A L Brown High School - Albrokan Yearbook (Kannapolis, NC)

 - Class of 1928

Page 1 of 88

 

A L Brown High School - Albrokan Yearbook (Kannapolis, NC) online yearbook collection, 1928 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 88 of the 1928 volume:

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' V ' • ’. ... ■ . - ■« .-i ' . r ' • ,-... • - .... .. w - 1 ••W’4... ; a? ■ ■ ’ A.1% •• . • mkmv: i i ... - : »• . • tJ . .’• , , . - . ■ • EX- LIBRIS Central High School i® • 5 ® i® “ 5 ® i® 5 ® i® ■j® m ■s® i® ■s® i® s® i® 5 ® ip a® m a® i® “ 5 ® i® ‘J® ip i® 5 ® i® “J® i ® •}® 4 ® ® P® = 5 ® i® 5 ® i® ■s® i® 1 ® i® 5 ® J® j® t JS) i® j® j® i® P - 3 ® i® 0 ® ip ' 5 ® i® ■ 5 ® iP ' " J® iP 5 ® i® nj§5 iP nj§5 i® ‘j® i® ‘j® «® ‘j® i® a® i® •s® i® • 2 ® p fs PIONEER VOLUME FIVE 7928 Published by the Senior Class of CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL KANNAPOLIS, N. C. Si sp Si @P Si ®a gj- fp 7 T •!- | |- §§. sp Si sp Si tap Si Sp Si Sp Si @p Sp .Si- Up Si (sp Si Sp s? ' Sp Si Sp Si Si Sp Si ®p Si Sp Si Sp Si Si Si •|P SS- •;- r •; - •;•(- -; f sp Si Si THE 1928 PIONEER OREWORD This year, so full of joys and sor- rows, defeats and victories, has gone, and try as we may. We cannot in reality live again the years that have past. But in this book we have tried to reflect as vividly as we can, our yesterdays, todays and tomorrows. Hoping we may succeed in recalling to you these memories of K. H. S. we now submit this volume of THE 1928 PIONEER Page Three r0r)(r01)(r01) WWW THE 1928 PIONEER To Miss Helen Elizabeth Harris Our Sponsor, who has been a very true and sympathetic friend; who has helped us in time of trouble, and rejoiced with us in our good fortune; who has labored diligently and faithfully with us in the publishing of this Annual, we, the class of Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-eight, respectfully dedicate this volume of The Pioneer DEDICATION THE 1928 PIONEER ' " Prt A»C ptl l ' ■Se-venWv G-rade. w e- o C-H (TfOa-l‘«sh TrCfv’cV. SV pe r A) te utic n) " t ,r J L-UOest Se ieM V SvaJ (Y Vicma »c S ' 7 r s u- 1 S”c Vc fftVVi Gr » d ' ? :®os CvdcJi Cd, ' rvr§3 4 Yv WWW THE 1928 PIONEER PIONEER STAFF OorV isl f»v E £ ' (ii)-or’ S po so v SV iscy pVioti V o d a K £ A e t 3 n ‘u.ru or THE 1928 PIONEER Seniors Pa ye Seven THE 1928 PIONEER SENIOR CLASS Motto: “En Avant” COLORS: Rose and Silver FLOWER: Pink Rosa Ralph Gillon Elsie McKnight Alene Stonestreet Virga Smith Edith Jolley . Shirley Turbyfill Ralph Whitley Crealie Steele Walter McInnis Page Eight OFFICERS President Vice-President Secretary T reasurer Historian Prophet T estator Poet Giftonan THE 1928 PIONEER W. H. BROWN. JR. Mascot is he, our little " Buddy’’ Brown, As handsome and cute as any boy in town. Seniors adore him, and so too would you; Cheer then for " Buddy, " cheer, " One! Two! One! Two! Of all the cute kids we have met. The cutest yet is ’Buddy.’ you bet. " MRS. D. A. JOLLEY mrs. j. r. Mcknight Grade Mothe rs " Oh mothers, dear, we look to you To be our guide through life, Each errant one you will pursue And guide us through the strife. Oh mothers, dear, oh mothers, dear, God give your works far fame For all success that comes to us We give your work acclaim.’’ HAZEL WILMA BAKER Philomathean Literary Society, ’25-’28. If you are looking for a good heart, a true friend, and a jolly companion, you will find them all in Hazel. She is quiet, conscientious, studious and respectful — a friend never to be forgotten. La voir, c’est V aimer avec beaucoup d ' amour LILLIAN FAY BRANTLEY Cannon Literary Society, ’25-’27 ; Philomathean Literary Society, ' 28; Home Economics Club, ’25-’26; Athletic Association, ’27-’28; Basketball, ’28. For any information about our blond, Lil- lian. just see " Leaky. " They say she’s inde- pendent, but she makes friends just the same. She shines in basketball, and is an all-round good sport. TOW THE 1928 PIONEER EDNA BROWN Philomathean Literary Society, ’25-’28; Glee Club, ’25-’26; Home Economics Club, ’2 5-’26; Athletic As- sociation, ’28. Edna, known as " Skinny.” always surprises us with the unexpected. A better sport is no where to be found. Her smiles and laughter will be missed at K. H. S. She’s our biggest teaser. WILMA BROWN Cannon Literary Society, ' 25-’27; Glee Club, ' 25; Home Economics Club, ’26- ' 27 ; Athletic Association, ’26-’28; Philomathean Literary Society, ’28. Wilma, the fairest of Seniors, has always a smile for every one, especially the opposite sex. As well as being pretty, she is sweet, and every- body loves her. MYRTLE ESTELLE DAVIS Cannon Literary Society, ' 25- ' 27 ; Home Economics Club, ’26; Executive Committee of Commercial Club, ’27; Philomathean Literary Society, ’28; Pioneer Stenographer, ’28. " Myrt, " voted the naughtiest Senior, is not naughty bad — but naughty nice! She has proved a great help to THE PIONEER staff this year with her skill as typist. LAWRENCE L. FOWLER Basketball, ’24- ' 28; Baseball, ’24-’28; Captain Bas- ketball, ’26-’27 ; Captain Baseball, ’26-’28; All-State Baseball, ' 25; All-Western Basketball, ’26-’27; Foot- ball, ’25- ' 26; Cannon Literary Society, ’25-’27; Ath- letic Association, ’24-’28; Vice-President Glee Club, ' 25; Vice-President Athletic Association, ’27- ' 28; Pioneer Athletic Editor, ’28. " An athlete and a good sport " — that ' s " Lot- tie. " He has gained fame with his B. B. record. RALPH GILLON Philomathean Literary Society, ’25- ' 28; Athletic As- sociation, ’25-’28; Class Secretary, ’26 J ’27; Track Team, ’28; Class President, ’28. Gillon is our most handsome Senior, and has the distinction of being our President as well. Though he isn ' t noted for " speed. " he gets us there, for he is steady, dependable, tried, and true. THE 1928 PIONEER MARY B. HARRISON Philomathean Literary Society, ’28; Athletic Associ- ation, ’28; Pioneer Assistant Editor, ’28; Cheer Leader, ’28. " Runt,” our cutest girl, is small in size, but she has taken no small part in school activities since joining us in ' 27. Her honors speak for her as being peppy, popular, and dependable. LAURA HASTINGS Cannon Literary Society, ’25-’27 ; Philomathean Literary Society, ’28; Poet, ’25; Glee Club, ’25-’26; Home Economics Club, ’25-’26; Athletic Association, ’27-’28; Pioneer Exchange Editor, ’28. " Peanut " has led a very active life through high school. There’s always something doing when she ' s around. She’s this kind: Tall, good-looking, popular, and sings like a bird. EDITH L. JOLLEY Philomathean Literary Society, ’2 5-’28; Home Eco- nomics Club, ’2 5-’26; Glee Club, ’25-’26; Athletic As- sociation, ’26- ' 28; Class Treasurer, ’27; Secretary Philomathean Literary Society, ’27 ; Historian, ’28. Edith, always the happy-go-lucky, and the most zealous of Seniors, is truly a good pal. She is a typical blond with eyes that shine in EDGAR MONROE KETCHIE Class President, ’25-’26; Vice-President, ' 27; Phi Kappa Alpha Literary Society, ’24; Philomathean Literary Society, ’25-’28; Athletic Association, ’25-’28; Football Squad, ’25-’26; Varsity Basketball, ’26-’28; Track Team, ’28; Pioneer Business Manager, ’28. " Ed " spells " pep, " and we mean he has it, not only in athletics but in all school activities. Consult The Pioneer. YVONNE ALBERTA MAULDEN Cannott Literary Society, ’25-’27; Home Economics Club, ’27; Class Historian, ’26; Treasurer Cannon Literary Society, ’26; Glee Club, ’25-’27 ; Basketball, ’26-’28; Athletic Association, ’28; Commercial Club, ’27-’28; Pioneer Staff, ’27; Cheer Leader, ’28; Pioneer Editor-in-Chief, ’28. Clever, athletic, attractive, peppy, sociable, good-natured, the best all-around Senior — that ' s " Vonn. 1 She shines in all school activities. Page Eleven THE 1928 PIONEER elsie Mcknight Philomathean Literary Society, ’25-’28; Home Eco- nomics Club, ’25-’26; Glee Club, ’25-’26; Class Poet, ' 27; Vice-President Class, ’28; Treasurer Philomathean Literary Society, ’28; Athletic Association, ’28. Elsie, better known as ‘ ' Chicken " to her friends, has won our hearts with her winsome ways. She is our most graceful Senior, and a good student. WALTER H. McINNIS Philomathean Literary Society, ’25; Cannon Literary Society, ’26- ' 27; Class President, ’25; Athletic Associ- ation, ’26; Glee Club, ’26; Commercial Club, ’28; Pioneer Joke Editor, ' 28. Among all the funny and witty people it will be hard to find one who surpasses " Walt. " He is our class joker, and as giftorian, we ex- pect him to shine in Commencement exercises. TITUS O. SILLS Cannon Literary Society, ’27 ; Philomathean Literary Society, ’28; Pioneer Subscription Editor, ’28. " Tyte " has been the " live wire " of the class since he joined us in our Junior year. When- ever there is laughter at K. H. S. he is right there. He’s little but he ' s loud — and has red hair besides. VIRGA MAE SMITH Philomathean Literary Society, ’25-’26; Glee Club, ’26-’27 ; Class Treasurer, ’28. " Binkie " has but to smile one of her win- ning smiles and the prey is hers. She’s a good pal, and a good sutdent, too. She’s always ready to answer questions in class, but she’s in all the excitement as well. CREALIE ALENE STEELE Philomathean Literary Society, ’25-’28; Home Eco- nomics Club, ’25-’26; Class Poet, ’28. An earnest and diligent student is our Crealie. She has an abundance of knowledge, especially of French, and we predict a professorship for her. Don ' t think she ' s two dignified for fun though — she likes it as much as anybody. MARGARET ALENE STONESTREET Vice-President Class, ’25 ; Cannon Literary Society, ’25-’27 ; President Philomathean Literary Society, ’28; Glee Club, ’25 -’26; Athletic Association, ’25-’28; Home Economics Club, ' 25-’26; Secretary Class, ’28; Pioneer Subscription Editor, ’28; Commercial Club, ’28. " Stony " was voted our most musical Senior, and well she deserves that honor, as well as the other honors bestowed upon her. Page Twelve THE 1928 PIONEER RUTH TAYLOR Cannon Literary Society, ’25-’27 ; Philomathean Literary Society, ’28; Pioneer Kodak Editor, ’28. " Laugh " is " Rooster ' s motto, and she has showed her good disposition throughout our high school days. She never looks on the dark side of things. To this characteristic of optim- ism, the Seniors add that of independence. ANNE STEELE THOMPSON Philomathean Literary Society, ’28; Pioneer Busi- ness Manager, ’28. " Ann ' s " sweet disposition accounts for her popularity. She holds the honor of being the most lovable Senior. She joined our class in ’ 26 , but has made up for lost time, and has won a warm spot in our hearts. Her class record is one to be coveted. SHIRLEY LOCKWOOD TURBYFILL Cannon Literary Society, ’25-’27; Home Economics Club, ’25-’26; Glee Club, ’25-’27; Secretary Glee Club, ' 25-’26; Vice-President Class, ’25-’26; Class President, ’27; Winner Expression Medal, ’27; Philomathean Literary Society, ’28; Pioneer Printer, ’28. " Sherlockette,” outwardly reserved, and yet the Senior kid, is really an all-round good sport. THELMA CATHERINE UPCHURCH Philomathean Literary Society, ’28. Thelma, known as " Cricket, " has been with us only one year, but she is loved by all. Her motto is " Work before pleasure,” consequently she ranks high in her studies. She was voted our " quietest " Senior, but she makes herself heard in all class questions. WALTER RALPH WHITLEY Historian, ' 26 ; Athletic Association, ’26-’28; Philo- mathean Literary Society, ’25-’28; Pioneer Art Editor, ’28. " Whit " always takes things just as thev come. He has been with us the four years and has proved himself useful as an artist. He is our most original Senior, and our lawyer, too. LEON BROWN WINECOFF Phi Kappa Alpha Literary Society, ’24; Cannon Literary Society, ’25-’27; Philomathean Literary So- ciety, ’28; Pioneer Literary Editor, ’2S; Basketball, ’28; Athletic Association, ’25-’28. The Seniors won’t ever forget the wonderful times they’ve had in " Leaky’s " K. H. S. run- about. " ' Leaky ' will takes us, " has become a by-word. He ' s our right-hand man. Page Thirteen mmw THE 1928 PIONEER SENIOR STATISTICS YOU. ' oN v o W e onte UJ c au. no cs 1 Yl$ome Page Fourteen IS THE 1928 PIONEER THE 1928 PIONEER CLASS HISTORY CHARACTER OF THE TIMES The summer of 1924 was a period of great unrest. The affairs of Kannapolis had been thrown into much confusion by the realization of the natives that gre at ignorance existed. It became the duty of every one who loved humanity to unite in an effort to gain knowledge. FOUNDING OF THE COLONY The most important outcome of this growing sentiment was the planting of a colony at the Kannapolis High School, September, 1924. Because of the verdure of the settlers the colonists called themselves Freshmen. HOSTILITY So strong was the determination of this group to alleviate their woeful ignorance that not even the hostilities of a savage tribe led by Warriors Wisby, Wood, Smart and Humbert were able to defeat them in their purpose. ELECTION OF 1924 In order to cope with existing conditions it was found necessary to have leaders, so early in the first year an election was held. Due to the size of the colony it was decided to divide it into two groups. Ketchie was chosen Governor; Harris, Lieut. -Governor ; Efird and Goldston, councillors, of one group. Mclnnis was chosen Governor; Stonestreet, Lieut. -Governor, and Helms, councillor, of the other. Under the capable leadership of these officers rapid progress along social and industrial lines was made. Invitations were ex- tended by nearby settlements to share their hospitality and much was learned from these neighbors. CHIEF EVENTS The greatest progress intellectually was under the leadership of Smart in the study of bugs, grass- hoppers, flowers and trees. The chief social event was la weiner roast enjoyed by the colony as a whole. NAME CHANGED; ELECTION OF 1925 A happy year rolled by, but the second year showed a decrease in the number of colonists. In spite of this decrease such growth in wisdom had taken place that it seemed proper to change the name of the colony, and they became known as Sophomores. A joint election was held early in 1925; Ketchie was chosen Governor; Turbyfill, Lieut. -Governor ; Gillon and Hall, councillors. PROGRESS; SOCIAL EVENTS Again marked progress was shown, especially by the women who in their art of dressmaking won prizes in the county fair. Numerous social events were enjoyed during the year. NAME CHANGED TO JUNIORS; ELECTION, 1926 So prosperous did the colonists, become, and so much improved in wisdom and knowledge, that the name Sophomore gave place to Juniors in 1926. As was the custom an election was held in the fall of that year. Turbyfill was chosen Governor; Ketchie, Lieut. -Governor ; Gillon and Jolley, councillors. It was found proper to keep a permanent record of this colony, which was destined to become so famous; so Maulden was chosen to represent the colony on the staff of The Pioneer, a record kept by a nearby settlement, the Seniors. SOCIAL PROGRESS Great intellectual progress was made during this year but the chief advancement was along social lines. The colonists were entertained elaborately by Elsie McKnight and Edyth Jolley. So friendly had the Juniors become with the next largest settlement, the Seniors, that a big reception was given them. They conducted themselves so admirably and enjoyed the occasion to such an extent that they decided to reciprocate; so a banquet was given the Seniors the following spring. It was a swell affair and did much to increase the friendly relations of the two settlements. COLONISTS EXCEL AS ACTORS In order to finance these various social affairs and to pay for space in The Pioneer, it was found neces- sary to raise money; so the colonists decided to try their skill as actors on the stage. A play, “The Wren,” w?s selected and so well did the first performance succeed that it was reproduced in several nearby settlements. JUNIORS SUCCEED SENIORS In May, 1927, the Senior colony decided to abandon their settlement, and because of their remarkable progress the Junior colony was chosen to fill their place. So in September, 1927, the Juniors assumed full responsibility, left their old abode, and changed their name to Seniors, and another election was held. ELECTION OF 1928 Since the business of the colony had grown so much it seemed wise to have more officers of the law. The result of the election was: Gillon, Governor; McKnight, Lieut. -Governor ; Stonestreet, Secretary of State; Smith, Secretary of Treasury; Jolly, Historian; Turbyfill, Prophet; Whitley, Chief Justice; Steele, Secretary of Poetic Art; Mclnnis, Secretary of Charities. STAFF OF PIONEER In taking this place as leader among the settlements, the Seniors assumed full management of The Pioneer, the record of the colonies. Thus it was necessary to have a staff. The following were elected: Editor-in-Chief, Maulden; Assistant Editor, Harrison; Business Managers, Ketchie and Thompson; Athletic Editor, Fowler; Exchange Editor, Hastings; Literary Editor, Winecoff; Art Editor, Whitley; Joke Editor, Mclnnis; Kodak Editor, Taylor; Subscription Editors, Stonestreet and Sills; Printer, Turbyfill; Stenographer, Davis. Great work was done by these capable staff members. The 1928 Pioneer stands as evidence of their efficient service. CHIEF SOCIAL EVENT OF ’ 27 The chief social event of 1927 was a Christmas party given the Junior colony by the Seniors. Santa Claus left a real Christmas tnee bearing gifts and goodies for every member of the two colonies. In spite of a downpour of rain the occasion was greatly enjoyed. THE END The great event toward which the colony is now working is Commencement, at which time we shall endeavor to show to the natives of Kannapolis our noble efforts in dispelling the woeful ignorance of our town. Note: A more complete account of this colony will be rendered at Commencement. Edyth Jolley, Historian. Page Sixteen THE 1928 PIONEER EXTRACTS FROM THE DIARY OF SHIRLEY NORWOOD Sept. 9, 1948 — My husband and I are taking a kind of second honeymoon during his vacation, stopping at the most celebrated parts of the United States. Poor fellow, a doctor’s life isn’t always such an easy one and this is our first real vacation since that thrilling month spent in New York on our first honeymoon, exactly fifteen years ago! But, not once has Shirley L. Turbyfill, noted elocutionist, regretted that she gave up her name and a most promising career to become the wife of the aforesaid doctor. Nevertheless, it will be great to leave cares behind and have an exciting time again. I’m all thrills! Sept. 11— You can’t guess what a surprise I had today! Alene Stonestreet, the “Stony” of K. H. S., was the first person I saw when I stepped aboard the Crescent Limited. She was on her way to Atlanta, where she is giving a concert tonight. I asked “Stony” about our old classmates of ’Twenty-eight. It was such a shock when she told me that Elsa McKnight, the tomboy of our class, had settled down and was teaching math back at dear old Kannapolis High. Can you imagine such a thing? “Stony” said that Ralph Gillon, now a famous boxer, and Wilma Brown were married last week and are now on their honeymoon abroad. “Stony” and I had a good old talk and I was sorry when she got off in Atlanta. Sept. 15 — The first stop on this, the famous tour, was in Asheville, N. C. While riding around I passed Biltmore Hospital and decided to stop for a few minutes. At the entrance I was met by the super- intendent, and can you imagine who it was? Laura Hastings! She told me that Edna Brown, Mary Harrison, and Thelma Upchurch were graduates of Biltmore and are now pursuing further knowledge at Johns Hopkins Hospital. I was nearly knocked speechless when she ' said that Dr. Virga Smith and Dr. Ann Thompson, both famous specialists, were performing some wonderful operations at the hospital. I wanted so much to see them, but my time was running short and I had to hurry to catch my train. Sept. 16 — The next place of interest to me was the Capitol in Washington. In the senate a distinguished looking man was making a speech and swaying the senate to his side. To my surprise, I recognized him as Ralph Whitley, my classmate of ’Twenty-eight. Then I remembered his oratorical ability at K. H. S. Back at my hotel I bought an extra of the Washington Times, and guess what it was all about? In big headlines, “Edgar Ketchie, second Lindbergh, and companions land in Egypt.” Well, at last “Ed” had achieved his ambition to be a great flier. I surely was surprised as I read on to find that his companions were his wife, the former Edith Jolley, Titus Sills, expert mechanic, and Dr. Walter Mclnnis of Columbia University, who was to conduct a party of Americans in some research work among the antiques of Egypt. It was all so completely new to me that I just couldn’t seem to grasp such astounding news. Just as I smarted to put the paper down my eye caught a familiar name. “Maulden,” it was, and I stopped to read, “Editor-in- Chief, Y. A. Maulden.” Why, that must be “Vonn” who labored so faithfully as the editor-in-chief of The Pioneer, our high school annual, back at K. H. S. Hope I can see her before leaving the city. Sept. 20— Have been having such a big time in New York that I haven’t had time to write down a thing. While at the opera last night I noticed a very stately looking woman in the opposite box. As she turned her face toward me I recognized her instantly as Ruth Taylor, the most independent senior of the class of ’Twenty-eight. I spoke, and as the curtains were being lowered at the end of the act, I soon found myself in her box. She was now a Countess, having married Count Huguenin of France. I surely was glad to see her, even if for just a few minutes. I hope to see more of her, but it is very doubtful, as I am leaving the city in the morning. Dr. Norwood and I have decided to buy a car before leaving. It’s wonderful to think that tomorrow we will be motoring westward. Sept. 24 — While passing over the plains into the West, Dr. Norwood and I beheld a large ranch. Here I was to find more classmates. The ranch belonged to Leon Winecoff and his wife, formerly Lillian Brantley. Sept. 27 — As dark overcame us tonight before reaching our destination, 1 we stopped in this small western town. The bells were ringing at a little Mission church for evening worship, and Dr. Norwood and I stopped in. There I beheld Crealie Steele teaching the westerners in her sweet way about Jesus. Oct. 3- — The next place in our travels was the theater in Los Angeles. To my delight I recognized Lawrence Fowler, well-known athlete, as the leading man in the play. In the chorus group I saw Myrtle Davis and Hazel Baker, now famous dancers. After the play Dr. Norwood and I went in to see them. They were the last of the Seniors of ’Twenty- eight. I was just wondering what had happened to Miss Helen Harris, our Sponsor, end the dearest of all, when Myrtle said that she was married and living happily in an orange grove in southern sunny California. Miss Harris could not find her husband in the east so she had gone west, and there forgotten her former lovers. We leave for home tomorrow, back to the humdrum of keeping house for a husband and three children. But what a wonderful vacation it has been! Seeing so many of my old friends has taken at least twenty years off my age, and I can almost imagine myself a school girl again back at dear old K. H. S. once more. Shirley L. Turbyfill, Class Prophetess. Page Seventeen mmw THE 1928 PIONEER LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT We, the Senior class of Kannapolis High School, realizing that we must leave the dear old school where we have been nesting for knowledge for four long years, and that we must start the journey of success in life, conscious of the fact that the road is filled with temptations of evil and good, but with sound minds, physical bodies, and lovable dispositions, do hereby make known and declare this to be our Last Will and Testament. ITEM ONE To the Juniors we do will our " Senior dignity, " our cozy room, and pictures, i and all our PIONEER bills and surplus money. ITEM TWO To the succeeding classes we leave our privileges of having a football team (see page 85), and our many privileges (if you can discover them). Our personal belongings we individually dispose of as follows: I. Mary Harrison, do will and bequeath to Helen Flowe my passion for ear rings and chewing gum. I, Alcne Stonestreet, do hereby will and bequeath my love of Chaucer, and my knowledge of the town happenings to " Gat " Parker. I, Wilma Brown, do hereby will and bequeath my innocence and dumb expression to Rachel Ketner. I, Edna Brown, do hereby leave and bequeath the extensive circumference of my waist to Johnsie Maulden. I, Edgar M, Ketchie, do hereby will and bequeath my shoes and sox to " Tuby " Bonds. I. Virga Smith, do hereby will and bequeath to McNeil Petrie my ability to sing " Frere Jacques.” I. Ralph Whitley, leave to Greer McCall my ability of explaining geometry, by request of Miss Ruth Cannon. I. Ralph Gillon, do hereby will and bequeath my ability of making “A ' s " on geometry to Boyd Baker. I. Leon Winecoff, do hereby will and bequeath my ability to speed to " Speedy " Durham. I, Hazel Baker, do hereby will and bequeath to Lucille Orr my numerous freckles. I, Myrtle Davis, do hereby will arid bequeath my naughtiness to Rosa Jane Cox. I, Elsie McKnight, do hereby leave and bequeath my ability to stammer to Charles Goldston. I, Yvonne Maulden, do hereby will and bequeath to Myrtle Daves my unrivaled athletic ability, trusting that this will assist her in adding many stars to her K. I, Ruth Taylor, do hereby will and bequeath to Erline Sims my permanent wig. I, Thelma Upchurch, do hereby will and bequeath to Pearl Keller my ability as typist. I, Titus Sills, do hereby will and bequeath three physics books to Wallace McCombs. I, Annie Thompson, do hereby will and bequeath my ability to " grin and bear it” to Rosalee Faggart. I. Laura Hastings, do will and bequeath to Alma McGuirt my winning ways and smiles, together with the merry twinkle of my brown eyes, hoping that she will break no, hearts on account of them. I. Crealie Steele, do hereby will and bequeath my ability to always know my lesson to James Funderburke and hope he will never have to study. I, Lillian Brantley, do hereby will and bequeath to Bill Hastings my chemistry book, hoping he will be as successful as I have been. I, Shirley Turbyfill, do hereby leave and bequeath my position as teacher ' s pet to " Jim " Peeler, the need thereof being most conspicuous. I, Edyth Jolly, do hereby will and bequeath mv ability to giggle to Connie Harmon. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, we set our seal and signatures this 22nd day of May. in the year of our Lord One Thousand Nine Hundred Twenty-eight. Ralph Whitley, Testator. Page Eighteen THE 1928 PIONEER Our high school days have come and gone; The years have fast passed by; It seems but just a day or two Since we were Freshies shy. For four short years we worked and played, With happiness and tears: But now we must prepare to face T he trials of coming years. Now, dear classmates of ’Twenty-eight, The time has come to part; With sadness we must say good-bye, For parting breaks in our hearts. When we think back to ' Twenty-four, When we entered this school so dear, It makes us want to live again Those days of each school year. Sweet memories shall never fade, From this fair school and true, For we shall always hold most dear The days we spent with you. Now let us all go up and on With all our might and vim; Determination is all we need In this old world to win. So farewell teachers, friends and school, We say our last adieu; In all the future years we pledge To you we will be true. Crealie Steele, Poet . Page Nineteen THE 1928 PIONEER 1 11 THE 1928 PIONEER THE 1928 PIONEER JUNIOR CLASS Motto: “Excelsior” COLORS: Pink and Rose FLOWER: Sweet Pea ; Grade Mothers: Mrs. Ridenhour and Mrs. Peeler OFFICERS Elizabeth Dowling Advisor James Funderburk President Alma McGuirt Vice-President Donald Brandon Secretary James Peeler Treasurer Kathleen Ridenhour Junior Editor Page Twenty-two THE 1928 PIONEER First Row: Boyd Baker, Donald Brandon, Ethel Brigman, Charles Correll. Second Row: Rosa Jane Cox, Poindexter Craven, Evelyn Critz, Clarence Danner, Elwood Durham. Third Roiv: Rosa Lee Faggart, James Funderburk, Charles Goldston, Aubrey G oodnight. Fourth Row: Hubert Hall, Connie Harmon, William Hastings, Gladys Hill. Fifth Rost ' : Rachel Ketner, Pearl Keller, Mary Virginia Leazer, Greer McCall, Marvin McCombs. Page Twenty-three Wx TXT THE 1928 PIONEER First Row: Wallace McCombs, Alma McGuirt, Haskell Mitchem, Grayce Moore, Pearl Nantz. Second Rozv : Lillie Overcash, Agatha Parker, James Peeler, Mary Ellen Petrea. Third Row: McNeal Petrea, Louise Perry, Kathleen Ridenhour, Robert Rollins, Pauline Rumple. Fourth Row: Alice Russell, Howard Simpson, Laura Simms, Erlene Simms. Fifth Row: Arthur Sloop, Lela Sloop, Elizabeth Walters, Helen Walters, Roy Whitley. Page T wentg-four THE 1928 PIONEER Page T wenty-Rve THE 1928 PIONEER SOPHOMORE CLASS SECTION A Ruth Cannon Norman Boger H. B. Clyburn Lerline White Aubrey Winecoff Avant, Beulah Barger, Willette Boger. Agnes Boger, Norman Brandon, Holland Brindle, Mozelle Castor. Frances Clyburn, H. B. Cox, Bonnie Daves. Myrtle Dellenger, Roy Fisher. Mildred Flowe, Helen Hall, Jasper Harrison, Kenneth Holdbrooks, Ynez Long, Mildred McKinley, J. R. McKnight, William Murph, Clarence Owings, Hazel Readling, Mae Rutledge. John h. Self, Essie Lou Thomason, Hubert Tillman. Bryant Winecoff, Aubrey White, Jack Advisor President Vice-President . . . Secretary T reasurer White, Lerline SECTION B Miriam Shirey Advisor M. B. Dunn President Helen Troutman Vice-President LOUISE Lipe Secretary Elizabeth White Treasurer MOTTO: “No One is Beat ' Til he Quits” Colors: Yellow and White Flower: Daisy. Grade Mothers: Mrs. H. L. Lipe and Mrs. J. L. Moore Anderson, James Jackson, M. Ree Paige, Anna Belk. Martha Jolley, Frances Rogers, Frances Brady. Richard Johnson, Linton Rhyme. Euphemia Brown. Ray Linker, Lillian Rumple, Hugh Castor. Robert Lipe, Louise Setzer, Viola Cline, Earnest Moore, Leola Sider. Clyde Craven. Carolyn Moore, Louise Troutman, Helen Cook. Irene Moore, Mary Troutman, Thelma Dunn. M. B. Moser, Ruth Teal, Edgenerl Fisher. Hazel Maulden, Lacy Vanpelt, John Graber, Helen Michael, Oscar Wilkinson, Richard Heintz. Mae Ola Morris, Harry Wilkinson, Irene Hinson, Jack Perry, William White, Elizabeth Page T wenty-six THE 1928 PIONEER The Sophomore Class Page Twenty-seuen THE 1928 PIONEER 51 51 m m 51 51 | sm m sM SUPPOSE “Tyte” Sills couldn’t laugh. Helen Flowe didn ' t know Latin. Clarence Danner studied. All the girls had long hair. “Vonn " Maulden won the shorthand pennant. “Ed” Ketchie forgot to argue. “Jim” Funderburk wasn’t conceited! “Skinny " Brown should lose her “Peanut.” The boys didn’t like rouge. The faculty was hardboiled. “Jim " Peeler was petted. We couldn’t have a football team. The sophomores weren’t wise. Shirley Turbyfill caught girls’ team eating sweets. The freshmen were green. T he teams couldn ' t use the “gym” every day. The China Grove telephone line wasn’t always busy. The seniors never disagreed. n 1 Page T wenty -eight THE 1928 PIONEER THE 1928 PIONEER m m m m 9m eaKitSiKii; FRESHMAN CLASS SECTION A Advisor . President Vice-President - Secretary Mont a Clark Mildred Oats Pauline Moser Leonard Gillon Eunice Gari INC, HOUSE Treasurer MOTTO: " Success Comes in Cans, Not in Cant ' s " COLORS: Pink and Lavender FLOWER: Sweet Pea Grade Mothers: Mrs. K. O. Boger and Mrs. a. M. Cobb Argo, Annie Lois Adams, Mary Eva Adams, Winoma Boger, Adelaide Cline, Mary Emma Cobb, Stowe Byron Garlinghouse. Eunice M. Gillon, Leonard Wilson Irby, William Crawford Jones, Arthur Wilburn Kinzy, Geo. Washington Lambert, Lucile Wilma Moser, Pauline Reid Mooney. Frankie R. D. Murph, Charles Robert Oats, Mildred Edna Overcash, Charles Edward Overcash, James Roberson, Alma Louise Sloop, Harry Stroupe, Revis Walter Yost, Willene SECTION B Ruth KARRIKER Advisor Ruth BOST President HELEN Smith Vice-President GAYNELLE ROGERS Secretary and Treasurer MOTTO: " Ipsa Scientia Potestas Est " COLORS: Blue and White FLOWER: White Rose Grade Mothers: Mrs. F, A. Rogers and Mrs. C. R. Parker Archer. Walter Cook. Dewey Lindsay. Wilburn Beasley, Margaret Connell, Maurice McCommons. Harry Bost, Ruth Daves, Kenneth Owings, Eva Bonds. Woodrow Ferguson, Alfred Parker, Edna Bolick. Dazil Fortner, Horace Parker, Margie Brown. Mabel Grooms, Edna Robinette, James Brown, Clifford Hampton, Conway Rogers, Gaynelle Brantley, Woodrow Heinze, Arlean Shepherd, Billy Butler, James Heinze, Norman Smith. Helen Lovelace, Ruby SECTION C L. M. Sherer Nora Whitley . . . JOHNSIE MAULDEN Harold Nantz , , , Baucom, Pauline Bostian, Ruby Bostian, Virginia Campbell. Ilene C ox, Zelma Critz, Fannie Lee Craven, Margaret Davis, Robert Emerson, Emmett Emerson, George Gentry, Edith Goodnight, Jay Harris, J. A. Hinson. Foy Karriker, Elsie Lowery. Mary B. Maulden, Johnsie McSwain, Vernie Nantz, Harold Overcash, Charlie Overcash, Annie Lee Petrea. Colsen Parker, Vivian Advisor President Vice-President . Secretary and T reasurer Robinett, Loreta Rogers, Kathryn Russell. Hazel Shinn, Loree Sills, Earl Slaughter, Lela Mae Tesh, Grier Troutman, Mae Vanpelt. Clarence Walker. Earl Whitley, Nora Page Thirty roorooroTi roil irOi rCni rOii irOi) THE 1928 PIONEER The Freshman Class THE 1928 PIONEER sm Baity, Margaret Barger, Walter Benson, Nevada Black welder, Margaret Boger, Kathleen Bostian, Herman Branch, Marvin Brewer, Daisy Brigman, Luther Bryant, George Cauthen, John C ' authen, Virginia Chisholm, Glenn Adams, Earl Boger, Nell Caldwell, Katherine Caudell, Corinne Gartner, Clarence Childers, Willie Clayton, Gwin Durham, Howard Eudy, Mildred Ford, Jack Furr, Macon Goldston, Nell Cobb, John Coone, Esther Correl, Louise Dayvault, Mary Dennis, Leona Gilbert, Mabel Ketner, Margaret Lafevers, Clyde Meacham, Harold Moore, Mildred Morris, Mary Nantz, Hazel Overcash, Kathleen Overcash, Marjorie 7-B Advisor: M. L. WEST Hagler, Clyde Hampton, Howard Hester, Gladys Hinson, J. A. Hoffman, Herman Lindsey, Cleatus McCarn, Lester Morris, Lewis Orr, Susie Over cash, Velma Pethel, James O wings, George Patterson, Lucile Pitts, Henry Plyler, Grace Readling, Richard Rodden, Woodrow Russell, Stella Sloop, Marks Sloop, Wilson Smith, Susie Tesh, Harold Upchurch, Edith Wise, W. C. Price, James Rary, Howard Rary, Thelma Rhinehardt, Marcus Sloop, Burette Smith, Graham Smith, Loyd Stack, Glenn Thornburg, Marie Trull, Myrtle Wallace, Marvin Young, Deward Page Thirty-two I T ' HE 1928 PIONEER Antley, Thomas Balmer, Ralph Bonds, Blair Bost, Gladys Bowers, Frances Brooks, Davis Brooks, Jay Hugh Cline, Edith Cline, Fred Collins, Eldridge Collins, Hugh Davis, James Durham, Rosa SEVENTH GRADE 7-C Advisor: JOY SHAVER Gibson, Idelle Hall, Frank Hastings, Philip Hill, Garnett Hobbs, Gladys Huss, Estay James, Beatrice Karriker, Edith Lee, Blanche Mantooth, Edna Mencer, Mary Lou Mitchem, Juanita Nichols, Helen Perry, Ava Lee Benson, Evelyn Bonds, Gladys Brandon, Charles Carpenter, Hazel Cassel, Geneva Cook, Laverna Daves, Clyde Davis, Glen Davis, Parks Fisher, Marie Fortner, Rosa Fortner, Manuel Goodnight, J. C. 7-D Advisor: RUBY ARMSWORTHY Goodnight, Pane Hare, Beatrice Hastings, Jane Holdbrooks, J. W. Ingram, Lucy Jackson, Markie Jones, Wilbur Jordan, Myrtle Ketchie, Robert Lawing, Ralph Leazer, Hortense Lowery, Jay McGuirt, Nell Price, Katherine Reid, Paul Rector, Lila Ridenhour, Elizabeth Ridenhour, John F. Rowell, Helen Sims, Foy Sims, Zelma Suther, Iva Dell Taylor, F. C. Thompson, Opel Warner, Elsie Whitley, Fred Menscer, Archie Murph, Elizabeth Morris, Mary Orr, Virginia Overcash, Madelene Rogers, Marvin Russell, Gladys Sinclair, Annie Stirewalt, Virginia Trammel, Helen Walter, Katherine Wilkerson, Nellie Yarborough, Baxter Page Thirty-three iiww THE 1928 PIONEER 3g$ £a £a m PUZZLE LAND i A TWISTED SQUARE 1. Nrjoui 2. Muhrad 3. Lrekle 4. Noancn 5. Hrtrua 6. Echalr Rearrange these letters so that you have: 1 . A class. 2. A city. 3. The last name of a noted woman. 4. An instrument of war. 5. A famous King. 6. A woman of the Bible. m 9m m m i3§ 238 m Da SB SB SB SB M m SB ii Rearrange these letters so that you have the last names of some school people: 1 . Ctekehi 2. Rheudniro 3. Doignhogt 4. Bruytilfl 5. Ybiws 6. Atresw III To behead means to cut off the first letter. Behead a question and get a head covering. Behead a rodent and get a preposition. Behead air and get z -f- one. Behead a place to sit and get to devour. Behead to ascend and get a branch. Behead in bed and get a place to sleep. Behead gravel and get a conjunction. Behead to peel and get your relatives. Behead to rip and get part of the head. Behead a town with four letters and get a boy’s name. The first letters of the new words reading down spell the name of a senior. Page Thirty- four THE 1928 PIONEER THE 1928 PIONEER 1C®( THE 1928 PIONEER Top: Sophomore Literary Society Bottom: Freshman Literary Society Page Thirty-seven THE 1928 PIONEER gl lofc m Top: SEVENTH GRADE BOYS ' LITERARY SOCIETY Bottom: WATERS LITERARY SOCIETY Page Thirty-eight THE 1928 PIONEER Top: Commercial Club Bottom: MARGARET EDWARDS HOME ECONOMICS CLUB Si n Page Thirty-nine THE 1928 PIONEER YELLS AND SONGS CHEER LEADERS Razzle! Dazzle! Not a frazzle Every thread is wool ! Altogether! altogether! That ' s the way to pull! Team! Team! Team! Wild and wooly, Wild and wooly. Beat ’em Kannapolis! Bust ’em bully, Hoot and toot, Cut and shoot. We re the bunch That does the rootin ' . Kannapolis! Kannapolis! Kannapolis! Rah! Rah! Kannapolis! We know you ' ll win, Fight till the finish — never give in! Rah! Rah! Rah! You do your best boys. We’ll do the rest boys, Rah! Rah! for K. H. S. Whoop her up. Whoop her up. Whoop her up some more! Kannapolis team is the team That we all adore. It’s such a peach, It’s won our hearts, It will surely win the game; It is not rough, It is not tough, But it gets there just the same. Skim a ring a ding ding, Skim a ring a du. We love you. Skim a ring a ding ding, Skim a ring a du, Our team true. We love you every morning, We love you every night; We love you when you ' re with us, We love you out of sight. Skim a ring a ding ding, Skim a ring a du, We love you. Yvonne Maulden Mary Harrison James Funderburk YELLS SONGS Page Forty THE 1928 PIONEER BOYS’ BASKETBALL “Chic " Demarcus H. B. Waters .... Lawrence Fowler Edgar Ketchie . . . Marvin McCombs James Peeler James Funderburk Woodrow Bonds . . Robert Rollins . . Morris Connel Leon Winecoff George Emerson Coach Faculty Manager Left Forward, Captain Left Guard, Student Manager Center Right Forward Right Forward Right Guard Right Guard Right Guard Left Guard Left Guard " To p to -L ' Hi Lf-0. £Vpv] e | iur ' t j j ' H ) {V SftJ acijer , C ora eVR. |! ' CeA) er — V a OfOe . ' h Cli ic.K Pe rrivrCM.$,Co cRfc)oKnsicf auUenS -£-!». ' SVLort’) To%a) -1_»o x sc L , pe S-C-S 4 . f y le PtiVes - (j. ( (-)}na6 ( .(juvirf C. (?. i K nce, L T CApATo. THE 1928 PIONEER iiSfccSiic GIRLS’ BASKETBALL T2 T IK EL M M m Bcs SS ._ Ex, i£ SS !Kt EK i£ THE 1928 PIONEER (LOJ1LQJ) C II )C )C: APPRECIATION I he show is over. The curtain has fallen, and now calmly recalling it all, the Staff of 1928 wishes to dedicate this page of The PIONEER to all those who have as- sisted in the preparation and rendering of this book. Our thanks are sincere and heart- felt. We are especially indebted to the business men of Kannapolis, who have given us their hearty support. Say, Won’t You Read Our Ads? Don ' t Miss the Jokes l Page Forty-four THE 1928 PIONEER SI 9 m m M m m W 7 ■T ssd m ♦ mini □ n Kannapolis Snip (Emnpanu ‘The Service Store” R 2 m 11 3 g We Appreciate Your Business Phone 97 HEADQUARTERS FOR HIGH SCHOOL GANG iiiimiiiamiratmamninmianimmmamiiiniinafiimimiiawmiiimciiniiinmiDMii niiimiiiuiiiiinaiiiiiiiiiiucsJiiiiniiiiiaiiiiiiniiiicjiiiniiiiiiianiiiMiiuiDiuniiiiiiic Page Forty-six THE 1928 PIONEER REG. U,S. PAT. OFF . CANNON MFG.CO. CANNON TOWELS AT ALL PRICES T here is a reason for the low price of Cannon Towels. These towels are from the world ' s largest towel producer. The tremendous volume cuts cost — makes possible lowest prices to you. You can select Cannon numbers that will open the fattest or leanest of pocketbooks. There are over 250 numbers in the complete Cannon Line — cotton and union buck towels; plain and fancy turkish towels. Such a range allows you to select towels to sell at any price you desire. Your jobber should be able to give you samples, prices and complete information. CANNON MILLS, Inc. Manufacturers Selling Agents CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE WALLACE 8 WALLACE Montreal and Toronto Grey Sheeting, Drills, Print Cloths, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Bleached Cottons. Damask, Hosiery. Colored Fabrics, Cotton Towels and Cotton Yarns, Tire Fabrics, Carded and Combed. Chicago St. Louis New York San Francisco Kannapolis, N. C. Boston Atlanta iiiiiHiiiiioiiimmiidiiiiiiimiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiii iiifwmifiammmmciwiiiiiiiMQiHwiiiinniiiiiM! iiiiiiiiiminiiiiumiiiaimiiimiiQiiiiiiiiiiiiaimiiiiiiiiaim Page Forty-seven THE 1928 PIONEER 4 l O l U 4) Cabamrag Cofttom Mill KANNAPOLIS, N. C. MANUFACTURERS OF Superior Quality l ire Fabric Egyption and Peeler, Carded and Combed. Cord and Square Woven. ALSO MANUFACTURERS OF Famous Superior Quality. Cabarrus Sheets, Sheeting and Pillow Cases. When you need to retire, use casings made from Cabarrus Cord. When you need sleep, insist on Cabarrus Sheets. iiiiuimMiimiaimimiiiiciinmamiamiimiiiiDiiiiiiniMiDiiiiiiiiiiiiaimiminiaiMmmiHnimiiiiuiiQiniiui! iiiiuiiMiiiiiinaiiiiiiuiiii Page Forty-eight THE 1928 PIONEER (LOJJ (L r J) (LOJ) (LOJ r V rtp W X CA — 3 R£3 (SE] C £3 C 1 f»3 C 3 Rs£3 £££3 C £) C D C £) C £3 CSS) c3£A iinimoiiiiiiiiiiiaiiii B. A. Ford Son GOOD GOODS IN GOOD ORDER PROMPTLY iinmomiiiiiiiiQiimmmoiiiimii!iainmiiiiiiamiMmuaniimiiiiiDmi)imiiiniiiiiuuiiiDiiiHiinwni!;iuiiiin[ 3 iiiiiiiii Gray Creech, Inc. Carolinas Largest Distribu- j tors of School Supplies Phone 167-W PAPER, TOYS, ETC. Kannapolis, N. C. WINSTON-SALEM. N. C. miainmiiiiiiciiiiimmiiaiiiimmiiaiiiimniiiomiiiiuiiiuiiiiiiimiiaiiiimiiiiiaiiiimiiiiiainiiuMiiiaiiiiimiiiiaimiiuiiiiauiiiiiiimc MISS HARRIS: Edna use despair in a sentence. EDNA BROWN: We had a flat tire and had to use de-spair. Charles Correll : Do you know Galahad? William Hasting: Had what? imimmiciimmmiaiimiimioiwi Durham’s Market I SHOES AND HOSIERY FRESH AND CURED MEATS POULTRY, FISH AND EGGS of the Better Class Phone 96-L Query-Goodman Co. HiiammiiiiHUummiiunilinuiimniuuiumiaiiunnnMOiMwoDmBwnmonmiiliwaiisauntXMUitK • x m ii ' iiniiiiinimiiiiiiniii n» unmiii iniiiiniiiiininiiii inn i n i n i nn i — i— i m iibiiimi iiiihiimi m i uni n i rOliiKTiir OA i k L ' j lKHi i: iro- Page Forty-nine THE 1928 PIONEER aimimimaiii A Good Place to Trade R. T. FRY Clothing Co. Lawrence Fowler: My dog will stand on his hind legs. HAZEL Baker: How does he do it? Lawrence Fowler: 1 hold his front ones up. niiiiiiiDiiiiiMiiniaiiiiiiiiiniaiiiiuiiiinDiiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiniainiiiiiiiHDiimiiiniiDiiiiniiiiiioiuiiniiiiiDniiniHiiiaiiiMiiimiDimniiminmii i Midway Garage ( Midway ) Dealers in Simplex Piston Rings Have Simplex Installed in Your Motor Wrecking Service Especially Tip Top Anti-Freeze Radiator ICE CREAM COLD DRINKS MISS Harris: Leon, how would you punctuate this sentence. " Lillian went down the street. " Leon WlNCOFF: I would make a dash after Lillian. Alexandra lUtrbrr bnp Ladies, Men and Children’ s Hair Cutting SERVICE — Our Motto CENTER VIEW R. B. McCombs Company Staple and Fancy Groceries Kannapolis, N. C. If we do not have it we’ll get it for you Phone 30 iiiiirainiHMiHniiininiiiiaiiHHMimniimmniiniinMHiiiaiiiimuiiionHiiuiHroiMiraiirawnmiiiouimNiuamiiumuoMitaiiim - THE 1928 PIONEER S UPREME ERVICE TAT ION GAS, OIL, ACCESSORIES We sell “That Good Gulf Gasoline’’ COMPLIMENTS OF E. L. WRENN DRY CLEANERS AND DYERS Phone 128 iiiiiiiiiiinaiiiiiiiiiiiicjiiiniii ' iiiaiiiiii MARY Harrison: Surely you don’t wear that hat on the street? LAURA Hastings: No, I wear it on my head. EAT AT THE Sanitary Lunch CLEANEST PLACE IN TOWN I Just Around the Corner With Our New Equipment We are Able to Serve You Properly iiiimaiiiinimnoiimmiiiiniiiiiimiiiQiiiinmiiia:iiMiiimiDiiMmiiiiiaiiiiiiimiiDiiiiiii SODAS CIGARS Palace of Sweets Kannapolis ' Only Mechanically Refrigerated Soda Fountain Dainty and Tempting Soda Service Home-Made Candies Made Every Day Phone 1 3 1 Kannapolis, N. C. CANDY MAGAZINES inn: iiiiuiaiiiNiimiciHuiiiiiiNaimNmmi]iiiiiniiuiaiinimiuit)HuiiuiuioiuiiHiiuiaiHniiuu(C3iHnuiunomiuiini)caiiuiwiiK]ii THE 1928 PIONEER ‘Jalin and Ollier Again l HE largest personal service school annual engraving house More than twenty years of successful experi- | in America. ence in Year Book designing and engraving. Three hundred craftsmen, specially skilled in Annual production. Over 40,000 square feet of operating space in our own fireproof building. A specially organized system of production that insures indi- vidual attention to each Annual, efficient manufacture, and on-time delivery. The personal co-operation of a creative and research service department with a reputation. m JAHN 8 OLLIER ENGRAVING COL == Ti Photographers, Artists, and Makers of III =|i Fine Printing Plates for Black, or Go orf K fvk 817 Washington Boulevard-f72 o?tfo f Mi v v ( rr a r.occLi T ! II t ti X M 3 t li 3 Kj 3l »0I t THE 1928 PIONEER IF YOU READ EAT SMOKE OR DRINK SEE H off man s (Enrljran 0 Women ' s Wear — Dresses, Coats Millinery Smartest footwear at all times Men, Women, Children HOSIERY Men, Women, Children Our Highest Aim is to Please You EDNA Brown: Edgar, do you take a morning paper? EDGAR KETCHIE: Occasionally when no one is looking. llll□llllllllllll□l llllmll□l!llllllllll□llllllllllll□llml W. R. Fincher GROCERIES AND FRESH MEATS r vj Phone 45-L East Kannapolis, N. C. If we have your business we appreciate it, if not, we want it iiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiinii ELWOOD DURHAM: Is this a first-class restaurant ? WAITER: Yes, but we don ' t mind serv- ing you. SUITS THAT FIT $ 29.50 SCHWARTZ TAILORING COMPANY J R. GOODMAN, Representative Kannapolis, N. C. wiiaiHiimiiiniiiimumioinmi DuiHiiumaiiiiiiiiiuioimiiimiic iiiiiiiiuaiiiiiiiiiiiianiiiiiii ' noiuiiiiiiiiicemiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiniiiic Page Fifty-three THE 1928 PIONEER m PHOTOGRAPHS WILL FOREVER FRESHEN OUR MEMORY OF LIFE ' S PASSING EVENTS KANNAPOLIS, N. C. “PHOTOGRAPHS LIVE FOREVER” miiiciiiiiKimiiamimimic MISS Harris: Mary, why are you late for class? MARY Harrison : I fell down the stair steps. MISS Harris: Well, that should not have taken you so long. ♦ ammiiminimninmniimminomiiimnommiiiniaii THIS SPACE IS GIVEN BY THE fomut Hint’s (ftljrtstunt Asanriatinn TO ASSIST THE SCHOOL BnnnaiaMimmiticiim iHniaHimramDWiianmDiuHiiBctintHiunminmiiiin»(n(iHununc3nnniitfiicjnminuiicwiiitmnium(i»imiQ(rnnmiiamamHSD;ni Page Fifty-four f Jn) (rOr) (tOti (tOy) (rOD (rOoirooirOT) THE 1928 PIONEER The Little Red School House and the red front A P stores are widespread American institu- tions. Both have won, and hold, the implicit confidence of the American people through merit alone. TSAI CHEAT AnuimctRftcmc TEA CO ALENE STONESTREET : How do you manage to chew your gum so long? RUTH TAYLOR: I use Standard gas on it and get more miles to the gallon. uiumiuiDimiiiiimDumiiiiiiiaiiiiDiiiiuaiiiiiiiiiuiDiimiiiii MimiiiiiGimiimmnim liiiiimiiiiiiuiiiDniiiuiiiiiGimiiiiiiiiQimDiiiniaiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiuiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiHiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiGiiiiuiiiii STATEMENT OF Cabarrus Savings Bank CONCORD, KANNAPOLIS. ALBEMARLE. MT. PLEASANT, NORTH CAROLINA AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS, OCTOBER 10, RESOURCES Cash in Vaults and Due from Banks .... . $ 332,72 4.64 Listed Bonds and other mar- ketable securities 355,151.98 Loans and Discounts 3,007,176.78 Banking House, Furniture and Fixtures 248,479.57 Other Real Estate owned 17,500.00 Customers Liability Letters of Credit 145,471.79 Capital $ 400,000.00 1927 LIABILITIES Paid in $175,000.00 I Earned $225,000.00 ( Surplus and Undivided Profits (Net) 178,539.42 Reserve for Interest and Taxes (Accrued) 24,000.00 Deposits 3,208,493.55 Bills Payable 150,000.00 Customers’ Liability Letters of Credit 145,471.79 Total $4,106,504.76 COMMERCIAL SAVINGS Total $4,106,504.76 TRUST SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES On the strength of the above statement we solicit your business Page Fifty-five THE 1928 PIONEER m Si iiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiiuiHiiiniiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiii 58 58 7M 7M m 58 QUALITY SERVICE FAIR PRICES THIS IS SOLE OWNER ' S MOTTO Fresh Meats and Groceries 58 58 llllll□llllllllH unllllllllll□llllmlllll□llllll union. iiiimiiei,aiiiiiiiiit,iiiii!iiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiaiimiHiuic)i!iii:m miiiiiiaiiiiiimiiiciiiiiimii JAMES FUNDERBURK: Lookit them poor elephants. Pitiful, ain ' t it? JAMES PEELER: Yeah, probably be elephants all their lives too. Hell attit Harris ’♦ jiiiiiiiiiiiiDiimiiiiiiiouiiMiiiiiiniimiiiinioiiiiiiiiMiiDiimiiiiiiiciiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiioimiiMiiiiijiiiihUMiiaiiiiiiMiiiirni.iiiainioiiiiiiii ' iiiniuiii V Kelly Bros. 1 jFuncral |Iarlm j : Funeral Directors and Embalmers | : Limousine Hearse and Ambulance Service Clothing, Hats, Shoes and All Calls Answered Promptly Gents Furnishings Day or Night | Phones: Day. 91; Night, 99-Y — 74 :♦ ! | Kannapolis, N. C. i 1 ' Kannapolis. N. C. 1 ‘ All Kinds of floral Designs ❖ - - — •iiiiiiaiii!iumiioiiiiiiiiimaiHiiiim!iaiiiiiimiiiauiiiiiiiuiaimimmiaiiiiMiiiiiiQiiiiiirmiiDiiiiiinmiaiiiuiiiiiiminiiiiiiiiiaiiiimiiuiDiiiiiirumt«J» Page Fifty -six (rODrCniirOi) rCnirOTiiroT) K irOTiirOT) rOorOoirOT) THE 1928 PIONEER □IIIIIIH AMERICAN CAFE TABLES FOR LADIES SANITARY SERVICE QUICK, CLEAN AND UP-TO-DATE DRINKS OF ALL KINDS REGULAR DINNERS SERVED Kannapolis, N. C. iiiiiinc]iiiiiiiiiiiiC]iiiiiiiiiiiiamiiiiiiinc)iiiiiMiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiU!iiiii.iii iiiimiiiicjimimiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiQiMiiiHiiiic MISS Dowling: What things count most in life nowadays? WALLACE McCombs: The adding machines. mu iitiiiiiiuc3iiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiitiii oiiiiiiiiiti (3iiiiniiiiiioiiitiit:iiii(3iiiiiiiiiiiiC3iiniiniii EASTMAN KODAKS AND SUPPLIES HOLLINGSWORTH ' S UNUSUAL CANDIES On the Minute Service Jf. X. Brug Company The Rexall Store WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE Phone No. 9 KANNAPOLIS. NORTH CAROLINA ♦ iiimiiiiiiiaiMiiiiiimdiiiiHiiiiiianii imiiiaiiiiimiiiiaiiimuttiiaimmiiiiidiiiimmitainimmiiDiiiiiii Paqe Fifty-seven PIES— CINNAMON BUNS THE 1928 PIONEER 3C3WCK •m iiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiioiniiiiiiiiirsiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiinn i Fixall Motor Company VULCANIZING SALES AND SERVICE Auto Accessories, Lubricants and Gasoline Kannapolis, N, C. BUY YOUR MILK FROM R. 0. STEELE’S DAIRY FARM Route 2 Kannapolis, N. C. FRESH EVERY DAY A Quart a Day the Doctors Say iiiiioiiniHimoimmiiiiioMMim Miss Dowling Ruth Taylor Miss Dowling Ruth Taylor Give me the most important date in history. 1 909. Why is 1909 so important. I was born that year. iimiiiuomiiiiiiiiir3miiimiiiaiimiiiimaiiiiimiiiinmiiiiiiiii(}mi BREAD— POUND CAKE— ROLLS A BILL BOARD OF HEALTH OUR PRODUCTS ARE FRESH TASTY AND GOOD TRY SOME Kannapolis Bakery COOKIES— LAYER CAKE iiiiiiniimimiiiamiimimcjiiimu Page Fifty-eight SPONGE CAKE— FRUIT CAKE THE 1928 PIONEER Miiiiir}iiiiiniiiiiaiMii!iiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiO)iiiiiiiiiiiDiminiiiiiaiiiiniii:iiaiiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiiC3iiii;iiiiii caiiii iiiiiumiiiiiiiiuioi!iii Belk Dept. Store KANNAPOLIS’ LEADING DEPARTMENT STORE OUTFITTERS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY Shoes, Clothing, Men’s Furnishings, Dry Goods, Notions, Ready-to-Wear, Millinery, Infants’ Department With a 44-Store Buying Power we always get the lowest prices and special discounts that enable us to sell much cheaper than anybody. The Motto of the Belk Stores for 32 Years WE SELL FOR LESS’ Belk Dept. Store THE HOME OF BETTER VALUES Phone 7 Kannapolis, N. C. 3 (Ski IIIIIIIIIIIIICIIIIIIIIIIUIC Page Fifty -nine 3 I ] Wife] tojiW £ mu THE 1928 PIONEER Si; ©utet Btgnitp Quiet dignity — two words which describe most fittingly our part in doing what we can to lessen the sorrow of the bereaved. Conducting the modern funeral has made quiet dignity the outstanding characteristic of our service. While modern methods have called for modern equip- ment we still maintain the same faithful service, the same that has been a part of our helpfulness in the past. p. P. IMktnson ani) Co. Funeral Home Telephone 2 Residence Phone 38-W IhOIIIIIIIIIIIIClIIIIUIIINIQIIIIIIHIIIICJIIIII iiiioiimiiiiiioiiiiiiiimQiiimiiiiiiQimimiiiinimniiiiiiQii iiMiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiNCiiMiiiiiiiiamiiiiiMiiniiiimiiiioiiiiiiHiiioiiiiiMiimaiiiiiiiiimcjiiii niimiic}iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiii(3]iiiiiiiiiiiciiiiinniiii(3iiiiiiiiii H. B. WILKINSON CO, ‘COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS’ KANNAPOLIS, N. C. Residence PLone Page Sixty rOo) (rcri) foi roi irOi roT) roll roi (roD (roll THE 1928 PIONEER m LOJ) (L QJ) (LO J) (UQJI |r gp3)iP] RECIPROCITY WlDENHOUSE CO. innaig=ol COMPLIMENTS OF STAR DRY CLEANERS mi 1§ K2 mL W mL mL if 2 iii.iimiiiiaiiiiiiwiiinwiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiniiiianiiiiniiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiDniimmioiiNMitiiDiiii EDGAR KETCHIE: Yes, I ' m a track man. Lawrence Fowler: What section do you work on? Mr. KING: Describe the mechanism of a steam shovel. VlRGA SMITH: Just how would you carry steam on a shovel? SO? iiiiimioiiiiniiiiiiciimiiiiiiiQuiiimmiaimiiiniUDumiHiim ♦ juiiMumniuinimiiciimiHiaiaiiiuiiMnDnmnimiDimiiiiimniiimiumDiiinmminmi TO CDiT FORD LINCOLN FORDSON SALES SERVICE PARTS BUY AT HOME See us for your Graduating Suit “The Middishade’’ Blue Serge Suit Kannapolis, N. C. iiuuiuiuuiuiaimmuiiiuimiiUMiiaiiimimiiuuniimiiauiiiimaiauii KANNAPOLIS MOTOR COMPANY J. A. LAMBETH Vice-Pres. and T r eas. Phone 33 iianiiiiimiiaimiiaimaimimniiaimuuiiiiamiiiiiminimnuiuinimHiuiiiniimraiiiiDramimnDiiiumimnnmiumiaaimim ss if Page Sixty-one m S3 THE 1928 PIONEER imMmiiOHmiiiiiHOuiHiiiiiiiaminiiuHoimimimoHNmiiii aiiimiuiiiomimnmuuiiHiMmaiiiiimminiimiimi!Ciiiiiiimiiiaiiiiiiiiiiioim:iiiHiQiiHii}iiiiiQiiHi:iii L, O, WIN ECO FF DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS— A FULL LINE OF HIGH GRADE HOSIERY A SPECIALTY Groceries and Tuxedo Feeds [RES TUBES A Full Line of China Ware 750 2 — Phone — 7 503 iiiitjiiiiHimiiQimimiiiiaiiiiuuiiMaiMiiiHimaiiiimiiiiiaiuiiiiiimaiiiiiiniiiiaiiiiiiiii War? MISS Dowling: How did the colonies get supplies during the Revolutionary ? CREALIE STEELE: They hauled them from France in wagons. iiimiichiii iioiimiimiiairmiiminiiiii. A nything scientific RTISTIC OlGNS DEALER IN Watches. Silverware and Jewelry Diamonds a Specialty Kannapolis, N. C. liiiiiiciiiiiiiiuiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiaimiiimiiaiiriiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiimoiiiiiii Clyt urn Bros, GOOD AT ANYTHING (We Mean With Pen or Brash) 2 — TELEPHONE — 1 10-W Kannapolis, N. C. Page Sixty-two rOi (r01) itOti IitOti itOt) (toy itOt) (rOD IIIOIIIIII 13 ■■ limn mOin Iiimuio miiiiiiiii 0 mi 11 iiimU mu 11 iimO mi mi i ill?. 1 11 1 mull ■■□ill i iiiiiii it: mil 1 1 n iriOimiE 1 1 ' nm ii iii. ' ii I ill D m iiiiiiiii»3miiiiiiiii ID 11 1 1 ill C3 mil 11 iimOiiiiiiii imO 11 mil I m 3ir 1 1 L l 4 i 4 lUlllllllllQlllillllllllCJIIIHIIIIIM IMIIIIIIIIIGIIIIIIMIIIIDIIIIinillllGlllllltllMIUIMIIIIIMIIOIMIMUIIIinilllMIIIIIIDIMIIIIIIIMIVI ' IIIIIIIIIQIIIiniliHinillllllMIIIDIIIIItMIMintlllllUllliniMnHIIIIIOIIII ' IIIIIIIIIIIIOMIIIIIIIIIinilllllllllliDlllll.illllinilllllllllH | iiiiiiiiiiGiiiii H 1 NOTHER ONE OF THE MANY COLLEGE AND HIGH SCHOOL ANNUALS PRINTED IN OUR SHOP ANNUAL PRINTERS FOR TW ENTY- NINE YEARS j HAVE YOU ever considered the quality of your Annual from the standpoint of care- ful type composition and efficient proofreading? The reputation of The Observer Printing House, Inc., as An- nual Printers, has been es- tablished through accuracy and attention to the little details for twenty-nine years. V III Observer Printing House Incorporated 29 South Church Street CHARLOTTE, N. C. iiriiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiaMiii-iiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiiaHiiiiMiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiic’i ' iMUihiiKiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiGiii. ' iiiiiiMQiiiiiiiiiiiiGMKiiiiimQiiiiMiiiiiiGiiiiiiiiiiiiamiiiiiiiiiaiiimiiiiMaiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiioiiuiHii! i!iioiiiimiiiiiaiiiiitiiiiiic. ' iiiiiiiiiiiiGiiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiim:c4 v iiimiiiQiiiii:iiimami:iiMiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiumumuiiiiiiioNiiimiiHGiiiuiiiJUtaHiiuiii;iiGuiuiHuuauuiuuiiinuiiuniuiamiiiiuiiiciiunQiuuiMiuiOMiiuiiuuaiMuiuyHOuu(iiMuciiu muHioiiii!i Iiiiiiiiim;c4 ' n : ;kiuiuioiiiiuiiiiiiaiuiiiiMuaHiiHii:mnuiimiiwaMiiairiiMO!iiiiimiiiaiiiiiiiwiic.uMiiiiiim3H uuiiiiauiiiwMiu4 THE 1928 PIONEER TV mu aiiiiniiiiiiciiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiomi iiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiKiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiHiniuiiii SMALL PROFITS QUICK SALES General Offices: Charlotte. N. C. New York Office: 34 W. 33rd St. EFIRD’S -THE SOUTH’S GREATEST CHAIN— Asheville, N. C. Albemarle. N. C. Anderson. S. C. Burlington. N. C. Charlotte. N. C. Chester, S. C. Concord, N. C. Columbia, S. C. Danville, Va. Durham, N. C. Florence, S. C. Forest City. N. C. Greenwood, S. C. 42 EFIRD STORES AT Goldsboro, N. C. Gastonia. N. C. Greenville, S. C. Greer, S. C. Greensboro, N. C. Hickory, N. C. High Point, N. C. Kannapolis, N. C. Kinston, N. C. Lumberton. N. C. Lenoir, N. C. Lincolnton, N. C. Laurinburg. N, C. Lexington, N. C. STORES— DEPENDABLE Monroe, N, C. New York City Raleigh, N. C. Rock Hill, S. C. Rocky Mount, N. C. Shelby, N. C. Salisbury, N. C. Spartanburg, S. C, Statesville. N. C. Sumter, S. C. Wilson, N. C. Winston-Salem, N. Wilmington. N. C. —PROGRESSIVE C. IF YOU PROSPER. WE PROGRESS — LET ' S WORK TOGETHER ' Efirds Department Store KANNAPOLIS, N. C. S. Z. PHLIEGER. Local Manager Phone 87 iiiiciiiMitiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiMiaiiiniiiMiic3iiiiiiiiiiiiaiimiiiiinaiimHiiiMc:iiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiniic]iiii THE 1928 PIONEER 3P 3 | Compliments of 1 O. G. TURBYFILL j " Sherlockette ' s” Dad Compliments of HELEN ELIZABETH HARRIS Senior Sponsor 1 Compliments of j H. B. WISBY I Our Superintendent Compliments of W. H. WHITLEY I Ralph ' s Dad j Compliments of j WALTER McINNIS 1 Senior. ' 28 Compliments of j G. C. MAULDEN Yvonne ' s Brother i | | Compliments of CITY BARBER SHOP I Kannapolis. N. C. Compliments of C. C. STONESTREET Alene ' s Dad § Compliments of I DEWITT BAKER 1 Hazel ' s Brother | Compliments of H. B. WATERS Our Principal | Compliments of RALPH GILLON j " A Senior " Compliments of I J. L. SMITH Virga ' s Dad | Compliments of j MRS. J. C. TAYLOR j Ruth ' s Mother Compliments of | ANNIE STEELE THOMPSON " A Senior " I Compliments of EDGAR MONROE KETCHIE j A Senior Compliments of WM. N. DcMARCUS Our Athletic Coach ! Page Sixty-five MKH KIC TURN Over QUICK I WANT TO GET [_0 UT THE ENO CANNON MEMORIAL LIBRARY KANNAPOLIS, NC 3 3083 00313 9679 ' seam Tirrwnn . •• ' •- ” iwfi • • • ■’• « " • ' 4 + ' ® ppHpr— ' »• » ■ j si p : -- • • 4 j " 1 a t --| [ -n |Mr -= ' ti‘ | ' « ' • 0 e. s ’+■ ' ' ‘ ' . ' ' ••»-» ... « • ' . • ' ' ' • . 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Suggestions in the A L Brown High School - Albrokan Yearbook (Kannapolis, NC) collection:

A L Brown High School - Albrokan Yearbook (Kannapolis, NC) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

1925

A L Brown High School - Albrokan Yearbook (Kannapolis, NC) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

1926

A L Brown High School - Albrokan Yearbook (Kannapolis, NC) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

1927

A L Brown High School - Albrokan Yearbook (Kannapolis, NC) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

1951

A L Brown High School - Albrokan Yearbook (Kannapolis, NC) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

1952

A L Brown High School - Albrokan Yearbook (Kannapolis, NC) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

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