Kiwanis ladies club at Younkers tea room and the Rotary ( lub s annual Cliristinas iunclieon at Motel Fort Des Moines in llu- Cirand Ballroom. I he vocal groups. dire ted by i Irs. B. Pearl Mapel. include: senior and junior horuses, A Cappella choir, junior girls glee club, senior girls glee club, and junior boys choir. 1 hose who will le ive the vocal groups are: Mary Ellen 1 homas. Wanda Van Note. Fvelyn Ciale. Imogene Perdue, hiizabeth Xoack. and Ruie l " arson. DAnce Orchestra — First Row, left to right; McAfee. Second Row: Stanley, Simpson. Ttiird Row: Devol, Close, Beardmore, Line- weaver. Fourth Row; Den Boer, Caskey. Cannon, Piert, Cunningham. Band — (Top picture) First Row, left to right: Van Horn. Riley, Stanley, Manning, Brubaker. Boyd, Long, Clemens, Williams, Kabrick, Foes, Roth, Little, Graham. Second Row; Mount, Nelson, Simpson, Fillman, Winkleman, Deval, Hall, Elizabeth Noack. Eunice ' ioack, Shreffler. Third How. Cunningham, Snell, Giel, Close, Cannon, Bianco, Robinson, Real. Fourth Row; Mr. Jacobs, Leo, Cooke, Fosdick, O. Fillman, den Boer, Lineweaver, Aldeara. Peardmore, Ogens. lunior Choir — (Center picture) First Row, left to right Mote, Russo, Scribner, Wyckoff, McClel- ind, Carlisle, DeMay. Second Row: Matson, Pearson, Stahl, Waddell, Wallace, Christian, Cook, Mintle, Mrs Mapel Third Row; Thomas, Clark, Reynolds, Barber, Nelson, Crane, Bergstrom, Atkinson. Musselman. Fourth Row; Chittenden, Gillam, Ostrum, Sheldon, Anderson, Conn, Hull, Paskvan, Hayner, Vacco, Burke. Orchestra— (Bottom picture) First Row, left to right: Lapham, Herker, Lewis, Steen, Brubaker. econd How: Devol, Simpson, Bianco, Robbeson, Noack. bird Row: Jacobs, Cannon, Den Boer, M. Fillman, O. Fillman, McAfee. M« niorail»U ' •liibih c After a spectacular footI all season, tlie Railsplitters cele- brated by holding a gala homecoming, November 21. I he setting was completely in unison wi th the occasion as Pella fell uncfer Lincoln s smashing attack that after- noon. The evening s festivities started w ith the movie " Har- mon of Michigan. which was selected by the student bodv. During an intermission of the movie the Queen. Mary Ellen Thomas, also se- lected by the student body, was crowned by Kenny Joss, acting captain for the eve- ning. After the coronation cere- monies the Queen and her attendants, Mary Scogin, Irene Sheraden, Marjorie Sh aw, and Evelyn Gale, pre- sided over a talent show. Master of ceremonies for the evening s show was Philip Slinker, Lincoln ' s popular as- sistant footfjall coach, who left a few days after the homecoming for Red Cross foreign service. Dancing was held in the boys ' gym for those wishing to dance, in lieu of seeing the rest of tfie show. Music was furnished by Norman l rowii s eleven-piece orches- tra. The Queen and Her Court — Left to right: Irene Sheraden, Marjorie Shaw, Queen Mary Ellen Thomas, Mary Scogin, Evelyn Gale. ' ' We Think Yon A He ' s Ours! " For the real aclilcvements and those of his foothall team, Coach Ruflf of Lincoln was rated as prep coach of the year in Iowa. Kuss Ruff exploded surprises all the way and climaxed a colorful foothall season by his team remaininfi undefeated. " From " Rejister-Tribune. " Precious " E ' s " Only two students in Lincoln have earned the Army-Navy " K " for ex- cellence in war production. The red, white, and blue pins are proudly worn by Maxine Prothero and Oonal Whicker. Maxine is employed at the United States Rubber Company and Donal at Hoyt Harness. " AH o You JUigh Who Dood It? Who? Why Dickie Reynolds, of course. He is the first boy in Lin- coln ' s history to be city football scor- ing champ. Dickey spent most of his time totinii the pifiskin. With 49 points in his favor. Dickie came out on top as city scorinji champion. Stylish News Sheet The Railsplitter was placed on the Honor Roll for its distinctive " mod- ern dress-up " by the School .lour- nalist. a mafSazine for national publi- cations, whose policy it is to hi hli ht the best bits of scholastic journalism from hiiih schools and colle( es. The Honor Roll includes each month, eifiht to ten school papers selected for spe- cial mention from all parts of the country. Senior Girls ' Glaa Club— (Top picture) Front Row, ielt to right: Farson, Perdue, Sleen, Mrs. Mapel, Cox, Rogers, Knudsen. Second Row: Bixby, Tinla, Thomas, Breeman, L. Millard, D. Millard, Banccio. Third Row: Robbins, Hildenbrand, Tarr, Henderson, Van Note, Hallonquist, Gale, Moore. Fourth Row: Venn, SIhone, Raterna, Eaton, Alkenson, De Leon, Parrick, Maxwell. A Capella Choir— (Center picture) First Row, left to right: Judd, Farson, Brixby, Steen, Noack, Perdue, Cnritlow, De Leon. Second Row: Mintle, Christian, Wallace, Reynolds, Cox, Breman, Thomas, Garwick, Eaton, Mrs Mapel. Third Row: I. Reyes, Crane, De May, Piorat, Cun- ningham, R. Reyes, Van Note, Parrick, Hallonquist, Gale. Fourth Row: Anderson, Sheldon, Paskvan, Musselman, Nelson, Kieruff, Fulitano, Fillman, Barber, Maxwell. Filth Row: Pearson, Mote, Gilliam, Seals, Stout, Conn, Hainer, Burke, Cariglino. Junior Boys ' Choru — (Bottom picture) First Row, lelt to right: Morris, Crazier, Baker, Mrs. Mapel, Burgess, Ellis. Second Row: Elings, Merkel, White, Kurschinski, Hopkins, Curnow, Keeley, Third Row: Holgate, Belcher, Purcil, Floyd, Burgett, PTiillips, Roth. Fourth Row: D. Harper, T. Harper, Crolt. Camel, Wilcoxen, Robertson. Patriots, All! One day every senior in Lincoln was thrilled to hear that the basic train- inf course in civilian defense would be (Jiven at school for all students who were williniJ to participate. The course, consistinfi of ei|(ht hours, was ({iven on school time. After comple- tion a certificate was awarded. Woe For Cierms No, they haven ' t moved home nurs- ing into the art room. Kut a few art students are making a model isola- tion room for the amateur nurses. The room consists of a bed, dresser, chair, and table. Hvcn a patient rests in one of the chairs, dressed in a suit- able home nursing garb. ' ' CiO €RASIIl i; AIIEAir ' PilintJ vi lory on i( tor . llie team readied unprecedented lieiglils. brinfjiny to Lincoln for tlie first time in its history, a co-city cliampion- sfiip with Roosevelt. Taking the reins for his first se- mester as coach for the . l)es. Rus- sell Ruff, former Atlantic coacli and (irinnell passintJ star, was named outstanding high school coacli of the year. Starting in September with a bunch of hard working boys, he pro- duced a team that will be remem- bered as one of the best in the his- tory o r 1 .in( oin High. RECORD Lincoln 6 — Indianola 6 Lincoln 12 — Valley 0 Lincoln 12 — Chariton 0 Lincoln 6 — Roosevelt 6 Lincoln 7 — North 6 Lincoln 20 — Winterset 0 Lincoln 7 — East 6 Lincoln 28 — Pella 7 Lincoln 14 — Dowling 7 Bill Macy . . . Held down left end position, jjlaying in every quarter throughout the season. Reserves. Ralph I ' orter, Jack Anderson. Bill Haines . . . Rough ta( l le and blocker. Reserve, fllmo Lewis. Clarence Mickish . . . Ouarcl who gets what he goes after. Reserves. F " rank Palmer. Lawrence Flaherty. COACH RIJSSEIX RUFF fjv 1 Maroon and Oold gridders strutk over night, alter 18 years ol Uigging behind. Bill Flaherty . . . Star center. On second all state team. I eserves. Harold .Johnson. Lloyd King. II OKeefe . . . All ( itv guard. All slate liftli team. Rough on delense. Reserve is Harvey Lllder. hu k Hamlin . . . Big tackle. Gets his men. Reserve, Amil Harker. Bill Benskin Reserves, Cross. . . . f ougli on defense. C lordon Kastler. .Hm Ken .loss . . Knows his Masimore. . FlasI iy c|uarterl acK. stuff. Reserve. Dick liin Reilly . . . Halfback, ting blocker. Reserve, men. Hard liit Hoi, hrv I )ic l Reynolds . . , FasI running halfback. Hard to slop. Reserves, Boh Alsup. Pete Yakish. I ol) Haycock . . . Smashing fidl- hack. Star blocker. Reserxe. Bill Sopber. COACH HAROLD C. JOHNSOX SECOND ' S RECORD Lincoln 7 — Roosevelt 25 Lincoln 0 — North 13 Lincoln 0 — East 0 Lincoln 0 — North 7 1. Standing, left to right: Coach Hull. Hamlm, Simon, Hull, Cook. Seated, lett to right, clockwise: Wilson, Jos.s, Lester, Comiskey, Elder, Palmer, Kastler, Co - 2. Palmer. 3. First Row, left to right: Palmer, Haines, Flaherty. Second Row; Macy, Reilley. 4. Macy. 5. First Row. left to right: Riggles, Ostren Lucas, Mickish, Burke, Brown. Second Row: Brightman, Stephenson, Hei:; mirg, Hudson, Evans, Jones, Coach Johnson. Third Row: Rich, Uhlman, Hanifen, Holhngs worth, Ramsey, Mortin, Gridges. Fouith Row: Van Vorhis, Dawson, Kinkaiti Reeves, Conn, Hull, Greco, Moon. 6. First Row, left to right: Davis, Johnso: Anderson, Mickish, Elder, King. Second Row: Reilly, Reynolds, Porter, lo-.- Lewis, Herker, Coach Ruff. Third Row: Haycock, Cross, Masimore, Sopher, Palmer, Macy, Hamlin. Fouith Row: Arnold, Haines, O ' Keefe, Bensk: Flaherty, Bremen. 7. Flaherty. C. O ' Keefe. " Praise the I-ord — and dream up a feature story ' . . . or any otiier story for llial mailer ... is ifie iiiollo of jonrnatism sliidenls. Room I l() is llie liaxeii for all joiunalism 2 stu- dents and a Sliantfrl f.a for (jreenliorn reporters. Behind its formidal le porlais many distinct events occur, hut never l)efore lias a class learned so ((uickiy tlie principles of newspaper produi tion as did the iournalism I students this semester. The CVeenhorns. led liv co-edilors Rose Jean Lewis and Burton Wilson, plus their worthy re- porting; aides. pro ed their ahilily as huddint ' journalists hy ahly puhlishinj; the tireenhorn issue of I he l ailspliller w ithout a deadline! .Ml the opx had tjonc to press 21 liouis hclorc the date set for deadline nifjlit. l " or the adviuiced journalism class, one day anticipated with gleeful relish hy those staff mem- l)ers fortunate enough to make the grade, is group |)iclure lay for the Senior Railspliller when fun( tioning journalists are e.xcused from classes. From 0:50 a.m. til 5:35 p.m.. slalf officials await one thing . . . you re right — the fac ult ' pic- lure! I hat is the peak of a perfec t, although oc- casionally old day. . n interesting little hy-phn ' in Room I 16 which is familiar to all journalists is the mounting of proverhs composed of raridon) words ut from I lie Railspliller. On the mirror hanging ahove the sink are pasted such sage compositions as: Hi. Spinl QiH ' en! . . . " I he unusual— a student " . . . I ypi( al stiuh ' tit ( reates comedy. With the paste scarcely dry is the recently added c|(iip. " Wouldn ' t it he awful if the students killed the faculty? 1 he dec iciing fac lor on every story, large or small, is the dynamic " Miss Mac. " She catches and correc ts the mistakes the geniuses miss. Most ol her lime is de oled to puhlishing Lincoln s literar - efforts and to proving that teachers are human. An ac li ily never engaged in before by journal- isls was the dismantling of cuts so that zinc could be salvaged for I nc le Sam. I his was acc om- plished by hammers, screw drivers, pliers, and a maxiimiiii .imount of noise. 1 he greatest help one derives from journalism besides learning to be exact and brief is the de- velopiiic-nl ol sue h dow ntrodden virtues as helpful- ness, punc tualilv. promptness, and of all things. i)i;i ' i:M). Bii n Y. It s realK the . Vmei ic aii Wiiy w hen a veri- table bee hi e of students, good and bad. can apply themselves and work together in a minia- lure newspaper oflic c to publish successfully the voic e ol Lincoln High. I he Railspliller. Journalism I (Top picture) Front Row left to right: Heii, Marturello, York, Sonneborn. Second Row: Gale, Knause, Tarn, Lewis, Deever, Scoqin, Flaherty, Miss McFarland, Cavender, Christian. Third Row: Hedburg, Griffin, Dixon, Rittel, Creveling, Madison, Quigley, Bradley, O Keele. Falbo, Iournalism 11 (Center picture) Front Row, left to right: Bergtrom, Harmon, Mitchem, Graham, Miss McFarland, Foust, Palmer. Anderson, Farson, Magnuson. Back Row, left to right: Crookshank, Rich, Reeves, Tripe, Sheraden, McConnell, Knotts, Darnes, Hines, Porter. Iournalism I (Bottom picture) Front Row, lelt to right, Sitting: Textor, Johnson, New- ton, Forsythe. Lester, Patthoff, Arlberg, Pearson, VanHorn, Harvey, Oliver, Folsom, Benoit, Clemmer, Joss, Wilson, Boudewyn, Wilson, Miss McFarland. ' ' Proxs Oiiwsii il To I INCOI.N SODA OR 11. 1. SANDWICHES GOOD MAI rS (is Ci )()( (((•( ' (() : i T QUEAL LUMBER CO. Holpinq Bitihl Dos Moinos CUNNINGHAM ALDER A GROCERIES AND MEATS iSOl Southwest Ninth Plioiu- 4-5246 Groceries and Meats ANDERSON TRADING POST 2 " )02 Southwest Ninth Street The Little RED ROOSTER liigijer and Belter HAMBURGERS HANIFEN BODY AND PAINT CO. I ' li.m.- ■1-822) ir . I ' li.iiK- 4 HH- ' ( Specialize in tiepdiiiiiq ' t( ( kc(l ( (irs 904 Ki:0 WAV Football Inventories Reineml) ' r the kick we jjol out ol the Roosevelt i inie. ' ' . . . and how thrilled we were the next week when we downed North? . . . hut O-O-O-O happy day. wcren t we really thrilled speechless the next Uarne when East went down? . . . incidentally, do you think Dowling reinemhers us? ... to the tune of I 1-7. I helieve. For l imes to Come When iiiiilh an l language classes are full — that s news ! I inie w as when few students could he seen struguliiiij with inathematic prohleins and lan- guage translations, hut war hrings many t lianges. Career const ious students tire now including in I heir programs more mathematics and language, preparing themselves for a new. post-war world. . nieri( a s future aviators and honihardiers. are deeply engrossed hy the compli( ations ol math in Miss Mary Coffey ' s classes. Girls, too. have turned lo matliematit s, training themselves to replace men going into war servi es. And language students study diligently. Although Latin has always had its place in llie limelight. Spanish and French are enjoying a new popularity. With modern aviation reducing the worhl to a ompreliensihie glohe. students feel thai a knowledge of language may prove of prac- tical value after the war. A Corps For Victory I he Victory Corps. whi( li was organized so that students coidd help in the war effort, has really FsiiiK ' . Liii4 olii llijulli oiMf into cxisleiu c. C)i Dcc emher 17. a leu clays after the years anniversary of fVarl Harljor. great tiiiml)ers of students. Iiolli junior ancf senior, took the oatli of tlie N ' iclorv C orps. In a special assent- l.ly. Speakers on the program were Mr. Elmer C. Betz. vice-principal, and Mr. .J. H. Stonecipher. direc tor of sec ondary ediu ation. Frank Cox of the navy, son of Mr. Howard Cox of l ituoln. was present to congratulate Lin- coln on its corps, and Coast Carardsnian I liigli ' an Hosen, another guest, expressed gratitude to those civilians who keep production moving so tlie armed forces gel necessary supplies. On Beans Beans are on the rationed list — all kinds of heans! When the sales of pork and beans were out. we laughed . . . when coffee beans were ecjually shared, we started having " spots of tea " . . . hut now. we walk . . . because gas beans are rationed, too! Leather Stockings Next? If Father I iiiie liad e or w rapped his stately rolies about hini. lirniiy c lute heel his sc ythe, and leapt from week to week and not from day to day. times still woulcin I lia e changed as cjuickly as sloe k ing styles did in the past year. In 10 1 1, before the lap and his silk worm caused Remember Pearl H;irbor. the feminine population had real silk socks. Bui w illi war wetil silk hose — the Nvlon cfviie inic) ils own. . nd the Nylon got to the top for its dural)ilily. I ho femmcs were pleased. Bui now. Nylons, alas. alas, are as scarce as lions teeth . . . and a new slocking pedigree, llie Rayon, adorns the feminine leg. But that s not all . . . cotton stockings are no longer either taboo or ( irandma s idea. 1 ho ( ollon and ravon stockings are in the lime- light. Occasionally a precious pair of Nylons shows up. ( I here was oven the painted leg. be- fore January s winds blew cold.) But if you ever see anyone with a cjueenly air. it s safe to place a bet. she s wearing real — not Nylon nor cotton or ra oii — but RKAI silk nose! American Institute of Business lOWA S I ARC.EST AND MOST niSTINGUISHEl) SCHOOL OF BUSINESS E. O. FENTON. Director Ciriuict nl IVnili DES MOINES. lOVN ' A (Fuily Accredited) I ROCTOR DRUG CO. ■ 2II Southwest Ninth Des NIoines. Iowa I ' llOXE. 4-7521 l)i:S MOiM:S BUILDING-LOAN AND SAVINGS ASSOCIATION 41 1 Sixth Avenue ni " s M()i !:s. i()w For Flowers C. ll KEHMS ' 000 W ' ahuil Street I ' iioiie j-iiro CRADU.VnON PICTURES A. O. HARPEL Photographer lOS Slio))s Building Dos Nloiiu-s ( )l ' l NIOMIAY I ' |- I C.S -or Y our C oriifriuMilv News . . . Re; cl n lie NlesseiitJer-Ww s Soulli Cilys Newsfiaper ■ )!• " ifir Printing . . . Ciive Us Your Ideas. SutJgestions. Layouts; Estimates Furnislied MESSENGER PRIN ' riNG CO.. Inc. not 10 Soiilliwrsl Ninlli Si, IVIciiliolK- T-1267 JACOBSONS anilla. Maple Nut and Cherry 0. ' FI avors y DE IN DES MOINES NORTHWESTERN CANDY CO. F. E. JACKSON SAND COAL CO. COALS _ Virginia, Kerituckv, Illinois, Iowa and Gravel Cement YARD 10 ' ) Soutliwes t Nintli St. Phone 4-72Q5 Concrete Mix Trucking RESIDENCE 212 Hillside Avenue Plione 4-4776 Special Prices on Following Quality Merchandise PARKER HERBEX COMPLETE LINE OF DERMEIICS Pormanents $2.50 «m Vp All Work Guaranteptl IOWA SCHOOL OF BEAUTY A. •3 " . . . OiiwsiimI Lincoln ' s First Lincoln I lifili tloesii I iicetl air raid w ardens to iiiaLc an air raid drill a success. Ill llic lirst air raid drill experienced al l.iiuoln. Sc|)l( ' n)l)er II. every sludeiil oheyed orders to llie letter. In an assciiiMv earlier in dav. instructions lor the drill were given by Miss Annamae Heaps and Mr. F-liner Belz. Walk, oliey. and keep silent were points stressed. Wlien tlie continuous ringing of the bell began to sound, students liled out of classrooms from all parts of the i)uilding. to take places on the lirst lloor. lii( h in ase of an air raid would offer the most protei lion from shell particles and war gases. Students and teat hers alike sat in cross-legged positions on the floor until the all-clear signal sounded. FAT SHOP Quality You ( oii 7 aste 6507 Southwest Ninth Street Congratulations! January 45 Graduates from Georcfe " , the Chili Kinsf Diamonds — Watches Jewel rv feiS fSs CLASS RINGS PINS . J. BITTLE a SONSC THIKO FIOOA SHOPS lUiLOlNO DES MOINES itraflualion Gifts Largo Slock to Seloti from (ilniiiiatint! 2 Wonder III! Years of Sorvirr Your Oraduation l l»otoyraph at . . . I ' h.Hir -Lomo. 420 otii St To F»me ' School Doesn ' t Keep I he lime ( ame! I liey always said it woiiltl. IhiI most shiclrnls liavinc a pessimislic viewpoint, merely drawled " Oh sure. " But the time did come when there wasii t a ( )iiif)laint of " loo iniu h school. " Earl in the fall, the lirst period (lasses were nt short lor two weeks so that students mi[ hl take hasic ' ivilian defense courses on s( liool lime. With Nov emher ( anie frecfuent holida s — teachers convention. .Armistice Day. $ as ration- int; interludes, and I hanksyivint; vacation. ember brotitjlil eariv dismissal for students excused to help in the downtown stores during; the holiday rush. Then came Hec emher icS and school was over for the vear. And When It ' s Over . . , Be prepared to take over I rake 0ffers Complete Scfi( ' (lttl( your duties in life. I.el Drake prepare you. I lit- university — Des Moines ' res ioKi i (lasses tl Mid Year own — oilers complete courses in its eight col Ucqistration leges. iie iins jim. 29 i.ii5i:r. i. . k is 11)1 ■( ATIO.X t I.NE AR I S 151151 .F-. LAW I ' llARMACV C.UADI ' .M f: i)l ISI(). ( OMMI.KCi; I INAXCI- DRAKE UNIVERSITY IM REDDY KII.OWAIT For only a few cents a day I litjht your home, operate oiir radio and refrifjerator. run your vacuum cleaner and washing ma( hine. and do many more johs to make voiir li ins more comfortahle and con- venient. ELECTRICHT IS CHEAP IN DES MOINES COr GRATULATlONS I ) llie Graduating Class of January, 43 From a Yoimsster of 8) Who Has .Serv ed I Cieneralions of . meri ans A P SUPER MARKETS (Fjilillilislird IHjQ) DI IRINC . THE DURATION OF GAS RATIONING Treat your car to tlie best of fuel. Battery recharging while you wait We are Fire lns[)ecfors i.iNcoi.N supi:r si:rvice 280j S. W. Ninth St. Phone 5-950-1 L ARSEMS BATHS S i;Ul li MASSAC . I I OK I.AI311-.S RI . I l i;i)UI " KS )N, M t. (-,r.,.l„„ I l)r Kiflll -ri, 1.. I iliil -, SliH LKiiliii. Sweileii sms MAC.i ' iKi-: (■„,„l„,.l.- N.ir..- I M 2tB-ai6 SHOPS BLOfi. 3-5 8 £3 MKRHDITH Pl ' BIJSHINC. COMPANY Bkttik Homi;s ani C ' iardkns Successful Farming l es Moines. Iowa Quality Jewelry SINCK 1871 JOSEPHS «r Jewelers 72 Years Sixth at Locust C. DiYOliNG IX)()I) MARKl-n 2001 Soiilliensl Sixlh Slrccl l lioiic 4- " )|(r QUAI.HT GROCERIES A l " REASONABLE I ' RiCES Frpp Op ii ' crv V . . . Oiiwsiril Wartime R ' s Do you know tlio war lime Rs 1 lie lliree 1 s of ' clear old i olclen rule clays, readin and rilin and rilhn)eli( liave l)een re- placed l)y llie lliree R ■ of war days, " retjulatini;. reslric lint;. » nd rationintJ. Oas rationing lias affected l.incoln as well as llie wliole nation. Students and teacliers alike have fell the pantf of the shortatJe. If l)y chance you see Mr. l-iolland .Njeffert strid- in;. ' swiftly across the premises, or Dora Ann (Vookshank and Kenny FousI strolling hand in hand in the direction of school, don t ix- alarmed: lliey re tJellinu daily exercise and savin{ ( as cou- pons for who knows what? VAN GINKEL FOOD MARKET A Home Owned Store " lOOl S iilli( ' ast I ' ourtocnlli ( niiUrallllitlions! Clr.uliialfs am! i .iilspltllrr Stall ll lias Utii a |il(aslirc Id service your priiiliiiU |)lale re |nireiii ' nls CAPITAL Cn Y rn lN riNG PLAI I-: CO. 1012 r.raiul Avn 7 Go to a Well Known Place! 5Tn AVENUE F OWLING ALLEY I ' iftli at 712 T.-l -[.li..M - ■) H-, Marlow Barher and Beauty Shop Id A 1)1 I ANi;V. (Kw.pr IW„uly Sli..p IIAKIiV MVUI OW. Owner RiirVr SI1..11 VOI K DOIIAU MVS vIORK CIvVIS iii;i i: .„ ...■],..,., Si, ni:S |OINI . IOWA To Fsime ' Riil()li l ' ()rt T iind llic yant; lie olleii (rated lo school are frequently seen riding llie street car. Evidently Ralph is saving his carbon-monoxide for further use. It s economical and I have lime lor more home life. " stated Mr. f-rancis lalarico. when asked how gas rationing was affecting him. Mr. Palarico ( omhines many trips into one. and uls out those long Sunday drives. The coupe belonging to iiill Wallace. Firuc c Crevelings jalopy, and Frank Palmer ' s bus are only a few ol the well known sights missing Irom I .in oin s ( urlis. Shoppers ' Helpers Because of the need for clerks in the rush Christ- mas season f)y retail stores, a short salesmansliip CENTRAL ENGRAVING COHPANY 10 1 r WALNUT STOEET OES MOINES I ' HONES: 3-1 I 17- 3-1118 YFiARS OF EXPERIKNCE AS ARTISTS AND ENGRAVERS D rnvvings aiirl P late.s for Any and All Kinds ol l rinting • COMPLETE PRINTING PLATE SERVICE ( oi r ( ' 0(is Seri ' icc ANDY AND BILL S MARKET l iiil I ' ) ' ll I ' irsI l-loor. City MiirL.t QIJAMIT ALWAYS W I N G A T E Costume Companv Th eatrical and Fancv Dress Costumes Caps and Oovvns Scforid iinil Wiilnnl Sln-r-t DIAL 4-3-2»T J LAUNDERERS DRY CLEANERS Covered Buttons. Buckles. Buttonholes, and Belts .NIade to Ord er Sewing Machines Repaired. All Makes VOUXKERS SEWIXC. MACHINE DEPT. PARK AVENUE PHARMACY k ' Rcxcill Stoip on llw Corner " I ' HON ' E VSilO ( ongrululations to the Senior Class fnmt Sarwin Photograph Studio 315 Kresge Building Phone 3-7236 ' sen I lie Fi orist vou think of l-l oivors or C orsages, call 4-6151 Seventh and Grand 7-1116 ri22 Beaver Complinxents of Aiiderson-Erickson Oairy Co. PASITIURIZED DAIRY PRODUCTS l 20 .Vvcniii- Fri-drrirli M. HiiMul Pllntlc 6- ' l17 Compliments of SPORTLAND ARCADE Corner Sixth and drand MILK QUICK-PASTEURIZED FOR BETTER FLAVOR Did you know that just one quart of milk supplies all the vital calcium you need a day, one-half of your protein re- quirements, one-fifth of your iron, two-fifths of your Vitamin A, one-fourth of your Vitamin Bi and one-third of your Vitamin Bi)? No wonder our national nutrition prosram urges us to drink lots of milk for radiant health! The Flynn Dairy Company Seventh and University Phone 3-6211 . . . OiiwsiimI liiss was fjiveii in tlic loi sliidents clesirini lo work. Lpoii coinplclion ol llic livr-lioiir ( oiirsc. a prllli(ale was awarded. Klil}il)ilit ( ards lia l lo Ix ' ( arricd all prospecl- ivp employees. 1 liesc students were allowed lo make up the work die missed liecause of holiday employment. Test or ' I ' in I he ever ori| ina I Miss lla .el Mil.I.ell dre ami up aiiotlier one. I his lime she diiln I hrinjj in honds. hill lin ( ans . . . hy the hundreds! She gave her l .iitjiish 7 students a i hoi e of either bringing in 1) cans, properly processed, or taking a quiz. It was optional, hul the choice was unanimous. Not a student was put " to the lest. I (xlay more lliaii ever i.s llie lime we must conserve — iiot only gasoline and rubber hut also on all food items. Therefore, it is necessary that we re( eive the hest. The Best For Less 7 Y o(U ' Order Is o iir opecm HIHO (.RILL tl7 fiudid HI-HO TOO 1558 East Oand GEIL COAL YARD Southwest Ninth and Army Post Road COAL ICE ANF3 FEEI I ' lidt..- .|- 826 J. R. C.EII. I !• r us MAKI-: VOI R Oi l) SIIOKS LOOK I.IKE NEW Our slioe rrpair cximtIs will rrliuiltl. rrpnir, tlyc your sIkm ' . ' s(» llicy ' II look just lik ' new. Briiifls yours in soon. — S ioc Ri ' iyair Svction YOUNKLRS BASEMENT AND good COI.ONIAL BAKING CO. .1. H. Cilirisl. President C olfl Slorage THE FRENCH WAY Cleaners Furriers Free Call For ancl Delivery Servin Se crilli and Grand 413 Eurlid Avenue LINCOLN THEATRE Always 1 wo Good SKows THE AnVEIlTISEIlS I ' llESS 010 i-ociist Street, Telephone 3-5512 Des Moines, Iowa (•.r:()KGli S, MI RI ' IIV MIIJ:s W. MI RI ' IIV (iii ' d s OMi ' sl I ' H ' c rv Slori ' 1863 (.R AQUATION GIFTS " Q(in i(v ii ' if ioiit " ..vlmi ' dflfiMre c and Atlr.u live Piec es in Jewelry and Silver $t. ' () to $10.00 iiii l ii|i v,inl All Allrat live Senior Ring or Pin S2.(K) l(. S! I 2.00 ( ' sf Otir ( tmrt ' iiii ' iit l tiynwnt Plan PI IJMB JI AVHLRY STORE W ' .iliuil ,il Si. lli ' , . . Onward 1 he Staff Meinl)ers of tlie joiirnali.sni 2 classes who served as staff lieads of the " Hit Parade issue of the Senior Railsplitter follow: Co-editors. Lorraine Bergstrojn. Frank Palmer Make-up Editor Irene Sheraden Advertisiiij; Manager. Dora Ann Crookshank Organization Editor Irene Magnuson C irculation Manager larkie Andersen Literary Editor Irene Dames ( ilossie l ' ..dilor Ruie Farson Co-sports Editors Ralph Porter. Robert Ciraham Otiier class contributors are: Kenneth Foust. Marie Harmon. Betty Hines. Phyllis Knotts. Mis K nou f. I .awrence NIcConnell. Robert Mit( licin. .Mice Reeves. Delores Rich. Chris Stanley. Charles Tripe. COOPERATE FOR VICTORY! Ridp the street cars between tO a.m. (I lid i p. ni. whenever possible. DVS MOINES RAILWAY COMPANY Parker Drug Store f " l. I )es . loines S. W. 1)1 h r- Army Post Road Plif) E J-Q02) Ft. Des Moines Food Markr-I QL ' .M.rn ' (;roclries meats |J|u)lie -6)17 W.- IJilivi r H) 1 . im Post Koail AMBULANT-PROCTOLOGY Xew Injection method for the treatment and cure of [■Ji cTAi. Diseases Hernia — (Rupture) Varicose Veins E.v(ifn (io ion I ' rpc Dr. Clias. W. McCutclien 0sleoi)atl ic Physician QOO Des Moines Bldg. Offi.r l l, -, R.- I ' l, - —,1 Get More for Your Oough Iron) HELEN JOE Reed Sliofjpe Across from Lincoln JACK ' S SERVICE lOth and Armv Post C)P. 1 id( anize We ' ll Ever Be True " " . . . .your name will ever stand With the best of the land Cjfor we think you are grand Lincol?i Highy


Suggestions in the Abraham Lincoln High School - Railsplitter Yearbook (Des Moines, IA) collection:

Abraham Lincoln High School - Railsplitter Yearbook (Des Moines, IA) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

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Abraham Lincoln High School - Railsplitter Yearbook (Des Moines, IA) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

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Abraham Lincoln High School - Railsplitter Yearbook (Des Moines, IA) online yearbook collection, 1945 Edition, Page 1

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