Abilene Christian College - Prickly Pear Yearbook (Abilene, TX)

 - Class of 1983

Page 138 of 424

 

Abilene Christian College - Prickly Pear Yearbook (Abilene, TX) online yearbook collection, 1983 Edition, Page 138
Page 138



Text from page 138:


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major from Pasadena and a Get-a-job-fluenza sufferer. Suiiiieatrincsj the inotutraioita A strange disease that doctors cannot cure hit the ACII campus in the fall. as it has done in years past. It crippled many students with gradually worsening effects that reached their climax at the end of the One symptom of Get-a-job-fluenza was an intense desire "to apply what you've learned," said jim McGathy, business-computer science spring semester. This dreaded disease had many faces and many names, but it most commonly was referred to as Senior-itis. science major from Lakewood, Kirk Boone, business-cornputer Colo., and another "fluenza" victim, said sufferers appeared as "nice- dressed individuals wearing signs saying, 'Yes, I will work for Certificates of deposit, money markets, high One form of the malady, Social Senior- minimum wage, and even that's itis, was characterized by an inability to con- Bill-mi Q:hl-istiim Damn, - negotiable' " centrate on books and a tendency to spend 3 4, MQW, 934, MM W 37, . l Victims also clustered to compare letters more time on social life. Observation had dmj9fj'Miu ylpyung 'Q of reply from potential employers, said Curt revealed that this type of Senior-iris usually 1-J .au-. -Mawaaaaa. ang, Watson, senior accounting major from Harl- hit single seniors who had no prospects for df WPI ' ingen. The victims had been known to trade engagement. One victim said the disease was iiirlgrlrir , ,,,., it.. 1, ..t, those lettets lllte baseball Cattls- brought on by the "ultimate realization that Q , A The ultimate cure for Senior-itis graduation is near." if , X :mkmq Economicos was, victims agreed, applying Senior-itis Maximum, the purest form of .yuan . I W Wmjvmg I yu my shoe leather to pavement in certain cities and j Social Senior-itis, had been found only in Bi- I f , MM jygy "W" towns. The cure for Social Senior-itis, which ble majors, who thought they were required I gi was more difficult to obtain, was marriage. to have a wife to graduate. A symptom of QP-?35i5f'a-joe' fgggi-dr, C3 To obtain the latter cure, Dr. Ed this subtype of the disease was the compul- at - 1 - o Headrick, chairman of the psychology sion to preach lessons on love in Chapel and at local congregations that had high concentrations of ACL' women. Another form ofthe disease is Senior-itis Iiconomicos, or Get-a- job-lluenya. Business majors. who had the most on-campus oppor- tunities for job interviewing, seemed most susceptible to this type. department, jokingly suggested that seniors should have lowered their expectations for a potential mate. "Any old clod will do," he said. If the victim could not obtain these cures, he might have tried McGathy's remedy: "Take lots of cold showers." - Rachel O'Rear Making deals for dollars Glenn Addison, SA treasurer, was the mov- interest accounts, IRAs, Treasury bills -- all became key words during 1982-83 as people sought to make the most from whatever funds they had through investments. The Students' Association was no exception as it negotiated with the administration for the option of investing the large amounts of money in its treasury. In the end, the SA was granted its proposal and invested several thousand dollars that earned even more money. 134 f Yau ing force behind the SA's proposal that the SA and other campus organizations be allowed to invest funds in accounts off campus. Under the system that had been used the organizations were required to deposit their money through the ACU business office. The organizations did not earn interest on the accounts, but the organizations were not chraged for check- writing and record-keeping services. Addison said he suggested the proposal because he believed the students, not the university, should be receiving the interest from the money in its treasury. "Since enrollment has off," Addison said, "our revenues have off, but the costs have kept rising." began after the SA passed a to allow organizational invested. Addison met with several including President William j. President for Finance Bill Hilton Garvin said he to in- VIEW off university to lose tuition increase might the rr way to recover the funds. Addison, however, said that according to figures he had compiled, the university wou lose only about 32,500 if it allowed the SA to i vest off campus. In order to recover that lo for the university, tuition would have to be i creased about 2 cents an hour, he said. After several meetings between Addison at the administrators an agreement was reached mid-September that allowed organizations wi accounts of at least 35,000 to invest the fum off campus. The organizations were required ' invest the money through Tim Yarbtoug ACU's investments analyst. Organizations with accounts of less th' 55,000 were to be handled as they had in tl past through the campus business office. - Kellfy Tobi-

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